Sample records for tabular ascii format

  1. XML/VOTable and Simple ASCII Tabular Output from NED with Sample Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Pevunova, O.; Mazzarella, J.; Good, J.; Berriman, B.; Madore, B.; NED Team

    2005-12-01

    The NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) provides data and cross-identifications for over 8 million objects fused from thousands of survey catalogs and journal articles. The data cover all frequencies from radio through gamma rays and include positions, redshifts, photometry and spectral energy distributions (SEDs), sizes, and images. NED services have traditionally supplied data in HTML format for connections from Web browsers, and a custom ASCII data structure for connections by remote computer programs written in C. We demonstrate new services that provide responses from NED queries in XML documents compliant with the international virtual observatory VOTable protocol, as well as simple tab-separated or comma-separated values (CSV). The NED services that support the new tabular output include By Name, Near Name and Near Position (cone searches), All-Sky searches based on object parameters (survey names, cross-IDs, redshifts, flux densities), and queries for images, photometry/SEDs, redshifts, positions, and diameters. The VOTable services have been integrated into the NVO registry, and they are also available directly from NED's Web interface (http://nedwww.ipac.caltech.edu). This development greatly simplifies the integration of data from NED into visualization and analysis packages, scripts, and other applications. We illustrate an example of importing a NED SED into Excel, as well as plotting and comparing SEDs using the VOPlot Java applet. NED is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The XML/VOTable portion of this work was funded by the US National Virtual Observatory, which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. We also acknowledge assistance from the NVO Technical Working Group.

  2. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) file format description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford; Hammond, Dana

    1987-01-01

    Described is a format for writing ASCII data on a file to facilitate its transfer from one computer system to another. The TOAD format conforms to all ANSI FORTRAN 77 standards. There are two advantages in using the TOAD format. First, TOAD files are of the preferred type and record length to make them easy to edit, read from and write on magnetic tape, or transfer across communications networks. Secondly, application programs, using the TOAD format to write computational results, are more portable and the answer files easier to postprocess. TOAD utility software is listed in an appendix.

  3. File-Format Program For Transferable Output ASCII Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford

    1988-01-01

    TOAD utilities machine-independent and require minimal central memory. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) file-format computer program facilitates transfer of data files from one computer installation to another. TOAD files preferred type and record length, easy to edit, read, and write on magnetic tape or transfer across communications networks. Applications programs write TOAD files directly and conform to all ANSI FORTRAN 77 standards.

  4. Formation of tabular plutons - results and implications of centrifuge modelling

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlo DIETL; Hemin KOYI

    2008-01-01

    * ?Correspondingauthor Geophysical investigations reveal that many granitoid plutons possess a tabular shape: either laccolithic, lopolithic or phacolithic. In this study, the results of a centrifuge experiment are used to understand the formation mechanisms of these features. The model was build of a sequence of 14 differently coloured plasticine layers. Two buoyant layers - with a volume of c. 40

  5. A Doppler-limited rubidium atlas in ascii format, 9500–12 300 cm ?1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda J. Ross; Victor Bertrand; Heather Harker; Patrick Crozet

    2010-01-01

    We present a Doppler-limited transmission spectrum of the rubidium dimer, suitable for frequency calibration of near infrared (e.g. Ti:sapphire) excitation experiments in the region 9500–12300cm?1. It provides an abundant source of reference peaks that can be used in a graphic environment to calibrate short (<1cm?1) scans of excitation spectrum. This is a sequel to an iodine atlas in ascii format

  6. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) gateway: Version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) Gateway, release 1.0 is described. This is a software tool for converting tabular data from one format into another via the TOAD format. This initial release of the Gateway allows free data interchange among the following file formats: TOAD; Standard Interface File (SIF); Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) input; Comma Separated Value (TSV); and a general free-form file format. As required, additional formats can be accommodated quickly and easily.

  7. Formation of tabular single-domain magnetite induced by Geobacter metallireducens GS-15

    PubMed Central

    Vali, Hojatollah; Weiss, Benjamin; Li, Yi-Liang; Sears, S. Kelly; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Zhang, Chuanlun L.

    2004-01-01

    Distinct morphological characteristics of magnetite formed intracellularly by magnetic bacteria (magnetosome) are invoked as compelling evidence for biological activity on Earth and possibly on Mars. Crystals of magnetite produced extracellularly by a variety of bacteria including Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, thermophilic bacteria, and psychrotolerant bacteria are, however, traditionally not thought to have nearly as distinct morphologies. The size and shape of extracellular magnetite depend on the culture conditions and type of bacteria. Under typical CO2-rich culture conditions, GS-15 is known to produce superparamagnetic magnetite (crystal diameters of approximately <30 nm). In the current study, we were able to produce a unique form of tabular, single-domain magnetite under nontraditional (low-CO2) culture conditions. This magnetite has a distinct crystal habit and magnetic properties. This magnetite could be used as a biosignature to recognize ancient biological activities in terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments and also may be a major carrier of the magnetization in natural sediments. PMID:15525704

  8. MISR Conversion to ASCII Routines

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... ordered from Exelis VIS on CD at no cost. The site provides installation instructions. The software was developed and tested with IDL and ... the  Readme file  for additional information, including installation and program execution instructions. The ASCII conversion ...

  9. XML Restructuring and Integration for Tabular Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Yu; Z. Meral Ozsoyoglu; Gultekin Ozsoyoglu

    \\u000a We study the data integration and restructuring issues of tabular data. We consider the case where the same set of data is\\u000a collected from independent sites, stored in different DBMSs or other repositories, organized in different tabular or equivalent\\u000a semi-structured formats, and published on the web. These sites transform tabular data into XML data with possible syntactic\\u000a discrepancies in their

  10. Geochemical properties of the water-snow-ice complexes in the area of Shokalsky glacier, Novaya Zemlya, in relation to tabular ground-ice formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O. Leibman; S. M. Arkhipov; D. D. Perednya; A. S. Savvichev; B. G. Vanshtein; H. W. Hubberten

    2005-01-01

    Tabular (massive) ground ice in periglacial areas of the Russian Arctic (Barents and Kara Sea coasts) is considered to be a remnant of past glacial epochs and is thus used as proof of the glacial extent. In this paper, we argue that the origin of these tabular ice bodies, which can be used as archives of specific climatic conditions and

  11. The NOAA Tide Predictions application provides predictions in both graphical and tabular formats, with many user selected options, for over 3000 stations broken down by key areas in each state.

    E-print Network

    The NOAA Tide Predictions application provides predictions in both graphical and tabular formats. Station Types: The NOAA Tide Predictions application provides predictions from 2 distinct categories by combining the harmonic constituents into a single tide curve. Subordinate - The high and low height values

  12. GOCEXML2ASCII an XML to ASCII converter for GOCE level EGG_NOM and SST_PSO data

    E-print Network

    Stuttgart, Universität

    GOCEXML2ASCII ­ an XML to ASCII converter for GOCE level EGG_NOM and SST_PSO data Ma hias Roth SST_PSO_2 file (a typical SST_PSO_2 file has a size of ~ MB). The advantage of this parser Institute (Arsov, ) is implemented in C++. According to Arsov, the GOCEPARSER needs ~ min to convert a SST_PSO

  13. Using Lexical tools to convert Unicode characters to ASCII.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chris J; Browne, Allen C; Divita, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Unicode is an industry standard allowing computers to consistently represent and manipulate text expressed in most of the worlds writing systems. It is widely used in multilingual NLP (natural language processing) projects. On the other hand, there are some NLP projects still only dealing with ASCII characters. This paper describes methods of utilizing lexical tools to convert Unicode characters (UTF-8) to ASCII (7-bit) characters. PMID:18998787

  14. Page 1 of 2 `5-Phase' EOS: A Tabular H2O EOS for Shock Physics Codes

    E-print Network

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    Page 1 of 2 `5-Phase' EOS: A Tabular H2O EOS for Shock Physics Codes Sarah T. Stewart Department-commercial use. 2) Users are expected to validate hydrocode calculations using the tabular EOS EOS should cite the appendix in: Senft, L. E., and S. T. Stewart. Impact Crater Formation in Icy

  15. 1 CFR 18.10 - Illustrations, tabular material, and forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.10 Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...it is necessary to publish a form or illustration, a clear and legible original...

  16. 1 CFR 18.10 - Illustrations, tabular material, and forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.10 Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...it is necessary to publish a form or illustration, a clear and legible original...

  17. 1 CFR 18.10 - Illustrations, tabular material, and forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.10 Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...it is necessary to publish a form or illustration, a clear and legible original...

  18. 1 CFR 18.10 - Illustrations, tabular material, and forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.10 Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...it is necessary to publish a form or illustration, a clear and legible original...

  19. 1 CFR 18.10 - Illustrations, tabular material, and forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...OF DOCUMENTS GENERALLY § 18.10 Illustrations, tabular material, and forms. ...it is necessary to publish a form or illustration, a clear and legible original...

  20. A Retrofit Network Intrusion Detection System for MODBUS RTU and ASCII Industrial Control Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Morris; Rayford Vaughn; Yoginder Dandass

    2012-01-01

    MODBUS RTU\\/ASCII Snort is software to retrofit serial based industrial control systems to add Snort intrusion detection and intrusion prevention capabilities. This article discusses the need for such a system by describing 4 classes of intrusion vulnerabilities (denial of service, command injection, response injection, and system reconnaissance) which can be exploited on MODBUS RTU\\/ASCII industrial control systems. The article provides

  1. ASCII Phonetic Symbols for the World's Languages: Worldbet James L. Hieronymus

    E-print Network

    Hosom, John-Paul

    ASCII Phonetic Symbols for the World's Languages: Worldbet James L. Hieronymus AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ 07974, USA Abstract A new ASCII encoding of the International Phonetic Alphabet a large number of languages with phonemic and phonetic symbols, these were found to be inadequate

  2. ASCII Phonetic Symbols for the World's Languages: Worldbet James L. Hieronymus

    E-print Network

    Penn, Gerald

    ASCII Phonetic Symbols for the World's Languages: Worldbet James L. Hieronymus AT&T Bell Laboratories, Murray Hill, NJ 07974, USA Abstract A new ASCII encoding of the International Phonetic Alphabet. When an attempt was made to label a large number of languages with phonemic and phonetic symbols

  3. A Distribution-Free Tabular CUSUM Chart for Autocorrelated Data

    E-print Network

    Kim, Seong-Hee

    A Distribution-Free Tabular CUSUM Chart for Autocorrelated Data SEONG-HEE KIM, CHRISTOS ALEXOPOULOS Raleigh, NC 27695-7906 A distribution-free tabular CUSUM chart is designed to detect shifts in the mean of an autocorrelated process. The chart's average run length (ARL) is approximated by gener- alizing Siegmund's ARL

  4. Starbase Data Tables: An ASCII Relational Database for Unix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roll, John

    2011-11-01

    Database management is an increasingly important part of astronomical data analysis. Astronomers need easy and convenient ways of storing, editing, filtering, and retrieving data about data. Commercial databases do not provide good solutions for many of the everyday and informal types of database access astronomers need. The Starbase database system with simple data file formatting rules and command line data operators has been created to answer this need. The system includes a complete set of relational and set operators, fast search/index and sorting operators, and many formatting and I/O operators. Special features are included to enhance the usefulness of the database when manipulating astronomical data. The software runs under UNIX, MSDOS and IRAF.

  5. Min-cut segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian L.; Barrett, William A.; Swingle, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten tabular documents, such as census, birth, death and marriage records, contain a wealth of information vital to genealogical and related research. Much work has been done in segmenting freeform handwriting, however, segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents is still an unsolved problem. Tabular documents present unique segmentation challenges caused by handwriting overlapping cell-boundaries and other words, both horizontally and vertically, as "ascenders" and "descenders" overlap into adjacent cells. This paper presents a method for segmenting handwriting in tabular documents using a min-cut/max-flow algorithm on a graph formed from a distance map and connected components of handwriting. Specifically, we focus on line, word and first letter segmentation. Additionally, we include the angles of strokes of the handwriting as a third dimension to our graph to enable the resulting segments to share pixels of overlapping letters. Word segmentation accuracy is 89.5% evaluating lines of the data set used in the ICDAR2013 Handwriting Segmentation Contest. Accuracy is 92.6% for a specific application of segmenting first and last names from noisy census records. Accuracy for segmenting lines of names from noisy census records is 80.7%. The 3D graph cutting shows promise in segmenting overlapping letters, although highly convoluted or overlapping handwriting remains an ongoing challenge.

  6. Towards Logical Analysis of Tabular Rule-Based Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antoni Ligeza

    1998-01-01

    Rule based systems constitute the most popular tool for specification of operational knowledge in majority of knowledge based systems. The paper addresses the issue of analysis and verification of selected properties of such systems in a systematic way. A uniform, tabular form of single level rule based systems is put forward. Such systems can be used independently as a generalized

  7. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary A. Dilts

    2006-01-01

    A valid fluid equation of state (EOS) must satisfy the thermodynamic conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flow for realistic materials require a tabular EOS, but typical software interfaces to such tables based on polynomial or rational interpolants may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce

  8. UNC Technical Report TR-02-047 Coding Polygon Meshes as Compressable ASCII

    E-print Network

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    compression schemes such as gzip. The coder is lossless when only the position and texture coordinate indices. In this paper we show how to incorporate compression of polygonal data into a purely text-based scene graph descrip- tion. Our scheme codes polygon meshes as ASCII strings that compress well with standard

  9. From tabular to rhombohedral dolomite crystals in Zechstein 2 dolostones from Scharzfeld (SW Harz/Germany): A case study with combined CL and EBSD investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillhaus, Axel; Richter, Detlev K.; Götte, Thomas; Neuser, Rolf D.

    2010-07-01

    Tabular dolomite crystals found within dolomite rhombs have been investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for the first time. The dolomites formed in the Upper Permian Stassfurt Carbonate Ca2 at the southern margin of the German/Polish Zechstein Basin. Cathodoluminescence petrography of the dolostone succession revealed that the dolomites developed in four phases. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis reveals tabular crystal growth during the two first generations, while the last two generations are characterized by rhombohedral crystal shapes. The tabular dolomite cement crystals and their microcrystalline equivalents in matrix and components have a stoichiometric composition with good to very good lattice ordering. Manganese and iron contents of the tabular crystals are low and their carbon and oxygen isotope composition confirms an early diagenetic dolomite formation under marine-evaporitic conditions from precursor carbonates of Upper Permian age. CL spectroscopy reveals that the tabular dolomite generation 1 has a very high percentage of Mn 2+ on the Ca lattice position which results in a visually yellowish-green CL emission. Although relatively increased Mn 2+ contents at the Ca lattice position appear to be rather common in evaporitic dolomites the combination of a tabular crystal shape and a preferred input of Mn 2+ at the Ca lattice position is a remarkable phenomenon. As tabular dolomite crystals so far are exclusively reported from evaporitic diagenetic settings they could be the result of a high Mg/Ca ratio which blocks c-axis orientated growth of dolomite crystal. The occurrence of well ordered dolomite of which the geochemical zoning can be studied in such detail is rare for the earliest, synsedimentary stages of dolomite formation in marine environments, because these early stages commonly consist of not or badly ordered Ca-dolomites. A primary geochemical zoning of such dolomite usually gets lost during stabilisation and transformation to better ordering and stoichiometry.

  10. RF model of the distribution system as a communication channel, phase 2. Volume 4: Sofware source program and illustrations ASCII database listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustay, R. C.; Gajjar, J. T.; Rankin, R. W.; Wentz, R. C.; Wooding, R.

    1982-01-01

    Listings of source programs and some illustrative examples of various ASCII data base files are presented. The listings are grouped into the following categories: main programs, subroutine programs, illustrative ASCII data base files. Within each category files are listed alphabetically.

  11. Room temperature synthesis of silver nanowires from tabular silver bromide crystals in the presence of gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Suwen [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, 620 Parrignton Oval, Room 208, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Wehmschulte, Rudolf J. [Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology, 150 West University Blvd., Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States)]. E-mail: rwehmsch@fit.edu; Lian Guoda [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, 620 Parrignton Oval, Room 208, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Burba, Christopher M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oklahoma, 620 Parrignton Oval, Room 208, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2006-03-15

    Long silver nanowires were synthesized at room temperature by a simple and fast process derived from the development of photographic films. A film consisting of an emulsion of tabular silver bromide grains in gelatin was treated with a photographic developer (4-(methylamino)phenol sulfate (metol), citric acid) in the presence of additional aqueous silver nitrate. The silver nanowires have lengths of more than 50 {mu}m, some even more than 100 {mu}m, and average diameters of about 80 nm. Approximately, 70% of the metallic silver formed in the reduction consists of silver nanowires. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) results indicate that the silver nanowires grow along the [111] direction. It was found that the presence of gelatin, tabular silver bromide crystals and silver ions in solution are essential for the formation of the silver nanowires. The nanowires appear to originate from the edges of the silver bromide crystals. They were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SAED, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  12. Chapter 2: Tabular Data and Graphical Images in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment - The Wind River Basin Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on this CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files) because of the number and variety of platforms and software available.

  13. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2002-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  14. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2001-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  15. Applying Data Privacy Techniques on Tabular Data in Uganda

    E-print Network

    Mivule, Kato

    2011-01-01

    The growth of Information Technology(IT) in Africa has led to an increase in the utilization of communication networks for data transaction across the continent. A growing number of entities in the private sector, academia, and government, have deployed the Internet as a medium to transact in data, routinely posting statistical and non statistical data online and thereby making many in Africa increasingly dependent on the Internet for data transactions. In the country of Uganda, exponential growth in data transaction has presented a new challenge: What is the most efficient way to implement data privacy. This article discusses data privacy challenges faced by the country of Uganda and implementation of data privacy techniques for published tabular data. We make the case for data privacy, survey concepts of data privacy, and implementations that could be employed to provide data privacy in Uganda.

  16. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state

    E-print Network

    Dilts, G A

    2005-01-01

    Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flows require an equation of state (EOS) to relate the thermodynamic variables of density, internal energy, temperature, and pressure. A valid EOS must satisfy the thermodynamic conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). When phase transitions are significant, the EOS is complicated and can only be specified in a table. For tabular EOS's such as SESAME from Los Alamos National Laboratory, the consistency and stability conditions take the form of a differential equation relating the derivatives of pressure and energy as functions of temperature and density, along with positivity constraints. Typical software interfaces to such tables based on polynomial or rational interpolants compute derivatives of pressure and energy and may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce the consistency condition and its derivatives. We describe a new type of table interface based on a constrained local least squar...

  17. 17 CFR 232.305 - Number of characters per line; tabular and columnar information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Number of characters per line; tabular and columnar information...Submissions § 232.305 Number of characters per line; tabular and columnar information...portion of a document shall not exceed 80 characters per line, including blank...

  18. Fast Registration of Tabular Document Images Using the Fourier-Mellin Transform

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luke A. D. Hutchison; William A. Barrett

    2004-01-01

    A new technique is presented for quickly identifying global affine transformations applied to tabular document images, and to correct for those transformations. This technique, based on the Fourier-Mellin transform, is used to register (align) a set of tabular documents to each other. Each component of the affine transform is handled separately, which dramatically reduces the total parameter space of the

  19. State Of The Art In Digital Steganography Focusing ASCII Text Documents

    E-print Network

    Rafat, Khan Farhan

    2010-01-01

    Digitization of analogue signals has opened up new avenues for information hiding and the recent advancements in the telecommunication field has taken up this desire even further. From copper wire to fiber optics, technology has evolved and so are ways of covert channel communication. By "Covert" we mean "anything not meant for the purpose for which it is being used". Investigation and detection of existence of such cover channel communication has always remained a serious concern of information security professionals which has now been evolved into a motivating source of an adversary to communicate secretly in "open" without being allegedly caught or noticed. This paper presents a survey report on steganographic techniques which have been evolved over the years to hide the existence of secret information inside some cover (Text) object. The introduction of the subject is followed by the discussion which is narrowed down to the area where digital ASCII Text documents are being used as cover. Finally, the conc...

  20. Summer Decay Processes in a Large Tabular Iceberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhams, P.; Wagner, T. M.; Bates, R.

    2012-12-01

    Summer Decay Processes in a Large Tabular Iceberg Peter Wadhams (1), Till J W Wagner(1) and Richard Bates(2) (1) Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA, UK (2) Scottish Oceans Institute, School of Geography and Geosciences, University of St Andrews, St. Andrews, Scotland KY16 9AL We present observational results from an experiment carried out during July-August 2012 on a giant grounded tabular iceberg off Baffin Island. The iceberg studied was part of the Petermann Ice Island B1 (PIIB1) which calved off the Petermann Glacier in NW Greenland in 2010. Since 2011 it has been aground in 100 m of water on the Baffin Island shelf at 69 deg 06'N, 66 deg 06'W. As part of the project a set of high resolution GPS sensors and tiltmeters was placed on the ice island to record rigid body motion as well as flexural responses to wind, waves, current and tidal forces, while a Waverider buoy monitored incident waves and swell. On July 31, 2012 a major breakup event was recorded, with a piece of 25,000 sq m surface area calving off the iceberg. At the time of breakup, GPS sensors were collecting data both on the main berg as well as on the newly calved piece, while two of us (PW and TJWW) were standing on the broken-out portion which rose by 0.6 m to achieve a new isostatic equilibrium. Crucially, there was no significant swell at the time of breakup, which suggests a melt-driven decay process rather than wave-driven flexural break-up. The GPS sensors recorded two disturbances during the hour preceding the breakup, indicative of crack growth and propagation. Qualitative observation during the two weeks in which our research ship was moored to, or was close to, the ice island edge indicates that an important mechanism for summer ablation is successive collapses of the overburden from above an unsupported wave cut, which creates a submerged ram fringing the berg. A model of buoyancy stresses induced by such rams indicates that they may have the capability through their moment arm of breaking off moderate-sized bergs, which may be the mechanism through which our smaller berg calved.

  1. Log ASCII Standard (LAS) Files for Geophysical (Gamma Ray) Wireline Well Logs and Their Application to Geologic Cross Section C-C' Through the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) regional geologic cross section C-C' (Ryder and others, 2008) displays key stratigraphic intervals in the central Appalachian basin. For this cross section, strata were correlated by using descriptions of well cuttings and gamma ray well log traces. This report summarizes the procedures used to convert gamma ray curves on paper well logs to the digital Log ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) Standard (LAS) format using the third-party software application Neuralog. The procedures could be used with other geophysical wireline logs also. The creation of digital LAS files from paper well logs by using Neuralog is very helpful, especially when dealing with older logs with limited or nonexistent digital data. The LAS files from the gamma ray logs of 11 wells used to construct cross section C-C' are included in this report. They may be downloaded from the index page as a single ZIP file.

  2. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilts, Gary A.

    2006-06-01

    A valid fluid equation of state (EOS) must satisfy the thermodynamic conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flow for realistic materials require a tabular EOS, but typical software interfaces to such tables based on polynomial or rational interpolants may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce the consistency condition and its derivatives. The consistency condition is important for the computation of various dimensionless parameters of an EOS that may involve derivatives of up to second order which are important for the development of more sensitive artificial viscosities and Riemann solvers that accurately model shock structure in regions near phase transitions. We describe a table interface based on the tuned regression method, which is derived from a constrained local least-squares regression technique. It is applied to several SESAME EOS showing how the consistency and stability conditions can be satisfied to round-off while computing first and second derivatives with demonstrated second-order convergence. An improvement of 14 orders of magnitude over conventional derivatives is demonstrated, although the method is apparently two orders of magnitude slower, due to the fact that every evaluation requires solving an 11-dimensional nonlinear system. Application is made to the computation of the fundamental derivative.

  3. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state.

    PubMed

    Dilts, Gary A

    2006-06-01

    A valid fluid equation of state (EOS) must satisfy the thermodynamic conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flow for realistic materials require a tabular EOS, but typical software interfaces to such tables based on polynomial or rational interpolants may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce the consistency condition and its derivatives. The consistency condition is important for the computation of various dimensionless parameters of an EOS that may involve derivatives of up to second order which are important for the development of more sensitive artificial viscosities and Riemann solvers that accurately model shock structure in regions near phase transitions. We describe a table interface based on the tuned regression method, which is derived from a constrained local least-squares regression technique. It is applied to several SESAME EOS showing how the consistency and stability conditions can be satisfied to round-off while computing first and second derivatives with demonstrated second-order convergence. An improvement of 14 orders of magnitude over conventional derivatives is demonstrated, although the method is apparently two orders of magnitude slower, due to the fact that every evaluation requires solving an 11-dimensional nonlinear system. Application is made to the computation of the fundamental derivative. PMID:16907020

  4. Genesis of the tabular-type vanadium-uranium deposits of the Henry Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northrop, H.R.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    Tabular-type vanadium-uranium deposits occur in fluvial sandstones of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation of Late Jurassic age The mineralized intervals and the weakly mineralized lateral extensions are bounded both above and below by zones rich in dolomite cement. Carbon isotope values of dolomite cements indicate that at least two sources of carbon existed. One source appears to be the same as that which formed the bedded carbonates in the evaporites in the Tidwell Member of the Morrison Formation stratigraphically below the mineralized interval. The second carbon source is typical of terrestrially deposited carbonates generally associated with meteoric water-dominated environments. Oxygen isotope values of these dolomites show the same trend of isotopically light values above the mineralized interval and isotopically heavier values in and below that interval; they indicate that two isotopically distinct fluids were involved in the mineralizing process. Some aspects of the origin of gangue and ore phases are explainable on the basis of processes which occurred solely within the saline fluid, but key aspects of ore genesis involved the interaction of the saline and meteoric waters. It is postulated that the solution interface migrated vertically within the stratigraphic section. -from Authors

  5. Michael P. Frank ASCII-controls-v2.2.doc 9/15/06 Page 1 of 9

    E-print Network

    Frank, Michael P.

    Michael P. Frank ASCII-controls-v2.2.doc 9/15/06 Page 1 of 9 Discussion of the Intended Meanings-controls-v2.2.doc 9/15/06 Page 2 of 9 x/y Hex Dec Oct Bin Ctl Syms Abbr Name Type Sec 0/2 02 2 002 000 0010 ^B

  6. Analyzing Tabular and State-Transition Requirements Specifications in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Rushby, John; Shankar, Natarajan

    1997-01-01

    We describe PVS's capabilities for representing tabular specifications of the kind advocated by Parnas and others, and show how PVS's Type Correctness Conditions (TCCs) are used to ensure certain well-formedness properties. We then show how these and other capabilities of PVS can be used to represent the AND/OR tables of Leveson and the Decision Tables of Sherry, and we demonstrate how PVS's TCCs can expose and help isolate errors in the latter. We extend this approach to represent the mode transition tables of the Software Cost Reduction (SCR) method in an attractive manner. We show how PVS can check these tables for well-formedness, and how PVS's model checking capabilities can be used to verify invariants and reachability properties of SCR requirements specifications, and inclusion relations between the behaviors of different specifications. These examples demonstrate how several capabilities of the PVS language and verification system can be used in combination to provide customized support for specific methodologies for documenting and analyzing requirements. Because they use only the standard capabilities of PVS, users can adapt and extend these customizations to suit their own needs. Those developing dedicated tools for individual methodologies may find these constructions in PVS helpful for prototyping purposes, or as a useful adjunct to a dedicated tool when the capabilities of a full theorem prover are required. The examples also illustrate the power and utility of an integrated general-purpose system such as PVS. For example, there was no need to adapt or extend the PVS model checker to make it work with SCR specifications described using the PVS TABLE construct: the model checker is applicable to any transition relation, independently of the PVS language constructs used in its definition.

  7. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish between these two explanations by examining the usage of tabular structures on a shallow mid-shelf reef of the Great Barrier Reef at midday and sunset. If predation avoidance is most important, usage should increase towards sunset; conversely, if avoidance of solar radiation is most important, more fishes should use cover at midday. Underwater video observations revealed that tabular structures were extensively used by large reef fishes at midday, being characterised by numerous species, especially Lutjanidae and Haemulidae. In contrast, at sunset, tabular structures were used by significantly fewer large reef fishes, being characterised mostly by species of unicornfish ( Naso spp.). Resident times of fishes using tabular structures were also significantly longer at midday (28:06 ± 5:55 min) than at sunset (07:47 ± 2:19 min). The results suggest that the primary function of tabular structures for large reef fishes is the avoidance of solar irradiance. This suggestion is supported by the position of fishes when sheltering. The majority of large reef fishes were found to shelter under the lip of tabular structure, facing outwards. This behaviour is thought to allow protection from harmful downwelling UV-B irradiance while allowing the fish to retain photopic vision and survey more of the surrounding area. These findings help to explain the importance of tabular structures for large reef fishes on coral reefs, potentially providing a valuable energetic refuge from solar irradiance.

  8. Chapter 3: Tabular Data and Graphical Images in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment - Western Gulf Province, Smackover-Austin-Eagle Ford Composite Total Petroleum System (504702)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on this CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  9. The role of {1 0 0} side faces for lateral growth of tabular silver bromide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bögels, G.; Meekes, H.; Bennema, P.; Bollen, D.

    1998-07-01

    In this study the growth of {1 1 1} tabular silver bromide crystals will be examined in situ under different conditions to determine a general growth mechanism. We established the side-face structure and aspect ratio of the tabular crystals for different concentrations of silver bromide dissolved in DMSO during the growth. The morphology of non-twinned crystals was studied to examine the relative growth rate of the {1 0 0} faces as compared to the {1 1 1} faces. It will be shown that there is a strong dependency between the relative growth rate of the {1 0 0} faces and the aspect ratio and side-face structures of the {1 1 1} tabular crystals. Relative fast growth of the {1 0 0} faces in comparison to the {1 1 1} faces leads to high aspect ratios and side-face structures with acute edges built up by {1 1 1} side faces. Relative slower growth leads to lower aspect ratios and ridge side-face structures built up by stable {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} faces. The lateral growth for all conditions can be explained by the substep mechanism proposed in an earlier study. This mechanism explains the increase of growth rate of a {1 1 1} side face that is linked via a twin plane to a faster growing {1 0 0} side face. From this mechanism and the observations it will be shown that the faces between the twin planes for double-twinned tabular crystals can be determined. The results presented here are not only valid for tabular crystals grown in the DMSO system but also for tabular crystals grown from the vapour phase and in the industrial precipitation method.

  10. Fourier-Mellin registration of line-delineated tabular document images

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luke A. D. Hutchison; William A. Barrett

    2006-01-01

    Image registration (or alignment) is a useful preprocessing tool for assisting in manual data extraction from handwritten forms, as well as for preparing documents for batch OCR of specific page regions. A new technique is presented for fast registration of lined tabular document images in the presence of a global affine transformation, using the Discrete Fourier--Mellin Transform (DFMT). Each component

  11. Agribusiness and Natural Resources Education in Michigan. Job Competencies Needed. A Tabular Supplement to the Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thuemmel, William L.; And Others

    This manual contains a tabular report of the competency identification of job task analysis component (Part Two) of the research project entitled "Agribusiness and Natural Resources Education in Michigan: Employment Demand, Competencies Required, and Recommended Delivery Systems." The data is a tabular supplement to Chapter III of the final…

  12. Chapter 3. Tabular data and graphical images in support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment--East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces, Jurassic Smackover Interior salt basins total petroleum system (504902), Cotton Valley group.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on the CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  13. Hydrogeology of an ancient arid closed basin: implications for tabular sandstone-hosted uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hydrogeologic modeling shows that tabular-type uranium deposits in the Grants uranium region of the San Juan basin, New Mexico, formed in zones of ascending and discharging regional ground-water flow. The association of either lacustrine mudstone or actively subsiding structures and uranium deposits can best be explained by the occurrence of lakes at topographic depressions where ground water having different sources and compositions is likely to converge, mix, and discharge. Ascending and discharging flow also explains the association of uranium deposits with underlying evaporites and suggests a brine interface. The simulations contradict previous suggestions that ground water moved downward in the mudflat. -Author

  14. Calcium-doped ceria\\/titanate tabular functional nanocomposite by layer-by-layer coating method

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiang W. Liu; M. K. Devaraju; Shu Yin; Tsugio Sato

    2010-01-01

    Ca-doped ceria (CDC)\\/tabular titanate (K0.8Li0.27Ti1.73O4, TT) UV-shielding functional nanocomposite with fairly uniform CDC coating layers was prepared through a polyelectrolyte-associated layer-by-layer (LbL) coating method. TT with lepidocrocite-like layered structure was used as the substrate, poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used as a coupling agent, CDC nanoparticles were used as the main UV-shielding component. CDC\\/TT nanocomposites with various coating layers of

  15. Atomic force microscopy studies on the surface morphology of {1 1 1} tabular AgBr crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plomp, M.; Buijnsters, J. G.; Bögels, G.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.; Bollen, Dirk

    2000-02-01

    Both ex situ and in situ atomic force microscopy have been applied to study the {1 1 1} and {1 0 0} surfaces of tabular silver bromide crystals grown from dimethyl sulphoxide-water solutions. This resulted in observations of monosteps, macrosteps, etch pits, pinning of steps and nucleated crystals showing twin planes. These examinations indicate that the growth and dissolution of both the {1 0 0} and the polar {1 1 1} faces occur via steps in many configurations. The registered 40-nm distance between the parallel twin planes of the nucleated crystals agrees with transmission electron microscopy measurements done on tabular crystals grown by the industrial double-jet precipitation method.

  16. Tabular water properties interface for Hydra-TH : CASL THM.CFD.P6.03 milestone report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John H.; Belcourt, Noel

    2013-04-01

    Completion of the CASL L3 milestone THM.CFD.P6.03 provides a tabular material properties capability to the Hydra code. A tabular interpolation package used in Sandia codes was modified to support the needs of multi-phase solvers in Hydra. Use of the interface is described. The package was released to Hydra under a government use license. A dummy physics was created in Hydra to prototype use of the interpolation routines. Finally, a test using the dummy physics verifies the correct behavior of the interpolation for a test water table. 3

  17. Tracking large tabular icebergs using the SeaWinds Ku-band microwave scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, K. M.; Long, D. G.

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge of iceberg locations is important for safety reasons as well as for understanding many geophysical and biological processes. Originally designed to measure wind speed and direction over the ocean, SeaWinds is a microwave scatterometer that operates at 13.4 GHz (Ku-band) on the QuikSCAT satellite. Radar measurements from SeaWinds are collected and processed on a daily basis using resolution-enhancement techniques to produce daily radar images. Because icebergs scatter microwave energy more than sea ice and sea water, icebergs are detected as high-backscatter targets surrounded by lower-backscatter regions in daily SeaWinds images. As a result, iceberg positions are determined in real-time and a time-series of iceberg positions is maintained in an Antarctic iceberg database by Brigham Young University's Microwave Earth Remote Sensing (MERS) laboratory. Since SeaWinds operates independent of both solar illumination and cloud cover and has a large daily spatial coverage, this paper demonstrates that SeaWinds is an excellent platform to detect and track large tabular icebergs. These icebergs are generally larger than 5 km and are typically characterized as a rough ice plateau above the surrounding sea water or sea ice. The number of icebergs tracked in the MERS Antarctic iceberg database is found to be generally greater than the number of icebergs tracked by the National Ice Center. The movement patterns of all icebergs detected by SeaWinds are also analyzed and 90% of icebergs are found to travel a counter-clockwise path around Antarctica and accumulate in the Weddell and Scotia Seas. Iceberg detection and tracking is demonstrated via multiple case studies that highlight icebergs C-19a and A-22a using the MERS database and through real-time operational support of the 2005, 2008, and 2009 NSF Antarctic cruises. Iceberg positions are validated by using collocated high-resolution satellite imagery and by navigating the NSF ships to physically intercept several large tabular icebergs in the Weddell and Scotia Seas.

  18. Calcium-doped ceria/titanate tabular functional nanocomposite by layer-by-layer coating method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W. Liu, Xiang; Devaraju, M. K.; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2010-07-01

    Ca-doped ceria (CDC)/tabular titanate (K 0.8Li 0.27Ti 1.73O 4, TT) UV-shielding functional nanocomposite with fairly uniform CDC coating layers was prepared through a polyelectrolyte-associated layer-by-layer (LbL) coating method. TT with lepidocrocite-like layered structure was used as the substrate, poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used as a coupling agent, CDC nanoparticles were used as the main UV-shielding component. CDC/TT nanocomposites with various coating layers of CDC were obtained through a multistep coating process. The phases were studied by X-ray diffraction. The morphology and coating quality were studied by scanning electron microscopy and element mapping of energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The oxidation catalytic activity, UV-shielding ability and using comfort were characterized by Rancimat test, UV-vis spectra and dynamic friction test, respectively. CDC/TT nanocomposites with low oxidation catalytic activity, high UV-shielding ability and good using comfort were finally obtained.

  19. Calcium-doped ceria/titanate tabular functional nanocomposite by layer-by-layer coating method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang W., E-mail: lxwluck@gmail.co [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 980-8577 Suita (Japan); Devaraju, M.K.; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 980-8577 Suita (Japan)

    2010-07-15

    Ca-doped ceria (CDC)/tabular titanate (K{sub 0.8}Li{sub 0.27}Ti{sub 1.73}O{sub 4}, TT) UV-shielding functional nanocomposite with fairly uniform CDC coating layers was prepared through a polyelectrolyte-associated layer-by-layer (LbL) coating method. TT with lepidocrocite-like layered structure was used as the substrate, poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used as a coupling agent, CDC nanoparticles were used as the main UV-shielding component. CDC/TT nanocomposites with various coating layers of CDC were obtained through a multistep coating process. The phases were studied by X-ray diffraction. The morphology and coating quality were studied by scanning electron microscopy and element mapping of energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The oxidation catalytic activity, UV-shielding ability and using comfort were characterized by Rancimat test, UV-vis spectra and dynamic friction test, respectively. CDC/TT nanocomposites with low oxidation catalytic activity, high UV-shielding ability and good using comfort were finally obtained. - Graphical abstract: Through the control of surface charge of particles calcium-doped ceria/titanate composites with low oxidation catalytic activity, higher UV-shielding ability and excellent comfort was obtained by a facile layer-by-layer coating method.

  20. Intra-colonial response to Acroporid ``white syndrome'' lesions in tabular Acropora spp. (Scleractinia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roff, G.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Fine, M.

    2006-05-01

    ‘White syndrome’ is considered to be the most prevalent coral disease on the Great Barrier Reef, characterised by rapid rates of lesion progression and high levels of colony mortality. This study investigated the production and translocation of photoassimilates towards white syndrome lesions (WSLs) and artificially inflicted lesions in healthy and diseased colonies of tabular Acropora spp. to determine the intra-colonial response to white syndrome using 14C labelling. Translocation of 14C labelled photoassimilates was preferentially orientated away from active WSLs, with minimal 14C activity observed in the lesion borders, whilst artificial lesions (ALs) created directly opposite WSL borders showed significantly higher 14C activity, suggesting active translocation of photoassimilates for tissue regeneration. Transport of photoassimilates in healthy coral colonies was preferentially oriented towards ALs with a higher perimeter-area ratio, although translocation towards WSL boundaries was minimal even though the lesion perimeter was often the width of the colony (>200 cm). We suggest that the preferential orientation of photoassimilates away from WSLs may represent a deliberate strategy by the colony to induce a ‘shutdown reaction’ in order to preserve intra-colonial resources within areas of the colony that are more likely to survive and recover.

  1. The Effectiveness of Graphic and Tabular Presentation under Time Pressure and Task Complexity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Mark I.

    1995-01-01

    Describes research that empirically tested the effects of presentation format, time, pressure, and task complexity on decision performance. The objective was to determine the most effective presentation format (i.e., graphics or tables) for the performance of tasks of varying capabilities by decision makers under time pressure. (Author/LRW)

  2. 17 CFR 232.305 - Number of characters per line; tabular and columnar information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...or columnar format exceed 132 positions wide. (b) Paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to HTML documents, Interactive Data Files (§ 232.11) or XBRL-Related Documents (§ 232.11). [58 FR 14670, Mar. 18, 1993, as amended...

  3. 17 CFR 232.305 - Number of characters per line; tabular and columnar information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...or columnar format exceed 132 positions wide. (b) Paragraph (a) of this section does not apply to HTML documents, Interactive Data Files (§ 232.11) or XBRL-Related Documents (§ 232.11). [58 FR 14670, Mar. 18, 1993, as amended...

  4. Comparison of Neural Networks and Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding for Hyperspectral Signature Classification in Unresolved Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, M.; Ritter, G.; Key, R.

    Accurate and computationally efficient spectral signature classification is a crucial step in the nonimaging detection and recognition of spaceborne objects. In classical hyperspectral recognition applications using linear mixing models, signature classification accuracy depends on accurate spectral endmember discrimination [1]. If the endmembers cannot be classified correctly, then the signatures cannot be classified correctly, and object recognition from hyperspectral data will be inaccurate. In practice, the number of endmembers accurately classified often depends linearly on the number of inputs. This can lead to potentially severe classification errors in the presence of noise or densely interleaved signatures. In this paper, we present an comparison of emerging technologies for nonimaging spectral signature classfication based on a highly accurate, efficient search engine called Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding (TNE) [3,4] and a neural network technology called Morphological Neural Networks (MNNs) [5]. Based on prior results, TNE can optimize its classifier performance to track input nonergodicities, as well as yield measures of confidence or caution for evaluation of classification results. Unlike neural networks, TNE does not have a hidden intermediate data structure (e.g., the neural net weight matrix). Instead, TNE generates and exploits a user-accessible data structure called the agreement map (AM), which can be manipulated by Boolean logic operations to effect accurate classifier refinement algorithms. The open architecture and programmability of TNE's agreement map processing allows a TNE programmer or user to determine classification accuracy, as well as characterize in detail the signatures for which TNE did not obtain classification matches, and why such mis-matches occurred. In this study, we will compare TNE and MNN based endmember classification, using performance metrics such as probability of correct classification (Pd) and rate of false detections (Rfa). As proof of principle, we analyze classification of multiple closely spaced signatures from a NASA database of space material signatures. Additional analysis pertains to computational complexity and noise sensitivity, which are superior to Bayesian techniques based on classical neural networks. [1] Winter, M.E. "Fast autonomous spectral end-member determination in hyperspectral data," in Proceedings of the 13th International Conference On Applied Geologic Remote Sensing, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, pp. 337-44 (1999). [2] N. Keshava, "A survey of spectral unmixing algorithms," Lincoln Laboratory Journal 14:55-78 (2003). [3] Key, G., M.S. SCHMALZ, F.M. Caimi, and G.X. Ritter. "Performance analysis of tabular nearest neighbor encoding algorithm for joint compression and ATR", in Proceedings SPIE 3814:115-126 (1999). [4] Schmalz, M.S. and G. Key. "Algorithms for hyperspectral signature classification in unresolved object detection using tabular nearest neighbor encoding" in Proceedings of the 2007 AMOS Conference, Maui HI (2007). [5] Ritter, G.X., G. Urcid, and M.S. Schmalz. "Autonomous single-pass endmember approximation using lattice auto-associative memories", Neurocomputing (Elsevier), accepted (June 2008).

  5. Tabular comparisons of the Flynn Creek impact crater, United States, Steinheim impact crater, Germany and Snowball explosion crater, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    A tabular outline of comparative data is presented for 340 basic dimensional, morphological, and structural parameters and related aspects for three craters of the flat-floored, central uplift type, two of which are natural terrestrial impact craters and one is a large-scale experimental explosion crater. The three craters are part of a general class, in terms of their morphology and structural deformation that is represented on each of the terrestrial planets including the moon. One of the considered craters, the Flynn Creek Crater, was formed by a hypervelocity impact event approximately 360 m.y. ago in what is now north central Tennessee. The impacting body appears to have been a carbonaceous chondrite or a cometary mass. The second crater, the Steinheim Crater, was formed by an impact event approximately 14.7 m.y. ago in what is now southwestern Germany. The Snowball Crater was formed by the detonation of a 500-ton TNT hemisphere on flat-lying, unconsolidated alluvium in Alberta, Canada.

  6. 14 CFR 331.23 - In what format must applications be submitted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...supporting financial documents must be submitted in hard copy. In addition, you may submit financial and accounting tabular data in Excel spreadsheet format, utilizing a 3.5? floppy disk, compact disk, or flash memory device, and doing so may expedite...

  7. Directory interchange format manual, version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Directory Interchange Format (DIF) is a data structure used to exchange directory level information about data sets among information systems. The format consists of a number of fields that describe the attributes of a directory entry and text blocks that contain a descriptive summary of and references for the directory entry. All fields and the summary are preceded by labels identifying their contents. All values are ASCII character strings. The structure is intended to be flexible, allowing for future changes in the contents of directory entries.

  8. Origin and significance of organic matter in uranium deposits of Morrison Formation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Squyres

    1980-01-01

    Primary uranium orebodies in the Morrison Formation of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, consist of submicroscopic coffinite in a matrix of dark-colored structureless carbonaceous matter that impregnates and partially replaces the Morrison sandstones. Recognizable carbonized plant fragments are also abundant both in and near ore. The orebodies are elongated, lenticular or tabular masses; they are oriented parallel to paleochannel

  9. An Upper Turonian fine-grained shallow marine stromatolite bed from the Muñecas Formation, Northern Iberian Ranges, Spain

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rodríguez-Martínez; F. Sánchez; E. O. Walliser; J. Reitner

    A fine-grained stromatolite bed, laterally continuous on the kilometer scale and with small synoptic relief, crops out in the Muñecas Formation in the Northern Iberian Ranges. The Muñecas Fm. was deposited during the late Turonian on a shallow water platform in the Upper Cretaceous intracratonic Iberian basin.The stromatolite bed has a tabular to domed biostromal macrostructure. Its internal mesostructure consists

  10. Verification of model simulated mass balance, flow fields and tabular calving events of the Antarctic ice sheet against remotely sensed observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Diandong; Leslie, Lance M.; Lynch, Mervyn J.

    2013-06-01

    The Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) has the greatest potential for global sea level rise. This study simulates AIS ice creeping, sliding, tabular calving, and estimates the total mass balances, using a recently developed, advanced ice dynamics model, known as SEGMENT-Ice. SEGMENT-Ice is written in a spherical Earth coordinate system. Because the AIS contains the South Pole, a projection transfer is performed to displace the pole outside of the simulation domain. The AIS also has complex ice-water-granular material-bedrock configurations, requiring sophisticated lateral and basal boundary conditions. Because of the prevalence of ice shelves, a `girder yield' type calving scheme is activated. The simulations of present surface ice flow velocities compare favorably with InSAR measurements, for various ice-water-bedrock configurations. The estimated ice mass loss rate during 2003-2009 agrees with GRACE measurements and provides more spatial details not represented by the latter. The model estimated calving frequencies of the peripheral ice shelves from 1996 (roughly when the 5-km digital elevation and thickness data for the shelves were collected) to 2009 compare well with archived scatterometer images. SEGMENT-Ice's unique, non-local systematic calving scheme is found to be relevant for tabular calving. However, the exact timing of calving and of iceberg sizes cannot be simulated accurately at present. A projection of the future mass change of the AIS is made, with SEGMENT-Ice forced by atmospheric conditions from three different coupled general circulation models. The entire AIS is estimated to be losing mass steadily at a rate of ~120 km3/a at present and this rate possibly may double by year 2100.

  11. DataUp 2.0: Improving On a Tool For Helping Researchers Archive, Manage, and Share Their Tabular Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, C.; Borda, S.; Cruse, P.; Kunze, J.

    2013-12-01

    There are many barriers to data management and sharing among earth and environmental scientists; among the most significant are a lack of knowledge about best practices for data management, metadata standards, or appropriate data repositories for archiving and sharing data. Last year we developed an open source web application, DataUp, to help researchers overcome these barriers. DataUp helps scientists to (1) determine whether their file is CSV compatible, (2) generate metadata in a standard format, (3) retrieve an identifier to facilitate data citation, and (4) deposit their data into a repository. With funding from the NSF via a supplemental grant to the DataONE project, we are working to improve upon DataUp. Our main goal for DataUp 2.0 is to ensure organizations and repositories are able to adopt and adapt DataUp to meet their unique needs, including connecting to analytical tools, adding new metadata schema, and expanding the list of connected data repositories. DataUp is a collaborative project between the California Digital Library, DataONE, the San Diego Supercomputing Center, and Microsoft Research Connections.

  12. Background Atmosphere Radiance Day (BARD) and Night (BARN)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. A. Armstrong; S. B. Downer; J. P. Kennealy; R. J. Larkin; S. P. McGowan

    1991-01-01

    This document describes the format, the details, and methods used to calculate the BACKGROUND ATMOSPHERE RADIANCE DAY (BARD) and NIGHT (BARN) data bases. BARD\\/BARN (v4.1), in tabular ASCII form, consists of 57 bins, each 5 percent in energy, spanning 1.9 to 34 micron. BARD\\/BARN (v4.1) is now available and is being used within fast running codes such as IRSim, HiSEMM,

  13. Tabular Privacyy Preserving Publishingg g

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jun

    Computer Back pain A04 56 F Government 610020 Sports Heart disease A05 47 M Police 610020 Music Neck pain Neck pain Bill 47 M Police 610020 Music Heart disease Explicit Identifier (e.g. name, ID #, Driver 610020 Sports Neck pain Bill 47 M Police 610020 Music Heart disease In the table 1. The value of every

  14. Deep seismic reflection studies in the Pacific Northwest US, CD-ROM: SEG-Y format

    SciTech Connect

    Zihlman, F.N.; Taylor, D.J.; Stanley, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This CD-ROM contains the final stack and migrated stack seismic data, in SEG-Y format, from 7 seismic lines collected in western Washington state. Also included are ASCII text files of shot point and CDP locations in latitude/longitude decimal degrees for each line, velocity functions by CDP for both the final stack and migrated data for each line, and field recording and processing parameters for each line. The SEG-Y seismic data files may be graphically displayed on DOS or Macintosh systems using the software included on disc: PLOTSEGY for DOS platforms, or TracePlot for Macintosh platforms. Documentation is provided for all data and software included on this disc in both ASCII text and PostScript format. This CD-ROM was produced in accordance with both the ISO 9660 and Macintosh HFS standards. While the data and text files are accessible by any system recognizing one of those standards, the software is intended for use on either a DOS-based or Macintosh system, as appropriate.

  15. Jargonial-Obfuscation(J-O) DISambiguation Elimination via Siegel-Baez Cognition Category-Semantics(C-S) in Siegel FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS (Son of TRIZ)/(F=C) Tabular List-Format Dichotomy Truth-Table Matrix Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Carl Ludwig; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    NOT "philosophy" per se but raising serious salient Arnol'd [Huygens and Barrow, Newton and Hooke(96)] questions begged is Rota empiricism Husserl VS. Frege maths-objects Dichotomy controversy: Hill-Haddock[Husserl or Frege?(00)]as manifestly-demonstrated by Hintikka[B.U.]-Critchey[Derrida Deconstruction Ethics(78)] deconstruction; Altshuler TRIZ; Siegel F=C/C-S; Siegel-Baez(UCR) Cognition C-S = "Category-theory ``+'' Cognitive-Semantics[Wierzbica-Langacker-Lakoff-Nunez[Where Maths Comes From(00)]-Fauconnier-Turner[Blending(98)]-Coulson[Semantic-Leaps (00)

  16. BOREAS TF-9 SSA-OBS Branch Level Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayment, Mark B.; Jarvis, Paul G.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-9 team collected data that describe carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes from foliage at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site from 07-April through 23-November-1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  17. BOREAS RSS-8 BIOME-BGC Model Simulations at Tower Flux Sites in 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Kimball, John

    2000-01-01

    BIOME-BGC is a general ecosystem process model designed to simulate biogeochemical and hydrologic processes across multiple scales (Running and Hunt, 1993). In this investigation, BIOME-BGC was used to estimate daily water and carbon budgets for the BOREAS tower flux sites for 1994. Carbon variables estimated by the model include gross primary production (i.e., net photosynthesis), maintenance and heterotrophic respiration, net primary production, and net ecosystem carbon exchange. Hydrologic variables estimated by the model include snowcover, evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and outflow. The information provided by the investigation includes input initialization and model output files for various sites in tabular ASCII format.

  18. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Basin Characteristics, 2002 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: tabular digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents basin characteristics for the year 2002 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). These characteristics are reach catchment shape index, stream density, sinuosity, mean elevation, mean slope and number of road-stream crossings. The source data sets are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) RF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011) and the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER/Line Files (U.S. Census Bureau,2006). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  19. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  20. Tabular equation of state for gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Jonathan; Honnell, Kevin G.; Peterson, Jeffrey H.; Greeff, Carl; Crockett, Scott

    2012-03-01

    A new, SESAME-type equation of state (EOS) , suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations, is described for gold. Pressures, internal energies, and Helmholtz free energies are tabulated on a rectangular temperature-and-density grid, spanning densities from 0 - 36 g/cc, temperatures from 0 - 800 eV, and extending up to pressures of 800 GPa. The EOS is constructed using the standard decomposition of the pressure into a static-lattice cold curve, a thermal nuclear contribution, and a thermal electronic contribution. The cold curve is derived from existing diamond-anvil-cell measurements, the thermal nuclear contribution from the Johnson model, and the thermal electronic contribution using Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. Predictions of the new EOS (SESAME 2705) for the cold curve, roomtemperature isotherm, principal Hugoniot, thermal expansion, heat capacity, melt line, and vapor pressure compare favorably with experimental data and are superior to the EOS currently available in the SESAME library (SESAME 2700).

  1. Tabular Equation of State for Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Jonathan; Honnell, Kevin; Peterson, Jeffrey; Greeff, Carl; Crockett, Scott

    2011-06-01

    A new, SESAME-type equation of state (EOS) is described for gold, suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations. The EOS is tabulated on a rectangular temperature-and-density grid, spanning densities from 0 - 29 g/cc, temperatures from 0 - 85,000 K, and extending up to pressures of 1000 GPa. It is constructed using the standard decomposition of the pressure into a static-lattice cold curve, a thermal nuclear contribution, and a thermal electronic contribution. The cold curve is derived from a combination of empirical data and density functional theory, the thermal nuclear contribution from the Johnson model, and the thermal electronic contribution using Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. Pressures, internal energies, and Helmholtz free energies are tabulated as functions of temperature and density. Predictions for the room-temperature isotherm, principal Hugoniot, thermal expansion, heat capacity, and vapor pressure are compared with experimental data and with the EOS currently available in the SESAME library (SESAME 2700).

  2. Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Eric Gawiser

    2005-12-15

    I summarize current knowledge of galaxy formation with emphasis on the initial conditions provided by the Lambda CDM cosmology, integral constraints from cosmological quantities, and the demographics of high-redshift protogalaxies. Tables are provided summarizing the number density, star formation rate and stellar mass per object, cosmic star formation rate and stellar mass densities, clustering length and typical dark matter halo masses for Lyman break galaxies, Lyman alpha emitting galaxies, Distant red galaxies, Sub-millimeter galaxies, and Damped Lyman alpha absorption systems. I also discuss five key unsolved problems in galaxy formation and prognosticate advances that the near future will bring.

  3. Soil Formation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Humans use soil for their daily needs but do not sufficiently take account of its slow formation and fast loss. Discover the amazing geology of soil formation and the basic rock and soil types.Although soil seems the end product from weathering rocks, it is merely a stage in the gigantic cycle of mineral recycling by the movement of tectonic plates.

  4. Drop Formation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site from the University of Bristolâ??s Mathematics department contains an explanation of drop formation and its applications. A description of studies of drop separation and its applications in medicine and technology are provided. The site also contains photographs, including a series of images showing the formation of a satellite drop.

  5. PREFERENCE FORMATION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James N. Druckman; Arthur Lupia

    2000-01-01

    ? Abstract This review concerns political preferences—what they are and where they come from. We begin by documenting the close relationship between processes of preference formation and change. Rather than suddenly appearing, most preferences emerge from interactions between individuals and their environment. This aspect of preference formation poses a concrete challenge: to uncover the mechanics of these interactions in important

  6. Regolith Formation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This is an activity about the formation of regolith, the loose fragmental material on the Moon's surface. Learners will engage in a series of hands-on activities comparing and contrasting regolith formation processes on the Moon and on Earth. This activity is in Unit 2 of the Exploring the Moon teachers guide and is designed for use especially, but not exclusively, with the Lunar Sample Disk program.

  7. Overview of the mineralogy of the Biwabik Iron Formation, Mesabi Iron Range, northern Minnesota.

    PubMed

    McSwiggen, Peter L; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The mineralogy of the Biwabik Iron Formation changes dramatically from west to east as the formation nears the basal contact of the Duluth Complex. This reflects a contact metamorphism that took place with the emplacement of the igneous Duluth Complex at temperatures as high as 1200 degrees C. However, the mineralogy of the Biwabik Iron Formation also varies vertically through the stratigraphy of the unit. This variability in both the vertical and horizontal dimensions makes it difficult to predict exact horizons where specific minerals will occur. The iron-formation has been subdivided into four broad stratigraphic units (lower cherty, lower slaty, upper cherty, and upper slaty) and into four lateral mineralogical zones (1-4). Zone 1, the westernmost zone, is characterized by quartz, magnetite, hematite, carbonates, talc, chamosite, greenalite, minnesotaite, and stilpnomelane. The silicate mineralogy in Zone 2 of the Biwabik Iron Formation changes very little. However, the minerals begin to change dramatically in Zone 3. Most significantly, Zone 3 is characterized by the appearance of grunerite in both a tabular form and a fibrous form. In Zone 4, the original silicate minerals have completely reacted, and a new suite of minerals occupies the iron-formation. These include grunerite, hornblende, hedenbergite, ferrohypersthene (ferrosilite), and fayalite. PMID:18069109

  8. Galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    Implications of the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background on large and small angular scales for galaxy formation are reviewed. In primeval adiabatic fluctuations, a universe dominated by cold, weakly interacting nonbaryonic matter, e.g., the massive photino is postulated. A possible signature of photino annihilation in our galactic halo involves production of cosmic ray antiprotons. If the density is near its closure value, it is necessary to invoke a biasing mechanism for suppressing galaxy formation throughout most of the universe in order to reconcile the dark matter density with the lower astronomical determinations of the mean cosmological density. A mechanism utilizing the onset of primordial massive star formation to strip gaseous protogalaxies is described. Only the densest, early collapsing systems form luminous galaxies.

  9. 30 CFR 1210.54 - Must I submit this royalty report electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...American Standard Code for information interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files...

  10. 30 CFR 1210.104 - Must I submit these production reports electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. External files created by the sender must be in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. These external files can be...

  11. 30 CFR 1210.54 - Must I submit this royalty report electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...American Standard Code for information interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files...

  12. 30 CFR 1210.54 - Must I submit this royalty report electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...American Standard Code for information interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files...

  13. 30 CFR 1210.104 - Must I submit these production reports electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...American Standard Code for information interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files...

  14. 30 CFR 1210.104 - Must I submit these production reports electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...American Standard Code for information interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files...

  15. 30 CFR 1210.104 - Must I submit these production reports electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...American Standard Code for information interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files...

  16. 30 CFR 1210.54 - Must I submit this royalty report electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. External files created by the sender must be in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. These external files can be...

  17. Planet formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jack J. Lissauer

    1993-01-01

    Models of planetary formation are developed using the present single example of a planetary system, supplemented by limited astrophysical observations of star-forming regions and circumstellar disks. The solar nebula theory and the planetesimal hypothesis are discussed. The latter is found to provide a viable theory of the growth of the terrestrial planets, the cores of the giant planets, and the

  18. Galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ? 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326

  19. Planet Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Quinn

    2005-01-01

    Motivating the study of planet formation is not difficult for any curious audience. One of the fundamental human questions\\u000a is that of origins: “where did I come from?„. Breaking this down into constituents produces a series of questions. How did\\u000a the Universe begin? How did stars form? How did planets form? How did life begin? How did intelligent life develop?

  20. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  1. Formation Scenarios

    E-print Network

    Rosemary F. G. Wyse

    1999-11-18

    I discuss various proposed formation scenarios for the metal-poor components of the Milky Way Galaxy, emphasising the stellar halo and the thick disk. Interactions and accretion played a significant role in Galactic evolution, in particular at earlier epochs. The present observations favour a scenario by which the thick disk formed through the heating of a pre-existing thin stellar disk, with the heating mechanism being the merging of a satellite galaxy. A remnant `moving group' of the satellite would provide strong support for this scenario, and may have been detected. The field stars in the stellar halo probably formed in early small-scale star-forming regions, which subsequently disrupted. Late accretion is not important for the bulk of the stellar halo. The stellar initial mass function shows no evidence of variations, and indeed shows evidence of being invariant, even in companion satellite galaxies.

  2. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  3. Formation of the enigmatic Matoush uranium deposit in the Paleoprotozoic Otish Basin, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Paul; Kyser, Kurt; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Beyer, Steve R.; Hiatt, Eric E.; Lafontaine, Jonathan

    2015-02-01

    The Matoush uranium deposit is situated in the Paleoproterozoic Otish Basin, northern Quebec, Canada, and is hosted by the Indicator Formation sandstones. Its sheet-like ore bodies are closely associated with the steeply dipping Matoush Fracture, which hosts mafic dykes and minor quartz-feldspar-tourmaline pegmatites. Regional diagenesis, involving oxidizing basinal fluids (?2H ˜-15‰, ?18O ˜8‰), produced mostly illite and possibly leached U from accessory phases in the Indicator Formation sandstones. The bimodal Matoush dyke intruded the Indicator Formation along the Matoush Fracture, and the related metasomatism produced Cr-rich dravite and muscovite in both the dyke and the proximal sandstones. Uraninite formed when U6+ in the basinal brine was reduced to U4+ in contact with the mafic dyke and by Fe2+ in Cr-dravite and Cr-muscovite, and precipitated together with eskolaite and hematite. Because of its unique characteristics, the Matoush deposit cannot be easily classified within the generally accepted classification of uranium deposits. Two of its main characteristics (unusual reduction mechanism, structural control) do not correspond to the sandstone-hosted group of deposits (unconformity type, tabular, roll front), in spite of uranium being derived from the Otish Group sandstones.

  4. BOREAS RSS-3 Reflectance Measured from a Helicopter-Mounted Barnes MMR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Walthall, Charles L.; Loechel, Sara; deColstoun, Eric Brown

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-3 team acquired helicopter-based radiometric measurements of forested sites with a Barnes MMR. The data were collected in 1994 during the three BOREAS IFCs at numerous tower and auxiliary sites in both the NSA and SSA. The 15-degree FOV of the MMR yielded approximately 79-m ground resolution from an altitude of 300 m. The MMR has seven spectral bands that are similar to the Landsat TM bands, ranging from the blue region to the thermal. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  5. mmView: a web-based viewer of the mmCIF format

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Structural biomolecular data are commonly stored in the PDB format. The PDB format is widely supported by software vendors because of its simplicity and readability. However, the PDB format cannot fully address many informatics challenges related to the growing amount of structural data. To overcome the limitations of the PDB format, a new textual format mmCIF was released in June 1997 in its version 1.0. mmCIF provides extra information which has the advantage of being in a computer readable form. However, this advantage becomes a disadvantage if a human must read and understand the stored data. While software tools exist to help to prepare mmCIF files, the number of available systems simplifying the comprehension and interpretation of the mmCIF files is limited. Findings In this paper we present mmView - a cross-platform web-based application that allows to explore comfortably the structural data of biomacromolecules stored in the mmCIF format. The mmCIF categories can be easily browsed in a tree-like structure, and the corresponding data are presented in a well arranged tabular form. The application also allows to display and investigate biomolecular structures via an integrated Java application Jmol. Conclusions The mmView software system is primarily intended for educational purposes, but it can also serve as a useful research tool. The mmView application is offered in two flavors: as an open-source stand-alone application (available from http://sourceforge.net/projects/mmview) that can be installed on the user's computer, and as a publicly available web server. PMID:21486459

  6. Capital Punishment 1997

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1999-01-01

    Recently released by the US Department of Justice's Bureau of Justice Statistics, this report presents capital punishment data for 1997 as well as preliminary data on executions in 1998. The report finds that in 1997, 3,335 men and women were on death row in 34 states, and during the year, seventeen states executed 74 prisoners -- all male -- with half of the executions occurring in Texas. Tabular data in the report display prisoners' sex, race, education, marital status, age, and method of execution, and the time between the imposition of the death sentence and execution. The report also includes historical tables that provide data on the 4,291 prisoners executed in the US between 1930 and 1997. The report is available in .pdf and ASCII format. Spreadsheets may be downloaded as a .zip file.

  7. BOREAS RSS-17 Stem, Soil, and Air Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; McDonald, Kyle C.; Way, JoBea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team collected several data sets in support of its research in monitoring and analyzing environmental and phenological states using radar data. This data set consists of tree bole and soil temperature measurements from various BOREAS flux tower sites. Temperatures were measured with thermistors implanted in the hydroconductive tissue of the trunks of several trees at each site and at various depths in the soil. Data were stored on a data logger at intervals of either 1 or 2 hours. The majority of the data were acquired between early 1994 and early 1995. The primary product of this data set is the diurnal stem temperature measurements acquired for selected trees at five BOREAS tower sites. The data are provided in tabular ASCII format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  8. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  9. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  10. Geochemistry and structure of the Hawley Formation: Northwestern Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.; Jacobi, R. (State Univ. of New York, Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Hawley Formation in northwestern Massachusetts is composed of mafic and felsic, (trondhjemitic) igneous units and black sulfidic schists and quartzites. The dominant lithology is a thinly foliated hbd-plag.-chi-qtz.-Fe carbonate schist with or without hornblende fasicules. Locally, this schist has alternating folia of chl/hbd and plag. and probably has a volcaniclastic protolith. Distinct pillows and tuffs are observed locally. In general, these schists have flat REE patterns at 10X chondrite and plot as IABs on discrimination diagrams. In the eastern part of the Hawley, some amphibolites show concave upward REE patterns, plot in the IAT or boninite field on discrimination diagrams, and appear to have boninitic affinities. The felsic lithologies are trondhjemitic and are intrusive into the IAT/boninite amphibolites. The intrusive nature is based on the presence of mafic xenoliths and intruded rafts of country rock in the trondhjemite as well as the occurrence of thin tabular trondhjemite bodies in sharp contact with the surrounding amphibolite. The trondhjemite varies from coarse-grained weakly foliated qtz-plag.-biotite gneiss with probable relict igneous zoned plagioclases to finer-grained well foliated qtz-plag.-garnet-hbd gneiss. REE patterns for the trondhjemites are weakly U-shaped with moderate to pronounced negative Eu anomalies. The trondhjemites, surrounding amphibolites, and black sulfidic schists and quartzites of the eastern part of the Hawley are intruded by massive, granular, medium grained, plagioclase phenocryst amphibolites with chilled margins. These intrusive sills predate or are coeval with the dominant foliation in the Hawley. Both sills and country rock contain a contact-parallel foliation as well as a later foliation at a low angle to the earlier foliation. The sill amphibolites are high TiO2 high Zr varieties that plot as MORBs to WPBs on discrimination diagrams and exhibit slightly LREE enriched MORB-like to T-MORB REE patterns.

  11. The mzTab Data Exchange Format: Communicating Mass-spectrometry-based Proteomics and Metabolomics Experimental Results to a Wider Audience*

    PubMed Central

    Griss, Johannes; Jones, Andrew R.; Sachsenberg, Timo; Walzer, Mathias; Gatto, Laurent; Hartler, Jürgen; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Salek, Reza M.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Neuhauser, Nadin; Cox, Jürgen; Neumann, Steffen; Fan, Jun; Reisinger, Florian; Xu, Qing-Wei; del Toro, Noemi; Pérez-Riverol, Yasset; Ghali, Fawaz; Bandeira, Nuno; Xenarios, Ioannis; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed several standardized data formats to facilitate data sharing in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. These allow researchers to report their complete results in a unified way. However, at present, there is no format to describe the final qualitative and quantitative results for proteomics and metabolomics experiments in a simple tabular format. Many downstream analysis use cases are only concerned with the final results of an experiment and require an easily accessible format, compatible with tools such as Microsoft Excel or R. We developed the mzTab file format for MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results to meet this need. mzTab is intended as a lightweight supplement to the existing standard XML-based file formats (mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML), providing a comprehensive summary, similar in concept to the supplemental material of a scientific publication. mzTab files can contain protein, peptide, and small molecule identifications together with experimental metadata and basic quantitative information. The format is not intended to store the complete experimental evidence but provides mechanisms to report results at different levels of detail. These range from a simple summary of the final results to a representation of the results including the experimental design. This format is ideally suited to make MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results available to a wider biological community outside the field of MS. Several software tools for proteomics and metabolomics have already adapted the format as an output format. The comprehensive mzTab specification document and extensive additional documentation can be found online. PMID:24980485

  12. The mzTab data exchange format: communicating mass-spectrometry-based proteomics and metabolomics experimental results to a wider audience.

    PubMed

    Griss, Johannes; Jones, Andrew R; Sachsenberg, Timo; Walzer, Mathias; Gatto, Laurent; Hartler, Jürgen; Thallinger, Gerhard G; Salek, Reza M; Steinbeck, Christoph; Neuhauser, Nadin; Cox, Jürgen; Neumann, Steffen; Fan, Jun; Reisinger, Florian; Xu, Qing-Wei; Del Toro, Noemi; Pérez-Riverol, Yasset; Ghali, Fawaz; Bandeira, Nuno; Xenarios, Ioannis; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning

    2014-10-01

    The HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed several standardized data formats to facilitate data sharing in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. These allow researchers to report their complete results in a unified way. However, at present, there is no format to describe the final qualitative and quantitative results for proteomics and metabolomics experiments in a simple tabular format. Many downstream analysis use cases are only concerned with the final results of an experiment and require an easily accessible format, compatible with tools such as Microsoft Excel or R. We developed the mzTab file format for MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results to meet this need. mzTab is intended as a lightweight supplement to the existing standard XML-based file formats (mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML), providing a comprehensive summary, similar in concept to the supplemental material of a scientific publication. mzTab files can contain protein, peptide, and small molecule identifications together with experimental metadata and basic quantitative information. The format is not intended to store the complete experimental evidence but provides mechanisms to report results at different levels of detail. These range from a simple summary of the final results to a representation of the results including the experimental design. This format is ideally suited to make MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results available to a wider biological community outside the field of MS. Several software tools for proteomics and metabolomics have already adapted the format as an output format. The comprehensive mzTab specification document and extensive additional documentation can be found online. PMID:24980485

  13. Interstratified arkosic and volcanic rocks of the Miocene Spanish Canyon Formation, Alvord Mountain area, California: descriptions and interpretations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buesch, David C.

    2014-01-01

    The Spanish Canyon Foundation in the Alvord Mountain area, California, varies from about 50 to 120 m thick and records the interstratification of arkosic sandstone and conglomerate with tuffaceous deposits and lava flows. In the lower third of the formation, arkosic sandstone and conglomerate are interstratified with tuffaceous deposits. Some tuffs might have been deposited as primary, nonwelded to partially welded ignimbrites or fallout tephra. Many of the tuffaceous deposits represent redeposited material that formed tuffaceous sandstone, and many of these deposits contain arkosic grains that represent mixing of different source matieral. Arkosic sandstone, and especially conglomerate (some with maximum clast lengths up to 1 m), represent intermittent incursions of coarser plutoniclastic fan deposits into other finer grained and mostly volcaniclastic basin deposits. After deposition of the 18.78 Ma Peach Spring Tuff, the amount of tuffaceous material decreased. The upper two-thirds of the formation has arkosic sandstone and conglomerate interstratified with two olivine basalt lave flows. locally, conglomerate clasts in this part of the section have maximum lengths up to 1 m. Many tuffaceous and arkosic sandstone beds of the Spanish Canyon Formation have tabular to broad (low-relief) lenticular geometry, and locally, some arkosic conglomerate fills channels as much as 1.5 m deep. These bedforms are consistent with deposition in medial to distal alluvial-fan or fluvial environments; some finer-grained deposits might have formed in lacustrine environments.

  14. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a “small plain, big front” character. PMID:26075611

  15. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character. PMID:26075611

  16. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  17. Structure Formation in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabrier, Gilles

    2009-01-01

    Part I. Physical Processes and Numerical Methods Common to Structure Formations in Astrophysics: 1. The physics of turbulence E. Levêque; 2. The numerical simulation of turbulence W. Schmidt; 3. Numerical methods for radiation magnetohydrodynamics in astrophysics R. Klein and J. Stone; 4. The role of jets in the formation of planets, stars, and galaxies R. Banerjee, R. Pudritz and R. Ouyed; 5. Advanced numerical methods in astrophysical fluid dynamics A. Hujeirat and F. Heitsch; Part II. Structure and Star Formation in the Primordial Universe: 6. New frontiers in cosmology and galaxy formation challenges for the future R. Ellis and J. Silk; 7. Galaxy formation physics T. Abel, G. Bryan and R. Teyssier; 8. First stars formation, evolution, feedback effects V. Bromm, A. Ferrara and A. Heger; Part III. Contemporary Star and Brown Dwarf Formation: a) Cloud Formation and Fragmentation: 9. Diffuse interstellar medium and the formation of molecular clouds P. Hennebelle, M. Mac Low and E. Vazquez-Semadeni; 10. The formation of distributed and clustered stars in molecular clouds T. Megeath, Z. -Y. Li and A. Nordlund; b) Core Fragmentation and Star Formation: 11. The formation and evolution of prestellar cores P. André, S. Basu and S. Inutsuka; 12. Models for the formation of massive stars; Part IV. Protoplanetary Disks and Planet Formation M. Krumholz and I. Bonnell: 13. Observational properties of disks and young stellar objects G. Duchêne, F. Ménard, J. Muzzerolle and S. Mohanty; 14. Structure and dynamics of protoplanetary disks C. Dullemond, R. Durisen and J. Papaloizou; 15. Planet formation and evolution theory and observation Y. Alibert, I. Baraffe, W. Benz, G. Laughlin and S. Udry; 16. Planet formation assembling the puzzle G. Wurm and T. Guillot; Part V. Summary: 17. Open issues in small- and large-scale structure formation R. Klessen and M. Mac Low; 18. Final word E. Salpeter.

  18. Scenarios for galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    The gravitational instability theory and its application to the origin of large scale structure are reviewed. The modeling of galaxy formation is described, from forwards and backwards perspectives. The emphasis is on the interactions between stellar and galactic formation.

  19. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  20. The formation of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Efstathiou, G.; Silk, J.

    1983-01-01

    Current models of galaxy formation are examined in a review of recent observational and theoretical studies. Observational data on elliptical galaxies, disk galaxies, luminosity functions, clustering, and angular fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background are summarized. Theoretical aspects discussed include the origin and early evolution of small fluctuations, matter and radiation fluctuations, the formation of large-scale structure, dissipationless galaxy formation, galaxy mergers, dissipational galaxy formation, and the implications of particle physics (GUTs, massive neutrinos, and gravitinos) for cosmology.

  1. Portable Executable File Format

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abhishek Singh

    PE stands for 'portable executable' file format. As the name suggests, the format can be portable across all the 32-bit operating\\u000a system and can be executed on any version of windows. The format is also being used by 32-bit dlls and Windows NT device derivers.\\u000a The WINNT.H header file defines the structure definition representation for the PE file format.\\u000a \\u000a Understanding

  2. BOREAS TF-9 SSA-OBS Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Massheder, Jonathan M.; Moncrieff, John B.; Rayment, Mark B.; Jarvis, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-9 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site during the growing season of 1994 and most of the year for 1996. From the winter of 1995 to 1996, soil temperature data were also collected and provided. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  3. BOREAS TF-6 SSA-YA Surface Energy Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessemoulin, Pierre; Puech, Dominique; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-6 team collected surface energy flux and meteorology data at the SSA-YA site. The data characterize the energy flux and meteorological conditions at the site from 18-Jul to 20-Sep-1994. The data set does not contain any trace gas exchange measurements. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  4. BOREAS TF-5 SSA-OJP Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Vogel, Christoph; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-5) team collected tower flux data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) site through the growing season of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  5. BOREAS RSS-2 Extracted Reflectance Factors Derived from ASAS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team derived atmospherically corrected bidirectional reflectance factor means from multispectral, multiangle ASAS imagery for small homogeneous areas near several BOREAS sites. The ASAS imagery was acquired from the C-130 aircraft platform in 1994 and 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  6. BOREAS TGB-1/TGB-3 CH4 Chamber Flux Data over the NSA Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubier, Jill L.; Moore, Tim R.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-3 team collected methane (CH4) chamber flux measurements at the NSA fen site during May-September 1994 and June-October 1996. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  7. BOREAS TF-8 NSA-OJP Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-8 team collected energy, CO2, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS NSA-OJP site during the growing season of 1994 and most of the year for 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  8. BOREAS TGB-10 Volatile Organic Carbon Data over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westberg, Hal; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Brad; Jackson, Andrea V.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-10 team collected several trace gas data sets in its efforts to determine the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions with respect to boreal forest carbon cycles. This data set contains measured VOC concentrations. These data were obtained at the SSA-OJP site from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  9. BOREAS TF-7 SSA-OBS Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Pattey, Elizabeth; Desjardins, Raymond L.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-7 team collected meteorological data as well as energy, carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide flux data at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site. The data were collected from 24-May to 19-Sep-1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  10. Tabular data boundary-state analysis of the Edwards cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. L. Ecker; T. C. Edwards; K. Jr. Wark

    1978-01-01

    A simplified analytical method was developed for determining the theoretical ideal performance of the Edwards cycle employing only tabulated boundary-state thermodynamic property data. The ideal Edwards cycle employs a multi-component\\/mixed-phase refrigerant which undergoes two heat transfer processes and isentropic compression and expansion processes. This cycle has been previously analyzed through the application of a polytropic model for the compression and

  11. A new numerical solution to traditional phytosociological tabular classification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Otto Wildi

    1989-01-01

    Often, manually and numerically derived phytosociological classifications yield different results. Hitherto, a twostep procedure has been suggested in which numerical analysis of the data is followed by the revision of the resulting table (c.f. van der Maarel 1982). In this paper a new methodology is presented which makes manual refinements superfluous. Objectives are derived from phytosociological paradigms and conclusions drawn

  12. A heuristic block coordinate descent approach for controlled tabular ...

    E-print Network

    2010-11-05

    with the standard BCD method. Partitioning the binary ..... 1560. 41314. 40560. 973. 5452 table 12. 21476. 2062. 1684. 43784. 42952. 2062. 9932 ..... propositional satisfiability, IEEE Transactions on Computers 48, 506–521. [25] Plazas, M.A. ...

  13. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gary A. Dilts

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flows require an equation of\\u000astate (EOS) to relate the thermodynamic variables of density, internal energy,\\u000atemperature, and pressure. A valid EOS must satisfy the thermodynamic\\u000aconditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability\\u000a(positive sound speed squared). When phase transitions are significant, the EOS\\u000ais complicated and can only be specified in

  14. MHD simulations of MTF implosions with tabular EOS and conductivities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. J. Faehl; W. L. Atchison; I. R. Lindemuth

    2003-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a pulsed approach that compresses magnetized fuel to achieving burning hydrogen plasma conditions. The compression in one MTF-scenario comes from uses a conducting liner that is imploded due to the action of high electrical currents that flow on the outer surface of the liner. This implosion compresses and heats a dense, warm magnetized deuterium or

  15. Analyzing Tabular Requirements Specifications Using Infinite State Model Checking

    E-print Network

    techniques for finite state systems, especially in techniques based on model check- ing [8]. In hardware and events. A condition is a predicate defined on a system state. A basic event, denoted @T(c), indicates Univ. of California, Santa Barbara Constance Heitmeyer2 Naval Research Laboratory Abstract This paper

  16. Developments in western Canada in 1979. [Tabular data and maps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hay

    1980-01-01

    In 1979, another all-time drilling record was set in Western Canada, with 7387 wells being drilled, an increase of 7% over 1978. Exploratory drilling decreased slightly to 2884 wells, down 5%, but development drilling reached record numbers, with 4503 wells, up 17% from 1978. The exploratory success rate was significantly higher at 63% in 1979, based on 713 oil discoveries

  17. Developments in western Canada in 1979. [Tabular data and maps

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, P.W.

    1980-09-01

    In 1979, another all-time drilling record was set in Western Canada, with 7387 wells being drilled, an increase of 7% over 1978. Exploratory drilling decreased slightly to 2884 wells, down 5%, but development drilling reached record numbers, with 4503 wells, up 17% from 1978. The exploratory success rate was significantly higher at 63% in 1979, based on 713 oil discoveries and 1101 gas discoveries. The development success rate stayed constant at 88%, from 1597 oil discoveries and 2349 gas discoveries. Records were set in average well depths and average land prices paid in Alberta and British Columbia. The most significant event in petroleum exploration in Western Canada for many years was the massive Kopanoar oil discovery in the Beaufort Sea, with estimated flow rates of 1900 cu m/d (12,000 b/d) of 28/sup 0/ sweet crude. A major Arctic Island gas discovery was also made in the Whitefish well near Drake Point. Alberta activity shifted into the deeper Alberta basin and foothills, with oil and gas discoveries south of Calgary at Claresholm, gas discoveries in the central foothills at Erith-Hanlan, Blackstone, and Brown Creek, and oil discoveries farther north in the deep-basin area at Wembley and Beaverlodge. A record $28.2 million bonus (or $8,400/ha) was paid for a single license in the Beaverlodge Triassic oil play by Esso and Pan-Canadian. Deep-basin development drilling in the tight Cretaceous sandstones continued in the Cutbank oil play and Elmworth gas trend, with emphasis on the westward extension of Elmworth into British Columbia. In eastern Alberta, shallow gas exploration is proceeding strongly at Suffield and Primrose Lake. Major British Columbia gas strikes were made in the southwest corner of the explored area at Sukunka and Monias. In southeast Saskatchewan, a Mississippian oil strike was made at Tatagwa.

  18. When Efficient Star Formation Drives Cluster Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Parmentier; U. Fritze

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the star-formation efficiency (SFE) in cluster-forming cores (i.e., local SFE) on the evolution of mass in star clusters (SCs) over the age range 1-100 Myr, when SCs undergo their infant weight-loss\\/mortality phase. Our model builds on the N-body simulation grid of Baumgardt & Kroupa. Assuming a constant formation rate of gas-embedded clusters and a weak

  19. Globular Cluster Formation

    E-print Network

    Keith M. Ashman

    2002-10-27

    The discovery of young globular clusters in merging galaxies and other environments provides an opportunity to study directly the process of globular cluster formation. Empirically it appears that globular cluster formation occurs preferentially in regions in which star formation occurs at a high rate and efficiency. Further, the interstellar medium in such regions is likely to be at a higher pressure than less active star-forming environments. An additional observational clue to the globular cluster formation process is that young globular clusters have little or no mass-radius relationship. In this paper I argue that high pressure and high star-formation efficiency are responsible for current globular cluster formation. I suggest that the precursors to globular clusters are molecular clouds and that the mass-radius relationship exhibited by such clouds is wiped out by a variable star formation efficiency.

  20. IDL Week 2: What we'll cover today

    E-print Network

    . To close a file: free_lun, lun #12;ASCII text: Pros and Cons Human readable Universal common format Can Subject to formatting errors #12;Reading in a free-format file Free-format ASCII files use whitespace readf an array subscript, the array will not be modified! #12;Free-format rules Rule #1: If reading

  1. Data format translation routines

    SciTech Connect

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base.

  2. Flash Open File Format

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Macromedia has released the file format specification for its Flash (discussed in the April 11, 1997 Scout Report) multimedia web tool. Flash allows web developers to create vector based graphics and animation. By making the format (.swf) available, Macromedia hopes to establish it as a standard for vector graphics and animation. The company claims it will "submit the format specification to a recognized Internet standards organization." In addition to providing the file format specification, the site provides Flash related news releases, a Flash FAQ, and a vector graphics white paper.

  3. layout formats sectioneight

    E-print Network

    Derisi, Joseph

    layout formats 69 sectioneight contents about the grid..........................................................................................................70 layout and the grid POSSIBLE SUB-HEAD POSITION UCSF basic brochure layout structure University of California San Francisco

  4. When efficient star formation drives cluster formation

    E-print Network

    G. Parmentier; U. Fritze

    2008-09-14

    We investigate the impact of the star formation efficiency in cluster forming cores on the evolution of the mass in star clusters over the age range 1-100Myr, when star clusters undergo their infant weight-loss/mortality phase. Assuming a constant formation rate of gas-embedded clusters and a weak tidal field, we show that the ratio between the total mass in stars bound to the clusters over that age range and the total mass in stars initially formed in gas-embedded clusters is a strongly increasing function of the averaged local SFE, with little influence from any assumed core mass-radius relation. Our results suggest that, for young starbursts with estimated tidal field strength and known recent star formation history, observed cluster-to-star mass ratios, once corrected for the undetected clusters, constitute promising probes of the local SFE, without the need of resorting to gas mass estimates. Similarly, the mass ratio of stars which remain in bound clusters at the end of the infant mortality/weight-loss phase depends sensitively on the mean local SFE, although the impacts of the width of the SFE distribution function and of the core mass-radius relation require more careful assessment in this case. Following the recent finding by Bastian (2008) that galaxies form, on the average, 8% of their stars in bound clusters regardless of their star formation rate, we raise the hypothesis that star formation in the present-day Universe is characterized by a near-universal distribution for the local SFE. A related potential application of our model consists in tracing the evolution of the local SFE over cosmological lookback times by comparing the age distribution of the total mass in star clusters to that in field stars. We describe model aspects which are still to be worked out before achieving this goal.

  5. Star formation Simon Goodwin

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Star formation Simon Goodwin Dept Physics & Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH, UK. s.goodwin@sheffield.ac.uk 1 Abstract Stars are one of the most important consituents of the Universe, and understanding their formation is crucial to many areas of astrophysics. Stars form from dense

  6. TRIHALOMETHANE REMOVAL AND FORMATION

    E-print Network

    District of Columbia, University of the

    --------------------------------------------------- 53 iii #12;Introduction Drinking water is chlorinated to inactivate the bacteria in order to prevent in water to give rise to haloform reactions and produce THMs. The organics that lead to the formation#12;TRIHALOMETHANE REMOVAL AND FORMATION MECHANISM IN WATER R.C. Chawla, M. M. Varma, A. BaIram, M

  7. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  8. Factors Affecting Clay Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isaac Barshad

    1957-01-01

    Barshad's method of calculating clay formation from the chemical analyses of the whole soil, the clay fraction, the nonclay fraction, and the mechanical analysis was applied to a large number of soils to determine the effect of climate, topography, parent material, vegetation and time on al~ount of clay formation. The amount of clay formed from )00 g of the nonclay

  9. Star Formation Ralf Klessen

    E-print Network

    Klessen,Ralf

    need to explain dynamic star formation theory gravity vs. turbulence (and all the rest) examples, green radio: blue Star formation in interacting galaxies: (from the Chandra Webpage) #12;(HST. The Trapezium cluster is only visible in the IR and contains about 2000 newly born stars. Orion molecular cloud

  10. Delayed ettringite formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. F. W Taylor; C Famy; K. L Scrivener

    2001-01-01

    Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) can damage concrete that has experienced a temperature above about 70°C. Claims that slow release of sulfate from the clinker can have a similar effect in concrete not thus heated are unsupported. Chemical and microstructural aspects of DEF are reviewed. Expansion results from formation of ettringite crystals of submicrometre size in the paste, the larger crystals

  11. International Exchange Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkinson, Alan

    This paper focuses on the establishment of three standard international formats for the exchange of bibliographic data--UNIMARC, CCF, and the UNISIST Reference Manual--and outlines their common and differing features. The development of the UNIMARC manual as the standard international MARC network exchange format is traced, and its salient…

  12. Star Formation Thresholds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaye, Joop

    2008-05-01

    To make predictions for the existence of “dark galaxies”, it is necessary to understand what determines whether a gas cloud will form stars. Star formation thresholds are generally explained in terms of the Toomre criterion for gravitational instability. I contrast this theory with the thermo-gravitational instability hypothesis of Schaye (2004), in which star formation is triggered by the formation of a cold gas phase and which predicts a nearly constant surface density threshold. I argue that although the Toomre analysis is useful for the global stability of disc galaxies, it relies on assumptions that break down in the outer regions, where star formation thresholds are observed. The thermo-gravitational instability hypothesis can account for a number of observed phenomena, some of which were thought to be unrelated to star formation thresholds.

  13. Formate production through biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Alissandratos, Apostolos; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Easton, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    The generation of formate from CO2 provides a method for sequestration of this greenhouse gas as well as the production of a valuable commodity chemical and stabilized form of hydrogen fuel. Formate dehydrogenases are enzymes with the potential to catalyze this reaction; however they generally favor the reverse process, i.e., formate oxidation. By contrast, the formate dehydrogenase of the acetogen Clostridium carboxidivorans has been found to preferentially catalyze the reduction of CO2. This is in accord with its natural role to introduce CO2 as a carbon source in the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. The direction of catalysis derives from the enzyme’s low affinity for formate. This enzyme is therefore an excellent candidate for biotechnological applications aimed at producing formic acid and derivative chemicals from CO2. PMID:23841981

  14. NATIONAL SURFACE WATER SURVEY: EASTERN LAKE SURVEY, PHASE 1 (ELS-1), 1984 (ASCII TAPE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I (ELS-I), conducted in the fall of 1984, was the first part of a long-term effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency known as the National Surface Water Survey. It was designed to synoptically quantify the surface water quality of the Unite...

  15. When efficient star formation drives cluster formation

    E-print Network

    Parmentier, G

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the star formation efficiency in cluster forming cores on the evolution of the mass in star clusters over the age range 1-100Myr, when star clusters undergo their infant weight-loss/mortality phase. Assuming a constant formation rate of gas-embedded clusters and a weak tidal field, we show that the ratio between the total mass in stars bound to the clusters over that age range and the total mass in stars initially formed in gas-embedded clusters is a strongly increasing function of the averaged local SFE, with little influence from any assumed core mass-radius relation. Our results suggest that, for young starbursts with estimated tidal field strength and known recent star formation history, observed cluster-to-star mass ratios, once corrected for the undetected clusters, constitute promising probes of the local SFE, without the need of resorting to gas mass estimates. Similarly, the mass ratio of stars which remain in bound clusters at the end of the infant mortality/weight-loss ...

  16. Urethral seam formation and hypospadias

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laurence S. Baskin; Ali Erol; Priya Jegatheesan; Yingwu Li; Wenhui Liu; Gerald R. Cunha

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation of the normal male urethra may elucidate the etiology of hypospadias. We describe urethral formation in the mouse, show the similarities and relevance to human urethral development, and introduce the concept of the epithelial seam formation and remodeling during urethral formation. Three mechanisms may account for epithelial seam formation: (1) epithelial-mesenchymal transformation similar to that described

  17. Formation of Hurricanes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Amber Morgan

    2012-08-10

    This is a picture inquiry based lesson for students to explore the formation of hurricanes. Groups of three students will observe and explain trends found in a picture and share ideas with their peers.

  18. Essays on Network Formation 

    E-print Network

    Mueller, William Graham

    2012-10-19

    This dissertation contains two essays which examine the roles that individual incentives, competition, and information play in network formation. In the first essay, I examine a model in which two competing groups offer ...

  19. Vascular Lumen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell–cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved. PMID:22474612

  20. Studies on shell formation. VIII. Electron microscopy of crystal growth of the nacreous layer of the oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    WATABE, N; SHARP, D G; WILBUR, K M

    1958-05-25

    Electron microscope observations have been made by means of the replica method on growth processes of calcite crystals of the nacreous layer of the shell of the oyster, Crassostrea virginica. Layer formation is initiated by the secretion of a conchiolin matrix and the deposition of rounded crystal seeds on or in this material. In some areas crystal seeds are elongate and within a given area show a similar orientation, probably due to slower deposition. The seeds appear to increase in size by dendritic growth, and smaller seeds become incorporated into larger ones which come into contact to form a single layer. With further growth, crystals overlap, forming a step-like arrangement. The direction of growth is frequently different in neighboring regions. Crystal seeds deposited on crystal surfaces are usually elongate and oriented. Well developed crystals have a tabular idiomorphic form and are parallel in their growth. Rounded and irregular crystals were also observed. The crystals show reticular structure with units of the order of 100 A and striations corresponding with the rhombohedral axes of the crystals. The role of the mantle is discussed in relation to the growth patterns of crystals and shell structure. PMID:13549499

  1. Formation of tectonic peperites from alkaline magmas intruded into wet sediments in the Beiya area, western Yunnan, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.-W.; Cai, X.-P.; Zhong, J.-Y.; Song, B.-C.; Peters, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tertiary (3.78 Ma to 3.65 Ma) biotite-K-feldspar porphyritic bodies intrude Tertiary, poorly consolidated lacustrine sedimentary rocks in the Beiya mineral district in southwestern China. The intrusives are characterized by a microcrystalline and vitreous-cryptocrystalline groundmass, by replacement of some tabular K-feldspar phenocrysts with microcrystalline chlorite and calcite, and by Fe-rich rings surrounding biotite phenocrysts. Peculiar structures, such as contemporary contact faults and slickensides, ductile shear zones and flow folds, foliation and lineations, tension fractures, and banded and boudin peperites, are developed along the contact zones of the intrusives. These features are related to the forceful intrusion of the alkaline magmas into the wet Tertiary sediments. The partially consolidated magmas were deformed and flattened by continued forceful magma intrusion that produced boudinaged and banded peperites. These peperites characterized by containing oriented deformation fabrics are classified as tectonic peperites as a new type of peperite, and formation of these tectonic peperites was related to fracturing of magmas caused by forceful intrusion and shear deformation and to contemporary migration and injection of fluidized sediments along fractures that dismembered the porphyritic magma. Emplacement of the magma into the wet sediments in the Beiya area is interpreted to be related to a large pressure difference rather than to the buoyancy force. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Variations in fluvial style in Westwater Canyon member, Morrison Formation (Jurassic), southern San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C.E.

    1988-02-01

    The large-scale architecture of fluvial strata within the Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation consists mainly of a series of tabular sheets of sandstone 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide separated by thin fine-grained units. These sandstone sheets are commonly flat bedded; however, lateral accretion surfaces and channels 10-20 m deep and up to at least 250 m wide are also present. Where studied in detail, the sheets comprise a complex of elements and bounding surfaces unlike any previously described from ancient fluvial deposits. Lateral accretion deposits, typical indicators of moderate to high-sinuosity channels, coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted foreset macroform deposits now thought to be typical of the sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins have been mapped by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces in several of the outcrops. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to earlier descriptions. Analogies with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganga and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, although convincing evidence now exists for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs from those modern rivers and previous interpretations.

  3. Formation of tectonic peperites from alkaline magmas intruded into wet sediments in the Beiya area, western Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xing-Wang; Cai, Xin-Ping; Zhong, Jia-You; Song, Bao-Chang; Peters, Stephen G.

    2007-08-01

    Tertiary (3.78 Ma to 3.65 Ma) biotite-K-feldspar porphyritic bodies intrude Tertiary, poorly consolidated lacustrine sedimentary rocks in the Beiya mineral district in southwestern China. The intrusives are characterized by a microcrystalline and vitreous-cryptocrystalline groundmass, by replacement of some tabular K-feldspar phenocrysts with microcrystalline chlorite and calcite, and by Fe-rich rings surrounding biotite phenocrysts. Peculiar structures, such as contemporary contact faults and slickensides, ductile shear zones and flow folds, foliation and lineations, tension fractures, and banded and boudin peperites, are developed along the contact zones of the intrusives. These features are related to the forceful intrusion of the alkaline magmas into the wet Tertiary sediments. The partially consolidated magmas were deformed and flattened by continued forceful magma intrusion that produced boudinaged and banded peperites. These peperites characterized by containing oriented deformation fabrics are classified as tectonic peperites as a new type of peperite, and formation of these tectonic peperites was related to fracturing of magmas caused by forceful intrusion and shear deformation and to contemporary migration and injection of fluidized sediments along fractures that dismembered the porphyritic magma. Emplacement of the magma into the wet sediments in the Beiya area is interpreted to be related to a large pressure difference rather than to the buoyancy force.

  4. An Upper Turonian fine-grained shallow marine stromatolite bed from the Muñecas Formation, Northern Iberian Ranges, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, M.; Sánchez, F.; Walliser, E. O.; Reitner, J.

    2012-07-01

    A fine-grained stromatolite bed, laterally continuous on the kilometer scale and with small synoptic relief, crops out in the Muñecas Formation in the Northern Iberian Ranges. The Muñecas Fm. was deposited during the late Turonian on a shallow water platform in the Upper Cretaceous intracratonic Iberian basin. The stromatolite bed has a tabular to domed biostromal macrostructure. Its internal mesostructure consists of planar, wavy to hemispherical stromatoids that display a broad spectrum of microstructures, including dense micrite, bahamite peloids, peloidal to clotted microfabrics, irregular micritic-wall tubes, which are suggestive of algae and filamentous microframeworks, which are suggestive of filamentous cyanobacteria. Various stromatolite growth stages have been linked to the dominance of different accretion processes. The accretion of the entire fine-grained stromatolite involves a complex mosaic of processes: trapping and binding of quartz-silt grains and bahamites, which form the agglutinated parts of some laminae, and microbially induced precipitation, which forms spongiostromic and micritic laminae. Tubiform and filamentous microframeworks resembling porostromatate or skeletal stromatolitic growth were also recognized. Laser ICP-MS measurements of Al, Si, Mg, Mn, Sr, S and Fe were analyzed to detect the influence of siliciclastic inputs and major trends during stromatolite accretion. Carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions from the stromatolite and associated facies were used to identify possible microbial signatures. These data describes a unique and well-preserved example of a shallow marine Upper Turonian fine-grained stromatolite.

  5. Field-based description of rhyolite lava flows of the Calico Hills Formation, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.

    2015-01-01

    In the area south of the Rainier Mesa caldera, surface and subsurface geologic data are combined to interpret the overall thickness of the Calico Hills Formation and the proportion of lava flow lithology across the study area. The formation is at least 500 meters (m) thick and contains the greatest proportion of rhyolite lava flow to the northeast of Yucca Mountain in the lower part of Fortymile Canyon. The formation thins to the south and southwest where it is between 50 and 200 m thick beneath Yucca Mountain and contains no rhyolite lavas. Geologic mapping and field-based correlation of individual lava flows allow for the interpretation of the thickness and extent of specific flows and the location of their source areas. The most extensive flows have widths from 2 to 3 kilometers (km) and lengths of at least 5–6 km. Lava flow thickness varies from 150 to 250 m above interpreted source vents to between 30 and 80 m in more distal locations. Rhyolite lavas have length-to-height ratios of 10:1 or greater and, in one instance, a length-to-width ratio of 2:1 or greater, implying a tongue-shaped geometry instead of circular domes or tabular bodies. Although geologic mapping did not identify any physical feature that could be positively identified as a vent, lava flow thickness and the size of clasts in subjacent pyroclastic deposits suggest that primary vent areas for at least some of the flows in the study area are on the east side of Fortymile Canyon, to the northeast of Yucca Mountain.

  6. Constraints on Exomoon Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Miki; Genda, Hidenori; Asphaug, Erik; Ida, Shigeru

    2014-11-01

    It has been widely accepted that the Earth’s moon formed by a giant impact during the late stage of the planetary formation process. The giant impact led to the formation of a debris disk around the Earth from which the Moon accreted. This type of satellite formation is considered to be common not only in the solar system (e.g., the Pluto-Charon system) but also in extrasolar systems (e.g. Ogihara & Ida 2009). However, no detailed research has been conducted on impact-induced exomoon formation. Wada et al. (2006) suggest that a vapor-rich disk is dynamically unstable and that it may not be suitable for moon formation. If this is the case, the mass and composition of a planet may affect the satellite formation process. Here, we show results from giant impact simulations of planets with various masses and compositions. We use the model suggested by Nakajima & Stevenson (2014) to estimate the vapor mass fractions of the disks. We find that the more massive and the more ice-rich the planet is, the higher the vapor mass fraction of the disk becomes. This indicates there is an upper limit of the planetary mass to form an impact-induced moon and the limit depends on the planetary composition. This upper limit is a few Earth masses for a rocky planet, and about an Earth mass for an icy planet. These results are consistent with the models that Earth’s and Pluto’s satellites formed by impacts. Although no exomoon has been detected yet, our model may be used to predict whether an observed terrestrial exoplanet could potentially have one or multiple impact-induced exomoons.

  7. Wotsit's File Format Collection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Wotsit's File Format Collection, provided by Paul Oliver, features a very large number of file formats. These include JPEG image files, wave sound files, Rich Text files, and common database and word-processing files such as Paradox and Wordperfect. Documents collected or linked at the site are primarily either original specifications from the creator or an improved version of the original. All of the specifications are very technical and are directed towards programmers. Users can subscribe to a mailing list for notification of site updates.

  8. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Institut fuer Mathematische Physik, Mendelssohnstrasse. 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Giedke, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Institut fuer Quantenelektronik, ETH Zuerich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 16, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F. [Institut fuer Mathematische Physik, Mendelssohnstrasse. 3, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Cirac, J.I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, Garching, D-85748 (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  9. Formation of Galactic Disks

    E-print Network

    S. Michael Fall

    2002-03-27

    We review progress in understanding the formation of galactic disks in the standard cosmogonic scenario involving gravitational clustering of baryons and dark matter and dissipative collapse of the baryons. This scenario accounts remarkably well for the observed properties of galactic disks if they have retained most of the specific angular momentum they acquired by tidal torques. Early simulations, which included cooling of the gas but not star formation and the associated feedback, indicated instead that most of the angular momentum of the baryons would be transferred to the dark matter. Recent simulations indicate that this angular-momentum problem can be solved partially, and in some cases entirely, by feedback and other effects.

  10. Cave Formation: Kane Cave

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This video documents an experiment conducted in Kane Cave, Wyoming, to see if microbes that inhabit the cave could actually be contributing to the cave-formation process. Adapted from a NOVA broadcast, the segment is four minutes and twelve seconds in length.

  11. Formation-flying interferometry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver P. Lay; Gary H. Blackwood

    2003-01-01

    There are many advantages to space-based interferometry, but monolithic, single-spacecraft platforms set limits on the collecting area and baseline length. These constraints can be overcome by distributing the optical elements of the interferometer over a system of multiple spacecraft flying in precise formation, opening up new realms of angular resolution and sensitivity. While the principles of interferometry are the same

  12. Peculiar Ice Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Wright

    1906-01-01

    As the question of earth-bearing ice-pillars has been recently raised in your columns (pp. 464, 485), there are one or two points to which I should like to direct attention, as they may be of interest to your readers. While working in company with a colleague on Divis Mountain, Belfast, in 1902, our attention was attracted by the peculiar formation

  13. Wound-Periderm Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Idit Ginzberg

    Herbivores, and particularly chewing insects, cause substantial damage to the plant. In addition to lost tissue, there are great concerns of pathogen invasion and water loss at the site of the attack. One of the plant’s defense strategies is the formation of wound periderm at the boundaries of the invaded or damaged region to isolate it from non-wounded healthy tissue.

  14. Revision lecture Exam format

    E-print Network

    Alechina, Natasha

    1 Revision lecture · Exam format · Some topics: time and space complexity, big-O, hash tables choice, covers the whole course). · The other three out of five are up to you. Multiple choice · Multiple[i/2]; arr1[i+1] = arr[i/2]; } return arr1; } s(n) = 2nc + c Big O · Big O notation is used to classify

  15. Revision lecture Exam format

    E-print Network

    Alechina, Natasha

    1 Revision lecture · Exam format · Some topics: time and space complexity, big-O, hash tables course). · The other three out of five are up to you. Multiple choice · Multiple choice]; arr2[i+1] = arr[i/2]; } return arr1; } s(n) = 2nc + c Big O · Big O notation is used to classify time

  16. Revision lecture Exam format

    E-print Network

    Alechina, Natasha

    1 Revision lecture · Exam format · Some topics: time and space complexity, big-O, hash tables of five are up to you. Multiple choice · Multiple choice is straightforward `select one correct option]; } return arr1; } s(n) = 2nc + c Big O · Big O notation is used to classify time/space growth functions

  17. Formation of Freirian Facilitators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Phyllis

    This paper is written for people who are already familiar with the philosophy and methodology of Paulo Freire's liberatory education and are interested in creating a formation program for adult education facilitators using his ideas. The author describes the paper as "a collection of thoughts, of things to consider," when organizing such a…

  18. FORMATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to develop a better understanding of smog aerosol formation with particular reference to haze in the Southern California area. This study combined laboratory work with ambient air studies. Counting of particles by light scattering was the principle physical tech...

  19. Controls on synchronous ephemeral- and perennial-river sedimentation in the middle sandstone member of the Triassic Chinle Formation, northeastern New Mexico, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deluca, J. L.; Eriksson, K. A.

    1989-02-01

    The middle sandstone member of the upper Triassic Chinle Formation in northeastern New Mexico consists of ephemeral-river deposits along the Front Range adjacent to the Ancestral Rocky Mountains and perennial braided-river deposits on the Plains to the east. The two fluvial systems were synchronous; the ephemeral rivers existed as transverse tributaries to a perennial trunk system that flowed from south to north. Proximal ephemeral-stream deposits are characterized by 60-80 m thick sequences of coarse-grained, siliciclastic sediments deposited principally by overbank sheetflooding. Facies associations are dominated by sandstone with horizontal stratification and subordinate sets of tabular-tangential and trough cross-stratification. Incised streamflood deposits are represented by channeled conglomerates and single-story, massive and trough cross-stratified sandstones. Distal ephemeral-stream deposits are distinguished by their lenticular geometries, thicknesses of 20-30 m, and sedimentary structures indicative mainly of lower-flow-regime stream flooding. Channeled conglomerates and trough cross-stratified and parallel-stratified sandstones are capped by trough cross-laminated and subordinate horizontally stratified sandstones. Facies associations in the deposits of the trunk system are comparable to those of the Platte and South Saskatchewan braided rivers. Sets and cosets of tabular-tangential or trough cross-stratified conglomerate and sandstone are separated by variable thicknesses of horizontally stratidied sandstone. These facies dominate 10-30 m thick, sheet-like, siliciclastic bodies that are traceable laterally for tens of kilometers and are separated by comparable or lesser thicknesses of red mudstone. Both extrabasinal (allocyclic) and intrabasinal (autocyclic) controls influenced sandstone body geometries in the middle Chinle Formation. Uplift and subsidence determined the position of base level that, in turn, determined the nature of autocyclic processes. Adjacent to the Ancestral Rocky Mountains, sediment yield was great resulting in accumulation of sheetflood deposits above base level, thereby promoting local incision. Under these conditions and with a continuously rising base level, lenticular, coarse-grained sediment body geometries were produced along the Front Range. On the Plains, sediment yield was moderate and subsidence rates were slow. Bedload sediment accumulated to, but not above base level, thereby promoting avulsion and the development of thin, sheet-like coarse-grained sediment bodies. The contrast between the two coexisting fluvial sedimentation styles is attributed to differences in runoff. Adjacent to the Ancestral Rocky Mountains, seasonal rainfall resulted in ephemeral flow, whereas on the Plains, flow was perennial due to groundwater discharge from the highlands to the west.

  20. Sedimentology and lithofacies of the Eocene Skookumchuk Formation in the Centralia coal mine, southwest Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, R.M.; Johnson, S.Y. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-04-01

    The late middle to late Eocene Skookumchuck Formation is well exposed in highwalls of the Centralia mine, southwest Washington. Three coal zones and intervening sandstone-rich successions occur in a 220-m-thick interval that extends from below the Smith to above the Tono No. 1 coal beds. The Smith-Big Dirty, Lower-Upper Thompson, and Tono No.`s. 1-2 coal zones contain coal beds that range from 0.5 to 15 m thick. The coal beds are interbedded with coarsening-upward units of mudstone, siltstone, and sandstone that are burrowed, flaser-and lenticular-bedded, mud-draped in their lower part, and rippled, wavy bedded, and tabular crossbedded (with reactivation surfaces) in their upper part. These coarsening-upward units are commonly overlain erosionally by fining-upward beds of trough-crossbedded, rippled, burrowed, and rooted sandstones. Coal formed in low-lying peat mires above mean high tide levels. Two discrete facies occur in the sandstone-rich successions between the coal zones. The first facies consists of very fine to coarse grained sandstones that have sharply defined bases and tops and are heavily bioturbated, horizontally bedded, trough crossbedded, hummocky bedded, and rippled. The second facies of the sandstone-rich successions consists of sandstone, siltstone, and mudstone beds with common ripple lamination, lenticular and flaser bedding, trough crossbedding, biotrubation, bivalve fossils, and root marks. Upward thinning of coal beds is consistent with deposition during a major transgression. These coals formed in mires of the tidally influenced coastal plain in the Centralia mine area, in contrast to coals elsewhere in Washington that accumulated in mires of the fluvial- and distributary-channel-influenced coastal plain. The Northcraft volcanic center to the east probably deflected fluvial drainages of the coastal plain to the north and south.

  1. Pattern formation during vasculogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Czirok, Andras; Little, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Vasculogenesis, the assembly of the first vascular network, is an intriguing developmental process that yields the first functional organ system of the embryo. In addition to being a fundamental part of embryonic development, vasculogenic processes also have medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how morphogenesis of tissue level structures can be controlled through cell behavior patterns that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes. Mathematical analyses and computer simulations can help conceptualize how to bridge organizational levels and thus help in evaluating hypotheses regarding the formation of vascular networks. Here we discuss the ideas that have been proposed to explain the formation of the first vascular pattern: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. PMID:22692888

  2. Energetics of chondrule formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    Meteorite chondrules apparently were formed as a result of localized, transient heating events in the protoplanetary nebula. Such transient events, which seem to have heated the chondrules to temperatures in excess of 1500 C for not more than a few minutes, are not easily explicable in terms of the canonically accepted evolutionary processes of the nebular disk. Thus the occurrence of extraordinary dynamical processes may be indicated by the presence of chondrules and, consequently, the existence of chondrules poses questions fundamental to the understanding of protoplanetary and protostellar systems. This chapter briefly considers the gross energetics, as well as some related questions, of chondrule formation and the implications for several previously proposed sources of chondrule formation energy, including gravitational infall of the nebula, energy derived from solid-body impacts within the nebula, and energy liberated by dissipative evolution of the nebula itself.

  3. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  4. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petruzzo, Charles; Guzman, Jose

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include (1) targeting to a fixed tetrahedron location and orientation, and (2) rotating and translating the tetrahedron. The number of impulsive maneuvers can also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the NASA Goddard Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  5. The Star Formation Camera

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Scowen; Rolf Jansen; Matthew Beasley; Daniela Calzetti; Steven Desch; Alex Fullerton; John Gallagher; Doug Lisman; Steve Macenka; Sangeeta Malhotra; Mark McCaughrean; Shouleh Nikzad; Robert O'Connell; Sally Oey; Deborah Padgett; James Rhoads; Aki Roberge; Oswald Siegmund; Stuart Shaklan; Nathan Smith; Daniel Stern; Jason Tumlinson; Rogier Windhorst; Robert Woodruff

    2009-01-01

    The Star Formation Camera (SFC) is a wide-field (~15'x19, >280 arcmin^2), high-resolution (18x18 mas pixels) UV\\/optical dichroic camera designed for the Theia 4-m space-borne space telescope concept. SFC will deliver diffraction-limited images at lambda > 300 nm in both a blue (190-517nm) and a red (517-1075nm) channel simultaneously. Our aim is to conduct a comprehensive and systematic study of the

  6. Formation of interpolymer complexes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eishun Tsuchida; Yoshihito Osada; Hiroyuki Ohno

    1980-01-01

    Interpolymer complex formations of poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) or poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) with oligocations as well as poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), and poly-(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone of various chain lengths were studied. For the case of complexation between PMAA and oligocations, the standard free energy change for the complexation ?G° was found to be linearly dependent on the number of interacting sites, n. The stability

  7. Flocks and Formations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. J. P. Veerman; G. Lafferriere; J. S. Caughman; A. Williams

    2005-01-01

    Given a large number (the “flock”) of moving physical objects, we investigate physically reasonable mechanisms of influencing\\u000a their orbits in such a way that they move along a prescribed course and in a prescribed and fixed configuration (or “in formation”).\\u000a Each agent is programmed to see the position and velocity of a certain number of others. This flow of information

  8. Quasars and galaxy formation

    E-print Network

    Andrea Cattaneo

    1999-07-23

    Quasars are widely believed to be powered by accretion onto supermassive black holes and there is now considerable evidence for a link between mergers, quasars and the formation of spheroids. Cattaneo, Haehnelt & Rees (1999) have demonstrated that a very simple model in which supermassive black holes form and accrete most of their mass in mergers of galaxies of comparable masses can reproduce the observed relation of black hole mass to bulge luminosity. Here we show that this simple model can account for the luminosity function of quasars and for the redshift evolution of the quasar population provided a few additional assumptions are made. We use the extended Press-Schechter formalism to simulate the formation of galaxies in hierarchical models of the formation of structures and we assume that, when two galaxies of comparable masses merge, their central black holes coalesce and a fraction of the gas in the merger remnant is accreted by the supermassive black hole over a time-scale of about 10^7 yr. We find that the decrease in the merging rate with cosmic time and the depletion in the amount of cold gas available due to the formation of stars are not sufficient to explain the strong decline in the space density of bright quasars between z=2 and z=0, since larger and larger structures form, which can potentially host brighter and brighter quasars. To explain the redshift evolution of the space density of bright quasars between z=2 and z=0 we need to assume that there is a dependence on redshift either in the fraction of available gas accreted or in the time-scale for accretion.

  9. Hail Formation in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, Matthew

    Hail poses a substantial threat to life and property in the state of Florida. These losses could be minimized through better understanding of the relationships between atmospheric variables that impact hail formation in Florida. Improving hail forecasting in Florida requires analyzing a number of meteorological parameters and synoptic data related to hail formation. NOAA archive data was retrieved to create a database that was used to categorize text files of hail days. The text files were entered into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory website to create National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis maps of atmospheric variables for Florida hail days as well as days leading to the hail event. These data were then analyzed to determine the relationship between variables that affect hail formation, in general, across different regions and seasons in Florida using Statistical Product and Service Solutions. The reasoning for the differing factors affecting hail formation between regions, seasons and hail sizes were discussed, as well as forecasting suggestions relating to region and month in Florida. The study found that the majority of all hail that occurs in Florida is during the wet season. A low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water and lower than average Sea Level Pressure, in most cases, is present during hail days in Florida. Furthermore, results show that Vector Wind magnitude increases as hail size increases. Additionally, several atmospheric variables useful to studying hail events, such as Lifted Index, Precipitable Water, Sea Level Pressure, Vector Wind and Temperature have significant correlations with each other depending on the region and season being observed. Strong correlations between low Lifted Index, high Precipitable Water values and the occurrence of hail events are discussed, as well as the relationship between temperature anomalies at various pressure levels and the occurrence of hail events.

  10. Drumlin Formation Library Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Alison M Anders

    Students will individually produce a written introduction for a paper about the presence of drumlins on Mars - this introduction describes different models for drumlin formation on earth. To prepare for this assignment, students work in groups to do library research to find and read articles. The groups summarize their findings for each other. Each student then writes an introduction incorporating material from all the groups. Designed for a geomorphology course Uses geomorphology to solve problems in other fields

  11. Cave Formation: Biogeochemical Cycles

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This video explores the role of biogeochemical cycles in the formation of caves. It discusses a radical new theory that identifies sulfuric acid as a cave-forming agent. The video, adapted from a NOVA broadcast, identifies the source of the sulfuric acid, which, unlike carbonic acid, the typical cave-forming agent, does not readily form in nature. The segment is 5 minutes and forty seconds in length.

  12. Anaphylatoxin formation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, A; Heideman, M

    1988-05-01

    Complement activation and anaphylatoxin formation were studied in 27 septic patients. The patients were treated with antibiotics and high-dose corticosteroids. Blood samples were drawn on admission and every week thereafter. Plasma levels of complement components C1INH, C3, C4, and C5 were low before the start of treatment but were above normal one week later in both successfully and unsuccessfully treated patients. In contrast, plasma levels of anaphylatoxins C3a/C3adesArg and C5a/C5adesArg were elevated on admission. After successful treatment, plasma levels of C3a/C3adesArg and C5a/C5adesArg returned to normal within one week. Nine patients had ongoing sepsis one week after the start of treatment and a persistent rise in anaphylatoxin concentration. They developed multisystem organ failure with respiratory, hepatic, and renal insufficiency. In vitro studies of Escherichia coli incubation in fresh serum indicated a dose-related formation of C3a/C3adesArg and C5a/C5adesArg. High concentrations of methylprednisolone inhibited the anaphylatoxin formation in vitro. PMID:3282496

  13. Formation of Lunar Swirls

    E-print Network

    Bamford, R A; Cruz, F; Kellett, B J; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Trines, R M G M; Halekas, J S; Kramer, G; Harnett, E; Cairns, R A; Bingham, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show a plausible mechanism that could lead to the formation of the Dark Lanes in Lunar Swirls, and the electromagnetic shielding of the lunar surface that results in the preservation of the white colour of the lunar regolith. We present the results of a fully self-consistent 2 and 3 dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of mini-magnetospheres that form above the lunar surface and show that they are consistent with the formation of `lunar swirls' such as the archetypal formation Reiner Gamma. The simulations show how the microphysics of the deflection/shielding of plasma operates from a kinetic-scale cavity, and show that this interaction leads to a footprint with sharp features that could be the mechanism behind the generation of `dark lanes'. The physics of mini-magnetospheres is described and shown to be controlled by space-charge fields arising due to the magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions. A comparison between model and observation is shown for a number of key plasma parameters...

  14. Chemistry of planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Sarah Elaine

    2008-02-01

    This thesis explores how the chemical environment in which planets develop influences planet formation. The total solid mass, gas/solid ratio, and specific ice inventory of protoplanetary disks can dramatically alter the planet's formation timescale, core/atmosphere mass ratio, and atmosphere composition. We present the results of three projects that probe the links between solar nebula composition and giant planet formation. The first project offers evidence that stars with planets exhibit statistically significant silicon and nickel enrichment over the general metal-rich population. To test whether this prediction is compatible with the core accretion theory of planet formation, we construct new numerical simulations of planet formation by core accretion that establish the timescale on which a planet forming at 5 AU reaches rapid gas accretion, t rga , as a function of solid surface density s solid : ( t rga /1 Myr) = (s solid /25.0 g cm -2 ) - 1.44 . This relation enables us to construct Monte Carlo simulations that predict the fraction of star-disk systems that form planets as a function of [Fe/H], [Si/Fe], disk mass, outer disk radius and disk lifetime. Our simulations reproduce both the known planet-metallicity correlation and the planet-silicon correlation reported in this paper. The simulations predict that 15% of Solar-type stars form Jupiter-mass planets, in agreement with 12% predicted from extrapolation of the observed planet frequency-semimajor axis distribution. Despite the success of our Monte Carlo simulation of the planet-silicon correlation at predicting the properties of extrasolar Jovian planets, there is still no in situ core accretion simulation that can successfully account for the formation of Saturn, Uranus or Neptune within the observed 2-3 Myr lifetimes of protoplanetary disks. Since solid accretion rate is directly proportional to the available planetesimal surface density, one way to speed up planet formation is to take a full inventory of all the solids present in the solar nebula. In Project 2 (Chapter 3) we combine a viscously evolving protostellar disk with a kinetic model of ice formation, which includes not just water but methane, ammonia, CO and 54 minor ices. We use this combined dynamical+chemical simulation to calculate the planetesimal composition and solid surface density in the solar nebula as a function of heliocentric distance and time. We find three effects that strongly favor giant planet formation: (1) a decretion flow that brings mass from the inner solar nebula to the giant planet-forming region, (2) recent lab results (Collings et al. 2004) showing that the ammonia and water ice lines should coincide, and (3) the presence of a substantial amount of methane ice in the trans-Saturnian region. Our results show higher solid surface densities than assumed in the core accretion models of Pollack et al. (1996) by a factor of 3-4 throughout the trans-Saturnian region. We also discuss the location of ice lines and their movement through the solar nebula, and provide new constraints on the possible initial disk configurations from gravitational stability arguments. Finally, we present a core accretion simulation of Saturn with a planet formation timescale of 3.37 Myr, consistent with observed protostellar disk lifetimes. The protostellar disk model underlying this simulation is also capable of forming Jupiter within 2.5 Myr. We observe a new manifestation of the core accretion theory, in which Saturn's solid core does not reach isolation mass, and argue that this paradigm should apply to Uranus and Neptune as well. The planet formation timescale is then governed primarily by the solid accretion rate instead of the gas contraction efficiency. Our model predicts a core mass of 44 M (+) for Saturn, heavier than inferred from observations by a factor of at least 2. We discuss possible mechanisms for reducing the core size without slowing down formation and comment on the similarity between our core- heavy Saturn model and the exoplanet HD 149026 b .

  15. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  16. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (?106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  17. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft flying in tetrahedron formations are excellent instrument platforms for electromagnetic and plasma studies. A minimum of four spacecraft - to establish a volume - is required to study some of the key regions of a planetary magnetic field. The usefulness of the measurements recorded is strongly affected by the tetrahedron orbital evolution. This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include targeting to a fixed tetrahedron orientation, rotating and translating the tetrahedron and/or varying the initial and final times. The number of impulsive maneuvers citn also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  18. Massive Star Formation

    E-print Network

    Tan, Jonathan C; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Fuente, Asuncion; Krumholz, Mark R; McKee, Christopher F; Stolte, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The enormous radiative and mechanical luminosities of massive stars impact a vast range of scales and processes, from the reionization of the universe, to the evolution of galaxies, to the regulation of the interstellar medium, to the formation of star clusters, and even to the formation of planets around stars in such clusters. Two main classes of massive star formation theory are under active study, Core Accretion and Competitive Accretion. In Core Accretion, the initial conditions are self-gravitating, centrally concentrated cores that condense with a range of masses from the surrounding, fragmenting clump environment. They then undergo relatively ordered collapse via a central disk to form a single star or a small-N multiple. In this case, the pre-stellar core mass function has a similar form to the stellar initial mass function. In Competitive Accretion, the material that forms a massive star is drawn more chaotically from a wider region of the clump without passing through a phase of being in a massive,...

  19. Primordial Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Rudolph E.; Gibson, Carl H.

    Recent spacecraft observations exploring solar system properties impact standard paradigms of the formation of stars, planets and comets. We stress the unexpected cloud of microscopic dust resulting from the DEEP IMPACT mission, and the existence of molten nodules in STARDUST samples. And the theory of star formation does not explain the common occurrence of binary and multiple star systems in the standard gas fragmentation scenario. No current theory of planet formation can explain the iron core of the earth, under oceans of water. These difficulties are avoided in a scenario where the planet mass objects form primordially and are today the baryonic dark matter. They have been detected in quasar microlensing and anomalous quasar radio brightening bursts. The primordial planets often concentrate together to form a star, with residual matter seen in pre-stellar accretion discs around the youngest stars. These primordial planet mass bodies were formed of hydrogen-helium, aggregated in dense clumps of a trillion at the time of plasma neutralization 380,000 years after the big bang. Most have been frozen and invisible, but are now manifesting themselves in numerous ways as sensitive modern space telescopes become operational. Their key detection signature is their thermal emission spectrum, pegged at the 13.8 degrees Kelvin triple point of hydrogen, the baryonic dark matter (Staplefeldt et al. 1999).

  20. VIRTUAL STRUCTURE BASED SPACECRAFT FORMATION CONTROL WITH FORMATION FEEDBACK

    E-print Network

    Ren, Wei

    VIRTUAL STRUCTURE BASED SPACECRAFT FORMATION CONTROL WITH FORMATION FEEDBACK Wei Ren Randal W. Beard Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Brigham Young University Provo, UT 84602 fweiren, beardg@ee.byu.edu Abstract Formation control for multiple vehicles has become an active research area

  1. Flexible formation configuration for terrain following flight: Formation keeping constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latyshev, Simon

    This work suggests a control method for the terrain-following formation motion of a group of communicating autonomous agents. The presented approach centers on defining a suitable set of constraints for formation keeping task that shall be fulfilled while agents are negotiating an unknown terrain toward the predefined goal location. It allows agents to maintain a general geometric formation shape, while allowing each individual formation member freedom of maneuver, required for terrain collision free motion. Formation structure is defined with the use of virtual leader. Formation keeping constraints are defined with plane surfaces, specified relative to position and navigation vector of the virtual leader. Formation navigation and guidance constraints are defined using navigation vectors of formation members and the virtual leader. Alternative designs for the constraints derived with parabolic, cone, and cylindrical surfaces are considered. Formation control is derived using the Udwadia-Kalaba equation, following corresponding approach to the development of control methods for constraint based dynamical systems, including leader-follower systems defined using geometric constraints. Approach to terrain following motion requiring agents to stay within bounds of cylindrical corridor volumes built around their respective navigation vectors is assumed. Individual formation primitives and multi-level, hierarchical, formation structures are considered. Simulations, based on three degrees of freedom nonlinear model of an agent, performed using Mathematica and specifically developed combined Maya-Mathematica modeling and simulation system, demonstrate that a flexible terrain following formation motion is achieved with the presented sets of constraints.

  2. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  3. Large-format holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratcliffe, David

    1998-02-01

    A review of the techniques and systems used and developed at Australian Holographics to make large format CW reflection (to 1.1. m X 1.1 m) and rainbow (to 1.1 m X 2.2 m) holograms will be given. Topics such as film holding, optical table design, optical schemes and geometries, the construction of large mirror towers, laser choice and installation, object choice and design, the use of unstable curtains, chemistry, drying and final product mounting will be covered. Pulsed holography as used by Australian Holographics will be briefly mentioned and its relative advantages and disadvantages compared to CW.

  4. Galaxy formation and evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, Lennox L.

    1991-01-01

    The presence of high z quasars and radio galaxies tells us that galaxy formation began at z greater than 5, but leaves unanswered the question of when the bulk of galaxies formed. Recent near infrared number counts of galaxies strongly favor a cosmological geometry with q(sub 0) = 0.5 and lambda = 0. Such a model grossly underpredicts blue galaxy counts. Spectroscopy shows that the excess blue galaxies at B = 24 are dwarfs at z approximately equals 0.4 which are no longer seen at the present time. These dwarfs must contain a large amount of baryonic matter which is not included in current estimates of baryonic omega .

  5. Star Cluster Formation and Star Formation: The Role of Environment and Star Formation Efficiencies

    E-print Network

    Uta Fritze

    2008-01-15

    Analyzing global starburst properties in various kinds of starburst and post-starburst galaxies and relating them to the properties of the star cluster populations they form, I explore the conditions for the formation of massive, compact, long-lived star clusters. The aim is to find out whether the relative amount of star formation that goes into star cluster formation as opposed to field star formation, and into the formation of massive long-lived clusters in particular, is universal or scales with star formation rate, burst strength, star formation efficiency, galaxy or gas mass, and whether or not there are special conditions or some threshold for the formation of star clusters that merit to be called globular clusters a few gigayears later.

  6. Urbanization and Slum Formation

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Kai Hong

    2007-01-01

    The formation of slums need not be inevitable with rapid urbanization. Such an argument appears to be contradicted by evidence of large slum populations in a large number of developing countries and particularly in rapidly urbanizing regions like Asia. The evidence discussed suggests that city authorities faced with rapid urban development lack the capacity to cope with the diverse demands for infrastructural provision to meet economic and social needs. Not only are strategic planning and intervention major issues in agenda to manage rapid urbanization, but city governments are not effectively linking the economic development trajectory to implications for urban growth and, hence, housing needs. In the following discussion, a case study is presented in support of the argument that city governments have to first recognize and then act to establish the link that is crucial between economic development, urban growth, and housing. This is the agendum that has been largely neglected by city and national governments that have been narrowly focused on economic growth with the consequent proliferation of slum formation as a housing solution. PMID:17387618

  7. Deep Water Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killworth, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Some simple arguments on plumes of dense water and filling boxes were given. What determines the time for a large-scale environment to be modified by the injection of dense water at its edge is the mass flux, not the buoyancy flux. However, it is the denser buoyancy flux, when there are several competing plumes (e.g., the Mediterranean outflow versus the Denmark Strait outflow) that determines which plume will provide the bottom water for that ocean basin. It was noted that the obvious laboratory experiment (rotate a pie-shaped annulus, and heat/cool it on the surface) had never been performed. Thus, to some extent our belief that deep convection is somehow automatic at high latitudes to close off some ill-defined meridional circulation has never been tested. A summary of deep convection was given. The two fundamental formation mechanisms were shown. Of the two, it is open-ocean convection which forms the water which supplies the Denmark Strait overflow -- in all likelihood, as formation in the Greenland Sea remains stubbornly unobserved. But it is the slope convection which finally creates North Atlantic deep water, following the Denmark Strait overspill.

  8. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  9. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  10. Gas formation. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane.

    PubMed

    Stolper, D A; Lawson, M; Davis, C L; Ferreira, A A; Santos Neto, E V; Ellis, G S; Lewan, M D; Martini, A M; Tang, Y; Schoell, M; Sessions, A L; Eiler, J M

    2014-06-27

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a "clumped isotope" technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models. PMID:24970083

  11. Pebbly mudstones in the Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation, western California: a study in the transitional stages from submarine slumps to cohesive debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Gamundí, Oscar R.

    1993-04-01

    The pebbly mudstones in the Late Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation originated by slumping and related debris-flow processes in a submarine canyon/slope depositional system. The sedimentary characteristics of the pebbly mudstones (PM) enable the distinction of two main varieties: (a) heterogeneous or "patchy" pebbly mudstones (PPM) exhibiting irregular bed geometries and diffuse to irregular bed contacts, with maximum clast sizes in intraformational boulder-sized population, including abundant rip-up mudstone and sandstone clasts with common soft sediment deformations; (b) homogeneous pebbly mudstones (HPM) with tabular bed geometries, non-erosive and almost flat bed contacts, maximum clast sizes in extraformational pebble-sized fraction and scarce to absent soft-sediment deformations. The two varieties of pebbly mudstone represent the mechanical transition from slumps to cohesive debris flows. The presence of abundant intraformational clasts and disrupted, yet preserved slump-fold features in the PPM suggest that this facies represents a stage closer to the slump end-member. As the shear-strain progressed and a fully remolded cohesive debris flow developed, an almost complete disaggregation of the poorly consolidated sand and mud clasts and the incorporation into the remolded "matrix" phase took place.

  12. Petroleum Formation and Occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philp, R. P.

    Organic geochemistry, or to be more specific for the purposes of this review, petroleum geochemistry, is an area of research that has been developing extremely rapidly in the last few years. Many of the concepts developed in research laboratories in the late 1970s are now routinely used by petroleum companies in investigating exploration problems. The second edition of Petroleum Formation and Occurrence reflects many of the changes that have occurred in the field since the first edition of this book was published in 1978. The new chapters that have been added and the parts of the text that have been updated are a clear indication of the areas in which most work has been done in the past 6 years.

  13. Pine Island Iceberg Formation

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Lori Perkins

    2002-01-10

    This animation is a sequence showing the formation of the Pine Island iceberg and the glacial seaward flow upstream from the crack. It is a series of MISR images from the Terra satellite on top of the continental Radarsat view of Antarctica. The Pine Island Glacier is the largest discharger of ice in Antarctica and the continents fastest moving glacier. Even so, when a large crack formed across the glacier in mid 2000, it was surprising how fast the crack expanded, 15 meters per day, and how soon the resulting iceberg broke off, mid-November, 2001. This iceberg, called B-21, is 42 kilometers by 17 kilometers and contains seven years of glacier outflow released to the sea in a single event.

  14. Cosmological Structure Formation

    E-print Network

    Primack, Joel R

    2015-01-01

    LCDM is remarkably successful in predicting the cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure, and LCDM parameters have been determined with only mild tensions between different types of observations. Hydrodynamical simulations starting from cosmological initial conditions are increasingly able to capture the complex interactions between dark matter and baryonic matter in galaxy formation. Simulations with relatively low resolution now succeed in describing the overall galaxy population. For example, the EAGLE simulation in volumes up to 100 cubic Mpc reproduces the observed local galaxy mass function nearly as well as semi-analytic models. It once seemed that galaxies are pretty smooth, that they generally grow in size as they evolve, and that they are a combination of disks and spheroids. But recent HST observations combined with high-resolution hydrodynamic simulations are showing that most star-forming galaxies are very clumpy; that galaxies often undergo compaction which reduces their radius and ...

  15. Transitions in biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Thatcher, Travis; Cooley, Benjamin

    2011-03-01

    Biofilms are multicellular, dynamic communities formed by interacting unicellular organisms bound to a surface. Forming a biofilm is a developmental process, characterized by sequential changes in gene expression and behavior as bacteria and yeast progress from discrete, free-swimming cells though stages that arrive at a mature biofilm. We are developing automated metrics to identify key transitions in early biofilm formation as cells attach to a surface, populate that surface, and adhere to each other to form early microcolonies. Our metrics use high-throughput tracking and analysis of microscopy movies to localize these transitions in space and time. Each of these transitions is associated with a loss of entropy in the bacterial system and, therefore, with biological activity that drives this loss of entropy. Better understanding of these transitions will allow automated determination of the strength and turn-on of attractive cell-surface and cell-cell interactions as biofilm development progresses.

  16. Galaxy formation by dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Field, Goerge B.

    1989-01-01

    It has been known since the early 1940's that radiation can cause an instability in the interstellar medium. Absorbing dust particles in an isotropic radiation field shadow each other by a solid angle which is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two particles, leading to an inverse-square attractive force - mock gravity. The effect is largest in an optically thin medium. Recently Hogan and White (HW, hereafter) proposed that if the pre-galactic universe contained suitable sources of radiation and dust, instability in the dust distribution caused by mock gravity may have led to the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters. In their picture of a well-coupled dust-gas medium, HW show that mock gravity begins to dominate gravitational instability when the perturbation becomes optically thin, provided that the radiation field at the time is strong enough. The recent rocket observation of the microwave background at submillimeter wavelengths by Matsumoto et al. might be from pre-galactic stars, the consequence of the absorption of ultraviolet radiation by dust, and infrared reemission which is subsequently redshifted. HW's analysis omits radiative drag, incomplete collisional coupling of gas and dust, finite dust albedo, and finite matter pressure. These effects could be important. In a preliminary calculation including them, the authors have confirmed that mock gravitational instability is effective if there is a strong ultraviolet radiation at the time, but any galaxies that form would be substantially enriched in heavy elements because the contraction of the dust is more rapid than that of the gas. Moreover, since the dust moves with supersonic velocity through the gas soon after the perturbation becomes optically thin, the sputtering of dust particles by gas is significant, so the dust could disappear before the instability develops significantly. They conclude that the mock gravity by dust is not important in galaxy formations.

  17. The KEA image file format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunting, Peter; Gillingham, Sam

    2013-08-01

    There are a large number of image formats already in use within the remote sensing community but currently there is no format that provides the features of: compression, support for large file sizes, ground control points, raster attribute tables and inbuilt image pyramids. Therefore, a new image format, named KEA, after the New Zealand bird, has been proposed. The KEA format provides a full implementation of the GDAL data model and is implemented within a HDF5 file. A software library with a GDAL driver have been freely provided to the community allowing use through any GDAL based software. The new format has comparable performance with existing formats while producing smaller file sizes and is already within active use for a number of projects within Landcare Research, New Zealand, and the wider community.

  18. Gaining Insight into Star Formation: Resolved Star Formation Laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebst, Kelley; Scowen, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Until recently astronomers have used star formation laws to measure the star formation rate and star formation efficiency of galaxies only on global scales because of the poor resolution of available data. What I am now capable of producing is a spatially resolved star formation law that can provide direct insight into the physical processes that govern star formation and assess the short-term nature of bursts of star formation and the longer-term nature of larger-scale events that can dictate the global distribution of stars and the ultimate fate of a galaxy as a whole. I am using exquisite narrowband optical data from a variety of sources, including the Hubble Space Telescope, and Kitt Peak National Observatory, etc., in conjunction with infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxy Survey and the Spitzer Local Volume Legacy survey, neutral gas data from The HI Nearby Galaxy Survey, and molecular gas data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association Survey of Nearby Galaxies, to provide star formation rates and star formation efficiencies on previously inaccessible small spatial scales across a suite of galaxies that represent a range of star formation environments and scales. My sample includes 18 spiral galaxies ranging from 2.1 to 15.1 Mpc in distance and offers a large range of morphological types (i.e. a large range of star formation environments). I am using these data to test different models of star formation modes under a variety of physical conditions and relate the variations I observe to the known local physical conditions and the associated star formation histories for each locale within each galaxy.This is the heart of the matter - that the nature and evolution of the local physical environment intimately influences how stars can form, how quickly and how massive those stars are allowed to form, and as a result how they shape the local conditions for subsequent star formation. It is this tracking of the stellar ecology that is vital for insight into the star formation process, but also to understand the conditions that can result in star and planet formation, or conversely what conditions prevent this. Such an analysis is only possible with the kind of datasets I am producing.

  19. An Evaluation of Alternative Delivery Modes for Information Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Craig; Christal, Melodie E.

    The use of the floppy disk as an alternative mode for delivering Information Services reports was evaluated for fiscal year 1985 by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS). A 5.25 inch, 8/9 sector, 40 track ASCII floppy disk used under PC-DOS on the IBM PC and IBM PC compatible hardware was tested. Tabular data but not…

  20. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen 1995 Leaf Area Index Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. These data are LAI measurements made by the TF-11 team throughout the 1995 growing season. The data include the LAI of plants that fall into six categories: total, Carex spp., Betula pumila, Menyanthes trifoliata, Salix spp., and other vascular plants. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  1. BOREAS TE-22 Allometric Forest Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shugart, H. H.; Nielsen, Eric; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-22 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the forest structure of boreal vegetation in the Southern and Northern Study Areas (SSA and NSA) during the 1994 growing season. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. BOREAS Derived Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Twine, Tracy; Rinker, Donald; Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, the BOREAS science teams identified the need for a continuous surface meteorological and radiation data set to support flux and surface process modeling efforts. This data set contains actual, substituted, and interpolated 15-minute meteorological and radiation data compiled from several surface measurements sites over the BOREAS SSA and NSA. Temporally, the data cover 01-Jan-1994 to 31-Dec-1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  3. BOREAS TGB-1 NSA CH4 and CO2 Chamber Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) dark chamber flux measurements at the NSA-OJP, NSA-OBS, NSA-BP, and NSA-YJP sites from 16-May-1994 through 13-Sep-1994. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from dark chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  4. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Soil Surface CO2 Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. These data are soil surface CO 2 flux data at the SSA-Fen site from 27- May-1994 to 23-Sep-1994 and from 13-May-1995 to 03-Oct-1995. A portable gas exchange system was used to make these measurements. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  5. County-based estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus content of animal manure in the United States for 1982, 1987, and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, Larry; Hitt, Kerie; Alexander, Richard

    1998-01-01

    names that correspond to the FIPS codes. 2. Tabular component - Nine tab-delimited ASCII lookup tables of animal counts and nutrient estimates organized by 5-digit state/county FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standards) code. Another table lists the county names that correspond to the FIPS codes. The use of trade names is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  6. Sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the Las Chacritas carbonate paleolake, Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic), Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.

    2013-02-01

    The Las Chacritas Member is the lower part of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic). The unit is a completely continental limestone succession with volcanic contributions that were deposited during the development of the Cañadón Asfalto Rift Basin (Chubut province, Patagonia, Argentina). A detailed sedimentological analysis was performed in the Fossati depocenter to determine the paleoenvironments that developed in the context of this rift. The Las Chacritas Member represents a carbonate paleolake system with ramp-shaped margins associated with wetlands that were eventually affected by subaerial exposure and pedogenesis. This process is represented by three main subenvironments: a) a lacustrine setting sensu stricto (lacustrine limestone facies association), represented by Mudstones/Wackestones containing porifera spicules (F1), Intraclastic packstones (F6) and Tabular stromatolites (F10) in which deposition and diagenesis were entirely subaqueous; b) a palustrine setting (palustrine limestone facies association) containing Microbial Mudstones (F2), Intraclastic sandy packstone with ostracode remains (F3), Oncolitic packstone (F5), Brecciated limestone (F7) and Nodular-Mottled limestone (F8) representing shallow marginal areas affected by groundwater fluctuations and minor subaerial exposure; and c) a pedogenic paleoenvironment (pedogenic limestone facies association) including Intraclastic limestone (F4) and Packstones containing Microcodium (F9) facies displaying the major features of subaerial exposure, pedogenic diagenesis and the development of paleosols. The fluvial-palustrine-lacustrine succession shows a general shallow upward trend in which contraction-expansion cycles are represented (delimited by exposure and surface erosion). The variations in the successive formations reflect the responses to fluctuations in a combination of two major controls, the tectonic and local climatic variables. The predominance of the palustrine facies associations was determined by its accommodation space as well as the local climate conditions. The variations in the lacustrine limestone facies associations reflect differential patterns of subsidence within the sub-basin. The diagnostic features of the palustrine limestone facies associations (organic matter (OM) content, microinvertebrate fauna, abundant mud cracks, brecciation, presence of evaporitic minerals) frame the sub-basin in a climatic context intermediate between arid and subhumid conditions.

  7. Formation and Research in Hydrography Formation et recherche en hydrographie

    E-print Network

    Santerre, Rock

    Formation and Research in Hydrography Formation et recherche en hydrographie ROCK SANTERRE, Ph Programs in Geomatics · Hydrography = Marine Geomatics · Research in Navigation and Hydrography · History of Hydrography Teaching - at Laval University - in New France (Nouvelle-France) R. Santerre, CHC 2010 ­ Québec

  8. Nuclear ``pasta'' formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Hughto, J.; Berry, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm-3 and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01fm-3 or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles (“swiss cheese”), hollow tubes, flat plates (“lasagna”), thin rods (“spaghetti”) and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates nonequilibrium effects. We use this to determine the best ways to obtain lower energy states of the pasta system from MD simulations and to place constraints on the equilibration time of the system.

  9. Bead lightning formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.O.; Saba, M.M.F. [Associated Plasma Laboratory, National Space Research Institute, 12227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Division of Space Geophysics, National Space Research Institute, 12227-010, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    Formation of beaded structures in triggered lightning discharges is considered in the framework of both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic instabilities. It is shown that the space periodicity of the structures can be explained in terms of the kink and sausage type instabilities in a cylindrical discharge with anomalous viscosity. In particular, the fast growth rate of the hydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is driven by the backflow of air into the channel of the decaying return stroke, dominates the initial evolution of perturbations during the decay of the return current. This instability is responsible for a significant enhancement of the anomalous viscosity above the classical level. Eventually, the damping introduced at the current channel edge by the high level of anomalous viscous stresses defines the final length scale of bead lightning. Later, during the continuing current stage of the lightning flash, the MHD pinch instability persists, although with a much smaller growth rate that can be enhanced in a M-component event. The combined effect of these instabilities may explain various aspects of bead lightning.

  10. Formation of "bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K.; Kästner, M.; Miltner, A.

    2009-04-01

    During degradation of organic pollutants in soil, metabolites, microbial biomass, CO2and "bound" residues ("non-extractable" residues in soil organic matter) are formed. Enhanced transformation of these contaminants into "bound" residues has been proposed as an alternative remediation method for polluted soils. However, this kind of residues may pose a potential risk for the environment due to their chemical structure and possible remobilization under different conditions. Therefore particular attention is given actually to "bound" residues. Part of these non-extractable residues may be "biogenic," because microorganisms use the carbon from the pollutant to form their biomass components (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars), which subsequently may be incorporated into soil organic matter. Furthermore, the CO2 originating from mineralization of xenobiotics, can be re-assimilated by microorganisms and also incorporated into "biogenic residue". The hazard posed by "bound" residues may be overestimated because they are "biogenic" (contain microbial fatty acids and amino acids). The knowledge about the pathways of "biogenic residue" formation is necessary for a proper assessment of the fate of tested pollutants and their turnover in the soil environment. Moreover, these data are needed to establish the realistic degradation rates of the contaminants in soil. The main objectives of this study are: to quantify the extent of "biogenic residue" (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars) formation during the degradation of a model pollutant (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid = 2,4-D) and during CO2 assimilation by microorganisms and to evaluate which components are mainly incorporated into "bound" residues. To investigate the extent of "biogenic residue" formation in soil during the degradation of 2,4-D, experiments with either 14C-U-ring and 13C6-2,4-D or carboxyl-14C 2,4-D were performed. The incubation experiments were performed according to OECD test guideline 307, in the dark, at constant temp 20Ë? C (+/-2Ë? C) and with intermittent aeration. During incubation, the mineralization was quantified and soil samples were analyzed for the presence of both "biogenic residues" and remaining 2,4-D. Mineralization of 2,4-D in both experiments was very high. However, the 14CO2 evolution was higher from carboxyl-14C 2,4-D than from 14C-ring 2,4-D. After 7 days of incubation, 30% of initial amount of 14C in soil contaminated with 14C-ring 2,4-D was mineralized, whereas 40% of total radioactivity was evolved as CO2after 4 days from soil incubated with 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D. The amount of extractable 2,4-D residues was very low in both experiments (14C-ring 2,4-D: 2% and 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D: 1%). The soil incubated with 14C-ring 2,4-D contained 60% of "non-extractable" residues of 2,4-D after 7 days, while the amount of these residues in soil contaminated with 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D reached 50% of the initial radioactivity in the tested system 4 days after application. More "biogenic residues" were formed in soil spiked with 14C-U-ring 2,4-D (10%) than in soil with carboxyl 14C 2,4-D (7%). Both 2,4-D and CO2-derived C were incorporated mainly into microbial amino acids (9.5% at day 7 and 7.0% at day 4, respectively). After 7 days of incubation, 0.5% of initial applied radioactivity in system was found in microbial lipids in the soil contaminated with 14C-ring 2,4-D. Only 0.1% of the total radioactivity was incorporated into lipids in soil treated with 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D on day 4 after application. Thin Layer Chromatography identified the microbial lipids containing the radioactivity as phosphatidylethanolamine, a phospholipid typical for microorganisms. The amount of microbial lipids (which corresponds to phospholipids) in both cases decreased with time; this can be explained by the death of the microbial biomass. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the formation of &qu

  11. Prominence formation and oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, P. F.

    Prominences, or filaments, are a striking phenomenon in the solar atmosphere. Besides their own rich features and dynamics, they are related to many other activities, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In the past several years we have been investigating the prominence formation, oscillations, and eruptions through both data analysis and radiative hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations. This paper reviews our progress on these topics, which includes: (1) With updated radiative cooling function, the coronal condensation becomes a little faster than previous work; (2) Once a seed condensation is formed, it can grow via siphon flow spontaneously even if the evaporation stops; (3) A scaling law was obtained to relate the length of the prominence thread to various parameters, indicating that higher prominences tend to have shorter threads, which is consistent with the fact that threads are long in active region prominences and short in quiescent prominences; (4) It was proposed that long-time prominence oscillations out of phase might serve as a precursor for prominence eruptions and CMEs; (5) An ensemble of oscillating prominence threads may explain the counter-streaming motion.

  12. Formation of caking coals

    SciTech Connect

    Liotta, R.

    1981-03-31

    Highly caking coals are formed by selective oxygen-alkylation or oxygen-acylation of moderately, weakly or non-caking coals, employing a phase transfer reaction which chemically alters phenolic and carboxylic functional substituents. These two very polar functional groups are converted to relatively non-polar ethers and esters, respectively. The o-alkylation or o-acylation is carried out in a binary liquid phase solution (Organic and water phases with a solid phase suspended in the medium). A quaternary ammonium or phosphonium salt is reacted with alkali or alkaline earth base to produce the corresponding quaternary ammonium or phosphonium base (An example of a phase transfer reagent). This quaternary base is non-nucleophilic and readily removes the phenolic and carboxylic protons but does little else to the coal structures. After the removal of the weakly acidic protons by the quaternary base, the phenoxides and carboxylates which are produced then undergo o-alkylation or o-acylation. The alkylating or acylating agent comprises a carbon-bearing functional group and a displaceable leaving group. The process of the invention produces caking properties in noncaking subbituminous coals and increases the caking ability of weakly or moderately caking coals. An important aspect of this invention concerns the coal liquids and gases which are produced during coke formation. The pyrolysis which forms the coke of the o-alkylated or o-acylated coal also produces higher quality coal liquids and gases.

  13. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  14. THE FORMATION OF PUBLIC OPINION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Moses A. Boudourides

    Our aim is to review the network concept and its relevance on theories of public opinion formation. For this purpose, after discussing social and policy networks, we are reviewing certain network theories of (i) collective action and (ii) voting choices and preferred modes of political participation. Finally, we are presenting a network simulation of public opinion formation that generalizes Axelrod's

  15. Formative Assessment: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Randy Elliot

    2011-01-01

    This paper covers six interrelated issues in formative assessment (aka, "assessment for learning"). The issues concern the definition of formative assessment, the claims commonly made for its effectiveness, the limited attention given to domain considerations in its conceptualisation, the under-representation of measurement principles in that…

  16. Organic chemistry of coke formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Guisnet; P Magnoux

    2001-01-01

    The modes of formation of carbonaceous deposits (“coke”) during the transformation of organic compounds over acid and over bifunctional noble metal-acid catalysts are described. At low reaction temperatures, (350°C), the coke components are polyaromatic. Their formation involves hydrogen transfer (acid catalysts) and dehydrogenation (bifunctional catalysts) steps in addition to condensation and rearrangement steps. On microporous catalysts, the retention of coke

  17. Formation stability after hydraulic fracturing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Panos Papanastasiou

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates stress changes resulting from fracturing in a weak formation and estimates the reduced risk of formation failure. The analysis is based on fracture propagation and closure of a plane strain elasto-plastic fracture. It is shown that during fracture propagation the area near the fracture tip undergoes plastic deformation, with the result that the in situ stresses there

  18. Formation of the solar system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Hayashi; K. Nakazawa; Y. Nakagawa

    1985-01-01

    The overall evolution of the solar system is discussed in terms of what is called the Kyoto model. Starting from the formation of the solar nebula, a multistep process is followed in detail, including growth and sedimentation of dust grains in the nebula, formation of planetesimals due to fragmentation of a dust layer, radial migration and accumulation of planetesimals to

  19. Professional Development through Formative Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nsibande, Rejoice; Garraway, James

    2011-01-01

    Formative evaluation and its associated methodology of reflection on practice are used extensively in academic staff development. In reflecting on formative evaluation processes in both more traditional and newer programmes conducted at a university of technology, a number of variables reported in the literature were observed to have influenced…

  20. Distributed Formation Control with Omnidirectional

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omid Shakernia; Shankar Sastry

    We consider the problem of distributed leader-follower formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots equipped with central-panoramic cameras. By specifying the desired formation in the image plane, we translate the control problem into a separate visual servoing task for each follower. We use a rank constraint on the omni- directional optical ows across multiple frames to estimate the position and velocities

  1. Flowstone Formations in Jewel Cave

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Jewel Cave is currently the 3rd most extensive cave network in the world. It is believed to have formed completely underwater, thus leading to the extensive coating of calcite crystals. In the center of the image, a formation known as flowstone can be seen. Flowstone is a type of calcite formation ...

  2. Bibliography Formatting Software: An Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stigleman, Sue

    1993-01-01

    Discusses software used for formatting bibliographies and describes 52 programs. Information provided includes type of operating system required, publication formats, citation styles, ability to arrange by subject, use of downloaded references, network versions, costs, and plans for future changes. A directory of the programs and producers is…

  3. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  4. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As w...

  5. Informatique Nature de la formation

    E-print Network

    Sart, Remi

    Informatique Nature de la formation : Diplôme national de l'Enseignement Supérieur Durée des études formation : Campus des Cézeaux (Aubière) #12;2 Informatique UFR Sciences et Technologies PRÉSENTATION Objectifs L'objectif de la licence Informatique est de donner une connaissance approfondie des systèmes

  6. ASDF: AUDIO SCENE DESCRIPTION FORMAT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthias Geier; Sascha Spors

    The Audio Scene Description Format (ASDF) is an col- laboratively evolving format for the storage and inter- change of static, dynamic and interactive spatial audio content. This position paper briefly describes the current status and raises a list of open questions which shall be addressed in the panel discussion.

  7. Science Sampler: Formative assessment guideposts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Carlos Ayala

    2005-01-01

    A formative assessment can provide a snapshot of what a student knows and is able to do. Use this approach to close the gap between what is known and what needs to be known through informative feedback. Explore the use of formative assessments with navigational help from these six guideposts.

  8. Treating fines containing earthen formations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Watkins; L. J. Kalfayan; R. K. Knight; D. C. Young

    1985-01-01

    Method for treating earthen formations which contain water-sensitive, finely divided particulate matter wherein there is injected into the formation steam or a mixture of steam and hot water containing an effective fines-stabilizing amount of a compound containing ammoniacal nitrogen selected from the group consisting of ammonium hydroxide, an ammonium salt of an inorganic acid, an ammonium salt of a carboxylic

  9. FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    (1) Gas-phase chemistry. With the clear and profound effect of the VOC/NOx ratio on SOA formation, we will augment gas-phase VOC oxidation mechanisms in atmospheric models to account for the effect of NOx level on the mechanism of SOA formation; (2) Revis...

  10. Formation depths of Fraunhofer lines

    E-print Network

    Gurtovenko, E A

    2015-01-01

    We have summed up our investigations performed in 1970--1993. The main task of this paper is clearly to show processes of formation of spectral lines as well as their distinction by validity and by location. For 503 photospheric lines of various chemical elements in the wavelength range 300--1000 nm we list in Table the average formation depths of the line depression and the line emission for the line centre and on the half-width of the line, the average formation depths of the continuum emission as well as the effective widths of the layer of the line depression formation. Dependence of average depths of line depression formation on excitation potential, equivalent widths, and central line depth are demonstrated by iron lines.

  11. Plasmapause formation at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, M. F.; Mitchell, D. G.; Jia, X.; Jackman, C. M.; Hospodarsky, G.; Coates, A. J.

    2015-04-01

    Cassini observations during a rapid, high-latitude, dawnside pass from Saturn's lobe to inner magnetosphere on 25 June 2009 provide strong evidence for the formation of a "plasmapause" at Saturn by Vasyliunas-type nightside reconnection of previously mass-loaded flux tubes. A population of hot, tenuous plasma that lies between the lobe and the dense inner magnetospheric plasma is consistent with a region formed by very recent injection from a reconnection region in the tail, including low density, high temperature, supercorotational flow, a significant O+ content, and the near-simultaneous observation of enhanced Saturn kilometric radiation emissions. The sharp boundary between that region and the cool dense inner magnetospheric plasma thus separates flux tubes that were involved in the reconnection from those that successfully traversed the nightside without mass loss. This event demonstrates that tail reconnection can strip off inner magnetospheric plasma in to at least dipole L = 8.6. Clear evidence of flux tube interchange driven by the sharp boundary is found, both inward moving flux tubes of hotter plasma and, for the first time, the outward moving cool population. The outward moving cool regions have azimuthal sizes less than 1 RS, were probably created within the past 1.2 h, and have outflow speeds greater than about 5 km/s. At the outer edge of the reconnected region, there is also a possible signature of Dungey-type lobe reconnection following the initial Vasyliunas-type reconnection. Observations from this event are entirely consistent with previously described global MHD simulations of tail reconnection, plasmoid departure, and Saturnward injection of reconnected flux.

  12. Light meromyosin paracrystal formation

    PubMed Central

    Chowrashi, PK; Pepe, FA

    1977-01-01

    Studies of paracrystal formation by column purified light meromyosin (LMM) prepared in a variety of ways led to the following conclusions: (a) different portions of the myosin rod may be coded for different stagger relationships. This was concluded from observations that paracrystals with different axial repeat periodicities could be obtained either with LMM framents of different lengths prepared with the same enzyme, or with LMM fragments of identical lengths but prepared with different enzymes. (b) Paracrystals with a 14-nm axial repeat periodicity are most likely formed by the aggregation of sheets with a 44-nm axial repeat within the sheets which are staggered by 14 nm. All of the axial repeat patterns expected from one sheet or aggregates of more than one sheet, on this basis, were observed in the same electron micrograph. (c) C-protein binding probably occurs preferentially to LMM molecules related in some specific way. This was concluded from the observation that the same axial repeat pattern was obtained in paracrystals formed from different LMM preparations in the presence of C-protein, regardless of differences in the axial repeat obtained in the absence of C-protein. (d) Nucleic acid is responsible for the 43-nm axial repeat patterns observed in paracrystals formed by the ethanol-resistant fraction of LMM. In the absence of nuclei acid, paracrystals with a 14nm axial repeat are obtained. (e) The 43-nm axial repeat pattern observed with the ethanol-resistant fraction of LMM is different for LMM preparations obtained by trypsin and papain digestions. PMID:326798

  13. Variations in fluvial style in the Westwater Canyon Member, Morrison formation (Jurassic), San Juan basin, Colorado plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miall, A.D.; Turner-Peterson, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques of architectural element analysis and lateral profiling have been applied to the fluvial Westwater Canyon Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) in southern San Juan Basin. On a large scale, the sandstone-body architecture consists mainly of a series of tabular sandstone sheets 5-15 m thick and hundreds of meters wide, separated by thin fine-grained units. Internally these sheets contain lateral accretion surfaces and are cut by channels 10-20 m deep and at least 250 m wide. On a more detailed scale, interpretations made from large-scale photomosaics show a complex of architectural elements and bounding surfaces. Typical indicators of moderate- to high-sinuosity channels (lateral accretion deposits) coexist in the same outcrop with downstream-accreted macroform deposits that are typical of sand flats of low-sinuosity, multiple-channel rivers. Broad, deep channels with gently to steeply dipping margins were mapped in several of the outcrops by carefully tracing major bounding surfaces. Locally thick accumulations of plane-laminated and low-angle cross-laminated sandstone lithofacies suggest rapid flow, probably transitional to upper flow regime conditions. Such a depositional style is most typical of ephemeral rivers or those periodically undergoing major seasonal (or more erratic) stage fluctuations, an interpretation consistent with independent mineralogical evidence of aridity. Fining-upward sequences are rare in the project area, contrary to the descriptions of Campbell (1976). The humid alluvial fan model of Galloway (1978) cannot be substantiated and, similarly, the architectural model of Campbell (1976) requires major revision. Comparisons with the depositional architecture of the large Indian rivers, such as the Ganges and Brahmaputra, still seem reasonable, as originally proposed by Campbell (1976), although there is now convincing evidence for aridity and for major stage fluctuations, which differs both from those modern rivers and Campbell's interpretation. ?? 1989.

  14. A low diversity, seasonal tropical landscape dominated by conifers and peltasperms: Early Permian Abo Formation, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Chaney, D.S.; Nelson, W.J.; Lucas, S.G.; Looy, C.V.; Quick, K.; Jun, W.

    2007-01-01

    Walchian conifers (Walchia piniformis Sternberg, 1825) and peltasperms similar to Supaia thinnfeldioides White and cf. Supaia anomala White dominate floodplain deposits of a narrow stratigraphic interval of the middle Abo Formation, Lower Permian of central New Mexico. The plant fossils occur in thinly bedded units up to two meters thick, consisting of coarse siltstone to very fine sandstone with clay partings. Bedding is primarily tabular, thin, and bears rare ripple marks and trough cross beds. Bedding surfaces display mud cracks, raindrop imprints, horizontal and vertical burrows of invertebrates, and footprints of terrestrial vertebrates. These features indicate intermittent and generally unchannelized stream flow, with repeated exposure to air. Channels appear to have cannibalized one another on a slowly subsiding coastal plain. Conifers are dominant at three collecting sites and at three others Supaia dominates. Although each of these genera occurs in assemblages dominated by the other, there are no truly co-dominant assemblages. This pattern suggests alternative explanations. Landscapes could have consisted of a small-scale vegetational patchwork dominated almost monospecifically in any one patch, meaning that these plants could have coexisted across the landscape. On the other hand, conifer and supaioid dominance could have been temporally distinct, occurring during different episodes of sedimentation; although in the field there are no noticeable sedimentological differences between conifer-dominated and Supaia-dominated channel deposits, they may represent slightly different climatic regimes. The considerable morphological differences between conifers and Supaia suggest that the floristic patterns are not a taphonomic effect of the loss of a significant part of the original biodiversity. In general, the climate under which this vegetation developed appears to have been relatively warm and arid, based on the geology (pervasive red color [oxidation], calcrete in paleosols, and abundant mud cracks evidencing ephemeral flow in streams) and biology (low floristic diversity, xeromorphic plant physiognomies). ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Paper C4-1 Nutrient Data Laboratory (USDA\\/ARS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joanne Holden

    USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference. The USDA Nutrient Database for Standard Reference (SR), Release 11 will be available in August, 1996. The database will adopt a relational structure and will be released as ASCII delimited files. In addition to the ASCII delimited files, the CD-ROM release will add files in DBF and the IFDA Data Exchange format. 2) Primary

  16. The formation of Pangea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampfli, G. M.; Hochard, C.; Vérard, C.; Wilhem, C.; vonRaumer, J.

    2013-05-01

    The making of Pangea is the result of large-scale amalgamation of continents and micro-continents, which started at the end of the Neoproterozoic with the formation of Gondwana. As pieces were added to Gondwana on its South-American, Antarctica and Australia side, ribbon-like micro-continents were detached from its African and South-Chinese side: Cadomia in the late Neoproterozoic, Avalonia and Hunia in the Ordovician, Galatia in the Devonian and Cimmeria in the Permian. Cadomia was re-accreted to Gondwana, but the other ribbon-continents were accreted to Baltica, North-China, Laurussia or Laurasia. Finding the origin of these numerous terranes is a major geological challenge. Recently, a global plate tectonic model was developed together with a large geological/geodynamic database, at the Lausanne University, covering the last 600 Ma of the Earth's history. Special attention was given to the placing of Gondwana derived terranes in their original position, using all possible constraints. We propose here a solution for the Variscan terranes, another paper deals with the Altaids. The Galatian super-terrane was detached from Gondwana in the Devonian, during the opening of Paleotethys, and was quickly separated into four sub-terranes that started to by-pass each other. The leading terranes collided at the end of the Devonian with the Hanseatic terrane detached from Laurussia. In the Carboniferous, Gondwana started to impinge onto the amalgamated terranes, creating the Variscan chain and the Pangean super-continent. East of Spain Paleotethys remained opened until the Triassic, subducting northward under Laurasia. Roll-back of the Paleotethyan slab triggered the collapse of most of the European Variscan orogen, which was replaced by series of Permian rifts, some of them becoming oceanized back-arc basins during the Triassic. Major force changes at the Pangean plate limits at the end of the Triassic provoked its break-up, through the opening of the proto-Caribbean, central-Atlantic, Alpine-Tethys oceanic seaways.

  17. Jet Formation and Collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauty, Christophe; Tsinganos, Kanaris; Trussoni, Edoardo

    We briefly review our current understanding for the formation, acceleration and collimation of winds to jets associated with compact astrophysical objects such as AGN and µQuasars.All such outflows may be considered to a first approximation as ideal MHD plasmas escaping from a rotating and magnetized accretion disk with a magnetosphere around a central black hole. A crucial ingredient for a correct modelling of the steady state problem is to place the appropriate boundary conditions, by taking into account how information can propagate through the outflow and ensuring, e.g., that shocks produced via the interaction of the flow with the external medium do not affect the overall structure. As an example underlining the role of setting the correct boundary conditions, we make the analogy of the critical surfaces in the steady and axisymmetric MHD problem with the event horizon and ergosphere of a rotating black hole in relativity.We discuss the acceleration of the outflow, by gas, radiation, or wave pressure gradients and also by magnetic mechanisms, showing the important role played by the disk corona in the vicinity of the black hole. Pressure and magnetic confinement both may also play a role in confining the outflow, although magnetic hoop stress confinement is likely to be a rather dominant process in tightly collimated outflows. The possible asymptotical morphology that jets achieve and the instabilities which are likely to explain the observed structures but do not prevent jets to possess toroidal magnetic fields are also reviewed.Finally, it is proposed that in a space where the two main variables are the energy of the magnetic rotator and the angle between the line of sight and the ejection axis, some observed characteristics of AGN jets can be understood. A criterion for the transition of the morphologies of the outflows from highly collimated jets to uncollimated winds is given. It is based on the analysis of a particular class of exact solutions and may somehow generalize other earlier suggestions, such as the spinning of the black hole, the fueling of the central object, or the effects of the environment.Thus, while the horizontal AGN classification from Type 0 to Types 1 and 2 may well be an orientation effect - i.e. a dependence on the viewing angle between the source axis and the observer as in the standard model - the vertical AGN classification with uncollimated outflows (radio-quiet sources) and collimated outflows (radio-loud sources) depends both on the efficiency of the magnetic rotator and the environment in which the outflows propagate.

  18. Dynamics of Earth orbiting formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploen, Scott R.; Scharf, Daniel P.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Acikmese, Ahmed B.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the equations of motion of a formation consisting of n spacecraft in Earth orbit are derived via Lagrange's equations. The equations of motion of the formation are developed with respect to both (1) a bound Keplerian reference orbit, and (2) a specific spacecraft in the formation. The major orbital perturbations acting on a formation in low Earth orbit are also included in the analysis. In contrast to the traditional approach based on the balance of linear momentum, the use of Lagrange's equations leads to a high-level matrix derivation of the formation equations of motion. The matrix form of the nonlinear motion equations is then linearized about a bound Keplerian reference orbit. Next, it is demonstrated that under the assumption of a circular reference orbit, the linearized equations of motion reduce to the well-known Hill-Clohessy-Wiltshire equations. The resulting linear and nonlinear dynamic equations lead to maximal physical insight into the structure of formation dynamics, and are ideally suited for use in the design and validation of formation guidance and control laws.

  19. User's guide for TRANZ: a data transformation and analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    This report is a user's guide for TRANZ, a program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for an IBM PC with a basic compiler, Version 2.0. The purpose of TRANZ is to convert, organize, and evaluate electrical end-use load data obtained from the Field Data Acquistion Systems (FDAS). These FDAS will be installed in commercial buildings and residence as part of the End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP) that is being managed by PNL for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). TRANZ has been developed with highly interactive menu-driven routines and requires little computer experience for proper operation. It is executable on a single or double disk drive IBM PC. The program can be used for spot checking data, troubleshooting installation problems, and preparing tabular and graphical summaries. Sample files and program output, and a program source code listing are provided as appendices. The program itself contains six primary routines: The first routine converts the raw character byte data dumped from the FDAS into a formatted ASCII engineering unit file. The second routine checks the data to make sure that each value is within a reasonable range. The third routine sorts a file so that the records start at the earliest time and end at the latest time. The fourth routine appends two files for the same building or residence, removing any overlap in the files. The fifth routine summarizes the data in both a tabular and graphical form. The sixth routine generates a hard copy table of day numbers and their corresponding dates.

  20. Geochemical and stable isotopic data on barren and mineralized drill core in the Devonian Popovich Formation, Screamer sector of the Betze-Post gold deposit, northern Carlin trend, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, William D.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Zohar, Pamela B.; Tousignant, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The Devonian Popovich Formation is the major host for Carlin-type gold deposits in the northern Carlin trend of Nevada. The Popovich is composed of gray to black, thin-bedded, calcareous to dolomitic mudstone and limestone deposited near the carbonate platform margin. Carlin-type gold deposits are Eocene, disseminated, auriferous pyrite deposits characterized by acid leaching, sulfidation, and silicification that are typically hosted in Paleozoic calcareous sedimentary rocks exposed in windows through siliceous sedimentary rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. The Carlin trend currently is the largest gold producer in the United States. The Screamer ore zone is a tabular body on the periphery of the huge Betze-Post gold deposit. Screamer is a good place to study both the original lithogeochemistry of the Popovich Formation and the effects of subsequent alteration and mineralization because it is below the level of supergene oxidation, mostly outside the contact metamorphic aureole of the Jurassic Goldstrike stock, has small, high-grade ore zones along fractures and Jurassic dikes, and has intervening areas with lower grade mineralization and barren rock. In 1997, prior to mining at Screamer, drill core intervals from barren and mineralized Popovich Formation were selected for geochemical and stable isotope analysis. The 332, five-foot core samples analyzed are from five holes separated by as much as 2000 feet (600 meters). The samples extend from the base of the Wispy unit up through the Planar and Soft sediment deformation units into the lower part of the upper Mud unit of the Popovich Formation.

  1. 12 CFR Appendix A to Part 360 - Non-Monetary Transaction File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...pipe-delimited ASCII format and provided through FDICconnect or Direct Connect. The file will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. Field name Field description Comments Format 1. DP_Acct_Identifier Account IdentifierThe primary...

  2. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 360 - Debit/Credit File Structure

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...pipe-delimited ASCII format and provided through FDICconnect or Direct Connect. The file will be encrypted using an FDIC-supplied algorithm. Field name Field description Comments Format 1. DP_Acct_Identifier Account IdentifierThe primary...

  3. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, J

    1993-01-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  4. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Silk, J

    1993-06-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  5. Positronium beams: Formation and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Berko, S.; Brown, B.L.; Canter, K.F.; Lynn, K.G.; Mills, A.P. Jr.; Roellig, L.O.; Tang, S.; Viescas, A.

    1985-01-01

    A beam of positronium, Ps, atoms has been constructed by using the high intensity, low energy, monoenergetic positron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The process of formation and uses of positronium are discussed in this paper. 3 figs. (LSP)

  6. Sandstone Formations in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  7. Lecture Notes on Pattern Formation

    E-print Network

    Schmeiser, Christian

    the existence of morphogenes as the carriers of structural information. Pattern formation is then described. We have three main options: Either the grid speed s := x/t tends to zero, to infinity, or we keep

  8. Use-driven concept formation

    E-print Network

    Roberts, Jennifer M. (Jennifer Marie)

    2010-01-01

    When faced with a complex task, humans often identify domain-specific concepts that make the task more tractable. In this thesis, I investigate the formation of domain-specific concepts of this sort. I propose a set of ...

  9. Dynamics of interfacial pattern formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Ben-Jacob; Nigel Goldenfeld; J. S. Langer; G. Schoen

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological model of dendritic solidification incorporating interfacial kinetics, crystalline anisotropy, and a local approximation for the dynamics of the thermal diffusion field is proposed. The preliminary results are in qualitative agreement with natural dendrite-like pattern formation.

  10. Formation of the Solar System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Joshua Barnes

    This chapter from an online astronomy course briefly describes the formation of the solar system from an accretionary disk. Links to additional resources, a homework assignment, and a quiz are included.

  11. Study of the Morrison Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Charles Craig Mook

    1916-01-01

    Not Available Bibtex entry for this abstract Preferred format for this abstract (see Preferences) Find Similar Abstracts: Use: Authors Title Return: Query Results Return items starting with number Query Form Database: Astronomy Physics arXiv e-prints

  12. The multifaceted planetesimal formation process

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Anders; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ormel, Chris; Bizzarro, Martin; Rickman, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of dust and ice particles into planetesimals is an important step in the planet formation process. Planetesimals are the seeds of both terrestrial planets and the solid cores of gas and ice giants forming by core accretion. Left-over planetesimals in the form of asteroids, trans-Neptunian objects and comets provide a unique record of the physical conditions in the solar nebula. Debris from planetesimal collisions around other stars signposts that the planetesimal formation process, and hence planet formation, is ubiquitous in the Galaxy. The planetesimal formation stage extends from micrometer-sized dust and ice to bodies which can undergo run-away accretion. The latter ranges in size from 1 km to 1000 km, dependent on the planetesimal eccentricity excited by turbulent gas density fluctuations. Particles face many barriers during this growth, arising mainly from inefficient sticking, fragmentation and radial drift. Two promising growth pathways are mass transfer, where small aggregates transfer u...

  13. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  14. Thiol isomerases in thrombus formation

    PubMed Central

    Furie, Bruce; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase, ERp5 and ERp57, among perhaps other thiol isomerases, are important for the initiation of thrombus formation. Using the laser injury thrombosis model in mice to induce in vivo arterial thrombus formation, it was shown that thrombus formation is associated with PDI secretion by platelets, that inhibition of PDI blocked platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation, and that endothelial cell activation leads to PDI secretion. Similar results using this and other thrombosis models in mice have demonstrated the importance of ERp5 and ERp57 in the initiation of thrombus formation. The integrins ?IIb?3 and ?V?3 play a key role in this process and interact directly with PDI, ERp5 and ERp57. The mechanism by which thiol isomerases participate in thrombus generation is being evaluated using trapping mutant forms to identify substrates of thiol isomerases that participate in the network pathways linking thiol isomerases, platelet receptor activation and fibrin generation. Protein disulfide isomerase as an antithrombotic target is being explored using isoquercetin and quercetin 3-rutinoside, inhibitors of PDI identified by high throughput screening. Regulation of thiol isomerase expression, analysis of the storage and secretion of thiol isomerases and determination of the electron transfer pathway are key issues to understanding this newly discovered mechanism of regulation of the initiation of thrombus formation. PMID:24677236

  15. 47 CFR 64.2329 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...telephone exchange service to a requesting directory publisher in the format the publisher...subscriber list information in the format the directory publisher specifies, the carrier shall...the publisher's request, inform the directory publisher that the requested format...

  16. 47 CFR 64.2329 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...telephone exchange service to a requesting directory publisher in the format the publisher...subscriber list information in the format the directory publisher specifies, the carrier shall...the publisher's request, inform the directory publisher that the requested format...

  17. 47 CFR 64.2329 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...telephone exchange service to a requesting directory publisher in the format the publisher...subscriber list information in the format the directory publisher specifies, the carrier shall...the publisher's request, inform the directory publisher that the requested format...

  18. 47 CFR 64.2329 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...telephone exchange service to a requesting directory publisher in the format the publisher...subscriber list information in the format the directory publisher specifies, the carrier shall...the publisher's request, inform the directory publisher that the requested format...

  19. 47 CFR 64.2329 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...telephone exchange service to a requesting directory publisher in the format the publisher...subscriber list information in the format the directory publisher specifies, the carrier shall...the publisher's request, inform the directory publisher that the requested format...

  20. Gypsum Layer in Spearfish Formation, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Spearfish Formation near Spearfish, SD. The Spearfish Formation is a red, silty shale with interbedded red sandstone and siltstone. The formation contains massive gypsum deposits, which is the white layer in the photograph....

  1. Micromachining and Burr Formation for Precision Components

    E-print Network

    Hartnett, Jeffrey; Min, Sangkee; Dornfeld, David

    2006-01-01

    Formation and Minimization through Process Control", Precision Engineering,Formation for Precision Component Jeffrey Hartnett, Sangkee Min, David Dornfeld Laboratory for Manufacturing and Sustainability, Department of Mechanical Engineering

  2. Micromachining and Burr Formation for Precision Components

    E-print Network

    Hartnett, Jeffrey; Min, Sangkee; Dornfeld, David

    2007-01-01

    formation and minimization through process control, Precision Engineering,Engineering University of California at Berkeley Berkeley, California USA 94720-1740 Abstract An understanding of burr formation

  3. Resolving the Formation of Protogalaxies

    E-print Network

    John H. Wise

    2008-04-25

    Cosmic structure originated from minute density perturbations in an almost homogeneous universe. The first stars are believed to be very massive and luminous, providing the first ionizing radiation and heavy elements to the universe and forming 100 million years after the Big Bang. The impact from primordial stellar radiation is far reaching and affects subsequent star and galaxy formation. In this thesis, we present results from adaptive mesh refinement calculations of the formation of the first galaxies. We gradually introduce important physical processes, such as molecular hydrogen cooling and stellar feedback, to base models that only consider atomic hydrogen and helium cooling. In these base models, we find that gas in dark matter halos with masses ~10^8 solar masses centrally collapse before multiple fragmentation occurs in a global disc. We then investigate the importance of molecular hydrogen cooling in early structure formation in the presence of a soft ultraviolet radiation background. We find that molecular hydrogen plays an important role in star formation in halos well below a virial temperature of 10,000 K even in the most extreme assumptions of negative radiative feedback. We also present results from the first radiation hydrodynamics calculations of early dwarf galaxy formation. We develop a novel technique, adaptive ray tracing, to accurately transport radiation from primordial stars. We find primordial stellar feedback alters the landscape of early galaxy formation in that its angular momentum is increased and baryon fractions are decreased. We also describe the metal enrichment of the intergalactic medium and early dwarf galaxies. Finally we explore cosmological reionization by these massive, metal-free stars and its effects on star formation in early galaxies.

  4. Numerical Simulations of Galaxy Formation: Cooling, Heating, Star \\\\ Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, A. A.

    Formation of luminous matter in the Universe is a complicated process, which includes many processes and components. It is the vastly different scales involved in the process (from star formation on few parsec scales to galaxy clusters and superclusters on megaparsecs scales) and numerous ill-understood processes, which make the whole field a maze of unsolved, but exciting problems. We present new approximations for numerical treatment of multiphase ISM forming stars. The approximations were tested and calibrated using N-body+fluid numerical simulations. We specifically target issues related with effects of unresolved lumpinesses of the gas.

  5. Formation of Molecular Clouds and Global Conditions for Star Formation

    E-print Network

    Dobbs, Clare L; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Bolatto, Alberto D; Fukui, Yasuo; Heyer, Mark; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ostriker, Eve C; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Giant molecular clouds (GMCs) are the primary reservoirs of cold, star-forming molecular gas in the Milky Way and similar galaxies, and thus any understanding of star formation must encompass a model for GMC formation, evolution, and destruction. These models are necessarily constrained by measurements of interstellar molecular and atomic gas, and the emergent, newborn stars. Both observations and theory have undergone great advances in recent years, the latter driven largely by improved numerical simulations, and the former by the advent of large-scale surveys with new telescopes and instruments. This chapter offers a thorough review of the current state of the field.

  6. An XML portable chart format.

    PubMed Central

    Chueh, H. C.; Raila, W. F.; Berkowicz, D. A.; Barnett, G. O.

    1998-01-01

    The clinical chart remains the fundamental record of outpatient clinical care. As this information migrates to electronic form, there is an opportunity to create standard formats for transmitting these charts. This paper describes work toward a Portable Chart Format (PCF) that can represent the relevant aspects of an outpatient chart. The main goal of the format is to provide a packaging medium for outpatient clinical charts in a transfer of care scenario. A secondary goal is to support the aggregation of comparable clinical data for outcomes analysis. The syntax used for PCF is Extended Markup Language (XML), a W3C standard. The structure of the PCF is based on a clinically relevant view of the data. The data definitions and nomenclature used are based primarily on existing clinical standards. PMID:9929315

  7. Biofilm formation by Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Dapa, Tanja; Unnikrishnan, Meera

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a major healthcare-associated disease worldwide. Recurring infections and increasing antibiotic resistance have complicated treatment of CDI. While C. difficile spores are important for transmission and persistence of CDI, other factors such as gut colonization and formation of bacterial communities in the gut may also contribute to pathogenesis and persistence, but have not been well investigated. Recently, we reported that important clinical C. difficile strains are able to form composite biofilms in vitro. C. difficile biofilm formation is a complex process, modulated by several different factors, including cell surface components and regulators. We also reported that bacteria within biofilms are more resistant to high concentrations of vancomycin, the antibiotic of choice for treatment of CDI. Here we summarize our recent findings and discuss the implications of biofilm formation by this anaerobic gut pathogen in disease pathogenesis and treatment. PMID:23892245

  8. International bilateral water treaty formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espey, Molly; Towfique, Basman

    2004-05-01

    A logistic model is estimated to determine factors that have influenced the formation of bilateral international water treaties over the last 60 years. Results indicate that the larger a water basin is as a percent of a country's size, the more likely the country is to form a treaty regarding its management. On the other hand, the more control over the water basin any given country has, the less likely it will be involved in a treaty. The results also support aspects of two competing theories about the role of country differences, that in some cases they serve as obstacles to treaty formation yet in other cases they encourage treaty formation to formalize management when informal arrangements are not adequate.

  9. Pattern formation in multiplex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Hata, Shigefumi; Guilera, Albert Díaz-

    2015-01-01

    The advances in understanding complex networks have generated increasing interest in dynamical processes occurring on them. Pattern formation in activator-inhibitor systems has been studied in networks, revealing differences from the classical continuous media. Here we study pattern formation in a new framework, namely multiplex networks. These are systems where activator and inhibitor species occupy separate nodes in different layers. Species react across layers but diffuse only within their own layer of distinct network topology. This multiplicity generates heterogeneous patterns with significant differences from those observed in single-layer networks. Remarkably, diffusion-induced instability can occur even if the two species have the same mobility rates; condition which can never destabilize single-layer networks. The instability condition is revealed using perturbation theory and expressed by a combination of degrees in the different layers. Our theory demonstrates that the existence of such topology-driven instabilities is generic in multiplex networks, providing a new mechanism of pattern formation. PMID:26042606

  10. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the ? cold dark matter (?CDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M? and collapsing at redshifts z ? 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae. PMID:24168986

  11. Formation of the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the ? cold dark matter (?CDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ˜106 M? and collapsing at redshifts z ? 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ˜2018, and for ‘stellar archaeology’, which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae.

  12. Conductive Anodic Filament (CAF) Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Antonio

    Conductive anodic filament (CAF) is a failure mode in printed wiring boards (PWBs) which occurs under high humidity and high voltage gradient conditions. The filament, a copper salt, grows from anode to cathode along the epoxy-glass interface. Ready and Turbini (2000) identified this copper salt as the Cu 2(OH)3Cl, atacamite compound. This work has investigated the influence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene propylene glycol (PEPG) fluxing agents on the chemical nature of CAF. For coupons processed with PEPG flux, with and without chloride, a copper-chloride containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix. This compound was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as CuCl and an electrochemical mechanism for the formation of the chloride-containing CAF has been proposed. For PEG flux, with and without chloride, it has been shown that CAF only formed, but no copper containing compound formed in the matrix. It appears for PEG fluxed coupons, a PEG-Cu-Cl complex forms, binds the available Cu and acts as a barrier to the formation of CuCl in the polymer matrix. Meeker and Lu Valle (1995) have previously proposed that CAF failure is best represented by two competing reactions -- the formation of a copper chloride corrosion compound (now identified as Cu2(OH)3Cl) and the formation of innocuous trapped chlorine compounds. Since no evidence of any trapped chloride compounds has been found, we propose that the formation of CAF is best represented by a single non-reversible reaction. For coupons processed with a high bromide-containing flux, bromide containing CAF was created and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to be Cu2(OH)3Br. In addition, a copper-containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix and characterized using XPS as CuBr. An electrochemical mechanism for the formation of bromide-containing CAF has been proposed based on the XPS data.

  13. Biofilm formation, cleaning, re-formation on polyamide composite membranes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arun Subramani; Eric M. V. Hoek

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation were studied in a continuous flow annular biofilm reactor using two commercial polyamide composite membranes — a relatively hydrophilic and smooth nanofiltration (NF) membrane and a relatively hydrophobic and rough reverse osmosis (RO) membrane. Multiple probe-liquid contact angle analyses confirmed that both membrane surfaces had nearly identical chemical properties after exposure to bacteria-free nutrient media

  14. Formation Flying In Highly Elliptical Orbits Initializing the Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mailhe, Laurie; Schiff, Conrad; Hughes, Steven

    2000-01-01

    In this paper several methods are examined for initializing formations in which all spacecraft start in a common elliptical orbit subsequent to separation from the launch vehicle. The tetrahedron formation used on missions such as the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Auroral Multiscale Midex (AMM), and Cluster is used as a test bed Such a formation provides full three degrees-of-freedom in the relative motion about the reference orbit and is germane to several missions. The type of maneuver strategy that can be employed depends on the specific initial conditions of each member of the formation. Single-impulse maneuvers based on a Gaussian variation-of-parameters (VOP) approach, while operationally simple and intuitively-based, work only in a limited sense for a special class of initial conditions. These 'tailored' initial conditions are characterized as having only a few of the Keplerian elements different from the reference orbit. Attempts to achieve more generic initial conditions exceed the capabilities of the single impulse VOP. For these cases, multiple-impulse implementations are always possible but are generally less intuitive than the single-impulse case. The four-impulse VOP formalism discussed by Schaub is examined but smaller delta-V costs are achieved in our test problem by optimizing a Lambert solution.

  15. Functions of coccolith formation1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Steven; Karl M. Wilbur

    Abstract Measurements,of discrimination,in fixation,of stable carbon,isotopes,by two,species,of coccolithophorids support the concept that coccolith formation depends on a supply of HCO,- hut that CO, is the principal substrate of photosynthesis. This in turn suggests that coccolith formation,and,photosynthesis,are linked,through,their complementary,influence,on,the in- ternal equilibrium of dissolved inorganic carbon. Measurements,of osmotic responses and transmcmbranc,potential,differences,of calcified and noncalcified,cells showed,that although coccolithophorids behaved as if they

  16. Core formation by giant impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1992-01-01

    The present model for the timing and mechanisms of planetary core formation argues that once a planet reaches a certain minimum mass, the large impacts that are typical of late accretion can trigger core formation. This model circumvents the difficulties posed by the large-scale segregation of molten iron into diapirs, and the displacement of the cold, elastic interior of the planet by the iron. The analytical melting model used is based on the Hugoniot equations, the empirical relationship for the decline of particle velocity with distance, and the linear shock-particle velocity relationship.

  17. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  18. Isocurvature mechanism for structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    We examine a novel mechanism for structure formation involving initial number density fluctuations between relativistic species, one of which then undergoes a temporary downward variation in its equation of state and generates superhorizon-scale density fluctuations. Isocurvature decaying dark matter (IDDM) models provide concrete examples. This mechanism solves the phenomenological problems of traditional isocurvature models, allowing IDDM models to fit the current cosmic microwave background and large-scale structure data, while still providing novel behavior. We characterize the decaying dark matter and its decay products as a single component of ``generalized dark matter.'' This simplifies calculations in decaying dark matter models and others that utilize this mechanism for structure formation.

  19. A Synopsis of Format-Preserving Encryption

    E-print Network

    Rogaway, Phillip

    A Synopsis of Format-Preserving Encryption Phillip Rogaway Department of Computer Science University of California, Davis, USA March 27, 2010 Abstract Format-preserving encryption (FPE) encrypts a plaintext of some specified format into a ciphertext of the same format--for example, encrypting a social

  20. Star formation in active dwarf galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. M. Telesco

    1986-01-01

    Star formation and the ISM in active dwarf galaxies are studied based on data from the IRAS Point Source Catalog. The dwarf galaxies that show evidence of recent energetic star formation are generally also strong far-infrared emitters; thus, active current star formation is associated with a history of energetic star formation. A fraction of the galaxies considered here have a

  1. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Maciejewski; R. Neuhäuser; R. Errmann; M. Mugrauer; Ch. Adam; A. Berndt; T. Eisenbeiss; S. Fiedler; Ch. Ginski; M. Hohle; U. Kramm; C. Marka; M. Moualla; T. Pribulla; St. Raetz; T. Roell; T. O. B. Schmidt; M. Seeliger; I. Spaleniak; N. Tetzlaff; L. Trepl

    2011-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just ~10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger

  2. Star formation across galactic environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Jason

    I present here parallel investigations of star formation in typical and extreme galaxies. The typical galaxies are selected to be free of active galactic nuclei (AGN), while the extreme galaxies host quasars (the most luminous class of AGN). These two environments are each insightful in their own way; quasars are among the most violent objects in the universe, literally reshaping their host galaxies, while my sample of AGN-free star-forming galaxies ranges from systems larger than the Milky Way to small galaxies which are forming stars at unsustainably high rates. The current paradigm of galaxy formation and evolution suggests that extreme circumstances are key stepping stones in the assembly of galaxies like our Milky Way. To test this paradigm and fully explore its ramifications, this dual approach is needed. My sample of AGN-free galaxies is drawn from the KPNO International Spectroscopic Survey. This Halpha-selected, volume-limited survey was designed to detect star-forming galaxies without a bias toward continuum luminosity. This type of selection ensures that this sample is not biased toward galaxies that are large or nearby. My work studies the KISS galaxies in the mid- and far-infrared using photometry from the IRAC and MIPS instruments aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. These infrared bands are particularly interesting for star formation studies because the ultraviolet light from young stars is reprocessed into thermal emission in the far-infrared (24mum MIPS) by dust and into vibrational transitions features in the mid-infrared (8.0mum IRAC) by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The work I present here examines the efficiencies of PAH and thermal dust emission as tracers of star-formation rates over a wide range of galactic stellar masses. I find that the efficiency of PAH as a star-formation tracer varies with galactic stellar mass, while thermal dust has a highly variable efficiency that does not systematically depend on galactic stellar mass. Complementing this study of normal star-forming galaxies, my study of quasar host galaxies utilizes narrow- and medium-band images of eight Palomar-Green (PG) quasars from the WFPC2 and NICMOS instruments aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Using images of a point-spread function (PSF) star in the same filters, I subtract the PSF of the quasar from each of the target images. The residual light images clearly show the host galaxies of the respective quasars. The narrow-band images were chosen to be centered on the Hbeta, [O II ], [O III], and Paalpha emission lines, allowing the use of line ratios and luminosities to create extinction and star formation maps. Additionally, I utilize the line-ratio maps to distinguish AGN-powered line emission from star formation powered line emission with line-diagnostic diagrams. I find star formation in each of the eight quasar host galaxies in my study. The bulk star-formation rates are lower than expected, suggesting that quasar host galaxies may be dynamically more advanced than previously believed. Seven of the eight quasar host galaxies in this study have higher-than-typical mass-specific star-formation rates. Additionally, I see evidence of shocked gas, supporting the hypotheses presented in earlier works that suggest that AGN activity quenches star formation in its host galaxy by disrupting its gas reservoir.

  3. Pattern formation outside of equilibrium

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. C. Cross; P. C. Hohenberg

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive review of spatiotemporal pattern formation in systems driven away from equilibrium is presented, with emphasis on comparisons between theory and quantitative experiments. Examples include patterns in hydrodynamic systems such as thermal convection in pure fluids and binary mixtures, Taylor-Couette flow, parametric-wave instabilities, as well as patterns in solidification fronts, nonlinear optics, oscillatory chemical reactions and excitable biological media.

  4. Predicting DXAA Formation During Chloramination

    E-print Network

    and Sean Raymond New England Water Treatment Technology Assistance Center (NEWTTAC) University of New Source Metedeconk River Lake Austin Water Type 1. Raw 2. Coagulated 3. Membrane Filtered 4. Biodegraded 5 on DXAA formation as a function of water characteristics and chloramination conditions 3. Develop

  5. Sedimentary pyrite formation: An update

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert A. Berner

    1984-01-01

    Sedimentary pyrite formation during early diagenesis is a major process for controlling the oxygen level of the atmosphere and the sulfate concentration in seawater over geologic time. The amount of pyrite that may form in a sediment is limited by the rates of supply of decomposable organic matter, dissolved sulfate, and reactive detrital iron minerals. Organic matter appears to be

  6. Solids formation on filtrate neutralization

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1988-01-01

    The Separations Technology Laboratory was requested to study what happens when a filtrate solution, which will be a F B-Line product, is neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The primary concern was the formation of solids that could cause damage in pump seals, resulting in their failure. The results of these experiments indicate that under process conditions, granular, crystalline sodium fluoride will

  7. Multiresolution FOPEN SAR image formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert C. Dipietro; Ronald L. Fante; Richard P. Perry; Mehrdad Soumekh; Laurens D. Tromp

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new technique for FOPEN SAR (foliage penetration synthetic aperture radar) image formation of Ultra Wideband UHF radar data. Planar Subarray Processing (PSAP) has successfully demonstrated the capability of forming multi- resolution images for X and Ka band radar systems under MITRE IR&D and the DARPA IBC program. We have extended the PSAP algorithm to provide the

  8. Reflexive Expectation Formation Timo Ehrig

    E-print Network

    Jost, Jürgen

    , and macroeconomic quantities, agents need not only take into account their belief regarding fundamental values there is a fundamental uncertainty about the market process, like after financial crises? How does the formation entertain higher order beliefs regarding the expectations of other economic agents, which are the basis

  9. Introduction Application Layer Message Formats

    E-print Network

    Soltys, Michael

    Definition (Network Packet) A network packet is a formatted unit of data carried by a computer network Packet Header The header contains overhead information about the data carried by the packet Structure of A Network Packet Payload The payload refers to the actual data that the packet is delivering

  10. Batch calcination studies: melt formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shefcik

    1961-01-01

    It is shown that the formation of a meltable calcine by batch calcination of an acidic waste solution containing primary sodium, iron, and aluminum sulfate and nitrate can be predicted. Calcine melting at temperatures less than 900°C can be correlated with the sodium to metal ion ratio and the sulfate to salt nitrate ratio. The minor constituents present in the

  11. Formation of Clastic Sedimentary Rocks

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2010-01-01

    This animation traces the formation of sedimentary rock. It starts at a beach environment where sea water minerals cement sand grains together. The animation concludes with a real microscopic image of sandstone showing both mineral grains and cement. The animation can be paused and rewound to stress important points.

  12. Formation of the Giant Planets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Mizuno

    1980-01-01

    The structure of a gaseous envelope surrounding a protoplanet has been investigated in connection with the formation of the giant planets. Under the assumptions of spherical symmetry and hydrostatic equilibrium, the structure has been calculated for the regions of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Energy transfer in the envelope has been taken into account precisely. When the core mass increases

  13. Signal Formation in Various Detectors

    E-print Network

    Manolis Dris; Theo Alexopoulos

    2014-08-15

    In this write up we present the general theory of the signal formation in various detectors. We follow a pedagogical analysis and presentation such that the results could easily understood and applied by the interested reader to the different detector configurations. We include few applications to gaseous detectors, namely, Monitored Drift Tubes (MDT) and microstrip pattern detector of the micromegas type.

  14. Program Evaluation: A Workable Format

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Matczynski; Joseph Rogus

    1979-01-01

    Evaluation models are abundant but many are complex, say these authors, who present in this article a format for translating theory into practice in a common sense manner. The material is structured around a series of questions which can be addressed in any situation.

  15. Formative Assessment: A Cybernetic Viewpoint

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roos, Bertil; Hamilton, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers alternative assessment, feedback and cybernetics. For more than 30 years, debates about the bi-polarity of formative and summative assessment have served as surrogates for discussions about the workings of the mind, the social implications of assessment and, as important, the role of instruction in the advancement of learning.…

  16. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorin S. Matthews; Ryan L. Hayes; Michael S. Freed; Truell W. Hyde

    2007-01-01

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, \\

  17. Star Formation in NGC 4631

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. M. Smith; N. R. Collins; R. Bohlin; M. N. Fanelli; S. G. Neff; R. W. O'Connell; M. S. Roberts; T. P. Stecher; W. H. Waller

    1997-01-01

    The group of galaxies including NGC 4631 provides an outstanding example of a galaxy interaction accompanied by intensive star formation. FUV imagery, recorded by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT), exhibits very bright far- ultraviolet (FUV) emission corresponding to the H II regions cataloged by Crillon and Monet (1969). This data is, in our experience, extraordinary in that NCG 4631 is

  18. Stereotype Formation: Biased by Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences in the extent to which social groups have previously been predictive of behavioral or physical properties. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness of groups with respect to evaluatively neutral…

  19. Compositional Balancing Before Moon Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. J. Taylor

    2008-01-01

    A striking feature in the compositions of the Earth and Moon is their identical abundances of oxygen isotopes. Most planetary scientists agree that the Moon formed as the result of a giant impact with the proto-Earth. It explains some important characteristics about the Earth and Moon, such as why the Moon has a small metallic iron core, but planetary formation

  20. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying the data. They can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). ...

  1. Formative Assessment in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughland, Tony; Kilpatrick, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    This action learning study in a year three classroom explored the implementation of five formative assessment principles to assist students' understandings of the scientific topic of liquids and solids. These principles were employed to give students a greater opportunity to express their understanding of the concepts. The study found that…

  2. Mechanisms of polymeric film formation.

    PubMed

    Felton, Linda A

    2013-12-01

    Polymeric films are applied to solid dosage forms for decorative, protective, and functional purposes. These films are generally applied by a spray atomization process, where the polymer is sprayed onto the solid substrate. The mechanism by which films are formed is dependent on whether the polymer is in the dissolved or dispersed state. For solutions, film formation occurs as the solvent evaporates, since the polymer chains are intimately mixed. Film formation from polymeric dispersions, however, requires the coalescence of individual polymer spheres and interpenetration of the polymer chains. Films prepared from polymeric dispersions exhibit a minimum film forming temperature and processing conditions must exceed this temperature in order to form the film. In addition, these systems generally require post-coating storage in temperature and humidity controlled environments to ensure complete polymer coalescence. Incomplete coalescence can lead to significant changes in drug release over time. This review article highlights the basic science principles involved in film formation from both polymeric solutions and dispersions and the variables that influence these film formation processes. PMID:23305867

  3. A standard audit trail format

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1995-02-01

    The central role of audit trails, or (more properly) logs, in security monitoring needs little description, for it is too well known for any to doubt it. Auditing, or the analysis of logs, is a central part of security not only in computer system security but also in analyzing financial and other non-technical systems. As part of this process, it is often necessary to reconcile logs from different sources. This speaks of a need for a standard logging format. A standard log format robust enough to meet the needs of heterogeneity, transportability across various network protocols, and flexibility sufficient to meet a variety of needs in very different environments must satisfy two basic properties: extensibility and portability. This report presents the author`s proposed format for a standard log record. In section 3, he shows how and where the translation should be done, and in section 4 he demonstrates how log records from several disparate systems would be put into this format. Section 5 concludes with some observations and suggestions for future work.

  4. Biofilm formation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto; Moscoso, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary Biofilm?grown bacteria are refractory to antimicrobial agents and show an increased capacity to evade the host immune system. In recent years, studies have begun on biofilm formation by Streptococcus pneumoniae, an important human pathogen, using a variety of in vitro model systems. The bacterial cells in these biofilms are held together by an extracellular matrix composed of DNA, proteins and, possibly, polysaccharide(s). Although neither the precise nature of these proteins nor the composition of the putative polysaccharide(s) is clear, it is known that choline?binding proteins are required for successful biofilm formation. Further, many genes appear to be involved, although the role of each appears to vary when biofilms are produced in batch or continuous culture. Prophylactic and therapeutic measures need to be developed to fight S.?pneumoniae biofilm formation. However, much care needs to be taken when choosing strains for such studies because different S.?pneumoniae isolates can show remarkable genomic differences. Multispecies and in vivo biofilm models must also be developed to provide a more complete understanding of biofilm formation and maintenance. PMID:21906265

  5. Reverse hydrotropy by complex formation.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Kamil; Gutberlet, Thomas; Raghuwanshi, Vikram Singh; Terry, Ann

    2015-01-14

    Self-aggregation of three di-N-alkylated diaza-18-crown-6 ethers (ACEs) was studied in non-polar solvents. The three ACEs differed by the length of the alkyl chain: n-decyl (ACE-10), n-hexadecyl (ACE-16) and n-tetracosane (ACE-24). From the previously reported interfacial tension isotherms, the formation of reverse micelles was expected above ACE concentrations of ?10(-3) M. However, the water content analysis in conjunction with Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS) and (1)H NMR Diffusion Ordered Spectroscopy (DOSY) do not provide any clear proof of the existence of aggregates. Only the Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) of concentrated toluene ACE solutions reveals the existence of small reverse micelles (probably ACE dimers forming small cages hosting 1-2 water molecules). On the other hand, spectrophotometric and fluorescence dye dissolution studies using eosin Y, tropaeolin OO and methyl orange suggest that ACEs can dissolve these dyes without requiring the formation of aggregates. This discrepancy was interpreted assuming the dye-ACE complexation as the driving force for dye solubilisation, providing a possible mechanism of reverse hydrotropy ("lipotropy") in non-polar solvents. This example shows that special care should be taken when dye solubilisation is used to probe self-aggregation of an amphiphile in non-polar solvents. The amphiphile-dye complex formation might be responsible for false positive results and the aggregate formation should always be confirmed with other methods. PMID:25415596

  6. Brain gangliosides and memory formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hinrich Rahmann

    1995-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the process of molecular facilitation of neuronal circuits by means of stabilization of synaptic contacts represents the structural basis for memory formation. At the distinct zone of synaptic contact the following basic events occur: alterations of the electrical field strength at the outer surface of synaptic membranes, conformational changes of membrane-bound functional proteins (ion channels,

  7. Cave Formations in Wind Cave

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wind Cave is the first cave national park and currently, the 6th most extensive cave network in the world. It's most famous for its large concentration of a fairly rare cave formation known as boxwork. Boxwork is formed when dissolved calcium carbonate crystallized in cracks in surrounding rock. The...

  8. Tourism motivation and expectation formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juergen Gnoth

    1997-01-01

    This theoretical study introduces a model of tourism motivation and expectation formation. It is based on a discussion and operationalization of both the behaviorist notion of drive reduction and the cognitivist constructs of attitudes and values. While the satisfaction of inner-directed values and motivations depends on classes of objects, outer-directed values target specific objects. In the case of trying to

  9. Sedimentary pyrite formation: An update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Robert A.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentary pyrite formation during early diagenesis is a major process for controlling the oxygen level of the atmosphere and the sulfate concentration in seawater over geologic time. The amount of pyrite that may form in a sediment is limited by the rates of supply of decomposable organic matter, dissolved sulfate, and reactive detrital iron minerals. Organic matter appears to be the major control on pyrite formation in normal (non-euxinic) terrigenous marine sediments where dissolved sulfate and iron minerals are abundant. By contrast, pyrite formation in non-marine, freshwater sediments is severely limited by low concentrations of sulfate and this characteristic can be used to distinguish ancient organic-rich fresh water shales from marine shales. Under marine euxinic conditions sufficient H 2S is produced that the dominant control on pyrite formation is the availability of reactive iron minerals. Calculations, based on a sulfur isotope model, indicate that over Phanerozoic time the worldwide average organic carbon-to-pyrite sulfur ratio of sedimentary rocks has varied considerably. High C/S ratios during Permo-Carboniferous time can be explained by a shift of major organic deposition from the oceans to the land which resulted in the formation of vast coal swamps at that time. Low C/S ratios, compared to today, during the early Paleozoic can be explained in terms of a greater abundance of euxinic basins combined with deposition of a more reactive type of organic matter in the remaining oxygenated portions of the ocean. The latter could have been due to lower oceanic oxygen levels and/or a lack of transportation of refractory terrestrial organic matter to the marine environment due to the absence of vascular land plants at that time.

  10. Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    E-print Network

    C. M. Gutierrez; M. S. Alonso; J. G. Funes; M. B. Ribeiro

    2006-04-14

    We present narrow-band observations of the H$\\alpha$ emission in a sample of 31 satellite orbiting isolated giant spiral galaxies. The sample studied spans the range $-19formation rates are 0.68 and 3.66 M$_\\sun$ yr$^{-1}$ respectively. Maps of the spatial distribution of ionized gas are presented. The star-forming regions show a rich structure in which frequently discrete complexes are imposed over more diffuse structures. In general, the current star formation rates are smaller that the mean values in the past obtained from the current stellar content; this probably indicates a declining rhythm with time in the generation of new stars. However, the reserve of gas is enough to continue fueling the current levels of star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. Four of the objects (NGC 2718b, NGC 4541e, NGC 5965a$_1$ and NGC 5965a$_2$) with higher current star formation rates show clear signs of interaction with close companions of comparable brightness at projected distances of 25, 20 and 2 kpc respectively. The only two galaxies in our sample that do not show star formation activity are members of these interacting systems, and it is unclear if this is a consequence of intrinsic properties (both are Hubble early types) or if it is related with possible disruption of the external parts due to the interaction. In the case of the pair NGC 2718a-b there are indications of gas transport between both galaxies.

  11. Peripheral Leptin Regulates Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Kalra, Satya P.; Wong, Carmen P.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Boghossian, Stephane; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence does not support the prevailing view that leptin, acting through a hypothalamic relay, decreases bone accrual by inhibiting bone formation. To clarify the mechanisms underlying regulation of bone architecture by leptin, we evaluated bone growth and turnover in wild type (WT) mice, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and ob/ob mice treated with leptin. We also performed hypothalamic leptin gene therapy to determine the effect of elevated hypothalamic leptin levels on osteoblasts. Finally, to determine the effects of loss of peripheral leptin signaling on bone formation and energy metabolism, we used bone marrow (BM) from WT or db/db donor mice to reconstitute the hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments in lethally irradiated WT recipient mice. Decreases in bone growth, osteoblast-lined bone perimeter and bone formation rate were observed in ob/ob mice and greatly increased in ob/ob mice following subcutaneous administration of leptin. Similarly, hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast-lined bone perimeter in ob/ob mice. In spite of normal osteoclast-lined bone perimeter, db/db mice exhibited a mild but generalized osteopetrotic-like (calcified cartilage encased by bone) skeletal phenotype and greatly reduced serum markers of bone turnover. Tracking studies and histology revealed quantitative replacement of BM cells following BM transplantation. WT mice engrafted with db/db BM did not differ in energy homeostasis from untreated WT mice or WT mice engrafted with WT BM. Bone formation in WT mice engrafted with WT BM did not differ from WT mice, whereas bone formation in WT mice engrafted with db/db cells did not differ from the low rates observed in untreated db/db mice. In summary, our results indicate that leptin, acting primarily through peripheral pathways, increases osteoblast number and activity. PMID:22887758

  12. Inside-out planet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tan, Jonathan C., E-mail: s.chatterjee@astro.ufl.edu, E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, ?, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors ? 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (?cm-m size) 'pebbles', drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ('dead zone') region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ?1 M {sub ?} planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  13. Leader-formation Navigation Using Dynamic Formation Pattern Yangmin Li and Xin Chen

    E-print Network

    Li, Yangmin

    Leader-formation Navigation Using Dynamic Formation Pattern Yangmin Li and Xin Chen Abstract-- Formation navigation is an interesting topic in robotic community. In this paper, we focus on two aspects of formation navigation, leader-formation keeping and obstacle avoidance. A local control strategy based

  14. Formation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of quasi-parallel Alfven solitons is investigated through the inverse scattering transformation (IST) for the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The DNLS has a rich complement of soliton solutions consisting of a two-parameter soliton family and a one-parameter bright/dark soliton family. In this paper, the physical roles and origins of these soliton families are inferred through an analytic study of the scattering data generated by the IST for a set of initial profiles. The DNLS equation has as limiting forms the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS), Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de-Vries (MKdV) equations. Each of these limits is briefly reviewed in the physical context of quasi-parallel Alfven waves. The existence of these limiting forms serves as a natural framework for discussing the formation of Alfven solitons.

  15. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  16. CEA Studies on Halo Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichoff, N.; Beauvais, P.-Y.; Duperrier, R.; Haouat, G.; Lagniel, J.-M.; Uriot, D.

    2003-12-01

    Beginning with the TRISPAL project, halo formation has been extensively studied at CEA last 10 years. Effect of mismatching, non-linear forces, resonances, longitudinal-transverse coupling, intrabeam scattering, and interaction with the residual gas have been explored. They have been studied theoretically from both analytical models and dedicated simulation codes and, for some of them, experimentally from proton beam profile measurements over a high dynamic range in a 26 periods FODO channel. Our knowledge, strongly improved through collaborations with our worldwide colleagues, has been applied to the design of several linac projects, whose last are SPIRAL2 and RX2. The goal of this presentation is to summarise the contribution of the CEA teams to the understanding of the halo formation.

  17. Engineering biofilm formation and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas K.; Hong, Seok Hoon; Ma, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Anywhere water is in the liquid state, bacteria will exist as biofilms, which are complex communities of cells cemented together. Although frequently associated with disease and biofouling, biofilms are also important for engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biocatalysis and microbial fuel cells. Here we review approaches to alter genetic circuits and cell signaling toward controlling biofilm formation, and emphasize utilizing these tools for engineering applications. Based on a better understanding of the genetic basis of biofilm formation, we find that biofilms may be controlled by manipulating extracellular signals and that they may be dispersed using conserved intracellular signals and regulators. Biofilms could also be formed at specific locations where they might be engineered to make chemicals or treat human disease. PMID:21131080

  18. The dynamics of city formation*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Vernon; Venables, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium city size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of cities with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention. PMID:25089087

  19. Molecule Formation on Interstellar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, G.

    2011-05-01

    The first experiments that were expressively designed to be applicable to hydrogen formation reactions in the ISM measured the efficiency of formation of molecular hydrogen on a polycrystalline olivine (Pirronello et al. (1997a)). It soon turned out that more was needed, and research began on the mechanism of reaction, on the in uence of the surface morphology, and on the excitation of the just- ormed molecule. In this review, I summarize what we learned from these and other experiments, and where more work is needed: in the elementary steps of reaction, in the bridging of the laboratory-ISM gap (large ux/large surface - small ux/small grain) using simulations, and in using realistic samples of dust grains. Understanding what experiments can and cannot deliver will help in designing and targeting observations, and vice-versa.

  20. Shock Formation in Lovelock Theories

    E-print Network

    Harvey S. Reall; Norihiro Tanahashi; Benson Way

    2014-09-12

    We argue that Lovelock theories of gravity suffer from shock formation, unlike General Relativity. We consider the propagation of (i) a discontinuity in curvature, and (ii) weak, high frequency, gravitational waves. Such disturbances propagate along characteristic hypersurfaces of a "background" spacetime and their amplitude is governed by a transport equation. In GR the transport equation is linear. In Lovelock theories, it is nonlinear and its solutions can blow up, corresponding to the formation of a shock. We show that this effect is absent in some simple cases e.g. a flat background spacetime, and demonstrate its presence for a plane wave background. We comment on weak cosmic censorship, the evolution of shocks, and the nonlinear stability of Minkowski spacetime, in Lovelock theories.

  1. Hail Formation via Microphysical Recycling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflaum, John C.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that alternation of low-density riming and wet growth processes play a role in hailstone formation. Such alternation of growth processes, which has been called microphysical recycling, is envisioned to operate in the following manner. During low-density riming growth, hailstones require reduced updraft velocities as compared to hailstones growing via classical high-density ice acquisition. During subsequent wet growth, water soaks into the previously acquired porous rime and on freezing produces hard, dense hailstones compatible with samples collected at the surface. Such a two-stage process lessens the dynamical requirements of hail formation.This article elucidates the microphysical recycling mechanism, cloud conditions necessary to initiate it, evidence that it is operational in the atmosphere, and the possible consequences of its existence with regard to hail suppression.

  2. New Paradigms For Asteroid Formation

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Anders; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    Asteroids and meteorites provide key evidence on the formation of planetesimals in the Solar System. Asteroids are traditionally thought to form in a bottom-up process by coagulation within a population of initially km-scale planetesimals. However, new models challenge this idea by demonstrating that asteroids of sizes from 100 to 1000 km can form directly from the gravitational collapse of small particles which have organised themselves in dense filaments and clusters in the turbulent gas. Particles concentrate passively between eddies down to the smallest scales of the turbulent gas flow and inside large-scale pressure bumps and vortices. The streaming instability causes particles to take an active role in the concentration, by piling up in dense filaments whose friction on the gas reduces the radial drift compared to that of isolated particles. In this chapter we review new paradigms for asteroid formation and compare critically against the observed properties of asteroids as well as constraints from meteo...

  3. Formation of polar ring galaxies

    E-print Network

    F. Bournaud; F. Combes

    2003-02-04

    Polar ring galaxies are peculiar systems in which a gas rich, nearly polar ring surrounds an early-type or elliptical host galaxy. Two formation scenarios for these objects have been proposed: they are thought to form either in major galaxy mergers or by tidal accretion of the polar material from a gas rich donor galaxy. Both scenarios are studied through N-body simulations including gas dynamics and star formation. Constraints on physical parameters are drawn out, in order to determine which scenario is the most likely to occur. Polar ring galaxies from each scenario are compared with observations and we discuss whether the accretion scenario and the merging scenario account for observational properties of polar ring galaxies. The conclusion of this study is that the accretion scenario is both the most likely and the most supported by observations. Even if the merging scenario is rather robust, most polar ring galaxies are shown to be the result of tidal gas accretion events.

  4. Star formation in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, J. M. Rodriguez; Rudy, Richard J.; Jones, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the IRAS data for a sample of classical (optically selected) Seyfert galaxies is presented. The IRAS fluxes at 25 micron, 60 micron, and 100 micron are found to be uncorrelated or only very weakly correlated with the UV/Optical continuum flux and the near and mid IR flux at 3.5 and 10 microns. To investigate the possibility that star formation accounts for the far IR flux, the IRAS measurements for the Seyfert galaxies are compared to IRAS observations of a sample of normal spiral galaxies, and a sample of Starburst galaxies. It is shown that the far IR luminosities and far IR colors of Seyfert galaxies are indistinguishable from those of the Starburst galaxies. Besides, normal galaxies are an order of magnitude less luminous than both the Seyfert and the Starburst galaxies. This indicates that star formation produces the bulk of the far infrared emission in Seyfert galaxies.

  5. Star Cluster Formation and Feedback

    E-print Network

    Krumholz, Mark R; Arce, Hector G; Dale, James E; Gutermuth, Robert; Klein, Richard I; Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-01

    Stars do not generally form in isolation. Instead, they form in clusters, and in these clustered environments newborn stars can have profound effects on one another and on their parent gas clouds. Feedback from clustered stars is almost certainly responsible for a number of otherwise puzzling facts about star formation: that it is an inefficient process that proceeds slowly when averaged over galactic scales; that most stars disperse from their birth sites and dissolve into the galactic field over timescales $\\ll 1$ Gyr; and that newborn stars follow an initial mass function (IMF) with a distinct peak in the range $0.1 - 1$ $M_\\odot$, rather than an IMF dominated by brown dwarfs. In this review we summarize current observational constraints and theoretical models for the complex interplay between clustered star formation and feedback.

  6. Equilibrium cluster formation and gelation

    E-print Network

    Rodrigo Sanchez; Paul Bartlett

    2005-06-22

    We study the formation and growth of equilibrium clusters in a suspension of weakly-charged colloidal particles and small non-adsorbing polymers. The effective potential is characterised by a short-range attraction and a long-range repulsion. The size, shape and local structure of the clusters are studied using three-dimensional particle microscopy. We observe a rapid growth in the mean cluster size and the average number of nearest neighbours approaching the gel boundary.

  7. Union formation in fragile families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcia Carlson; Sara Mclanahan; Paula England

    2004-01-01

    In this article, we use data from a new longitudinal survey—the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study—to examine union\\u000a formation among unmarried parents who have just had a child together. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate\\u000a the effects of economic, cultural\\/interpersonal, and other factors on whether (relative to having no romantic relationship)\\u000a parents are romantically involved and living apart,

  8. Molecular mechanisms of memory formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. T. Ng; M. E. Gibbs; S. F. Crowe; G. L. Sedman; F. Hua; W. Zhao; B. O'Dowd; N. Rickard; C. L. Gibbs; E. Syková; J. Svoboda; P. Jendelová

    1991-01-01

    Studies with neonate chicks, trained on a passive avoidance task, suggest that at least two shorter-term memory stages precede\\u000a long-term, protein synthesis-dependent memory consolidation. Posttetanic neuronal hyperpolarization arising from two distinct\\u000a mechanisms is postulated to underlie formation of these two early memory stages. Maintenance of the second of these stages\\u000a may involve a prolonged period of hyperpolarization brought about by

  9. Hierarchical Clustering and Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Simon D. M. White

    1996-02-12

    I review the theory of hierarchical clustering, starting with an historical overview and moving on to a discussion of those aspects of dissipationless clustering under gravity which are most relevant to galaxy formation. I conclude with some comments on the additional problems which arise when including all the other physics needed to build a realistic picture for the origin and evolution of the galaxy population.

  10. Pyrazines: occurrence, formation and biodegradation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rudolf Müller; Sugima Rappert

    2010-01-01

    Pyrazines are a class of compounds that occur almost ubiquitously in nature. Pyrazines can be synthesised chemically or biologically,\\u000a and are used as flavouring additives. The major formation of pyrazines occurs during heating of food. There is very little\\u000a information available on the degradation of these compounds. In humans and animals, pyrazines are excreted as glucuronates\\u000a or bound to glutathione

  11. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    E-print Network

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  12. Predicting struvite formation in digestion

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. N. Ohlinger; T. M. Young; E. D. Schroeder

    1998-01-01

    The solubility constant for struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) was measured in formation and dissolution equilibrium experiments. The proposed solubility constant (pKSO=13.26) accurately predicted struvite precipitation in sludge handling facilities at the Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, whereas the solubility constant in common use did not. An improved method was developed for predicting struvite precipitation potential in anaerobic digestion and post-digestion processes. Method

  13. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits amyloid formation.

    PubMed

    Rosario-Alomar, Manuel F; Quiñones-Ruiz, Tatiana; Kurouski, Dmitry; Sereda, Valentin; Ferreira, Eduardo B; Jesús-Kim, Lorraine De; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel; Zagorevski, Dmitri V; López-Garriga, Juan; Lednev, Igor K

    2015-01-29

    Amyloid fibrils are large aggregates of misfolded proteins, which are often associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, and vascular dementia. The amount of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is known to be significantly reduced in the brain tissue of people diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease relative to that of healthy individuals. These findings prompted us to investigate the effects of H2S on the formation of amyloids in vitro using a model fibrillogenic protein hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL). HEWL forms typical ?-sheet rich fibrils during the course of 70 min at low pH and high temperatures. The addition of H2S completely inhibits the formation of ?-sheet and amyloid fibrils, as revealed by deep UV resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and ThT fluorescence. Nonresonance Raman spectroscopy shows that disulfide bonds undergo significant rearrangements in the presence of H2S. Raman bands corresponding to disulfide (RSSR) vibrational modes in the 550-500 cm(-1) spectral range decrease in intensity and are accompanied by the appearance of a new 490 cm(-1) band assigned to the trisulfide group (RSSSR) based on the comparison with model compounds. The formation of RSSSR was proven further using a reaction with TCEP reduction agent and LC-MS analysis of the products. Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence study shows a strong denaturation of HEWL containing trisulfide bonds. The presented evidence indicates that H2S causes the formation of trisulfide bridges, which destabilizes HEWL structure, preventing protein fibrillation. As a result, small spherical aggregates of unordered protein form, which exhibit no cytotoxicity by contrast with HEWL fibrils. PMID:25545790

  14. Germanide phase formation and texture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Gaudet; C. Lavoie; C. Detavernier; P. Desjardins

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to complete a systematic investigation of metal-germanium reactions to isolate promising candidates for contacting Ge-based microelectronic devices. Based on their low formation temperature, low resistivity, limited film roughness, sufficient morphological stability, and limited sensitivity to oxidation, NiGe and PdGe were found to be the most promising candidates. These materials are, however, subject to

  15. Supernova Feedback in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-06-01

    The hierarchical model of galaxy formation is known to suffer from the ``over-cooling'' problem: the high efficiency of radiative cooling results in too much baryonic matter in a condensed phase (namely, cold gas or stars) when compared to observations. A solution proposed by many authors (see Springel & Hernquist 2003; Fujita et al. 2004; Rasera & Teyssier 2005) is feedback due to supernova (SN) driven winds or active galactic nuclei. Modeling SN feedback by direct injection of thermal energy usually turns out to be inefficient in galaxy-scale simulations, due to the quasi-instantaneous radiation of the SN energy. To avoid this effect, we have developed a new method to incorporate SN feedback in cosmological simulations: using temporary test particles, we reproduce explicitly a local Sedov blast wave solution in the gas distribution. We have performed several self-consistent runs of isolated Navarro, Frenk, & White (1996, hereafter NFW) halos with radiative cooling, star formation, SN feedback and metal enrichment using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002). We have explored the influence of SN feedback on the formation and the evolution of galaxies with different masses. We have studied the efficiency of the resulting galactic winds, as a function of the mass of the parent halo.

  16. Illusory contour formation survives crowding.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan Siu Fung; Cheung, Sing-Hang

    2012-01-01

    Flanked objects are difficult to identify using peripheral vision due to visual crowding, which limits conscious access to target identity. Nonetheless, certain types of visual information have been shown to survive crowding. Such resilience to crowding provides valuable information about the underlying neural mechanism of crowding. Here we ask whether illusory contour formation survives crowding of the inducers. We manipulated the presence of illusory contours through the (mis)alignment of the four inducers of a Kanizsa square. In the inducer-aligned condition, the observers judged the perceived shape (thin vs. fat) of the illusory Kanizsa square, manipulated by small rotations of the inducers. In the inducer-misaligned condition, three of the four inducers (all except the upper-left) were rotated 90°. The observers judged the orientation of the upper-left inducer. Crowding of the inducers worsened observers' performance significantly only in the inducer-misaligned condition. Our findings suggest that information for illusory contour formation survives crowding of the inducers. Crowding happens at a stage where the low-level featural information is integrated for inducer orientation discrimination, but not at a stage where the same information is used for illusory contour formation. PMID:22693333

  17. Galaxies within hierarchical structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Joseph Antonio

    2010-12-01

    While the structure of the Universe can typically be studied only by observing the light from luminous galaxies, the distribution of the galaxies themselves is ultimately a product of the formation of the dark matter halos that host them. This thesis explores the relationship between galaxies and the hierarchical growth of the cosmic web. Employing analytic and numerical techniques, we investigate the effects of the structure formation on observations of galaxies and use galaxy observations to constrain the underlying theoretical models. On large scales, the Lagrangian-based excursion-set formalism calculates the statistics of halos in a given survey volume, with any Eulerian evolution away from the Hubble flow described by the spherical collapse model. However, we also rely on high-resolution N-body simulations of dark matter to treat the nonlinear behavior on small-scales. We consider how the clustering of massive halos and the rapid evolution of their abundance with redshift informs the interpretation of high-redshift galaxy surveys with the Hubble Space Telescope. We further calculate the density and dynamics of the Shapley Supercluster from X-ray observations of galaxy clusters, primarily from the ROSAT satellite, and place constraints on reionization and the formation of first stars using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data from relics of the early Universe orbiting the Milky Way.

  18. Theory of Planetary System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations support the idea that the Solar System formed by the collapse of tenuous interstellar matter to a disk of gas and dust (the primitive solar nebula), from which the Sun and other components separated under the action of dissipative forces and by the coagulation of solid material. Thus, planets are understood to be contemporaneous byproducts of star formation. Because the circumstellar disks of new stars are easier to observe than mature planetary systems, the possibility arises that the nature and variety of planets might be studied from observations of the conditions of their birth. A useful theory of planetary system formation would therefore relate the properties of circumstellar disks both to the initial conditions of star formation and to the consequent properties of planets to those of the disk. Although the broad outlines of such a theory are in place, many aspects are either untested, controversial, or otherwise unresolved; even the degree to which such a comprehensive theory is possible remains unknown.

  19. Bubble migration during hydrate formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagapov, V. Sh.; Chiglintseva, A. S.; Rusinov, A. A.

    2015-03-01

    A model of the process of migration of methane bubbles in water under thermobaric conditions of hydrate formation is proposed. The peculiarities of the temperature field evolution, migration rate, and changes in the radius and volume fraction of gas hydrate bubbles are studied. It is shown that, with a constant mass flow of gas from the reservoir bottom, for all parameters of the surfacing gas hydrate disperse system, there is a quasistationary pattern in the form of a "step"-like wave. Depending on the relationship of the initial gas bubble density with the average gas density in the hydrate composition determined by the depth from which bubbles rise to the surface, the final radius of hydrate particles may be larger or smaller than the initial gas bubble radii. It is established that the speed at which gas hydrate inclusions rise to the surface decreases by several times due to an increase in their weight during hydrate formation. The influence of the depth of the water reservoir whose bottom is a gas flow source on the dynamics of hydrate formation is studied.

  20. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  1. Distributed simulation for formation flying applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohl, Garett A.; Udomkesmalee, Santi; Kellogg, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    High fidelity engineering simulation plays a key role in the rapidly developing field of space-based formation flying. This paper describes the design and implementation of the Formation Algorithms and Simulation Testbed (FAST).

  2. SHARAD Observations of the Medusae Fossae Formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. M. Carter; B. A. Campbell; T. R. Watters; R. Seu; R. J. Phillips; D. Biccari; J. W. Holt; C. J. Leuschen; J. J. Plaut; A. Safaeinili; R. Orosei; S. E. Smrekar; G. Picardi; N. E. Putzig; A. F. Egan; F. Bernardini

    2007-01-01

    The SHARAD instrument on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter can be used to look for layering within the Medusae Fossae Formation. We will show current results, including subsurface interfaces beneath thin deposits on the northern boundary of the formation.

  3. 48 CFR 415.204 - Contract format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 2010-10-01 false Contract format. 415.204 Section...Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION...Information 415.204 Contract format. The Senior...

  4. 48 CFR 415.204 - Contract format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 2011-10-01 false Contract format. 415.204 Section...Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES CONTRACTING BY NEGOTIATION...Information 415.204 Contract format. The Senior...

  5. SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-11-01

    Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

  6. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-print Network

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  7. 48 CFR 227.7012 - Contract format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Infringement Claims, Licenses, and Assignments 227.7012 Contract format. The format at 252.227-7012...

  8. XML Format for SESAME and LEOS

    SciTech Connect

    Durrenberger, J K; Neely, J R; Sterne, P A

    2009-04-29

    The objective of this document is to describe the XML format used by LLNL and LANL to represent the equation-of-state and related material information in the LEOS and SESAME data libraries. The primary purpose of this document is to describe a specific XML format for representing EOS data that is tailored to the nature of the underlying data and is amenable to conversion to both legacy SESAME and LEOS binary formats. The secondary purpose is to describe an XML format that lends itself to a 'natural' representation in a binary file format of the SESAME, pdb or hdf5 form so that this format and related tools can be used for the rapid and efficient development and implementation of prototype data structures. This document describes the XML format only. A working knowledge of LEOS and SESAME formats is assumed.

  9. Constraint Lingo: A program for solving logic puzzles and other tabular constraint problems.

    E-print Network

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    and ve others (three women: Jeanne, Kate, and Liana, and two men: Martin and Robert) sat at a circular Magazines; quoted by permission. We present only four of the nine clues. #12;A solution has ve columns- straint Lingo code. CLASS person: claude jeanne kate liana martin robert PARTITION gender: men women CLASS

  10. Constraint Lingo: A program for solving logic puzzles and other tabular constraint problems.

    E-print Network

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    and five others (three women: Jeanne, Kate, and Liana, and two men: Martin and Robert) sat at a circular. 1 Copyright 1999, Dell Magazines; quoted by permission. We present only four of the nine clues. #12 robert PARTITION gender: men women CLASS position: 1 .. 6 circular CLASS soda: blueberry lemon peach

  11. DataUp: A tool to help researchers describe and share tabular data

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Carly; Kunze, John; Abrams, Stephen; Cruse, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Scientific datasets have immeasurable value, but they lose their value over time without proper documentation, long-term storage, and easy discovery and access. Across disciplines as diverse as astronomy, demography, archeology, and ecology, large numbers of small heterogeneous datasets (i.e., the long tail of data) are especially at risk unless they are properly documented, saved, and shared. One unifying factor for many of these at-risk datasets is that they reside in spreadsheets. In response to this need, the California Digital Library (CDL) partnered with Microsoft Research Connections and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to create the DataUp data management tool for Microsoft Excel. Many researchers creating these small, heterogeneous datasets use Excel at some point in their data collection and analysis workflow, so we were interested in developing a data management tool that fits easily into those work flows and minimizes the learning curve for researchers. The DataUp project began in August 2011. We first formally assessed the needs of researchers by conducting surveys and interviews of our target research groups: earth, environmental, and ecological scientists. We found that, on average, researchers had very poor data management practices, were not aware of data centers or metadata standards, and did not understand the benefits of data management or sharing. Based on our survey results, we composed a list of desirable components and requirements and solicited feedback from the community to prioritize potential features of the DataUp tool. These requirements were then relayed to the software developers, and DataUp was successfully launched in October 2012. PMID:25653834

  12. DataUp: A tool to help researchers describe and share tabular data.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Carly; Kunze, John; Abrams, Stephen; Cruse, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Scientific datasets have immeasurable value, but they lose their value over time without proper documentation, long-term storage, and easy discovery and access. Across disciplines as diverse as astronomy, demography, archeology, and ecology, large numbers of small heterogeneous datasets (i.e., the long tail of data) are especially at risk unless they are properly documented, saved, and shared. One unifying factor for many of these at-risk datasets is that they reside in spreadsheets. In response to this need, the California Digital Library (CDL) partnered with Microsoft Research Connections and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to create the DataUp data management tool for Microsoft Excel. Many researchers creating these small, heterogeneous datasets use Excel at some point in their data collection and analysis workflow, so we were interested in developing a data management tool that fits easily into those work flows and minimizes the learning curve for researchers. The DataUp project began in August 2011. We first formally assessed the needs of researchers by conducting surveys and interviews of our target research groups: earth, environmental, and ecological scientists. We found that, on average, researchers had very poor data management practices, were not aware of data centers or metadata standards, and did not understand the benefits of data management or sharing. Based on our survey results, we composed a list of desirable components and requirements and solicited feedback from the community to prioritize potential features of the DataUp tool. These requirements were then relayed to the software developers, and DataUp was successfully launched in October 2012. PMID:25653834

  13. Cambio climático y diversidad de la flora vascular en las montañas tabulares de Guayana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valentí Rull; Teresa Vegas-Vilarrúbia; Sandra Nogué

    2006-01-01

    Among the potential consequences of the projected global warming on high-mountain en- vironments is biodiversity loss by upward migration of environmental conditions and the consequent habitat vanishing for upland species. So far, such effect has been considered only for temperate and boreal mountain ranges. Here, the same situation is analysed on the neotrop- ical Guayana mountains, in northern South America.

  14. Kinematic and seismic analysis of giant tabular iceberg breakup at Cape Adare, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Seelye; Drucker, Robert; Aster, Richard; Davey, Fred; Okal, Emile; Scambos, Ted; Macayeal, Douglas

    2010-06-01

    Satellite imagery reveals that a series of large icebergs (B15B in April 2001, C19 in June 2003, and B15A in October 2005) broke up or fractured while exiting the Ross Sea in a narrowly defined area off Cape Adare, Antarctica. Examination of recent swath-mapped bathymetric observations revealed that the principle agent of these breakups is a previously unknown 9 km long ridge with minimum depths of 215 m that we call Davey Shoal. Satellite imagery shows that the icebergs are driven into the shoal by coastal currents that converge over the narrow continental shelf. One of the icebergs, the 120 km by 30 km B15A, was instrumented with a seismograph, GPS, and fluxgate compass. This instrumentation provided a unique opportunity to establish the details of the iceberg kinematics that were not revealed by satellite imagery alone and to correlate seismic events observed both on the iceberg and in the far field during breakup. B15A fractured from multiple strikes against Davey Shoal and the adjacent Possession Islands; these strikes were driven by the combination of tidal currents and the coastal mean flow. The periods of iceberg-sourced seismic radiation were correlated with the strikes. The iceberg- and land-based seismic signals showed that the iceberg fracture, its sliding across the shoals, and the ice-on-ice stick-slip contacts among the postbreakup iceberg fragments generated the strong chaotic and harmonic tremor episodes that were observed at distances as far as the South Pole, where these signals propagated as seismically coupled hydroacoustic T phases.

  15. Tabular data base construction and analysis from thematic classified Landsat imagery of Portland, Oregon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, N. A.; George, A. J., Jr.; Hegdahl, R.

    1977-01-01

    A systematic verification of Landsat data classifications of the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area has been undertaken on the basis of census tract data. The degree of systematic misclassification due to the Bayesian classifier used to process the Landsat data was noted for the various suburban, industrialized and central business districts of the metropolitan area. The Landsat determinations of residential land use were employed to estimate the number of automobile trips generated in the region and to model air pollution hazards.

  16. Multiple Foci Drill-Down through Tuple and Attribute Polyarchies in Tabular Data

    E-print Network

    college basketball teams can be organized hierarchically based on division, geography, tournament position, player position, and statistics. These hierarchies combine into a sports polyarchy. Breakdown

  17. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  18. 48 CFR 752.7005 - Submission requirements for development experience documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...products including training materials, publications, databases, computer software programs, videos and other intellectual deliverable...Version 6.1 or ASCII or PDF. (B) The format for any graphic and/or image file submitted, e.g.,...

  19. 48 CFR 752.7005 - Submission requirements for development experience documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...products including training materials, publications, databases, computer software programs, videos and other intellectual deliverable...Version 6.1 or ASCII or PDF. (B) The format for any graphic and/or image file submitted, e.g.,...

  20. 48 CFR 752.7005 - Submission requirements for development experience documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...products including training materials, publications, databases, computer software programs, videos and other intellectual deliverable...Version 6.1 or ASCII or PDF. (B) The format for any graphic and/or image file submitted, e.g.,...

  1. 49 CFR 387.323 - Electronic filing of surety bonds, trust fund agreements, certificates of insurance and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...transmission must be in fixed format, i.e., all records must have the same number of fields and same length. The record layouts for ASCII electronic transactions are described in the following table: Electronic Insurance Filing Transactions...

  2. PADS/ML: A Functional Data Description Language Yitzhak Mandelbaum, Kathleen Fisher, David Walker, Mary Fernandez, Artem Gleyzer

    E-print Network

    Walker, David

    of such formats, including ASCII, binary, and Cobol encodings, with both fixed and variable- width records&T Call detail data: Fixed-width Phone call fraud detection binary records AT&T billing data: Cobol

  3. A Language for Describing and Transforming Ad Hoc Data Mary Fernandez and Kathleen Fisher, AT&T Research

    E-print Network

    Walker, David

    applications at Princeton. Formats include ASCII, binary, and Cobol, with both fixed and variable-width records detail: Fixed-width binary Undocumented data Fraud detection (~7GB/day) AT&T billing data (Altair): Cobol

  4. 37 CFR 270.2 - Reports of use of sound recordings under statutory license for preexisting subscription services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ASCII delimited format, using pipe characters as delimiter, with no headers or footers; (2) Carats should surround strings; (3) No carats should surround dates and numbers; (4) Dates should be indicated by: MM/DD/YYYY; (5)...

  5. 37 CFR 270.2 - Reports of use of sound recordings under statutory license for preexisting subscription services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...ASCII delimited format, using pipe characters as delimiter, with no headers or footers; (2) Carats should surround strings; (3) No carats should surround dates and numbers; (4) Dates should be indicated by: MM/DD/YYYY; (5)...

  6. 37 CFR 270.2 - Reports of use of sound recordings under statutory license for preexisting subscription services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...ASCII delimited format, using pipe characters as delimiter, with no headers or footers; (2) Carats should surround strings; (3) No carats should surround dates and numbers; (4) Dates should be indicated by: MM/DD/YYYY; (5)...

  7. 37 CFR 370.3 - Reports of use of sound recordings under statutory license for preexisting subscription services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ASCII delimited format, using pipe characters as delimiter, with no headers or footers; (2) Carats should surround strings; (3) No carats should surround dates and numbers; (4) Dates should be indicated by: YYYY/MM/DD; (5)...

  8. String Formatting Considered Harmful for Novice Programmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Michael C.; Jadud, Matthew C.; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.

    2010-01-01

    In Java, "System.out.printf" and "String.format" consume a specialised kind of string commonly known as a format string. In our study of first-year students at the Ateneo de Manila University, we discovered that format strings present a substantial challenge for novice programmers. Focusing on their first laboratory we found that 8% of all the…

  9. Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation: New Insights

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. M. Kamens; M. Jang; S. Lee; N. Czoschke; S. Leungsakul; D. Hu

    2003-01-01

    A discussion of some of the important issues related to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation is presented, and SOA formation is placed in a context of global fine aerosol sources. Outdoor smog chamber experiments are described for the purposes of exploring the effects of different types of background aerosols on SOA formation from the reaction of alpha -pinene with NOx

  10. Interchange Format for Hybrid Systems: Abstract Semantics

    E-print Network

    Carloni, Luca

    Interchange Format for Hybrid Systems: Abstract Semantics Alessandro Pinto1 , Luca P. Carloni3] we advocated the need for an interchange format for hybrid systems that enables the integration interchange format. In doing so, we clearly separate the structure of a hybrid system from the semantics

  11. In situ chemical stimulation of diatomite formations

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, B.W.

    1989-05-09

    A method is described of recovering hydrocarbon from a subsurface diatomite formation comprising the steps of: a. introducing an aqueous surface solution into the diatomite formation, the aqueous surface active solution comprising (i) a diatomite/oil/ water wettability improving agent, and (ii) an oil/water interfacial tension lowering agent; and b. producing oil from the diatomite formation.

  12. Distributed Circular Formation Stabilization for Dynamic Unicycles

    E-print Network

    Maggiore, Manfredi

    of understanding the flocking and swarming behavior. On the Engineering side, interest in formation controlDistributed Circular Formation Stabilization for Dynamic Unicycles Mohamed I. El-Hawwary, Member in a desired direction. The vehicles are required to converge to a formation on the circle, expressed

  13. GXL: Toward a Standard Exchange Format

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard C. Holt; Andreas Winter; Andy Schiirr

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes ongoing work toward the devel- opment of a standard software exchange format (SEF), for exchanging information among tools that analyze com- puter programs. A particular exchange format called GXL (Graph Exchange Language) is proposed. GXL can be viewed as a merger of well known formats (e. g. GraX, PRO- GRES, RPA, RSF, and TA) for exchanging typed,

  14. SENSOR CONSIDERATIONS FOR DEEP SPACE FORMATION FLYING

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Holt; E. G. Lightsey

    An investigation was performed to evaluate sensor suitability and perfor- mance for formation flying in a variety of spaceborne environments. This was done as a precursor to the development of strategies for novel uses of satel- lite formations in environments other than Low Earth Orbit. A number of sensors were analyzed for noise characteristics and performance. A formation simulation environment

  15. Research on missile formation control system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naigang Cui; Changzhu Wei; Jifeng Guo; Biao Zhao

    2009-01-01

    The control system of missile formation flight is described. In this paper, the missile formation flight controller and BTT intelligence missile outer-loop controller are interested. A combination of proportion and differential control of the position error is used in the designing of the missile formation flight controller to generate the control command for the single missile. The missile outer-loop controller

  16. Formative Assessment: Responding to Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2009-01-01

    This "how-to" book on formative assessment is filled with practical suggestions for teachers who want to use formative assessment in their classrooms. With practical strategies, tools, and examples for teachers of all subjects and grade levels, this book shows you how to use formative assessment to promote successful student learning. Topics…

  17. Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays

    E-print Network

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays Daniel W. Kwon and David W. Miller February 2005 SSL # 2-05 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays By DANIEL W. KWON S;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays by DANIEL W. KWON Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics

  18. Formative Assessment: Guidance for Early Childhood Policymakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley-Ayers, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    This policy report provides a guide and framework to early childhood policymakers considering formative assessment. The report defines formative assessment and outlines its process and application in the context of early childhood. The substance of this document is the issues for consideration in the implementation of the formative assessment…

  19. Transfer of Training with Formation Flight Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gary B.; Cyrus, Michael L.

    The present research was conducted to determine transfer of practice from a formation simulator to actual aircraft flight for the wing aircraft component of the formation flying task. Evidence in support of positive transfer was obtained by comparing students trained in the formation simulator with students who were essentially untrained and with…

  20. Kinetics of Film Formation by Interfacial Polycondensation

    E-print Network

    Freger, Viatcheslav "Slava"

    Kinetics of Film Formation by Interfacial Polycondensation Viatcheslav Freger* Zuckerberg Institute An approximate analytical model of film formation by interfacial polycondensation is presented. The analysis (insipient film formation, slowdown, and diffusion-limited growth) sets a different pattern of local polymer

  1. Successful Student Writing through Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2010-01-01

    Use formative assessment to dramatically improve your students' writing. In "Successful Student Writing Through Formative Assessment", educator and international speaker Harry G. Tuttle shows you how to guide middle and high school students through the prewriting, writing, and revision processes using formative assessment techniques that work.…

  2. A new PICL trace file format

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.H.

    1992-10-01

    A trace file format is described that will be used in future releases of the Portable Instrumented Communication Library (PICL) and ParaGraph. The new format provides improved support for tracing and profiling PICL communication primitives and user-defined events. The new format is also easily extended and may be useful in other instrumentation packages and performance visualization tools.

  3. Nonlinear formation control of marine craft

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Roger Skjetne; Sonja Moi; Thor I. Fossen

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates formation control of a fleet of ships. The control objective for each ship is to maintain its position in the formation while a (virtual) Formation Reference Point (FRP) tracks a predefined path. This is obtained by using vectorial backstepping to solve two subproblems; a geometric task, and a dynamic task. The former guarantees that the FRP, and

  4. Shear band formation and poromechanical properties; application to unlithified sand, Humboldt County, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaproth, B. M.; Perez, E.; Cashman, S. M.; Saffer, D. M.; Marone, C.

    2009-12-01

    In response to shear strain, porous granular media may fail in tabular zones of grain deformation, commonly referred to as shear bands. Previous researchers have argued that shear bands form via cataclasis and strain hardening, and that once formed they do not accommodate additional shear-strain. If correct, this hypothesis requires that shear bands are stronger than their parent material, and that parent material strengthens in response to shear-driven cataclasis, each of which may alter the effective permeability. We report on laboratory experiments designed to resolve the frictional strength and permeability of shear bands formed in well-sorted nearshore marine sand and their unlithified parent material, and to elucidate the strength and deformation properties of parent material under conditions of shear-band formation. Experiments were conducted on in situ shear bands and parent material from late Quaternary nearshore marine sand in the footwall of the active McKinleyville thrust fault, Humboldt County, CA. Shear bands are exposed in positive relief, a consequence of reduced grain size and cementation, which result in decreased permeability. Permeability was measured under hydrostatic stress conditions at effective confining pressures from 0.2 MPa - 5.0 MPa . Shear bands have permeabilities of 8.2*10 -15 - 1.3*10 -17 m 2 , which represents roughly a 1 to 3 order of magnitude decrease relative to that of the parent material (7.0*10 -14 - 2.0*10 -14 m 2 ). We sheared parent material and in situ shear bands in the single-direct shear geometry over a range of probable in situ normal stresses (0.5-1.8 MPa). Shear bands have greater strength than parent material, with the coefficient of internal friction being ? i = 0.623 and ? i = 0.525, respectively. We sheared parent material in the double-direct shear geometry under conditions approximating shear band formation (sliding velocity = 10 ?m/s-10 mm/s, ? n = 0.75-1.75 MPa, saturated/dry, shear strain = 0.5-20). We find that parent material strengthens as a function of shear strain throughout individual experiments; frictional yield strength increases by 1 to 9% over a range of shear strain from 0 to 10. We attribute the increase in strength to increased grain angularity and abundance of small particles, both of which are a consequence of pervasive cataclasis. Our results support the hypothesis that shear bands are stronger than their parent material and that parent material exhibits strengthening as a function of shear-driven cataclasis. Further, cataclasis may be responsible for the observed permeability contrast of in situ shear bands and parent material. Ongoing work will analyze the role of cataclasis on parent material permeability as a function of shear strain.

  5. The formation of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancone, Conor L.

    In this work I sought to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies. Specifically, I studied three key aspects of galaxy formation: star formation, mass assembly, and structural evolution. Past research has shown that the formation of a galaxy is strongly coupled to its local environment (i.e. the local galaxy density). Therefore, I studied the evolution of cluster galaxies because clusters are the highest density environments that exist in the universe. In turn, the observational results found herein form a foundation upon which to test theories of galaxy formation in the densest environments. I used the latest sample of galaxy clusters from the Bootes region to measure the near-infrared luminosity function (NIR LF) of cluster galaxies from 0 < z < 2 and estimate the primary epoch of star formation for massive cluster galaxies. I found that massive cluster galaxies formed the bulk of their stars at zf ˜ 2.5, that they evolved passively at z ? 1.3, and that they deviated from passive evolution at higher redshifts. This latter observation suggested that massive cluster galaxies were actively assembling their final stellar masses at z > 1.3. I used deeper IRAC imaging to study the NIR LF of high redshift cluster galaxies (1 < z < 1.5) with focus on the properties of faint (i.e. low mass) galaxies. I found no evidence for evolution of the LF for low mass cluster galaxies out to the highest redshifts studied, which suggested that the cluster galaxy population was in place at high redshift. Finally, I calculated the evolution of the size-mass relationship (SMR) of cluster galaxies as a function of morphology for the high redshift cluster sample. I found that apparent evolution of the SMR can be partially explained by the progenitor bias, but that there was a missing population of large, massive cluster galaxies. These galaxies were either be accreted by clusters at lower redshifts, or the cluster galaxy population underwent size-evolution to account for their presence at low redshift. I developed two new programs to aid in my research as well as future research in this field. I created EzGal, a program which extracts observables (magnitudes, k-corrections, stellar masses, mass-to-light ratios, etc...) from standard stellar population synthesis (SPS) models. This simplified comparisons of observations to many different model sets, and simplified comparison of different model sets to each other. I used EzGal to quantitatively compare various model sets and estimate SPS model uncertainty, and recovered the well known result that SPS models agree best in the optical for old stellar populations, but disagree substantially for intermediate age stellar populations in the NIR. The latter uncertainty was caused by the presence of thermally pulsating AGB stars, which are poorly understood observationally but contribute substantially to the NIR light of a stellar population. I also created the Python Galaxy Fitter (PyGFit), a program which measures PSF matched photometry from crowded imaging with disparate PSFs and resolutions. This enabled accurate measurement of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in crowded cluster fields.

  6. Testing Magnetic Star Formation Theory

    E-print Network

    Richard M. Crutcher; Nicholas Hakobian; Thomas H. Troland

    2008-10-17

    We report here observations of the Zeeman effect in the 18-cm lines of OH in the envelope regions surrounding four molecular cloud cores toward which detections of B(LOS) have been achieved in the same lines, and evaluate the ratio of mass to magnetic flux, M/Phi, between the cloud core and envelope. This relative M/Phi measurement reduces uncertainties in previous studies, such as the angle between B and the line of sight and the value of [OH/H]. Our result is that for all four clouds, the ratios R of the core to the envelope values of M/Phi are less than 1. Stated another way, the ratios R' of the core to the total cloud M/Phi are less than 1. The extreme case or idealized (no turbulence) ambipolar diffusion theory of core formation requires the ratio of the central to total M/Phi to be approximately equal to the inverse of the original subcritical M/Phi, or R' > 1. The probability that all four of our clouds have R' > 1 is 3 x 10^{-7}; our results are therefore significantly in contradiction with the hypothesis that these four cores were formed by ambipolar diffuson. Highly super-Alfvenic turbulent simulations yield a wide range of relative M/Phi, but favor a ratio R < 1, as we observe. Our experiment is limited to four clouds, and we can only directly test the predictions of the extreme-case "idealized" models of ambipolar-diffusion driven star formation that have a regular magnetic field morphology. Nonetheless, our experimental results are not consistent with the "idealized" strong field, ambipolar diffusion theory of star formation.

  7. Transcriptional regulation in wood formation.

    PubMed

    Demura, Taku; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2007-02-01

    Wood (i.e. xylem tissue) in trees is mainly composed of two types of cells, fibres and tracheary elements. Recent molecular studies of various trees, as well as the non-tree species Arabidopsis thaliana and Zinnia elegans, have revealed coordinated gene expression during differentiation of these cells in wood and the presence of several transcription factors that might govern the complex networks of transcriptional regulation. This article reviews recent findings concerning the regulation of genes by transcription factors involved in wood formation such as AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF), CLASS III HOMEODOMAIN-LEUCINE ZIPPER (HD-ZIPIII), KANADI (KAN), MYB and NAM/ATAF/CUC (NAC). PMID:17224301

  8. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOEpatents

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  9. Dark Matter and Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primack, Joel R.

    2009-12-01

    The four lectures that I gave in the XIII Ciclo de Cursos Especiais at the National Observatory of Brazil in Rio in October 2008 were (1) a brief history of dark matter and structure formation in a ?CDM universe; (2) challenges to ?CDM on small scales: satellites, cusps, and disks; (3) data on galaxy evolution and clustering compared with simulations; and (4) semi-analytic models. These lectures, themselves summaries of much work by many people, are summarized here briefly. The slides [1] contain much more information.

  10. Formation of Po@ C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtsuki, T.; Ohno, K.

    2005-10-01

    Radioactive endohedral fullerenes, Po210@C60 and the dimers, are detected by using radiochemical and radiochromatographic techniques. The results show that a Po atom can be inserted into C60 by a recoil process following a nuclear reaction. Using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations based on the all-electron mixed-basis approach, we also theoretically showed that the formation of a Po doped fullerene is possible. These findings may be useful for several nuclear applications such as nuclear medicine and/or nuclear waste disposal.

  11. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  12. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Yvon [CEA/IRFU/Sap, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  13. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  14. Multi-Robot Formations based on the Queue-Formation Scheme with Limited Communications

    E-print Network

    Ge, Shuzhi Sam

    Multi-Robot Formations based on the Queue-Formation Scheme with Limited Communications Cheng, IEEE Abstract-- In this paper, we investigate the operation of the Queue-formation structure (or Q into formation. It provides greater control over the distance between robots on the same queue for better

  15. Autonomous Formation Flight: Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jennifer; Cobleigh, Brent; Vachon, Jake; Ray, Ronald J.; Ennix, Kimberly; Walsh, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: a) Map the vortex effects; b) Formation Auto-Pilot Requirements. Two NASA F/A-18 aircraft in formation: a) NASA 845 Systems Research Aircraft; b) NASA 847 Support Aircraft. Flight Conditions: M = 0.56, 25000 feet (Subsonic condition); b) M = 0.86, 36000 feet (Transonic condition). Nose-To-Tail (N2T) Distances: 20, 55, 110 and 190 feet. Lessons learned: a) Controllable flight in vortex is possible with pilot feedback (displays); b) Position hold at best C(sub D), is attainable; c) Best drag location is close to max rolling moment; e) Drag reductions demonstrated up to 22% (WFE up to 20%); f) Induced drag results compare favorably with simple prediction model; g) "Sweet Spot" (lateral & vertical area > 25%) is larger than predicted; h) Larger wing overlaps result in sign reversals in roll, yaw; i) As predicted, favorable effects degrade gradually with increased nose-to-tail distances after peaking at 3 span lengths aft; and j) Demonstrated - over 100 N mi (>15%) range improvement and 650 lbs (14%) fuel savings on actual simulated F/A-18 cruise mission.

  16. Abundance gradients and galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiavelli, M.; Matteucci, F.

    1991-08-01

    A three-dimensional collisionless code is used to simulate the formation of elliptical galaxies with a time scale for star formation comparable to the collapse time. A one-zone chemical evolution scheme is used to compute the evolution of the abundances of several chemical elements. The initial 'clumpy' system is made of gas and, in some cases, of warm dark matter. In the latter case, it is shown that abundance gradients are produced. For a galaxy of 10 to the 11th solar mass of gas and 3 x 10 to the 11th solar mass of warm dark matter, the predicted gradients of Fe and Mg are d(Fe/H)/d log r = -0.11 and d(Mg/H)/d log r = -0.05, respectively. In the absence of dark matter a greater amount of dissipation is required to produce abundance gradients. The mechanism proposed here should be relevant for bright and extended objects where there is evidence for the presence of dark matter.

  17. Computer simulation of bubble formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Bazhirov, T.; Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Institute for High Energy Densities of Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-01-01

    Properties of liquid metals (Li, Pb, Na) containing nanoscale cavities were studied by atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD). Two atomistic models of cavity simulation were developed that cover a wide area in the phase diagram with negative pressure. In the first model, the thermodynamics of cavity formation, stability and the dynamics of cavity evolution in bulk liquid metals have been studied. Radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of nano-scale cavities of various radii were calculated for liquid Li, Na, and Pb at various temperatures and densities, and at small negative pressures near the liquid-gas spinodal, and the work functions for cavity formation in liquid Li were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The cavitation rate can further be obtained by using the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The second model is based on the stability study and on the kinetics of cavitation of the stretched liquid metals. A MD method was used to simulate cavitation in a metastable Pb and Li melts and determine the stability limits. States at temperatures below critical (T < 0.5Tc) and large negative pressures were considered. The kinetic boundary of liquid phase stability was shown to be different from the spinodal. The kinetics and dynamics of cavitation were studied. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained for several temperatures. The results of MD calculations were compared with estimates based on classical nucleation theory.

  18. Tube Formation in Nanoscale Materials

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The formation of tubular nanostructures normally requires layered, anisotropic, or pseudo-layered crystal structures, while inorganic compounds typically do not possess such structures, inorganic nanotubes thus have been a hot topic in the past decade. In this article, we review recent research activities on nanotubes fabrication and focus on three novel synthetic strategies for generating nanotubes from inorganic materials that do not have a layered structure. Specifically, thermal oxidation method based on gas–solid reaction to porous CuO nanotubes has been successfully established, semiconductor ZnS and Nb2O5nanotubes have been prepared by employing sacrificial template strategy based on liquid–solid reaction, and an in situ template method has been developed for the preparation of ZnO taper tubes through a chemical etching reaction. We have described the nanotube formation processes and illustrated the detailed key factors during their growth. The proposed mechanisms are presented for nanotube fabrication and the important pioneering studies are discussed on the rational design and fabrication of functional materials with tubular structures. It is the intention of this contribution to provide a brief account of these research activities. PMID:20592945

  19. Beaver assisted river valley formation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westbrook, C.J.; Cooper, D.J.; Baker, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined how beaver dams affect key ecosystem processes, including pattern and process of sediment deposition, the composition and spatial pattern of vegetation, and nutrient loading and processing. We provide new evidence for the formation of heterogeneous beaver meadows on riverine system floodplains and terraces where dynamic flows are capable of breaching in-channel beaver dams. Our data show a 1.7-m high beaver dam triggered overbank flooding that drowned vegetation in areas deeply flooded, deposited nutrient-rich sediment in a spatially heterogeneous pattern on the floodplain and terrace, and scoured soils in other areas. The site quickly de-watered following the dam breach by high stream flows, protecting the deposited sediment from future re-mobilization by overbank floods. Bare sediment either exposed by scouring or deposited by the beaver flood was quickly colonized by a spatially heterogeneous plant community, forming a beaver meadow. Many willow and some aspen seedlings established in the more heavily disturbed areas, suggesting the site may succeed to a willow carr plant community suitable for future beaver re-occupation. We expand existing theory beyond the beaver pond to include terraces within valleys. This more fully explains how beavers can help drive the formation of alluvial valleys and their complex vegetation patterns as was first postulated by Ruedemann and Schoonmaker in 1938. ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Globular Cluster Formation in Mergers

    E-print Network

    Francois Schweizer

    2006-06-01

    Mergers of gas-rich galaxies lead to gravitationally driven increases in gas pressure that can trigger intense bursts of star and cluster formation. Although star formation itself is clustered, most newborn stellar aggregates are unbound associations and disperse. Gravitationally bound star clusters that survive for at least 10-20 internal crossing times (~20-40 Myr) are relatively rare and seem to contain globular clusters formed in present-day mergers exceed omega Cen by an order of magnitude in mass, yet appear to have normal stellar initial mass functions. In the local universe, recent remnants of major gas-rich disk mergers appear as protoelliptical galaxies with subpopulations of typically 100-1000 young metal-rich globular clusters in their halos. The evidence is now strong that these "second-generation" globular clusters formed from giant molecular clouds in the merging disks, squeezed into collapse by large-scale shocks and high gas pressure rather than by high-velocity cloud-cloud collisions. Similarly, first- generation metal-poor globular clusters may have formed during cosmological reionization from low-metallicity giant molecular clouds squeezed by the universal reionization pressure.

  1. Microbubble formation from plasma polymers.

    PubMed

    Shahravan, Anaram; Yelamarty, Srinath; Matsoukas, Themis

    2012-09-27

    We document the formation of liquid-like particles in a toluene glow discharge that subsequently solidify via a process that releases hydrogen to form a solid microbubble with micrometer-size diameter, nanometer-size shell thickness, and high volume fraction, in excess of 90%. Liquid-like particles are produced in a toluene plasma under conditions that promote low degree of cross-linking (low power, high pressure). When these are transferred for observation in TEM, they are seen to transform under irradiation by the electron beam into solid bubbles with diameter of about 3 ?m. This transformation also takes place under laser irradiation of sufficient power and under heating. We present evidence that the formation of these microbubbles is due to solidification of the liquid-like precursor that is accompanied by release of hydrogen. This mechanism is supported by a geometric model that provides a quantitative description of the particle size before and after solidification. These unique stimuli-responsive particles exhibit the potential of using temperature, electron beam, or laser as a source to change their size and structure which may find application in thermal insulators, lightweight materials, and light scattering agents. PMID:22954230

  2. Cepheid Binarity and Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remage Evans, Nancy

    Classical Cepheids are important for extragalactic distance calibration and star formation studies. A survey the fifty brightest classical Cepheids in our galaxy to search for blue companions will provide the following: An accurate determination of the percentage of Cepheid binaries with companions more massive than 2 MO and with mass ratios as small as M (COMP) / M(cep) - 1/3. This will provide valuable information on star formation for intermediate mass stars in the mass ratio and period ranges poorly sampled by other techniques. An accurate identification of Cepheids with bright companions and hence improved calibrations of temperature, reddening, and luminosity scales. A stringent test of reddening from the visual region for many Cepheids. These results must be determined from a survey of Cepheids in our galaxy since crowding in external galaxies will confuse the detection of physical companions, and orbital radial velocity material will not be available to provide additional information on mass and period distribution. While this survey builds on the 36 Cepheids already observed with IUE, it is vital to observe the 23 other stars on this program in order to obtain unbiased statistics because many of the observations in the archives were made because the stars were suspected of having companions.

  3. Supercoil Formation During DNA Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayar, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, Baris; Kabakcioglu, Alkan

    2009-03-01

    Supercoil formation plays a key role in determining the structure-function relationship in DNA. Biological and technological processes, such as protein synthesis, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays relys on separation of the two strands in DNA, which is coupled to the unwinding of the supercoiled structure. This problem has been studied theoretically via Peyrard-Bishop and Poland-Scheraga type models, which include a simple representation of the DNA structural properties. In recent years, computational models, which provide a more realtistic representaion of DNA molecule, have been used to study the melting behavior of short DNA chains. Here, we will present a new coarse-grained model of DNA which is capable of simulating sufficiently long DNA chains for studying the supercoil formation during melting, without sacrificing the local structural properties. Our coarse-grained model successfully reproduces the local geometry of the DNA molecule, such as the 3'-5' directionality, major-minor groove structure, and the helical pitch. We will present our initial results on the dynamics of supercoiling during DNA melting.

  4. Dilatational band formation in bone

    PubMed Central

    Poundarik, Atharva A.; Diab, Tamim; Sroga, Grazyna E.; Ural, Ani; Boskey, Adele L.; Gundberg, Caren M.; Vashishth, Deepak

    2012-01-01

    Toughening in hierarchically structured materials like bone arises from the arrangement of constituent material elements and their interactions. Unlike microcracking, which entails micrometer-level separation, there is no known evidence of fracture at the level of bone’s nanostructure. Here, we show that the initiation of fracture occurs in bone at the nanometer scale by dilatational bands. Through fatigue and indentation tests and laser confocal, scanning electron, and atomic force microscopies on human and bovine bone specimens, we established that dilatational bands of the order of 100 nm form as ellipsoidal voids in between fused mineral aggregates and two adjacent proteins, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN). Laser microdissection and ELISA of bone microdamage support our claim that OC and OPN colocalize with dilatational bands. Fracture tests on bones from OC and/or OPN knockout mice (OC?/?, OPN?/?, OC-OPN?/?;?/?) confirm that these two proteins regulate dilatational band formation and bone matrix toughness. On the basis of these observations, we propose molecular deformation and fracture mechanics models, illustrating the role of OC and OPN in dilatational band formation, and predict that the nanometer scale of tissue organization, associated with dilatational bands, affects fracture at higher scales and determines fracture toughness of bone. PMID:23129653

  5. Coke formation in visbreaking process

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.Y. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (USA))

    1987-04-01

    Visbreaking is a mild cracking process primarily used to reduce residual oil viscosity and thus decrease the amount of cutter stock required for blending to heavy fuels specification. It can also be used to produce incremental quantities of gasoline, middle distillates and catalytic cracker feeds. This process was widely used in the 1930s and 1940s and became obsolete until a few years ago. When the need for increased conversion of residues to light products became desirable, visbreaking offered economic advantages to many refining schemes - especially in Western Europe. Between 1978-1981, Exxon brought on stream seven visbreakers ranging from 1900 to 9100 tons/SD capacity. In January 1983, the world-wide visbreaking capacity was over 2 MM B/SD. The visbreaking process and its application in refinery operations have been well described. In general, the process economics improve as the process severity is increased but it is limited by coke formation in the process. For this reason, they have studied the kinetics of coke formation in the visbreaking process.

  6. Protoporphyrin formation in Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Keithly, J H; Nadler, K D

    1983-01-01

    The obligately aerobic soybean root nodule bacterium Rhizobium japonicum produces large amounts of heme (iron protoporphyrin) only under low oxygen tensions, such as exist in the symbiotic root nodule. Aerobically incubated suspensions of both laboratory-cultured and symbiotic bacteria (bacteroids) metabolize delta-aminolevulinic acid to uroporphyrin, coproporphyrin, and protoporphyrin. Under anaerobic conditions, suspensions of laboratory-cultured bacteria form greatly reduced amounts of protoporphyrin from delta-aminolevulinic acid, whereas protoporphyrin formation by bacteroid suspensions is unaffected by anaerobiosis, suggesting that bacteroids form protoporphyrin under anaerobic conditions more readily than do free-living bacteria. Oxygen is the major terminal electron acceptor for coproporphyrinogen oxidation in cell-free extracts of both bacteroids and free-living bacteria. In the absence of oxygen, ATP, NADP, Mg2+, and L-methionine are required for protoporphyrin formation in vitro. In the presence of these supplements, coproporphyrinogenase activity under anaerobic conditions is 5 to 10% of that observed under aerobic conditions. Two mechanisms for coproporphyrinogen oxidation exist in R. japonicum: an oxygen-dependent process and an anaerobic oxidation in which electrons are transferred to NADP. The significance of these findings with regard to heme biosynthesis in the microaerophilic soybean root nodule is discussed. PMID:6841317

  7. An Inhibitor of PIDDosome Formation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Ruth; Shah, Richa B; Liu, Peter H; Gupta, Yogesh K; Ando, Kiyohiro; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Sidi, Samuel

    2015-06-01

    The PIDDosome-PIDD-RAIDD-caspase-2 complex-is a proapoptotic caspase-activation platform of elusive significance. DNA damage can initiate complex assembly via ATM phosphorylation of the PIDD death domain (DD), which enables RAIDD recruitment to PIDD. In contrast, the mechanisms limiting PIDDosome formation have remained unclear. We identify the mitotic checkpoint factor BubR1 as a direct PIDDosome inhibitor, acting in a noncanonical role independent of Mad2. Following its phosphorylation by ATM at DNA breaks, "primed" PIDD relocates to kinetochores via a direct interaction with BubR1. BubR1 binds the PIDD DD, competes with RAIDD recruitment, and negates PIDDosome-mediated apoptosis after ionizing radiation. The PIDDosome thus sequentially integrates DNA damage and mitotic checkpoint signals to decide cell fate in response to genotoxic stress. We further show that by sequestering PIDD at the kinetochore, BubR1 acts to delay PIDDosome formation until the next cycle, defining a new mechanism by which cells evade apoptosis during mitosis. PMID:25936804

  8. Formation Flying for Distributed InSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel P.; Murray, Emmanuell A.; Ploen, Scott R.; Gromov, Konstantin G.; Chen, Curtis W.

    2006-01-01

    We consider two spacecraft flying in formation to create interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). Several candidate orbits for such in InSar formation have been previously determined based on radar performance and Keplerian orbital dynamics. However, with out active control, disturbance-induced drift can degrade radar performance and (in the worst case) cause a collision. This study evaluates the feasibility of operating the InSAR spacecraft as a formation, that is, with inner-spacecraft sensing and control. We describe the candidate InSAR orbits, design formation guidance and control architectures and algorithms, and report the (Delta)(nu) and control acceleration requirements for the candidate orbits for several tracking performance levels. As part of determining formation requirements, a formation guidance algorithm called Command Virtual Structure is introduced that can reduce the (Delta)(nu) requirements compared to standard Leader/Follower formation approaches.

  9. Early planet formation as a trigger for further planet formation

    E-print Network

    Philip J. Armitage; Brad M. S. Hansen

    1999-12-08

    Recent discoveries of extrasolar planets at small orbital radii, or with significant eccentricities, indicate that interactions between massive planets and the disks of gas and dust from which they formed are vital for determining the final shape of planetary systems. We show that if this interaction occurs at an early epoch, when the protoplanetary disc was still massive, then rapid planet growth through accretion causes an otherwise stable disc to fragment into additional planetary mass bodies when the planetary mass reaches 4-5 Jupiter masses. We suggest that such catastrophic planet formation could account for apparent differences in the mass function of massive planets and brown dwarfs, and the existence of young stars that appear to have dissipated their discs at an early epoch. Subsequent gravitational interactions will lead to planetary systems comprising a small number of massive planets in eccentric orbits.

  10. Meander formation in supraglacial streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlstrom, Leif; Gajjar, Parmesh; Manga, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Meandering streams on the surface of glaciers are similar in planform geometry to meanders in alluvial and bedrock rivers, despite fundamental differences in the mechanisms and timescales of incision. We develop depth-averaged conservation equations for flow in such supraglacial channels with erodible boundaries and solve the linear stability problem for harmonic perturbations to an initially straight channel. Meander formation in supraglacial streams is driven by channel curvature, which enhances heat production and heat transfer to the surrounding ice at bend apexes. This leads to enhanced melting and lateral channel migration, with near constant channel width maintained by the competition of lateral erosion and broadscale ablation of the glacier surface. We find that meandering occurs for a wide but finite range of hydraulic and thermal parameters in both subcritical and supercritical flows and that meanders usually propagate downstream. Predicted meander wavelengths are in general agreement with an empirical scaling between supraglacial channel width and meander wavelength derived from glacial environments worldwide.

  11. Protein folding drives disulfide formation

    PubMed Central

    Kosuri, Pallav; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Feng, Jason; Kaplan, Anna; Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Badilla, Carmen L.; Stockwell, Brent R.; Sánchez-Ruiz, José M.; Holmgren, Arne; Fernández, Julio M.

    2012-01-01

    PDI catalyzes the oxidative folding of disulfide-containing proteins. However, the sequence of reactions leading to a natively folded and oxidized protein remains unknown. Here we demonstrate a technique that enables independent measurements of disulfide formation and protein folding. We find that non-native disulfides are formed early in the folding pathway and can trigger misfolding. In contrast, a PDI domain favors native disulfides by catalyzing oxidation at a late stage of folding. We propose a model for co-translational oxidative folding wherein PDI acts as a placeholder that is relieved by the pairing of cysteines caused by substrate folding. This general mechanism can explain how PDI catalyzes oxidative folding in a variety of structurally unrelated substrates. PMID:23141538

  12. Sandpile formation by revolving rivers.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, E; Ramos, O; Martínez, E; Batista-Leyva, A J; Rivera, A; Bassler, K E

    2003-07-01

    Experimental observation of a new mechanism of sandpile formation is reported. As a steady stream of dry sand is poured onto a horizontal surface, a pile forms which has a thin river of sand on one side flowing from the apex of the pile to the edge of its base. The river rotates about the pile, depositing a new layer of sand with each revolution, thereby causing the pile to grow. For small piles the river is steady and the pile formed is smooth. For larger piles, the river becomes intermittent and the surface of the pile becomes undulating. The essential features of the system that produce the phenomenon are discussed, and the robustness of the phenomena is demonstrated with experiments using different boundary conditions and sands. PMID:12906542

  13. A study of coal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Jubert, K.; Stevens, G.; Masudi, H.

    1995-03-01

    Coal is a solid, brittle, more or less distinctly stratified, combustible, carbonaceous rock. It is being rediscovered as a reliable energy source, which, historically provided the resource base for the industrialization of the United States economy. A firm understanding of growth in coal development is important to the national energy scene so that the implications of factors influencing coal growth upon the industry`s ability to realize national energy objectives may be determined. As a result, the future of coal development will be facilitated by compiling basic facts on coal reserves, production, and utilization. In view of this, a review and assessment of facts pertaining to the nature and origin of coal is presented. The various properties and uses of coal are then described, followed by a discussion of the process of coal formation.

  14. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  15. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    E-print Network

    Matthews, A L S; Freed, M S; Hyde, T W; Matthews, Authors Lorin S.; Hayes, Ryan L.; Freed, Michael S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2007-01-01

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, "much as dust bunnies form under a bed." One poorly understood problem in this coagulation process is the manner in which micron-sized, charged grains form the fractal aggregate structures now thought to be the precursors of protoplanetary disk evolution. This study examines the characteristics of such fractal aggregates formed by the collision of spherical monomers and aggregates where the charge is distributed over the aggregate structure. The aggregates are free to rotate due to collisions and dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions. Comparisons are made for different precursor size distributions and like-charged, oppositelycharged, and neutral grains.

  16. Formation of Cosmic Dust Bunnies

    E-print Network

    Lorin S. Matthews; Ryan L. Hayes; Michael S. Freed; Truell W. Hyde

    2007-01-12

    Planetary formation is an efficient process now thought to take place on a relatively short astronomical time scale. Recent observations have shown that the dust surrounding a protostar emits more efficiently at longer wavelengths as the protoplanetary disk evolves, suggesting that the dust particles are coagulating into fluffy aggregates, "much as dust bunnies form under a bed." One poorly understood problem in this coagulation process is the manner in which micron-sized, charged grains form the fractal aggregate structures now thought to be the precursors of protoplanetary disk evolution. This study examines the characteristics of such fractal aggregates formed by the collision of spherical monomers and aggregates where the charge is distributed over the aggregate structure. The aggregates are free to rotate due to collisions and dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions. Comparisons are made for different precursor size distributions and like-charged, oppositelycharged, and neutral grains.

  17. Sandpile formation by revolving rivers

    E-print Network

    E. Altshuler; O. Ramos; A. J. Batista-Leyva; A. Rivera; K. E. Bassler

    2002-06-25

    Experimental observation of a new mechanism of sandpile formation is reported. As a steady stream of dry sand is poured onto a horizontal surface, a pile forms which has a thin river of sand on one side flowing from the apex of the pile to the edge of its base. The river rotates about the pile, depositing a new layer of sand with each revolution, thereby growing the pile. For small piles the river is steady and the pile formed is smooth. For larger piles, the river becomes intermittent and the surface of the pile becomes undulating. The frequency of revolution of the river is measured as the pile grows and the results are explained with a simple scaling argument. The essential features of the system that produce the phenomena are discussed.

  18. Adaptive Optics in Star Formation

    E-print Network

    Wolfgang Brandner

    2003-09-29

    Over the past ten years, the concept of adaptive optics has evolved from early experimental stages to a standard observing tool now available at almost all major optical and near-infrared telescope facilities. Adaptive optics will also be essential in exploiting the full potential of the large optical/infrared interferometers currently under construction. Both observations with high-angular resolution and at high contrast, and with a high point source sensitivity are facilitated by adaptive optics. Among the areas which benefit most from the use of adaptive optics are studies of the circumstellar environment (envelopes, disks, outflows), substellar companions and multiple systems, and dense young stellar populations. This contribution highlights some of the recent advances in star formation studies facilitated by adaptive optics, and gives a brief tutorial on optimized observing and data reduction strategies.

  19. Pattern formation in colloidal explosions

    E-print Network

    Arthur V. Straube; Ard A. Louis; Jörg Baumgartl; Clemens Bechinger; Roel P. A. Dullens

    2011-07-23

    We study the non-equilibrium pattern formation that emerges when magnetically repelling colloids, trapped by optical tweezers, are abruptly released, forming colloidal explosions. For multiple colloids in a single trap we observe a pattern of expanding concentric rings. For colloids individually trapped in a line, we observe explosions with a zigzag pattern that persists even when magnetic interactions are much weaker than those that break the linear symmetry in equilibrium. Theory and computer simulations quantitatively describe these phenomena both in and out of equilibrium. An analysis of the mode spectrum allows us to accurately quantify the non-harmonic nature of the optical traps. Colloidal explosions provide a new way to generate well-characterized non-equilibrium behaviour in colloidal systems.

  20. Foam formation in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessling, Francis C.; Mcmanus, Samuel P.; Matthews, John; Patel, Darayas

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus that produced the first polyurethane foam in low gravity has been described. The chemicals were mixed together in an apparatus designed for operation in low gravity. Mixing was by means of stirring the chemicals with an electric motor and propeller in a mixing chamber. The apparatus was flown on Consort 1, the first low-gravity materials payload launched by a commercial rocket launch team. The sounding rocket flight produced over 7 min of low gravity during which a polyurethane spheroidal foam of approximately 2300 cu cm was formed. Photographs of the formation of the foam during the flight show the development of the spheroidal form. This begins as a small sphere and grows to approximately a 17-cm-diam spheroid. The apparatus will be flown again on subsequent low-gravity flights.

  1. Myc inhibition impairs autophagosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Toh, Pearl P. C.; Luo, Shouqing; Menzies, Fiona M.; Raskó, Tamás; Wanker, Erich E.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, a major clearance route for many long-lived proteins and organelles, has long been implicated in cancer development. Myc is a proto-oncogene often found to be deregulated in many cancers, and thus is an attractive target for design of cancer therapy. Therefore, understanding the relationship between anti-Myc strategies and autophagy will be important for development of effective therapy. Here, we show that Myc depletion inhibits autophagosome formation and impairs clearance of autophagy substrates. Myc suppression has an inhibitory effect on autophagy via reduction of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) phosphorylation. Additionally, the decrease in JNK1 phosphorylation observed with Myc knockdown is associated with a reduction in ROS production. Our data suggest that targeting Myc in cancer therapy might have the additional benefit of inhibiting autophagy in the case of therapy resistance associated with chemotherapy-induced autophagy. PMID:23933736

  2. Biomineralization: mineral formation by organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addadi, Lia; Weiner, Steve

    2014-09-01

    Organisms form many different types of minerals, with diverse shapes and sizes. These minerals fulfill a variety of functions. Inspired by the late H A Lowenstam, Steve Weiner and Lia Addadi have addressed many questions that relate to the mechanisms by which biological organisms produce these mineral phases and how their structures relate to their functions. Addadi and Weiner have explored the manner in which macromolecules extracted from mineralized tissues can interact with some crystal planes and not others, how these macromolecules can be occluded inside the forming crystals residing preferentially on specific crystal planes, and how they can induce one polymorph of calcium carbonate and not another to nucleate. Addadi and Weiner have also identified a novel strategy used by the sea urchin to form its smooth and convoluted mineralized skeletal elements. The strategy involves the initial production by cells of a highly disordered mineral precursor phase in vesicles, and then the export of this so-called amorphous phase to the site of skeletal formation, where it crystallizes. This strategy is now known to be used by many different invertebrate phyla, as well as by vertebrates to build bones and teeth. One of the major current research aims of the Weiner--Addadi group is to understand the biomineralization pathways whereby ions are extracted from the environment, are transported and deposited inside cells within vesicles, how these disordered phases are then transferred to the site of skeletal formation, and finally how the so-called amorphous phase crystallizes. Biology has clearly evolved unique strategies for forming crystalline minerals. Despite more than 300 years of research in this field, many challenging questions still remain unanswered.

  3. Early Preheating and Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    A. J. Benson; P. Madau

    2003-07-07

    Winds from pregalactic starbursts and 'miniquasars' may pollute the IGM with metals and raise its temperature to a high adiabat, and so inhibit the formation of early galaxies. We compute the thermal history of the IGM when it experiences a period of rapid, homogeneous "preheating" at high redshifts. Measurements of the temperature of the Lyamn-alpha forest at z~3 constrain the redshift and energy of preheating, and rule out models that preheat too late or to too high a temperature. We predict galaxy luminosity functions in preheated universes. The results depend crucially on whether the baryonic smoothing scale in the IGM is computed globally, or in a local, density-dependent fashion. Using a globally averaged smoothing scale, we find that models with excessive preheating produce too few L_* and fainter galaxies, and are therefore inconsistent with observational data. A density-dependent smoothing scale requires more energetic preheating to achieve the same degree of suppression in the faint-end slope. All models, however, appear unable to explain the sharp cut-off in the luminosity function at bright magnitudes. Supernova-driven preheating scenarios tend to raise the mean metallicity of the universe well above the minimum levels observed in the Lyman-alpha clouds. We find that ionizing photon escape fractions must be significantly higher than 10% in order to explain the low inferred HI fraction at z~6. While early preheating causes strong suppression of dwarf galaxy formation we show that it is not able to reproduce the observed abundance of satellite galaxies in the Local Group in detail.

  4. Engram formation in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors substantially influence beginning and progression of mental illness, reinforcing or reducing the consequences of genetic vulnerability. Often initiated by early traumatic events, “engrams” or memories are formed that may give rise to a slow and subtle progression of psychiatric disorders. The large delay between beginning and time of onset (diagnosis) may be explained by efficient compensatory mechanisms observed in brain metabolism that use optional pathways in highly redundant molecular interactions. To this end, research has to deal with mechanisms of learning and long-term memory formation, which involves (a) epigenetic changes, (b) altered neuronal activities, and (c) changes in neuron-glia communication. On the epigenetic level, apparently DNA-methylations are more stable than histone modifications, although both closely interact. Neuronal activities basically deliver digital information, which clearly can serve as basis for memory formation (LTP). However, research in this respect has long time neglected the importance of glia. They are more actively involved in the control of neuronal activities than thought before. They can both reinforce and inhibit neuronal activities by transducing neuronal information from frequency-encoded to amplitude and frequency-modulated calcium wave patterns spreading in the glial syncytium by use of gap junctions. In this way, they serve integrative functions. In conclusion, we are dealing with two concepts of encoding information that mutually control each other and synergize: a digital (neuronal) and a wave-like (glial) computing, forming neuron-glia functional units with inbuilt feedback loops to maintain balance of excitation and inhibition. To better understand mental illness, we have to gain more insight into the dynamics of adverse environmental impact on those cellular and molecular systems. This report summarizes existing knowledge and draws some outline about further research in molecular psychiatry. PMID:24904262

  5. Star formation in active dwarf galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A., Jr.; Telesco, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Star formation and the ISM in active dwarf galaxies are studied based on data from the IRAS Point Source Catalog. The dwarf galaxies that show evidence of recent energetic star formation are generally also strong far-infrared emitters; thus, active current star formation is associated with a history of energetic star formation. A fraction of the galaxies considered here have a star formation rate that is significantly greater than the average rate in the recent past. Available gas is being consumed as efficiently in the presently active dwarfs as in the Milky Way. A primary difference between galaxies that are energetically forming stars and those that are not is the difference in gas mass, as well as the efficiency of star formation. The most important process may be the assembly of large amounts of gaseous material.

  6. Stereoregularity Drives Precipitation in Polyelectrolyte Complex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirrell, Matthew; Perry, Sarah; Leon, Lorraine; Kade, Matthew; Priftis, Dimitris; Black, Katie; Hoffman, Kyle; Whitmer, Jonathan; Qin, Jian; de Pablo, Juan

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of stereoregularity on the formation of polypeptide-based complex formation and assembly into micelles, hydrogels and ordered phases. We demonstrate that fluid complex coacervate formation (rather than solid complex precipitation) between oppositely charged polypeptides requires at least one racemic partner in order to disrupt backbone hydrogen bonding networks and prevent the hydrophobic collapse of the polymers into compact, fibrillar secondary structures. Computer simulations bear this out and enable visualization of the molecular structure of the complexes. The ability to choose between conditions of fluid phase formation and solid phase formation is a useful tool in developing new self-assembled materials based on polyelectrolyte complex formation. Support from the Argonne National Laboratory Laboratory Research and Development Program (2011-217) is gratefully acknowledged.

  7. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  8. Giant Planet Formation, Evolution, and Internal Structure

    E-print Network

    Helled, Ravit; Podolak, Morris; Boley, Aaron; Meru, Farzana; Nayakshin, Sergei; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mayer, Lucio; Alibert, Yann; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    The large number of detected giant exoplanets offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the formation mechanism, evolution, and interior structure of gas giant planets. The two main models for giant planet formation are core accretion and disk instability. There are substantial differences between these formation models, including formation timescale, favorable formation location, ideal disk properties for planetary formation, early evolution, planetary composition, etc. First, we summarize the two models including their substantial differences, advantages, and disadvantages, and suggest how theoretical models should be connected to available (and future) data. We next summarize current knowledge of the internal structures of solar- and extrasolar- giant planets. Finally, we suggest the next steps to be taken in giant planet exploration.

  9. Fibril formation from pea protein and subsequent gel formation.

    PubMed

    Munialo, Claire Darizu; Martin, Anneke H; van der Linden, Erik; de Jongh, Harmen H J

    2014-03-19

    The objective of this study was to characterize fibrillar aggregates made using pea proteins, to assemble formed fibrils into protein-based gels, and to study the rheological behavior of these gels. Micrometer-long fibrillar aggregates were observed after pea protein solutions had been heated for 20 h at pH 2.0. Following heating of pea proteins, it was observed that all of the proteins were hydrolyzed into peptides and that 50% of these peptides were assembled into fibrils. Changes on a structural level in pea proteins were studied using circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. During the fibril assembly process, an increase in aggregate size was observed, which coincided with an increase in thioflavin T binding, indicating the presence of ?-sheet aggregates. Fibrils made using pea proteins were more branched and curly. Gel formation of preformed fibrils was induced by slow acidification from pH 7.0 to a final pH of around pH 5.0. The ability of pea protein-based fibrillar gels to fracture during an amplitude sweep was comparable to those of soy protein and whey protein-based fibrillar gels, although gels prepared from fibrils made using pea protein and soy protein were weaker than those of whey protein. The findings show that fibrils can be prepared from pea protein, which can be incorporated into protein-based fibrillar gels. PMID:24564788

  10. Calculations of Aircraft Contrail Formation Critical Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, Mark L.

    1997-12-01

    Forecasts of condensation trail (contrail) formation are an extremely important consideration in military aircraft operations, particularly in the operation of stealth aircraft. Some recently published works have claimed improvements in the time-tested forecast technique of H. Appleman, but the results are called into question by errors in the basic physics. This note provides a brief explanation of contrail formation theory and presents a simple derivation of the critical temperature of contrail formation for representative jet engine types.

  11. Polar format algorithm for bistatic SAR

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BRIAN D. RIGLING; RANDOLPH L. MOSES

    2004-01-01

    Matched filtering (MF) of phase history data is a mathematically ideal but computationally expensive approach to bistatic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image formation. Fast backprojection algorithms (BPAs) for image formation have recently been shown to give improved O(N2 log2N) performance. An O(N2 log2N) bistatic polar format algorithm (PFA) based on a bistatic far-field assumption is derived. This algorithm is a

  12. TRANSIMS and the hierarchical data format

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, B.W.

    1997-06-12

    The Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) is a general-purposed scientific data format developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications. It supports metadata, compression, and a variety of data structures (multidimensional arrays, raster images, tables). FORTRAN 77 and ANSI C programming interfaces are available for it and a wide variety of visualization tools read HDF files. The author discusses the features of this file format and its possible uses in TRANSIMS.

  13. Formation of Water on Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidali, G.; Jing, D.; He, J.; Frank, P.; Brucato, J.; de Sio, A.; Tozzetti, L.

    2011-05-01

    We studied the formation of water on dust grain analogs using isotopically labeled atomic hydrogen and oxygen beams. We detect the formation of water and intermediate products. As dust analogs, we used amorphous silicate films; for comparison, experiments done on a single crystal silicate were also carried out. The samples were characterized by in-situ infrared spectroscopy and ex-site atom force microscopy. Implications of these results on the formation of water in ISM environments will be discussed.

  14. Empirical correlation verifies true formation skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kutasov, I.M. [MultiSpectrum Technologies, Santa Monica, CA (United States)

    1995-04-03

    To determine formation (true) skin and the rate-dependent skin, a semi-theoretical equation is proposed for relating the critical value of flow rate (q{sub c}) to formation permeability, formation porosity, and gas/oil dynamic viscosity. An accurate evaluation of skin is important for designing remedial treatments or evaluating gas well productivity. Three examples illustrate the proposed equation. In all cases, the actual gas/oil flow rates are compared with the calculated critical flow rate.

  15. MWD gains as formation-evaluation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, M.V.; Fontenot, J.E.

    1988-02-08

    A comparison of measuring while drilling (MWD) and wire line methods as alternatives for formation evaluation is now pertinent. The recent addition of neutron porosity and formation density logs to the MWD logging sutie has significantly advanced it as a tool for quantitative formation evaluation. Though wire line measurements are far from obsolete, their replacement by MWD is becoming more common, particularly in high-angle holes. This is the second article in a series on MWD.

  16. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Maciejewski; R. Neuhaeuser; R. Errmann; M. Mugrauer; Ch. Adam; A. Berndt; T. Eisenbeiss; S. Fiedler; Ch. Ginski; M. Hohle; U. Kramm; C. Marka; M. Moualla; T. Pribulla; St. Raetz; T. Roell; T. O. B. Schmidt; M. Seeliger; I. Spaleniak; N. Tetzlaff; L. Trepl

    2010-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just about 10 Myrs after formation of\\u000atheir host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation\\u000atheories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet\\u000aformation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10\\u000aMyrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by\\u000agravitational collapse (being

  17. GLOBULAR CLUSTER FORMATION WITHIN A COSMOLOGICAL CONTEXT

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, Aaron C.; Lake, George; Read, Justin; Teyssier, Romain, E-mail: aaron.boley@gmail.co [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, Zurich, CH-8057 (Switzerland)

    2009-11-20

    We place constraints on the formation redshifts for blue globular clusters (BGCs), independent of the details of hydrodynamics and population III star formation. The observed radial distribution of BGCs in the Milky Way Galaxy suggests that they formed in biased dark matter halos at high redshift. As a result, simulations of a approx1 Mpc box up to z approx 10 must resolve BGC formation in LAMBDACDM. We find that most halo stars could be produced from destroyed BGCs and other low-mass clusters that formed at high redshift. We present a proof-of-concept simulation that captures the formation of globular-like star clusters.

  18. GENESIS finite element mesh file format

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, L.M.; Flanagan, D.P.; Mills-Curran, W.C.

    1986-05-01

    A new finite element mesh file format which provides a neutral interface from a mesh generation program to a finite element analysis program is described. The file format has been constructed to allow for multiple element types and flexible definition of boundary conditions. It provides for arbitrary element connectivity and attributes, so that continuum and structural elements can easily be accommodated in the same model. Element side boundary conditions as well as nodal point boundary conditions are supported. The file format is applicable to finite element models in any n-dimensional space. Both bandwidth and wavefront optimization schemes can be accommodated with the GENESIS file format. 1 ref.

  19. Dominant diffusing species during cobalt silicide formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comrie, C. M.; Newman, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    The dominant moving species during cobalt monosilicide and cobalt disilicide formation has been examined using a thin tantalum layer as a metal marker. The marker data obtained following the formation of CoSi from Co2Si showed that monosilicide growth was essentially due Si diffusion only. When used to study CoSi2 formation, the data indicated that silicon was also the dominant moving species during disilicide formation, although a noninsignificant amount of cobalt diffusion was also observed to take place.

  20. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  1. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    E-print Network

    Maciejewski, G; Errmann, R; Mugrauer, M; Adam, Ch; Berndt, A; Eisenbeiss, T; Fiedler, S; Ginski, Ch; Hohle, M; Kramm, U; Marka, C; Moualla, M; Pribulla, T; Raetz, St; Roell, T; Schmidt, T O B; Seeliger, M; Spaleniak, I; Tetzlaff, N; Trepl, L

    2010-01-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just about 10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young) or accretion growth (being smaller when young). We present a survey, the main goal of which is to find and then characterise TEPs in very young open clusters.

  2. Towards the Rosetta Stone of planet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, G.; Neuhäuser, R.; Errmann, R.; Mugrauer, M.; Adam, Ch.; Berndt, A.; Eisenbeiss, T.; Fiedler, S.; Ginski, Ch.; Hohle, M.; Kramm, U.; Marka, C.; Moualla, M.; Pribulla, T.; Raetz, St.; Roell, T.; Schmidt, T. O. B.; Seeliger, M.; Spaleniak, I.; Tetzlaff, N.; Trepl, L.

    2011-02-01

    Transiting exoplanets (TEPs) observed just ~10 Myrs after formation of their host systems may serve as the Rosetta Stone for planet formation theories. They would give strong constraints on several aspects of planet formation, e.g. time-scales (planet formation would then be possible within 10 Myrs), the radius of the planet could indicate whether planets form by gravitational collapse (being larger when young) or accretion growth (being smaller when young). We present a survey, the main goal of which is to find and then characterise TEPs in very young open clusters.

  3. Diet and renal stone formation.

    PubMed

    Trinchieri, A

    2013-02-01

    The relationship between diet and the formation of renal stones is demonstrated, but restrictive diets do not take into account the complexity of metabolism and the complex mechanisms that regulate the saturation and crystallization processes in the urine. The restriction of dietary calcium can reduce the urinary excretion of calcium but severe dietary restriction of calcium causes hyperoxaluria and a progressive loss of bone mineral component. Furthermore urinary calcium excretion is influenced by other nutrients than calcium as sodium, potassium, protein and refined carbohydrates. Up to 40% of the daily excretion of oxalate in the urine is from dietary source, but oxalate absorption in the intestine depends linearly on the concomitant dietary intake of calcium and is influenced by the bacterial degradation by several bacterial species of intestinal flora. A more rational approach should be based on the cumulative effects of foods and different dietary patterns on urinary saturation rather than on the effect of single nutrients. A diet based on a adequate intake of calcium (1000-1200 mg per day) and containment of animal protein and salt can decrease significantly urinary supersaturation for calcium oxalate and reduce the relative risk of stone recurrence in hypercalciuric renal stone formers. The DASH-style diet that is high in fruits and vegetables, moderate in low-fat dairy products and low in animal proteins and salt is associated with a lower relative supersaturation for calcium oxalate and a marked decrease in risk of incident stone formation. All the diets above mentioned have as a common characteristic the reduction of the potential acid load of the diet that can be correlated with a higher risk of recurrent nephrolithiasis, because the acid load of diet is inversely related to urinary citrate excretion. The restriction of protein and salt with an adequate calcium intake seem to be advisable but should be implemented with the advice to increase the intake of vegetables that can carry a plentiful supply of alkali that counteract the acid load coming from animal protein. New prospective studies to evaluate the effectiveness of the diet for the prevention of renal stones should be oriented to simple dietary advices that should be focused on a few specific goals easily controlled by means of self-evaluation tools, such as the LAKE food screener. PMID:23392537

  4. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-03-31

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  5. Spheromak formation studies in SSPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Bulmer, R H; Cohen, B L; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Mattor, N; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Pearlstein, L D; Ryutov, D D; Stallard, B W; Wood, R D; Woodruff, S; Holcomb, C T; Jarboe, T; Sovinec, C R; Wang, Z; Wurden, G

    2000-09-29

    We present results from the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) at LLNL, which has been built to study energy confinement in spheromak plasmas sustained for up to 2 ms by coaxial DC helicity injection. Peak toroidal currents as high as 600kA have been obtained in the 1m dia. (0.23m minor radius) device using injection currents between 200-400kA; these currents generate edge poloidal fields in the range of 0.2-0.4T. The internal field and current profiles are inferred from edge field measurements using the CORSICA code. Density and impurity control is obtained using baking, glow discharge cleansing, and titanium gettering, after which long plasma decay times ({tau} {ge} 1.5ms) are observed and impurity radiation losses are reduced from {approx}50% to <20% of the input energy. Thomson scattering measurements show peaked electron temperature and pressure profiles with T{sub e} (0){approx}120eV and {beta}{sub e}{approx}7%. Edge field measurements show the presence of n=1 modes during the formation phase, as has been observed in other spheromaks. This mode dies away during sustainment and decay so that edge fluctuation levels as low as 1% have been measured. These results are compared with numerical simulations using the NIMROD code.

  6. Equol: history, chemistry, and formation.

    PubMed

    Setchell, Kenneth D R; Clerici, Carlo

    2010-07-01

    Equol, first isolated from equine urine in 1932 and identified 50 years later in human urine as a metabolite of the soy isoflavones, daidzin and daidzein, is produced by intestinal bacteria in some, but not all, adults. This observation led to the term equol-producers to define those adults that could make equol in response to consuming soy isoflavones and the hypothesis that the health benefits of soy-based diets may be greater in equol-producers than in equol nonproducers. By virtue of a chiral center, equol occurs as a diastereoisomer and intestinal bacteria are enantiospecific in synthesizing exclusively the S-(-)equol enantiomer, an enantiomer that has selective affinity for the estrogen receptor-beta. Both enantiomers are of interest from a clinical and pharmacological perspective and are currently being developed as nutraceutical and pharmacological agents. The wide range of biological activities these enantiomers possess warrants their investigation for the treatment of a number of hormone-related conditions involving estrogen-dependent and androgen-related conditions. The following review describes the history, chemistry, and factors governing the intestinal bacterial formation of equol. PMID:20519412

  7. Compositional Balancing Before Moon Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2008-02-01

    A striking feature in the compositions of the Earth and Moon is their identical abundances of oxygen isotopes. Most planetary scientists agree that the Moon formed as the result of a giant impact with the proto-Earth. It explains some important characteristics about the Earth and Moon, such as why the Moon has a small metallic iron core, but planetary formation models suggest that the Moon ought to have a different oxygen isotopic composition than the Earth. Why is it the same? Kaveh Pahlevan and David Stevenson (Caltech) suggest that after the giant impact and before the Moon formed, Earth exchanged materials with the disk of magma and gas surrounding it, ironing out differences in their isotopic compositions. The process would take a couple of hundred years, about the time (100 to 1000 years) the disk would last before coalescing into the Moon. This interesting idea is far from proven, but it will undoubtedly lead to additional work because it has such great implication s for the compositions of the Earth and Moon, when Earth received its water, and how planets accreted from the cloud of gas and dust surrounding the primitive Sun.

  8. STAR FORMATION IN DENSE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Philip C., E-mail: pmyers@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    A model of core-clump accretion with equally likely stopping describes star formation in the dense parts of clusters, where models of isolated collapsing cores may not apply. Each core accretes at a constant rate onto its protostar, while the surrounding clump gas accretes as a power of protostar mass. Short accretion flows resemble Shu accretion and make low-mass stars. Long flows resemble reduced Bondi accretion and make massive stars. Accretion stops due to environmental processes of dynamical ejection, gravitational competition, and gas dispersal by stellar feedback, independent of initial core structure. The model matches the field star initial mass function (IMF) from 0.01 to more than 10 solar masses. The core accretion rate and the mean accretion duration set the peak of the IMF, independent of the local Jeans mass. Massive protostars require the longest accretion durations, up to 0.5 Myr. The maximum protostar luminosity in a cluster indicates the mass and age of its oldest protostar. The distribution of protostar luminosities matches those in active star-forming regions if protostars have a constant birthrate but not if their births are coeval. For constant birthrate, the ratio of young stellar objects to protostars indicates the star-forming age of a cluster, typically {approx}1 Myr. The protostar accretion luminosity is typically less than its steady spherical value by a factor of {approx}2, consistent with models of episodic disk accretion.

  9. UNION FORMATION IN FRAGILE FAMILIES*

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Marcia; McLanahan, Sara; England, Paula

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we use data from a new longitudinal survey—the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study—to examine union formation among unmarried parents who have just had a child together. We use multinomial logistic regression to estimate the effects of economic, cultural/interpersonal, and other factors on whether (relative to having no romantic relationship) parents are romantically involved living apart, cohabiting, or married to each other about one year after the child’s birth. Net of other factors (including baseline relationship status), women’s education and men’s earnings encourage marriage. Cultural and inter-personal factors also have strong effects: women’s trust of men, both parents’ positive attitudes toward marriage, and both parents’ assessment of the supportiveness in their relationship encourage marriage. Supportiveness also encourages cohabitation, while fathers’ having a problem with alcohol or drugs and reporting higher conflict in the relationship discourage cohabitation. Fathers’ physical violence deters couples’ remaining in romantic non-resident relationships. PMID:15209039

  10. Supragingival calculus: formation and control.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ye; Yip, Hak-Kong

    2002-01-01

    Dental calculus is composed of inorganic components and organic matrix. Brushite, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, octacalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, and whitlockite form the mineral part of dental calculus. Salivary proteins selectively adsorb on the tooth surface to form an acquired pellicle. It is followed by the adherence of various oral micro-organisms. Fimbriae, flagella, and some other surface proteins are essential for microbial adherence. Microbial co-aggregation and co-adhesion enable some micro-organisms, which are incapable of adhering, to adhere to the pellicle-coated tooth surface. Once organisms attach to the tooth surface, new genes could be expressed so that mature dental plaque can form and biofilm bacteria assume increased resistance to antimicrobial agents. Supersaturation of saliva and plaque fluid with respect to calcium phosphates is the driving force for plaque mineralization. Both salivary flow rate and plaque pH appear to influence the saturation degree of calcium phosphates. Acidic phospholipids and specific proteolipids present in cell membranes play a key role in microbial mineralization. The roles of crystal growth inhibitors, promoters, and organic acids in calculus formation are discussed. Application of biofilm culture systems in plaque mineralization is concisely reviewed. Anti-calculus agents used--centering on triclosan plus polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid copolymer, pyrophosphate plus polyvinyl methyl ether/maleic acid copolymer, and zinc ion-in commercial dentifrices are also discussed in this paper. PMID:12393761

  11. Structure Formation by Electrohydrodynamic Instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhiqun; Kerle, Tobias; Hoagland, David A.; Russell, Thomas P.; Schaffer, Erik; Steiner, Ullrich

    2002-03-01

    External electric fields were used to amplify the thermal fluctuations at liquid/air and liquid/liquid interfaces. The electrostatic pressure at the interface operates against the Laplace pressure, given by the product of the interfacial tension and the curvature of the fluctuation, to induce the electrohydrodynamic instabilities. Small wavelength fluctuations are suppressed, since they are too costly energetically. Long wavelength fluctuations, on the other hand, are also suppressed due to the fluid dynamics. Consequently, interfacial fluctuations having a characteristic wavelength ?_max grow, producing structures at the interface having well-defined shapes and separation distances. A simple theoretical framework to describe experimental observations is presented. The theoretical model predicts a substantial reduction in the characteristic wavelength ?_max if the surface energy is replaced by interfacial energy, which occurs when the air is replaced by a second dielectric liquid in the bilayer case. Using reduced variables, a master curve was developed, which quantitatively describes the experimental data for all system studied under different geometries with no adjustable external parameters. Our results show that a submicron structure formation and replication can be easily done.

  12. Plasma Formation Around Single Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duselis, Peter U.; Kusse, Bruce R.

    2002-12-01

    At Cornell's Laboratory of Plasma Studies, single wires of various metals were exploded using a ˜250 ns pulser with a rise time of ˜20 A/ns. It was found that the wires first experience a resistive heating phase that lasts 50-80 ns before a rapid collapse of voltage. From that point on, the voltage across the wire was negligible while the current through the wire continued to increase. We attribute this voltage collapse to the formation of plasma about the wire. Further confirmation of this explanation will be presented along with new experimental data describing preliminary spectroscopy results, the expansion rate of the plasma, and current flow along the wire as a function of radius. The resistance of the wire-electrode connection will be shown to significantly affect the energy deposition. Various diagnostics were used to obtain these experiments. Ultraviolet sensitive vacuum photodiodes and a framing camera with an 8 ns shutter were used to detect and measure the width of the visible light emitted by the plasma. A special wire holder was constructed that allowed the transfer of current from the wire to the surrounding plasma to be observed.

  13. Dispersal, settling and layer formation.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, James R; Hughes, Barry D; Landman, Kerry A

    2011-07-01

    Motivated by examples in developmental biology and ecology, we develop a model for convection-dominated invasion of a spatial region by initially motile agents which are able to settle permanently. The motion of the motile agents and their rate of settling are affected by the local concentration of settled agents. The model can be formulated as a nonlinear partial differential equation for the time-integrated local concentration of the motile agents, from which the instantaneous density of settled agents and its long-time limit can be extracted. In the limit of zero diffusivity, the partial differential equation is of first order; for application-relevant initial and boundary-value problems, shocks arise in the time-integrated motile agent density, leading to delta-function components in the motile agent density. Furthermore, there are simple solutions for a model of successive layer formation. In addition some analytic results for a one-dimensional system with non-zero diffusivity can also be obtained. A case study, both with and without diffusion, is examined numerically. Some important predictions of the model are insensitive to the specific settling law used and the model offers insight into biological processes involving layered growth or overlapping generations of colonization. PMID:21536053

  14. Absorption and elimination of formate following oral administration of calcium formate in female human subjects

    E-print Network

    Hanzlik, Robert P.; Fowler, Stephen C.; Eells, Janis T.

    2005-02-01

    Published abstract: Calcium formate is a water-soluble salt of an essential mineral nutrient with potential for use as a dietary calcium supplement. Formate ion is a product of endogenous and xenobiotic metabolism, but ...

  15. Exciton formation and stability in semiconductor heterostructures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Siggelkow; W. Hoyer; M. Kira; S. W. Koch

    2004-01-01

    The formation and stability of excitons in semiconductors is studied on the basis of a microscopic model that includes Coulomb interacting fermionic electrons and holes as well as phonons. Whereas quasiequilibrium calculations predict substantial exciton fractions coexisting with an electron-hole plasma at low temperatures and densities, dynamic calculations reveal that the exciton formation times under these conditions exceed the characteristic

  16. Calculations of Aircraft Contrail Formation Critical Temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark L. Schrader

    1997-01-01

    Forecasts of condensation trail (contrail) formation are an extremely important consideration in military aircraft operations, particularly in the operation of stealth aircraft. Some recently published works have claimed improvements in the time-tested forecast technique of H. Appleman, but the results are called into question by errors in the basic physics. This note provides a brief explanation of contrail formation theory

  17. Adiabatic theories of galaxy formation and pancakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, J.R.; Szalay, A.S.

    1984-01-01

    The adiabatic theory of galaxy formation in universes dominated by massive neutrinos or other more weakly interacting particles such as gravitinos or photinos is reviewed. Collisionless damping leads to a density fluctuation spectrum with a cutoff, the nonlinear evolution of which naturally results in the formation of pancakes, strings, voids, galaxies, and galactic halos. 38 references.

  18. Adiabatic theories of galaxy formation and pancakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. R.; Szalay, A. S.

    The adiabatic theory of galaxy formation in universes dominated by massive neutrinos or other more weakly interacting particles such as gravitinos or photinos is reviewed. Collisionless damping leads to a density fluctuation spectrum with a cutoff, the nonlinear evolution of which naturally results in the formation of pancakes, strings, voids, galaxies, and galactic halos.

  19. SRB Monthly Averages Legacy - HDF Format

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-08-01

    ... HDF Format HDF Format:  Equal-area grid system Algorithms: GEWEX  - Algorithm based on detailed ... previous releases. An important difference between the Release 2.5 data set and the corresponding Release 2.0 data set is the use of ...

  20. SRB Daily Averages Legacy - HDF Format

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-08-01

    ... HDF Format HDF Format:  Equal-area grid system Algorithms: GEWEX  - Algorithm based on detailed ... previous releases. An important difference between the Release 2.5 data set and the corresponding Release 2.0 data set is the use of ...

  1. Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control

    E-print Network

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    Autonomous Helicopter Formation using Model Predictive Control Hoam Chung and S. Shankar Sastry for teams of helicopters. However, the potential for accidents is greatly increased when helicopter teams to the problem of helicopter formations comprised of heterogenous vehicles. The disturbance attenuation property

  2. A pheromone model for public opinion formation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fan Jia; Yun Liu; Fei Ding; Di Xie

    2010-01-01

    A method to simulate the dynamics of public opinion formation with pheromone is proposed. It is assumed that an individual would sense and deposit pheromone during its opinion formation, and it changes and updates opinion basing on the transition probability determined by the distribution of pheromone. Using the proposed model, simulations with several sets of parameters are carried out. The

  3. Potentials of large format camera photography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. C. Malhotra

    1986-01-01

    From the viewpoint of improved precision, resolution, area coverage, and other terrain mapping considerations, a large format camera of 30-cm focal length and a pair of stellar cameras to determine camera attitude were recommended for Apollo Missions. In this paper, the potentials of a Large Format Camera (LFC) photography are explored specifically for the purpose of carrying out photogrammetic control

  4. H2 Formation on Dust Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirronello, V.; Manicó, G.; Roser, J.; Vidali, G.

    2004-05-01

    Results of recent laboratory experiments on the formation of molecular hydrogen on surfaces of astrophysical interest and in condition close to those encountered in the interstellar medium are reviewed. Deductions on the mechanisms responsible for the hydrogen molecule formation reaction and theoretical modeling of the relevant process are also presented.

  5. Mylonitic Breccia near the Gunsight Formation

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Mylonitic breccia in alluvium of Little Deer Creek, downstream from a moderately west-dipping contact between biotitic quartzite of the Gunsight Formation, which is structurally overlain by garnet-chloritoid-bearing banded siltite of the banded siltite unit of the Apple Creek Formation. That structu...

  6. Star Formation in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Palla; Steven W. Stahler

    1999-01-01

    We study the record of star formation activity within the dense cluster associated with the Orion Nebula. The bolometric luminosity function of 900 visible members is well matched by a simplified theoretical model for cluster formation. This model assumes that stars are produced at a constant rate and distributed according to the field-star initial mass function. Our best-fit age for

  7. Shell Formation and Bone Strength Laying Hens

    E-print Network

    , Daidzein and Exogenous Estrogen Abstract In Sweden almost 3.8% of all eggs are ruined due to cracked was detected. An imbalance between estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and estrogen receptor beta (ER) in the shell and overview of egg formation 10 1.2.2 Calcium sources for shell formation 13 1.2.3 Shell gland and the process

  8. High frequency callus formation from maize protoplasts

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. R. Ludwig; D. A. Somers; W. L. Petersen; R. F. Pohlman; M. A. Zarowitz; B. G. Gengenbach; J. Messing

    1985-01-01

    A solid feeder layer technique was developed to improve callus formation of Black Mexican Sweet maize (Zea mays L.) suspension culture protoplasts. Protoplasts were plated in 0.2 ml liquid media onto a cellulose nitrate filter on top of agarose-solidified media in which Black Mexican Sweet suspension feeder cells were embedded. Callus colony formation frequencies exceeding 10% of the plated protoplasts

  9. Island Formation: Constructing a Coral Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Heather; Edd, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The process of coral island formation is often difficult for middle school students to comprehend. Coral island formation is a dynamic process, and students should have the opportunity to experience this process in a synergistic context. The authors provide instructional guidelines for constructing a coral island. Students play an interactive role…

  10. Planet Formation Is the Solar System Misleading?

    E-print Network

    Wuchterl, Günther

    Planet Formation Is the Solar System Misleading? Günther Wuchterl Max://www.xray.mpe.mpg.de/wuchterl/ Abstract The discovery of more than hundred extrasolar planet candidates chal- lenges our understanding of planet formation. Do we have to modify the theories that were mostly developed for the solar system

  11. Planet formation by concurrent collapse Michael Wilkinson

    E-print Network

    Wilkinson, Michael

    Planet formation by concurrent collapse Michael Wilkinson and Bernhard Mehlig Department the difficulties faced by the conventional theory of planet formation (based upon the aggregation of microscopic dust particles), we describe an alternative hypothesis. We propose that planets form by gravitational

  12. Harnessing Collaborative Annotations on Online Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jian-Wei; Lai, Yuan-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    This paper harnesses collaborative annotations by students as learning feedback on online formative assessments to improve the learning achievements of students. Through the developed Web platform, students can conduct formative assessments, collaboratively annotate, and review historical records in a convenient way, while teachers can generate…

  13. Molecular Star Formation Rate Indicators in Galaxies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Desika Narayanan; Thomas J. Cox; Yancy Shirley; Romeel Davé; Lars Hernquist; Christopher K. Walker

    2008-01-01

    We derive a physical model for the observed relations between star formation rate (SFR) and molecular line (CO and HCN) emission in galaxies and show how these observed relations are reflective of the underlying star formation law. We do this by combining 3D non-LTE radiative transfer calculations with hydrodynamic simulations of isolated disk galaxies and galaxy mergers. We demonstrate that

  14. Formate metabolism in fetal and neonatal sheep.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Shannon E; Caudill, Marie A; Malysheva, Olga; MacFarlane, Amanda J; Behan, Nathalie A; Harnett, Brian; MacMillan, Luke; Pongnopparat, Theerawat; Brosnan, John T; Brosnan, Margaret E

    2015-05-15

    By virtue of its role in nucleotide synthesis, as well as the provision of methyl groups for vital methylation reactions, one-carbon metabolism plays a crucial role in growth and development. Formate, a critical albeit neglected component of one-carbon metabolism, occurs extracellularly and may provide insights into cellular events. We examined formate metabolism in chronically cannulated fetal sheep (gestation days 119-121, equivalent to mid-third trimester in humans) and in their mothers as well as in normal full-term lambs. Plasma formate levels were much higher in fetal lamb plasma and in amniotic fluid (191 ± 62 and 296 ± 154 ?M, respectively) than in maternal plasma (33 ± 13 ?M). Measurements of folate, vitamin B12, and homocysteine showed that these high formate levels could not be due to vitamin deficiencies. Elevated formate levels were also found in newborn lambs and persisted to about 8 wk of age. Formate was also found in sheep milk. Potential precursors of one-carbon groups were also measured in fetal and maternal plasma and in amniotic fluid. There were very high concentrations of serine in the fetus (?1.6 mM in plasma and 3.5 mM in the amniotic fluid) compared with maternal plasma (0.19 mM), suggesting increased production of formate; however, we cannot rule out decreased formate utilization. Dimethylglycine, a choline metabolite, was also 30 times higher in the fetus than in the mother. PMID:25805190

  15. DIU FORMATION COMPLMENTAIRE EN PDOPSYCHIATRIE ET PSYCHIATRIE

    E-print Network

    Brest, Université de

    DIU FORMATION COMPLÉMENTAIRE EN PÉDOPSYCHIATRIE ET PSYCHIATRIE POUR MÉDECINS GÉNÉRALISTES OBJECTIFS DE LA FORMATION Ce diplôme répond à des besoins de santé publique en pédopsychiatrie et psychiatrie compétences en pédopsychiatrie et psychiatrie sur l'ensemble de la région Bretagne. PUBLIC CONCERNÉ Être

  16. COMMUNICATION Mechanism of Formation of Actomyosin Interface

    E-print Network

    Rhode Island, University of

    COMMUNICATION Mechanism of Formation of Actomyosin Interface Oleg A. Andreev and Yana K. Reshetnyak-actin. At the end of each cycle myosin and actin form a tight complex with a substantial interface area. We investigated the dynamics of formation of actomyosin interface in presence and absence of nucleotides

  17. Robot Behavior Adaptation for Formation Maintenance

    E-print Network

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    1 Robot Behavior Adaptation for Formation Maintenance Maite López-Sánchez maite@maia.ub.es WAI) Acknowledgements: Bernat Grau Index · Introduction · Basic behaviors · Formation maintenance · Performance ­ inverted-V or wedge ­ rectangle or roman manipulus · Local information (behaviors) · No notion about

  18. Omnidirectional Vision-Based Formation Control

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Omid Shakernia; Shankar Sastry

    We consider the problem of distributed leader-follower formation control for nonholonomic mobile robots equipped with paracatadioptric cameras. Our ap- proach is to translate the formation control problem from the conguration space into a separate visual servoing task for each follower. First, we present an algorithm for innitesimal multi-body motion segmentation from multiple paracatadioptric views. We derive a rank constraint on

  19. Arabic Formatting with DITROFF\\/FFORTID

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johny Srouji; Daniel M. Berry

    1992-01-01

    SUMMARY This paper describes an Arabic formatting system that is able to format multilingual scientific documents, containing text in Arabic or Persian, as well as other languages, plus pictures, graphs, formulae, tables, bibliographical citations, and bibliographies. The system is an extension of ditroff\\/ffortid that is already capable of handling Hebrew in the context of multi- lingual scientific documents. ditroff\\/ffortid itself

  20. Lipase catalyzed formation of flavour esters

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Langrand; C. Triantaphylides; J. Baratti

    1988-01-01

    Summary Thirteen commercial lipase preparations were checked for their ability to catalyse the formation of flavour esters (isoamyl or geranyl acetate, propionate and butyrate) by either direct esterification or ester solvolysis in n-heptane. The formation of isoamyl or geranyl butyrates and propionates by direct esterification was catalyzed by the majority of the tested lipases. Acetic acid esters were more difficult