Science.gov

Sample records for tabular ascii format

  1. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) file format description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford; Hammond, Dana

    1987-01-01

    Described is a format for writing ASCII data on a file to facilitate its transfer from one computer system to another. The TOAD format conforms to all ANSI FORTRAN 77 standards. There are two advantages in using the TOAD format. First, TOAD files are of the preferred type and record length to make them easy to edit, read from and write on magnetic tape, or transfer across communications networks. Secondly, application programs, using the TOAD format to write computational results, are more portable and the answer files easier to postprocess. TOAD utility software is listed in an appendix.

  2. File-Format Program For Transferable Output ASCII Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingle, Bradford

    1988-01-01

    TOAD utilities machine-independent and require minimal central memory. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) file-format computer program facilitates transfer of data files from one computer installation to another. TOAD files preferred type and record length, easy to edit, read, and write on magnetic tape or transfer across communications networks. Applications programs write TOAD files directly and conform to all ANSI FORTRAN 77 standards.

  3. ascii2gdocs

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-30

    Enables UNIX and Mac OS X command line users to put (individually or batch mode) local ascii files into Google Documents, where the ascii is converted to Google Document format using formatting the user can specify.

  4. National Sewage Sludge Survey (NSSS), data element dictionary for the ASCII format databases

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-16

    A data element dictionary including ASCII database file structures, variable naming conventions, and unique identifier variables is provided for the ASCII formats of the Questionnaire, Data Conventions, and Analytical Databases for the 1988 National Sewage Sludge Use and Disposal Survey (NSSS). Data collected in the questionnaire component of the survey are contained in the Questionnaire Database. Revised questionnaire data, including regulatory analytical use or disposal practices, followup information from the Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTWs), and imputed values for missing or improbable responses which could not be resolved, are recorded in the Data Conventions Database. Chemical concentrations from sewage sludge samples collected just prior to disposal are recorded in the Analytical Database.

  5. Formation of tabular single-domain magnetite induced by Geobacter metallireducens GS-15

    E-print Network

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    Formation of tabular single-domain magnetite induced by Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 Hojatollah.g., an anisotropic medium) has been reported (1, 2). Although magnetite forms predominantly diamond-shape octahedrons is produced intracellularly by a variety of magnetic bacteria in diverse environments (4­6). The formation

  6. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) gateway: Version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) Gateway, release 1.0 is described. This is a software tool for converting tabular data from one format into another via the TOAD format. This initial release of the Gateway allows free data interchange among the following file formats: TOAD; Standard Interface File (SIF); Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST) input; Comma Separated Value (TSV); and a general free-form file format. As required, additional formats can be accommodated quickly and easily.

  7. A quantitative model of ground-water flow during formation of tabular sandstone uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a quantitative simulation of regional groundwater flow during uranium deposition in the Westwater Canyon Member and Jackpile Sandstone Member of the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation in the San Juan basin. Topographic slope, shoreline position, and density contrasts in the lake and pore fluids controlled the directions of flow and recharge-discharge areas. The most important results for uranium ore deposit formation are that regional groundwater discharged throughout the basin, regional discharge was concentrated along the shore line or playa margin, flow was dominantly gravity driven, and compaction dewatering was negligible. A strong association is found between the tabular sandstone uranium deposits and major inferred zones of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge. -from Author

  8. Fast-Ice Formation in Presence of Tabular Icebergs in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, O.; Brunt, K.; Macayeal, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Icebergs calved from the Ross Ice Shelf during last five years (B15, C16 and C19) and currently adrift in the Ross Sea have had an impact on the formation and break-up of fast ice (sea ice that is immobile and attached to the shore) in the vicinity of McMurdo Sound. Between October 2004 and May 2005, a great wall of icebergs consisting of B15A, the Dragalski Ice Tongue, B15K and C16 fortuitously developed along the Victoria Land Coast and effectively isolated McMurdo Sound, from the effects of the open Ross Sea. During this time period, 40% to 90% of the seaward boundary of this area was blocked by these icebergs. The iceberg barrier occurred during the warmest summer months (December - March) when sea ice is normally cleared from the area; thus, as the 2005 austral winter progressed, land-fast multiyear sea ice has remained in the region, despite a subsequent break-down of the iceberg barrier (i.e., B15A drifting north). This barrier reduced the effect on the sea ice of southerly winds by presenting a mechanical buttress to nortward flow, and also blocked currents from the Ross Sea which normally contribute to the break up of fast ice in the austral summer. In addition, lateral melting of the icebergs resulted in the freshening of the ocean surface layer, enhancing stratification and sea-ice formation. This study shall Geographic Information System analysis of satellite imagery to quantify the length of the iceberg barrier, and to demonstrate the resultant impact on the development and total extent of fast ice. A simple numerical model of one-dimensional water-column/sea-ice interaction will be used to quantify the effects of fresh-water flux from iceberg melting and associated effects on sea-ice formation.

  9. The NOAA Tide Predictions application provides predictions in both graphical and tabular formats, with many user selected options, for over 3000 stations broken down by key areas in each state.

    E-print Network

    The NOAA Tide Predictions application provides predictions in both graphical and tabular formats. Station Types: The NOAA Tide Predictions application provides predictions from 2 distinct categories by combining the harmonic constituents into a single tide curve. Subordinate - The high and low height values

  10. A MICROPROCESSOR ASCII CHARACTER BUFFERING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A microprocessor buffering system (MBS) was developed at the Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory -Cincinnati (EMSL-CI) to provide an efficient transfer for serial ASCII information between intelligent instrument systema and a Data General NOVA laboratory automation co...

  11. A new model for tabular-type uranium deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sanford, R.F.

    1992-01-01

    Tabular-type uranium deposits occur as tabular, originally subhorizontal bodies entirely within reduced fluvial sandstones of Late Silurian age or younger. This paper proposes that belts of tabular-type uranium deposits formed in areas of mixed local and regional groundwater discharge shortly after deposition of the host sediments. The general characteristics of tabular-type uranium deposits indicate that their essential feature was the formation at a density-stratified ground-water interface in areas of local and regional ground-water discharge. Reconstruction of the paleohydrogeology is the key to understanding the formation of these deposits. Geologic ground-water controls that favor discharge, such as the pinch-out of major aquifers, are also favorable for uranium ore. The combination of topographic and geologic features that both cause discharge is most favorable for ore deposition. -from Author

  12. Chapter 6. Tabular data and graphical images in support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment-East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces, Jurassic Smackover interior salt basins total petroleum system (504902), Travis Peak and Hosston formations.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on the CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  13. Organic matter diagenesis as the key to a unifying theory for the genesis of tabular uranium-vanadium deposits in the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hansley, P.L.; Spirakis, C.S.

    1992-01-01

    Interstitial, epigenetic amorphous organic matter is intimately associated with uranium in the Grants uranium region and is considered essential to genetic models for these deposits. In contrast, uranium minerals are intimately associated with authigenic vanadium chlorite and vanadium oxides in amorphous organic matter-poor ores of the Slick Rock and Henry Mountains mining districts and therefore, in some genetic models amorphous organic matter is not considered crucial to the formation of these deposits. Differences in organic matter content can be explained by recognizing that amorphous organic matter-poor deposits have been subjected to more advanced stages of diagenesis than amorphous organic matter-rich deposits. Evidence that amorphous organic matter was involved in the genesis of organic matter-poor, as well as organic matter-rich, deposits is described. -from Authors

  14. Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor version 1.0 user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bingel, Bradford D.; Shea, Anne L.; Hofler, Alicia S.

    1991-01-01

    The Transferable Output ASCII Data (TOAD) editor is an interactive software tool for manipulating the contents of TOAD files. The TOAD editor is specifically designed to work with tabular data. Selected subsets of data may be displayed to the user's screen, sorted, exchanged, duplicated, removed, replaced, inserted, or transferred to and from external files. It also offers a number of useful features including on-line help, macros, a command history, an 'undo' option, variables, and a full compliment of mathematical functions and conversion factors. Written in ANSI FORTRAN 77 and completely self-contained, the TOAD editor is very portable and has already been installed on SUN, SGI/IRIS, and CONVEX hosts.

  15. DAWN: A Novel Strategy for Detecting ASCII Worms in Networks

    E-print Network

    Chen, Shigang

    DAWN: A Novel Strategy for Detecting ASCII Worms in Networks Parbati Kumar Manna Sanjay Ranka for detecting the binary worms exploiting the vulnerability of buffer overflow, very little effort has been spent in detecting worms that consist of only text, i.e., printable ASCII characters. We show

  16. GOCEXML2ASCII an XML to ASCII converter for GOCE level EGG_NOM and SST_PSO data

    E-print Network

    Stuttgart, Universität

    GOCEXML2ASCII ­ an XML to ASCII converter for GOCE level EGG_NOM and SST_PSO data Ma hias Roth. In contrary to the above mentioned parsers, our parser can only convert EGG_NOM_2 and SST_PSO_2 at the moment of the shell skripting was, to keep the GOCE data compressed. E. g., all available EGG_NOM_2 files (September

  17. Taiwan Ascii and Idl_save Data Archives (AIDA) for THEMIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B.; Hsieh, W.; Shue, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K. H.; McFadden, J. P.; Larson, D.

    2008-12-01

    THEMIS (Time History of Events and their Macroscopic Interactions during Substorms) is a satellite mission that aims to determine where and how substorms are triggered. The space research team in Taiwan has been involved in data promotion and scientific research. Taiwan Ascii and Idl_save Data Archives (AIDA) for THEMIS is the main work of the data promotion. Taiwan AIDA is developed for those who are not familiar with the Interactive Data Language (IDL) data analysis and visualization software, and those who have some basic IDL concepts and techniques and want more flexibilities in reading and plotting the THEMIS data. Two kinds of data format are stored in Taiwan AIDA: one is ASCII format for most users and the other is IDL SAVE format for IDL users. The public can download THEMIS data in either format through the Taiwan AIDA web site, http://themis.ss.ncu.edu.tw/e_data_download.php. Taiwan AIDA provides (1) plasma data including number density, average temperature, and velocity of ions and electrons, (2) magnetic field data, and (3) state information including the position and velocity of five THEMIS probes. On the Taiwan AIDA web site there are two data-downloading options. The public can download a large amount of data for a particular instrument in the FTP equivalent option; the public can also download all the data for a particular date in the Data Search option.

  18. Progress Report on the ASCII for Science Data, Airborne and Geospatial Working Groups of the 2014 ESDSWG for MEaSUREs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, K. D.; Krotkov, N. A.; Mattmann, C. A.; Boustani, M.; Law, E.; Conover, H.; Chen, G.; Olding, S. W.; Walter, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth Science Data Systems Working Groups (ESDSWG) were setup by NASA HQ 10 years ago. The role of the ESDSWG is to make recommendations relevant to NASA's Earth science data systems from users experiences. Each group works independently focussing on a unique topic. Participation in ESDSWG groups comes from a variety of NASA-funded science and technology projects, NASA information technology experts, affiliated contractor staff and other interested community members from academia and industry. Recommendations from the ESDSWG groups will enhance NASA's efforts to develop long term data products. The ASCII for Science Data Working Group (WG) will define a minimum set of information that should be included in ASCII file headers so that the users will be able to access the data using only the header information. After reviewing various use cases, such as field data and ASCII data exported from software tools, and reviewing ASCII data guidelines documentation, this WG will deliver guidelines for creating ASCII files that contain enough header information to allow the user to access the science data. The Airborne WG's goal is to improve airborne data access and use for NASA science. The first step is to evaluate the state of airborne data and make recommendations focusing on data delivery to the DAACs (data centers). The long term goal is to improve airborne data use for Earth Science research. Many data aircraft observations are reported in ASCII format. The ASCII and Airborne WGs seem like the same group, but the Airborne WG is concerned with maintaining and using airborne for science research, not just the data format. The Geospatial WG focus is on the interoperability issues of Geospatial Information System (GIS) and remotely sensed data, in particular, focusing on DAAC(s) data from NASA's Earth Science Enterprise. This WG will provide a set of tools (GIS libraries) to use with training and/or cookbooks through the use of Open Source technologies. A progress report on these groups from the 2014 ESDSWG will be presented.

  19. A Tabular Expression Toolbox for Matlab/Simulink

    E-print Network

    Lawford, Mark

    with Matlab's simulation and code generation. 1 Introduction Model based design (MBD) has gained increasedA Tabular Expression Toolbox for Matlab/Simulink Colin Eles and Mark Lawford McMaster Centre the Tabular Expression Toolbox for Matlab/Simulink1 . An intuitive user interface allows users to easily

  20. Users' guide for the tabular display report generator program (TABDIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braley, D. M.

    1980-01-01

    The tabular display report generator (TABDIS) program is described. The program functions as a document generation tool that provides tabular displays of data stored on a data file which has been generated by a user program. The main features of the program are outlined and all necessary inputs are detailed.

  1. BayesDB : querying the probable implications of tabular data

    E-print Network

    Baxter, Jay

    2014-01-01

    BayesDB, a Bayesian database table, lets users query the probable implications of their tabular data as easily as an SQL database lets them query the data itself. Using the built-in Bayesian Query Language (BQL), users ...

  2. Network-Based Visual Analysis of Tabular Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Zhicheng

    2012-01-01

    Tabular data is pervasive in the form of spreadsheets and relational databases. Although tables often describe multivariate data without explicit network semantics, it may be advantageous to explore the data modeled as a graph or network for analysis. Even when a given table design conveys some static network semantics, analysts may want to look…

  3. Min-cut segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Brian L.; Barrett, William A.; Swingle, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    Handwritten tabular documents, such as census, birth, death and marriage records, contain a wealth of information vital to genealogical and related research. Much work has been done in segmenting freeform handwriting, however, segmentation of cursive handwriting in tabular documents is still an unsolved problem. Tabular documents present unique segmentation challenges caused by handwriting overlapping cell-boundaries and other words, both horizontally and vertically, as "ascenders" and "descenders" overlap into adjacent cells. This paper presents a method for segmenting handwriting in tabular documents using a min-cut/max-flow algorithm on a graph formed from a distance map and connected components of handwriting. Specifically, we focus on line, word and first letter segmentation. Additionally, we include the angles of strokes of the handwriting as a third dimension to our graph to enable the resulting segments to share pixels of overlapping letters. Word segmentation accuracy is 89.5% evaluating lines of the data set used in the ICDAR2013 Handwriting Segmentation Contest. Accuracy is 92.6% for a specific application of segmenting first and last names from noisy census records. Accuracy for segmenting lines of names from noisy census records is 80.7%. The 3D graph cutting shows promise in segmenting overlapping letters, although highly convoluted or overlapping handwriting remains an ongoing challenge.

  4. Horizontal Aggregations for Building Tabular Data Sets Carlos Ordonez

    E-print Network

    Ordonez, Carlos

    Horizontal Aggregations for Building Tabular Data Sets Carlos Ordonez Teradata, NCR San Diego, CA, USA ABSTRACT In a data mining project, a significant portion of time is devoted to building a data set suitable for analysis. In a re- lational database environment, building such data set usu- ally requires

  5. STILTS - A Package for Command-Line Processing of Tabular Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. B.

    2006-07-01

    STILTS, the STIL Tool Set, is a set of non-interactive tools for manipulation of tables such as astronomical object catalogues. It can read and write data in many formats, including VOTable, FITS, relational databases and ASCII. Facilities provided include table format conversion, row selection and sorting, column creation and rearrangement, coordinate conversion, metadata manipulation and display, flexible cross-matching, per-row and statistical calculations and VOTable validation. STILTS is based on the Starlink Tables Infrastructure Library, which also underlies the interactive table-analysis tool TOPCAT, and can be considered its non-interactive counterpart, providing many of the same features in a form which is suitable for headless, batch or scripted environments. Uses include data manipulation from the desktop or as part of server-based workflows or query operations. The package is portable (Java), open source, fully documented, efficient and scalable; in particular it is designed for use with large, and for many purposes arbitrarily large, tables.

  6. MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME

    SciTech Connect

    HUGHES, H. GRADY

    2007-01-08

    The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

  7. Room temperature synthesis of silver nanowires from tabular silver bromide crystals in the presence of gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Suwen; Wehmschulte, Rudolf J. . E-mail: rwehmsch@fit.edu; Lian Guoda; Burba, Christopher M.

    2006-03-15

    Long silver nanowires were synthesized at room temperature by a simple and fast process derived from the development of photographic films. A film consisting of an emulsion of tabular silver bromide grains in gelatin was treated with a photographic developer (4-(methylamino)phenol sulfate (metol), citric acid) in the presence of additional aqueous silver nitrate. The silver nanowires have lengths of more than 50 {mu}m, some even more than 100 {mu}m, and average diameters of about 80 nm. Approximately, 70% of the metallic silver formed in the reduction consists of silver nanowires. Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) results indicate that the silver nanowires grow along the [111] direction. It was found that the presence of gelatin, tabular silver bromide crystals and silver ions in solution are essential for the formation of the silver nanowires. The nanowires appear to originate from the edges of the silver bromide crystals. They were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), SAED, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD)

  8. Chapter 2: Tabular Data and Graphical Images in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment - The Wind River Basin Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on this CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files) because of the number and variety of platforms and software available.

  9. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2002-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  10. CAP: A Computer Code for Generating Tabular Thermodynamic Functions from NASA Lewis Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.; Gordon, Sanford; McBride, Bonnie J.

    2001-01-01

    For several decades the NASA Glenn Research Center has been providing a file of thermodynamic data for use in several computer programs. These data are in the form of least-squares coefficients that have been calculated from tabular thermodynamic data by means of the NASA Properties and Coefficients (PAC) program. The source thermodynamic data are obtained from the literature or from standard compilations. Most gas-phase thermodynamic functions are calculated by the authors from molecular constant data using ideal gas partition functions. The Coefficients and Properties (CAP) program described in this report permits the generation of tabulated thermodynamic functions from the NASA least-squares coefficients. CAP provides considerable flexibility in the output format, the number of temperatures to be tabulated, and the energy units of the calculated properties. This report provides a detailed description of input preparation, examples of input and output for several species, and a listing of all species in the current NASA Glenn thermodynamic data file.

  11. RF model of the distribution system as a communication channel, phase 2. Volume 4: Sofware source program and illustrations ASCII database listings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rustay, R. C.; Gajjar, J. T.; Rankin, R. W.; Wentz, R. C.; Wooding, R.

    1982-01-01

    Listings of source programs and some illustrative examples of various ASCII data base files are presented. The listings are grouped into the following categories: main programs, subroutine programs, illustrative ASCII data base files. Within each category files are listed alphabetically.

  12. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilts, Gary

    2005-07-01

    A valid fluid equation of state must satisfy the thermodynamic differential conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). Typical software interfaces to tabular equations of state based on polynomial or rational interpolants compute derivatives of pressure and energy and may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce the consistency condition and its derivatives, which is important for the computation of dimensionless quantities associated with more sensitive artificial viscosities and Riemann solvers that accurately model shock structure in regions near phase transitions. We describe a new type of table interface derived from a constrained local least squares regression technique. Application to several SESAME tables shows the consistency condition can be satisfied to round-off with third-order accuracy. An improvement of 14 orders of magnitude over conventional derivatives is demonstrated, although the new method is two orders of magnitude slower, due to solving an 11-dimensional nonlinear system. The new approach can be used to construct consistent and stable tables of derivatives, however.

  13. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilts, Gary A.

    2006-06-01

    A valid fluid equation of state (EOS) must satisfy the thermodynamic conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flow for realistic materials require a tabular EOS, but typical software interfaces to such tables based on polynomial or rational interpolants may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce the consistency condition and its derivatives. The consistency condition is important for the computation of various dimensionless parameters of an EOS that may involve derivatives of up to second order which are important for the development of more sensitive artificial viscosities and Riemann solvers that accurately model shock structure in regions near phase transitions. We describe a table interface based on the tuned regression method, which is derived from a constrained local least-squares regression technique. It is applied to several SESAME EOS showing how the consistency and stability conditions can be satisfied to round-off while computing first and second derivatives with demonstrated second-order convergence. An improvement of 14 orders of magnitude over conventional derivatives is demonstrated, although the method is apparently two orders of magnitude slower, due to the fact that every evaluation requires solving an 11-dimensional nonlinear system. Application is made to the computation of the fundamental derivative.

  14. Wind-driven upwelling around grounded tabular icebergs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Alon A.; Johnson, Eric; Holland, David M.; Wagner, Till J. W.; Wadhams, Peter; Bates, Richard; Abrahamsen, E. Povl; Nicholls, Keith W.; Crawford, Anna; Gagnon, Jonathan; Tremblay, Jean-Eric

    2015-08-01

    Temperature and salinity data collected around grounded tabular icebergs in Baffin Bay in 2011, 2012, and 2013 indicate wind-induced upwelling at certain locations around the icebergs. These data suggest that along one side of the iceberg, wind forcing leads to Ekman transport away from the iceberg, which causes upwelling of the cool saline water from below. The upwelling water mixes with the water above the thermocline, causing the mixed layer to become cooler and more saline. Along the opposite side of the iceberg, the surface Ekman transport moves towards the iceberg, which causes a sharpening of the thermocline as warm fresh water is trapped near the surface. This results in higher mixed layer temperatures and lower mixed layer salinities on this side of the iceberg. Based on these in situ measurements, we hypothesize that the asymmetries in water properties around the iceberg, caused by the opposing effects of upwelling and sharpening of the thermocline, lead to differential deterioration around the iceberg. Analysis of satellite imagery around iceberg PII-B-1 reveals differential decay around the iceberg, in agreement with this mechanism.

  15. Geosites inventory of the northwestern Tabular Middle Atlas of Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Wartiti, Mohamed; Malaki, Amina; Zahraoui, Mohamed; El Ghannouchi, Abdelilah; di Gregorio, Felice

    2008-07-01

    Across the northwestern Tabular Middle Atlas of Morocco there are many examples of landscapes, rocks and fossils that provide key evidence of a particular moment or period in Earth history. Such Earth heritage sites are important for educating the general public in environmental matters. They also serve as tools for demonstrating sustainable development and for illustrating methods of site conservation as well as remembering that rocks, minerals, fossils, soils, landforms form an integral part of the natural world. The significance of certain sites for aesthetic or tourism reasons is obvious. There are numerous geosites, which could contribute to effective exploitation of geotourism, often in conjunction with ecotourism. The strategy employed to such sites involves close consultation with all communities in the vicinity of the respective geosite and is not only aimed at tourism and education, but also at sustainable improvement of the infrastructure of the people of this area. Geological heritage sites, properly managed, can generate employment and new economic activities, especially in regions in need of new or additional sources of income.

  16. Automated Generation of Tabular Equations of State with Uncertainty Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, John H.; Robinson, Allen C.; Debusschere, Bert J.; Mattsson, Ann E.

    2015-06-01

    As computational science pushes toward higher fidelity prediction, understanding the uncertainty associated with closure models, such as the equation of state (EOS), has become a key focus. Traditional EOS development often involves a fair amount of art, where expert modelers may appear as magicians, providing what is felt to be the closest possible representation of the truth. Automation of the development process gives a means by which one may demystify the art of EOS, while simultaneously obtaining uncertainty information in a manner that is both quantifiable and reproducible. We describe our progress on the implementation of such a system to provide tabular EOS tables with uncertainty information to hydrocodes. Key challenges include encoding the artistic expert opinion into an algorithmic form and preserving the analytic models and uncertainty information in a manner that is both accurate and computationally efficient. Results are demonstrated on a multi-phase aluminum model. *Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Consistent thermodynamic derivative estimates for tabular equations of state.

    PubMed

    Dilts, Gary A

    2006-06-01

    A valid fluid equation of state (EOS) must satisfy the thermodynamic conditions of consistency (derivation from a free energy) and stability (positive sound speed squared). Numerical simulations of compressible fluid flow for realistic materials require a tabular EOS, but typical software interfaces to such tables based on polynomial or rational interpolants may enforce the stability conditions, but do not enforce the consistency condition and its derivatives. The consistency condition is important for the computation of various dimensionless parameters of an EOS that may involve derivatives of up to second order which are important for the development of more sensitive artificial viscosities and Riemann solvers that accurately model shock structure in regions near phase transitions. We describe a table interface based on the tuned regression method, which is derived from a constrained local least-squares regression technique. It is applied to several SESAME EOS showing how the consistency and stability conditions can be satisfied to round-off while computing first and second derivatives with demonstrated second-order convergence. An improvement of 14 orders of magnitude over conventional derivatives is demonstrated, although the method is apparently two orders of magnitude slower, due to the fact that every evaluation requires solving an 11-dimensional nonlinear system. Application is made to the computation of the fundamental derivative. PMID:16907020

  18. Preliminary investigation of the elemental variation and diagenesis of a tabular uranium deposit, La Sal Mine, San Juan County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Robert A.; Campbell, John A.

    1976-01-01

    Ore in the La Sal mine, San Juan County, Utah, occurs as a typical tabular-type uranium deposit of the-Colorado Plateau. Uranium-vanadium occurs in the Salt Wash Member of the Jurassic Morrison Formation. Chemical and petrographic analyses were used to determine elemental variation and diagenetic aspects across the orebody. Vanadium is concentrated in the dark clay matrix, which constitutes visible ore. Uranium content is greater above the vanadium zone. Calcium, carbonate carbon, and lead show greater than fifty-fold increase across the ore zone, whereas copper and organic carbon show only a several-fold increase. Large molybdenum concentrations are present in and above the tabular layer, and large selenium concentrations occur below the uranium zone within the richest vanadium zone. Iron is enriched in the vanadium horizon. Chromium is depleted from above the ore and strongly enriched below. Elements that vary directly with the vanadium content include magnesium, iron, selenium, zirconium, strontium, titanium, lead, boron, yttrium, and scandium. The diagenetic sequence is as follows: (1) formation of secondary quartz overgrowths as cement; (2) infilling and lining of remaining pores with amber opaline material; (3) formation of vanadium-rich clay matrix, which has replaced overgrowths as well as quartz grains; (4) replacement of overgrowths and detrital grains by calcite; (5) infilling of pores with barite and the introduction of pyrite and marcasite.

  19. Genesis of the tabular-type vanadium-uranium deposits of the Henry Basin, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Northrop, H.R.; Goldhaber, M.B.

    1990-01-01

    Tabular-type vanadium-uranium deposits occur in fluvial sandstones of the Salt Wash Member of the Morrison Formation of Late Jurassic age The mineralized intervals and the weakly mineralized lateral extensions are bounded both above and below by zones rich in dolomite cement. Carbon isotope values of dolomite cements indicate that at least two sources of carbon existed. One source appears to be the same as that which formed the bedded carbonates in the evaporites in the Tidwell Member of the Morrison Formation stratigraphically below the mineralized interval. The second carbon source is typical of terrestrially deposited carbonates generally associated with meteoric water-dominated environments. Oxygen isotope values of these dolomites show the same trend of isotopically light values above the mineralized interval and isotopically heavier values in and below that interval; they indicate that two isotopically distinct fluids were involved in the mineralizing process. Some aspects of the origin of gangue and ore phases are explainable on the basis of processes which occurred solely within the saline fluid, but key aspects of ore genesis involved the interaction of the saline and meteoric waters. It is postulated that the solution interface migrated vertically within the stratigraphic section. -from Authors

  20. Analyzing Tabular and State-Transition Requirements Specifications in PVS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owre, Sam; Rushby, John; Shankar, Natarajan

    1997-01-01

    We describe PVS's capabilities for representing tabular specifications of the kind advocated by Parnas and others, and show how PVS's Type Correctness Conditions (TCCs) are used to ensure certain well-formedness properties. We then show how these and other capabilities of PVS can be used to represent the AND/OR tables of Leveson and the Decision Tables of Sherry, and we demonstrate how PVS's TCCs can expose and help isolate errors in the latter. We extend this approach to represent the mode transition tables of the Software Cost Reduction (SCR) method in an attractive manner. We show how PVS can check these tables for well-formedness, and how PVS's model checking capabilities can be used to verify invariants and reachability properties of SCR requirements specifications, and inclusion relations between the behaviors of different specifications. These examples demonstrate how several capabilities of the PVS language and verification system can be used in combination to provide customized support for specific methodologies for documenting and analyzing requirements. Because they use only the standard capabilities of PVS, users can adapt and extend these customizations to suit their own needs. Those developing dedicated tools for individual methodologies may find these constructions in PVS helpful for prototyping purposes, or as a useful adjunct to a dedicated tool when the capabilities of a full theorem prover are required. The examples also illustrate the power and utility of an integrated general-purpose system such as PVS. For example, there was no need to adapt or extend the PVS model checker to make it work with SCR specifications described using the PVS TABLE construct: the model checker is applicable to any transition relation, independently of the PVS language constructs used in its definition.

  1. The functional role of tabular structures for large reef fishes: avoiding predators or solar irradiance?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Large reef fishes may often be seen sheltering under tabular structures on coral reefs. There are two principle explanations for this behaviour: avoidance of predation or avoidance of solar irradiance. This study sought supporting evidence to distinguish between these two explanations by examining the usage of tabular structures on a shallow mid-shelf reef of the Great Barrier Reef at midday and sunset. If predation avoidance is most important, usage should increase towards sunset; conversely, if avoidance of solar radiation is most important, more fishes should use cover at midday. Underwater video observations revealed that tabular structures were extensively used by large reef fishes at midday, being characterised by numerous species, especially Lutjanidae and Haemulidae. In contrast, at sunset, tabular structures were used by significantly fewer large reef fishes, being characterised mostly by species of unicornfish ( Naso spp.). Resident times of fishes using tabular structures were also significantly longer at midday (28:06 ± 5:55 min) than at sunset (07:47 ± 2:19 min). The results suggest that the primary function of tabular structures for large reef fishes is the avoidance of solar irradiance. This suggestion is supported by the position of fishes when sheltering. The majority of large reef fishes were found to shelter under the lip of tabular structure, facing outwards. This behaviour is thought to allow protection from harmful downwelling UV-B irradiance while allowing the fish to retain photopic vision and survey more of the surrounding area. These findings help to explain the importance of tabular structures for large reef fishes on coral reefs, potentially providing a valuable energetic refuge from solar irradiance.

  2. Do tabular corals constitute keystone structures for fishes on coral reefs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, J. T.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the changes in community composition of reef fishes by experimentally manipulating the availability of shelter provided by tabular structures on a mid-shelf reef on the Great Barrier Reef. At locations where access to tabular corals ( Acropora hyacinthus and Acropora cytherea) was excluded, a rapid and sustained reduction in the abundance of large reef fishes occurred. At locations where tabular structure was added, the abundance and diversity of large reef fishes increased and the abundance of small reef fishes tended to decrease, although over a longer time frame. Based on their response to changes in the availability of tabular structures, nine families of large reef fishes were separated into three categories; designated as obligate, facultative or non-structure users. This relationship may relate to the particular ecological demands of each family, including avoidance of predation and ultraviolet radiation, access to feeding areas and reef navigation. This study highlights the importance of tabular corals for large reef fishes in shallow reef environments and provides a possible mechanism for local changes in the abundance of reef fishes following loss of structural complexity on coral reefs. Keystone structures have a distinct structure and disproportionate effect on their ecosystem relative to their abundance, as such the result of this study suggests tabular corals may constitute keystone structures on shallow coral reefs.

  3. Chapter 3: Tabular Data and Graphical Images in Support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment - Western Gulf Province, Smackover-Austin-Eagle Ford Composite Total Petroleum System (504702)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on this CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  4. Log ASCII Standard (LAS) Files for Geophysical (Gamma Ray) Wireline Well Logs and Their Application to Geologic Cross Section C-C' Through the Central Appalachian Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trippi, Michael H.; Crangle, Robert D., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) regional geologic cross section C-C' (Ryder and others, 2008) displays key stratigraphic intervals in the central Appalachian basin. For this cross section, strata were correlated by using descriptions of well cuttings and gamma ray well log traces. This report summarizes the procedures used to convert gamma ray curves on paper well logs to the digital Log ASCII (American Standard Code for Information Interchange) Standard (LAS) format using the third-party software application Neuralog. The procedures could be used with other geophysical wireline logs also. The creation of digital LAS files from paper well logs by using Neuralog is very helpful, especially when dealing with older logs with limited or nonexistent digital data. The LAS files from the gamma ray logs of 11 wells used to construct cross section C-C' are included in this report. They may be downloaded from the index page as a single ZIP file.

  5. Tracking large tabular icebergs using the SeaWinds Ku-band microwave scatterometer

    E-print Network

    Long, David G.

    Tracking large tabular icebergs using the SeaWinds Ku-band microwave scatterometer K.M. Stuart Ã, D Resolution enhancement Icebergs Sea ice NSF Antarctic cruise a b s t r a c t Knowledge of iceberg locations icebergs scatter microwave energy more than sea ice and sea water, icebergs are detected as high

  6. STING Report: convenient web-based application for graphic and tabular presentations of protein

    E-print Network

    Neshich, Goran

    STING Report: convenient web-based application for graphic and tabular presentations of protein sequence, structure and function descriptors from the STING database Goran Neshich*, Adauto L. Mancini and Accepted October 18, 2004 ABSTRACT The Sting Report is a versatile web-based application for extraction

  7. Hydrogeology of an ancient arid closed basin: Implications for tabular sandstone-hosted uranium deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, R.F. )

    1990-11-01

    Hydrogeologic modeling shows that tabular-type uranium deposits in the grants uranium region of the San Juan basin, New Mexico, formed in zones of ascending and discharging regional ground-water flow. The association of either lacustrine mudstone or actively subsiding structures and uranium deposits can best be explained by the occurrence of lakes at topographic depressions where ground water having different sources and compositions is likely to converge, mix, and discharge. Ascending and discharging flow also explains the association of uranium deposits with underlying evaporites and suggests a brine interface. The simulations contradict previous suggestions that ground water moved downward in the mudflat.

  8. Chapter 3. Tabular data and graphical images in support of the U.S. Geological Survey National Oil and Gas Assessment--East Texas basin and Louisiana-Mississippi salt basins provinces, Jurassic Smackover Interior salt basins total petroleum system (504902), Cotton Valley group.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Le, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    This chapter describes data used in support of the process being applied by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Oil and Gas Assessment (NOGA) project. Digital tabular data used in this report and archival data that permit the user to perform further analyses are available elsewhere on the CD-ROM. Computers and software may import the data without transcription from the Portable Document Format files (.pdf files) of the text by the reader. Because of the number and variety of platforms and software available, graphical images are provided as .pdf files and tabular data are provided in a raw form as tab-delimited text files (.tab files).

  9. A Simple Tool for Integration and Differentiation of Tabular Values in Microsoft Excel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugland, Ole Anton

    2011-12-01

    There are many software alternatives for analyzing experimental data in our physics teaching. I prefer to use Excel® because of its flexibility and widespread use elsewhere in our society. Whatever our students will work with in their future career, they almost certainly will have access to a spreadsheet. For a long time I have missed a tool for integrating and differentiating tabular values in Excel. For every new version I thought it would appear, but it did not. Such a tool could also be useful if you analyze data from other sources than your own experiment, for example, data from the Internet. Therefore, I have written a simple tool that can be integrated seamlessly into Excel as an add-in. It is written in Excels powerful macro language Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications. The tool can be downloaded online and there are two versions of it: one for Excel 2003 and one for Excel 2007/2010.

  10. Tribological Behavior of TiAl Matrix Composites with MoO3 Tabular Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ao; Shi, Xiaoliang; Zhai, Wenzheng; Yang, Kang; Wang, Zhihai

    2015-11-01

    The friction and wear behaviors of TiAl matrix self-lubricating composites (TMSC) with MoO3 tabular crystal (MTC) against GCr15 steel ball are tested using a constant load of 10 N and a constant speed of 0.2 m/s from room temperature to 600 °C. The result shows that, during the sliding friction and wear process, the MTC which has the microstructure of multiple layers could reduce the shear stress, leading to the reduction of friction coefficient. Meanwhile, TMSC with MTC exhibits the excellent tribological performance over a wide temperature range, if compared to TiAl based alloy. Moreover, MTC can improve the tribological properties of TMSC obviously below 400 °C.

  11. Tabular water properties interface for Hydra-TH : CASL THM.CFD.P6.03 milestone report.

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John H.; Belcourt, Noel

    2013-04-01

    Completion of the CASL L3 milestone THM.CFD.P6.03 provides a tabular material properties capability to the Hydra code. A tabular interpolation package used in Sandia codes was modified to support the needs of multi-phase solvers in Hydra. Use of the interface is described. The package was released to Hydra under a government use license. A dummy physics was created in Hydra to prototype use of the interpolation routines. Finally, a test using the dummy physics verifies the correct behavior of the interpolation for a test water table. 3

  12. Effects of Rigid Body Collisions and Tide-Forced Drift on Large Tabular Icebergs of the Antarctic

    E-print Network

    Macayeal, Douglas R.

    1 Effects of Rigid Body Collisions and Tide-Forced Drift on Large Tabular Icebergs of the Antarctic ICEBERGS #12;2 Abstract. Following the calving of an iceberg from an ice shelf, many collisions between the new iceberg and the remaining shelf can occur as the iceberg responds to time-varying oceanic

  13. Tracking large tabular icebergs using the SeaWinds Ku-band microwave scatterometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, K. M.; Long, D. G.

    2011-06-01

    Knowledge of iceberg locations is important for safety reasons as well as for understanding many geophysical and biological processes. Originally designed to measure wind speed and direction over the ocean, SeaWinds is a microwave scatterometer that operates at 13.4 GHz (Ku-band) on the QuikSCAT satellite. Radar measurements from SeaWinds are collected and processed on a daily basis using resolution-enhancement techniques to produce daily radar images. Because icebergs scatter microwave energy more than sea ice and sea water, icebergs are detected as high-backscatter targets surrounded by lower-backscatter regions in daily SeaWinds images. As a result, iceberg positions are determined in real-time and a time-series of iceberg positions is maintained in an Antarctic iceberg database by Brigham Young University's Microwave Earth Remote Sensing (MERS) laboratory. Since SeaWinds operates independent of both solar illumination and cloud cover and has a large daily spatial coverage, this paper demonstrates that SeaWinds is an excellent platform to detect and track large tabular icebergs. These icebergs are generally larger than 5 km and are typically characterized as a rough ice plateau above the surrounding sea water or sea ice. The number of icebergs tracked in the MERS Antarctic iceberg database is found to be generally greater than the number of icebergs tracked by the National Ice Center. The movement patterns of all icebergs detected by SeaWinds are also analyzed and 90% of icebergs are found to travel a counter-clockwise path around Antarctica and accumulate in the Weddell and Scotia Seas. Iceberg detection and tracking is demonstrated via multiple case studies that highlight icebergs C-19a and A-22a using the MERS database and through real-time operational support of the 2005, 2008, and 2009 NSF Antarctic cruises. Iceberg positions are validated by using collocated high-resolution satellite imagery and by navigating the NSF ships to physically intercept several large tabular icebergs in the Weddell and Scotia Seas.

  14. Calcium-doped ceria/titanate tabular functional nanocomposite by layer-by-layer coating method

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiang W.; Devaraju, M.K.; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio

    2010-07-15

    Ca-doped ceria (CDC)/tabular titanate (K{sub 0.8}Li{sub 0.27}Ti{sub 1.73}O{sub 4}, TT) UV-shielding functional nanocomposite with fairly uniform CDC coating layers was prepared through a polyelectrolyte-associated layer-by-layer (LbL) coating method. TT with lepidocrocite-like layered structure was used as the substrate, poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) was used as a coupling agent, CDC nanoparticles were used as the main UV-shielding component. CDC/TT nanocomposites with various coating layers of CDC were obtained through a multistep coating process. The phases were studied by X-ray diffraction. The morphology and coating quality were studied by scanning electron microscopy and element mapping of energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The oxidation catalytic activity, UV-shielding ability and using comfort were characterized by Rancimat test, UV-vis spectra and dynamic friction test, respectively. CDC/TT nanocomposites with low oxidation catalytic activity, high UV-shielding ability and good using comfort were finally obtained. - Graphical abstract: Through the control of surface charge of particles calcium-doped ceria/titanate composites with low oxidation catalytic activity, higher UV-shielding ability and excellent comfort was obtained by a facile layer-by-layer coating method.

  15. Ambient seismic, hydroacoustic, and flexural gravity wave noise on a tabular iceberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Wang, Yitan; Okal, Emile A.

    2015-02-01

    Cross correlation of ambient seismic noise between four seismographs on tabular iceberg C16, Ross Sea, Antarctica, reveals both the source and the propagation characteristics of signals associated with icebergs. We find that noise correlation functions computed from station data are asymmetric about zero time lag, and this indicates that noise observed on the iceberg originates primarily from a compact, localized source associated with iceberg collisions between C16 and a neighboring iceberg, B15A. We additionally find two, and possibly more, distinct phases of noise propagation. We believe that flexural gravity wave propagation dominates the low-frequency noise (>10 s period) and that hydroacoustic wave propagation in the water column between the ice and seabed appears to dominate high-frequency noise (>10 Hz). Faster seismic propagation dominates the intermediate band (2-6 Hz); however, we do not have sufficient data to characterize the wave mechanisms more precisely, e.g., by identifying distinct longitudinal and shear body waves and/or surface waves. Secular changes in the amplitude and timing of ambient noise correlations, e.g., a diurnal cycle and an apparent shift in the noise correlation of fast seismic modes between two periods of the deployment, allow us to speculate that ambient noise correlation analysis may be helpful in understanding the sources and environmental controls on iceberg-generated ocean noise as well as geometric properties (such as water column thickness) of subglacial lakes.

  16. The communicability of graphical alternatives to tabular displays of statistical simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alex R; Teo, Shanice W L

    2011-01-01

    Simulation studies are often used to assess the frequency properties and optimality of statistical methods. They are typically reported in tables, which may contain hundreds of figures to be contrasted over multiple dimensions. To assess the degree to which these tables are fit for purpose, we performed a randomised cross-over experiment in which statisticians were asked to extract information from (i) such a table sourced from the literature and (ii) a graphical adaptation designed by the authors, and were timed and assessed for accuracy. We developed hierarchical models accounting for differences between individuals of different experience levels (under- and post-graduate), within experience levels, and between different table-graph pairs. In our experiment, information could be extracted quicker and, for less experienced participants, more accurately from graphical presentations than tabular displays. We also performed a literature review to assess the prevalence of hard-to-interpret design features in tables of simulation studies in three popular statistics journals, finding that many are presented innumerately. We recommend simulation studies be presented in graphical form. PMID:22132184

  17. TARFOX WALLOPS MET (ASCII)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-25

    ... Ground Station Instrument:  Barometer Humidity Sensor Thermometer Wind Sensor Spatial Coverage:  ... ASDC Order Tool Parameters:  Pressure Relative Humidity Temperature Wind Direction Wind Speed Order ...

  18. Operations Support of Phase 2 Integrated Demonstration In Situ Bioremediation. Volume 2, Final report: Data in tabular form, Disks 2,3,4

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    This document consists solely of data acquired during phase 2 of the integrated demonstration project concerning in situ bioremediation performed at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina. The data is presented in tabular form.

  19. Using the LAS format - part I. [Well log files

    SciTech Connect

    Elphcik, R.Y.

    1991-12-01

    A program that will read in an LAS (Logging ASCII Standard) formatted file, perform a simple log analysis, and place the results in another LAS format file is developed. When the input LAS format is read, certain parameters needed for the log analysis are looked for - if any parameter is not found, the user is asked to supply a value. The output file contains all the pertinent parameters and useful information. Codes for Amiga and Macintosh computers are given.

  20. Comparison of Neural Networks and Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding for Hyperspectral Signature Classification in Unresolved Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmalz, M.; Ritter, G.; Key, R.

    Accurate and computationally efficient spectral signature classification is a crucial step in the nonimaging detection and recognition of spaceborne objects. In classical hyperspectral recognition applications using linear mixing models, signature classification accuracy depends on accurate spectral endmember discrimination [1]. If the endmembers cannot be classified correctly, then the signatures cannot be classified correctly, and object recognition from hyperspectral data will be inaccurate. In practice, the number of endmembers accurately classified often depends linearly on the number of inputs. This can lead to potentially severe classification errors in the presence of noise or densely interleaved signatures. In this paper, we present an comparison of emerging technologies for nonimaging spectral signature classfication based on a highly accurate, efficient search engine called Tabular Nearest Neighbor Encoding (TNE) [3,4] and a neural network technology called Morphological Neural Networks (MNNs) [5]. Based on prior results, TNE can optimize its classifier performance to track input nonergodicities, as well as yield measures of confidence or caution for evaluation of classification results. Unlike neural networks, TNE does not have a hidden intermediate data structure (e.g., the neural net weight matrix). Instead, TNE generates and exploits a user-accessible data structure called the agreement map (AM), which can be manipulated by Boolean logic operations to effect accurate classifier refinement algorithms. The open architecture and programmability of TNE's agreement map processing allows a TNE programmer or user to determine classification accuracy, as well as characterize in detail the signatures for which TNE did not obtain classification matches, and why such mis-matches occurred. In this study, we will compare TNE and MNN based endmember classification, using performance metrics such as probability of correct classification (Pd) and rate of false detections (Rfa). As proof of principle, we analyze classification of multiple closely spaced signatures from a NASA database of space material signatures. Additional analysis pertains to computational complexity and noise sensitivity, which are superior to Bayesian techniques based on classical neural networks. [1] Winter, M.E. "Fast autonomous spectral end-member determination in hyperspectral data," in Proceedings of the 13th International Conference On Applied Geologic Remote Sensing, Vancouver, B.C., Canada, pp. 337-44 (1999). [2] N. Keshava, "A survey of spectral unmixing algorithms," Lincoln Laboratory Journal 14:55-78 (2003). [3] Key, G., M.S. SCHMALZ, F.M. Caimi, and G.X. Ritter. "Performance analysis of tabular nearest neighbor encoding algorithm for joint compression and ATR", in Proceedings SPIE 3814:115-126 (1999). [4] Schmalz, M.S. and G. Key. "Algorithms for hyperspectral signature classification in unresolved object detection using tabular nearest neighbor encoding" in Proceedings of the 2007 AMOS Conference, Maui HI (2007). [5] Ritter, G.X., G. Urcid, and M.S. Schmalz. "Autonomous single-pass endmember approximation using lattice auto-associative memories", Neurocomputing (Elsevier), accepted (June 2008).

  1. Tabular comparisons of the Flynn Creek impact crater, United States, Steinheim impact crater, Germany and Snowball explosion crater, Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    A tabular outline of comparative data is presented for 340 basic dimensional, morphological, and structural parameters and related aspects for three craters of the flat-floored, central uplift type, two of which are natural terrestrial impact craters and one is a large-scale experimental explosion crater. The three craters are part of a general class, in terms of their morphology and structural deformation that is represented on each of the terrestrial planets including the moon. One of the considered craters, the Flynn Creek Crater, was formed by a hypervelocity impact event approximately 360 m.y. ago in what is now north central Tennessee. The impacting body appears to have been a carbonaceous chondrite or a cometary mass. The second crater, the Steinheim Crater, was formed by an impact event approximately 14.7 m.y. ago in what is now southwestern Germany. The Snowball Crater was formed by the detonation of a 500-ton TNT hemisphere on flat-lying, unconsolidated alluvium in Alberta, Canada.

  2. From steep feeders to tabular plutons - Emplacement controls of syntectonic granitoid plutons in the Damara Belt, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Duncan; Kisters, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Granitoid plutons in the deeply eroded south Central Zone of the Damara Belt in Namibia commonly show tabular geometries and pronounced stratigraphic controls on their emplacement. Subhorizontal, sheet-like pluton geometries record emplacement during regional subhorizontal shortening, but the intrusion of spatially and temporally closely-related granitoid plutons at different structural levels and in distinct structural settings suggests independent controls on their levels of emplacement. We describe and evaluate the controls on the loci of the dyke-to-sill transition that initiated the emplacement of three syntectonic (560-530 Ma) plutons in the basement-cover stratigraphy of the Erongo region. Intrusive relationships highlight the significance of (1) rigidity anisotropies associated with competent sedimentary packages or pre-existing subhorizontal granite sheets and (2) rheological anisotropies associated with the presence of thick ductile marble horizons. These mechanical anisotropies may lead to the initial deflection of steep feeder conduits as well as subsequent pluton assembly by the repeated underaccretion of later magma batches. The upward displacement of regional isotherms due to the heat advection associated with granite emplacement is likely to have a profound effect on the mechanical stratification of the upper crust and, consequently, on the level at which granitoid pluton emplacement is initiated. In this way, pluton emplacement at progressively shallower crustal depths may have resulted in the unusually high apparent geothermal gradients recorded in the upper crustal levels of the Damara Belt during its later evolution.

  3. Using DTA and DTAARRAY variables and programming in WinNonlin ASCII models to streamline user-defined calculation and data analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Li, Shuanglian; Bowsher, Ronald R; Vick, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    In pharmacokinetic (PK) analysis, there are many occasions where user-defined calculations need to be performed before or after the primary PK modeling/analysis. Conventionally, these calculations are often executed outside of the primary PK analysis by pre- or post-processing data from multiple sources, manually entering formulas and multiple additional set-ups. Such analysis approaches increase the risk of generating data defects and can employ software that is not fully compliant. We propose a method of leveraging DTA and DTAARRAY variables plus simple programming techniques in an ASCII model to automate these user-defined calculations in WinNonlin and eliminate the need for manual handling of data outside of the primary analysis. We demonstrated the application of this strategy through three case study examples. In case 1 (post-processing data), DTA variables were used to calculate three user-defined parameters in the primary PK model. In case 2 (pre-processing data), a baseline correction decision tree was programmed into the PK model to account for both the endogenous baseline level as well as the presence of residual drug. In case 3, DTAARRAY variables were used to perform a looping operation to calculate the difference factor (F1) and the similarity factor (F2) in support of in vitro bioequivalence evaluations. PMID:25583216

  4. 14 CFR 331.23 - In what format must applications be submitted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false In what format must applications be submitted? 331.23 Section 331.23 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... tabular data in Excel spreadsheet format, utilizing a 3.5? floppy disk, compact disk, or flash...

  5. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Soil Characteristics Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z; Nesic, Z.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret soil information at the SSA-OA tower site in 1994 as part of BOREAS. Data sets collected include soil respiration, temperature, moisture, and gravimetric data. The data are stored in tabular ASCII format.

  6. 14 CFR 331.23 - In what format must applications be submitted?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...supporting financial documents must be submitted in hard copy. In addition, you may submit financial and accounting tabular data in Excel spreadsheet format, utilizing a 3.5? floppy disk, compact disk, or flash memory device, and doing so may expedite...

  7. The motion of the earth-moon system in modern tabular ephemerides. II - Inertial motion, mean longitude of the sun, and general precession in longitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stumpff, P.; Lieske, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Properties of astronomical time scales (ET and UT) are considered, with particular emphasis on correctly determining of-date longitude as the sum of inertial mean longitude of the sun relative to the mean equinox of a fixed epoch (1950.0), and the general precession in longitude accumulated since the epoch. The inertial mean longitude and motion (relative to the mean equinox) are derived from tabular ephemerides such as the Jet Propulsion Laboratories' DE 102 and DE 96, by comparisons with subroutines based on Newcomb's perturbation theory. An unresolved inconsistency of approximately 1 second per century among the mean inertial motion of DE 102, IAU precession speed (1976), and the classical Newcomb of-date mean motion is found. Interpretation difficulties arising from the use of different systems of Ephemeris Time are also discussed.

  8. Directory interchange format manual, version 3.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The Directory Interchange Format (DIF) is a data structure used to exchange directory level information about data sets among information systems. The format consists of a number of fields that describe the attributes of a directory entry and text blocks that contain a descriptive summary of and references for the directory entry. All fields and the summary are preceded by labels identifying their contents. All values are ASCII character strings. The structure is intended to be flexible, allowing for future changes in the contents of directory entries.

  9. DataUp 2.0: Improving On a Tool For Helping Researchers Archive, Manage, and Share Their Tabular Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, C.; Borda, S.; Cruse, P.; Kunze, J.

    2013-12-01

    There are many barriers to data management and sharing among earth and environmental scientists; among the most significant are a lack of knowledge about best practices for data management, metadata standards, or appropriate data repositories for archiving and sharing data. Last year we developed an open source web application, DataUp, to help researchers overcome these barriers. DataUp helps scientists to (1) determine whether their file is CSV compatible, (2) generate metadata in a standard format, (3) retrieve an identifier to facilitate data citation, and (4) deposit their data into a repository. With funding from the NSF via a supplemental grant to the DataONE project, we are working to improve upon DataUp. Our main goal for DataUp 2.0 is to ensure organizations and repositories are able to adopt and adapt DataUp to meet their unique needs, including connecting to analytical tools, adding new metadata schema, and expanding the list of connected data repositories. DataUp is a collaborative project between the California Digital Library, DataONE, the San Diego Supercomputing Center, and Microsoft Research Connections.

  10. Hierarchical data format (HDF5) for Modflow, Modpath and ZoneBudget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosemans, A.; Batelaan, O.; Louwyck, A.; Lermytte, J.

    2012-04-01

    More and more spatially detailed time dependent groundwater models are used and hence input files for models like Modflow (USGS) are becoming larger and larger. These input files are in ASCII format and contain datasets with values for each cell, changing often for each stress period. To diminish the problem of huge ASCII files, the datasets of the input files can be stored in an HDF5 file (Hierarchical data format). HDF5 is a data model, library and file format designed by HDFgroup for storing and managing data, flexible and efficient input and output and high volume and complex data. The file has a binary format and can be compressed with different kinds of compression methods. An HDF5 file consists among others of groups and datasets, referencing a dataset in the HDF5 file is similar to referencing a file in a folder of a file system. The contents of an HDF5 file can be viewed with HDFview, a Java-based viewer. HDF5 files can be constructed manually with the help of HDFview, or with the help of programming languages like C, C++, Matlab, Fortran or Python. The goal of this contribution is to show how HDF can improve data management of Modflow. A similar HDF5 link to Modflow has been implemented in the interface Groundwater Modeling System. Modflow has been extended to be able to read datasets from the ASCII input files which contain a reference to an HDF5 file for every real 1 or 2-dimensional dataset, every 2-dimensional integer dataset and the stress lists described in the Modflow user manual as U1DREL, U2DREL, U2DINT and ULSTRD. Two other programs from USGS, Modpath and Zonebudget, are also using partly the same input files as Modflow, and have been extended to be able to read the requested datasets from the HDF5 file. The total Modflow input file size, i.e. converted ASCII files and HDF5 file, will be decimated compared to the original size. Partly this is due to 'zlib' compression, 'zlib' is a free lossless data compression library. Due to faster reading of the HDF5 data compared to the original ASCII data model the Modflow, Modpath and ZoneBudget run time decreases.

  11. Tabular Privacyy Preserving Publishingg g

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Jun

    Computer Back pain A04 56 F Government 610020 Sports Heart disease A05 47 M Police 610020 Music Neck pain Neck pain Bill 47 M Police 610020 Music Heart disease Explicit Identifier (e.g. name, ID #, Driver 610020 Sports Neck pain Bill 47 M Police 610020 Music Heart disease In the table 1. The value of every

  12. Concept Formation Concept Formation

    E-print Network

    Goldstone, Robert

    Concept Formation 1 Concept Formation Robert L. Goldstone Thomas T. Hills Samuel B. Day Indiana, IN. 47408 Other Correspondences: rgoldsto@indiana.edu (812) 855-4853 Keywords: Concepts, Learning, Representation, Prototypes, Exemplars #12;Concept Formation 2 Concept Formation A concept is a mentally possessed

  13. Jargonial-Obfuscation(J-O) DISambiguation Elimination via Siegel-Baez Cognition Category-Semantics(C-S) in Siegel FUZZYICS=CATEGORYICS (Son of TRIZ)/(F=C) Tabular List-Format Dichotomy Truth-Table Matrix Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegel, Carl Ludwig; Siegel, Edward Carl-Ludwig

    2011-03-01

    NOT "philosophy" per se but raising serious salient Arnol'd [Huygens and Barrow, Newton and Hooke(96)] questions begged is Rota empiricism Husserl VS. Frege maths-objects Dichotomy controversy: Hill-Haddock[Husserl or Frege?(00)]as manifestly-demonstrated by Hintikka[B.U.]-Critchey[Derrida Deconstruction Ethics(78)] deconstruction; Altshuler TRIZ; Siegel F=C/C-S; Siegel-Baez(UCR) Cognition C-S = "Category-theory ``+'' Cognitive-Semantics[Wierzbica-Langacker-Lakoff-Nunez[Where Maths Comes From(00)]-Fauconnier-Turner[Blending(98)]-Coulson[Semantic-Leaps (00)

  14. Directory interchange format manual, version 4.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Directory Interchange Format (DIF) is a data structure used to exchange directory-level information about data sets among information systems. In general the format consists of a number of fields that describe the attributes of a directory entry and text blocks that contain a descriptive summary of and references for the directory entry. All fields and the summary are preceded by labels identifying their contents. All values are ASCII character strings. The structure is intended to be flexible, allowing for future changes in the contents of directory entries. The manual is structured as follows: section 1 is a general description of what constitutes a directory entry; section 2 describes the content of the individual fields within the data structure, together with some examples. Also included in the six appendices is a description of the syntax used within the examples; samples of the directory interchange format applied to different data sets; the allowable discipline keywords; a current list of valid location keywords; a list of allowable parameter keywords; a list of acronyns and a glossary of terms used; and a description of the Standard Formatted Data Unit header, which may be added to the front of a DIF file to identify the file as a registered standard format.

  15. Attributes for MRB_E2RF1 Catchments by Major River Basins in the Conterminous United States: Basin Characteristics, 2002 Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: tabular digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wieczorek, Michael E.; LaMotte, Andrew E.

    2010-01-01

    This tabular data set represents basin characteristics for the year 2002 compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment of selected Major River Basins (MRBs, Crawford and others, 2006). These characteristics are reach catchment shape index, stream density, sinuosity, mean elevation, mean slope and number of road-stream crossings. The source data sets are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) RF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011) and the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER/Line Files (U.S. Census Bureau,2006). The MRB_E2RF1 catchments are based on a modified version of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) ERF1_2 and include enhancements to support national and regional-scale surface-water quality modeling (Nolan and others, 2002; Brakebill and others, 2011). Data were compiled for every MRB_E2RF1 catchment for the conterminous United States covering New England and Mid-Atlantic (MRB1), South Atlantic-Gulf and Tennessee (MRB2), the Great Lakes, Ohio, Upper Mississippi, and Souris-Red-Rainy (MRB3), the Missouri (MRB4), the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf (MRB5), the Rio Grande, Colorado, and the Great basin (MRB6), the Pacific Northwest (MRB7) river basins, and California (MRB8).

  16. Tabular Equation of State for Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Jonathan; Honnell, Kevin; Peterson, Jeffrey; Greeff, Carl; Crockett, Scott

    2011-06-01

    A new, SESAME-type equation of state (EOS) is described for gold, suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations. The EOS is tabulated on a rectangular temperature-and-density grid, spanning densities from 0 - 29 g/cc, temperatures from 0 - 85,000 K, and extending up to pressures of 1000 GPa. It is constructed using the standard decomposition of the pressure into a static-lattice cold curve, a thermal nuclear contribution, and a thermal electronic contribution. The cold curve is derived from a combination of empirical data and density functional theory, the thermal nuclear contribution from the Johnson model, and the thermal electronic contribution using Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. Pressures, internal energies, and Helmholtz free energies are tabulated as functions of temperature and density. Predictions for the room-temperature isotherm, principal Hugoniot, thermal expansion, heat capacity, and vapor pressure are compared with experimental data and with the EOS currently available in the SESAME library (SESAME 2700).

  17. A Tabular Approach to Titration Calculations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Kieran F.

    2012-01-01

    Titrations are common laboratory exercises in high school and university chemistry courses, because they are easy, relatively inexpensive, and they illustrate a number of fundamental chemical principles. While students have little difficulty with calculations involving a single titration step, there is a significant leap in conceptual difficulty…

  18. Tabular equation of state for gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettger, Jonathan; Honnell, Kevin G.; Peterson, Jeffrey H.; Greeff, Carl; Crockett, Scott

    2012-03-01

    A new, SESAME-type equation of state (EOS) , suitable for use in hydrodynamic calculations, is described for gold. Pressures, internal energies, and Helmholtz free energies are tabulated on a rectangular temperature-and-density grid, spanning densities from 0 - 36 g/cc, temperatures from 0 - 800 eV, and extending up to pressures of 800 GPa. The EOS is constructed using the standard decomposition of the pressure into a static-lattice cold curve, a thermal nuclear contribution, and a thermal electronic contribution. The cold curve is derived from existing diamond-anvil-cell measurements, the thermal nuclear contribution from the Johnson model, and the thermal electronic contribution using Thomas-Fermi-Dirac theory. Predictions of the new EOS (SESAME 2705) for the cold curve, roomtemperature isotherm, principal Hugoniot, thermal expansion, heat capacity, melt line, and vapor pressure compare favorably with experimental data and are superior to the EOS currently available in the SESAME library (SESAME 2700).

  19. A revision of the genus Paracanthonchus (Cyatholaimidae, Nematoda) with a tabular key to species and a description of P. mamubiae sp. n. from the deep North-Western Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miljutina, Maria A.; Miljutin, Dmitry M.

    2015-01-01

    The species-rich genus of marine free-living nematodes, Paracanthonchus Mikoletzky 1924 (Nematoda: Cyatholaimidae), is revised. The genus numbers 72 valid species; twenty are indicated as species inquirenda because of poor descriptions and/or doubtful placement in the genus. Species of the genus were described from all oceans and latitudes. Of valid species, 64 ones (90%) were described from the tidal or upper subtidal zones, four species were recorded from the medium or lower shelf, and three species are abyssal. Thirty one species (43%) are known from Europe and the Northern Africa; 19 and 9 ones were described from South and North America (respectively); 8 ones were recorded from Asia; and 6 ones from the Australian region. The type species, Paracanthonchus caecus Mikoletzky 1924 has been recorded by a number of authors from various oceans around the World, yet many of these specimens have only roughly resembled the type description. Evidently, this species represents a complex of closely related species. Possibly, the same situation is in some other Paracanthonchus species, the repeated findings of which have no strong resemblance to type specimens. A tabular key to species is provided. A new abyssal species Paracanthonchus mamubiae from the Zenkevich Rise (North-Western Pacific, off North Japan, 5350 m depth) is described. The new species is characterized by: the tail, which is long with a thin, cylindrical terminal section; the absence of lateral differentiation of the cuticle; the presence of two groups of lateral pores (level of posterior part of pharynx and in cloacal region); one large dorsal tooth and two pairs of small subventral teeth combined with pharyngostomal cuticular ridges forming two denticles which may appear as a third pair of subventral teeth; 3-5 indistinct tubular preanal supplements; and a massive, proximally paired gubernaculum possessing broad flattened plates on each distal end. Each flattened gubernacular plate bears numerous (50-60) small cusps and one large process.

  20. BOREAS TF-9 SSA-OBS Branch Level Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rayment, Mark B.; Jarvis, Paul G.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-9 team collected data that describe carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes from foliage at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site from 07-April through 23-November-1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  1. BOREAS RSS-8 BIOME-BGC Model Simulations at Tower Flux Sites in 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Kimball, John

    2000-01-01

    BIOME-BGC is a general ecosystem process model designed to simulate biogeochemical and hydrologic processes across multiple scales (Running and Hunt, 1993). In this investigation, BIOME-BGC was used to estimate daily water and carbon budgets for the BOREAS tower flux sites for 1994. Carbon variables estimated by the model include gross primary production (i.e., net photosynthesis), maintenance and heterotrophic respiration, net primary production, and net ecosystem carbon exchange. Hydrologic variables estimated by the model include snowcover, evaporation, transpiration, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and outflow. The information provided by the investigation includes input initialization and model output files for various sites in tabular ASCII format.

  2. Facies architecture and depositional environments of the Upper Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation, southern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Eric M.

    2007-04-01

    The Kaiparowits Formation is an unusually thick package of Upper Cretaceous (late Campanian) strata exposed in Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument of southern Utah, USA. The formation was deposited within the rapidly subsiding Cordilleran foreland basin as part of a thick clastic wedge derived from sources in the Sevier orogenic belt, thrust sheets in southeastern Nevada and southern California, and the Mogollon slope in southwestern Arizona. Channel systems in the Kaiparowits Formation shifted from northeastward to southeastward flow over time, and for a short period of time, sea level rise in the Western Interior Seaway resulted in tidally influenced rivers and/or estuarine systems. Thick floodbasin pond deposits, large suspended-load channels, and poorly developed, hydromorphic paleosols dominate the sedimentary record, and all are suggestive of a relatively wet, subhumid alluvial system. This is supported by extremely rapid sediment accumulation rates (41 cm/ka), and high diversity and abundance of aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate fossils. Facies and architectural analysis was performed on the Kaiparowits Formation, resulting in the identification of nine distinct facies associations: 1) intraformational conglomerate, 2) mollusc-shell conglomerate, 3) major tabular sandstone, 4) major lenticular sandstone, 5) minor tabular and lenticular sandstone, 6) finely laminated, calcareous siltstone, 7) inclined heterolithic sandstone and mudstone, 8) sandy mudstone, and 9) carbonaceous mudstone. These facies associations are interpreted as: 1) channel lags, 2) rare channel-hosted storm beds, 3) meandering channels, 4) anastomosing channels, 5) crevasse splays and crevasse channels, 6) lakes, 7) tidally influenced fluvial and/or estuarine channels, 8) mud-dominated floodplains, and 9) swamps and oxbow lakes. Based on this analysis, the formation is subdivided into three informal units, representative of gross changes in alluvial architecture, including facies stacking patterns, sandstone/mudstone ratios, and interpreted channel morphology. Alluvial architecture and stacking patterns in the Kaiparowits Formation were controlled by a combination of allogenic controls, most significantly tectonics followed by climate and eustasy.

  3. Rectangular subsonic jet flow field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Swan, David H.

    1989-01-01

    Flow field measurements are presented of 3 subsonic rectangular cold air jets. The 3 cases presented had aspect ratios of 1 x 2, 1 x 4 at a Mach number of 0.09 and an aspect ratio of 1 x 2 at a Mach number of 0.9. All measurements were made using a 3-D laser Doppler anemoneter system. The presented data includes the mean velocity vector, all Reynolds stress tensor components, turbulent kinetic energy and velocity correlation coefficients. The data is presented in tabular and graphical form. No analysis of the measured data or comparison to other published data is made. All tabular data are available in ASCII format on MS-DOS compatible disks.

  4. Overview of the mineralogy of the Biwabik Iron Formation, Mesabi Iron Range, northern Minnesota.

    PubMed

    McSwiggen, Peter L; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The mineralogy of the Biwabik Iron Formation changes dramatically from west to east as the formation nears the basal contact of the Duluth Complex. This reflects a contact metamorphism that took place with the emplacement of the igneous Duluth Complex at temperatures as high as 1200 degrees C. However, the mineralogy of the Biwabik Iron Formation also varies vertically through the stratigraphy of the unit. This variability in both the vertical and horizontal dimensions makes it difficult to predict exact horizons where specific minerals will occur. The iron-formation has been subdivided into four broad stratigraphic units (lower cherty, lower slaty, upper cherty, and upper slaty) and into four lateral mineralogical zones (1-4). Zone 1, the westernmost zone, is characterized by quartz, magnetite, hematite, carbonates, talc, chamosite, greenalite, minnesotaite, and stilpnomelane. The silicate mineralogy in Zone 2 of the Biwabik Iron Formation changes very little. However, the minerals begin to change dramatically in Zone 3. Most significantly, Zone 3 is characterized by the appearance of grunerite in both a tabular form and a fibrous form. In Zone 4, the original silicate minerals have completely reacted, and a new suite of minerals occupies the iron-formation. These include grunerite, hornblende, hedenbergite, ferrohypersthene (ferrosilite), and fayalite. PMID:18069109

  5. Planet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    1993-01-01

    Models of planetary formation are developed using the present single example of a planetary system, supplemented by limited astrophysical observations of star-forming regions and circumstellar disks. The solar nebula theory and the planetesimal hypothesis are discussed. The latter is found to provide a viable theory of the growth of the terrestrial planets, the cores of the giant planets, and the smaller bodies present in the solar system. The formation of solid bodies of planetary size should be a common event, at least around young stars which do not have binary companions orbiting at planetary distances. Stochastic impacts of large bodies provide sufficient angular momentum to produce the obliquities of the planets. The masses and bulk compositions of the planets can be understood in a gross sense as resulting from planetary growth within a disk whose temperature and surface density decreased with distance from the growing sun.

  6. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  7. Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Modern theories of star and planet formation and of the orbital stability of planetary systems are described and used to discuss possible characteristics of undiscovered planetary systems. The most detailed models of planetary growth are based upon observations of planets and smaller bodies within our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. These models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most single stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. A potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits resulting from interactions with material within the disk. Planets more massive than Earth have the potential to decay the fastest, and may be able to sweep up smaller planets in their path. The implications of the giant planets found in recent radial velocity searches for the abundances of habitable planets are discussed, and the methods that are being used and planned for detecting and characterizing extrasolar planets are reviewed.

  8. 30 CFR 1210.54 - Must I submit this royalty report electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...ASCII) or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. You must create your external files in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. You can generate these external files from your system application. Reporters/payors also...

  9. Formation of the Upper Cretaceous cherts in northeastern Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genedi, Adel

    1998-02-01

    The Upper Cretaceous cherts in northeast Sinai, Egypt are found as nodules, tabular sheets and continuous beds within the carbonate dominated successions. They occur in the Halal, Wata and Matulla Formations and become a very conspicuous constituent in the Sudr Chalk. The chert framework is typical of all interstratal structures and is of two types: spotted and brecciated forms. The chert is classified into a fossiliferous and nonfossiliferous variety. The first is likely either to form packstone-grainstone fabrics or to form wackestone fabrics. The packstone-grainstone fabric is interpreted as replacing platform carbonate deposits at relatively lower energy but in an oxygenated environment while the wackestone fabric chert replaces low energy deep water carbonates. This Upper Cretaceous silica cycle was dominated by inorganic reactions involving dissolved silica, and there is much evidence of secondary diagenetic silicification. This process would have started in early diagenesis as opal-A, opal-C and opal-CT precipitated from interstitial waters. Quartz represents the end product of recrystallisation. This transformation from metastable to stable silica phases is explained as a solid-solid diagenetic reaction as emphasised by ?18O. The nodular cherts have formed in coastal mixing zones with opal-CT and quartz supersaturation and calcite undersaturation. The source of silica of the deep water cherts cannot be explained by this mixing zone model and needs further study. On the other hand, there is no evidence of deposition of layered amorphous silica in either shallow or deep environments.

  10. P Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying; Balaraju, J. N.; Huang, Yizhong; Tay, Yee Yan; Shen, Yiqiang; Tsakadze, Zviad; Chen, Zhong

    2014-11-01

    The voids formed in the Ni3P layer during reaction between Sn-based solders and electroless Ni-P metallization is an important cause of rapid degradation of solder joint reliability. In this study, to suppress formation of the Ni3P phase, an electrolessly plated Ni-Sn-P alloy (6-7 wt.% P and 19-21 wt.% Sn) was developed to replace Ni-P. The interfacial microstructure of electroless Ni-Sn-P/Sn-3.5Ag solder joints was investigated after reflow and solid-state aging. For comparison, the interfacial reaction in electroless Ni-P/Sn-3.5Ag solder joints under the same reflow and aging conditions was studied. It was found that the Ni-Sn-P metallization is consumed much more slowly than the Ni-P metallization during soldering. After prolonged reaction, no Ni3P or voids are observed under SEM at the Ni-Sn-P/Sn-3.5Ag interface. Two main intermetallic compounds, Ni3Sn4 and Ni13Sn8P3, are formed during the soldering reaction. The reason for Ni3P phase suppression and the overall mechanisms of reaction at the Ni-Sn-P/Sn-3.5Ag interface are discussed.

  11. Spatial data in geographic information system format on agricultural chemical use, land use, cropping practices in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglin, W.A.; Goolsby, D.A.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial data in geographic information system format described in this report consist of estimates for all counties in the conterminous United States of the annual use of 96 herbicides in 1989; annual sales of nitrogen fertilizer, in tons, for 1985-91; and agricultural expenses, land use, chemical use, livestock holdings, and cropping practices in 1987. The source information, originally in tabular form, is summarized as digital polygon attribute data in the 18 geographic information system spatial data layers (coverages) provided. The information in these coverages can be used in estimating regional agricultural-chemical use or agricultural practices and in producing visual displays and mapping relative rates of agricultural-chemical use or agricultural practices across broad regions of the United States.

  12. Astronomical data formats: What we have and how we got here

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mink, Jessica D.

    2015-09-01

    Despite almost all being acquired as photons, astronomical data from different instruments and at different stages in its life may exist in different formats to serve different purposes. Beyond the data itself, descriptive information is associated with it as metadata, either included in the data format or in a larger multi-format data structure. Those formats may be used for the acquisition, processing, exchange, and archiving of data. It has been useful to use similar formats, or even a single standard to ease interaction with data in its various stages using familiar tools. Knowledge of the evolution and advantages of present standards is useful before we discuss the future of how astronomical data is formatted. The evolution of the use of world coordinates in FITS is presented as an example. It may be in the form of structures, such as a single file with several FITS extensions (Ponz et al., 1994), or a file with metadata linking to data, such as VO returned data packages (Dolensky and Tody, 2004) containing metadata separate from the actual data.FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) (Wells et al., 1981) was originally designed in 1979 as an exchange format, first used by radio astronomers in the AIPS software system (Associated Universities, 1999). It enabled astronomers to share data without having to maintain separate translation programs. At roughly the same time, the more flexible and more complicated N-Dimensional Data Format (NDF) was being developed in the U.K. Tim Jenness has explained the evolution of that system (Jenness et al., 2015).The original simple FITS consisted of a human-readable ASCII header of 80-character lines (matching the width of Hollerith cards then used to store and use computer software and data) and blocks of binary data described by the header and system commands. Each of these contained an integral number of 2880-byte blocks, padded with spaces at the end of each unit. A basic set of standard metadata keywords was included with the original FITS definition. The use of FITS expanded beyond exchange and archiving to recording and processing as computers got fast enough that the time it took to read and write ASCII header information and convert pixel information into internally-usable bits became increasingly negligible.This expanding use was aided by the ability to use FITS reading and writing libraries such as FITSIO (Pence, 1991) and CFITSIO (Pence, 1999) to deal with input and output from local software which worked on the bits or packages of tools such as AIPS (Associated Universities, 1999), IRAF (National Optical Astronomy Observatories, 1999) (which started with a propriety format and added FITS (Zarate and Greenfield, 1996)), and WCSTools (Mink, 2011) which perform sophisticated operations directly on FITS files. If we wish to display a FITS file, we can use a variety of tools: DS9 (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 2000) for images, TOPCAT (Taylor, 2011) for tables, FV (Pence and Chai, 2012) for either images or tables, and something like WCSTools (Mink, 2011) IMHEAD to check out the metadata.

  13. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    Modern theories for the origin of the planets are based on observations of the solar system and star-forming regions elsewhere in the galaxy, together with the results of numerical models. Some key observations are: - The solar system contains eight large planets with roughly circular, coplanar orbits lying 0.4-30 AU from the Sun. There are few locations between the planets where additional large objects could exist on stable orbits. - The major planets are grouped: small volatile-poor planets lie close to the Sun, with large volatile-rich planets further out. The main asteroid belt (2-4 AU from the Sun) is substantially depleted in mass with respect to other regions. - The planets and asteroids are depleted in volatile elements compared to the Sun. The degree of fractionation decreases with distance: the terrestrial planets and inner-belt asteroids are highly depleted in volatiles, the outer-belt asteroids are less so, while many satellites in the outer solar system are ice rich. Primitive CI meteorites (probably from the outer asteroid belt) have elemental abundances very similar to the Sun except for highly volatile elements. - Ancient solid surfaces throughout the solar system are covered in impact craters (e.g., the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Callisto). Most of the planets have large axial tilts with respect to their orbits. Earth possesses a large companion with a mass ˜1% that of the planet itself. - The terrestrial planets and many asteroids have undergone differentiation. There is strong evidence that Saturn is highly centrally condensed, with a core of mass ˜10M?, and weaker evidence that Jupiter has a core of similar mass. These cores have masses comparable to Uranus and Neptune. - Meteorites from the main asteroid belt show evidence that they once contained short-lived radioactive isotopes with half-lives <10 Myr. The main components of primitive meteorites (chondrules and refractory inclusions) have sizes clustered around 1 mm. These components appear to have undergone rapid melting and cooling. - Young stars generally exist in gas- and dust-rich environments. Many young stars possess massive, optically thick disks with diameters of 10-1,000 AU. These disks are inferred to have lifetimes of ˜1-10 Myr. - At least 4% of main sequence (ordinary) stars have planetary-mass companions. The companions have masses of 0.1-10 Jupiter masses (the lower limit is the current detection threshhold), and orbital distances from 0.05 AU to 5 AU (the upper limit is the current detection threshhold).These observations have led to the development and refinement of a theory in which the planets formed from a disk-shaped protoplanetary nebula (Laplace) by pairwise accretion of small solid bodies (Safranov, 1969). A variant of the standard model invokes the gravitational collapse of portions of this disk to form gas giant planets directly. It should be pointed out that the standard model is designed to explain the planets observed in the solar system. Attempts to account for planetary systems recently discovered orbiting other stars suggest that planet formation is likely to differ in several respects from one system to another.

  14. Initial development and performance evaluation of a process for formation of dense carbon by pyrolysis of methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noyes, G. P.; Cusick, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The three steps in pyrolytic carbon formation are: (1) gaseous hydrocarbon polymerization and aromatic formation; (2) gas-phase condensation and surface adsorption/impingement of polyaromatic hydrocarbon; and (3) final dehydration to carbon. The structure of the carbon in the various stages of formation is examined. The apparatuses and experimental procedures for the pyrolysis of methane in a 60 cm long quartz reactor tube at temperatures ranging from 1400-1600 K are described. The percentage of carbon converted and its density are calculated and tabularly presented. The results reveal that dense carbon formation is maximized and soot eliminated by this procedure. It is observed that conversion efficiency depends on the composition of the inlet gas and conversion increases with increasing temperature. Based on the experimental data a three-man carbon reactor subsystem (CRS) is developed; the functions of the Sabatier Methanation Reactor, two carbon formation reactors and fluid handling components of the CRS are analyzed. The CRS forms 16 kg of carbon at a rate of 0.8 kg/day for 20 days in a two percent volume density quartz wool packing at temperature of 1500-1600 K.

  15. Cave Formations and Waterlines

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A series of speleothems, or cave formations, in the Caverns of Sonora. A prior waterline can be seen in the formations where the color changes from primarily white (formations formed in the air) to more beige (formations formed underwater). In addition, the previously submerged formations are larger...

  16. Formation of the enigmatic Matoush uranium deposit in the Paleoprotozoic Otish Basin, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre, Paul; Kyser, Kurt; Layton-Matthews, Daniel; Beyer, Steve R.; Hiatt, Eric E.; Lafontaine, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The Matoush uranium deposit is situated in the Paleoproterozoic Otish Basin, northern Quebec, Canada, and is hosted by the Indicator Formation sandstones. Its sheet-like ore bodies are closely associated with the steeply dipping Matoush Fracture, which hosts mafic dykes and minor quartz-feldspar-tourmaline pegmatites. Regional diagenesis, involving oxidizing basinal fluids (?2H ˜-15‰, ?18O ˜8‰), produced mostly illite and possibly leached U from accessory phases in the Indicator Formation sandstones. The bimodal Matoush dyke intruded the Indicator Formation along the Matoush Fracture, and the related metasomatism produced Cr-rich dravite and muscovite in both the dyke and the proximal sandstones. Uraninite formed when U6+ in the basinal brine was reduced to U4+ in contact with the mafic dyke and by Fe2+ in Cr-dravite and Cr-muscovite, and precipitated together with eskolaite and hematite. Because of its unique characteristics, the Matoush deposit cannot be easily classified within the generally accepted classification of uranium deposits. Two of its main characteristics (unusual reduction mechanism, structural control) do not correspond to the sandstone-hosted group of deposits (unconformity type, tabular, roll front), in spite of uranium being derived from the Otish Group sandstones.

  17. Magnetostratigraphy of the Miocene Las Arcas Formation, Santa María Valley, northwestern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnuolo, Cecilia M.; Georgieff, Sergio M.; Rapalini, Augusto E.

    2015-11-01

    The first magnetostratigraphic study of the Las Arcas Formation (Late Miocene) was carried out in Las Totoritas creek (26º12?S; 65º47?W, NW Argentina), a key place in between of two geological provinces: Northwestern Pampean Ranges and Eastern Cordillera, in northwestern Argentina. This was accompanied by isotopic dating (9.01 ± 0.12 Ma, 40Ar-39Ar in amphibole) of the unit, obtained from a 3.4 m thick tuff intercalated at ?45 m above the base. The Las Arcas Formation is 810 m thick at the sampling locality and it is mainly composed of tabular reddish conglomerates, sandstones and siltstones in both coarsening- and thickening-upward arrangements. The exposed section was sampled at 48 sites, 26 of which are interpreted as carrying primary magnetization. The new magnetostratigraphic column was correlated with the Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS), and suggests that deposition of the Las Arcas Formation strata started at around 9.1 Ma and ended around 6.8 Ma. The paleomagnetic pole obtained for this unit (Dec = 8.7° Inc = -43.9° dp = 14.9 dm 9.3) indicates that this area underwent non-significant rotation (11.0° ± 13.6°) since the Late Miocene.

  18. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    PubMed Central

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production. PMID:21687599

  19. Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks

    E-print Network

    Jacob, Eshel Ben

    Water Formatics Engineered formation of nanobubbles networks in water and aqueous solutions We present the idea that the anomalous effects of rf-treatments of water and aqueous solution resulted from-bubble exchange interactions. These exchange interactions are mediated by the ordering of the water molecules

  20. Design of tabular excavations in foliated rock: an integrated numerical

    E-print Network

    Eberhardt, Erik

    . EBERHARDT*, D. STEAD , M. J. REEVES* and C. CONNORS * Department of Geological Sciences, University. The first stage in the design process is the characterization of the rock mass using both in situ of the mining process, requiring that the rock mass stability, both within the orebody and in the rock adjacent

  1. Analyzing Tabular Requirements Specifications Using Infinite State Model Checking

    E-print Network

    -world, safety-critical sys- tems such as air traffic control systems and nuclear power plants. These formal in the requirements specifi- cations can be detected and corrected early in the develop- ment process when correcting, Santa Barbara. His research is supported in part by NSF grant CCR-0341365. 2C. Heitmeyer's research

  2. Domino: Extracting, Comparing, and Manipulating Subsets Across Multiple Tabular Datasets.

    PubMed

    Gratzl, Samuel; Gehlenborg, Nils; Lex, Alexander; Pfister, Hanspeter; Streit, Marc

    2014-12-01

    Answering questions about complex issues often requires analysts to take into account information contained in multiple interconnected datasets. A common strategy in analyzing and visualizing large and heterogeneous data is dividing it into meaningful subsets. Interesting subsets can then be selected and the associated data and the relationships between the subsets visualized. However, neither the extraction and manipulation nor the comparison of subsets is well supported by state-of-the-art techniques. In this paper we present Domino, a novel multiform visualization technique for effectively representing subsets and the relationships between them. By providing comprehensive tools to arrange, combine, and extract subsets, Domino allows users to create both common visualization techniques and advanced visualizations tailored to specific use cases. In addition to the novel technique, we present an implementation that enables analysts to manage the wide range of options that our approach offers. Innovative interactive features such as placeholders and live previews support rapid creation of complex analysis setups. We introduce the technique and the implementation using a simple example and demonstrate scalability and effectiveness in a use case from the field of cancer genomics. PMID:26356916

  3. Comparison of abundances of chemical elements in mineralized and unmineralized sandstone of the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation, Smith Lake District, Grants uranium region, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierson, C.T.; Spirakis, C.S.; Robertson, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Statistical treatment of analytical data from the Mariano Lake and Ruby uranium deposits in the Smith Lake district, New Mexico, indicates that organic carbon, arsenic, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, gallium, iron, lead, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, selenium, strontium, sulfur, vanadium, yttrium, and zirconium are concentrated along with uranium in primary ore. Comparison of the Smith Lake data with information from other primary deposits in the Grants uranium region and elsewhere in the Morrison Formation of the Colorado Plateau suggests that these elements, with the possible exceptions of zirconium and gallium and with the probable addition of aluminum and magnesium, are typically associated with primary, tabular uranium deposits. Chemical differences between the Ruby and Mariano Lake deposits are consistent with the interpretation that the Ruby deposit has been more affected by post-mineralization oxidizing solutions than has the Mariano Lake deposit.

  4. BOREAS RSS-17 Stem, Soil, and Air Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Reiner; McDonald, Kyle C.; Way, JoBea; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team collected several data sets in support of its research in monitoring and analyzing environmental and phenological states using radar data. This data set consists of tree bole and soil temperature measurements from various BOREAS flux tower sites. Temperatures were measured with thermistors implanted in the hydroconductive tissue of the trunks of several trees at each site and at various depths in the soil. Data were stored on a data logger at intervals of either 1 or 2 hours. The majority of the data were acquired between early 1994 and early 1995. The primary product of this data set is the diurnal stem temperature measurements acquired for selected trees at five BOREAS tower sites. The data are provided in tabular ASCII format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884) or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Star Formation in Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: star formation; galactic infrared emission; molecular clouds; OB star luminosity; dust grains; IRAS observations; galactic disks; stellar formation in Magellanic clouds; irregular galaxies; spiral galaxies; starbursts; morphology of galactic centers; and far-infrared observations.

  6. TRIHALOMETHANE REMOVAL AND FORMATION

    E-print Network

    District of Columbia, University of the

    substances, and algae like material also react with aqueous chlorine to produce THMs., The THM formation also in water to give rise to haloform reactions and produce THMs. The organics that lead to the formation

  7. Scenarios for galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    The gravitational instability theory and its application to the origin of large scale structure are reviewed. The modeling of galaxy formation is described, from forwards and backwards perspectives. The emphasis is on the interactions between stellar and galactic formation.

  8. The Format Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  9. FORMCON -- Data Format Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawden, M. D.; Pearce, Dave

    Two data format conversion utilities are available: - IPCSIN: Convert IPCS data to Starlink format. - VICARIN: Convert VICAR data to Starlink format. The Starlink format referred to is that used by the INTERIM Starlink environment described in SUN/4 and used by programs such as those in the ASPIC package. The input data is assumed to be held on magnetic tape. Both these programs are Starlink Application Programs and should be used within the INTERIM environment.

  10. The mzTab Data Exchange Format: Communicating Mass-spectrometry-based Proteomics and Metabolomics Experimental Results to a Wider Audience*

    PubMed Central

    Griss, Johannes; Jones, Andrew R.; Sachsenberg, Timo; Walzer, Mathias; Gatto, Laurent; Hartler, Jürgen; Thallinger, Gerhard G.; Salek, Reza M.; Steinbeck, Christoph; Neuhauser, Nadin; Cox, Jürgen; Neumann, Steffen; Fan, Jun; Reisinger, Florian; Xu, Qing-Wei; del Toro, Noemi; Pérez-Riverol, Yasset; Ghali, Fawaz; Bandeira, Nuno; Xenarios, Ioannis; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The HUPO Proteomics Standards Initiative has developed several standardized data formats to facilitate data sharing in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics. These allow researchers to report their complete results in a unified way. However, at present, there is no format to describe the final qualitative and quantitative results for proteomics and metabolomics experiments in a simple tabular format. Many downstream analysis use cases are only concerned with the final results of an experiment and require an easily accessible format, compatible with tools such as Microsoft Excel or R. We developed the mzTab file format for MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results to meet this need. mzTab is intended as a lightweight supplement to the existing standard XML-based file formats (mzML, mzIdentML, mzQuantML), providing a comprehensive summary, similar in concept to the supplemental material of a scientific publication. mzTab files can contain protein, peptide, and small molecule identifications together with experimental metadata and basic quantitative information. The format is not intended to store the complete experimental evidence but provides mechanisms to report results at different levels of detail. These range from a simple summary of the final results to a representation of the results including the experimental design. This format is ideally suited to make MS-based proteomics and metabolomics results available to a wider biological community outside the field of MS. Several software tools for proteomics and metabolomics have already adapted the format as an output format. The comprehensive mzTab specification document and extensive additional documentation can be found online. PMID:24980485

  11. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a “small plain, big front” character. PMID:26075611

  12. Formation Conditions and Sedimentary Characteristics of a Triassic Shallow Water Braided Delta in the Yanchang Formation, Southwest Ordos Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziliang; Shen, Fang; Zhu, Xiaomin; Li, Fengjie; Tan, Mengqi

    2015-01-01

    A large, shallow braided river delta sedimentary system developed in the Yanchang Formation during the Triassic in the southwest of the Ordos basin. In this braided delta system, abundant oil and gas resources have been observed, and the area is a hotspot for oil and gas resource exploration. Through extensive field work on outcrops and cores and analyses of geophysical data, it was determined that developments in the Late Triassic produced favorable geological conditions for the development of shallow water braided river deltas. Such conditions included a large basin, flat terrain, and wide and shallow water areas; wet and dry cyclical climate changes; ancient water turbulence; dramatic depth cycle changes; ancient uplift development; strong weathering of parent rock; and abundant supply. The shallow water braided river delta showed grain sediment granularity, plastic debris, and sediment with mature composition and structure that reflected the strong hydrodynamic environment of large tabular cross-bedding, wedge cross-bedding, and multiple positive rhythms superimposed to form a thick sand body layer. The branch river bifurcation developed underwater, and the thickness of the sand body increased further, indicating that the slope was slow and located in shallow water. The seismic responses of the braided river delta reflected strong shallow water performance, indicated by a progradation seismic reflection phase axis that was relatively flat; in addition, the seismic reflection amplitude was strong and continuous with a low angle and extended over considerable distances (up to 50 km). The sedimentary center was close to the provenance, the width of the river was large, and a shallow sedimentary structure and a sedimentary rhythm were developed. The development of the delta was primarily controlled by tectonic activity and changes in the lake level; as a result, the river delta sedimentary system eventually presented a "small plain, big front" character. PMID:26075611

  13. Depositional facies of the Cambrian Araba Formation in the Taba region, east Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Araby, A.; Abdel-Motelib, A.

    1999-10-01

    A thick succession of Cambrian sediments is exposed in the Taba region, east Sinai, and subdivided into the Araba Formation and the overlying Naqus Formation. The vertical and lateral distribution of the Araba Formation in the Taba region provides an outstanding example of an overall retrograding sequence. Three distinctive units (I, II and III) are distinguished within this succession on the basis of depositional geometries, stratified patterns, sedimentary features and petrographic examinations. They record different depositional environments and each unit is distinguished by a particular facies association, which records processes characteristic of these environments. The lower unit (I) is dominated by five depositional facies (la-le) which belong to low sinuosity braided channels associated with floodplain fines and alluvial fans. Channel deposits are represented by tabular cross-bedded and horizontally stratified pebbly coarse-grained sandstones. The middle unit (II) reveals a relative sea level rise and is composed of fine- to coarse-grained sandstone, shale and mudstone with carbonate intercalcations. From four depositional facies (Ila-Ild), recognised facies (Ila, Ilc and Ild) are comparable to upper-lower shoreface and tidal channel environments. The fourth facies (Ilb) is carbonate-dominated with trilobite tracks, and reflects deposition in the upper-middle intertidal flat. The latter facies (llb) is subjected to intea-Cambrian karstification, which is deduced from the presence of macro- and microscopic fresh water calcite fillings, botryoidal Fe and Mn oxides and terra rossa. The uppermost unit (III) is shale-dominated from the inner shelf and is represented by two facies (Illa and Illb). Despite the general rise in sea-level in the Araba Formation, the uppermost facies (Illb) points to a progradational-upward tendency in unit (III), and this is coeval with an increase in the percentage of interbedded fine-grained sandstones.

  14. Sedimentology of a muddy alluvial deposit: Triassic Denwa Formation, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Parthasarathi; Sarkar, Soumen; Maulik, Pradip

    2006-09-01

    Triassic Upper Denwa Formation (˜ 380 m) in the Satpura Gondwana basin, central India is a mudstone-dominated fluvial succession that comprises isolated ribbon-shaped (2-5-m-thick) channel-fill bodies encased within fine-grained extra-channel deposits. Eight architectural elements are recognized, of which five belong to channel-fill deposits and the remaining three to extra-channel deposits. Majority of channel-fill deposits are characterized by sandy or muddy inclined heterolithic strata (IHS) that record limited lateral accretion of point bars or benches (constrained by cohesive banks) in mixed- to suspended-load sinuous channels. A few ribbon bodies are mud rich and attest to nearly stagnant conditions in partly abandoned channels. A few single- or multistorey ribbon bodies that are dominantly sandy and lack inclined strata represent deposits of straight, laterally stable channel. The smallest ribbon bodies (˜ 1 m thick) of calcirudite/calcarenite possibly represent deposits of secondary channels in the interfluves. Coexistence of channel-fill bodies of different dimension, lithology and internal organization in restricted stratigraphic intervals suggests an anabranching system having channels with different fill histories. The extra-channel deposits mainly comprise red mudstone (1-5 m thick) that indicates pervasive oxidation of overbank sediments in well-aerated and well-drained setting. Sporadically developed calcic vertisols suggest a hot, semi-arid climate during the Upper Denwa period. Sandy to heterolithic sheets (70 cm to 2 m thick) with sharp, planar basal surfaces are replete with features suggestive of unconfined sheet flow. Also at places there are indications of subaqueous emplacement of sands. These bodies with paleocurrent oblique to that of the channel-fills are interpreted as crevasse splay deposits. Tabular heterolithic bodies (3-5 m thick) are characterized by undulating basal surface, complex organization of sandstone lenses interwoven with heteroliths and red mudstone (in decimeter-scale) with desiccation cracks. Such tabular bodies are attributed to repetitive, sheet-like and poorly channelized splaying. Very thick (10 to 20 m) mudstones intervals are inexplicable in terms of overbank flooding only. Poorly developed pedogenic features in sandy to muddy heterolithic sheets and certain mudstone intervals and well-developed cumulative paleosols in surrounding mudstone highlights the contrast between rapidly emplaced splay deposits and slowly accumulated floodplain deposits. The Denwa channels are comparable with modern, low-gradient and low-energy anabranching river system in which the sediment load is dominantly fine-grained. The semi-arid climate possibly facilitated enhanced supply of fines to the Upper Denwa system. However, sediment partitioning and distribution in a particular channel was controlled by flow diversion to and from other channels in that anabranching system. Low flow strength with periodic flood events, high bank strength and a rate of sediment supply that slightly exceeded that of onward transport probably were important factors for the development of the Upper Denwa anabranching system.

  15. Star Formation for Predictive Primordial Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Milosavljevic, Milos

    2015-01-01

    The elegance of inflationary cosmology and cosmological perturbation theory ends with the formation of the first stars and galaxies, the initial sources of light that launched the phenomenologically rich process of cosmic reionization. Here we review the current understanding of early star formation, emphasizing unsolved problems and technical challenges. We begin with the first generation of stars to form after the Big Bang and trace how they influenced subsequent star formation. The onset of chemical enrichment coincided with a sharp increase in the overall physical complexity of star forming systems. Ab-initio computational treatments are just now entering the domain of the predictive and are establishing contact with local observations of the relics of this ancient epoch.

  16. Tropical cyclone formation

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, M.T.; Farrell, B.F. )

    1993-01-15

    The physics of tropical cyclone formation is not well understood, and more is known about the mature hurricane than the formative mechanisms that produce it. It is believed part of the reason for this can be traced to insufficient upper-level atmospheric data. Recent observations suggest that tropical cyclones are initiated by asymmetric interactions associated with migratory upper-level potential vorticity disturbances and low-level disturbances. Favored theories of cyclones formation, however, focus on internal processes associated with cumulus convection and/or air-sea interaction. This work focuses on external mechanisms of cyclone formation and, using both a two- and three-dimensional moist geostrophic momentum model, investigates the role of upper-level potential vorticity disturbances on the formation process. A conceptual model of tropical cyclone formation is proposed, and implications of the theory are discussed. 71 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Aspects of Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2001-12-13

    I describe some of the current challenges in galaxy formation theory with applications to formation of disks and of spheroids. Forthcoming deep surveys of galaxies with Keck and VLT will provide high quality spectra of $\\sim 10^5$ galaxies that will probe stellar populations and star formation rates at redshift unity. This will help refine our phenomenological knowledge of galaxy evolution and enable robust predictions to be developed for future breakthroughs in understanding galaxy formation at high redshift that are anticipated with NGST and with the proposed new generation of 30 metre-class telescopes.

  18. BOREAS TF-5 SSA-OJP Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldocchi, Dennis; Vogel, Christoph; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-5) team collected tower flux data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area Old Jack Pine (SSA-OJP) site through the growing season of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  19. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Understory Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z.; Nesic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and momentum flux data under the canopy along with meteorological and soils data at the BOREAS SSA-OA site from mid-October to mid-November of 1993 and throughout all of 1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  20. BOREAS TF-9 SSA-OBS Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Massheder, Jonathan M.; Moncrieff, John B.; Rayment, Mark B.; Jarvis, Paul G.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-9 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site during the growing season of 1994 and most of the year for 1996. From the winter of 1995 to 1996, soil temperature data were also collected and provided. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  1. BOREAS TF-6 SSA-YA Surface Energy Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bessemoulin, Pierre; Puech, Dominique; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-6 team collected surface energy flux and meteorology data at the SSA-YA site. The data characterize the energy flux and meteorological conditions at the site from 18-Jul to 20-Sep-1994. The data set does not contain any trace gas exchange measurements. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  2. BOREAS RSS-2 Extracted Reflectance Factors Derived from ASAS Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Dabney, P.; Kovalick, W.; Graham, D.; Bur, Michael; Irons, James R.; Tierney, M.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-2 team derived atmospherically corrected bidirectional reflectance factor means from multispectral, multiangle ASAS imagery for small homogeneous areas near several BOREAS sites. The ASAS imagery was acquired from the C-130 aircraft platform in 1994 and 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  3. BOREAS TF-4 SSA-YJP Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Canopy Condition Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Striegl, Robert; Wickland, Kimberly; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-4) team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS Southern Study Area-Young Jack Pine (SSA-YJP) site during the growing season of 1994. In addition, meteorological data were collected both above and within the canopy. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  4. BOREAS TGB-9 Above-canopy NMHC at SSA-OBS, SSA-OJP, and SSA-OA Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keiser, B. N.; Niki, H.; Young, V. L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-9 team collected data in order to inventory and quantify the anthropogenic and biogenic NMHCs over the BOREAS study areas. This data set contains concentration and mixing ratio values for several NMHCs collected at the BOREAS SSA from 27-May-1994 to 15-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  5. BOREAS TF-7 SSA-OBS Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Pattey, Elizabeth; Desjardins, Raymond L.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-7 team collected meteorological data as well as energy, carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and nitrous oxide flux data at the BOREAS SSA-OBS site. The data were collected from 24-May to 19-Sep-1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  6. BOREAS TGB-10 Volatile Organic Carbon Data over the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westberg, Hal; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Hall, Brad; Jackson, Andrea V.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-10 team collected several trace gas data sets in its efforts to determine the role of biogenic hydrocarbon emissions with respect to boreal forest carbon cycles. This data set contains measured VOC concentrations. These data were obtained at the SSA-OJP site from May to September 1994. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  7. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Black, T. Andrew; Chen, Z.; Nesic, Zoran

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected energy, carbon dioxide, and momentum flux data above the canopy along with meteorological and soils data at the BOREAS SSA-OA site from mid-April to the end of the year for 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  8. BOREAS TF-8 NSA-OJP Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Moore, Kathleen E.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-8 team collected energy, CO2, and water vapor flux data at the BOREAS NSA-OJP site during the growing season of 1994 and most of the year for 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  9. BOREAS TF-3 NSA-OBS Tower Flux, Meteorological, and Soil Temperature Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wofsy, Steven; Sutton, Doug; Goulden, Mike; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Tower Flux (BOREAS TF-3) team collected tower flux, surface meteorological, and soil temperature data at the BOREAS Northern Study Area-Old Black Spruce (NSA-OBS) site continuously from the March 1994 through October 1996. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  10. BOREAS TGB-1/TGB-3 CH4 Chamber Flux Data over the NSA Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubier, Jill L.; Moore, Tim R.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-3 team collected methane (CH4) chamber flux measurements at the NSA fen site during May-September 1994 and June-October 1996. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  11. ADVANCED FORENSIC FORMAT: AN OPEN, EXTENSIBLE FORMAT

    E-print Network

    Malan, David J.

    . Malan, K. Dubec, C. Stevens and C. Pham Abstract This paper describes the Advanced Forensic Format (AFF). This paper also describes the Advanced Disk Imager (AImage), a new program for acquiring disk images for divorce. Police might raid a drug dealer's apartment and seize a computer that was used for contacting

  12. GLOBAL STAR FORMATION REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Silk, Joseph; Norman, Colin E-mail: norman@stsci.edu

    2009-07-20

    A general treatment of disk star formation is developed from a dissipative multiphase model, with the dominant dissipation due to cloud collisions. The Schmidt-Kennicutt (SK) law emerges naturally for star-forming disks and starbursts. We predict that there should be an inverse correlation between Tully-Fisher law and SK law residuals. The model is extended to include a multiphase treatment of supernova feedback that leads to a turbulent pressure-regulated generalization of the star formation law and is applicable to gas-rich starbursts. Enhanced pressure, as expected in merger-induced star formation, enhances star formation efficiency. An upper limit is derived for the disk star formation rate in starbursts that depends on the ratio of global ISM to cloud pressures. We extend these considerations to the case where the interstellar gas pressure in the inner galaxy is dominated by outflows from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN). During massive spheroid formation, AGN-driven winds trigger star formation, resulting in enhanced supernova feedback and outflows. The outflows are comparable to the AGN-boosted star formation rate and saturate in the super-Eddington limit. Downsizing of both SMBH and spheroids is a consequence of AGN-driven positive feedback. Bondi accretion feeds the central black hole with a specific accretion rate that is proportional to the black hole mass. AGN-enhanced star formation is mediated by turbulent pressure and relates spheroid star formation rate to black hole accretion rate. The relation between black hole mass and spheroid velocity dispersion has a coefficient (Salpeter time to gas consumption time ratio) that provides an arrow of time. Highly efficient, AGN-boosted star formation can occur at high redshift.

  13. Formative Assessment Probes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Francis; Keeley, Page

    2008-01-01

    Formative assessment probes can be effective tools to help teachers build a bridge between students' initial ideas and scientific ones. In this article, the authors describe how using two formative assessment probes can help teachers determine the extent to which students make similar connections between developing a concept of matter and a…

  14. Star formation Simon Goodwin

    E-print Network

    Crowther, Paul

    Star formation Simon Goodwin Dept Physics & Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield, S3 7RH, UK. s.goodwin@sheffield.ac.uk 1 Abstract Stars are one of the most important consituents of the Universe, and understanding their formation is crucial to many areas of astrophysics. Stars form from dense

  15. School Formative Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halverson, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Data-driven instructional improvement relies on developing coherent systems that allow school staff to generate, interpret, and act upon quality formative information on students and school programs. This article offers a formative feedback system model that captures how school leaders and teachers structure artifacts and practices to create…

  16. Simple Data Format A Platform Independent Data Format that

    E-print Network

    California at Berkeley, University of

    are supported Proprietary, no support for C/Fortran FITS format Heritage in solar physics, wide software base format and I/O software that is easy to use and very portable: Simple Data Format (SDF). 1. The SDF fileSimple Data Format ­ A Platform Independent Data Format that works in Fortran, C, and IDL George H

  17. When Efficient Star Formation Drives Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmentier, G.; Fritze, U.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the impact of the star-formation efficiency (SFE) in cluster-forming cores (i.e., local SFE) on the evolution of mass in star clusters (SCs) over the age range 1-100 Myr, when SCs undergo their infant weight-loss/mortality phase. Our model builds on the N-body simulation grid of Baumgardt & Kroupa. Assuming a constant formation rate of gas-embedded clusters and a weak tidal field, we show that the ratio between the total mass in stars bound to the clusters over that age range and the total mass in stars initially formed in gas-embedded clusters is a strongly increasing function of the averaged local SFE, with little influence from any assumed core mass-radius relation. Our results suggest that, for young starbursts with estimated tidal field strength and known recent star-formation history, observed cluster-to-star mass ratios, once corrected for the undetected clusters, constitute promising probes of the local SFE without the need to resort to gas mass estimates. Similarly, the mass ratio of stars that remain in bound clusters at the end of the infant mortality/weight-loss phase (i.e., age gsim50 Myr) depends sensitively on the mean local SFE, although the impacts of the width of the SFE distribution function and of the core mass-radius relation require more careful assessment in this case. Following the recent finding by Bastian that galaxies form, on average, 8% of their stars in bound clusters regardless of their star-formation rate, we raise the hypothesis that star formation in the present-day universe is characterized by a near-universal distribution of the local SFE. A related potential application of our model is in tracing the evolution of the local SFE over cosmological lookback times by comparing the age distribution of the total mass in SCs to that in field stars in galaxies where field stars can be resolved and age dated. We describe aspects of our model which are still to be worked out before this goal can be achieved.

  18. Sparse Image Format

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2007-04-12

    The Sparse Image Format (SIF) is a file format for storing spare raster images. It works by breaking an image down into tiles. Space is savid by only storing non-uniform tiles, i.e. tiles with at least two different pixel values. If a tile is completely uniform, its common pixel value is stored instead of the complete tile raster. The software is a library in the C language used for manipulating files in SIF format. Itmore »supports large files (> 2GB) and is designed to build in Windows and Linux environments.« less

  19. Star Formation Ralf Klessen

    E-print Network

    Klessen,Ralf

    bangl) Stars form in galaxies and protogalaxies star formation at high redshift (Hubble Ultra-Deep Field, from HST Web site) #12;Antennae galaxy NGC4038/39 distance: 19.2Mpc vis. Magn: 11.2 optical: white

  20. Notes on Star Formation

    E-print Network

    Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of star formation at a level suitable for graduate students or advanced undergraduates in astronomy or physics. The structure of the book is as follows. The first two chapters begin with a discussion of observational techniques, and the basic phenomenology they reveal. The goal is to familiarize students with the basic techniques that will be used throughout, and to provide a common vocabulary for the rest of the book. The next five chapters provide a similar review of the basic physical processes that are important for star formation. Again, the goal is to provide a basis for what follows. The remaining chapters discuss star formation over a variety of scales, starting with the galactic scale and working down to the scales of individual stars and their disks. The book concludes with a brief discussion of the clearing of disks and the transition to planet formation. The book includes five problem sets, complete with solutions.

  1. Formation of Giant Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Under the support of NASA Origins grant, we studied the formation of gaps in protoplanetary disks due the tidal interaction between a fully grown protoplanet and protostellar disk. The result of this study is published in the Astrophysical Journal, (vol 514, 344-367, 1999) and in several conference proceedings. The main focus of this work is to analyze planet-disk interaction during the final stages of protoplanetary formation.

  2. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  3. Display formats manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runnels, R. L.

    1973-01-01

    The standards and procedures for the generation of operational display formats to be used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) display control system are presented. The required effort, forms, and fundamentals for the design, specifications, and production of display formats are identified. The principles of display design and system constraints controlling the creation of optimum operational displays for mission control are explained. The basic two types of MCC display systems for presenting information are described.

  4. Autonomous Formation Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  5. Positronium Formation in Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D. R.

    1970-01-01

    Positronium formation in muscle at +4°C and -4°C was examined by the measurement of the angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation. Since the positronium formation rate in ice is considerably higher than it is in water, there should be a comparable increase in the positronium formation rate in muscle tissue if recent speculation that cellular water is ordered in a semicrystalline icelike state is correct. Comparison of the angular correlation from muscle at +4°C with that from water at +4°C shows no enhancement of the positronium formation rate. Frozen muscle at -4°C shows an enhancement of the positronium formation rate of approximately half that found in ice at -4°C, indicating that most cellular water undergoes a normal water-ice transition when frozen. It is concluded therefore that cell water in muscle is not ordered in a hexagonal icelike structure. While the results are consistent with the hypothesis that cell water is in the liquid state, the hypothesis that cell water is ordered in an undetermined close packed structure which transforms to the hexagonal ice structure at or near 0°C cannot be ruled out. PMID:5436881

  6. Vascular Lumen Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell–cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved. PMID:22474612

  7. Gaussian entanglement of formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.M.; Giedke, G.; Krueger, O.; Werner, R. F.; Cirac, J.I.

    2004-05-01

    We introduce a Gaussian version of the entanglement of formation adapted to bipartite Gaussian states by considering decompositions into pure Gaussian states only. We show that this quantity is an entanglement monotone under Gaussian operations and provide a simplified computation for states of arbitrary many modes. For the case of one mode per site the remaining variational problem can be solved analytically. If the considered state is in addition symmetric with respect to interchanging the two modes, we prove additivity of the considered entanglement measure. Moreover, in this case and considering only a single copy, our entanglement measure coincides with the true entanglement of formation.

  8. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of triggered star formation in a cosmological context.

  9. An Upper Turonian fine-grained shallow marine stromatolite bed from the Muñecas Formation, Northern Iberian Ranges, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, M.; Sánchez, F.; Walliser, E. O.; Reitner, J.

    2012-07-01

    A fine-grained stromatolite bed, laterally continuous on the kilometer scale and with small synoptic relief, crops out in the Muñecas Formation in the Northern Iberian Ranges. The Muñecas Fm. was deposited during the late Turonian on a shallow water platform in the Upper Cretaceous intracratonic Iberian basin. The stromatolite bed has a tabular to domed biostromal macrostructure. Its internal mesostructure consists of planar, wavy to hemispherical stromatoids that display a broad spectrum of microstructures, including dense micrite, bahamite peloids, peloidal to clotted microfabrics, irregular micritic-wall tubes, which are suggestive of algae and filamentous microframeworks, which are suggestive of filamentous cyanobacteria. Various stromatolite growth stages have been linked to the dominance of different accretion processes. The accretion of the entire fine-grained stromatolite involves a complex mosaic of processes: trapping and binding of quartz-silt grains and bahamites, which form the agglutinated parts of some laminae, and microbially induced precipitation, which forms spongiostromic and micritic laminae. Tubiform and filamentous microframeworks resembling porostromatate or skeletal stromatolitic growth were also recognized. Laser ICP-MS measurements of Al, Si, Mg, Mn, Sr, S and Fe were analyzed to detect the influence of siliciclastic inputs and major trends during stromatolite accretion. Carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions from the stromatolite and associated facies were used to identify possible microbial signatures. These data describes a unique and well-preserved example of a shallow marine Upper Turonian fine-grained stromatolite.

  10. Formation of tectonic peperites from alkaline magmas intruded into wet sediments in the Beiya area, western Yunnan, China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.-W.; Cai, X.-P.; Zhong, J.-Y.; Song, B.-C.; Peters, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tertiary (3.78 Ma to 3.65 Ma) biotite-K-feldspar porphyritic bodies intrude Tertiary, poorly consolidated lacustrine sedimentary rocks in the Beiya mineral district in southwestern China. The intrusives are characterized by a microcrystalline and vitreous-cryptocrystalline groundmass, by replacement of some tabular K-feldspar phenocrysts with microcrystalline chlorite and calcite, and by Fe-rich rings surrounding biotite phenocrysts. Peculiar structures, such as contemporary contact faults and slickensides, ductile shear zones and flow folds, foliation and lineations, tension fractures, and banded and boudin peperites, are developed along the contact zones of the intrusives. These features are related to the forceful intrusion of the alkaline magmas into the wet Tertiary sediments. The partially consolidated magmas were deformed and flattened by continued forceful magma intrusion that produced boudinaged and banded peperites. These peperites characterized by containing oriented deformation fabrics are classified as tectonic peperites as a new type of peperite, and formation of these tectonic peperites was related to fracturing of magmas caused by forceful intrusion and shear deformation and to contemporary migration and injection of fluidized sediments along fractures that dismembered the porphyritic magma. Emplacement of the magma into the wet sediments in the Beiya area is interpreted to be related to a large pressure difference rather than to the buoyancy force. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Kepler Planet Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler has vastly increased our knowledge of planets and planetary systems located close to stars. The new data shows surprising results for planetary abundances, planetary spacings and the distribution of planets on a mass-radius diagram. The implications of these results for theories of planet formation will be discussed.

  12. Formation of planetesimals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, Stuart J.

    1991-01-01

    Formation of planetesimals is discussed. The following subject areas are covered: (1) nebular structure; (2) aerodynamics of the solid bodies in the nebula; (3) problems with gravitational instability; (4) particle growth by coagulation; properties of fractal aggregates; and (5) coagulation and settling of fractal aggregates.

  13. The Formation of Trihalomethanes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trussell, R. Rhodes; Umphres, Mark D.

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed are a number of factors important in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) including the nature of aquatic humus and the influences of preozonation, bromide, pH, and chlorine. A brief investigation is also conducted into the kinetics of the THM reaction. Several major research needs are represented. (CS)

  14. Technobabble: File Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    1999-01-01

    Considers the confusion of over 20 different kinds of graphics programs. Briefly distinguishes between some of the more popular graphics formats (Photoshop, TIFF, JPEG, GIF, PICT, and EPS), and describes the benefits and disadvantages of each in the context of journalism education. (SC)

  15. Bacterial formate hydrogenlyase complex

    PubMed Central

    McDowall, Jennifer S.; Murphy, Bonnie J.; Haumann, Michael; Palmer, Tracy; Armstrong, Fraser A.; Sargent, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Under anaerobic conditions, Escherichia coli can carry out a mixed-acid fermentation that ultimately produces molecular hydrogen. The enzyme directly responsible for hydrogen production is the membrane-bound formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which links formate oxidation to proton reduction and has evolutionary links to Complex I, the NADH:quinone oxidoreductase. Although the genetics, maturation, and some biochemistry of FHL are understood, the protein complex has never been isolated in an intact form to allow biochemical analysis. In this work, genetic tools are reported that allow the facile isolation of FHL in a single chromatographic step. The core complex is shown to comprise HycE (a [NiFe] hydrogenase component termed Hyd-3), FdhF (the molybdenum-dependent formate dehydrogenase-H), and three iron-sulfur proteins: HycB, HycF, and HycG. A proportion of this core complex remains associated with HycC and HycD, which are polytopic integral membrane proteins believed to anchor the core complex to the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. As isolated, the FHL complex retains formate hydrogenlyase activity in vitro. Protein film electrochemistry experiments on Hyd-3 demonstrate that it has a unique ability among [NiFe] hydrogenases to catalyze production of H2 even at high partial pressures of H2. Understanding and harnessing the activity of the FHL complex is critical to advancing future biohydrogen research efforts. PMID:25157147

  16. FORMATION OF PHOTOCHEMICAL AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective was to develop a better understanding of smog aerosol formation with particular reference to haze in the Southern California area. This study combined laboratory work with ambient air studies. Counting of particles by light scattering was the principle physical tech...

  17. Decentralized Formation Selection Mechanisms

    E-print Network

    Egerstedt, Magnus

    bottlenose dolphins belong) are complex and intelligent ani- mals. The Encephalization Quotient (E.Q.), which is the brain to body mass ratio, is a factor often used to judge intelligence, and dolphins rate 2nd in E Bottlenose Dolphins M.A. Haque and M. Egerstedt 1 Introduction Formation control is an important sub

  18. Hair follicle Formation of

    E-print Network

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    Hair follicle Formation of new follicles Bud Healed skin Hair bulge Open wound Epidermis a b Dermis 1950s and help to explain the controversy. What is the origin of the cells that make up these new hair follicles? Are they derived from existing hair follicles located at the wound edge

  19. Queen's Garden Formations

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Views along the Queen's Garden Trail in Bryce Canyon National Park. Bryce Canyon is a unique sandstone formation in southern Utah. It is home to a large number of hoodoos, which are oddly shaped pillars of rock that formed due to different erosion rates for the dolomite that caps them and the sands...

  20. Formation in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Fred; Jacobsen, Douglas; Jacobsen, Rhonda Hustedt; Thatamanil, John J.; Porterfield, Amanda; Moore, Mary Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    What is the relationship between the academic knowledge of the guild and the formation of students in the classroom? This Forum gathers four essays originally presented at a Special Topics Session at the 2009 conference of the American Academy of Religion (Atlanta, Georgia), with a brief introductory essay by Fred Glennon explaining the genesis of…

  1. Field-based description of rhyolite lava flows of the Calico Hills Formation, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Bova, Shiera C.

    2015-01-01

    In the area south of the Rainier Mesa caldera, surface and subsurface geologic data are combined to interpret the overall thickness of the Calico Hills Formation and the proportion of lava flow lithology across the study area. The formation is at least 500 meters (m) thick and contains the greatest proportion of rhyolite lava flow to the northeast of Yucca Mountain in the lower part of Fortymile Canyon. The formation thins to the south and southwest where it is between 50 and 200 m thick beneath Yucca Mountain and contains no rhyolite lavas. Geologic mapping and field-based correlation of individual lava flows allow for the interpretation of the thickness and extent of specific flows and the location of their source areas. The most extensive flows have widths from 2 to 3 kilometers (km) and lengths of at least 5–6 km. Lava flow thickness varies from 150 to 250 m above interpreted source vents to between 30 and 80 m in more distal locations. Rhyolite lavas have length-to-height ratios of 10:1 or greater and, in one instance, a length-to-width ratio of 2:1 or greater, implying a tongue-shaped geometry instead of circular domes or tabular bodies. Although geologic mapping did not identify any physical feature that could be positively identified as a vent, lava flow thickness and the size of clasts in subjacent pyroclastic deposits suggest that primary vent areas for at least some of the flows in the study area are on the east side of Fortymile Canyon, to the northeast of Yucca Mountain.

  2. Mission Summary ASCII 4 January: 15 March 2012, Battle Pass Site, Wyoming Contact: Katja Friedrich,

    E-print Network

    20120119 1500 UTC END 20120119 2040 UTC Author: Evan Kalina Instrument status: Disdrometer CU01 Down for repairs Disdrometer CU02 Normal operation MRR Normal operation Radiometer Normal operation Changes. Radiometer and disdrometer became heavily rimed overnight and were melted off with a hair dryer before

  3. Mission Summary ASCII 4 January: 15 March 2012, Battle Pass Site, Wyoming Contact: Katja Friedrich,

    E-print Network

    : 10-15 LT, 17-22 UTC (upslope event) Author: Katja Friedrich Instrument status: Disdrometer CU01 Does not collect DSD (took offline) Disdrometer CU02 working MRR working Radiometer Working (installed neural

  4. Mission Summary ASCII 4 January: 15 March 2012, Battle Pass Site, Wyoming Contact: Katja Friedrich,

    E-print Network

    20120118 2145 UTC END 20120119 0400 UTC Author: Evan Kalina Instrument status: Disdrometer CU01 Down for repairs Disdrometer CU02 Normal operation MRR Normal operation Radiometer Normal operation Changes

  5. Mission Summary ASCII 4 January: 15 March 2012, Battle Pass Site, Wyoming Contact: Katja Friedrich,

    E-print Network

    -01-16 1230 UTC END 2012-01-16 2245 UTC Author: Evan Kalina Instrument status: Disdrometer CU01 Down for repairs Disdrometer CU02 Normal operation MRR Started late at 1750 UTC, then normal operation Radiometer

  6. Mission Summary ASCII 4 January: 15 March 2012, Battle Pass Site, Wyoming Contact: Katja Friedrich,

    E-print Network

    20120120 1230 UTC END 20120120 1900 UTC Author: Evan Kalina Instrument status: Disdrometer CU01 Down for repairs Disdrometer CU02 Normal operation MRR Normal operation Radiometer Normal operation Changes

  7. NATIONAL SURFACE WATER SURVEY: EASTERN LAKE SURVEY, PHASE 1 (ELS-1), 1984 (ASCII TAPE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eastern Lake Survey-Phase I (ELS-I), conducted in the fall of 1984, was the first part of a long-term effort by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency known as the National Surface Water Survey. It was designed to synoptically quantify the surface water quality of the Unite...

  8. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust or volcanic ash, and are thus more susceptible to windblown erosion. The Martian winds have actually been strong and relentless enough over time to strip the land in the bottom of this image of the material that once covered it, leaving it hard and bare to the eye.

  9. Cosmological structure formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, David N.

    1991-01-01

    A summary of the current forefront problem of physical cosmology, the formation of structures (galaxies, clusters, great walls, etc.) in the universe is presented. Solutions require two key ingredients: (1) matter; and (2) seeds. Regarding the matter, it now seems clear that both baryonic and non-baryonic matter are required. Whether the non-baryonic matter is hot or cold depends on the choice of seeds. Regarding the seeds, both density fluctuations and topological defects are discussed. The combination of isotropy of the microwave background and the recent observations indicating more power on large scales have severly constrained, if not eliminated, Gaussian fluctuations with equal power on all scales, regardless of the eventual resolution of both the matter and seed questions. It is important to note that all current structure formation ideas require new physics beyond SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1).

  10. Moment formation in solids

    SciTech Connect

    Buyers, W.J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of moment formation in metallic systems lies at the interface of localized and itinerant magnetism. The phenomena observed correspond to destruction rather than to formation of spin-correlations. They give rise to the progression from localized ground states through Kondo and mixed-valence behavior to itinerant magnetic or non-magnetic systems. Somewhere in the progression superconductivity can occur in the presence of f-moments. This conference presents information on the following topics: neuron inelastic scattering as a probe of moments in metallic systems; cyclotron resonance and relaxation of hot charge carriers; orbital effects in actinide systems; theory of elementary excitations in intermediate valence materials: phenomena involving magnetic moment suppresion; and superconducting ground state of a strongly interacting electron system: UBe/sub 13/.

  11. Formation of bacterial nanocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainshtein, Mikhail; Kudryashova, Ekaterina; Suzina, Natalia; Ariskina, Elena; Voronkov, Vadim

    1998-07-01

    Existence of nanobacteria received increasing attention both in environmental microbiology/geomicro-biology and in medical microbiology. In order to study a production of nanoforms by typical bacterial cells. Effects of different physical factors were investigated. Treatment of bacterial cultures with microwave radiation, or culturing in field of electric current resulted in formation a few types of nanocells. The number and type of nanoforms were determined with type and dose of the treatment. The produced nanoforms were: i) globules, ii) clusters of the globules--probably produced by liaison, iii) nanocells coated with membrane. The viability of the globules is an object opened for doubts. The nanocells discovered multiplication and growth on solidified nutrient media. The authors suggest that formation of nanocells is a common response of bacteria to stress-actions produced by different agents.

  12. Prominence Formation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsch, B. T.; DeVore, C. R.; Antiochos, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    Martens and Zwaan (ApJ v. 558 872) have proposed a prominence/ filament formation model in which differential rotation drives reconnection between two initially unconnected active regions to form helical field lines that support mass and are held down by overlying field. Using an MHD solver with adaptive refinement we simulated this process by imposing a shear flow meant to mimic differential rotation on two bipolar flux distributions meant to mimic distinct active regions. In some runs the flux systems are initially potential while in others they have been twisted by footpoint rotation to inject helicity prior to imposing the shear flow. The resulting structures are studied to understand the role of helicity in the formation of prominence-like structures.

  13. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petruzzo, Charles; Guzman, Jose

    2004-01-01

    This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include (1) targeting to a fixed tetrahedron location and orientation, and (2) rotating and translating the tetrahedron. The number of impulsive maneuvers can also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the NASA Goddard Magnetospheric Multi-Scale (MMS) mission to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  14. Emptiness Formation Probability

    E-print Network

    Nicholas Crawford; Stephen Ng; Shannon Starr

    2014-12-30

    We present rigorous upper and lower bounds on the emptiness formation probability for the ground state of a spin-$1/2$ Heisenberg XXZ quantum spin system. For a $d$-dimensional system we find a rate of decay of the order $\\exp(-c L^{d+1})$ where $L$ is the sidelength of the box in which we ask for the emptiness formation event to occur. In the $d=1$ case this confirms previous predictions made in the integrable systems community, though our bounds do not achieve the precision predicted by Bethe ansatz calculations. On the other hand, our bounds in the case $d \\geq 2$ are new. The main tools we use are reflection positivity and a rigorous path integral expansion which is a variation on those previously introduced by Toth, Aizenman-Nachtergaele and Ueltschi.

  15. Format( )MEDIC( )Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, K.

    1994-09-01

    This document is a description of a computer program called Format( )MEDIC( )Input. The purpose of this program is to allow the user to quickly reformat wind velocity data in the Model Evaluation Database (MEDb) into a reasonable 'first cut' set of MEDIC input files (MEDIC.nml, StnLoc.Met, and Observ.Met). The user is cautioned that these resulting input files must be reviewed for correctness and completeness. This program will not format MEDb data into a Problem Station Library or Problem Metdata File. A description of how the program reformats the data is provided, along with a description of the required and optional user input and a description of the resulting output files. A description of the MEDb is not provided here but can be found in the RAS Division Model Evaluation Database Description document.

  16. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    DOEpatents

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  17. Mesospheric cloud formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1980-01-01

    Formation of mesospheric clouds as a result of deposition of large amounts of H2O by the heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) of the solar power satellite system is discussed. The conditions which must be met in order to form and maintain clouds near the mesopause are described. The frequency and magnitude of H2O injections from the HLLV rocket exhaust are considered.

  18. Ribbed moraine formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hättestrand, Clas; Kleman, Johan

    Ribbed (Rogen) moraines are conspicuous landforms found in interior parts of formerly glaciated areas. Two major theories for ribbed moraine formation have been suggested in recent years: (i) the shear and stack theory, which explains ribbed moraine formation by shearing and stacking of till slabs or englacially entrained material during compressive flow, followed by basal melt-out of transverse moraine ridges, and (ii) the fracturing theory, according to which ribbed moraines form by fracturing of frozen pre-existing till sheets, at the transition from cold- to warm-based conditions under deglaciating ice sheets. In this paper, we present new data on the distribution of ribbed moraines and their close association with areas of frozen-bed conditions under ice sheets. In addition, we show examples of ribbed moraine ridges that fit together like a jig-saw puzzle. These observations indicate that fracturing and extension of a pre-existing till sheet may be a predominant process in ribbed moraine formation. In summary, we conclude that all described characteristics of ribbed moraines are compatible with the fracturing theory, while the shear and stack theory is hampered by an inability to explain many conspicuous features in the distribution pattern and detailed morphology of ribbed moraines. One implication of the fracturing theory is that the distribution of ribbed moraines can be used to reconstruct the extent of areas that underwent a change from frozen-bed to thawed-bed conditions under former ice sheets.

  19. Terrestrial planet formation

    PubMed Central

    Righter, K.; O’Brien, D. P.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (?106 y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few × 106 y), and finally embryos to planets (107–108 y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  20. Tetrahedron Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Jose J.

    2003-01-01

    Spacecraft flying in tetrahedron formations are excellent instrument platforms for electromagnetic and plasma studies. A minimum of four spacecraft - to establish a volume - is required to study some of the key regions of a planetary magnetic field. The usefulness of the measurements recorded is strongly affected by the tetrahedron orbital evolution. This paper considers the preliminary development of a general optimization procedure for tetrahedron formation control. The maneuvers are assumed to be impulsive and a multi-stage optimization method is employed. The stages include targeting to a fixed tetrahedron orientation, rotating and translating the tetrahedron and/or varying the initial and final times. The number of impulsive maneuvers citn also be varied. As the impulse locations and times change, new arcs are computed using a differential corrections scheme that varies the impulse magnitudes and directions. The result is a continuous trajectory with velocity discontinuities. The velocity discontinuities are then used to formulate the cost function. Direct optimization techniques are employed. The procedure is applied to the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) to compute preliminary formation control fuel requirements.

  1. Terrestrial planet formation.

    PubMed

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids. PMID:21709256

  2. Formation of Lunar Swirls

    E-print Network

    Bamford, R A; Cruz, F; Kellett, B J; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O; Trines, R M G M; Halekas, J S; Kramer, G; Harnett, E; Cairns, R A; Bingham, R

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we show a plausible mechanism that could lead to the formation of the Dark Lanes in Lunar Swirls, and the electromagnetic shielding of the lunar surface that results in the preservation of the white colour of the lunar regolith. We present the results of a fully self-consistent 2 and 3 dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of mini-magnetospheres that form above the lunar surface and show that they are consistent with the formation of `lunar swirls' such as the archetypal formation Reiner Gamma. The simulations show how the microphysics of the deflection/shielding of plasma operates from a kinetic-scale cavity, and show that this interaction leads to a footprint with sharp features that could be the mechanism behind the generation of `dark lanes'. The physics of mini-magnetospheres is described and shown to be controlled by space-charge fields arising due to the magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions. A comparison between model and observation is shown for a number of key plasma parameters...

  3. 76 FR 72144 - Standardized and Enhanced Disclosure Requirements for Television Broadcast Licensee Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ...searchable format--such as Microsoft Word ``.doc'' format or non-copy...formats'' such as spreadsheets in Microsoft ``.xml'' format for non-text...available electronically in ASCII, Microsoft Word, and/or Adobe Acrobat....

  4. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  5. Method for measuring pollutant formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annen, Kurt (Inventor); Stickler, David B. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Diagnostic methods for determining an instantaneous rate of pollutant formation in a combustion system are based on measurement of chemiluminescence intensity generated simultaneously with the formation of the pollutant. The chemiluminescent signal is generated by an analog reaction which occurs in parallel with a key step in the formation of a specific pollutant of interest. The connection between the analog reaction and the pollution reaction is such that the chemiluminescent signal indicates the local, instantaneous formation rate of the pollutant of interest.

  6. Formative Assessment: Simply, No Additives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen; Neuman, Susan B.

    2012-01-01

    Among the types of assessment the closest to daily reading instruction is formative assessment. In contrast to summative assessment, which occurs after instruction, formative assessment involves forming judgments frequently in the flow of instruction. Key features of formative assessment include identifying gaps between where students are and…

  7. Petroleum Engineering 321 Formation Evaluation

    E-print Network

    to the solution of formation evaluation problems. General Education None Course Learning Outcomes and Relationship18 Petroleum Engineering 321 Formation Evaluation Credit 4: (3-3) Required for Juniors Catalog Description: Introduction to well-log interpretation for formation evaluation of hydrocarbon

  8. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-print Network

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  9. Star Cluster Formation and Star Formation: The Role of Environment and Star Formation Efficiencies

    E-print Network

    Uta Fritze

    2008-01-15

    Analyzing global starburst properties in various kinds of starburst and post-starburst galaxies and relating them to the properties of the star cluster populations they form, I explore the conditions for the formation of massive, compact, long-lived star clusters. The aim is to find out whether the relative amount of star formation that goes into star cluster formation as opposed to field star formation, and into the formation of massive long-lived clusters in particular, is universal or scales with star formation rate, burst strength, star formation efficiency, galaxy or gas mass, and whether or not there are special conditions or some threshold for the formation of star clusters that merit to be called globular clusters a few gigayears later.

  10. Planet Formation - Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2005-01-01

    Modern theories of star and planet formation are based upon observations of planets and smaller bodies within our own Solar System, exoplanets &round normal stars and of young stars and their environments. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. These models predict that rocky planets should form in orbit about most single stars. It is uncertain whether or not gas giant planet formation is common, because most protoplanetary disks may dissipate before solid planetary cores can grow large enough to gravitationally trap substantial quantities of gas. A potential hazard to planetary systems is radial decay of planetary orbits resulting from interactions with material within the disk. Planets more massive than Earth have the potential to decay the fastest, and may be able to sweep up smaller planets in their path.

  11. Fullerene formation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Mintmire, J.W.

    1996-04-05

    Why does the highly symmetric carbon cluster C{sub 60} form in such profusion under the right conditions? This question was first asked in 1985, when Kroto suggested that the predominance of the C{sub 60} carbon clusters observed in the molecular beam experiments could be explained by the truncated icosahedral (or soccer ball) form. The name given to this cluster, buckminsterfullerene, led to the use of the term fullerenes for the family of hollow-cage carbon clusters made up of even numbers of triply coordinated carbons arranged with 12 pentagonal rings and an almost arbitrary number of hexagonal rings. More than a decade later, we still lack a completely satisfying understanding of the fundamental chemistry that takes place during fullerene formation. Most current models for fullerene formation require a facile mechanism for ring rearrangement in the fullerene structure, but the simplest proposed mechanisms are believed to have unrealistically high activation barriers. In recent research calculations have suggested that atomic carbon in the reaction mixture could act as a catalyst and allow substantially lower activation barriers for fullerene annealing. This article discusses the background for this research and other adjunct research. 14 refs.

  12. Egg Formation in Lepidoptera

    PubMed Central

    Telfer, William H.

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive biology in the Twentieth Century produced comprehensive descriptions of the mechanisms of egg formation in most of the major orders of insects. While many general principles of ovarian development and physiology emerged, every order turned out to have a set of its own special motifs. Discovery of the lepidopteran motifs is summarized in this essay. The emphasis is on developmental mechanisms, beginning with the early growth and differentiation of female germ cells and ending, after many turns in morphogenesis, physiology and biosynthesis, with eggs that are filled with yolk and encased in chorions. Examples of uniquely lepidopteran traits include the cellular composition of ovarian follicles, the number of tubular ovarioles in which they mature, the functions of cell-to-cell junctional complexes in their maturation, their use of glycosaminoglycans to maintain intercellular patency during vitellogenesis, the role of proton and calcium pumps in their ion physiology, a separate postvitellogenic period of water and inorganic ion uptake, and the fine structure and protein composition of their chorions. Discovery of this combination of idiosyncracies was based on advances in the general concepts and techniques of cell and molecular biology and on insights borrowed from studies on other insects. The lepidopteran ovary in turn has contributed much to the understanding of egg formation in insects generally. PMID:20050770

  13. The Planet Formation Imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, S.; Buscher, D. F.; Monnier, J. D.; PFI Science, the; Technical Working Group

    2014-04-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work is being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI and discuss how PFI could significantly advance our understanding of the architecture and potential habitability of planetary systems. We present radiation-hydrodynamics simulations from which we derive preliminary specifications that guide the design of the facility. Finally, we give an overview about the interferometric and non-interferometric technologies that we are investigating in order to meet the specifications.

  14. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1994-01-01

    Two KC-135 flight campaigns have been conducted to date which are specifically dedicated to study bubble formation in microgravity. The first flight was conducted during March 14-18, 1994, and the other during June 20-24, 1994. The results from the June 1994 flight have not been analyzed yet, while the results from the March flight have been partially analyzed. In the first flight three different experiments were performed, one with the specific aim at determining whether or not cavitation can take place during any of the fluid handling procedures adopted in the shuttle bioprocessing experiments. The other experiments were concerned with duplicating some of the procedures that resulted in bubble formation, namely the NCS filling procedure and the needle scratch of a solid surface. The results from this set of experiments suggest that cavitation did not take place during any of the fluid handling procedures. The results clearly indicate that almost all were generated as a result of the breakup of the gas/liquid interface. This was convincingly demonstrated in the scratch tests as well as in the liquid fill tests.

  15. Group Formation in Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demange, Gabrielle; Wooders, Myrna

    2005-01-01

    Broad and diverse ranges of activities are conducted within and by organized groups of individuals, including political, economic and social activities. These activities have recently become a subject of intense interest in economics and game theory. Some of the topics investigated in this collection are models of networks of power and privilege, trade networks, co-authorship networks, buyer-seller networks with differentiated products, and networks of medical innovation and the adaptation of new information. Other topics are social norms on punctuality, clubs and the provision of club goods and public goods, research and development and collusive alliances among corporations, and international alliances and trading agreements. While relatively recent, the literature on game theoretic studies of group formation in economics is already vast. This volume provides an introduction to this important literature on game-theoretic treatments of situations with networks, clubs, and coalitions, including some applications.

  16. Galaxy evolution and formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, Lennox L.; Lilly, Simon J.

    1990-01-01

    Results from the Hawaii imaging and spectroscopy deep survey are discussed. Cumulative galaxy counts now exceed 10 exp 6/deg. To B = 24 the bulk of these galaxies lie at low redshift. Flat spectrum sources constitute a fraction of about 30-40 percent of the sources at B = 24. There are not enough of these to explain the high number counts, but they are an exceedingly interesting population in their own right. It is argued that they are unlikely to lie at z of about 1, but could be either massive starbursters at z of about 2 - 3 or dwarf starbursting galaxies at very low redshift (less than approximately 0.1). In either case they constitute a major episode in galaxy formation.

  17. Frost formation with salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guadarrama-Cetina, J.; Mongruel, A.; González-Viñas, W.; Beysens, D.

    2015-06-01

    The formation of frost in presence of salt (NaCl) crystal is experimentally investigated on a hydrophobic surface. It presents several remarkable features due to the interplay of salty-water saturation pressure evolution, initially lower than the saturation pressure of ice and water, and the percolating propagation of ice dendrites from defects throughout the supercooled water droplet pattern. In particular, it is remarkable that nucleation of supercooled water and/or ice is prevented around the salty drop in a region of inhibited condensation where the substrate remains dry. As condensation proceeds, salt concentration decreases to eventually become lower than ice's, allowing ice dendrites to hit the salty drop. Salty water then melts ice but eventually freezes as an effect of dilution.

  18. DUST FORMATION IN MACRONOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Hajime; Ioka, Kunihito; Nozawa, Takaya E-mail: kunihito.ioka@kek.jp

    2014-07-01

    We examine dust formation in macronovae (as known as kilonovae), which are the bright ejecta of neutron star binary mergers and one of the leading sites of r-process nucleosynthesis. In light of information about the first macronova candidate associated with GRB 130603B, we find that dust grains of r-process elements have difficulty forming because of the low number density of the r-process atoms, while carbon or elements lighter than iron can condense into dust if they are abundant. Dust grains absorb emission from ejecta with an opacity even greater than that of the r-process elements, and re-emit photons at infrared wavelengths. Such dust emission can potentially account for macronovae without r-process nucleosynthesis as an alternative model. This dust scenario predicts a spectrum with fewer features than the r-process model and day-scale optical-to-ultraviolet emission.

  19. Galaxy formation by dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Boqi; Field, Goerge B.

    1989-01-01

    It has been known since the early 1940's that radiation can cause an instability in the interstellar medium. Absorbing dust particles in an isotropic radiation field shadow each other by a solid angle which is inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two particles, leading to an inverse-square attractive force - mock gravity. The effect is largest in an optically thin medium. Recently Hogan and White (HW, hereafter) proposed that if the pre-galactic universe contained suitable sources of radiation and dust, instability in the dust distribution caused by mock gravity may have led to the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters. In their picture of a well-coupled dust-gas medium, HW show that mock gravity begins to dominate gravitational instability when the perturbation becomes optically thin, provided that the radiation field at the time is strong enough. The recent rocket observation of the microwave background at submillimeter wavelengths by Matsumoto et al. might be from pre-galactic stars, the consequence of the absorption of ultraviolet radiation by dust, and infrared reemission which is subsequently redshifted. HW's analysis omits radiative drag, incomplete collisional coupling of gas and dust, finite dust albedo, and finite matter pressure. These effects could be important. In a preliminary calculation including them, the authors have confirmed that mock gravitational instability is effective if there is a strong ultraviolet radiation at the time, but any galaxies that form would be substantially enriched in heavy elements because the contraction of the dust is more rapid than that of the gas. Moreover, since the dust moves with supersonic velocity through the gas soon after the perturbation becomes optically thin, the sputtering of dust particles by gas is significant, so the dust could disappear before the instability develops significantly. They conclude that the mock gravity by dust is not important in galaxy formations.

  20. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 16 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 11o N, 159o W (201o E) and shows examples of the remarkable variations that can be seen in the erosion of the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region, like many others throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, the surface has been eroded by the wind into a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These ridges generally point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to erode the landscape of Mars. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Within this single image it is possible to see differing amounts of erosion and stripping of layers in the Medusae Fossae Formation. Near the bottom (southern) edge of the image a rock layer with a relatively smooth upper surface covers much of the image. Moving upwards (north) in the image this layer becomes more and more eroded. At first there are isolated regions where the smooth unit has been eroded to produce sets of parallel ridges and knobs. Further north these linear knobs increase in number, and only small, isolated patches of the smooth upper surface remain. Finally, at the top of the image, even the ridges have been removed, exposing the remarkably smooth top of hard, resistant layer below. This sequence of layers with differing hardness and resistance to erosion is common on Earth and on Mars, and suggests significant variations in the physical properties, composition, particle size, and/or cementation of these martian layers. As is common throughout the Medusae Fossae Formation, very few impact craters are visible, indicating that the surface exposed is relatively young, and that the process of erosion may be active today. The Story 'Yardang!' Now, that may seem like a peculiar-sounding curse word, but nobody would get in trouble for using it. A yardang is one of the very cool-sounding words geologists use to describe long, irregular features like the ones seen in this image. Yardangs are grooved, furrowed ridges that form as the wind erodes away weakly cemented material in the region. Rippling across the surface, yardangs tell the story of how the powerful Martian wind carved the surface into such a gorgeous pattern over time. (Don't miss clicking on the above image to see a detailed view, in which the beauty and almost dance-like symmetry of the waving terrain pops out in highly compelling, three-dimensional texture.) It may be easy to see which way the wind blows in this area, since these streamlined features point in the direction of prevailing winds. But how can geologists understand the various kinds of terrain seen here? First, they have to study the different patterns of erosion, looking closely at how the wind has stripped off certain layers and not others. Want to be a geologist yourself? Start at the bottom of the image and scroll upward, and see how the relatively smooth, higher terrain toward the south gradually becomes more and more eroded. Moving up the image, at first you?ll see only a few, isolated regions of parallel ridges and knolls. Go a little farther north with your eyes (toward the center of the image), and you?ll see how these linear knobs really get going! Once you get to the top of the image, only patches of these grooved ridges remain, leaving an incredibly smooth, wind-scrubbed surface behind. You know this layer has to be made of pretty hard material, because it seems impervious to further erosion. Geologists studying Mars can compare these Martian yardangs to examples found on Earth, such as those in the Lut desert of Iran. Humans have even been known to use the wind as their inspiration, sculpting the shape of yardangs themselves. The famous sphynx at Giza in Egypt is thought to be a yardang that's been whittled

  1. 78 FR 7939 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Microwave Ovens (Active Mode)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  2. 76 FR 43941 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  3. 77 FR 8525 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Standby Mode and Off Mode for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-14

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  4. 76 FR 20089 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ...their statement in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  5. 78 FR 41609 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Refrigerators...

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    2013-07-10

    ...Excel, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  6. 78 FR 64295 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Commercial Refrigeration Equipment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  7. 77 FR 21038 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for Light-Emitting Diode Lamps

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-09

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  8. 78 FR 63410 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

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  9. 76 FR 56661 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps, General...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  10. 76 FR 77914 - Energy Conservation Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-15

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  11. 77 FR 2829 - Energy Conservation Program: Test Procedure for Television Sets

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

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  12. 76 FR 18428 - Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ...their statement in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 and 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  13. 78 FR 7681 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Furnaces and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  14. 76 FR 76328 - Energy Conservation Program: Enforcement of Regional Standards for Residential Furnaces and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format, to the appropriate...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  15. Pebbly mudstones in the Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation, western California: a study in the transitional stages from submarine slumps to cohesive debris flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Gamundí, Oscar R.

    1993-04-01

    The pebbly mudstones in the Late Cretaceous Pigeon Point Formation originated by slumping and related debris-flow processes in a submarine canyon/slope depositional system. The sedimentary characteristics of the pebbly mudstones (PM) enable the distinction of two main varieties: (a) heterogeneous or "patchy" pebbly mudstones (PPM) exhibiting irregular bed geometries and diffuse to irregular bed contacts, with maximum clast sizes in intraformational boulder-sized population, including abundant rip-up mudstone and sandstone clasts with common soft sediment deformations; (b) homogeneous pebbly mudstones (HPM) with tabular bed geometries, non-erosive and almost flat bed contacts, maximum clast sizes in extraformational pebble-sized fraction and scarce to absent soft-sediment deformations. The two varieties of pebbly mudstone represent the mechanical transition from slumps to cohesive debris flows. The presence of abundant intraformational clasts and disrupted, yet preserved slump-fold features in the PPM suggest that this facies represents a stage closer to the slump end-member. As the shear-strain progressed and a fully remolded cohesive debris flow developed, an almost complete disaggregation of the poorly consolidated sand and mud clasts and the incorporation into the remolded "matrix" phase took place.

  16. Archean deep-water depositional system: interbedded and banded iron formation and clastic turbidites in the Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentner, Danielle; Lowe, Donald

    2013-04-01

    The 3.23 billion year old sediments in the Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa include some of the world's oldest known deep-water deposits. Unique to this locality are turbidites interbedded with banded iron formation (BIF) and banded ferruginous chert (BFC). This unusual association may provide clues for reconstructing Archean deep-water depositional settings. For our study we examined freshly drilled core in addition to measuring ~500 m of outcrop exposures along road cuts. The stacking pattern follows an overall BIF to BFC to amalgamated turbidite succession, although isolated turbidites do occur throughout the sequence. The turbidites are predominately massive, and capped with thin, normally graded tops that include mud rip-ups, chert plates, and ripples. The lack of internal stratification and the amalgamated character suggests emplacement by surging high-density turbidity currents. Large scours and channels are absent and bedding is tabular: the flows were collapsing with little turbulence reaching the bed. In contrast, field evidence indicates the BIF and BFC most likely precipitated directly out of the water column. Preliminary interpretations indicate the deposits may be related to a pro-deltaic setting. (1) Deltaic systems can generate long-lived, high volume turbidity currents. (2) The contacts between the BIF, BFC, and turbidite successions are gradual and inter-fingered, possibly representing lateral facies relationships similar to modern pro-delta environments. (3) Putative fan delta facies, including amalgamated sandstone and conglomerate, exist stratigraphically updip of the basinal sediments.

  17. Formative Assessment Probes: Is It a Rock? Continuous Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2013-01-01

    A lesson plan is provided for a formative assessment probe entitled "Is It a Rock?" This probe is designed for teaching elementary school students about rocks through the use of a formative assessment classroom technique (FACT) known as the group Frayer Model. FACT activates students' thinking about a concept and can be used to…

  18. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    J. S. Rohrer; Lacey Stewart; M. D. Wilke; N. S. King; S. A Baker; Wilfred Lewis

    1999-08-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics.

  19. The formation of dew

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beysens, D.

    Dew is the condensation into liquid droplets of water vapor on a substrate. The presence of a substrate is the origin of the peculiarities and richness of the phenomenon. We review the aspects related to heterogeneous nucleation and subsequent growth of water droplets. A key point is the drop interaction through drop fusion or coalescence, which leads to scaling in the growth and gives universality to the process. The effects of substrate heterogeneity and gravity effects are also considered. Coalescence events lead to temporal and spatio-temporal fluctuations in the substrate coverage, drop configuration, etc., which give rise to a very peculiar dynamics. When the substrate is a liquid or a liquid crystal, the drop pattern can exhibit special spatial orders, such as crystalline, hexatic phases and fractal contours. And condensation on a solid substrate near its melting point can make the drop jump. The applications of monitoring dew formation are manyfold. Examples can be found in nanoelectronics and optics (vapor deposition and thin films), medicine (sterilization process), agriculture (green houses). We here discuss in greater details the production of clean water by "atmospheric wells".

  20. Nuclear ``pasta'' formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, A. S.; Horowitz, C. J.; Hughto, J.; Berry, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The formation of complex nonuniform phases of nuclear matter, known as nuclear pasta, is studied with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations containing 51200 nucleons. A phenomenological nuclear interaction is used that reproduces the saturation binding energy and density of nuclear matter. Systems are prepared at an initial density of 0.10fm-3 and then the density is decreased by expanding the simulation volume at different rates to densities of 0.01fm-3 or less. An originally uniform system of nuclear matter is observed to form spherical bubbles (“swiss cheese”), hollow tubes, flat plates (“lasagna”), thin rods (“spaghetti”) and, finally, nearly spherical nuclei with decreasing density. We explicitly observe nucleation mechanisms, with decreasing density, for these different pasta phase transitions. Topological quantities known as Minkowski functionals are obtained to characterize the pasta shapes. Different pasta shapes are observed depending on the expansion rate. This indicates nonequilibrium effects. We use this to determine the best ways to obtain lower energy states of the pasta system from MD simulations and to place constraints on the equilibration time of the system.

  1. Acromioclavicular joint cyst formation.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Andrew D; Miller, Joshua D; Zeller, John L

    2010-03-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) cysts are an uncommon and unusual sequela associated with shoulder pathophysiology. The majority of literature on ACJ cysts consists of individual case reports with no definitive literature review currently available. In addition to a comprehensive literature review, four clinical cases are presented in this report. First described by Craig (1984), a total of 41 cases have been previously reported in the literature. Of these cases, five occurred with the rotator cuff musculature intact. The remaining 36 cases of ACJ cysts occurred in patients with a complete tear/avulsion of the rotator cuff. Previous attempts at compiling a complete record of all reported cases have combined several distinct conditions into a single category. This article presents two distinct etiologies for the pathogenesis of ACJ cyst formation. In the presence of an intact rotator cuff, a Type 1 cyst can form superficially and be limited to the ACJ. Following a massive or traumatic tear of the rotator cuff, mechanical instability of the humeral head can cause a deterioration of the inferior acromioclavicular capsule (cuff tear arthropathy) and an overproduction of synovial fluid. Overtime, a "geyser" of fluid can form between the glenohumeral and the ACJ, forming a Type 2 cyst. This differentiation and categorization is essential for appropriate classification and treatment. PMID:20069645

  2. Bead lightning formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ludwig, G.O.; Saba, M.M.F.

    2005-09-15

    Formation of beaded structures in triggered lightning discharges is considered in the framework of both magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and hydrodynamic instabilities. It is shown that the space periodicity of the structures can be explained in terms of the kink and sausage type instabilities in a cylindrical discharge with anomalous viscosity. In particular, the fast growth rate of the hydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which is driven by the backflow of air into the channel of the decaying return stroke, dominates the initial evolution of perturbations during the decay of the return current. This instability is responsible for a significant enhancement of the anomalous viscosity above the classical level. Eventually, the damping introduced at the current channel edge by the high level of anomalous viscous stresses defines the final length scale of bead lightning. Later, during the continuing current stage of the lightning flash, the MHD pinch instability persists, although with a much smaller growth rate that can be enhanced in a M-component event. The combined effect of these instabilities may explain various aspects of bead lightning.

  3. Formation of nuclear heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Guetg, Claudio; Santoro, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    Establishment and inheritance of heterochromatic states is critical in maintaining genome integrity and gene expression state. The elucidation of the mechanisms implicated in these processes is fundamental to understand the control of epigenetic regulation of the genome. Recently, the nucleolus emerged as an important component of the nuclear architecture. Although the nucleolus is the most active site of cellular transcription, it is also an attractive compartment for nuclear heterochromatic regions, such as pericentric repeats, inactive X chromosome and regions with low gene density significantly enriched in repressed genes. The coexistence of euchromatic and heterochromatic rRNA genes in each cell reflects these two opposite functions of the nucleolus. An epigenetic network that is controlled by NoRC complex establishes and maintains rDNA heterochromatin. It is here discussed how heterochromatic rRNA genes and the associated epigenetic regulatory activities might mediate formation and inheritance of nuclear heterochromatic regions. Finally, we propose that the analysis of the components of heterochromatic rRNA genes will be not only relevant to understand the general composition of heterochromatin but has the potential to provide important and novel insights of how nuclear heterochromatic structures are established and inherited. PMID:22735386

  4. Bubble formation in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antar, Basil N.

    1996-01-01

    An extensive experimental program was initiated for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms leading to bubble generation during fluid handling procedures in a microgravity environment. Several key fluid handling procedures typical for PCG experiments were identified for analysis in that program. Experiments were designed to specifically understand how such procedures can lead to bubble formation. The experiments were then conducted aboard the NASA KC-135 aircraft which is capable of simulating a low gravity environment by executing a parabolic flight attitude. However, such a flight attitude can only provide a low gravity environment of approximately 10-2go for a maximum period of 30 seconds. Thus all of the tests conducted for these experiments were designed to last no longer than 20 seconds. Several experiments were designed to simulate some of the more relevant fluid handling procedures during protein crystal growth experiments. These include submerged liquid jet cavitation, filling of a cubical vessel, submerged surface scratch, attached drop growth, liquid jet impingement, and geysering experiments. To date, four separate KC-135 flight campaigns were undertaken specifically for performing these experiments. However, different experiments were performed on different flights.

  5. Formation of "bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, K.; Kästner, M.; Miltner, A.

    2009-04-01

    During degradation of organic pollutants in soil, metabolites, microbial biomass, CO2and "bound" residues ("non-extractable" residues in soil organic matter) are formed. Enhanced transformation of these contaminants into "bound" residues has been proposed as an alternative remediation method for polluted soils. However, this kind of residues may pose a potential risk for the environment due to their chemical structure and possible remobilization under different conditions. Therefore particular attention is given actually to "bound" residues. Part of these non-extractable residues may be "biogenic," because microorganisms use the carbon from the pollutant to form their biomass components (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars), which subsequently may be incorporated into soil organic matter. Furthermore, the CO2 originating from mineralization of xenobiotics, can be re-assimilated by microorganisms and also incorporated into "biogenic residue". The hazard posed by "bound" residues may be overestimated because they are "biogenic" (contain microbial fatty acids and amino acids). The knowledge about the pathways of "biogenic residue" formation is necessary for a proper assessment of the fate of tested pollutants and their turnover in the soil environment. Moreover, these data are needed to establish the realistic degradation rates of the contaminants in soil. The main objectives of this study are: to quantify the extent of "biogenic residue" (fatty acids, amino acids, amino sugars) formation during the degradation of a model pollutant (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid = 2,4-D) and during CO2 assimilation by microorganisms and to evaluate which components are mainly incorporated into "bound" residues. To investigate the extent of "biogenic residue" formation in soil during the degradation of 2,4-D, experiments with either 14C-U-ring and 13C6-2,4-D or carboxyl-14C 2,4-D were performed. The incubation experiments were performed according to OECD test guideline 307, in the dark, at constant temp 20Ë? C (+/-2Ë? C) and with intermittent aeration. During incubation, the mineralization was quantified and soil samples were analyzed for the presence of both "biogenic residues" and remaining 2,4-D. Mineralization of 2,4-D in both experiments was very high. However, the 14CO2 evolution was higher from carboxyl-14C 2,4-D than from 14C-ring 2,4-D. After 7 days of incubation, 30% of initial amount of 14C in soil contaminated with 14C-ring 2,4-D was mineralized, whereas 40% of total radioactivity was evolved as CO2after 4 days from soil incubated with 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D. The amount of extractable 2,4-D residues was very low in both experiments (14C-ring 2,4-D: 2% and 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D: 1%). The soil incubated with 14C-ring 2,4-D contained 60% of "non-extractable" residues of 2,4-D after 7 days, while the amount of these residues in soil contaminated with 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D reached 50% of the initial radioactivity in the tested system 4 days after application. More "biogenic residues" were formed in soil spiked with 14C-U-ring 2,4-D (10%) than in soil with carboxyl 14C 2,4-D (7%). Both 2,4-D and CO2-derived C were incorporated mainly into microbial amino acids (9.5% at day 7 and 7.0% at day 4, respectively). After 7 days of incubation, 0.5% of initial applied radioactivity in system was found in microbial lipids in the soil contaminated with 14C-ring 2,4-D. Only 0.1% of the total radioactivity was incorporated into lipids in soil treated with 14C-carboxyl 2,4-D on day 4 after application. Thin Layer Chromatography identified the microbial lipids containing the radioactivity as phosphatidylethanolamine, a phospholipid typical for microorganisms. The amount of microbial lipids (which corresponds to phospholipids) in both cases decreased with time; this can be explained by the death of the microbial biomass. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the formation of &qu

  6. Layer Formation in Semiconvection

    E-print Network

    Joseph A. Biello

    2001-02-20

    Layer formation in a thermally destabilized fluid with stable density gradient has been observed in laboratory experiments and has been proposed as a mechanism for mixing molecular weight in late stages of stellar evolution in regions which are unstable to semiconvection. It is not yet known whether such layers can exist in a very low viscosity fluid: this work undertakes to address that question. Layering is simulated numerically both at high Prandtl number (relevant to the laboratory) in order to describe the onset of layering intability, and the astrophysically important case of low Prandtl number. It is argued that the critical stability parameter for interfaces between layers, the Richardson number, increases with decreasing Prandtl number. Throughout the simulations the fluid has a tendency to form large scale flows in the first convecting layer, but only at low Prandtl number do such structures have dramatic consequences for layering. These flows are shown to drive large interfacial waves whose breaking contributes to significant mixing across the interface. An effective diffusion coefficient is determined from the simulation and is shown to be much greater than the predictions of both an enhanced diffusion model and one which specifically incorporates wave breaking. The results further suggest that molecular weight gradient interfaces are ineffective barriers to mixing even when specified as initial conditions, such as would arise when a compositional gradient is redistributed by another mechanism than buoyancy, such as rotation or internal waves.

  7. Sedimentology and paleoenvironments of the Las Chacritas carbonate paleolake, Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic), Patagonia, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabaleri, Nora G.; Benavente, Cecilia A.

    2013-02-01

    The Las Chacritas Member is the lower part of the Cañadón Asfalto Formation (Jurassic). The unit is a completely continental limestone succession with volcanic contributions that were deposited during the development of the Cañadón Asfalto Rift Basin (Chubut province, Patagonia, Argentina). A detailed sedimentological analysis was performed in the Fossati depocenter to determine the paleoenvironments that developed in the context of this rift. The Las Chacritas Member represents a carbonate paleolake system with ramp-shaped margins associated with wetlands that were eventually affected by subaerial exposure and pedogenesis. This process is represented by three main subenvironments: a) a lacustrine setting sensu stricto (lacustrine limestone facies association), represented by Mudstones/Wackestones containing porifera spicules (F1), Intraclastic packstones (F6) and Tabular stromatolites (F10) in which deposition and diagenesis were entirely subaqueous; b) a palustrine setting (palustrine limestone facies association) containing Microbial Mudstones (F2), Intraclastic sandy packstone with ostracode remains (F3), Oncolitic packstone (F5), Brecciated limestone (F7) and Nodular-Mottled limestone (F8) representing shallow marginal areas affected by groundwater fluctuations and minor subaerial exposure; and c) a pedogenic paleoenvironment (pedogenic limestone facies association) including Intraclastic limestone (F4) and Packstones containing Microcodium (F9) facies displaying the major features of subaerial exposure, pedogenic diagenesis and the development of paleosols. The fluvial-palustrine-lacustrine succession shows a general shallow upward trend in which contraction-expansion cycles are represented (delimited by exposure and surface erosion). The variations in the successive formations reflect the responses to fluctuations in a combination of two major controls, the tectonic and local climatic variables. The predominance of the palustrine facies associations was determined by its accommodation space as well as the local climate conditions. The variations in the lacustrine limestone facies associations reflect differential patterns of subsidence within the sub-basin. The diagnostic features of the palustrine limestone facies associations (organic matter (OM) content, microinvertebrate fauna, abundant mud cracks, brecciation, presence of evaporitic minerals) frame the sub-basin in a climatic context intermediate between arid and subhumid conditions.

  8. FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    (1) Gas-phase chemistry. With the clear and profound effect of the VOC/NOx ratio on SOA formation, we will augment gas-phase VOC oxidation mechanisms in atmospheric models to account for the effect of NOx level on the mechanism of SOA formation; (2) Revis...

  9. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications.

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Daniel H.,

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  10. The Algebra Formative Assessment Project

    E-print Network

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    Meetings · Discuss, Research, Plan, Implement, Debrief, Revise · Common Core State Standards · Standards the MDTP and common formative assessments to drive instruction. These steps will prepare the students diagnostic and formative assessment process including the use of the Math Diagnostic Testing Project (MDTP

  11. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  12. Flowstone Formations in Jewel Cave

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Jewel Cave is currently the 3rd most extensive cave network in the world. It is believed to have formed completely underwater, thus leading to the extensive coating of calcite crystals. In the center of the image, a formation known as flowstone can be seen. Flowstone is a type of calcite formation ...

  13. Motivating Students through Formative Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauch, Lois

    2007-01-01

    Technology tools that are used to help apply standards and benchmarks motivate physical educators to use new methods of teaching, and create new ways to provide students with direct formative feedback, the number one motivator for students. Direct formative feedback refers to verbal communication between the teacher and/or parent and student. The…

  14. The Principal as Formative Coach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nidus, Gabrielle; Sadder, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Formative coaching, an approach that uses student work as the foundation for mentoring and professional development, can help principals become more effective instructional leaders. In formative coaching, teaches and coaches analyze student work to determine next steps for instruction. This article shows how a principal can use the steps of the…

  15. Star formation in the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-03-15

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  16. The Apennine Bench Formation revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spudis, P. D.; Hawke, B. R.

    1985-01-01

    The Apennine Bench Formation consists of pre-mare light plains materials that crop out south of the crater Archimedes, inside the Imbrium basin. This material was ascribed to either impact or volcanic origins. The characteristics of Apollo 15 KREEP basalts and the Apennine Bench Formation are reviewed to determine whether their characteristics are compatible with a volcanic origin.

  17. Cloud formation in giant planets

    E-print Network

    Christiane Helling

    2007-11-23

    We calculate the formation of dust clouds in atmospheres of giant gas-planets. The chemical structure and the evolution of the grain size distribution in the dust cloud layer is discussed based on a consistent treatment of seed formation, growth/evaporation and gravitational settling. Future developments are shortly addressed.

  18. Machining -Chip Formation, Cutting Fluids,

    E-print Network

    Colton, Jonathan S.

    Machining - Chip Formation, Cutting Fluids, Vibration, Chatter, ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing workpiece crack ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 9 #12;AISI 4340: V Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 10 ­ cracks extend into workpiece #12;Formation of Built up Edge (BUE

  19. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As w...

  20. Triglycerides and gallstone formation.

    PubMed

    Smelt, A H M

    2010-11-11

    Changes in bile acid (BA) metabolism and gallbladder function are critical factors in the pathogenesis of gallstones. Patients with hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) - often overweight and insulin resistant - are at risk for gallstone disease. The question arises whether HTG itself contributes to gallstone formation or whether gallstone disease only associates with this disorder. Triglycerides are formed in response to fluxes of non-esterified fatty acids and glucose. Hypertriglyceridemia results from either overproduction of triglycerides by the liver, impaired lipolysis or a combination of both. Hyperinsulinemia, as observed in the insulin resistant state, stimulates very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-triglyceride synthesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver X receptors (LXRs), farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4? (HNF4?) are the nuclear receptors involved in the regulation of lipogenesis. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is involved in the production of VLDL and its activation is also under control of transcription factors as FXR and Forkhead box-O1 (FoxO1). Triglyceride and BA metabolism are linked. There is an inverse relationship between bile acid fluxes and pool size and VLDL production and SHP (small heterodimer partner) and FXR are the link between BAs and TG metabolism. BAs are also ligands for FXR and G-protein-coupled receptors, such as TGR5. FXR activation by BAs suppresses the expression of MTP, transcription factor sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1c and other lipogenic genes. LXRs stimulate lipogenesis whereas FXRs inhibit the metabolic process. Synthesis of BAs from cholesterol occurs either via the classical pathway (7?-hydroxylation of cholesterol; CYP7A1) or via the alternate pathway (CYP39A1 or CYP7B1). BAs induce FXR, which inhibits CYP7A1 transcription by activation of SHP and inhibition of HNF4? transactivation. Bile composition (supersaturation with cholesterol), gallbladder dysmotility, inflammation, hypersecretion of mucin gel in the gallbladder and slow large intestinal motility and increased intestinal cholesterol absorption may contribute to the pathogenesis of cholesterol gallstones. In HTG patients supersaturated bile may be related to the presence of obesity rather than to HTG itself. Contraction and relaxation of the gallbladder are regulated by neuronal, hormonal and paracrine factors. Postprandial gallbladder emptying is regulated by cholecystokinin (CCK). Poor postprandial gallbladder contraction may be due to the magnitude of the CCK response and to the amount of CCK receptors in the gallbladder smooth muscle cells. In the fasting state gallbladder motility is associated with the intestinal migrating motor complex (MMC) activity and with elevated plasma motilin levels. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF19), produced on arrival of bile acids in the ileum, is also important for gallbladder motility. Gallbladder motility is impaired in HTG patients compared to BMI matched controls. There is evidence that the gallbladder in HTG is less sensitive to CCK and that this sensitivity improves after reversal of high serum TG levels by use of TG lowering agents. In hypertriglyceridemia TG lowering therapy (fibrates or fish-oil) is essential to prevent cardiovascular disease and pancreatitis. Fibrates, however, also increase the risk for cholelithiasis by increasing biliary cholesterol saturation and by reduction of bile acid synthesis. On the other hand fish-oil decreases biliary cholesterol saturation. Fish-oil may increase bile acid synthesis by activation of 7alpha-hydroxylase and may inhibit VLDL production and secretion through activation of nuclear factors and increased apoB degradation. In HTG patients, gallbladder motility improves during bezafibrate as well as during fish-oil therapy. The question remains whether improvement of gallbladder motility and increased lithogenicity of bile by bezafibrate therapy counteract each other or still result in gallstone formation in HTG patients. PMID:20699090

  1. Microdiamonds Formation During

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogasawara, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The previous studies on the Kokchetav UHPM rocks by the authors group demonstrated the following subjects on the formation of microdiamonds. Microdiamond is highly abundant (max. ca. 2700carat/ton) in dolomite marble that has diopside (with K-bearing silicate lamella)-dolomite-garnet assemblage and was stable at XCO2=0.1. The microdiamonds in dolomite marble are classified into 3- types; S, R and T. The dominant type S (ca. 80%) indicates that it grew at two stages, the core and rim stages. R-type grew mainly at the core stage, and T-type grew at the rim stage (Ishida et al., 2003; Yoshioka & Ogasawara, 2005). One of the possible source of carbon for the 2nd stage growth is a fluid during UHPM. Some domains of dolomite marble contacting with dolomitic marble lack diamond, and indicate are lower XCO2 than diamond-bearing marble. No diamond occurs in dolomitic marble that is a product of strong H2O-rich fluid effect during UHPM (Ogasawara & Aoki, 2005); Ti-clinohumite-aragonite corresponds to extremely low-XCO2 (=<0.01), and the TiO2 carrier could be a H2O-rich fluid. Hydroxyl in lamellar-free diopside was confirmed as > 850ppm (Kikuchi & Ogasawara, in press). Low XCO2 condition corresponds to relatively oxidized conditions (Ogasawara et al., 2000). Extremely low-XCO2 conditions are unsuitable for diamond formation. A small amount of microdiamond (61 grains) occurs in diopside (with lamellar) in some layers of titanite-bearing calcite marble. Other domain contains titanite with coesite exsolution and the precursor silica-excess composition of titanite gave the minimum pressure as 6 GPa (Ogasawara et al., 2002). The presence of titanite (including relic aragonite + rutile) indicates very low-XCO2 (ca. 0.02). All grains of microdiamond are similar to R-type in morphology. No evidence for the 2nd stage diamond growth was observed. No diamond occurs in garnet- clinopyroxene rock like _gskarns_h. This rock has UHP evidence; coesite exsolution in titanite and K- bearing-silicate lamella in clinopyroxene, and is a product of the metasomatism (indicating very low XCO2) under UHP. The lack of diamond is consistent with other diamond-free carbonate rocks that were stable under extremely low- XCO2. The 2nd abundant diamond-bearing rock is pelitic gneiss. The characteristic features of microdiamonds show the strong contrast with those in dolomite marble. The dominant morphology is rounded to cuboidal form with rugged surface (> 80%); this corresponds to R- type. S-type is rare in pelitic gneiss. Morphology of microdiamond is controlled by growth and/or dissolution. Rounded grain with smooth surface may show the resorption after diamond growth. The absence of S-type diamond is a great difference from the microdiamond in dolomite marble, and indicates that fluid played different roles in both two diamond-bearing rocks; 1) carbon dissolved into aqueous fluid in pelitic gneiss, and 2) carbon precipitated from fluid to form microdiamond at the 2nd stage in dolomite marble. The microdiamond formed at the 2nd stage might be closely related to UHPM fluid. A model for fluid evolution from CO2-rich to H2O-rich during prograde stage can explain the metamorphic history of the Kokchetav carbonate rocks. Such UHPM fluid evolution may be caused by the dehydration in gneisses/eclogites surrounding the carbonate. Summarizing these, ``Intraslab UHP metasomatism" could be proposed. References: Ishida et al. (2003) J. Metamorphic Geol., 21. Kikuchi & Ogasawara (in press) GSA Special Papers. Ogasawara et al. (2000) Island Arc, 9, 400-416. Ogasawara et al. (2002) Am. Min., 87, 454-461. Ogasawara & Aoki (2005) Int. Geol. Rev., 47 (in press). Yoshioka & Ogasawara (2005) Int. Geol. Rev., 47, 703-715.

  2. Formation of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissauer, J. J.; Stevenson, D. J.

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution, and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our solar system contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium; these gases could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. The transiting extrasolar planet HD149026b, which is slightly more massive than Saturn, appears to have comparable amounts of light gases and heavy elements. The other observed transiting exoplanets are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our solar system, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of these planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the giant planet cores grow massive enough to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary question regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions can planets develop cores sufficiently massive to accrete gas envelopes within the lifetimes of gaseous protoplanetary disks.

  3. Medusae Fossae Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    An exotic terrain of wind-eroded ridges and residual smooth surfaces are seen in one of the highest resolution images ever taken of Mars from orbit. The Medusae Fossae formation is believed to be formed of the fragmental ejecta of huge explosive volcanic eruptions. When subjected to intense wind-blasting over hundreds of millions of years, this material erodes easily once the uppermost tougher crust is breached. In the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shown on the right, the crust, or cap rock, can be seen in the upper right part of the picture. The finely-spaced ridges are similar to features on Earth called yardangs, which are formed by intense winds plucking individual grains from, and by wind-driven sand blasting particles off, sedimentary deposits.

    The MOC image was taken on October 30, 1997 at 11:05 AM PST, shortly after the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft's 31st closest approach to Mars. The image covers an area 3.6 X 21.5 km (2.2 X 13.4 miles) at 3.6 m (12 feet) per picture element--craters only 11 m (36 feet, about the size of a swimming pool) across can be seen. The context image (left; the best Viking view of the area; VO 1 387S34) has a resolution of 240 m/pixel, or 67 times lower resolution than the MOC frame.

    Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  4. Physics of primordial star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Naoki

    2012-09-01

    The study of primordial star formation has a history of nearly sixty years. It is generally thought that primordial stars are one of the key elements in a broad range of topics in astronomy and cosmology, from Galactic chemical evolution to the formation of super-massive blackholes. We review recent progress in the theory of primordial star formation. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation posits that the present-day rich structure of the Universe developed through gravitational amplification of tiny matter density fluctuations left over from the Big Bang. It has become possible to study primordial star formation rigorously within the framework of the standard cosmological model. We first lay out the key physical processes in a primordial gas. Then, we introduce recent developments in computer simulations. Finally, we discuss prospects for future observations of the first generation of stars.

  5. Double layer formation. [in plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the plasma processes which occur during the formation of a double layer in response to an applied initial electric field, when triggered by a current in the plasma. The important feature of the formation process was the creation of an ion-rich plasma-density cavity. The positive space charge of the cavity was shielded by induction of a negative space charge on the low potential side of the cavity, giving rise to the formation of a fully developed double layer. The shielding was complete only when the electron current from the low potential side exceeded the electron thermal current. It was found that during the formation of double layers counterstreaming electrons are generated. Moreover, transient double layers with reverse polarity also occur during this phase. Thus, the recurring formation of double layers can give rise to flickering double layers.

  6. Galaxy Formation and Dark Matter

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2006-03-08

    The challenge of dark matter may be addressed in two ways; by studying the confrontation of structure formation with observation and by direct and indirect searches. In this review, I will focus on those aspects of dark matter that are relevant for understanding galaxy formation, and describe the outlook for detecting the most elusive component, non-baryonic dark matter. Galaxy formation theory is driven by phenomenology and by numerical simulations of dark matter clustering under gravity. Once the complications of star formation are incorporated, the theory becomes so complex that the brute force approach of numerical simulations needs to be supplemented by incorporation of such astrophysical processes as feedback by supernovae and by active galactic nuclei. I present a few semi-analytical perspectives that may shed some insight into the nature of galaxy formation.

  7. Formation of interstellar anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senent, Maria Luisa

    2012-05-01

    Formation of interstellar anions: M.L. Senent. The recent detection of negative charged species in the ISM1 has instigated enthusiasm for anions in the astrophysical community2. Many of these species are new and entail characterization. How they are formed in astrophysical sources is a question of major relevance. The anion presence in ISM was first predicted theoretically on the basis of electron affinities and on the negative linear chain molecular stabilities. Although very early, they were considered in astrochemical models3-4, their discovery is so recent because their abundances seem to be relatively low. These have to be understood in terms of molecular stabilities, reaction probabilities and radiative and collisional excitations. Then, we present our theoretical work on even carbon chains type Cn and CnH (n=2,4,6) focused to the understanding of anion abundances. We use highly correlated ab initio methods. We performed spectroscopic studies of various isomers that can play important roles as intermediates5-8. In previous papers9-10, we compared C2H and C2H- collisional rates responsible for observed line intensities. Actually, we study hydrogen attachment (Cn +H ? CnH and Cn- +H ? CnH-) and associative detachment processes (Cn- +H ? CnH +e-) for 2, 4 and 6 carbon atom chains11. [1] M.C.McCarthy, C.A.Gottlieb, H.Gupta, P.Thaddeus, Astrophys.J, 652, L141 (2006) [2] V.M.Bierbaum, J.Cernicharo, R.Bachiller, eds., 2011, pp 383-389. [3] A. Dalgarno, R.A. Mc Cray, Astrophys.J,, 181, 95 (1973) [4] E. Herbst E., Nature, 289, 656 (1981); [5] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, P.Rosmus, M.Hochlaf, J.Chem.Phys., 124, 234304 (2006) [6] M.L.Senent, M.Hochlaf, Astrophys. J. , 708, 1452(2010) [7] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, J.Phys.Chem.A, 113, 12404 (2009) [8] D. Hammoutene, M.Hochlaf, M.L.Senent, submitted. [9] A. Spielfiedel, N. Feautrier, F. Najar, D. ben Abdallah, F. Dayou, M.L. Senent, F. Lique, Mon.Not.R.Astron.Soc., 421, 1891 (2012) [10] F.Dumouchel, A, Spielfieldel , M.L.Senent, N.Feautrier, Chem. Phys. Lett., 533, 6 (2012) [11] M.L.Senent, M.Hochlaf, submitted

  8. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  9. Formation of the Milky Way

    E-print Network

    J. E. Hesser; P. B. Stetson; W. E. Harris; M. Bolte; T. A. Smecker-Hane; D. A. Vandenberg; R. A. Bell; H. E. Bond; S. van den Bergh; R. D. McClure; G. G. Fahlman; H. B. Richer

    1997-03-08

    We review observational evidence bearing on the formation of a prototypical large spiral galaxy, the Milky Way. New ground- and space-based studies of globular star clusters and dwarf spheroidal galaxies provide a wealth of information to constrain theories of galaxy formation. It appears likely that the Milky Way formed by a combination of rapid, dissipative collapse and mergers, but the relative contributions of these two mechanisms remain controversial. New evidence, however, indicates that initial star and star cluster formation occurred simultaneously over a volume that presently extends to twice the distance of the Magellanic Clouds.

  10. Dissipative processes in galaxy formation.

    PubMed Central

    Silk, J

    1993-01-01

    A galaxy commences its life in a diffuse gas cloud that evolves into a predominantly stellar aggregation. Considerable dissipation of gravitational binding energy occurs during this transition. I review here the dissipative processes that determine the critical scales of luminous galaxies and the generation of their morphology. The universal scaling relations for spirals and ellipticals are shown to be sensitive to the history of star formation. Semiphenomenological expressions are given for star-formation rates in protogalaxies and in starbursts. Implications are described for elliptical galaxy formation and for the evolution of disk galaxies. PMID:11607396

  11. Antihydrogen Formation using Cold Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, N.; Bowe, P.D.; Hangst, J.S.; Amoretti, M.; Carraro, C.; Macri, M.; Testera, G.; Variola, A.; Amsler, C.; Johnson, I.; Pruys, H.; Regenfus, C.; Bonomi, G.; Bouchta, A.; Doser, M.; Kellerbauer, A.; Landua, R.; Cesar, C.L.; Charlton, M.; Joergensen, L.V.

    2004-10-20

    Antihydrogen, the antimatter counterpart of the hydrogen atom, can be formed by mixing cold samples of antiprotons and positrons. In 2002 the ATHENA collaboration succeeded in the first production of cold antihydrogen. By observing and imaging the annihilation products of the neutral, non-confined, antihydrogen atoms annihilating on the walls of the trap we can observe the production in quasi-real-time and study the dynamics of the formation mechanism. The formation mechanism strongly influences the final state of the formed antihydrogen atoms, important for future spectroscopic comparison with hydrogen. This paper briefly summarizes the current understanding of the antihydrogen formation in ATHENA.

  12. A low diversity, seasonal tropical landscape dominated by conifers and peltasperms: Early Permian Abo Formation, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DiMichele, W.A.; Chaney, D.S.; Nelson, W.J.; Lucas, S.G.; Looy, C.V.; Quick, K.; Jun, W.

    2007-01-01

    Walchian conifers (Walchia piniformis Sternberg, 1825) and peltasperms similar to Supaia thinnfeldioides White and cf. Supaia anomala White dominate floodplain deposits of a narrow stratigraphic interval of the middle Abo Formation, Lower Permian of central New Mexico. The plant fossils occur in thinly bedded units up to two meters thick, consisting of coarse siltstone to very fine sandstone with clay partings. Bedding is primarily tabular, thin, and bears rare ripple marks and trough cross beds. Bedding surfaces display mud cracks, raindrop imprints, horizontal and vertical burrows of invertebrates, and footprints of terrestrial vertebrates. These features indicate intermittent and generally unchannelized stream flow, with repeated exposure to air. Channels appear to have cannibalized one another on a slowly subsiding coastal plain. Conifers are dominant at three collecting sites and at three others Supaia dominates. Although each of these genera occurs in assemblages dominated by the other, there are no truly co-dominant assemblages. This pattern suggests alternative explanations. Landscapes could have consisted of a small-scale vegetational patchwork dominated almost monospecifically in any one patch, meaning that these plants could have coexisted across the landscape. On the other hand, conifer and supaioid dominance could have been temporally distinct, occurring during different episodes of sedimentation; although in the field there are no noticeable sedimentological differences between conifer-dominated and Supaia-dominated channel deposits, they may represent slightly different climatic regimes. The considerable morphological differences between conifers and Supaia suggest that the floristic patterns are not a taphonomic effect of the loss of a significant part of the original biodiversity. In general, the climate under which this vegetation developed appears to have been relatively warm and arid, based on the geology (pervasive red color [oxidation], calcrete in paleosols, and abundant mud cracks evidencing ephemeral flow in streams) and biology (low floristic diversity, xeromorphic plant physiognomies). ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The depositional environment and petrology of the White Rim Sandstone Member of the Permian Cutler Formation, Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steele-Mallory, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation of Permian age in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, was deposited in coastal eolian and associated interdune environments. This conclusion is based on stratigraphic relationships primary sedimentary structures, and petrologic features. The White Rim consists of two major genetic units. The first represents a coastal dune field and the second represents related interdune ponds. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the coastal dune unit include large- to medium-scale, unidirectional, tabular-planar cross-bedding; high-index ripples oriented parallel to dip direction of the foresets; coarse-grained lag layers; avalanche or slump marks; and raindrop impressions. Cross-bedding measurements suggest the dunes were deposited as transverse ridges by a dominantly northwest to southeast wind. Distinctive sedimentary structures of the interdune pond unit include wavy, horizontally laminated bedding, adhesion ripples, and desiccation polygons. These features may have been produced by alternate wetting and drying of sediment during water-table fluctuations. Evidence of bioturbation is also present in this unit. Petrologic characteristics of the White Rim helped to define the depositional environment as coastal. A crinoid fragment was identified at one location; both units are enriched in heavy minerals, and small amounts of well rounded, reworked glauconite were found in the White Rim throughout the study area. Earlier work indicates that the White Rim sandstone is late Wolfcampian to early Leonardian in age. During this time, the Canyonlands area was located in a depositional area alternately dominated by marine and nonmarine environments. Results of this study suggest the White Rim represents a coastal dune field that was deposited by predominantly on-shore winds during a period of marine transgression.

  14. BOREAS TE-22 Allometric Forest Survey Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shugart, H. H.; Nielsen, Eric; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-22 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the forest structure of boreal vegetation in the Southern and Northern Study Areas (SSA and NSA) during the 1994 growing season. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  15. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Soil Surface CO2 Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. These data are soil surface CO 2 flux data at the SSA-Fen site from 27- May-1994 to 23-Sep-1994 and from 13-May-1995 to 03-Oct-1995. A portable gas exchange system was used to make these measurements. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  16. BOREAS TF-4 CO2 and CH4 Chamber Flux Data from the SSA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Dean; Striegl, Robert; Wickland, Kimberly; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-4 team measured fluxes of CO2 and CH4 across the soil-air interface in four ages of jack pine forest at the BOREAS SSA during August 1993 to March 1995. Gross and net flux of CO2 and flux of CH4 between soil and air are presented for 24 chamber sites in mature jack pine forest, 20-year-old, 4-year-old, and clear cut areas. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  17. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen 1995 Leaf Area Index Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. These data are LAI measurements made by the TF-11 team throughout the 1995 growing season. The data include the LAI of plants that fall into six categories: total, Carex spp., Betula pumila, Menyanthes trifoliata, Salix spp., and other vascular plants. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  18. BOREAS RSS-11 Ground Network of Sunphotometer Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markham, Brian L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickerson, Jaime (Editor); Schafer, Joel; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-11 team operated a network of five automated (Cimel) and two hand-held (Miami) solar radiometers from 1994 to 1996 during the BOREAS field campaigns. The data provide aerosol optical depth measurements, size distribution, phase function, and column water vapor amounts over points in northern Saskatchewan and Manitoba, Canada. The data are useful for the correction of remotely sensed aircraft and satellite images. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  19. BOREAS Derived Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Twine, Tracy; Rinker, Donald; Knapp, David

    2000-01-01

    In 1995, the BOREAS science teams identified the need for a continuous surface meteorological and radiation data set to support flux and surface process modeling efforts. This data set contains actual, substituted, and interpolated 15-minute meteorological and radiation data compiled from several surface measurements sites over the BOREAS SSA and NSA. Temporally, the data cover 01-Jan-1994 to 31-Dec-1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  20. BOREAS TF-1 SSA-OA Weekly Tower CH4 and N2O Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurtell, George; Edwards, Grant; Simpson, George; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-1 team collected various trace gas and energy flux data in its efforts to characterize the temporal energy and gas exchanges that occurred over the SSA-OA site. This data set contains methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) fluxes that were measured at the BOREAS SSA-OA site. These fluxes were measured from 16-Apr to 16-Sep-1994. The data were averaged to weekly values and are available in tabular ASCII files.

  1. BOREAS TF-11 SSA-Fen Leaf Gas Exchange Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arkebauer, Timothy J.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TF-11 team gathered a variety of data to complement its tower flux measurements collected at the SSA-Fen site. This data set contains single-leaf gas exchange data from the SSA-Fen site during 1994 and 1995. These leaf gas exchange properties were measured for the dominant vascular plants using portable gas exchange systems. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files.

  2. BOREAS TGB-4 NSA-BVP Tower Flux and Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roulet, Nigel T.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Huemmrich, Karl (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-4) team measured the exchange of heat, water, and CO2 between a boreal forest beaver pond and the atmosphere in the Northern Study Area (NSA) for the ice-free period of BOREAS. The data cover the period of 28-May to 18-Sep-1994. The data are available in tabular ASCII files.

  3. BOREAS TGB-1 NSA SF6 Chamber Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made several chamber and tower measurements of trace gases at sites in the BOREAS NSA. This data set contains sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) dark chamber flux measurements at the NSA-OJP and NSA-YJP sites from 16-May through 13-Sep-1994. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from dark chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  4. BOREAS TGB-1 NSA CH4 and CO2 Chamber Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) dark chamber flux measurements at the NSA-OJP, NSA-OBS, NSA-BP, and NSA-YJP sites from 16-May-1994 through 13-Sep-1994. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from dark chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  5. County-based estimates of nitrogen and phosphorus content of animal manure in the United States for 1982, 1987, and 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Puckett, Larry; Hitt, Kerie; Alexander, Richard

    1998-01-01

    names that correspond to the FIPS codes. 2. Tabular component - Nine tab-delimited ASCII lookup tables of animal counts and nutrient estimates organized by 5-digit state/county FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standards) code. Another table lists the county names that correspond to the FIPS codes. The use of trade names is for identification purposes only and does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  6. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  7. Formation of the First Star Clusters

    E-print Network

    Klessen,Ralf

    Formation of the First Star Clusters Ralf Klessen Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg-Hsu Wang ... many collaborators abroad! #12;First star formation agenda #12;Star cluster formation First of molecular clouds Star cluster formation First star formation Magnetic fields in the primordial universe

  8. Sandstone Formations in Capitol Reef

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Capitol Reef is primarily made up of sandstone formations within the Waterpocket Fold, monocline that extends nearly 100 miles. A monocline is a step-like fold in rock strata that can resemble an enormous wrinkle in the earth....

  9. Databases and mapping File formats

    E-print Network

    South Bohemia, University of

    Databases and mapping BWA Samtools #12;File formats FASTQ, SFF, bax.h5 ACE, FASTG FASTA BAM/SAM GFF polymorphism and assembly uncertainty. The G stands for `graph'. http://fastg.sourceforge.net #FASTG

  10. Marmoryen Formation (marble) STORETVEIT GROUP

    E-print Network

    Fossen, Haakon

    ) STORETVEIT GROUP Minor Bergen Arc Paradis Formation (green polymict congl.) Deformed saussurite gabbro, gabbro-pegmatite, basic/acidic dykes NORDÅSVATN COMPLEX Fine-grained amphibolite, mylonitic in most

  11. The Formation of Galaxy Disks

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2000-10-31

    Galaxy disk formation must incorporate the multiphase nature of the interstellar medium. The resulting two-phase structure is generated and maintained by gravitational instability and supernova energy input, which yield a source of turbulent viscosity that is able to effectively compete in the protodisk phase with early angular momentum loss of the baryonic component via dynamical friction in the dark halo. Provided that star formation occurs on the viscous drag time-scale, this mechanism provides a means of accounting for disk sizes and radial profiles. The star formation feedback is self-regulated by turbulent gas pressure-limited percolation of the supernova remnant-heated hot phase, but can run away in gas-rich protodisks to generate compact starbursts. A simple analytic model is derived for a Schmidt-like global star formation law in terms of the cold gas volume density.

  12. Micromagnetosphere Formation on the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Poppe, A. R.

    2015-10-01

    Kinetic simulations of the solar wind's interaction with lunar crustal magnetic fields reveal formation of micromagnetospheres where ions are deflected by strong electric fields. Future missions should measure magnetic field structure at the ground.

  13. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  14. The Portable Document Format - PDF.

    PubMed

    Grech, V

    2002-04-01

    This article demonstrates how documents prepared in hypertext or word processor format can be saved in portable document format (PDF). These files are self-contained documents that that have the same appearance on screen and in print, regardless of what kind of computer or printer are used, and regardless of what software package was originally used to for their creation. PDF files are compressed documents, invariably smaller than the original files, hence allowing rapid dissemination and download. PMID:22368611

  15. Immigration, Integration and Ghetto Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    We study ghetto formation in a population with natives and immigrants in the framework of the two-dimensional Ising-model with Kawasaki-exchange dynamics. It is the phase structure of the Ising model, the integration speed and the immigration rate which determine whether ghetto formation between natives and immigrants can be avoided or not. Our simulations are performed in- and out-of-equilibrium.

  16. Progress in Giant Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Two very different mechanisms have been proposed for the formation of the gas and ice giant planets. The conventional explanation for the formation of gas giant planets, core accretion, presumes that a gaseous envelope collapses upon a roughly 10 Earth-mass, solid core that was formed by the collisional accumulation of planetary embryos orbiting in a gaseous disk. The more radical explanation, disk instability, hypothesizes that the gaseous portion of protoplanetary disks undergoes a gravitational instability, leading to the formation of self-gravitating clumps, within which dust grains coagulate and settle to form cores. Core accretion appears to require several million years or more to form a gas giant planet, implying that only long-lived disks would form gas giants. Disk instability, on the other hand, is so rapid (thousands of years), that gas giants could form in even the shortest-lived disks. Core accretion has severe difficulty in explaining the formation of the ice giant planets, unless two extra protoplanets are formed in the gas giant planet region and thereafter migrate outward. Recently, an alternative mechanism for ice giant planet formation has been proposed, based on observations of protoplanetary disks in the Orion nebula cluster: disk instability leading to the formation of four gas giant protoplanets with cores, followed by photoevaporation of the disk and gaseous envelopes of the protoplanets outside about 10 AU by a nearby OB star, producing ice giants. In this scenario, Jupiter survives unscathed, while Saturn is a transitional planet. These two basic mechanisms have very different predictions for gas and ice giant extrasolar planets, both in terms of their frequency and epoch of formation, suggesting a number of astronomical tests which could determine the dominant mechanism for giant planet formation.

  17. Geochemical and stable isotopic data on barren and mineralized drill core in the Devonian Popovich Formation, Screamer sector of the Betze-Post gold deposit, northern Carlin trend, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christiansen, William D.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Zohar, Pamela B.; Tousignant, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    The Devonian Popovich Formation is the major host for Carlin-type gold deposits in the northern Carlin trend of Nevada. The Popovich is composed of gray to black, thin-bedded, calcareous to dolomitic mudstone and limestone deposited near the carbonate platform margin. Carlin-type gold deposits are Eocene, disseminated, auriferous pyrite deposits characterized by acid leaching, sulfidation, and silicification that are typically hosted in Paleozoic calcareous sedimentary rocks exposed in windows through siliceous sedimentary rocks of the Roberts Mountains allochthon. The Carlin trend currently is the largest gold producer in the United States. The Screamer ore zone is a tabular body on the periphery of the huge Betze-Post gold deposit. Screamer is a good place to study both the original lithogeochemistry of the Popovich Formation and the effects of subsequent alteration and mineralization because it is below the level of supergene oxidation, mostly outside the contact metamorphic aureole of the Jurassic Goldstrike stock, has small, high-grade ore zones along fractures and Jurassic dikes, and has intervening areas with lower grade mineralization and barren rock. In 1997, prior to mining at Screamer, drill core intervals from barren and mineralized Popovich Formation were selected for geochemical and stable isotope analysis. The 332, five-foot core samples analyzed are from five holes separated by as much as 2000 feet (600 meters). The samples extend from the base of the Wispy unit up through the Planar and Soft sediment deformation units into the lower part of the upper Mud unit of the Popovich Formation.

  18. Gypsum Layer in Spearfish Formation, SD

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Spearfish Formation near Spearfish, SD. The Spearfish Formation is a red, silty shale with interbedded red sandstone and siltstone. The formation contains massive gypsum deposits, which is the white layer in the photograph....

  19. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  20. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as lamellar domains within relict opal-CT fibers. These findings indicate that the type of transformation mechanism depends upon the primary structural characteristics of the authigenic opaline. varieties that are in turn influenced by the sediment lithology.

  1. The Dynamics of Latifundia Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Luis Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Land tenure inequity is a major social problem in developing nations worldwide. In societies, where land is a commodity, inequities in land tenure are associated with gaps in income distribution, poverty and biodiversity loss. A common pattern of land tenure inequities through the history of civilization has been the formation of latifundia [Zhu?ngyuán in chinese], i.e., a pattern where land ownership is concentrated by a small fraction of the whole population. Here, we use simple Markov chain models to study the dynamics of latifundia formation in a heterogeneous landscape where land can transition between forest, agriculture and recovering land. We systematically study the likelihood of latifundia formation under the assumption of pre-capitalist trade, where trade is based on the average utility of land parcels belonging to each individual landowner during a discrete time step. By restricting land trade to that under recovery, we found the likelihood of latifundia formation to increase with the size of the system, i.e., the amount of land and individuals in the society. We found that an increase of the transition rate for land use changes, i.e., how quickly land use changes, promotes more equitable patterns of land ownership. Disease introduction in the system, which reduced land profitability for infected individual landowners, promoted the formation of latifundia, with an increased likelihood for latifundia formation when there were heterogeneities in the susceptibility to infection. Finally, our model suggests that land ownership reforms need to guarantee an equitative distribution of land among individuals in a society to avoid the formation of latifundia. PMID:24376597

  2. The Physics of Planetesimal Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Jacob; Armitage, Philip; Youdin, Andrew; Li, Rixin

    2015-12-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of potoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  3. Review of nutrition labeling formats.

    PubMed

    Geiger, C J; Wyse, B W; Parent, C R; Hansen, R G

    1991-07-01

    This article examines nutrition labeling history as well as the findings of nine research studies of nutrition labeling formats. Nutrition labeling regulations were announced in 1973 and have been periodically amended since then. In response to requests from consumers and health care professionals for revision of the labeling system, the Food and Drug Administration initiated a three-phase plan for reform of nutrition labeling in 1990. President Bush signed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act in November 1990. Literature analysis revealed that only nine studies with an experimental design have focused on nutrition labeling since 1971. Four were conducted before 1975, which was the year that nutrition labeling was officially implemented, two were conducted in 1980, and three were conducted after 1986. Only two of the nine studies supported the traditional label format mandated by the Code of Federal Regulations, and one study partially supported it. Four of the nine studies that evaluated graphic presentations of nutrition information found that consumer comprehension of nutrition information was improved with a graphic format for nutrition labeling: three studies supported the use of bar graphs and one study supported the use of a pie chart. Full disclosure (ie, complete nutrient and ingredient labeling) was preferred by consumers in two of the three studies that examined this variable. The third study supported three types of information disclosure dependent upon socioeconomic class. In those studies that tested graphics, a bar graph format was significantly preferred and showed better consumer comprehension than the traditional format. PMID:2071796

  4. Biofilm Formation by Candida dubliniensis

    PubMed Central

    Ramage, Gordon; Vande Walle, Kacy; Wickes, Brian L.; López-Ribot, José L.

    2001-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is an opportunistic yeast closely related to Candida albicans that has been recently implicated in oropharyngeal candidiasis in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients. Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation, with cells in biofilms displaying properties dramatically different from free-living cells grown under normal laboratory conditions. Here, we report on the development of in vitro models of C. dubliniensis biofilms on the surfaces of biomaterials (polystyrene and acrylic) and on the characteristics associated with biofilm formation by this newly described species. Time course analysis using a formazan salt reduction assay to monitor metabolic activities of cells within the biofilm, together with microscopy studies, revealed that biofilm formation by C. dubliniensis occurred after initial focal adherence, followed by growth, proliferation, and maturation over 24 to 48 h. Serum and saliva preconditioning films enhanced the initial attachment of C. dubliniensis and subsequent biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal scanning laser microscopy were used to further characterize C. dubliniensis biofilms. Mature C. dubliniensis biofilms consisted of a dense network of yeasts cells and hyphal elements embedded within exopolymeric material. C. dubliniensis biofilms displayed spatial heterogeneity and an architecture showing microcolonies with ramifying water channels. Antifungal susceptibility testing demonstrated the increased resistance of sessile C. dubliniensis cells, including the type strain and eight different clinical isolates, against fluconazole and amphotericin B compared to their planktonic counterparts. C. dubliniensis biofilm formation may allow this species to maintain its ecological niche as a commensal and during infection with important clinical repercussions. PMID:11526156

  5. Formate dehydrogenase of Clostridium pasteurianum.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, C L; Mortenson, L E

    1984-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from N2-fixing cells of Clostridium pasteurianum W5. The purified enzyme has a minimal Mr of 117,000 with two nonidentical subunits with molecular weights of 76,000 and 34,000, respectively. It contains 2 mol of molybdenum, 24 mol of nonheme iron, and 28 mol of acid-labile sulfide per mol of enzyme; no other metal ions were detected. Analysis of its iron-sulfur centers by ligand exchange techniques showed that 20 iron atoms of formate dehydrogenase can be extruded as Fe4S4 centers. Fluorescence analysis of its isolated molybdenum centers suggests it is a molybdopterin. The clostridial formate dehydrogenase has a pH optimum between 8.3 and 8.5 and a temperature optimum of 52 degrees C. The Km for formate is 1.72 mM with a Vmax of 551 mumol of methyl viologen reduced per min per mg of protein. Sodium azide competes competitively with formate (K1 = 3.57 microM), whereas the inactivation by cyanide follows pseudo-first-order kinetics with K = 5 X 10(2) M-1 s-1. PMID:6547435

  6. User's guide for TRANZ: a data transformation and analysis program

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, K.J.

    1985-12-01

    This report is a user's guide for TRANZ, a program developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for an IBM PC with a basic compiler, Version 2.0. The purpose of TRANZ is to convert, organize, and evaluate electrical end-use load data obtained from the Field Data Acquistion Systems (FDAS). These FDAS will be installed in commercial buildings and residence as part of the End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP) that is being managed by PNL for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). TRANZ has been developed with highly interactive menu-driven routines and requires little computer experience for proper operation. It is executable on a single or double disk drive IBM PC. The program can be used for spot checking data, troubleshooting installation problems, and preparing tabular and graphical summaries. Sample files and program output, and a program source code listing are provided as appendices. The program itself contains six primary routines: The first routine converts the raw character byte data dumped from the FDAS into a formatted ASCII engineering unit file. The second routine checks the data to make sure that each value is within a reasonable range. The third routine sorts a file so that the records start at the earliest time and end at the latest time. The fourth routine appends two files for the same building or residence, removing any overlap in the files. The fifth routine summarizes the data in both a tabular and graphical form. The sixth routine generates a hard copy table of day numbers and their corresponding dates.

  7. Data Transfer Capabilities of CD-ROM Software, Part II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasco, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Describes and compares several exchange/transfer formats used to upload records into software host programs, including unstructured or plain ASCII; fixed field; delimited ASCII; tagged; MARC (Machine Readable Cataloging); and graphic. It is concluded that CD-ROM producers should strengthen the built-in output management of programs and offer…

  8. Sterile neutrinos and structure formation

    E-print Network

    Stasielak, Jaroslaw; Kusenko, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Warm dark matter is consistent with the observations of the large-scale structure, and it can also explain the cored density profiles on smaller scales. However, it has been argued that warm dark matter could delay the star formation. This does not happen if warm dark matter is made up of keV sterile neutrinos, which can decay into X-ray photons and active neutrinos. The X-ray photons have a catalytic effect on the formation of molecular hydrogen, the essential cooling ingredient in the primordial gas. In all the cases we have examined, the overall effect of sterile dark matter is to facilitate the cooling of the gas and to reduce the minimal mass of the halo prone to collapse. We find that the X-rays from the decay of keV sterile neutrinos facilitate the collapse of the gas clouds and the subsequent star formation at high redshift.

  9. Sterile neutrinos and structure formation

    E-print Network

    Jaroslaw Stasielak; Peter L. Biermann; Alexander Kusenko

    2007-10-29

    Warm dark matter is consistent with the observations of the large-scale structure, and it can also explain the cored density profiles on smaller scales. However, it has been argued that warm dark matter could delay the star formation. This does not happen if warm dark matter is made up of keV sterile neutrinos, which can decay into X-ray photons and active neutrinos. The X-ray photons have a catalytic effect on the formation of molecular hydrogen, the essential cooling ingredient in the primordial gas. In all the cases we have examined, the overall effect of sterile dark matter is to facilitate the cooling of the gas and to reduce the minimal mass of the halo prone to collapse. We find that the X-rays from the decay of keV sterile neutrinos facilitate the collapse of the gas clouds and the subsequent star formation at high redshift.

  10. Structure formation in active networks

    E-print Network

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Structure formation and constant reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton are key requirements for the function of living cells. Here we show that a minimal reconstituted system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular-motor filaments exhibits a generic mechanism of structure formation, characterized by a broad distribution of cluster sizes. We demonstrate that the growth of the structures depends on the intricate balance between crosslinker-induced stabilization and simultaneous destabilization by molecular motors, a mechanism analogous to nucleation and growth in passive systems. We also show that the intricate interplay between force generation, coarsening and connectivity is responsible for the highly dynamic process of structure formation in this heterogeneous active gel, and that these competing mechanisms result in anomalous transport, reminiscent of intracellular dynamics.

  11. Sterile Neutrinos and Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasielak, J.; Biermann, P. L.; Kusenko, A.

    2007-12-01

    Warm dark matter is consistent with the observations of the large-scale structure, and it can also explain the cored density profiles on smaller scales. However, it has been argued that warm dark matter could delay the star formation. This does not happen if warm dark matter is made up of keV sterile neutrinos, which can decay into X-ray photons and active neutrinos. The X-ray photons have a catalytic effect on the formation of molecular hydrogen, the essential cooling ingredient in the primordial gas. In all the cases we have examined, the overall effect of sterile dark matter is to facilitate the cooling of the gas and to reduce the minimal mass of the halo prone to collapse. We find that the X-rays from the decay of keV sterile neutrinos facilitate the collapse of the gas clouds and the subsequent star formation at high redshift.

  12. Structure formation in active networks

    E-print Network

    Simone Köhler; Volker Schaller; Andreas R. Bausch

    2011-03-18

    Structure formation and constant reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton are key requirements for the function of living cells. Here we show that a minimal reconstituted system consisting of actin filaments, crosslinking molecules and molecular-motor filaments exhibits a generic mechanism of structure formation, characterized by a broad distribution of cluster sizes. We demonstrate that the growth of the structures depends on the intricate balance between crosslinker-induced stabilization and simultaneous destabilization by molecular motors, a mechanism analogous to nucleation and growth in passive systems. We also show that the intricate interplay between force generation, coarsening and connectivity is responsible for the highly dynamic process of structure formation in this heterogeneous active gel, and that these competing mechanisms result in anomalous transport, reminiscent of intracellular dynamics.

  13. A New Spoke Formation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.; Krupp, N.; Krueger, H.; Roussos, E.; Ip, W.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Woch, J.; Lagg, A.; Fraenz, M.; Dougherty, M. K.; Arridge, C. S.; McAndrews, H. J.

    2006-12-01

    A new model is proposed for the formation of spokes in Saturn's rings. We contend that they are formed by the electrostatic charging of sub-micron ring particles by magnetic field-aligned electron beams originating in Saturn's atmosphere. The existence of these beams has recently been confirmed by the MIMI instrument aboard Cassini. Although observed by MIMI outside the main ring system, the beams are also expected to occur closer to the planet. On striking the rings, the electrons charge the dust, causing the levitation of the fine grains above the main ring plane. A simulation of the proposed formation process provides strong supporting evidence for the validity of the process, explaining the spokes' formation locations, morphologies, and subsequent development as observed in Voyager images. The process can be tested using Cassini observations; we outline how the model's validity can be gauged.

  14. Conductive Anodic Filament (CAF) Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Antonio

    Conductive anodic filament (CAF) is a failure mode in printed wiring boards (PWBs) which occurs under high humidity and high voltage gradient conditions. The filament, a copper salt, grows from anode to cathode along the epoxy-glass interface. Ready and Turbini (2000) identified this copper salt as the Cu 2(OH)3Cl, atacamite compound. This work has investigated the influence of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylene propylene glycol (PEPG) fluxing agents on the chemical nature of CAF. For coupons processed with PEPG flux, with and without chloride, a copper-chloride containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix. This compound was characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as CuCl and an electrochemical mechanism for the formation of the chloride-containing CAF has been proposed. For PEG flux, with and without chloride, it has been shown that CAF only formed, but no copper containing compound formed in the matrix. It appears for PEG fluxed coupons, a PEG-Cu-Cl complex forms, binds the available Cu and acts as a barrier to the formation of CuCl in the polymer matrix. Meeker and Lu Valle (1995) have previously proposed that CAF failure is best represented by two competing reactions -- the formation of a copper chloride corrosion compound (now identified as Cu2(OH)3Cl) and the formation of innocuous trapped chlorine compounds. Since no evidence of any trapped chloride compounds has been found, we propose that the formation of CAF is best represented by a single non-reversible reaction. For coupons processed with a high bromide-containing flux, bromide containing CAF was created and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to be Cu2(OH)3Br. In addition, a copper-containing compound was formed in the polymer matrix and characterized using XPS as CuBr. An electrochemical mechanism for the formation of bromide-containing CAF has been proposed based on the XPS data.

  15. Formation of the first stars.

    PubMed

    Bromm, Volker

    2013-11-01

    Understanding the formation of the first stars is one of the frontier topics in modern astrophysics and cosmology. Their emergence signalled the end of the cosmic dark ages, a few hundred million years after the Big Bang, leading to a fundamental transformation of the early Universe through the production of ionizing photons and the initial enrichment with heavy chemical elements. We here review the state of our knowledge, separating the well understood elements of our emerging picture from those where more work is required. Primordial star formation is unique in that its initial conditions can be directly inferred from the ? cold dark matter (?CDM) model of cosmological structure formation. Combined with gas cooling that is mediated via molecular hydrogen, one can robustly identify the regions of primordial star formation, the so-called minihalos, having total masses of ~10(6) M? and collapsing at redshifts z ? 20-30. Within this framework, a number of studies have defined a preliminary standard model, with the main result that the first stars were predominantly massive. This model has recently been modified to include a ubiquitous mode of fragmentation in the protostellar disks, such that the typical outcome of primordial star formation may be the formation of a binary or small multiple stellar system. We will also discuss extensions to this standard picture due to the presence of dynamically significant magnetic fields, of heating from self-annihalating WIMP dark matter, or cosmic rays. We conclude by discussing possible strategies to empirically test our theoretical models. Foremost among them are predictions for the upcoming James Webb space telescope (JWST), to be launched ~2018, and for 'stellar archaeology', which probes the abundance pattern in the oldest, most-metal poor stars in our cosmic neighborhood, thereby constraining the nucleosynthesis inside the first supernovae. PMID:24168986

  16. Cosmic Star-Formation History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madau, Piero; Dickinson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, an avalanche of new data from multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic surveys has revolutionized our view of galaxy formation and evolution. Here we review the range of complementary techniques and theoretical tools that allow astronomers to map the cosmic history of star formation, heavy element production, and reionization of the Universe from the cosmic “dark ages” to the present epoch. A consistent picture is emerging, whereby the star-formation rate density peaked approximately 3.5 Gyr after the Big Bang, at z?1.9, and declined exponentially at later times, with an e-folding timescale of 3.9 Gyr. Half of the stellar mass observed today was formed before a redshift z = 1.3. About 25% formed before the peak of the cosmic star-formation rate density, and another 25% formed after z = 0.7. Less than ˜1% of today's stars formed during the epoch of reionization. Under the assumption of a universal initial mass function, the global stellar mass density inferred at any epoch matches reasonably well the time integral of all the preceding star-formation activity. The comoving rates of star formation and central black hole accretion follow a similar rise and fall, offering evidence for coevolution of black holes and their host galaxies. The rise of the mean metallicity of the Universe to about 0.001 solar by z = 6, one Gyr after the Big Bang, appears to have been accompanied by the production of fewer than ten hydrogen Lyman-continuum photons per baryon, a rather tight budget for cosmological reionization.

  17. 30 CFR 1210.54 - Must I submit this royalty report electronically?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...or Comma Separated Values (CSV) formats. External files created by the sender must be in the proprietary ASCII and CSV file layout formats defined by ONRR. These external files can be generated from a reporter's system application. (c) Refer to...

  18. Pattern formation in the geosciences

    PubMed Central

    Goehring, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation is a natural property of nonlinear and non-equilibrium dynamical systems. Geophysical examples of such systems span practically all observable length scales, from rhythmic banding of chemical species within a single mineral crystal, to the morphology of cusps and spits along hundreds of kilometres of coastlines. This article briefly introduces the general principles of pattern formation and argues how they can be applied to open problems in the Earth sciences. Particular examples are then discussed, which summarize the contents of the rest of this Theme Issue. PMID:24191107

  19. Star formation and extinct radioactivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A. G. W.

    1984-01-01

    An assessment is made of the evidence for the existence of now-extinct radioactivities in primitive solar system material, giving attention to implications for the early stages of sun and solar system formation. The characteristics of possible disturbances in dense molecular clouds which can initiate the formation of cloud cores is discussed, with emphasis on these disturbances able to generate fresh radioactivities. A one-solar mass red giant star on the asymptotic giant branch appears to have been the best candidate to account for the short-lived extinct radioactivities in the early solar system.

  20. Formation de laborantin biologie ou chimieen

    E-print Network

    Halazonetis, Thanos

    Formation de laborantin biologie ou chimieen Unité de Formation des apprentis ochure_A6_Laborantin.indd 1 03/12/13 17:1 #12;Formation de laborantin en biologie Introduction L'Unité de Formation des Apprentis (UFA) forme les apprentis laborantin* CFC orientation biologie et orientation chimie au sein de l

  1. What Is Formation? A Conceptual Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutphen, Molly; de Lange, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the principles and connotations of the term "formation." In our discussion of formation, we draw on different disciplines in order to widen and deepen our understanding of the concept of formation. We also mirror the formation concept against comparable terms and draw on studies in which it has been applied in…

  2. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  3. ASDF: A new data format for astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfield, P.; Droettboom, M.; Bray, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present the case for developing a successor format for the immensely successful FITS format. We first review existing alternative formats and discuss why we do not believe they provide an adequate solution. The proposed format is called the Advanced Scientific Data Format (ASDF) and is based on an existing text format, YAML, that we believe removes most of the current problems with the FITS format. An overview of the capabilities of the new format is given along with specific examples. This format has the advantage that it does not limit the size of attribute names (akin to FITS keyword names) nor place restrictions on the size or type of values attributes have. Hierarchical relationships are explicit in the syntax and require no special conventions. Finally, it is capable of storing binary data within the file in its binary form. At its basic level, the format proposed has much greater applicability than for just astronomical data.

  4. Formative Assessment in Primary Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughland, Tony; Kilpatrick, Laetitia

    2015-01-01

    This action learning study in a year three classroom explored the implementation of five formative assessment principles to assist students' understandings of the scientific topic of liquids and solids. These principles were employed to give students a greater opportunity to express their understanding of the concepts. The study found that…

  5. Audiences for Contemporary Radio Formats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lull, James T.; And Others

    A radio audience survey of 110 sample geographic clusters in the Santa Barbara, California, area served a twofold purpose: the construction of a demographic profile of audience types according to radio format choices, and the identification and analysis of various audience subgroups. A skip interval technique of these geographic clusters resulted…

  6. A standard audit trail format

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, M.

    1995-02-01

    The central role of audit trails, or (more properly) logs, in security monitoring needs little description, for it is too well known for any to doubt it. Auditing, or the analysis of logs, is a central part of security not only in computer system security but also in analyzing financial and other non-technical systems. As part of this process, it is often necessary to reconcile logs from different sources. This speaks of a need for a standard logging format. A standard log format robust enough to meet the needs of heterogeneity, transportability across various network protocols, and flexibility sufficient to meet a variety of needs in very different environments must satisfy two basic properties: extensibility and portability. This report presents the author`s proposed format for a standard log record. In section 3, he shows how and where the translation should be done, and in section 4 he demonstrates how log records from several disparate systems would be put into this format. Section 5 concludes with some observations and suggestions for future work.

  7. Formation of myocardial zonal lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ratliff, N. B.; Kopelman, R. I.; Goldner, R. D.; Cruz, P. T.; Hackel, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Right ventricular papillary muscles from control cats and from cats subjected to hemorrhagic shock were studied by electron microscopy. Half of the muscles were fixed at the apex of their active length-tension curves following stimulation in a papillary muscle bath. The other half were also fixed under tension. The ultrastructure of each muscle was examined in detail. A series of stages in the formation of myocardial zonal lesions, ranging from minimal changes in the intercalated discs to severe lesions, were identified and interpreted as representing the sequential stages in the formation of zonal lesions. One of the earliest (least severe) changes in the formation of zonal lesions, the separations of actin filaments from the intercalated disc, may be critical to the subsequent development of cardiac failure in hypovolemic shock. Mitochondrial displacement was a late event in the formation of the lesions, occurring only after major alterations had taken place in the sarcomeres and intercalated discs. It was noted that the ultrastructure of mitochondria remained essentially normal, and that there was no cell swelling associated with zonal lesions. This serves as confirmatory evidence that myocardial zonal lesions are a unique form of myocyte injury, are potentially reversible, and are not caused by ischemia. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 Fig 4 Fig 5 Fig 6 Fig 7 Fig 8 Fig 9 Fig 10 PMID:1146964

  8. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying the data. They can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). ...

  9. Oxide formation: reaction details studied,

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Edward A.

    Oxide formation: reaction details studied, reported in brief Sir -- Nineteen years ago, I published-nitrosohydroxylamines undergo an alternative decomposition under very similar reaction conditions to liberate nitrous oxide, N2O (refs 4,5). Moreover, this alternative reaction involves highly electrophilic intermediates analogous

  10. Cave Formations in Wind Cave

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Wind Cave is the first cave national park and currently, the 6th most extensive cave network in the world. It's most famous for its large concentration of a fairly rare cave formation known as boxwork. Boxwork is formed when dissolved calcium carbonate crystallized in cracks in surrounding rock. The...

  11. Understanding Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila-Reese, Vladimir

    The old dream of integrating into one the study of micro and macrocosmos is now a reality. Cosmology, astrophysics and particle physics converge within a scenario (but still not a theory) of cosmic structure formation and evolution called ? Cold Dark Matter (?CDM).

  12. Understanding Galaxy Formation and Evolution

    E-print Network

    V. Avila-Reese

    2006-05-09

    The old dream of integrating into one the study of micro and macrocosmos is now a reality. Cosmology, astrophysics, and particle physics intersect in a scenario (but still not a theory) of cosmic structure formation and evolution called Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LCDM) model. This scenario emerged mainly to explain the origin of galaxies. In these lecture notes, I first present a review of the main galaxy properties, highlighting the questions that any theory of galaxy formation should explain. Then, the cosmological framework and the main aspects of primordial perturbation generation and evolution are pedagogically detached. Next, I focus on the ``dark side'' of galaxy formation, presenting a review on LCDM halo assembling and properties, and on the main candidates for non-baryonic dark matter. It is shown how the nature of elemental particles can influence on the features of galaxies and their systems. Finally, the complex processes of baryon dissipation inside the non-linearly evolving CDM halos, formation of disks and spheroids, and transformation of gas into stars are briefly described, remarking on the possibility of a few driving factors and parameters able to explain the main body of galaxy properties. A summary and a discussion of some of the issues and open problems of the LCDM paradigm are given in the final part of these notes.

  13. Star Formation in the Multiverse

    E-print Network

    Raphael Bousso; Stefan Leichenauer

    2008-10-17

    We develop a simple semi-analytic model of the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of time. We estimate the SFR for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  14. Tooth formation - delayed or absent

    MedlinePLUS

    ... at which the tooth comes in varies. Most infants get their first tooth between 6 and 9 months, but it may ... in"? What other symptoms are also present? An infant with delayed or absent tooth formation may have other symptoms and signs that ...

  15. Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction

    E-print Network

    Estalella, Robert

    Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

  16. Cloud formation in substellar atmospheres

    E-print Network

    Christiane Helling

    2008-09-26

    Clouds seem like an every-day experience. But -- do we know how clouds form on brown dwarfs and extra-solar planets? How do they look like? Can we see them? What are they composed of? Cloud formation is an old-fashioned but still outstanding problem for the Earth atmosphere, and it has turned into a challenge for the modelling of brown dwarf and exo-planetary atmospheres. Cloud formation imposes strong feedbacks on the atmospheric structure, not only due to the clouds own opacity, but also due to the depletion of the gas phase, possibly leaving behind a dynamic and still supersaturated atmosphere. I summarise the different approaches taken to model cloud formation in substellar atmospheres and workout their differences. Focusing on the phase-non-equilibrium approach to cloud formation, I demonstrate the inside we gain from detailed micro-physical modelling on for instance the material composition and grain size distribution inside the cloud layer on a Brown Dwarf atmosphere. A comparison study on four different cloud approaches in Brown Dwarf atmosphere simulations demonstrates possible uncertainties in interpretation of observational data.

  17. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  18. Formative Assessment in Dance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Heidi; Lui, Angela; Palma, Maria; Hefferen, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is crucial to students' growth as dancers. When used within the framework of formative assessment, or assessment for learning, feedback results in actionable next steps that dancers can use to improve their performances. This article showcases the work of two dance specialists, one elementary and one middle school teacher, who have…

  19. Stereotype Formation: Biased by Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences in the extent to which social groups have previously been predictive of behavioral or physical properties. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness of groups with respect to evaluatively neutral…

  20. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, III, Henry Grady

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  1. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  2. Scale formation during alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Krumrine, P.H.; Brock, G.F.; Mayer, E.H.

    1984-04-01

    Alkaline chemicals in enhanced recovery operations have been and are being used: 1) as preflush agents, 2) with polymers and surfactants, and 3) as a principal recovery agent. In these chemical flooding techniques the reactions of multivalent hardness ions with alkalis to form precipitates are of particular concern. These reactions can be prevented at the injection wells through adequate preflushing and/or the use of good quality softened water; filtration can be used to remove any precipitates. These practices minimize the precipitation and subsequent damage to the well equipment and to the formation around the injectors, and reduce the chance for injectivity impairment. In the formation a host of reactions which significantly alter the injected slug occur including: dissolution, mixing, neutralization, and ion exchange. These may lead to fluid diversion as precipitates form to block high flow channels. At the producing wells, however, precipitation and deposition phenomena are undesirable since scales can form to restrict production and foul well equipment. With the higher concentrations of alkali being used in the field, the development of well scaling has become noticeable and difficult to control using previously accepted practices. This paper describes the progress and experience gained at the Long Beach Unit, Wilmington, CA alkaline pilot dealing with scales formed in producing wells. These scales have been made up variously of calcium carbonate, magnesium silicate, and amorphous silica. In particular, the reservoir characteristics and chemical conditions leading to the scale formation are discussed in detail showing what, how, and why the scale forms. For the Wilmington alkaline pilot, the mixing during production of very hard waters from one subzone with moderately alkaline water from other subzones, and the dissolution of formation solids has led to scale formation in producers closest to the alkaline injection.

  3. Peripheral Leptin Regulates Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Russell T.; Kalra, Satya P.; Wong, Carmen P.; Philbrick, Kenneth A.; Lindenmaier, Laurence B.; Boghossian, Stephane; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2012-01-01

    Substantial evidence does not support the prevailing view that leptin, acting through a hypothalamic relay, decreases bone accrual by inhibiting bone formation. To clarify the mechanisms underlying regulation of bone architecture by leptin, we evaluated bone growth and turnover in wild type (WT) mice, leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice, leptin-deficient ob/ob mice and ob/ob mice treated with leptin. We also performed hypothalamic leptin gene therapy to determine the effect of elevated hypothalamic leptin levels on osteoblasts. Finally, to determine the effects of loss of peripheral leptin signaling on bone formation and energy metabolism, we used bone marrow (BM) from WT or db/db donor mice to reconstitute the hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cell compartments in lethally irradiated WT recipient mice. Decreases in bone growth, osteoblast-lined bone perimeter and bone formation rate were observed in ob/ob mice and greatly increased in ob/ob mice following subcutaneous administration of leptin. Similarly, hypothalamic leptin gene therapy increased osteoblast-lined bone perimeter in ob/ob mice. In spite of normal osteoclast-lined bone perimeter, db/db mice exhibited a mild but generalized osteopetrotic-like (calcified cartilage encased by bone) skeletal phenotype and greatly reduced serum markers of bone turnover. Tracking studies and histology revealed quantitative replacement of BM cells following BM transplantation. WT mice engrafted with db/db BM did not differ in energy homeostasis from untreated WT mice or WT mice engrafted with WT BM. Bone formation in WT mice engrafted with WT BM did not differ from WT mice, whereas bone formation in WT mice engrafted with db/db cells did not differ from the low rates observed in untreated db/db mice. In summary, our results indicate that leptin, acting primarily through peripheral pathways, increases osteoblast number and activity. PMID:22887758

  4. Inside-out planet formation

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C. E-mail: jt@astro.ufl.edu

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, ?, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors ? 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (?cm-m size) 'pebbles', drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ('dead zone') region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ?1 M {sub ?} planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  5. Star Formation in Satellite Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, C. M.; Alonso, M. S.; Funes, , J. G.; Ribeiro, M. B.

    2006-08-01

    We present narrowband observations of the H? emission in a sample of 31 satellites orbiting isolated giant spiral galaxies. The sample studied spans the range -19 magformation rates are 0.68 and 3.66 Msolar yr-1, respectively. Maps of the spatial distribution of ionized gas are presented. The star-forming regions show a rich structure in which frequently discrete complexes are imposed over more diffuse structures. In general, the current star formation rates are smaller than the mean values in the past, obtained from the stellar content; this probably indicates a declining rate with time in the generation of new stars. However, the reserve of gas is enough to continue fueling the current levels of star formation activity for at least another Hubble time. Four of the objects (NGC 2718b, NGC 4541e, and NGC 5965a1 and NGC 5965a2) with higher current star formation rates show clear signs of interaction with close companions of comparable brightness at projected distances of 25, 20, and 2 kpc, respectively. The only two galaxies in our sample that do not show star formation activity are members of these interacting systems, and it is unclear if this is a consequence of intrinsic properties (both are early Hubble types) or if it is related to possible disruption of the external parts due to the interaction. In the case of the pair NGC 2718a-2718b there are indications of gas transport between the galaxies. Based on observations with the Vatican Advanced Technology Telescope: the Alice P. Lennon Telescope and the Thomas J. Bannan Astrophysics Facility.

  6. Presentations frequently include material appropriated from external sources; they may incorporate tabular data from

    E-print Network

    Marshall, Cathy

    ABSTRACT Presentations frequently include material appropriated from external sources; they may potential for a new style of presentation: one that interprets and organizes materials produced by others and published on-line. Authoring such presentations requires the analysis of the source information. However

  7. Tabular Icebergs in the South Atlantic: Melt Ponding, Melt Pond Geometry and Margin Evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergienko, O. V.; Scambos, T. A.; Macayeal, D. R.; Fastook, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    In December of 2003, several massive icebergs originating from the Ronne-Filchner Ice Shelf in the souther Weddell Sea, Antarctica, arrived off the coast of South Georgia Island. MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) imagery and photography obtained by astronauts aboard the international space station revealed that one of these icebergs was covered by and extensive meltwater pond. The main curiosity associated with the pond was its arrangement as elongate edge-parallel shallow water body about 1 km inboard from the iceberg edge. An "edge levee" appeared to keep this meltwater pond from spilling over the edge of the iceberg. ICESAT (Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Sattelite) profiles of this and "dry" icebergs of a similar size revealed surface elevation maxima near the iceberg edges that may represent the same kind of topographic expression that becomes the edge levees on the melt covered iceberg. Margin ridges seen in the ICESAT data were 1-2 m high and 400-1200 m wide. The one iceberg that displayed the levee-contained melt ponds disintegrated in late summer, 2003, in a pattern very similar to therapidbreak-up observed for the Larsen A and Larsen B ice shelves in 1995 and 2002, respectively. In this presentation, we shall consider the possible origins of this levee surface meltwater pond geometry. Among the hypotheses to be tested are: a. that the flexural effects of the iceberg in response to both the bending moment introduced at the iceberg edge by sea water pressure and the loading associated with surface melt ponding can explain the "edge levees", their size and location, and b. variable ice thickness, in particular thickening at the edges of the iceberg, is necessary to explain the "edge levees". The presentation will cover both the observational record of curious iceberg meltwater pond geometry and efforts to model iceberg flexural profiles using a simple approach involving the thin-elastic plate approximation. Where possible, model results will be compared to GLAS altimeter profiles of icebergs encountering strong surface melting.

  8. GORDON i~. WOOD REFINEMENTS IN TABULAR. MODELS OF VAR.IATION

    E-print Network

    in a designated locality and give an indication of relative abun- dance there. It is these two works which set, for instance, in item 125, VEHICLE FOR A SMALL BABY, the synonym baby cabhad been selected from the synonym set baby buggy, baby cab, babycarriage, baby coach, then it would be punched as the next entry on the card

  9. DataUp: A tool to help researchers describe and share tabular data

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Carly; Kunze, John; Abrams, Stephen; Cruse, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Scientific datasets have immeasurable value, but they lose their value over time without proper documentation, long-term storage, and easy discovery and access. Across disciplines as diverse as astronomy, demography, archeology, and ecology, large numbers of small heterogeneous datasets (i.e., the long tail of data) are especially at risk unless they are properly documented, saved, and shared. One unifying factor for many of these at-risk datasets is that they reside in spreadsheets. In response to this need, the California Digital Library (CDL) partnered with Microsoft Research Connections and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to create the DataUp data management tool for Microsoft Excel. Many researchers creating these small, heterogeneous datasets use Excel at some point in their data collection and analysis workflow, so we were interested in developing a data management tool that fits easily into those work flows and minimizes the learning curve for researchers. The DataUp project began in August 2011. We first formally assessed the needs of researchers by conducting surveys and interviews of our target research groups: earth, environmental, and ecological scientists. We found that, on average, researchers had very poor data management practices, were not aware of data centers or metadata standards, and did not understand the benefits of data management or sharing. Based on our survey results, we composed a list of desirable components and requirements and solicited feedback from the community to prioritize potential features of the DataUp tool. These requirements were then relayed to the software developers, and DataUp was successfully launched in October 2012. PMID:25653834

  10. Multiple Foci Drill-Down through Tuple and Attribute Polyarchies in Tabular Data

    E-print Network

    attempt to identify key events that have enabled a particular company to perform well. Similarly, sports of these hierarchies. These multiple intersecting hierarchies define a financial market polyarchy [12]. In sports, NCAA structures for organizing tuple aggregation and table attributes. This structure is seen in sport statistics

  11. Extending Simple Tabular Reduction with Short Supports Christopher Jefferson, Peter Nightingale

    E-print Network

    St Andrews, University of

    , such as GAC-Schema [Bessi`ere and R´egin, 1997], GAC2001/3.1 [Bessi`ere et al., 2005], STR2 [Lecoutre, 2011 on the classic general-purpose GAC algo- rithm GAC-Schema [Bessi`ere and R´egin, 1997]. Compared to GAC

  12. Calcification, Storm Damage and Population Resilience of Tabular Corals under Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Madin, Joshua S.; Hughes, Terry P.; Connolly, Sean R.

    2012-01-01

    Two facets of climate change–increased tropical storm intensity and ocean acidification–are expected to detrimentally affect reef-building organisms by increasing their mortality rates and decreasing their calcification rates. Our current understanding of these effects is largely based on individual organisms’ short-term responses to experimental manipulations. However, predicting the ecologically-relevant effects of climate change requires understanding the long-term demographic implications of these organism-level responses. In this study, we investigate how storm intensity and calcification rate interact to affect population dynamics of the table coral Acropora hyacinthus, a dominant and geographically widespread ecosystem engineer on wave-exposed Indo-Pacific reefs. We develop a mechanistic framework based on the responses of individual-level demographic rates to changes in the physical and chemical environment, using a size-structured population model that enables us to rigorously incorporate uncertainty. We find that table coral populations are vulnerable to future collapse, placing in jeopardy many other reef organisms that are dependent upon them for shelter and food. Resistance to collapse is largely insensitive to predicted changes in storm intensity, but is highly dependent on the extent to which calcification influences both the mechanical properties of reef substrate and the colony-level trade-off between growth rate and skeletal strength. This study provides the first rigorous quantitative accounting of the demographic implications of the effects of ocean acidification and changes in storm intensity, and provides a template for further studies of climate-induced shifts in ecosystems, including coral reefs. PMID:23056379

  13. Constraint Lingo: A program for solving logic puzzles and other tabular constraint problems.

    E-print Network

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    either blueberry or lemon soda, didn't sit in seat number one. 2. Robert, who didn't sit next to Kate tahiti liana woman 5 peach belgium martin man 3 lemon quebec robert man 2 blueberry martinique 3 position: 1 .. 6 circular CLASS soda: blueberry lemon peach tangelo kiwi grapefruit CLASS visits: quebec

  14. Constraint Lingo: A program for solving logic puzzles and other tabular constraint problems.

    E-print Network

    Truszczynski, Miroslaw

    to Quebec, who drank either blueberry or lemon soda, didn't sit in seat number one. 2. Robert, who didn robert man 2 blueberry martinique 3 Representation in Constraint Lingo We encode the implicit constraints robert PARTITION gender: men women CLASS position: 1 .. 6 circular CLASS soda: blueberry lemon peach

  15. Multiple Foci Drill-Down through Tuple and Attribute Aggregation Polyarchies in Tabular Data

    E-print Network

    for financial statement analysis is called DuPont Analysis [10]. Typically, the DuPont Analysis ratio tree (Figure 2) is used to lead the analysis. #12;Figure 2: DuPont ratio formula hierarchy used to aggregate

  16. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOEpatents

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  17. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  18. Scale formation during alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Krumrine, P.H.; Brock, G.F.; Mayer, E.M.

    1984-04-01

    Alkaline chemicals in enhanced recovery operations have been and are being used: 1) as preflush agents, 2) with polymers and surfactants, and 3) as a principal recovery agent. In these chemical flooding techniques the reactions of multivalent hardness ions with alkalis to form precipitates are of particular concern. These reactions can be prevented at the injection wells through adequate preflushing and/or the use of good quality softened water; filtration can be used to remove any precipitates. These practices minimize the precipitation and subsequent damage to the well equipment and to the formation around the injectors, and reduce the chance for injectivity impairment. In the formation a host of reactions which significantly alter the injected slug occur including: dissolution, mixing, neutralization, and ion exchange. These may lead to fluid diversion as precipitates form to block high flow channels.

  19. Formation of quasiparallel Alfven solitons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, R. L.; Kennel, C. F.; Mjolhus, E.

    1992-01-01

    The formation of quasi-parallel Alfven solitons is investigated through the inverse scattering transformation (IST) for the derivative nonlinear Schroedinger (DNLS) equation. The DNLS has a rich complement of soliton solutions consisting of a two-parameter soliton family and a one-parameter bright/dark soliton family. In this paper, the physical roles and origins of these soliton families are inferred through an analytic study of the scattering data generated by the IST for a set of initial profiles. The DNLS equation has as limiting forms the nonlinear Schroedinger (NLS), Korteweg-de-Vries (KdV) and modified Korteweg-de-Vries (MKdV) equations. Each of these limits is briefly reviewed in the physical context of quasi-parallel Alfven waves. The existence of these limiting forms serves as a natural framework for discussing the formation of Alfven solitons.

  20. Star formation in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espinosa, J. M. Rodriguez; Rudy, Richard J.; Jones, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the IRAS data for a sample of classical (optically selected) Seyfert galaxies is presented. The IRAS fluxes at 25 micron, 60 micron, and 100 micron are found to be uncorrelated or only very weakly correlated with the UV/Optical continuum flux and the near and mid IR flux at 3.5 and 10 microns. To investigate the possibility that star formation accounts for the far IR flux, the IRAS measurements for the Seyfert galaxies are compared to IRAS observations of a sample of normal spiral galaxies, and a sample of Starburst galaxies. It is shown that the far IR luminosities and far IR colors of Seyfert galaxies are indistinguishable from those of the Starburst galaxies. Besides, normal galaxies are an order of magnitude less luminous than both the Seyfert and the Starburst galaxies. This indicates that star formation produces the bulk of the far infrared emission in Seyfert galaxies.

  1. Engineering biofilm formation and dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Thomas K.; Hong, Seok Hoon; Ma, Qun

    2011-01-01

    Anywhere water is in the liquid state, bacteria will exist as biofilms, which are complex communities of cells cemented together. Although frequently associated with disease and biofouling, biofilms are also important for engineering applications, such as bioremediation, biocatalysis and microbial fuel cells. Here we review approaches to alter genetic circuits and cell signaling toward controlling biofilm formation, and emphasize utilizing these tools for engineering applications. Based on a better understanding of the genetic basis of biofilm formation, we find that biofilms may be controlled by manipulating extracellular signals and that they may be dispersed using conserved intracellular signals and regulators. Biofilms could also be formed at specific locations where they might be engineered to make chemicals or treat human disease. PMID:21131080

  2. Developmental Pattern Formation in Phases.

    PubMed

    Kicheva, Anna; Briscoe, James

    2015-10-01

    Cells in developing organs undergo a series of changes in their transcriptional state until a complete repertoire of cell types is specified. These changes in cell identity, together with the control of tissue growth, determine the pattern of gene expression in the tissue. Recent studies explore the dynamics of pattern formation during development and provide new insights into the control mechanisms. Changes in morphogen signalling and transcriptional networks control the specification of cell types. This is often followed by a distinct second phase, where pattern is elaborated by tissue growth. Here, we discuss the transitions between distinct phases in pattern formation. We consider the implications of the underlying mechanisms for understanding how reproducible patterns form during development. PMID:26410404

  3. Formation of Ultracold Polar Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor-Juarros, E.; Côté, R.; Kirby, K.

    2002-05-01

    A variety of experimental techniques have been employed to create a number of ultracold molecules, including CaH, Na_2, K_2, Cs_2, Rb2 and CO. Novel effects are predicted to occur in samples of ultracold polar molecules.(L. Santos et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 1791 (2000). We present calculations of the formation rate of ultracold hydrides (LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH), using the most accurate molecular potentials and dipole moments available. We show that these polar molecules can be produced in selected vibrational and rotational states by stimulated radiative association in a mixture of ultracold hydrogen and alkali metal atoms. We study the properties of these atomic mixtures as well as those of the hydrides, and explore the effect of shape resonances on the formation rates. [2ex] *Supported by NSF

  4. Multiwavelength star formation indicators: Observations

    E-print Network

    H. R. Schmitt; D. Calzetti; L. Armus; M. Giavalisco; T. M. Heckman; R. C. Kennicutt Jr.; C. Leitherer; G. R. Meurer

    2006-02-03

    We present a compilation of multiwavelength data on different star formation indicators for a sample of nearby star forming galaxies. Here we discuss the observations, reductions and measurements of ultraviolet images obtained with STIS, on board the Hubble Space Telescope, ground-based Halpha, and VLA 8.46 GHz radio images. These observations are complemented with infrared fluxes, as well as large aperture optical radio and ultraviolet data from the literature. This database will be used in a forthcoming paper to compare star formation rates at different wavebands. We also present spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for those galaxies with at least one far-infrared measurements from ISO, longward of 100 um. These SEDs are divided in two groups, those which are dominated by the far-infrared emission, and those where the contribution from the far-infrared and optical emission is comparable. These SEDs are useful tools to study the properties of high redshift galaxies.

  5. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P {sub BH}(M {sub ZAMS}) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  6. Method for fracturing subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Almond, S. W.; Conway, M. W.

    1985-11-19

    The present invention relates to a thermally stable crosslinked gel fracturing fluid for use in the treatment of subterranean formations penetrated by a well bore. The fracturing fluid comprises an aqueous liquid, a gelling agent comprising a selected modified cellulose ether, a crosslinking agent and any additional additives that may be present. The fracturing fluid is thermally stable under shear at temperatures in excess of about 200/sup 0/ F.

  7. Membrane adhesion and domain formation

    E-print Network

    Thomas R. Weikl; Reinhard Lipowsky

    2007-09-23

    We review theoretical results for the adhesion-induced phase behavior of biomembranes. The focus is on models in which the membranes are represented as discretized elastic sheets with embedded adhesion molecules. We present several mechanism that lead to the formation of domains during adhesion, and discuss the time-dependent evolution of domain patterns obtained in Monte-Carlo simulations. The simulated pattern dynamics has striking similarities to the pattern evolution observed during T cell adhesion.

  8. Pattern formation through gravitational instability.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rica, S.

    1995-05-01

    As a consequence of gravitational instability, a spherical nebula creates a well defined pattern of matter. It follows that the largest concentrations of matter - where the planets were probably created - occur at well defined distances following a geometrical progression: the Titius-Bode law for the Solar System. The universality (in the form) of this law is verified for different planetary systems such as: Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus. It is also shown that turbulent vortices can be responsible for the formation of planets.

  9. Formation mechanism for interstellar molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harteck, P.; Beaudoin, A.; Reeves, R.

    1973-01-01

    The major ions in the region of the interstellar clouds include H(+) and H2(+). The ions may be formed by photo ionization, cosmic rays, or other processes. The chemistry of H2(+) is considered and reactions involving carbon atoms are described. The formation of nitrogen-containing molecules may occur mainly on interstellar grains. Reactions involving negative ions may also contribute to the production of certain species.

  10. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-print Network

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  11. ISM Turbulence (and Star Formation)

    E-print Network

    Klessen,Ralf

    abundance hydrogen H 1 1.000.000 deuterium 1H2 1 16 helium He 2 68.000 carbon C 6 420 nitrogen N 7 90 oxygen ---> formation of molecular clouds the first (strong) magnetic fields in the universe summary Taurus #12;fff Star;Ralf Klessen: San Diego, 15.06.2010 Abundances, scaled to 1.000.000 H atoms element atomic number

  12. SCALE FORMATION IN CHRYSOPHYCEAN ALGAE

    PubMed Central

    Brown, R. Malcolm; Franke, Werner W.; Kleinig, Hans; Falk, Heinz; Sitte, Peter

    1970-01-01

    The cell wall of the marine chrysophycean alga Pleurochrysis scherfellii is composed of distinct wall fragments embedded in a gelatinous mass. The latter is a polysaccharide of pectic character which is rich in galactose and ribose. These wall fragments are identified as scales. They have been isolated and purified from the vegetative mother cell walls after zoospore formation. Their ultrastructure is described in an electron microscope study combining sectioning, freeze-etch, and negative staining techniques. The scales consist of a layer of concentrically arranged microfibrils (ribbons with cross-sections of 12 to 25 x 25 to 40 A) and underlying radial fibrils of similar dimensions. Such a network-plate is densely coated with particles which are assumed to be identical to the pectic component. The microfibrils are resistant to strong alkaline treatment and have been identified as cellulose by different methods, including sugar analysis after total hydrolysis, proton resonance spectroscopical examination (NMR spectroscopy) of the benzoylated product, and diverse histochemical tests. The formation and secretion of the scales can be followed along the maturing Golgi cisternae starting from a pronounced dilated "polymerization center" as a completely intracisternal process which ends in the exocytotic extrusion of the scales. The scales reveal the very same ultrastructure within the Golgi cisternae as they do in the cell wall. The present finding represents the first evidence on cellulose formation by the Golgi apparatus and is discussed in relation to a basic scheme for cellulose synthesis in plant cells in general. PMID:5513606

  13. Theory of Planetary System Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1996-01-01

    Observations and theoretical considerations support the idea that the Solar System formed by the collapse of tenuous interstellar matter to a disk of gas and dust (the primitive solar nebula), from which the Sun and other components separated under the action of dissipative forces and by the coagulation of solid material. Thus, planets are understood to be contemporaneous byproducts of star formation. Because the circumstellar disks of new stars are easier to observe than mature planetary systems, the possibility arises that the nature and variety of planets might be studied from observations of the conditions of their birth. A useful theory of planetary system formation would therefore relate the properties of circumstellar disks both to the initial conditions of star formation and to the consequent properties of planets to those of the disk. Although the broad outlines of such a theory are in place, many aspects are either untested, controversial, or otherwise unresolved; even the degree to which such a comprehensive theory is possible remains unknown.

  14. Supernova Feedback in Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Y.; Teyssier, R.

    2008-06-01

    The hierarchical model of galaxy formation is known to suffer from the ``over-cooling'' problem: the high efficiency of radiative cooling results in too much baryonic matter in a condensed phase (namely, cold gas or stars) when compared to observations. A solution proposed by many authors (see Springel & Hernquist 2003; Fujita et al. 2004; Rasera & Teyssier 2005) is feedback due to supernova (SN) driven winds or active galactic nuclei. Modeling SN feedback by direct injection of thermal energy usually turns out to be inefficient in galaxy-scale simulations, due to the quasi-instantaneous radiation of the SN energy. To avoid this effect, we have developed a new method to incorporate SN feedback in cosmological simulations: using temporary test particles, we reproduce explicitly a local Sedov blast wave solution in the gas distribution. We have performed several self-consistent runs of isolated Navarro, Frenk, & White (1996, hereafter NFW) halos with radiative cooling, star formation, SN feedback and metal enrichment using the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES (Teyssier 2002). We have explored the influence of SN feedback on the formation and the evolution of galaxies with different masses. We have studied the efficiency of the resulting galactic winds, as a function of the mass of the parent halo.

  15. Memory Formation Shaped by Astroglia

    PubMed Central

    Zorec, Robert; Horvat, Anemari; Vardjan, Nina; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes, the most heterogeneous glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS), execute a multitude of homeostatic functions and contribute to memory formation. Consolidation of synaptic and systemic memory is a prolonged process and hours are required to form long-term memory. In the past, neurons or their parts have been considered to be the exclusive cellular sites of these processes, however, it has now become evident that astrocytes provide an important and essential contribution to memory formation. Astrocytes participate in the morphological remodeling associated with synaptic plasticity, an energy-demanding process that requires mobilization of glycogen, which, in the CNS, is almost exclusively stored in astrocytes. Synaptic remodeling also involves bidirectional astroglial-neuronal communication supported by astroglial receptors and release of gliosignaling molecules. Astroglia exhibit cytoplasmic excitability that engages second messengers, such as Ca2+, for phasic, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), for tonic signal coordination with neuronal processes. The detection of signals by astrocytes and the release of gliosignaling molecules, in particular by vesicle-based mechanisms, occurs with a significant delay after stimulation, orders of magnitude longer than that present in stimulus–secretion coupling in neurons. These particular arrangements position astrocytes as integrators ideally tuned to support time-dependent memory formation. PMID:26635551

  16. A New Spoke Formation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Geraint H.; Krupp, N.; Krueger, H.; Roussos, E.; Ip, W.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Woch, J.; Lagg, A.; Fraenz, M.; Dougherty, M. K.; Arridge, C. S.; McAndrews, H. J.

    2006-09-01

    We propose a new model for the formation of spokes in Saturn's rings. The model involves the electrostatic charging of sub-micron dust grains in the rings by magnetic field-aligned electron beams. Such beams have recently been observed by the MIMI instrument aboard Cassini at 3.1 Saturn radii, outside the main ring system. It is reasonable to expect the beams to also occur closer to the planet. We contend that on striking the rings, the electron beams’ dust-charging effects cause the levitation of the fine grains above the main ring plane, forming the spokes. Using a semi-quantitative model, we explain the spokes’ formation locations, their initial morphologies, and the subsequent development of their appearance as reported in studies based on Voyager observations. Controlling effects on the spokes’ locations are also proposed. We outline tests that can be carried out using Cassini datasets to gauge the validity of our proposed formation process. MIMI/LEMMS work at MPS is financed by the German Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung, and by the Max Planck Gesellschaft.

  17. Formation of the hurricane eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigh, Jonathan L.

    This dissertation consists of three distinct studies which investigate aspects of eye formation. The first study reviews eye phenomenon in a variety of vortices ranging from simple vortices to the menagerie of geophysical vortices, emphasizing similarities and differences to the eyes formed in hurricanes. The hurricane eye is found to be a paradoxical structure imposed by conservation of angular momentum and the boundaries of the vortex. A comprehensive definition for hurricane eye formation is proposed and various eye formation mechanisms are summarized. The next study presents a simple theoretical argument to isolate the conditions under which a tropical cyclone can rapidly develop a warm-core thermal structure and subsequently approach a steady state. The theoretical argument is based on the balanced vortex model and, in particular, on the associated transverse circulation equation and the geopotential tendency equation. The transverse circulation and the temperature tendency in a tropical vortex depend not only on the diabatic forcing, but also on the spatial distributions of the static stability, the baroclinity, and the inertial stability. The vortex response to diabatic heating depends critically on whether the heating occurs in the low inertial stability region outside the radius of maximum wind or in the high inertial stability region inside the radius of maximum wind. This result suggests that rapid intensification is favored for storms which have at least some of the eyewall convection inside the radius of maximum wind. The development of an eye partially removes diabatic heating from the high inertial stability region of the storm center, yet rapid intensification may continue if the eyewall heating continues to become more efficient. As the warm core matures and static stability increases over the inner core, conditions there become less favorable for deep upright convection and the storm tends to approach a steady state. The final study characterizes the kinematic and thermodynamic changes that occur before, during, and after the initial eye formations of a broad set of Atlantic tropical cyclones. To obtain the requisite structure and intensity parameters, a new data set has been synthesized from the Vortex Data Messages transmitted by routine aircraft reconnaissance from 1989--2008. Intensity ranges are determined for the times when the eye/eyewall structure first appears in aircraft radar and infrared satellite imagery. The mean intensity at which an eye is first observed in both aircraft or satellite imagery is found to be 58 kt, somewhat lower than reported in previous studies. Changes about the time of eye formation are examined for intensity, the radius of maximum winds, the minimum Rossby radius of deformation, eye temperature and dew point temperature depression. Storms are found to intensify most rapidly near the time of eye formation, especially when a persistent eye is observed in infrared satellite imagery. Many storms which are forming eyes are found to undergo a substantial and rapid contraction in the radius of maximum winds during the 24-h period before the eye is observed; once the eye is present, this contraction slows or ceases. Strong warming at lower levels (850 or 700 hPa) of the eye is not observed to correlate well with the time in which the eye is first observed. Finally, observations suggest that the dynamical heating efficiency of the resulting eyewall increases even as the physical scale of the efficient heating region decreases. This allows the storm to continue intensifying even though the total inner core diabatic heating may decrease. The answer to why some storms fail to form eyes may shed light on whether eye formation is a stochastic process involving constructive and destructive mesoscale interactions---or whether it is a manifold attractor of the system sometimes stymied by an unfavorable environment.

  18. GenBank at Los Alamos: User manual, training guide, and reference manual for the ASCII AWB

    SciTech Connect

    Reese, G.C.; Keen, G.M.; Gilna, P.; Cinkosky, M.J.

    1993-03-15

    The GenBank project at Los Alamos collects nucleotide sequence submissions from the biological research community. This work includes the processing of data received in several different forms as well as maintenance and quality control on those submissions. This manual explains the procedures involved in that work for both Los Alamos GenBank staff and off-site users. The GenBank database stores annotated DNA sequences. This manual contains the procedures for depositing these sequences into the database. There are two ways to do this. Either the sequence arrives at GenBank as a submission and is entered by the database staff or the sequence is directly entered by an off-site user. The Annotator's WorkBench (AWB), which is a database browsing and editing tool, is used in both cases. This manual is for GenBank staff and off-site users of the GenBank database at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It contains an introduction and tutorials for AWB, as well as procedures for entering sequences either as submissions or as data directly deposited by an off-site user. Instructions for all of these are found in Chapters 2 through 4. The introduction to AWB is in Chapter 2. Instructions for submission handling are in Chapter 3. Instructions for entering sequence information are in Chapter 4. Off-site users should look at section 4.3 for instructions on entering a sequence. In addition, the manual describes various in-house curatorial tasks that are part of maintaining the database, as well as the procedures and conventions for annotating sequences. The procedures for annotation and review are in Chapters 5 and 6. The description of in-house curator's tasks is in Chapter 7. The appendices contain: Annotation conventions, two reference chapters on AWB and other utility programs, a complete list of all the forms, fields, and commands in AWB and descriptions of other (non-AWB) software utilities used by database staff.

  19. THE FORMATION OF LIFE Robert L. Kurucz

    E-print Network

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    THE FORMATION OF LIFE Robert L. Kurucz Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics November 7, 2000 Revised October 15, 2008; November 20, 2011 #12;THE FORMATION OF LIFE Robert L. Kurucz Harvard-Smithsonian

  20. XML Format for SESAME and LEOS

    SciTech Connect

    Durrenberger, J K; Neely, J R; Sterne, P A

    2009-04-29

    The objective of this document is to describe the XML format used by LLNL and LANL to represent the equation-of-state and related material information in the LEOS and SESAME data libraries. The primary purpose of this document is to describe a specific XML format for representing EOS data that is tailored to the nature of the underlying data and is amenable to conversion to both legacy SESAME and LEOS binary formats. The secondary purpose is to describe an XML format that lends itself to a 'natural' representation in a binary file format of the SESAME, pdb or hdf5 form so that this format and related tools can be used for the rapid and efficient development and implementation of prototype data structures. This document describes the XML format only. A working knowledge of LEOS and SESAME formats is assumed.

  1. Dynamics and control of electromagnetic satellite formations

    E-print Network

    Ahsun, Umair, 1972-

    2007-01-01

    Satellite formation flying is an enabling technology for many space missions, especially for space-based telescopes. Usually there is a tight formation-keeping requirement that may need constant expenditure of fuel or at ...

  2. Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 35 NIST/EPA Gas-Phase Infrared; JCAMP Format (PC database for purchase)   This data collection contains 5,228 infrared spectra in the JCAMP-DX (Joint Committee for Atomic and Molecular Physical Data "Data Exchange") format.

  3. NCI Best Case Summary Format-OCCAM

    Cancer.gov

    The following is a sample Case Report Format used to submit BCS Case Summaries Please adhere to the suggestions below. You may alter the format but include as much of the indicated content as possible.

  4. 49 CFR 563.8 - Data format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Data format 563.8 Section 563.8 Transportation...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EVENT DATA RECORDERS § 563.8 Data format (a) The data elements listed in...

  5. SAR polar format implementation with MATLAB.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Grant D.; Doerry, Armin Walter

    2005-11-01

    Traditional polar format image formation for Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) requires a large amount of processing power and memory in order to accomplish in real-time. These requirements can thus eliminate the possible usage of interpreted language environments such as MATLAB. However, with trapezoidal aperture phase history collection and changes to the traditional polar format algorithm, certain optimizations make MATLAB a possible tool for image formation. Thus, this document's purpose is two-fold. The first outlines a change to the existing Polar Format MATLAB implementation utilizing the Chirp Z-Transform that improves performance and memory usage achieving near realtime results for smaller apertures. The second is the addition of two new possible image formation options that perform a more traditional interpolation style image formation. These options allow the continued exploration of possible interpolation methods for image formation and some preliminary results comparing image quality are given.

  6. Treating nahcolite containing formations and saline zones

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-06-11

    A method for treating a nahcolite containing subsurface formation includes removing water from a saline zone in or near the formation. The removed water is heated using a steam and electricity cogeneration facility. The heated water is provided to the nahcolite containing formation. A fluid is produced from the nahcolite containing formation. The fluid includes at least some dissolved nahcolite. At least some of the fluid is provided to the saline zone.

  7. Star formation laws, rates, thresholds in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karoline Walch, Stefanie

    2015-08-01

    Star formation at galactic scales is subject to a number of scaling relations, which are motivated by observations. I will review the theoretical ideas that could explain these and bring put them in context with a modern view of the multi-phase, turbulent interstellar medium. I will address the questions: Is molecular gas important for star formation? What physical processes regulate star formation on galactic scales? Is there a surface density threshold for star formation? How important is the galactic environment?

  8. Formation and evolution of disk galaxies

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2008-09-02

    Global star formation is the key to understanding galaxy disk formation. This in turn depends on gravitational instability of disks and continuing gas accretion as well as minor merging. A key component is feedback from supernovae. Primary observational constraints on disk galaxy formation and evolution include the Schmidt-Kennicutt law, the Tully-Fisher relation and the galaxy luminosity function. I will review how theory confronts phenomenology, and discuss future prospects for refining our understanding of disk formation.

  9. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and....1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with sodium hydroxide. (b) The ingredient...

  10. Formative Constructs Implemented via Common Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiblmaier, Horst; Bentler, Peter M.; Mair, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been a renewed interest in formative measurement and its role in properly specified models. Formative measurement models are difficult to identify, and hence to estimate and test. Existing solutions to the identification problem are shown to not adequately represent the formative constructs of interest. We propose a new two-step…

  11. 48 CFR 333.212-70 - Formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Formats. 333.212-70 Section 333.212-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Disputes and Appeals 333.212-70 Formats. (a) Contracting activities shall use the following format...

  12. Transfer of Training with Formation Flight Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Gary B.; Cyrus, Michael L.

    The present research was conducted to determine transfer of practice from a formation simulator to actual aircraft flight for the wing aircraft component of the formation flying task. Evidence in support of positive transfer was obtained by comparing students trained in the formation simulator with students who were essentially untrained and with…

  13. Composition and method of stimulating subterranean formations

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, W.R.; Walker, M.L.; Ford, G.F.

    1987-07-14

    This patent describes a method of treating a subterranean formation containing iron comprising contacting a subterranean formation with an aqueous fluid containing a compound consisting essentially of at least one member selected from the group consisting of: dihydroxymaleic acid, salts of dihydroxymaleic acid, glucono-deltalactone present in an amount sufficient to prevent the precipitation of ferric iron during contact with the subterranean formation.

  14. PALAEODIVERSITY AND FORMATION COUNTS: REDUNDANCY OR BIAS?

    E-print Network

    Benton, Michael

    comprises finds from Europe and North America, where new formation discoveries reached their half-life outside Europe and North America and the formation half-life for these `new' lands is 1986, showing vertebrates at least, formation counts of various kinds are poor predictors of sampling, missing, for example

  15. Successful Student Writing through Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2010-01-01

    Use formative assessment to dramatically improve your students' writing. In "Successful Student Writing Through Formative Assessment", educator and international speaker Harry G. Tuttle shows you how to guide middle and high school students through the prewriting, writing, and revision processes using formative assessment techniques that work.…

  16. 7 CFR 1755.407 - Data formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Data formats. 1755.407 Section 1755.407 Agriculture... TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.407 Data formats. The following suggested formats listed in this section may be used for recording the test...

  17. 7 CFR 1755.407 - Data formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Data formats. 1755.407 Section 1755.407 Agriculture... TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.407 Data formats. The following suggested formats listed in this section may be used for recording the test...

  18. 7 CFR 1755.407 - Data formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Data formats. 1755.407 Section 1755.407 Agriculture... TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.407 Data formats. The following suggested formats listed in this section may be used for recording the test...

  19. 7 CFR 1755.407 - Data formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Data formats. 1755.407 Section 1755.407 Agriculture... TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.407 Data formats. The following suggested formats listed in this section may be used for recording the test...

  20. 7 CFR 1755.407 - Data formats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Data formats. 1755.407 Section 1755.407 Agriculture... TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICIES ON SPECIFICATIONS, ACCEPTABLE MATERIALS, AND STANDARD CONTRACT FORMS § 1755.407 Data formats. The following suggested formats listed in this section may be used for recording the test...

  1. Word Formation: The Anarchy of the Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Robert

    This is a state-of-the-art review of word formative morphology. The paper surveys three loosely knit 'schools' of word formation: (1) the Generative school, (2) the Continental school, and (3) the Slavicist school. It points out that much work in word formation is being duplicated because of a lack of coordination and communication between the…

  2. A new PICL trace file format

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, P.H.

    1992-10-01

    A trace file format is described that will be used in future releases of the Portable Instrumented Communication Library (PICL) and ParaGraph. The new format provides improved support for tracing and profiling PICL communication primitives and user-defined events. The new format is also easily extended and may be useful in other instrumentation packages and performance visualization tools.

  3. Diet History Questionnaire II: Size Formats

    Cancer.gov

    Two serving size formats are used on the NCI versions of the DHQ as shown below. Format 1 is used for nearly all serving size questions. Format 2 is used only in special cases, where 'never' is allowed as a response.

  4. Brown dwarf formation in clusters Matthew Bate

    E-print Network

    Joergens, Viki

    Brown dwarf formation in clusters Matthew Bate University of Exeter #12;· Bate, Bonnell & Bromm · Resolved binaries with · separations >1 AU · disc with radii >10 AU · Produced 23 stars & 27 brown dwarfs disc First cluster formation calculation to resolve brown dwarfs #12;Brown dwarf formation · How do

  5. Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays

    E-print Network

    Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays Daniel W. Kwon and David W. Miller February 2005 SSL # 2-05 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays By DANIEL W. KWON S;#12;Electromagnetic Formation Flight of Satellite Arrays by DANIEL W. KWON Submitted to the Department of Aeronautics

  6. Supermassive Black Holes and Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2001-09-19

    The formation of supermassive black holes (SMBH) is intimately related to galaxy formation, although precisely how remains a mystery. I speculate that formation of, and feedback from, SMBH may alleviate problems that have arisen in our understanding of the cores of dark halos of galaxies.

  7. Some Current Issues in Galaxy Formation

    E-print Network

    Joseph Silk

    2004-01-06

    I describe recent challenges in hierarchical galaxy formation theory, including the formation of disk galaxies and of ellipticals. Problems with cold dark matter are summarized, and possible solutions are presented. I conclude with a description of the prospects for observing one of the most important ingredients in galaxy formation theory, namely cold dark matter.

  8. String Formatting Considered Harmful for Novice Programmers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Michael C.; Jadud, Matthew C.; Rodrigo, Ma. Mercedes T.

    2010-01-01

    In Java, "System.out.printf" and "String.format" consume a specialised kind of string commonly known as a format string. In our study of first-year students at the Ateneo de Manila University, we discovered that format strings present a substantial challenge for novice programmers. Focusing on their first laboratory we found that 8% of all the…

  9. Feedback During Massive Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kei; Tan, Jonathan C.; Zhang, Yichen

    2016-01-01

    We present models of photoionization of massive protostellar cores, and show the impact of this ionization feedback on the efficiency of star formation and its observational features. Based on the Core Accretion scenario, we construct the collapse model of rotating massive-protostellar cloud cores together with a protostellar evolutional calculation, including feedback effects from a MHD disk wind, photoionization and radiation pressure. First, the MHD wind creates a bipolar outflow whose opening angle increases over the timescale of mass accretion. The ionizing luminosity dramatically increases after the protostar reaches ~ 5 Msun due to Kelvin-Helmholz contraction, and the MHD wind is photoionized when the protostellar mass reaches ~ 10 - 20 Msun. As the ionizing and bolometric luminosities increase, the outflow opening angle becomes wider due to radiation pressure feedback. By this combination of feedback processes, the envelope is eroded and the mass infall rate is significantly reduced to that arriving only from the disk-shielded equatorial region. At a protostellar mass of ~ 50 - 100 Msun, depending on the initial core properties, the mass accretion is halted by disk photoevaporation. In this way, feedback significantly reduces the star formation efficiency when forming massive stars from massive cloud cores, which could produce a cutoff at the high-mass end of the initial mass function. Along this evolutionary calculation, we also compute the detailed structure of the photoionized regions using a ray-tracing radiative transfer code and evaluate their emission signatures. Their free-free continuum and recombination line emissions are consistent with the variety of observed radio sources associated with massive protostars, i.e., jets and ultra/hyper-compact HII regions. The comparison between our models and such observations enables us to better define the evolutionary sequence of massive star formation.

  10. Formation of Kuiper Belt Binaries

    E-print Network

    Peter Goldreich; Yoram Lithwick; Re'em Sari

    2002-08-28

    It appears that at least several percent of large Kuiper belt objects are members of wide binaries. Physical collisions are too infrequent to account for their formation. Collisionless gravitational interactions are more promising. These provide two channels for binary formation. In each, the initial step is the formation of a transient binary when two large bodies penetrate each other's Hill spheres. Stabilization of a transient binary requires that it lose energy. Either dynamical friction due to small bodies or the scattering of a third large body can be responsible. Our estimates favor the former, albeit by a small margin. We predict that most objects of size comparable to those currently observed in the Kuiper belt are members of multiple systems. More specifically, we derive the probability that a large body is a member of a binary with semi-major axis of order a. The probability depends upon sigma, the total surface density, Sigma, the surface density of large bodies having radius R, and theta=10^-4, the angle subtended by the solar radius as seen from the Kuiper belt. For (sigma/Sigma)RKuiper belt, we estimate Sigma/rho=3 10^-4cm and R=100km. We obtain sigma/rho=0.3cm by extrapolating the surface density deduced for the minimum mass solar nebula. Rough predictions are: outside of the critical separation r_u/a_odot=3'', the binary probability is 0.3%; at separations of 0.2'', comparable to current resolving capabilities, it reaches 5%, in agreement with results from the HST binary survey by Brown.

  11. Dust formation by failed supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2014-11-01

    We consider dust formation during the ejection of the hydrogen envelope of a red supergiant during a failed supernova (SN) creating a black hole. While the dense, slow moving ejecta are very efficient at forming dust, only the very last phases of the predicted visual transient will be obscured. The net grain production consists of Md ˜ 10- 2 M? of very large grains (10-1000 ?m). This means that failed SNe could be the source of the very large extrasolar dust grains possibly identified by Ulysses, Galileo and radar studies of meteoroid re-entry trails rather than their coming from an ejection process associated with protoplanetary or other discs.

  12. Cosmological Acceleration from Structure Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Räsänen, Syksy

    We discuss the Buchert equations, which describe the average expansion of an inhomogeneous dust universe. In the limit of small perturbations, they reduce to the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker equations. However, when the universe is very inhomogeneous, the behavior can be qualitatively different from the FRW case. In particular, the average expansion rate can accelerate even though the local expansion rate decelerates everywhere. We clarify the physical meaning of this paradoxical feature with a simple toy model, and demonstrate how acceleration is intimately connected with gravitational collapse. This provides a link to structure formation, which in turn has a preferred time around the era when acceleration has been observed to start.

  13. Tube formation in fluid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Sknepnek, Rastko; Schwarz, Jennifer; Bowick, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Consider a point force pulling on a fluid membrane. As the magnitude of the force increases, there is a first-order shape transition from nontubular to tubular with a force barrier in between. Motivated by tube formation in endocytosis in yeast, we generalize this problem by including additional force components and steric interactions. Both new ingredients are a consequence of the underlying actin cytoskeletal network, which exerts active forces on the cell membrane to deform it into a tube. We study this generalized problem using variational and Monte Carlo methods in order to quantify endocytosis in yeast.

  14. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  15. Formation Flying and Deformable Instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Rio, Yvon

    2009-05-11

    Astronomers have always attempted to build very stable instruments. They fight all that can cause mechanical deformation or image motion. This has led to well established technologies (autoguide, active optics, thermal control, tip/tilt correction), as well as observing methods based on the use of controlled motion (scanning, micro scanning, shift and add, chopping and nodding). Formation flying disturbs this practice. It is neither possible to reduce the relative motion to very small amplitudes, nor to control it at will. Some impacts on Simbol-X instrument design, and operation are presented.

  16. Petrophysical evaluation of subterranean formations

    DOEpatents

    Klein, James D; Schoderbek, David A; Mailloux, Jason M

    2013-05-28

    Methods and systems are provided for evaluating petrophysical properties of subterranean formations and comprehensively evaluating hydrate presence through a combination of computer-implemented log modeling and analysis. Certain embodiments include the steps of running a number of logging tools in a wellbore to obtain a variety of wellbore data and logs, and evaluating and modeling the log data to ascertain various petrophysical properties. Examples of suitable logging techniques that may be used in combination with the present invention include, but are not limited to, sonic logs, electrical resistivity logs, gamma ray logs, neutron porosity logs, density logs, NRM logs, or any combination or subset thereof.

  17. Zonal flow as pattern formation

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Jeffrey B.; Krommes, John A.

    2013-10-15

    Zonal flows are well known to arise spontaneously out of turbulence. We show that for statistically averaged equations of the stochastically forced generalized Hasegawa-Mima model, steady-state zonal flows, and inhomogeneous turbulence fit into the framework of pattern formation. There are many implications. First, the wavelength of the zonal flows is not unique. Indeed, in an idealized, infinite system, any wavelength within a certain continuous band corresponds to a solution. Second, of these wavelengths, only those within a smaller subband are linearly stable. Unstable wavelengths must evolve to reach a stable wavelength; this process manifests as merging jets.

  18. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    DOEpatents

    Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX; Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX) [Houston, TX

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  19. Scale formation during Alkaline flooding

    SciTech Connect

    Krumrine, P.H.; Craton, G.M.

    1985-08-01

    Alkaline chemicals in enhanced recovery operations are used as preflush agents, with polymers and surfactants, and as a principal recovery agent. In these chemical flooding techniques, the precipitation reactions of multivalent hardness ions with alkalis are of particular concern. These reactions may be prevented at the injection wells through adequate preflushing and/or the use of good-quality softened water; filtration can remove any precipitates that form at the surface. In the formation, many reactions occur that alter the injected slug significantly. These include dissolution, mixing, neutralization, and ion exchange. Such reactions may lead to beneficial fluid diversion as precipitates form and block high-flow channels. At the producing wells, however, precipitation and deposition phenomena are undesirable because scales may form that restrict production and foul well equipment. With the current higher concentrations of alkali being used in the field, the development of well scaling has become noticeable and difficult to control by previously accepted practices. This paper describes the progress and experience gained at the Long Beach Unit, Wilmington, CA, alkaline pilot dealing with scales formed in producing wells. These scales have been made up variously of calcium carbonate, magnesium silicate, and amorphous silica. In particular, the reservoir characteristics and chemical conditions leading to the scale formation are discussed in detail, showing what, how, and why the scale forms.

  20. BAR FORMATION FROM GALAXY FLYBYS

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Meagan; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Sinha, Manodeep E-mail: k.holley@vanderbilt.edu

    2014-08-01

    Recently, both simulations and observations have revealed that flybys—fast, one-time interactions between two galaxy halos—are surprisingly common, nearing/comparable to galaxy mergers. Since these are rapid, transient events with the closest approach well outside the galaxy disk, it is unclear if flybys can transform the galaxy in a lasting way. We conduct collisionless N-body simulations of three coplanar flyby interactions between pure-disk galaxies to take a first look at the effects flybys have on disk structure, with particular focus on stellar bar formation. We find that some flybys are capable of inciting a bar with bars forming in both galaxies during our 1:1 interaction and in the secondary during our 10:1 interaction. The bars formed have ellipticities ? 0.5, sizes on the order of the host disk's scale length, and persist to the end of our simulations, ?5 Gyr after pericenter. The ability of flybys to incite bar formation implies that many processes associated with secular bar evolution may be more closely tied with interactions than previously thought.

  1. Possible mechanisms of macrolayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Chappidi, P.R.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1992-05-01

    The high heat flux nucleate boiling region, also called the vapor mushroom region, has been shown to have a thin liquid layer on the heater surface under the large mushroom-shaped vapor bubbles that grow from the heater surface. The name given to this liquid layer is the macrolayer to differentiate it from the microlayer that exists under the discrete bubbles found at lower heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling region. Typical thicknesses of this macrolayer range from 50 to 500 {mu}m for water on a flat horizontal boiling surface and depend upon the heat flux. Thus, the macrolayer is thicker than the wedge-shaped microlayers, found under discrete bubbles, which range in thickness from 1 to 10 {mu}m. Although the mechanism of microlayer formation and its evaporation is conceptually simple that of the macrolayer is still not understood. This paper critically compares the potential mechanisms proposed for macrolayer formation. These mechanisms include the Helmholtz instability applied to the vapor stem above active nucleation sites, liquid trapped by lateral coalescence of discrete bubbles that initially form during the mushroom bubble`s waiting period, and the limitation of liquid resupply at mushroom departure as a result of vapor flow from the active nucleation sites.

  2. Possible mechanisms of macrolayer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Chappidi, P.R.; Unal, C.; Nelson, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    The high heat flux nucleate boiling region, also called the vapor mushroom region, has been shown to have a thin liquid layer on the heater surface under the large mushroom-shaped vapor bubbles that grow from the heater surface. The name given to this liquid layer is the macrolayer to differentiate it from the microlayer that exists under the discrete bubbles found at lower heat fluxes in the nucleate boiling region. Typical thicknesses of this macrolayer range from 50 to 500 {mu}m for water on a flat horizontal boiling surface and depend upon the heat flux. Thus, the macrolayer is thicker than the wedge-shaped microlayers, found under discrete bubbles, which range in thickness from 1 to 10 {mu}m. Although the mechanism of microlayer formation and its evaporation is conceptually simple that of the macrolayer is still not understood. This paper critically compares the potential mechanisms proposed for macrolayer formation. These mechanisms include the Helmholtz instability applied to the vapor stem above active nucleation sites, liquid trapped by lateral coalescence of discrete bubbles that initially form during the mushroom bubble's waiting period, and the limitation of liquid resupply at mushroom departure as a result of vapor flow from the active nucleation sites.

  3. Coring in deep hardrock formations

    SciTech Connect

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1988-08-01

    The United States Department of Energy is involved in a variety of scientific and engineering feasibility studies requiring extensive drilling in hard crystalline rock. In many cases well depths extend from 6000 to 20,000 feet in high-temperature, granitic formations. Examples of such projects are the Hot Dry Rock well system at Fenton Hill, New Mexico and the planned exploratory magma well near Mammoth Lakes, California. In addition to these programs, there is also continuing interest in supporting programs to reduce drilling costs associated with the production of geothermal energy from underground sources such as the Geysers area near San Francisco, California. The overall progression in these efforts is to drill deeper holes in higher temperature, harder formations. In conjunction with this trend is a desire to improve the capability to recover geological information. Spot coring and continuous coring are important elements in this effort. It is the purpose of this report to examine the current methods used to obtain core from deep wells and to suggest projects which will improve existing capabilities. 28 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Supercoil Formation During DNA Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayar, Mehmet; Avsaroglu, Baris; Kabakcioglu, Alkan

    2009-03-01

    Supercoil formation plays a key role in determining the structure-function relationship in DNA. Biological and technological processes, such as protein synthesis, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays relys on separation of the two strands in DNA, which is coupled to the unwinding of the supercoiled structure. This problem has been studied theoretically via Peyrard-Bishop and Poland-Scheraga type models, which include a simple representation of the DNA structural properties. In recent years, computational models, which provide a more realtistic representaion of DNA molecule, have been used to study the melting behavior of short DNA chains. Here, we will present a new coarse-grained model of DNA which is capable of simulating sufficiently long DNA chains for studying the supercoil formation during melting, without sacrificing the local structural properties. Our coarse-grained model successfully reproduces the local geometry of the DNA molecule, such as the 3'-5' directionality, major-minor groove structure, and the helical pitch. We will present our initial results on the dynamics of supercoiling during DNA melting.

  5. Formation of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of the formation of our Solar System, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of planets and smaller bodies within our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Larger disk mass allows for faster growth of solid planetary bodies. The ability of a solid planet to trap gas from the protoplanetary disk increases rapidly as its mass increases (because the depth of its gravitational potential well increases), but decreases as the planetesimal accretion rate is increased (as it becomes hotter). The net effect of increasing disk mass is that gas giant planets form more rapidly, but with larger core masses. Observations of circumstellar disks suggest an upper bound on the time available prior to dissipation of the gas, and planetary models place upper limits on core sizes. Together, these constraints suggest that Jupiter and Saturn formed in 1 - 10 million years, and the density of solids in the region of their formation was a few times as large as the lower bound provided by the traditional minimum mass nebula.

  6. Formation of Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    An overview of current theories of the formation of our Solar System, with emphasis on giant planets, is presented. The most detailed models are based upon observations of planets and smaller bodies within our own Solar System and of young stars and their environments. Terrestrial planets are believed to grow via pairwise accretion until the spacing of planetary orbits becomes large enough that the configuration is stable for the age of the system. Giant planets begin their growth as do terrestrial planets, but they become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. Larger disk mass allows for faster growth of solid planetary bodies. The ability of a solid planet to trap gas from the protoplanetary disk increases rapidly as its mass increases (because the depth of its gravitational potential well increases), but decreases as the planetesimal accretion rate is increased (as it becomes hotter). The net effect of increasing disk mass is that gas giant planets form more rapidly, but with larger core masses. Observations of circumstellar disks suggest an upper bound on the time available prior to dissipation of the gas, and planetary models place upper limits on core sizes. Together, these constraints suggest that Jupiter and Saturn formed in 1-10 million years, and the density of solids in the region of their formation was a few times as large as the lower bound provided by the traditional minimum mass nebula.

  7. Galaxy interactions and star formation: Results of a survey of global H-alpha emission in spiral galaxies in 8 clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C.

    1990-01-01

    Kennicutt and Kent (1983) have shown that the global H alpha emission from a spiral galaxy is an indicator of the formation rate of massive stars. Moss, Whittle and Irwin (1988) have surveyed two clusters (Abell 347 and 1367) for galaxies with H alpha emission using a high dispersion objective prism technique. The purpose of the survey is to investigate environmental effects on star formation in spiral galaxies, and in particular to ascertain whether star formation is enhanced in cluster spirals. Approximately 20 percent of CGCG galaxies were detected in emission. Two plates of excellent quality were obtained for each of the two clusters, and galaxies were only identified to have emission if this was detected on both plates of a plate pair. In this way, plate flaws and other spurious identifications of emission could be rejected, and weak emission confirmed. The results of this survey have been discussed by Moss (1987). The detected galaxies are of types SO-a and later. The frequency with which galaxies are detected in emission increases towards later morphological type as expected (cf. Kennicutt and Kent 1983). There is no evidence of any dependence of the frequency of detected emission on the absolute magnitude of the galaxy (cf. Moss and Whittle 1990), but there is a strong correlation between a disturbed morphological appearance of the galaxy and the detection of emission. Furthermore it is found that the emission is more centrally concentrated in those galaxies which show a disturbed morphology. It may be noted that the objective prism plate gives a spectrum of a 400 A region around rest wavelength H alpha, but superposed on this is the H alpha emission from the galaxy which, because the light is essentially monochromatic, results in a true two-dimensional image of the H alpha distribution. The visual appearance of the emission on the prism plates was classified according to its diffuseness on a 5 point scale (very diffuse, diffuse, intermediate, compact, and very compact). In tabular form, the relation is shown between this classification and a morphologically disturbed appearance for the galaxy.

  8. Lower Eocene alluvial paleosols (Willwood Formation, Northwest Wyoming, U.S.A.) and their significance for paleoecology, paleoclimatology, and basin analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Kraus, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    The lower Eocene Willwood Formation of northwest Wyoming is a 700 m thick accumulation of alluvial floodplain and channel mudstones and sandstones, nearly all of which show paleopedogenic modifications. Pedogenesis of Willwood sandstones is indicated by taproot and vertebrate and invertebrate bioturbation, early local cementation by calcium carbonate, and thin illuviation cutans on clastic grains. Pedogenesis in Willwood mudstones is indicated by plant bioturbation, insect and other invertebrate burrow casts and lebensspuren; free iron, aluminum, and manganese mobilization, including hydromorphic gleying; sesquioxide and calcareous glaebule formation in lower parts of the solum; presence of clay-rich and organic carbon-rich zones; and well differentiated epipedons and albic and spodic horizons. Probable A horizons are also locally well developed. Occurrence of variegated paleosol units in thick floodplain mudstone deposits and their association with thin, lenticular, and unconnected fluvial sandstones in the Willwood Formation of the central and southeast Bighorn Basin suggest that these soils formed during times of rapid sediment accumulation. The tabular geometry and lateral persistence of soil units as well as the absence of catenization indicate that Willwood floodplains were broad and essentially featureless. All Willwood paleosols were developed on alluvial parent materials and are complex in that B horizons of younger paleosols were commonly superimposed upon and mask properties of suspected A and B horizons of the next older paleosols. The soils appear to be wet varieties of the Spodosol and Entisol groups (aquods and ferrods, and aquents, respectively), though thick, superposed and less mottled red, purple, and yellow paleosols resemble some ultisols. Most Willwood paleosols resemble warm temperate to subtropical alluvial soils that form today under alternating wet and dry conditions and (or) fluctuating water tables. The up-section decrease in frequency of gley mottles, increase in numerical proportion and thickness of red versus orange coloration, and increase in abundance of calcrete glaebules indicate better drained soils and probably drier climate in late Willwood time. This drying is believed to be related to creation of rain shadows and spacing of rainfall (but not necessarily decrease in absolute rainfall) due to progressive tectonic structural elevation of the mountainous margins of the Bighorn Basin. ?? 1981.

  9. Combuster. [low nitrogen oxide formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A. (inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A combuster is provided for utilizing a combustible mixture containing fuel and air, to heat a load fluid such as water or air, in a manner that minimizes the formation of nitrogen oxide. The combustible mixture passes through a small diameter tube where the mixture is heated to its combustion temperature, while the load fluid flows past the outside of the tube to receive heat. The tube is of a diameter small enough that the combustible mixture cannot form a flame, and yet is not subject to wall quench, so that combustion occurs, but at a temperature less than under free flame conditions. Most of the heat required for heating the combustible mixture to its combustion temperature, is obtained from heat flow through the walls of the pipe to the mixture.

  10. Sandpile formation by revolving rivers.

    PubMed

    Altshuler, E; Ramos, O; Martínez, E; Batista-Leyva, A J; Rivera, A; Bassler, K E

    2003-07-01

    Experimental observation of a new mechanism of sandpile formation is reported. As a steady stream of dry sand is poured onto a horizontal surface, a pile forms which has a thin river of sand on one side flowing from the apex of the pile to the edge of its base. The river rotates about the pile, depositing a new layer of sand with each revolution, thereby causing the pile to grow. For small piles the river is steady and the pile formed is smooth. For larger piles, the river becomes intermittent and the surface of the pile becomes undulating. The essential features of the system that produce the phenomenon are discussed, and the robustness of the phenomena is demonstrated with experiments using different boundary conditions and sands. PMID:12906542

  11. Chondrule formation in lightning discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Chondrules represent a significant mass fraction of primitive meteorites. These millimeter-sized glassy droplets appear to be the products of intensive transient heating events. Their size distribution, chemical and mineral composition, texture, isotope composition suggest that chondrules were produced as a result of short-duration melting followed by rapid cooling of solid precursor particles. Gas-dynamics heating, magnetic reconnection, and electrostatic discharges are thought to be the leading candidates to explain chondrule formation. In this paper we summarize our recent theoretical progress on the effects of 'lightning' in the early solar system and also report on preliminary results from our laboratory experiments. Differential settling of various sized dust particles toward the midplane of the nebula is suspected to build large-scale charge separations that episodically relax via the electric breakdown of the nebular gas. The electrostatic discharge os analogous to lightning in the Earth's atmosphere.

  12. Formation control for cooperative surveillance 

    E-print Network

    Woo, Sang-Bum

    2009-05-15

    are deflned by substituting ri for r?i in the formation constraints as follows: Ei = 2 64 kri ?rv1k2 ?d2i \\([ri ?rv1]I)?\\([rv2 ?rv1]I)?fii 3 75 = 2 64ei;l ei; 3 75; i = 1;:::;N (2.4) E. Controller Design Sliding mode control can be used for stabilizing...;l +?i;l) ? e2i;l + 2 i;l?i;l ei;l _ei;l + 1+ i;l?i;l i;l?i;l( i;l +?i;l) ? _e2i;l si; = i; +?i; i; ?i; + 1+ i; ?i; ( i; +?i; ) ? e2i; + 2 i; ?i; ei; _ei; + 1+ i; ?i; i; ?i; ( i; +?i; ) ? _e2i; (2.6) where ?i;l > 0, i;l > 0, ?i; > 0...

  13. Pattern formation in colloidal explosions

    E-print Network

    Arthur V. Straube; Ard A. Louis; Jörg Baumgartl; Clemens Bechinger; Roel P. A. Dullens

    2011-07-23

    We study the non-equilibrium pattern formation that emerges when magnetically repelling colloids, trapped by optical tweezers, are abruptly released, forming colloidal explosions. For multiple colloids in a single trap we observe a pattern of expanding concentric rings. For colloids individually trapped in a line, we observe explosions with a zigzag pattern that persists even when magnetic interactions are much weaker than those that break the linear symmetry in equilibrium. Theory and computer simulations quantitatively describe these phenomena both in and out of equilibrium. An analysis of the mode spectrum allows us to accurately quantify the non-harmonic nature of the optical traps. Colloidal explosions provide a new way to generate well-characterized non-equilibrium behaviour in colloidal systems.

  14. Macromolecules Relevant to Stone Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryall, Rosemary L.; Cook, Alison F.; Thurgood, Lauren A.; Grover, Phulwinder K.

    2007-04-01

    Despite years of research, no single macromolecule in kidney calculi or in urine has yet been shown to fulfill a specific function in stone pathogenesis. In this paper we briefly review papers investigating the urinary excretion of individual macromolecules, their effects on calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystallization and attachment of crystals to renal epithelial cells, and the influence of lithogenic conditions on their renal expression in cultured cells and animal models. Using prothrombin fragment 1 (PTF1) and human serum albumin as examples, we show the types of patterns resulting from the binding of a fluorescently tagged protein to a specific CaOx monohydrate (COM) crystal face and its incorporation into the crystal structure. Molecular modeling is also used to illustrate how PTF1 can align with the atomic array on a COM crystal surface. We conclude that although many macromolecules are, by strict definition, relevant to stone formation, very few are probably truly influential.

  15. Formation of helical ion chains

    E-print Network

    Ramil Nigmatullin; Adolfo del Campo; Gabriele De Chiara; Giovanna Morigi; Martin B. Plenio; Alex Retzker

    2015-08-25

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of the linear to zigzag structural phase transition exhibited by an ion chain confined in a trap with periodic boundary conditions. The transition is driven by reducing the transverse confinement at a finite quench rate, which can be accurately controlled. This results in the formation of zigzag domains oriented along different transverse planes. The twists between different domains can be stabilized by the topology of the trap and under laser cooling the system has a chance to relax to a helical chain with nonzero winding number. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to obtain a large sample of possible trajectories for different quench rates. The scaling of the average winding number with different quench rates is compared to the prediction of the Kibble-Zurek theory, and a good quantitative agreement is found.

  16. Chaos in Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-print Network

    Hoffmann, Volker; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This highly chaotic behaviour questions the predictability of different scenarios for the formation and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems in general. However, multiple realisations of the same initial conditions can be used to predict certain global statistics. We present two sets of numerical experiments that quantify this behaviour. Firstly, we demonstrate that simulations with slightly displaced particles are completely divergent after ~500 years, irrespective of initial displacement, particle number, and code accuracy. If a single planetesimal is moved by less than one millimetre, then a different set of planets results -- this timescale for chaotic divergence decreases with increasing particle number. Secondly, we s...

  17. Mean depths of line formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gussmann, E. A.

    A straightforward reasonable physical definition of a mean depth is effected by means of the expectation value used in mathematical statistics. The real atmosphere is replaced by a fixed layer situated at the mean depth of line formation from which the observed intensity or flux emerges. Applied to the emergent line depression it is not possible to define a fixed depth but a thickness of an absorbing layer forming the absorption line. These two values have a different physical meaning and must not be confused with one another. The mean depth is calculated approximately by taking the arithmetic mean of the depths weighted with the absorption along the path outwards. This immediately leads to the well known Eddington/Barbier method.

  18. Formation and support of prominence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, T. G.

    1986-01-01

    A short introduction is given to the concepts discussed by the group on the formation and support of prominences. Only quiescent and long-lived active region prominences were considered, since transient prominence phenomena, such as sprays, surges, H alpha flare-loops, and coronal rain, are dynamically distinct from long-lived, prominences. Stable prominences (which are often referred to as filaments when seen against the disk) can be subdivided into three categories, namely active region prominences, quiescent prominences and polar crown prominences. The third category is closely related to the second since a quiescent prominence will eventually evolve into a polar crown prominence if it lasts long enough. The distinction between the first and second categories is not sharp either since intermediates exist here as well (Martin, 1973).

  19. Groundwater formation of martian valleys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Malin, M.C.; Carr, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The martian surface shows large outflow channels, widely accepted as having been formed by gigantic floods that could have occurred under climatic conditions like those seen today. Also present are branching valley networks that commonly have tributaries. These valleys are much smaller than the outflow channels and their origins and ages have been controversial. For example, they might have formed through slow erosion by water running across the surface, either early or late in Mars' history, possibly protected from harsh conditions by ice cover. Alternatively, they might have formed through groundwater or ground-ice processes that undermine the surface and cause collapse, again either early or late in Mars' history. Long-duration surface runoff would imply climatic conditions quite different from the present environment. Here we present high-resolution images of martian valleys that support the view that ground water played an important role in their formation, although we are unable as yet to establish when this occurred.

  20. The Science of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, Gerard

    2009-03-01

    Our knowledge of the Universe remains discovery-led: in the absence of adequate physics-based theory, interpretation of new results requires a scientific methodology. Commonly, scientific progress in astrophysics is motivated by the empirical success of the “Copernican Principle”, that the simplest and most objective analysis of observation leads to progress. A complementary approach tests the prediction of models against observation. In practise, astrophysics has few real theories, and has little control over what we can observe. Compromise is unavoidable. Advances in understanding complex non-linear situations, such as galaxy formation, require that models attempt to isolate key physical properties, rather than trying to reproduce complexity. A specific example is discussed, where substantial progress in fundamental physics could be made with an ambitious approach to modelling: simulating the spectrum of perturbations on small scales.

  1. Supercoil formation in DNA denaturation

    E-print Network

    A. Kabakcioglu; E. Orlandini; D. Mukamel

    2009-06-04

    We generalize the Poland-Scheraga (PS) model to the case of a circular DNA, taking into account the twisting of the two strains around each other. Guided by recent single-molecule experiments on DNA strands, we assume that the torsional stress induced by denaturation enforces formation of supercoils whose writhe absorbs the linking number expelled by the loops. Our model predicts that, when the entropy parameter of a loop satisfies $c \\le 2$, denaturation transition does not take place. On the other hand for $c>2$ a first-order denaturation transition is consistent with our model and may take place in the actual system, as in the case with no supercoils. These results are in contrast with other treatments of circular DNA melting where denaturation is assumed to be accompanied by an increase in twist rather than writhe on the bound segments.

  2. Statoconia formation in molluscan statocysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiederhold, M. L.; Sheridan, C. E.; Smith, N. K.

    1986-01-01

    The gravity sensors of all molluscs phylogenetically below the cephalopods are spherical organs called statocysts. The wall of the sphere contains mechanosensory cells whose sensory cilia project into the lumen of the cyst. The lumen is filled with fluid and dense "stones", the statoconia or statoliths, which sink under the influence of gravity to load, and stimulate, those receptor cells which are at the bottom. The statoconia of Aplysia californica are shown to be calcified about a lamellar arrangement of membranes. Similar lamellar membrane arrangements are seen within the receptor cells, and their possible role in the formation of the statoconia is discussed. SEM of unfixed statoconia reveals plate-like crystallization on their surface. Elemental analysis shows a relatively high Sr content, which is of interest, since others have recently reported that Sr is required in the culture medium of several laboratory reared molluscs in order for the statoconia to develop.

  3. Union formation in fragile families.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Marcia; McLanahan, Sara; England, Paula

    2004-05-01

    In this article, we use data from a new longitudinal survey--the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study--to examine union formation among unmarried parents who have just had a child together. We used multinomial logistic regression to estimate the effects of economic, cultural/interpersonal, and other factors on whether (relative to having no romantic relationship) parents are romantically involved and living apart, cohabiting, or married to each other about one year after the child's birth. Net of other factors (including baseline relationship status), women's education and men's earnings encourage marriage. Cultural and interpersonal factors also have strong effects: women's trust of men, both parents' positive attitudes toward marriage, and both parents' assessment of the supportiveness in their relationship encourage marriage. Supportiveness also encourages cohabitation, while fathers having a problem with alcohol or drugs and reporting higher conflict in the relationship discourage cohabitation: Fathers' physical violence deters couples' remaining in romantic nonresident relationships. PMID:15209039

  4. Crystal formation in furunculosis agar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bullock, G.L.; Ross, A.J.

    1964-01-01

    SINCE ITS INTRODUCTION SOME MONTHS AGO, FURUNCULOSIS AGAR has been employed in the diagnosis of suspect furunculosis and also as a general purpose medium. During our work with this medium we have noticed discrete "colonies," of crystalline material, which very closely resemble microbial colonies. These crystal colonies are compact and appear on both the surface and subsurface; they occur in inoculated slants and plates incubated for long periods (2 to 3 weeks), as well as in uninoculated stored medium. As the crystal colonies could be confusing to workers using this medium, we decided to attempt to identify them and also to determine whether storage conditions and different lots of medium affect crystal formation.

  5. Multimap formation in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rishabh; Millin, Rachel; Mel, Bartlett W.

    2015-01-01

    An extrastriate visual area such as V2 or V4 contains neurons selective for a multitude of complex shapes, all sharing a common topographic organization. Simultaneously developing multiple interdigitated maps—hereafter a “multimap”—is challenging in that neurons must compete to generate a diversity of response types locally, while cooperating with their dispersed same-type neighbors to achieve uniform visual field coverage for their response type at all orientations, scales, etc. Previously proposed map development schemes have relied on smooth spatial interaction functions to establish both topography and columnar organization, but by locally homogenizing cells' response properties, local smoothing mechanisms effectively rule out multimap formation. We found in computer simulations that the key requirements for multimap development are that neurons are enabled for plasticity only within highly active regions of cortex designated “learning eligibility regions” (LERs), but within an LER, each cell's learning rate is determined only by its activity level with no dependence on location. We show that a hybrid developmental rule that combines spatial and activity-dependent learning criteria in this way successfully produces multimaps when the input stream contains multiple distinct feature types, or in the degenerate case of a single feature type, produces a V1-like map with “salt-and-pepper” structure. Our results support the hypothesis that cortical maps containing a fine mixture of different response types, whether in monkey extrastriate cortex, mouse V1 or elsewhere in the cortex, rather than signaling a breakdown of map formation mechanisms at the fine scale, are a product of a generic cortical developmental scheme designed to map cells with a diversity of response properties across a shared topographic space. PMID:26641946

  6. Multimap formation in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rishabh; Millin, Rachel; Mel, Bartlett W

    2015-12-01

    An extrastriate visual area such as V2 or V4 contains neurons selective for a multitude of complex shapes, all sharing a common topographic organization. Simultaneously developing multiple interdigitated maps-hereafter a "multimap"-is challenging in that neurons must compete to generate a diversity of response types locally, while cooperating with their dispersed same-type neighbors to achieve uniform visual field coverage for their response type at all orientations, scales, etc. Previously proposed map development schemes have relied on smooth spatial interaction functions to establish both topography and columnar organization, but by locally homogenizing cells' response properties, local smoothing mechanisms effectively rule out multimap formation. We found in computer simulations that the key requirements for multimap development are that neurons are enabled for plasticity only within highly active regions of cortex designated "learning eligibility regions" (LERs), but within an LER, each cell's learning rate is determined only by its activity level with no dependence on location. We show that a hybrid developmental rule that combines spatial and activity-dependent learning criteria in this way successfully produces multimaps when the input stream contains multiple distinct feature types, or in the degenerate case of a single feature type, produces a V1-like map with "salt-and-pepper" structure. Our results support the hypothesis that cortical maps containing a fine mixture of different response types, whether in monkey extrastriate cortex, mouse V1 or elsewhere in the cortex, rather than signaling a breakdown of map formation mechanisms at the fine scale, are a product of a generic cortical developmental scheme designed to map cells with a diversity of response properties across a shared topographic space. PMID:26641946

  7. Methanol Masers and Star Formation

    E-print Network

    A. M. Sobolev; A. B. Ostrovskii; M. S. Kirsanova; O. V. Shelemei; M. A. Voronkov; A. V. Malyshev

    2006-01-12

    Methanol masers which are traditionally divided into two classes provide possibility to study important parts of the star forming regions: Class~II masers trace vicinities of the massive YSOs while class~I masers are likely to trace more distant parts of the outflows where newer stars can form. There are many methanol transitions which produce observed masers. This allows to use pumping analysis for estimation of the physical parameters in the maser formation regions and its environment, for the study of their evolution. Extensive surveys in different masing transitions allow to conclude on the values of the temperatures, densities, dust properties, etc. in the bulk of masing regions. Variability of the brightest masers is monitored during several years. In some cases it is probably caused by the changes of the dust temperature which follow variations in the brightness of the central YSO reflecting the character of the accretion process. A unified catalogue of the class II methanol masers consisting of more than 500 objects is compiled. Analysis of the data shows that: physical conditions within the usual maser source vary considerably; maser brightness is determined by parameters of some distinguished part of the object - maser formation region; class II methanol masers are formed not within the outflows but in the regions affected by their propagation. It is shown that the "near" solutions for the kinematic distances to the sources can be used for statistical analysis. The luminosity function of the 6.7 GHz methanol masers is constructed. It is shown that improvement of the sensitivity of surveys can increase number of detected maser sources considerably.

  8. Microfoam formation in a capillary.

    PubMed

    Kotopoulis, Spiros; Postema, Michiel

    2010-02-01

    The ultrasound-induced formation of bubble clusters may be of interest as a therapeutic means. If the clusters behave as one entity, i.e., one mega-bubble, its ultrasonic manipulation towards a boundary is straightforward and quick. If the clusters can be forced to accumulate to a microfoam, entire vessels might be blocked on purpose using an ultrasound contrast agent and a sound source. In this paper, we analyse how ultrasound contrast agent clusters are formed in a capillary and what happens to the clusters if sonication is continued, using continuous driving frequencies in the range 1-10 MHz. Furthermore, we show high-speed camera footage of microbubble clustering phenomena. We observed the following stages of microfoam formation within a dense population of microbubbles before ultrasound arrival. After the sonication started, contrast microbubbles collided, forming small clusters, owing to secondary radiation forces. These clusters coalesced within the space of a quarter of the ultrasonic wavelength, owing to primary radiation forces. The resulting microfoams translated in the direction of the ultrasound field, hitting the capillary wall, also owing to primary radiation forces. We have demonstrated that as soon as the bubble clusters are formed and as long as they are in the sound field, they behave as one entity. At our acoustic settings, it takes seconds to force the bubble clusters to positions approximately a quarter wavelength apart. It also just takes seconds to drive the clusters towards the capillary wall. Subjecting an ultrasound contrast agent of given concentration to a continuous low-amplitude signal makes it cluster to a microfoam of known position and known size, allowing for sonic manipulation. PMID:19875143

  9. Engram formation in psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gebicke-Haerter, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental factors substantially influence beginning and progression of mental illness, reinforcing or reducing the consequences of genetic vulnerability. Often initiated by early traumatic events, “engrams” or memories are formed that may give rise to a slow and subtle progression of psychiatric disorders. The large delay between beginning and time of onset (diagnosis) may be explained by efficient compensatory mechanisms observed in brain metabolism that use optional pathways in highly redundant molecular interactions. To this end, research has to deal with mechanisms of learning and long-term memory formation, which involves (a) epigenetic changes, (b) altered neuronal activities, and (c) changes in neuron-glia communication. On the epigenetic level, apparently DNA-methylations are more stable than histone modifications, although both closely interact. Neuronal activities basically deliver digital information, which clearly can serve as basis for memory formation (LTP). However, research in this respect has long time neglected the importance of glia. They are more actively involved in the control of neuronal activities than thought before. They can both reinforce and inhibit neuronal activities by transducing neuronal information from frequency-encoded to amplitude and frequency-modulated calcium wave patterns spreading in the glial syncytium by use of gap junctions. In this way, they serve integrative functions. In conclusion, we are dealing with two concepts of encoding information that mutually control each other and synergize: a digital (neuronal) and a wave-like (glial) computing, forming neuron-glia functional units with inbuilt feedback loops to maintain balance of excitation and inhibition. To better understand mental illness, we have to gain more insight into the dynamics of adverse environmental impact on those cellular and molecular systems. This report summarizes existing knowledge and draws some outline about further research in molecular psychiatry. PMID:24904262

  10. Drill cuttings mount formation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye

    2014-07-01

    Oil, Gas and Energy sector has been identified as an essential driving force in the Malaysian Economic Transformation Programs (ETP). Recently confirmed discovery of many offshore oil and gas deposits in Malaysian waters has ignited new confidence in this sector. However, this has also spurred intense interest on safeguarding the health and environment of coastal waters in Malaysia from adverse impact resulting from offshore oil and gas production operation. Offshore discharge of spent drilling mud and rock cuttings is the least expensive and simplest option to dispose of large volumes of drilling wastes. But this onsite offshore disposal may have adverse environmental impacts on the water column and the seabed. It may also pose occupational health hazards to the workers living in the offshore platforms. It is therefore important to model the transport and deposition of drilling mud and rock cuttings in the sea to enable proper assessment of their adverse impacts on the environment and the workers. Further, accumulation of drill particles on the seabed may impede proper operation of pipelines on the seabed. In this paper, we present an in-house application model TUNA-PT developed to cater to local oil and gas industry needs to simulate the dispersion and mount formation of drill cuttings by offshore oil and gas exploration and production platforms. Using available data on Malaysian coastal waters, simulation analyses project a pile formation on the seabed with a maximum height of about 1 m and pile radius of around 30 to 50 m. Simulated pile heights are not sensitive to the heights of release of the cuttings as the sensitivity has been mitigated by the depth of water.

  11. Formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stolper, D.A.; Lawson, M.; Davis, C.L.; Ferreira, A.A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Ellis, G.S.; Lewan, M.D.; Martini, A.M.; Tang, Y.; Schoell, M.; Sessions, A.L.; Eiler, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and energy resource generated dominantly by methanogens at low temperatures and through the breakdown of organic molecules at high temperatures. However, methane-formation temperatures in nature are often poorly constrained. We measured formation temperatures of thermogenic and biogenic methane using a “clumped isotope” technique. Thermogenic gases yield formation temperatures between 157° and 221°C, within the nominal gas window, and biogenic gases yield formation temperatures consistent with their comparatively lower-temperature formational environments (<50°C). In systems where gases have migrated and other proxies for gas-generation temperature yield ambiguous results, methane clumped-isotope temperatures distinguish among and allow for independent tests of possible gas-formation models.

  12. Giant Planet Formation, Evolution, and Internal Structure

    E-print Network

    Helled, Ravit; Podolak, Morris; Boley, Aaron; Meru, Farzana; Nayakshin, Sergei; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mayer, Lucio; Alibert, Yann; Boss, Alan P

    2013-01-01

    The large number of detected giant exoplanets offers the opportunity to improve our understanding of the formation mechanism, evolution, and interior structure of gas giant planets. The two main models for giant planet formation are core accretion and disk instability. There are substantial differences between these formation models, including formation timescale, favorable formation location, ideal disk properties for planetary formation, early evolution, planetary composition, etc. First, we summarize the two models including their substantial differences, advantages, and disadvantages, and suggest how theoretical models should be connected to available (and future) data. We next summarize current knowledge of the internal structures of solar- and extrasolar- giant planets. Finally, we suggest the next steps to be taken in giant planet exploration.

  13. Autonomous Formations of Multi-Agent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhali, Sanjana; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous formation control of multi-agent dynamic systems has a number of applications that include ground-based and aerial robots and satellite formations. For air vehicles, formation flight ("flocking") has the potential to significantly increase airspace utilization as well as fuel efficiency. This presentation addresses two main problems in multi-agent formations: optimal role assignment to minimize the total cost (e.g., combined distance traveled by all agents); and maintaining formation geometry during flock motion. The Kuhn-Munkres ("Hungarian") algorithm is used for optimal assignment, and consensus-based leader-follower type control architecture is used to maintain formation shape despite the leader s independent movements. The methods are demonstrated by animated simulations.

  14. 78 FR 19606 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Furnace Fans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ...Standards_Table.pdf). \\9...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft...WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide documents...originating organization in batches of between 50 to 500 form letters per PDF or as one form...

  15. 14 CFR 302.603 - Contents of complaint or request for determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...versions, or in such other format as may be specified by notice in the Federal Register: Microsoft Word (or RTF), Word Perfect, Ami Pro, Microsoft Excel, Lotus 123, Quattro Pro, or ASCII tab-delineated files. Parties should...

  16. 14 CFR 302.603 - Contents of complaint or request for determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...versions, or in such other format as may be specified by notice in the Federal Register: Microsoft Word (or RTF), Word Perfect, Ami Pro, Microsoft Excel, Lotus 123, Quattro Pro, or ASCII tab-delineated files. Parties should...

  17. 14 CFR 302.603 - Contents of complaint or request for determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...versions, or in such other format as may be specified by notice in the Federal Register: Microsoft Word (or RTF), Word Perfect, Ami Pro, Microsoft Excel, Lotus 123, Quattro Pro, or ASCII tab-delineated files. Parties should...

  18. 14 CFR 302.603 - Contents of complaint or request for determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...versions, or in such other format as may be specified by notice in the Federal Register: Microsoft Word (or RTF), Word Perfect, Ami Pro, Microsoft Excel, Lotus 123, Quattro Pro, or ASCII tab-delineated files. Parties should...

  19. 42 CFR 414.68 - Imaging accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...organization's ability to furnish CMS with electronic data in ASCII comparable code. (13) A resource analysis that demonstrates that the organization's...the following in written format (either electronic or hard copy): (i) Copies of...

  20. 42 CFR 424.58 - Accreditation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...organization's ability to furnish CMS with electronic data in ASCII comparable code. (xiv) A resource analysis that demonstrates that the organization's...the following in written format (either electronic or hard copy) and on a monthly basis...

  1. Radon

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Some PDF files may be electronic conversions from paper copy or other electronic ASCII text files. This ... format errors. Users are referred to the original paper copy of the toxicological profile for the official ...

  2. Arsenic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Some PDF files may be electronic conversions from paper copy or other electronic ASCII text files. This ... format errors. Users are referred to the original paper copy of the toxicological profile for the official ...

  3. 76 FR 52892 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-24

    ...levels considered for each representative product class. An Excel spreadsheet summarizing these levels is available on DOE's...should be provided in PDF (preferred), Microsoft Word or Excel, WordPerfect, or text (ASCII) file format. Provide...

  4. 14 CFR 302.603 - Contents of complaint or request for determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...format as may be specified by notice in the Federal Register: Microsoft Word (or RTF), Word Perfect, Ami Pro, Microsoft Excel, Lotus 123, Quattro Pro, or ASCII tab-delineated files. Parties should submit three copies of each diskette to...

  5. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with...

  6. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with...

  7. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with...

  8. 21 CFR 186.1756 - Sodium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sodium formate. 186.1756 Section 186.1756 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1756 Sodium formate. (a) Sodium formate (CHNaO2, CAS Reg. No. 141-53-7) is the sodium salt of formic acid. It is produced by the reaction of carbon monoxide with...

  9. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  10. Navigation and control of large satellite formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamford, William Alfred, Jr.

    In recent years, there has been substantial interest in autonomous satellite formations, driven by the new technologies that enable smaller and cheaper spacecraft. Formation flying allows for mission designs, such as stereoscopic imaging, that are impractical or impossible for a single satellite. Much of the current work focuses upon small formations, which can be defined as four or less satellites in a relatively tight grouping. Next generation formations may be composed of more satellites spanning greater spatial distances. The large formation problem becomes more difficult for several reasons, including an increased amount of communication required between the satellites, and orbit perturbations, which become more important as the formation size grows. The purpose of this dissertation is to examine formation flying for large formations, and determine whether or not generalizations can be made linking the large and small formation regimes. In order to model formations with many satellites, a simulation environment was constructed in which different observers, controllers, and formation architectures can be modelled. This dissertation focuses on a decentralized control scheme, but the software is general enough to accommodate a variety of control architectures. Validation of the large formation models is accomplished by initially modelling only a pair of satellites and comparing the results against those found in the literature. As a demonstration of the theoretical results, a real-time, closed-loop, hardware-in-the-loop simulation was constructed using GPS receivers as the measurement source. A large constellation, real-tune simulation system was developed that utilized the Internet to connect simulation equipment from research centers in different locations.

  11. Magnetic Assisted Colloidal Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ye

    Pattern formation is a mysterious phenomenon occurring at all scales in nature. The beauty of the resulting structures and myriad of resulting properties occurring in naturally forming patterns have attracted great interest from scientists and engineers. One of the most convenient experimental models for studying pattern formation are colloidal particle suspensions, which can be used both to explore condensed matter phenomena and as a powerful fabrication technique for forming advanced materials. In my thesis, I have focused on the study of colloidal patterns, which can be conveniently tracked in an optical microscope yet can also be thermally equilibrated on experimentally relevant time scales, allowing for ground states and transitions between them to be studied with optical tracking algorithms. In particular, I have focused on systems that spontaneously organize due to particle-surface and particle-particle interactions, paying close attention to systems that can be dynamically adjusted with an externally applied magnetic or acoustic field. In the early stages of my doctoral studies, I developed a magnetic field manipulation technique to quantify the adhesion force between particles and surfaces. This manipulation technique is based on the magnetic dipolar interactions between colloidal particles and their "image dipoles" that appear within planar substrate. Since the particles interact with their own images, this system enables massively parallel surface force measurements (>100 measurements) in a single experiment, and allows statistical properties of particle-surface adhesion energies to be extracted as a function of loading rate. With this approach, I was able to probe sub-picoNewton surface interactions between colloidal particles and several substrates at the lowest force loading rates ever achieved. In the later stages of my doctoral studies, I focused on studying patterns formed from particle-particle interaction, which serve as an experimental model of phase transitions in condensed matter systems that can be tracked with single particle resolution. Compared with other research on colloidal crystal formation, my research has focused on multi-component colloidal systems of magnetic and non-magnetic colloids immersed in a ferrofluid. Initially, I studied the types of patterns that form as a function of the concentrations of the different particles and ferrofluid, and I discovered a wide variety of chains, rings and crystals forming in bi-component and tri-component systems. Based on these results, I narrowed my focus to one specific crystal structure (checkerboard lattice) as a model of phase transformations in alloy. Liquid/solid phase transitions were studied by slowly adjusting the magnetic field strength, which serves to control particle-particle interactions in a manner similar to controlling the physical temperature of the fluid. These studies were used to determine the optimal conditions for forming large single crystal structures, and paved the way for my later work on solid/solid phase transitions when the angle of the external field was shifted away from the normal direction. The magnetostriction coefficient of these crystals was measured in low tilt angle of the applied field. At high tilt angles, I observed a variety of martensitic transformations, which followed different pathways depending on the crystal direction relative to the in-plane field. In the last part of my doctoral studies, I investigated colloidal patterns formed in a superimposed acoustic and magnetic field. In this approach, the magnetic field mimics "temperature", while the acoustic field mimics "pressure". The ability to simultaneously tune both temperature and pressure allows for more efficient exploration of phase space. With this technique I demonstrated a large class of particle structures ranging from discrete molecule-like clusters to well ordered crystal phases. Additionally, I demonstrated a crosslinking strategy based on photoacids, which stabilized the structures after the external field

  12. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Colmenares, Tulio Rafael (Houston, TX); Zhang, Etuan (Houston, TX); Marino, Marian (Houston, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Ryan, Robert Charles (Houston, TX); Beer, Gary Lee (Houston, TX); Dombrowski, Robert James (Houston, TX); Jaiswal, Namit (Houston, TX)

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  13. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  14. The formation of ice on airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noth, H; Polte, W

    1936-01-01

    The present report examines the problem of ice formation from the point of view of the pilot and the meteorologist. Their experiences prove the ice deposit to be first and foremost a navigational problem and only secondarily a question of de-icing devices. With correct utilization of the meteorological information by the flyer, ice hazard can in many cases be minimized or avoided. Ice formation and the different types of ice deposits are listed and discussed. Weather formation during these ice deposits are also discussed as well as the effect of ice formation on aircraft.

  15. New Particle Formation Study Final Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, JN; McMurry, PH

    2015-01-01

    The scientific foci of the New Particle Formation Study were the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosols and the impacts of newly formed particles on cloud processes. Specifically, we planned to: (1) to identify the species and mechanisms responsible for the initial steps of new particle formation, i.e., the formation of thermodynamically stable clusters; (2) investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; (3) investigate the contribution of other surface area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth; (4) create a comprehensive dataset related to new particle formation and growth that can be used as input for our own thermodynamic models as well as the modeling efforts by our Department of Energy (DOE) Aerosol Life Cycle working group collaborators; (5) characterize the increase of the number and activity of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) due to particle formation and growth; (6) determine the regional extent of new particle formation to address the role that atmospheric transport plays in determining the impacts, if any, of new particle formation on cloud number and properties.

  16. Duration of the earth-formation interval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levskii, L. K.

    The duration of the formation interval of prototerrestrial matter is estimated on the basis of the iodine-xenon and plutonium-xenon dating techniques. The formation interval is shown to include two phases: (1) a galactic (nebular) phase corresponding to the independent existence of two sources and lasting 150 million years; and (2) a planetesimal (accretion) phase lasting not more than 140 million years. The total duration of the formation interval from the termination of nucleosynthesis to the formation of the planet amounts to not more than 300-400 million years.

  17. Processes and problems in secondary star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, R.I.; Whitaker, R.W.; Sandford M.T. II

    1984-03-01

    Recent developments relating the conditions in molecular clouds to star formation triggered by a prior stellar generation are reviewed. Primary processes are those that lead to the formation of a first stellar generation. The secondary processes that produce stars in response to effects caused by existing stars are compared and evaluated in terms of the observational data presently available. We discuss the role of turbulence to produce clumpy cloud structures and introduce new work on colliding inter-cloud gas flows leading to non-linear inhomogeneous cloud structures in an intially smooth cloud. This clumpy morphology has important consequences for secondary formation. The triggering processes of supernovae, stellar winds, and H II regions are discussed with emphasis on the consequences for radiation driven implosion as a promising secondary star formation mechanism. Detailed two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of radiation driven implosion are discussed. This mechanism is shown to be highly efficient in synchronizing the formation of new stars in congruent to 1-3 x 10/sup 4/ years and could account for the recent evidence for new massive star formation in several UCHII regions. It is concluded that, while no single theory adequately explains the variety of star formation observed, a uniform description of star formation is likely to involve several secondary processes. Advances in the theory of star formation will require multiple dimensional calculations of coupled processes. The important non-linear interactions include hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and magnetic fields.

  18. On the Formation of Brown Dwarfs

    E-print Network

    Ing-Guey Jiang; G. Laughlin; D. N. C. Lin

    2003-09-19

    The observational properties of brown dwarfs pose challenges to the theory of star formation. Because their mass is much smaller than the typical Jeans mass of interstellar clouds, brown dwarfs are most likely formed through secondary fragmentation processes, rather than through the direct collapse of a molecular cloud core. In order to prevent substantial post-formation mass accretion, young brown dwarfs must leave the high density formation regions in which they form. We propose here that brown dwarfs are formed in the circumbinary disks. Through post-formation dynamical interaction with their host binary stars, young brown dwarfs are either scattered to large distance or removed, with modest speed, from their cradles.

  19. Star formation in very young galactic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, M.C.; Comins, N.F.

    1988-03-01

    It is argued, following Stahler (1985), that in young galactic clusters both the suggested exponential increase in star-formation rates with time and the mass-age correlation are artifacts of incorrectly assigning pre-main-sequence ages to main-sequence stars. Quantitative arguments are presented for simultaneous formation of stars with different masses (contemporaneous star formation) in such clusters and a method is presented for determining star-formation histories and the ages of young galactic clusters (i.e., clusters in which pre-main-sequence stars are detectable). 25 references.

  20. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2013-10-15

    A method for treating a karsted formation containing heavy hydrocarbons and dolomite includes providing heat to at least part of one or more karsted layers in the formation from one or more heaters located in the karsted layers. A temperature in at least one of the karsted layers is allowed to reach a decomposition temperature of dolomite in the formation. The dolomite is allowed to decompose and at least some hydrocarbons are produced from at least one of the karsted layers of the formation.

  1. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying, more coherent "heald" crust, and an innermost, 320-km ring at the crust-mantle interface. Depth-diameter ratios of 1 10to 1 15 are consistent with this interpretation and suggest that volumes of transient cavities and hence of basin ejecta may be considerably greater than commonly assumed. ?? 1978.

  2. Format requirements of thermal neutron scattering data in a nuclear data format to succeed the ENDF format

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.

    2014-03-31

    In November 2012, the Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup 38 (WPEC-SG38) began with the task of developing a nuclear data format and supporting infrastructure to replace the now nearly 50 year old ENDF format. The first step in this process is to develop requirements for the new format and infrastructure. In this talk, I will review the status of ENDF's Thermal Scattering Law (TSL) formats as well as support for this data in the GND format (from which the new format is expected to evolve). Finally, I hope to begin a dialog with members of the thermal neutron scattering community so that their data needs can be accurately and easily accommodated by the new format and tools, as captured by the requirements document. During this discussion, we must keep in mind that the new tools and format must; Support what is in existing data files; Support new things we want to put in data files; and Be flexible enough for us to adapt it to future unanticipated challenges.

  3. Spheromak formation studies in SSPX

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D N; Bulmer, R H; Cohen, B L; Hooper, E B; LoDestro, L L; Mattor, N; McLean, H S; Moller, J; Pearlstein, L D; Ryutov, D D; Stallard, B W; Wood, R D; Woodruff, S; Holcomb, C T; Jarboe, T; Sovinec, C R; Wang, Z; Wurden, G

    2000-09-29

    We present results from the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) at LLNL, which has been built to study energy confinement in spheromak plasmas sustained for up to 2 ms by coaxial DC helicity injection. Peak toroidal currents as high as 600kA have been obtained in the 1m dia. (0.23m minor radius) device using injection currents between 200-400kA; these currents generate edge poloidal fields in the range of 0.2-0.4T. The internal field and current profiles are inferred from edge field measurements using the CORSICA code. Density and impurity control is obtained using baking, glow discharge cleansing, and titanium gettering, after which long plasma decay times ({tau} {ge} 1.5ms) are observed and impurity radiation losses are reduced from {approx}50% to <20% of the input energy. Thomson scattering measurements show peaked electron temperature and pressure profiles with T{sub e} (0){approx}120eV and {beta}{sub e}{approx}7%. Edge field measurements show the presence of n=1 modes during the formation phase, as has been observed in other spheromaks. This mode dies away during sustainment and decay so that edge fluctuation levels as low as 1% have been measured. These results are compared with numerical simulations using the NIMROD code.

  4. Cosmic vacuum and galaxy formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.

    2006-04-01

    It is demonstrated that the protogalactic perturbations must enter the nonlinear regime before the red shift z? 1; otherwise they would be destroyed by the antigravity of the vacuum dark energy at the subsequent epoch of the vacuum domination. At the zrrV={M/[(8?/3)?V]}1/3, where M is the mass of a given over-density and ?V is the vacuum density. The criterion provides a new relation between the largest mass condensations and their spatial scales. All the real large-scale systems follow this relation definitely. It is also shown that a simple formula is possible for the key quantity in the theory of galaxy formation, namely the initial amplitude of the perturbation of the gravitational potential in the protogalactic structures. The amplitude is time independent and given in terms of the Friedmann integrals, which are genuine physical characteristics of the cosmic energies. The results suggest that there is a strong correspondence between the global design of the Universe as a whole and the cosmic structures of various masses and spatial scales.

  5. Chaos in Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-print Network

    Volker Hoffmann; Simon L. Grimm; Ben Moore; Joachim Stadel

    2015-08-04

    Terrestrial planets are thought to be the result of a vast number of gravitational interactions and collisions between smaller bodies. We use numerical simulations to show that practically identical initial conditions result in a wide array of final planetary configurations. This highly chaotic behaviour questions the predictability of different scenarios for the formation and evolution of our solar system and planetary systems in general. However, multiple realisations of the same initial conditions can be used to predict certain global statistics. We present two sets of numerical experiments that quantify this behaviour. Firstly, we demonstrate that simulations with slightly displaced particles are completely divergent after ~500 years, irrespective of initial displacement, particle number, and code accuracy. If a single planetesimal is moved by less than one millimetre, then a different set of planets results -- this timescale for chaotic divergence decreases with increasing particle number. Secondly, we show final planetary configurations of initially similar simulations with and without giant planets after evolving them for ~148 Myr. We find that the same simulations including giant planets tend to generate higher mass planets at lower semi-major axes than simulations without gas giants. This prediction can be tested with forthcoming observational programs. By extracting outliers in the observations, we cautiously predict that Kepler-10, Kepler-9, 61 Vir, HD 134060, and HD 51608 may host as yet undetected giant planets.

  6. String formation beyond leading colour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christiansen, Jesper R.; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new model for the hadronisation of multi-parton systems, in which colour correlations beyond leading N C are allowed to influence the formation of confining potentials (strings). The multiplet structure of SU(3) is combined with a minimisation of the string potential energy, to decide between which partons strings should form, allowing also for "baryonic" configurations (e.g., two colours can combine coherently to form an anticolour). In e + e -collisions, modifications to the leading-colour picture are small, suppressed by both colour and kinematics factors. But in pp collisions, multi-parton interactions increase the number of possible subleading connections, counteracting their naive 1/ N {/C 2} suppression. Moreover, those that reduce the overall string lengths are kinematically favoured. The model, which we have implemented in the PYTHIA 8 generator, is capable of reaching agreement not only with the important < p ?> ( n charged) distribution but also with measured rates (and ratios) of kaons and hyperons, in both ee and pp collisions. Nonetheless, the shape of their p ? spectra remains challenging to explain.

  7. Spiral Galactic Formation and Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, Stewart

    2009-05-01

    Before the period of galactic formation the uiverse consisted of a vast number of pre-formed systems consisting of two or more pre-galactic arms, the arms orbiting each other. As the orbits of the arms decayed the sides of the fore-sections of the arms tangentially collided and joined and thereby forming multi-armed spiral galaxies which began to rotate.The rotation resulted from the conversion of the orbital motion of the individual arms when joined into faster rotational motion of the newly formed galaxy. The spiral arms were maintained by the centripital force of the rapidly rotational motion of the galaxy system. As the rotational motion of the galaxy slowed down the arms of the spiral galaxy collapsed towards the body of the galaxy due to lessening of centripetal force on the arms and elliptical galaxies were formed and with further lessening of galactic rotational motion galactic disks were formed. One can see in galaxies M51, M100, NGC2336 and NGC4939 the galactic arms came from external orbit, not disks or instabilities in support of this theory. Also in support of this theory of galactic evolution is that spiral galaxies rotate faster than ellipticals or disks.

  8. Formation of the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawal, J. J.

    1986-02-01

    An alternative method for deriving the Titius-Bode law is examined. Prentice's modern Laplacian theory (1978a, b) which calculates the ratio of orbital radii of successively disposed rings as 1.69, and Rawal's (1984a) 1.442 ratio value derived from the Roche limit concept are reviewed. The interrelations between the supersonic turbulent convection, rotational instability, and Roche limit are analyzed. The equations for evaluating the total energy of a uniformly turbulent cloud of equatorial radius existing in a hydrostatic equilibrium are explained. The influence of turbulence on the cloud is investigated. The supersonic turbulence is unable to completely stabilize the cloud during the collapse from 10,000 to 300 solar radii. The turbulent stress also causes the formation of a very steep density inversion at the photosphere; the effect of turbulence on the differential motion and rotation in the cloud is studied. It is concluded that the Bode constant calculated using the proposed technique is equivalent to the Roche limit.

  9. The Magellanic System's Interactive Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putman, M. E.

    2000-04-01

    The interaction between the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds has resulted in several high-velocity complexes which are connected to the Clouds. The complexes are known as the Magellanic Bridge, an HI connection between the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, the Magellanic Stream, a 10° × 100° HI filament which trails the Clouds, and the Leading Arm, a diffuse HI filament which leads the Clouds. The mechanism responsible for these features formation remains under some debate, with the lack of detailed HI observations being one of the limiting factors in resolving the issue. Here I present several large mosaics of HI Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS) data which show the full extent of the three Magellanic complexes at almost twice the resolution of previous observations. These interactive features are connected, but unique in their spatial and velocity distribution. The differences may shed light on their origin and present environment. Dense clumps of HI along the sightline to the Sculptor Group, which may or may not be associated with the Magellanic complexes, are also discussed.

  10. A model for fingerprint formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kücken, M.; Newell, A. C.

    2004-10-01

    The uniqueness of fingerprints (epidermal ridges) has been recognized for over two thousand years. They have been studied scientifically for more than two hundred years. Yet, in spite of the accumulation of a wealth of empirical and experimental knowledge, no widely accepted explanation for the development of epidermal ridges on fingers, palms and soles has yet emerged. Informed by an extensive literature study we suggest that fingerprint patterns are created as the result of a buckling instability in the basal cell layer of the fetal epidermis. Analysis of the well-known von Karman equations informs us that the buckling direction is perpendicular to the direction of greatest stress in the basal layer. We propose that this stress is induced by resistance of furrows and creases to the differential growth of the basal layer and regression of the volar pads during the time of ridge formation. These theories have been tested by computer experiments. The results are in close harmony with observations. Specifically, they are consistent with the well-known observation that the pattern type depends on the geometry of the fingertip surface when fingerprint patterns are formed.

  11. Star Formation in Tadpole Galaxies

    E-print Network

    Munoz-Tunon, Casiana; Elmegreen, Debra M; Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2014-01-01

    Tadpole Galaxies look like a star forming head with a tail structure to the side. They are also named cometaries. In a series of recent works we have discovered a number of issues that lead us to consider them extremely interesting targets. First, from images, they are disks with a lopsided starburst. This result is firmly established with long slit spectroscopy in a nearby representative sample. They rotate with the head following the rotation pattern but displaced from the rotation center. Moreover, in a search for extremely metal poor (XMP) galaxies, we identified tadpoles as the dominant shapes in the sample- nearly 80% of the local XMP galaxies have a tadpole morphology. In addition, the spatially resolved analysis of the metallicity shows the remarkable result that there is a metallicity drop right at the position of the head. This is contrary to what intuition would say and difficult to explain if star formation has happened from gas processed in the disk. The result could however be understood if the ...

  12. Dune formation under bimodal winds

    PubMed Central

    Parteli, Eric J. R.; Durán, Orencio; Tsoar, Haim; Schwämmle, Veit; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2009-01-01

    The study of dune morphology represents a valuable tool in the investigation of planetary wind systems—the primary factor controlling the dune shape is the wind directionality. However, our understanding of dune formation is still limited to the simplest situation of unidirectional winds: There is no model that solves the equations of sand transport under the most common situation of seasonally varying wind directions. Here we present the calculation of sand transport under bimodal winds using a dune model that is extended to account for more than one wind direction. Our calculations show that dunes align longitudinally to the resultant wind trend if the angle ?w between the wind directions is larger than 90°. Under high sand availability, linear seif dunes are obtained, the intriguing meandering shape of which is found to be controlled by the dune height and by the time the wind lasts at each one of the two wind directions. Unusual dune shapes including the “wedge dunes” observed on Mars appear within a wide spectrum of bimodal dune morphologies under low sand availability. PMID:20018703

  13. Pattern Formation in Excitable Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, William Nash

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenon of excitability is observed in a wide variety of physical and biological systems. In this work, spatially extended excitable systems are examined from several different perspectives. First, a pedagogical introduction is used to motivate the derivation of the dynamics of one dimensional excitable pulses. In the second part, coupled map techniques for numerical simulation of excitable media and other interfacial systems are described. Examples are given for both excitable media and crystal growth. The third chapter addresses the phenomenon of spiral formation in excitable media. Exact rotating solutions are found for a class of models of excitable media. The solutions consist of two regions: an outer region, consisting of the spiral proper, which exhibits a singularity at its tip, and the core region, obtained by rescaling space in the vicinity of the tip. The tip singularity is resolved in the core region, leading to a consistent solution in all of space. The stability of both the spiral and the core is investigated, with the result that the spiral is found to be stable, and the core unstable. Finally, the stability of excitable waves of the chemical cAMP traveling over aggregating colonies of the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum is examined by coupling the excitable dynamics of the cAMP signalling system to a simple model of chemotaxis, with result that cellular motion is found to destabilize the waves, causing the initially uniform field of cells to break up into streams.

  14. The Political Dilemmas of Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorn, Sherman

    2010-01-01

    The literature base on using formative assessment for instructional and intervention decisions is formidable, but the history of the practice of formative assessment is spotty. Even with the pressures of high-stakes accountability, its definition is fuzzy, its adoption is inconsistent, and the prognosis for future use is questionable. A historical…

  15. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  16. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  17. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  18. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  19. 1 CFR 10.3 - Format.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Format. 10.3 Section 10.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PRESIDENTIAL PAPERS Regular Publication § 10.3 Format. The Daily Compilation of Presidential Documents is published online...

  20. GALAXY FORMATION AND EVOLUTION Richard B. Larson

    E-print Network

    Larson, Richard B.

    GALAXY FORMATION AND EVOLUTION Richard B. Larson Yale Astronomy Department Box 6666 New Haven, CT 06511, U.S.A. 1 #12;#12;Galaxy Formation and Evolution 3 1 INTRODUCTION Most of the visible matter in the universe is concentrated in galaxies, which are the basic astronomical ecosystems in which stars are born

  1. Achievement Goal Orientations and Identity Formation Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Avi; Flum, Hanoch

    2010-01-01

    The present article points to shared underlying theoretical assumptions and central processes of a prominent academic motivation perspective--achievement goal theory--and recent process perspectives in the identity formation literature, and more specifically, identity formation styles. The review highlights the shared definition of achievement…

  2. A UNIMARC Bibliographic Format Database for ABCD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megnigbeto, Eustache

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: ABCD is a web-based open and free software suite for library management derived from the UNESCO CDS/ISIS software technology. The first version was launched officially in December 2009 with a MARC 21 bibliographic format database. This paper aims to detail the building of the UNIMARC bibliographic format database for ABCD.…

  3. Methods for forming wellbores in heated formations

    DOEpatents

    Guimerans, Rosalvina Ramona; Mansure, Arthur James

    2012-09-25

    A method for forming a wellbore in a heated formation includes flowing liquid cooling fluid to a bottom hole assembly in a wellbore in a heated formation. At least a portion of the liquid cooling fluid is vaporized at or near a region to be cooled. Vaporizing the liquid cooling fluid absorbs heat from the region to be cooled.

  4. Convection and giant planet formation G. Wuchterl

    E-print Network

    Wuchterl, Günther

    Convection and giant planet formation G. Wuchterl Institut f¨ur Astronomie der Universit¨at Wien, A­1180 Wien Abstract. Convection is of key importance in stellar structure, evolution and formation. Only planet structure. I will show that 1. Mixing length convection significantly reduces the critical mass

  5. Mylonitic Breccia near the Gunsight Formation

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Mylonitic breccia in alluvium of Little Deer Creek, downstream from a moderately west-dipping contact between biotitic quartzite of the Gunsight Formation, which is structurally overlain by garnet-chloritoid-bearing banded siltite of the banded siltite unit of the Apple Creek Formation. That structu...

  6. 21 CFR 573.170 - Ammonium formate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.170 Ammonium formate. The food additive, partially ammonium formate, may be safely used in...) To assure safe use of the additive, in addition to the other information required by the Federal...

  7. Robot Behavior Adaptation for Formation Maintenance

    E-print Network

    López-Sánchez, Maite

    1 Robot Behavior Adaptation for Formation Maintenance Maite López-Sánchez maite@maia.ub.es WAI): ­1 or 2 reference robots to follow ­keeping fixed angle (formation property) ­and fixed distance d (separation distance) · related to robot visibility range, speed or reaction capabilities Basic behaviors I

  8. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FORMATTING YOUR IGLC-7 PAPER

    E-print Network

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR FORMATTING YOUR IGLC-7 PAPER Iris D. Tommelein1 , One Co-author2 , and Another Co-author3 ABSTRACT Formatting of technical papers is important to those interested in seeing conference proceedings that have a consistent appearance. This paper presents the guidelines for authors wishing

  9. FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    E-print Network

    Waddington, Ian

    FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY Deborah B. Haarsma 1 , R. Bruce Partridge 1 , Ian 85287­1504 USA Abstract. Faint extragalactic radio sources provide important information about the global history of star formation. Sensitive radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and other fields

  10. Island Formation: Constructing a Coral Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Heather; Edd, Amelia

    2009-01-01

    The process of coral island formation is often difficult for middle school students to comprehend. Coral island formation is a dynamic process, and students should have the opportunity to experience this process in a synergistic context. The authors provide instructional guidelines for constructing a coral island. Students play an interactive role…

  11. LARSPEC spectroradiometer-multiband radiometer data formats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biehl, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    The data base software system, LARSPEC, is discussed and the data base format for agronomic, meteorological, spectroradiometer, and multiband radiometer data is described. In addition, the contents and formats of each record of data and the wavelength tables are listed and the codes used for some of the parameters are described.

  12. Citation Format ESP 171 Spring 2010

    E-print Network

    Handy, Susan L.

    1 Citation Format ESP 171 Spring 2010 We have asked that cite your sources "appropriately," including proper citation format. Because we have received a lot of papers with improper citations in the past, we recommend you use APA style for the citations in your paper if you're unsure about proper

  13. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Vascular Network Formation

    E-print Network

    Triolo, Livio

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Vascular Network Formation Paolo Butt`a1 , Fiammetta Cerreti1", Compendio Viminale, 00184 Roma, Italy 4 Dipartimento di Matematica, Universit`a di Roma "Tor Vergata", Via for the formation of the capillary blood vessel network. We describe a system of endothelial cells by means of two

  14. Conceptualizing Pre-emptive Formative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carless, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to unpack some dimensions of formative assessment not yet fully articulated in the existing literature. It introduces the term, pre-emptive formative assessment to denote teacher actions which attempt to clarify student understandings before misconceptions have resulted in ineffective learning outcomes and/or loss of marks in…

  15. INSTRUCTIONS FOR FORMATTING YOUR CEC02 PAPER

    E-print Network

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    with the first author (send e-mail to tommelein@ce.berkeley.edu) prior to submitting your paper if other word the list should be in Text First format. #12;DOCUMENT STRUCTURE Provide on the first page the paper's titleINSTRUCTIONS FOR FORMATTING YOUR CEC02 PAPER Iris D. Tommelein1 , One Co-author2 , and Another Co

  16. DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

    E-print Network

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE Submitted by Jonathan L. Vigh Department of Atmospheric OF THE HURRICANE EYE BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY. Schubert Department Head: Richard H. Johnson ii #12;ABSTRACT OF DISSERTATION FORMATION OF THE HURRICANE EYE

  17. Remaking Civic Formation: Towards a Learning Citizen?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seddon, Terri

    2004-01-01

    This paper uses three examples of educational innovation emerging in the contemporary context of market-liberal reform as a focus for exploring the patterns and possibilities of civic formation. The first part of the paper contextualises contemporary civic formation within the long historic struggle between capitalism and democracy, highlighting…

  18. Formative Assessment in the High School IMC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Valerie A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how she uses formative assessments of information literacy skills in the high school IMC. As a result of informal observation and conversations with individual students--a form of formative assessment itself--the author learned that students were not using indexes to locate relevant information in nonfiction…

  19. APPREND: Formative Assessment Tools for APP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherborne, Tony

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how Assessing Pupils' Progress (APP) can be turned into more of a tool for formative assessment. It describes an approach called "APPREND" as a set of APP-based tools for formative assessment. The author provides a glimpse of how APPREND tools can help. (Contains 2 tables.)

  20. Bone formation: roles of genistein and daidzein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling consists of a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis is the result of increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation causing a decreased bone mass density, loss of bone microarchitecture, and an increased risk of fractu...