Sample records for tacstd2 mutation identified

  1. Establishment of a Human Conjunctival Epithelial Cell Line Lacking the Functional Tacstd2 Gene (An American Ophthalmological Society Thesis)

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Shigeru; Kawasaki, Satoshi; Kitazawa, Koji; Shinomiya, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To report the establishment of a human conjunctival epithelial cell line lacking the functional tumor-associated calcium signal transducer 2 (TACSTD2) gene to be used as an in vitro model of gelatinous drop-like corneal dystrophy (GDLD), a rare disease in which the corneal epithelial barrier function is significantly compromized by the loss of function mutation of the TACSTD2 gene. Methods: A small piece of conjunctival tissue was obtained from a GDLD patient. The conjunctival epithelial cells were enzymatically separated and dissociated from the tissue and immortalized by the lentiviral introduction of the SV40 large T antigen and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) genes. Population doubling, protein expression, and transepithelial resistance (TER) analyses were performed to assess the appropriateness of the established cell line as an in vitro model for GDLD. Results: The life span of the established cell line was found to be significantly elongated compared to nontransfected conjunctival epithelial cells. The SV40 large T antigen and hTERT genes were stably expressed in the established cell line. The protein expression level of the tight junction–related proteins was significantly low compared to the immortalized normal conjunctival epithelial cell line. TER of the established cell line was found to be significantly low compared to the immortalized normal conjunctival epithelial cell line. Conclusions: Our conjunctival epithelial cell line was successfully immortalized and well mimicked several features of GDLD corneas. This cell line may be useful for the elucidation of the pathogenesis of GDLD and for the development of novel treatments for GDLD. PMID:23818740

  2. Using passenger mutations to estimate the timing of driver mutations and identify mutator alterations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent developments in high-throughput genomic technologies make it possible to have a comprehensive view of genomic alterations in tumors on a whole genome scale. Only a small number of somatic alterations detected in tumor genomes are driver alterations which drive tumorigenesis. Most of the somatic alterations are passengers that are neutral to tumor cell selection. Although most research efforts are focused on analyzing driver alterations, the passenger alterations also provide valuable information about the history of tumor development. Results In this paper, we develop a method for estimating the age of the tumor lineage and the timing of the driver alterations based on the number of passenger alterations. This method also identifies mutator genes which increase genomic instability when they are altered and provides estimates of the increased rate of alterations caused by each mutator gene. We applied this method to copy number data and DNA sequencing data for ovarian and lung tumors. We identified well known mutators such as TP53, PRKDC, BRCA1/2 as well as new mutator candidates PPP2R2A and the chromosomal region 22q13.33. We found that most mutator genes alter early during tumorigenesis and were able to estimate the age of individual tumor lineage in cell generations. Conclusions This is the first computational method to identify mutator genes and to take into account the increase of the alteration rate by mutator genes, providing more accurate estimates of the tumor age and the timing of driver alterations. PMID:24330428

  3. Scientists Using TCGA Data Identify 21 Mutational Signatures in Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Many mutations have been implicated in human cancer, but the biological mechanisms that produce them remain largely unknown. In a study published online in Nature on August 14, 2013, researchers identified 21 signatures of mutational processes underlying 30 types of cancer. Characterizing mutational signatures may provide a greater understanding of the mechanistic basis of cancer and potentially lead to better treatments that target its root causes.

  4. Key clinical features to identify girls with CDKL5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydeé; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothée; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlène; Héron, Delphine; N'guyen Morel, Marie Ange; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-10-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of CDKL5-associated encephalopathy. We screened the entire coding region of CDKL5 for mutations in 183 females with encephalopathy with early seizures by denaturing high liquid performance chromatography and direct sequencing, and we identified in 20 unrelated girls, 18 different mutations including 7 novel mutations. These mutations were identified in eight patients with encephalopathy with RTT-like features, five with infantile spasms and seven with encephalopathy with refractory epilepsy. Early epilepsy with normal interictal EEG and severe hypotonia are the key clinical features in identifying patients likely to have CDKL5 mutations. Our study also indicates that these patients clearly exhibit some RTT features such as deceleration of head growth, stereotypies and hand apraxia and that these RTT features become more evident in older and ambulatory patients. However, some RTT signs are clearly absent such as the so called RTT disease profile (period of nearly normal development followed by regression with loss of acquired fine finger skill in early childhood and characteristic intensive eye communication) and the characteristic evolution of the RTT electroencephalogram. Interestingly, in addition to the overall stereotypical symptomatology (age of onset and evolution of the disease) resulting from CDKL5 mutations, atypical forms of CDKL5-related conditions have also been observed. Our data suggest that phenotypic heterogeneity does not correlate with the nature or the position of the mutations or with the pattern of X-chromosome inactivation, but most probably with the functional transcriptional and/or translational consequences of CDKL5 mutations. In conclusion, our report show that search for mutations in CDKL5 is indicated in girls with early onset of a severe intractable seizure disorder or infantile spasms with severe hypotonia, and in girls with RTT-like phenotype and early onset seizures, though, in our cohort, mutations in CDKL5 account for about 10% of the girls affected by these disorders. PMID:18790821

  5. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth (Yale-MED); (UCLA); (Queens)

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  6. Exome capture sequencing identifies a novel mutation in BBS4

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Xianfeng; Dudinsky, Lynn; Patenia, Claire; Chen, Yiyun; Li, Yumei; Wei, Yue; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Lupski, James R.; Mardon, Graeme; Gibbs, Richard A.; Perkins, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most severe eye dystrophies characterized by severe vision loss at an early stage and accounts for approximately 5% of all retinal dystrophies. The purpose of this study was to identify a novel LCA disease allele or gene and to develop an approach combining genetic mapping with whole exome sequencing. Methods Three patients from King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital (KKESH205) underwent whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping, and a single candidate region was identified. Taking advantage of next-generation high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies, whole exome capture sequencing was performed on patient KKESH205#7. Sanger direct sequencing was used during the validation step. The zebrafish model was used to examine the function of the mutant allele. Results A novel missense mutation in Bardet-Biedl syndrome 4 protein (BBS4) was identified in a consanguineous family from Saudi Arabia. This missense mutation in the fifth exon (c.253G>C;p.E85Q) of BBS4 is likely a disease-causing mutation as it segregates with the disease. The mutation is not found in the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) database, the 1000 Genomes Project, or matching normal controls. Functional analysis of this mutation in zebrafish indicates that the G253C allele is pathogenic. Coinjection of the G253C allele cannot rescue the mislocalization of rhodopsin in the retina when BBS4 is knocked down by morpholino injection. Immunofluorescence analysis in cell culture shows that this missense mutation in BBS4 does not cause obvious defects in protein expression or pericentriolar localization. Conclusions This mutation likely mainly reduces or abolishes BBS4 function in the retina. Further studies of this allele will provide important insights concerning the pleiotropic nature of BBS4 function. PMID:22219648

  7. International team identifies critical genes mutated in stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore and National Cancer Centre of Singapore, has identified hundreds of novel genes that are mutated in stomach cancer, the second-most lethal cancer worldwide.

  8. RhoA Mutations Identified in Diffuse Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Hayakawa, Yoku; Wang, Timothy C.; Bass, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse-type histologic variant of gastric cancer is characterized by highly invasive growth patterns and lack of cellular cohesion. Two recent studies have identified highly recurrent mutations of the gene encoding the small GTPase RhoA and suggest that RhoA activity may have a tumor suppressive role in this disease. PMID:25026207

  9. Using Aspergillus nidulans to identify antifungal drug resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoxiao; Li, Shengnan; Kaminskyj, Susan G W

    2014-02-01

    Systemic fungal infections contribute to at least 10% of deaths in hospital settings. Most antifungal drugs target ergosterol (polyenes) or its biosynthetic pathway (azoles and allylamines), or beta-glucan synthesis (echinocandins). Antifungal drugs that target proteins are prone to the emergence of resistant strains. Identification of genes whose mutations lead to targeted resistance can provide new information on those pathways. We used Aspergillus nidulans as a model system to exploit its tractable sexual cycle and calcofluor white as a model antifungal agent to cross-reference our results with other studies. Within 2 weeks from inoculation on sublethal doses of calcofluor white, we isolated 24 A. nidulans adaptive strains from sectoring colonies. Meiotic analysis showed that these strains had single-gene mutations. In each case, the resistance was specific to calcofluor white, since there was no cross-resistance to caspofungin (echinocandin). Mutation sites were identified in two mutants by next-generation sequencing. These were confirmed by reengineering the mutation in a wild-type strain using a gene replacement strategy. One of these mutated genes was related to cell wall synthesis, and the other one was related to drug metabolism. Our strategy has wide application for many fungal species, for antifungal compounds used in agriculture as well as health care, and potentially during protracted drug therapy once drug resistance arises. We suggest that our strategy will be useful for keeping ahead in the drug resistance arms race. PMID:24363365

  10. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent mutations in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Zhengyan; Zheng, Hancheng; Liu, Xiao; Li, Shuyu; Barber, Thomas D.; Gong, Zhuolin; Gao, Huan; Hao, Ke; Willard, Melinda D.; Xu, Jiangchun; Hauptschein, Robert; Rejto, Paul A.; Fernandez, Julio; Wang, Guan; Zhang, Qinghui; Wang, Bo; Chen, Ronghua; Wang, Jian; Lee, Nikki P.; Zhou, Wei; Lin, Zhao; Peng, Zhiyu; Yi, Kang; Chen, Shengpei; Li, Lin; Fan, Xiaomei; Yang, Jie; Ye, Rui; Ju, Jia; Wang, Kai; Estrella, Heather; Deng, Shibing; Wei, Ping; Qiu, Ming; Wulur, Isabella H.; Liu, Jiangang; Ehsani, Mariam E.; Zhang, Chunsheng; Loboda, Andrey; Sung, Wing Kin; Aggarwal, Amit; Poon, Ronnie T.; Fan, Sheung Tat; Wang, Jun; Hardwick, James; Reinhard, Christoph; Dai, Hongyue; Li, Yingrui; Luk, John M.; Mao, Mao

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly cancers worldwide and has no effective treatment, yet the molecular basis of hepatocarcinogenesis remains largely unknown. Here we report findings from a whole-genome sequencing (WGS) study of 88 matched HCC tumor/normal pairs, 81 of which are Hepatitis B virus (HBV) positive, seeking to identify genetically altered genes and pathways implicated in HBV-associated HCC. We find beta-catenin to be the most frequently mutated oncogene (15.9%) and TP53 the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor (35.2%). The Wnt/beta-catenin and JAK/STAT pathways, altered in 62.5% and 45.5% of cases, respectively, are likely to act as two major oncogenic drivers in HCC. This study also identifies several prevalent and potentially actionable mutations, including activating mutations of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1), in 9.1% of patients and provides a path toward therapeutic intervention of the disease. PMID:23788652

  11. Human-specific nonsense mutations identified by genome sequence comparisons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoonsoo Hahn; Byungkook Lee

    2006-01-01

    The comparative study of the human and chimpanzee genomes may shed light on the genetic ingredients for the evolution of the\\u000a unique traits of humans. Here, we present a simple procedure to identify human-specific nonsense mutations that might have\\u000a arisen since the human–chimpanzee divergence. The procedure involves collecting orthologous sequences in which a stop codon\\u000a of the human sequence is

  12. DCEG Scientists Identify New Gene Mutation Related to Familial Melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have identified a rare inherited mutation in a gene that can increase the risk of familial melanoma, according to a study that appeared online in Nature Genetics on March 30, 2014. Although the finding does not offer immediate benefit to patients, variation in the Protection of Telomeres-1 (POT1) gene provides additional clues as to the origins of melanoma and may open new avenues in prevention and treatment research. Read the full NCI Benchmarks blog post about this study.

  13. New ZNF644 mutations identified in patients with high myopia

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Xinying; Wang, Tianyun; Tong, Ping; Li, Yunping; Guo, Hui; Wan, Anran; Xia, Lu; Liu, Yanling; Li, Ying; Tian, Qi; Shen, Lu; Cai, Xinzhang; Tian, Lei; Jin, Xuemin; Hu, Zhengmao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Myopia, or near-sightedness, is one of the most common human visual impairments worldwide, and high myopia is one of the leading causes of blindness. In this study, we investigated the mutation spectrum of ZNF644, a causative gene for autosomal dominant high myopia, in a high-myopia cohort from a Chinese population. Methods DNA was isolated with the standard proteinase K digestion and phenol-chloroform method from a case cohort of 186 subjects diagnosed with high myopia (spherical refractive error equal or less than ?6.00 diopters). Sanger sequencing was performed to find potential mutations in all coding exons, flanking splicing sites, and untranslated regions (UTRs) of ZNF644 (NM_201269). Identified novel variants were further screened in 526 ethnically matched normal controls. Functional prediction and conservation analysis were performed using ANNOVAR. Results Five novel variants were identified. Three are missense (c.1201A>G:p.T401A, c.2867C>G:p.T956S, c.3833A>G:p.E1278G), one is synonymous (c.2565A>G:p.T855T), and one (c.-219C>A) is located in the 5? UTR. Functional prediction indicates that c.3833A>G:p.E1278G was predicted to be damaging by SIFT and Polyphen2. Conservation analysis using PhyloP and GERP++ indicate all of the missense variants are highly conserved. None of these novel mutations was identified in 526 normal controls. Conclusions ZNF644 is associated with high myopia in a cohort from a Chinese population. ZNF644 mutations have a minor contribution to the genetic etiology of high myopia. PMID:24991186

  14. Exome sequencing identifies secondary mutations of SETBP1 and JAK3 in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    E-print Network

    Takahashi, Ryo

    leukemia Highlights Wholeexome sequencing analysis identified that SETBP1 and JAK3 genes were among common targets for secondary mutations in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML), an intractable pediatric leukemia with poor prognosis. These newly identified gene mutations were often subclonal

  15. LineUp: Identifying Deleterious Mutations Using Protein Domain Alignment - Brady Bernard, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2014

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos LineUp: Identifying Deleterious Mutations Using Protein Domain Alignment - Brady Bernard LineUp: Identifying Deleterious Mutations Using Protein Domain Alignment - Brady Bernard, TCGA Scientific Symposium

  16. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes: computational approaches to enable

    E-print Network

    Raphael, Ben J.

    REVIEW Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes: computational approaches to enable precision medicine Benjamin J Raphael1,2* , Jason R Dobson1,2,3 , Layla Oesper1 and Fabio Vandin1,2 Abstract mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences

  17. Key Clinical Features to Identify Girls with "CDKL5" Mutations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Nectoux, Juliette; Rosas-Vargas, Haydee; Milh, Mathieu; Boddaert, Nathalie; Girard, Benoit; Cances, Claude; Ville, Dorothee; Afenjar, Alexandra; Rio, Marlene; Heron, Delphine; Morel, Marie Ange N'Guyen; Arzimanoglou, Alexis; Philippe, Christophe; Jonveaux, Philippe; Chelly, Jamel; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the human X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 ("CDKL5") gene have been shown to cause infantile spasms as well as Rett syndrome (RTT)-like phenotype. To date, less than 25 different mutations have been reported. So far, there are still little data on the key clinical diagnosis criteria and on the natural history of…

  18. Whole exome sequencing identifies new causative mutations in Tunisian families with non-syndromic deafness.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Louha, Malek; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Laroussi, Nadia; Chargui, Mariem; Kefi, Rym; Jonard, Laurence; Dorboz, Imen; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Salah, Sihem Belhaj; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Weil, Dominique; McElreavey, Kenneth; Boespflug, Odile Tanguy; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the causative mutations in patients affected by autosomal recessive non syndromic deafness (DFNB forms), is demanding due to genetic heterogeneity. After the exclusion of GJB2 mutations and other mutations previously reported in Tunisian deaf patients, we performed whole exome sequencing in patients affected with severe to profound deafness, from four unrelated consanguineous Tunisian families. Four biallelic non previously reported mutations were identified in three different genes: a nonsense mutation, c.208C>T (p.R70X), in LRTOMT, a missense mutation, c.5417T>C (p.L1806P), in MYO15A and two splice site mutations, c.7395+3G>A, and c.2260+2T>A, in MYO15A and TMC1 respectively. We thereby provide evidence that whole exome sequencing is a powerful, cost-effective screening tool to identify mutations causing recessive deafness in consanguineous families. PMID:24926664

  19. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies New Causative Mutations in Tunisian Families with Non-Syndromic Deafness

    PubMed Central

    Zainine, Rim; Louha, Malek; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Laroussi, Nadia; Chargui, Mariem; Kefi, Rym; Jonard, Laurence; Dorboz, Imen; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Salah, Sihem Belhaj; Levilliers, Jacqueline; Weil, Dominique; McElreavey, Kenneth; Boespflug, Odile Tanguy; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Identification of the causative mutations in patients affected by autosomal recessive non syndromic deafness (DFNB forms), is demanding due to genetic heterogeneity. After the exclusion of GJB2 mutations and other mutations previously reported in Tunisian deaf patients, we performed whole exome sequencing in patients affected with severe to profound deafness, from four unrelated consanguineous Tunisian families. Four biallelic non previously reported mutations were identified in three different genes: a nonsense mutation, c.208C>T (p.R70X), in LRTOMT, a missense mutation, c.5417T>C (p.L1806P), in MYO15A and two splice site mutations, c.7395+3G>A, and c.2260+2T>A, in MYO15A and TMC1 respectively. We thereby provide evidence that whole exome sequencing is a powerful, cost-effective screening tool to identify mutations causing recessive deafness in consanguineous families. PMID:24926664

  20. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes: computational approaches to enable precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein sequence or structure. Finally, we review techniques to identify recurrent combinations of somatic mutations, including approaches that examine mutations in known pathways or protein-interaction networks, as well as de novo approaches that identify combinations of mutations according to statistical patterns of mutual exclusivity. These techniques, coupled with advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing, are enabling precision medicine approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:24479672

  1. A graph theoretic approach to utilizing protein structure to identify non-random somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It is well known that the development of cancer is caused by the accumulation of somatic mutations within the genome. For oncogenes specifically, current research suggests that there is a small set of "driver" mutations that are primarily responsible for tumorigenesis. Further, due to recent pharmacological successes in treating these driver mutations and their resulting tumors, a variety of approaches have been developed to identify potential driver mutations using methods such as machine learning and mutational clustering. We propose a novel methodology that increases our power to identify mutational clusters by taking into account protein tertiary structure via a graph theoretical approach. Results We have designed and implemented GraphPAC (Graph Protein Amino acid Clustering) to identify mutational clustering while considering protein spatial structure. Using GraphPAC, we are able to detect novel clusters in proteins that are known to exhibit mutation clustering as well as identify clusters in proteins without evidence of prior clustering based on current methods. Specifically, by utilizing the spatial information available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) along with the mutational data in the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), GraphPAC identifies new mutational clusters in well known oncogenes such as EGFR and KRAS. Further, by utilizing graph theory to account for the tertiary structure, GraphPAC discovers clusters in DPP4, NRP1 and other proteins not identified by existing methods. The R package is available at: http://bioconductor.org/packages/release/bioc/html/GraphPAC.html. Conclusion GraphPAC provides an alternative to iPAC and an extension to current methodology when identifying potential activating driver mutations by utilizing a graph theoretic approach when considering protein tertiary structure. PMID:24669769

  2. What is custom mutation analysis? Custom mutation analysis refers to testing of any gene for families with previously identified mutations associated

    E-print Network

    Gilad, Yoav

    in an affected family member in a research laboratory, and the family is seeking prenatal or carrier testing Families with an identified mutation, who are interested in prenatal or carrier testing which Laboratories Custom mutation analysis #12;3/10 7. Prenatal, carrier or diagnostic testing can then be offered

  3. High Throughput Genotyping in Osteosarcoma Identifies Multiple Mutations in PIK3CA and other Oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis; MacConaill, Laura; Harmon, David; Tariq, Zeeshan; Garraway, Levi; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of new genes that are mutated in osteosarcomas is critical to developing a better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this disease and discovering new targets for therapeutic development. Methods We identified somatic non-synonymous coding mutations in oncogenes associated with human cancers and hotspot mutations from tumor suppressor genes that were either well-described in literature or seen multiple times in human cancer sequencing efforts. We then systematically characterized 961 mutations in 89 genes across 98 osteosarcoma tumor samples and cell lines. All identified mutations were replicated on an independent platform using homogeneous mass extend MALDI-TOF (Sequenom hME Genotyping). Results We identified 14 mutations in at least one osteosarcoma tumor sample or cell line. Some of the genetic changes identified were in tumor suppressor genes previously known to be altered in osteosarcoma: p53 (R273H, R273C, and Y163C) and RB1 (E137*). Notably, we identified multiple mutations in PIK3CA (H1047R, E545K, and H701P) which have never previously been observed in osteosarcoma. Additionally, we observed mutations in KRAS (G12S), CUBN (I3189V, seen in two separate tumor samples), CDH1 (A617T, seen in two separate tumor samples), CTNNB1 (N287S), and FSCB (S775L). Conclusion We performed the largest mutational profiling of osteosarcoma to date and identified for the first time several mutations involving the PI3 kinase pathway – adding osteosarcoma on to the growing list of malignancies with PI3 kinase mutations. Additionally, we initiated a mutational map detailing DNA sequence changes across a variety of osteosarcoma subtypes and offered new candidates for therapeutic targeting. PMID:22006429

  4. Identifying DNA mutations in purified hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ziming; Zhou, Ting; Merchant, Azhar; Prihoda, Thomas J; Wickes, Brian L; Xu, Guogang; Walter, Christi A; Rebel, Vivienne I

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it has become apparent that genomic instability is tightly related to many developmental disorders, cancers, and aging. Given that stem cells are responsible for ensuring tissue homeostasis and repair throughout life, it is reasonable to hypothesize that the stem cell population is critical for preserving genomic integrity of tissues. Therefore, significant interest has arisen in assessing the impact of endogenous and environmental factors on genomic integrity in stem cells and their progeny, aiming to understand the etiology of stem-cell based diseases. LacI transgenic mice carry a recoverable ? phage vector encoding the LacI reporter system, in which the LacI gene serves as the mutation reporter. The result of a mutated LacI gene is the production of ?-galactosidase that cleaves a chromogenic substrate, turning it blue. The LacI reporter system is carried in all cells, including stem/progenitor cells and can easily be recovered and used to subsequently infect E. coli. After incubating infected E. coli on agarose that contains the correct substrate, plaques can be scored; blue plaques indicate a mutant LacI gene, while clear plaques harbor wild-type. The frequency of blue (among clear) plaques indicates the mutant frequency in the original cell population the DNA was extracted from. Sequencing the mutant LacI gene will show the location of the mutations in the gene and the type of mutation. The LacI transgenic mouse model is well-established as an in vivo mutagenesis assay. Moreover, the mice and the reagents for the assay are commercially available. Here we describe in detail how this model can be adapted to measure the frequency of spontaneously occurring DNA mutants in stem cell-enriched Lin(-)IL7R(-)Sca-1(+)cKit(++)(LSK) cells and other subpopulations of the hematopoietic system. PMID:24637843

  5. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in CCDC114 as a cause of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Ostrowski, Lawrence E; Huang, Lu; Carson, Johnny L; Hazucha, Milan J; Yin, Weining; Berg, Jonathan S; Davis, Stephanie D; Dell, Sharon D; Ferkol, Thomas W; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sagel, Scott D; Milla, Carlos E; Olivier, Kenneth N; Turner, Emily H; Lewis, Alexandra P; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2013-01-10

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal-recessive disorder, characterized by oto-sino-pulmonary disease and situs abnormalities. PCD-causing mutations have been identified in 14 genes, but they collectively account for only ~60% of all PCD. To identify mutations that cause PCD, we performed exome sequencing on six unrelated probands with ciliary outer dynein arm (ODA) defects. Mutations in CCDC114, an ortholog of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii motility gene DCC2, were identified in a family with two affected siblings. Sanger sequencing of 67 additional individuals with PCD with ODA defects from 58 families revealed CCDC114 mutations in 4 individuals in 3 families. All 6 individuals with CCDC114 mutations had characteristic oto-sino-pulmonary disease, but none had situs abnormalities. In the remaining 5 individuals with PCD who underwent exome sequencing, we identified mutations in two genes (DNAI2, DNAH5) known to cause PCD, including an Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutation in DNAI2. These results revealed that mutations in CCDC114 are a cause of ciliary dysmotility and PCD and further demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing to identify genetic causes in heterogeneous recessive disorders. PMID:23261302

  6. Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in CCDC114 as a Cause of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Michael R.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Huang, Lu; Carson, Johnny L.; Hazucha, Milan J.; Yin, Weining; Berg, Jonathan S.; Davis, Stephanie D.; Dell, Sharon D.; Ferkol, Thomas W.; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Sagel, Scott D.; Milla, Carlos E.; Olivier, Kenneth N.; Turner, Emily H.; Lewis, Alexandra P.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Zariwala, Maimoona A.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous, autosomal-recessive disorder, characterized by oto-sino-pulmonary disease and situs abnormalities. PCD-causing mutations have been identified in 14 genes, but they collectively account for only ?60% of all PCD. To identify mutations that cause PCD, we performed exome sequencing on six unrelated probands with ciliary outer dynein arm (ODA) defects. Mutations in CCDC114, an ortholog of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii motility gene DCC2, were identified in a family with two affected siblings. Sanger sequencing of 67 additional individuals with PCD with ODA defects from 58 families revealed CCDC114 mutations in 4 individuals in 3 families. All 6 individuals with CCDC114 mutations had characteristic oto-sino-pulmonary disease, but none had situs abnormalities. In the remaining 5 individuals with PCD who underwent exome sequencing, we identified mutations in two genes (DNAI2, DNAH5) known to cause PCD, including an Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutation in DNAI2. These results revealed that mutations in CCDC114 are a cause of ciliary dysmotility and PCD and further demonstrate the utility of exome sequencing to identify genetic causes in heterogeneous recessive disorders. PMID:23261302

  7. Identifying and Mapping Parallel Mutations of GAR-3

    E-print Network

    Prompuntagorn, Christopher

    2009-06-09

    (mating behavior). From the isolated worms we created about thirty recombinants, crossing arecoline resistant mutants genetically wildtype worms, and collected their DNA. Testing the chromosomes at different loci can identify a locus that contains mutant...

  8. Exome sequencing identifies FUS mutations as a cause of essential tremor.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy D; Girard, Simon L; Catoire, Hélène; Bourassa, Cynthia V; Belzil, Véronique V; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Hince, Pascale; Levert, Annie; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Noreau, Anne; Diab, Sabrina; Szuto, Anna; Fournier, Hélène; Raelson, John; Belouchi, Majid; Panisset, Michel; Cossette, Patrick; Dupré, Nicolas; Bernard, Geneviève; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2012-08-10

    Essential tremor (ET) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a postural or motion tremor. Despite a strong genetic basis, a gene with rare pathogenic mutations that cause ET has not yet been reported. We used exome sequencing to implement a simple approach to control for misdiagnosis of ET, as well as phenocopies involving sporadic and senile ET cases. We studied a large ET-affected family and identified a FUS p.Gln290(?) mutation as the cause of ET in this family. Further screening of 270 ET cases identified two additional rare missense FUS variants. Functional considerations suggest that the pathogenic effects of ET-specific FUS mutations are different from the effects observed when FUS is mutated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases; we have shown that the ET FUS nonsense mutation is degraded by the nonsense-mediated-decay pathway, whereas amyotrophic lateral sclerosis FUS mutant transcripts are not. PMID:22863194

  9. Exome Sequencing Identifies FUS Mutations as a Cause of Essential Tremor

    PubMed Central

    Merner, Nancy D.; Girard, Simon L.; Catoire, Hélène; Bourassa, Cynthia V.; Belzil, Véronique V.; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Hince, Pascale; Levert, Annie; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Noreau, Anne; Diab, Sabrina; Szuto, Anna; Fournier, Hélène; Raelson, John; Belouchi, Majid; Panisset, Michel; Cossette, Patrick; Dupré, Nicolas; Bernard, Geneviève; Chouinard, Sylvain; Dion, Patrick A.; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is a common neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by a postural or motion tremor. Despite a strong genetic basis, a gene with rare pathogenic mutations that cause ET has not yet been reported. We used exome sequencing to implement a simple approach to control for misdiagnosis of ET, as well as phenocopies involving sporadic and senile ET cases. We studied a large ET-affected family and identified a FUS p.Gln290? mutation as the cause of ET in this family. Further screening of 270 ET cases identified two additional rare missense FUS variants. Functional considerations suggest that the pathogenic effects of ET-specific FUS mutations are different from the effects observed when FUS is mutated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases; we have shown that the ET FUS nonsense mutation is degraded by the nonsense-mediated-decay pathway, whereas amyotrophic lateral sclerosis FUS mutant transcripts are not. PMID:22863194

  10. RBPJ Mutations Identified in Two Families Affected by Adams-Oliver Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hassed, Susan J.; Wiley, Graham B.; Wang, Shaofeng; Lee, Ji-Yun; Li, Shibo; Xu, Weihong; Zhao, Zhizhuang J.; Mulvihill, John J.; Robertson, James; Warner, James; Gaffney, Patrick M.

    2012-01-01

    Through exome resequencing, we identified two unique mutations in recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J (RBPJ) in two independent families affected by Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), a rare multiple-malformation disorder consisting primarily of aplasia cutis congenita of the vertex scalp and transverse terminal limb defects. These identified mutations link RBPJ, the primary transcriptional regulator for the Notch pathway, with AOS, a human genetic disorder. Functional assays confirmed impaired DNA binding of mutated RBPJ, placing it among other notch-pathway proteins altered in human genetic syndromes. PMID:22883147

  11. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Novel Recurrently Mutated Genes in Patients with Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ennis, Sarah; Walewska, Renata; Forster, Jade; Parker, Helen; Davis, Zadie; Gardiner, Anne; Collins, Andrew; Oscier, David G.; Strefford, Jonathan C.

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) remains largely unknown. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies have identified recurrent mutations in key pathways, most notably NOTCH2 mutations in >25% of patients. These studies are based on small, heterogeneous discovery cohorts, and therefore only captured a fraction of the lesions present in the SMZL genome. To identify further novel pathogenic mutations within related biochemical pathways, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and copy number (CN) analysis to a biologically and clinically homogeneous cohort of seven SMZL patients with 7q abnormalities and IGHV1-2*04 gene usage. We identified 173 somatic non-silent variants, affecting 160 distinct genes. In additional to providing independent validation of the presence of mutation in several previously reported genes (NOTCH2, TNFAIP3, MAP3K14, MLL2 and SPEN), our study defined eight additional recurrently mutated genes in SMZL; these genes are CREBBP, CBFA2T3, AMOTL1, FAT4, FBXO11, PLA2G4D, TRRAP and USH2A. By integrating our WES and CN data we identified three mutated putative candidate genes targeted by 7q deletions (CUL1, EZH2 and FLNC), with FLNC positioned within the well-characterized 7q minimally deleted region. Taken together, this work expands the reported directory of recurrently mutated cancer genes in this disease, thereby expanding our understanding of SMZL pathogenesis. Ultimately, this work will help to establish a stratified approach to care including the possibility of targeted therapy. PMID:24349473

  12. Whole exome sequencing identifies novel recurrently mutated genes in patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Parry, Marina; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J J; Gibson, Jane; Ennis, Sarah; Walewska, Renata; Forster, Jade; Parker, Helen; Davis, Zadie; Gardiner, Anne; Collins, Andrew; Oscier, David G; Strefford, Jonathan C

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) remains largely unknown. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies have identified recurrent mutations in key pathways, most notably NOTCH2 mutations in >25% of patients. These studies are based on small, heterogeneous discovery cohorts, and therefore only captured a fraction of the lesions present in the SMZL genome. To identify further novel pathogenic mutations within related biochemical pathways, we applied whole exome sequencing (WES) and copy number (CN) analysis to a biologically and clinically homogeneous cohort of seven SMZL patients with 7q abnormalities and IGHV1-2*04 gene usage. We identified 173 somatic non-silent variants, affecting 160 distinct genes. In additional to providing independent validation of the presence of mutation in several previously reported genes (NOTCH2, TNFAIP3, MAP3K14, MLL2 and SPEN), our study defined eight additional recurrently mutated genes in SMZL; these genes are CREBBP, CBFA2T3, AMOTL1, FAT4, FBXO11, PLA2G4D, TRRAP and USH2A. By integrating our WES and CN data we identified three mutated putative candidate genes targeted by 7q deletions (CUL1, EZH2 and FLNC), with FLNC positioned within the well-characterized 7q minimally deleted region. Taken together, this work expands the reported directory of recurrently mutated cancer genes in this disease, thereby expanding our understanding of SMZL pathogenesis. Ultimately, this work will help to establish a stratified approach to care including the possibility of targeted therapy. PMID:24349473

  13. Yale team identifies successful combination drug therapies for melanoma mutations

    Cancer.gov

    Yale Cancer Center researchers have identified several effective combinations of therapies that inhibit melanomas driven by two of the most formidable cancer genes. Some combinations include cholesterol-lowering statin drugs. The study appears in the journal Cancer Discovery. The Yale scientists were seeking to overcome the problems of resistance and partial response to single-drug cancer therapy in patients with melanoma.

  14. Non-classical hereditary hemochromatosis in Portugal: novel mutations identified in iron metabolism-related genes.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Ana Isabel; Ferro, Ana; Martins, Rute; Picanço, Isabel; Gomes, Susana; Cerqueira, Rute; Correia, Manuel; Nunes, António Robalo; Esteves, Jorge; Fleming, Rita; Faustino, Paula

    2009-03-01

    The most frequent genotype associated with Hereditary hemochromatosis is the homozygosity for C282Y, a common HFE mutation. However, other mutations in HFE, transferrin receptor 2 (TFR2), hemojuvelin (HJV) and hepcidin (HAMP) genes, have also been reported in association with this pathology. A mutational analysis of these genes was carried out in 215 Portuguese iron-overloaded individuals previously characterized as non-C282Y or non-H63D homozygous and non-compound heterozygous. The aim was to determine the influence of these genes in the development of iron overload phenotypes in our population. Regarding HFE, some known mutations were found, as S65C and E277K. In addition, three novel missense mutations (L46W, D129N and Y230F) and one nonsense mutation (Y138X) were identified. In TFR2, besides the I238M polymorphism and the rare IVS5 -9T-->A mutation, a novel missense mutation was detected (F280L). Concerning HAMP, the deleterious mutation 5'UTR -25G-->A was found once, associated with Juvenile Hemochromatosis. In HJV, the A310G polymorphism, the novel E275E silent alteration and the novel putative splicing mutation (IVS2 +395C-->G) were identified. In conclusion, only a few number of mutations which can be linked to iron overload was found, revealing their modest contribution for the development of this phenotype in our population, and suggesting that their screening in routine diagnosis is not cost-effective. PMID:18762941

  15. Mutation and evolutionary analyses identify NR2E1-candidate-regulatory mutations in humans with severe cortical malformations

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R A; Leach, S; Bonaguro, R; Chen, J; Yokom, D W; Abrahams, B S; Seaver, L; Schwartz, C E; Dobyns, W; Brooks-Wilson, A; Simpson, E M

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear receptor 2E1 (NR2E1) is expressed in human fetal and adult brains; however, its role in human brain–behavior development is unknown. Previously, we have corrected the cortical hypoplasia and behavioral abnormalities in Nr2e1?/? mice using a genomic clone spanning human NR2E1, which bolsters the hypothesis that NR2E1 may similarly play a role in human cortical and behavioral development. To test the hypothesis that humans with abnormal brain–behavior development may have null or hypomorphic NR2E1 mutations, we undertook the first candidate mutation screen of NR2E1 by sequencing its entire coding region, untranslated, splice site, proximal promoter and evolutionarily conserved non-coding regions in 56 unrelated patients with cortical disorders, namely microcephaly. We then genotyped the candidate mutations in 325 unrelated control subjects and 15 relatives. We did not detect any coding region changes in NR2E1; however, we identified seven novel candidate regulatory mutations that were absent from control subjects. We used in silico tools to predict the effects of these candidate mutations on neural transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Four candidate mutations were predicted to alter TFBS. To facilitate the present and future studies of NR2E1, we also elucidated its molecular evolution, genetic diversity, haplotype structure and linkage disequilibrium by sequencing an additional 94 unaffected humans representing Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Oceania, as well as great apes and monkeys. We detected strong purifying selection, low genetic diversity, 21 novel polymorphisms and five common haplotypes at NR2E1. We conclude that protein-coding changes in NR2E1 do not contribute to cortical and behavioral abnormalities in the patients examined here, but that regulatory mutations may play a role. PMID:17054721

  16. Exome Sequencing Identifies SLCO2A1 Mutations as a Cause of Primary Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenlin; Xia, Weibo; He, Jinwei; Zhang, Zeng; Ke, Yaohua; Yue, Hua; Wang, Chun; Zhang, Hao; Gu, Jiemei; Hu, Weiwei; Fu, Wenzhen; Hu, Yunqiu; Li, Miao; Liu, Yujuan

    2012-01-01

    By using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous guanine-to-adenine transition at the invariant ?1 position of the acceptor site of intron 1 (c.97?1G>A) in solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 2A1 (SLCO2A1), which encodes a prostaglandin transporter protein, as the causative mutation in a single individual with primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) from a consanguineous family. In two other affected individuals with PHO from two unrelated nonconsanguineous families, we identified two different compound heterozygous mutations by using Sanger sequencing. These findings confirm that SLCO2A1 mutations inactivate prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) transport, and they indicate that mutations in SLCO2A1 are the pathogenic cause of PHO. Moreover, this study might also help to explain the cause of secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy. PMID:22197487

  17. Somatic mutations identify a subgroup of aplastic anemia patients who progress to myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Jiang, Jie; Smith, Alexander E; Mohamedali, Azim M; Mian, Syed; Gandhi, Shreyans; Gaken, Joop; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Marsh, Judith C W; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2014-10-23

    The distinction between acquired aplastic anemia (AA) and hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) is often difficult, especially nonsevere AA. We postulated that somatic mutations are present in a subset of AA, and predict malignant transformation. From our database, we identified 150 AA patients with no morphological evidence of MDS, who had stored bone marrow (BM) and constitutional DNA. We excluded Fanconi anemia, mutations of telomere maintenance, and a family history of BM failure (BMF) or cancer. The initial cohort of 57 patients was screened for 835 known genes associated with BMF and myeloid cancer; a second cohort of 93 patients was screened for mutations in ASXL1, DNMT3A, BCOR, TET2, and MPL. Somatic mutations were detected in 19% of AA, and included ASXL1 (n = 12), DNMT3A (n = 8) and BCOR (n = 6). Patients with somatic mutations had a longer disease duration (37 vs 8 months, P < .04), and shorter telomere lengths (median length, 0.9 vs 1.1, P < .001), compared with patients without mutations. Somatic mutations in AA patients with a disease duration of >6 months were associated with a 40% risk of transformation to MDS (P < .0002). Nearly one-fifth of AA patients harbor mutations in genes typically seen in myeloid malignancies that predicted for later transformation to MDS. PMID:25139356

  18. Whole Exome Analysis Identifies Frequent CNGA1 Mutations in Japanese Population with Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Satoshi; Akahori, Masakazu; Sergeev, Yuri; Yoshitake, Kazutoshi; Ikeo, Kazuho; Furuno, Masaaki; Hayashi, Takaaki; Kondo, Mineo; Ueno, Shinji; Tsunoda, Kazushige; Shinoda, Kei; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Tsurusaki, Yohinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi; Iwata, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate frequent disease-causing gene mutations in autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in the Japanese population. Methods In total, 99 Japanese patients with non-syndromic and unrelated arRP or sporadic RP (spRP) were recruited in this study and ophthalmic examinations were conducted for the diagnosis of RP. Among these patients, whole exome sequencing analysis of 30 RP patients and direct sequencing screening of all CNGA1 exons of the other 69 RP patients were performed. Results Whole exome sequencing of 30 arRP/spRP patients identified disease-causing gene mutations of CNGA1 (four patients), EYS (three patients) and SAG (one patient) in eight patients and potential disease-causing gene variants of USH2A (two patients), EYS (one patient), TULP1 (one patient) and C2orf71 (one patient) in five patients. Screening of an additional 69 arRP/spRP patients for the CNGA1 gene mutation revealed one patient with a homozygous mutation. Conclusions This is the first identification of CNGA1 mutations in arRP Japanese patients. The frequency of CNGA1 gene mutation was 5.1% (5/99 patients). CNGA1 mutations are one of the most frequent arRP-causing mutations in Japanese patients. PMID:25268133

  19. Somatic mutations identify a subgroup of aplastic anemia patients who progress to myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulasekararaj, Austin G.; Jiang, Jie; Smith, Alexander E.; Mohamedali, Azim M.; Mian, Syed; Gandhi, Shreyans; Gaken, Joop; Czepulkowski, Barbara; Marsh, Judith C. W.

    2014-01-01

    The distinction between acquired aplastic anemia (AA) and hypocellular myelodysplastic syndrome (hMDS) is often difficult, especially nonsevere AA. We postulated that somatic mutations are present in a subset of AA, and predict malignant transformation. From our database, we identified 150 AA patients with no morphological evidence of MDS, who had stored bone marrow (BM) and constitutional DNA. We excluded Fanconi anemia, mutations of telomere maintenance, and a family history of BM failure (BMF) or cancer. The initial cohort of 57 patients was screened for 835 known genes associated with BMF and myeloid cancer; a second cohort of 93 patients was screened for mutations in ASXL1, DNMT3A, BCOR, TET2, and MPL. Somatic mutations were detected in 19% of AA, and included ASXL1 (n = 12), DNMT3A (n = 8) and BCOR (n = 6). Patients with somatic mutations had a longer disease duration (37 vs 8 months, P < .04), and shorter telomere lengths (median length, 0.9 vs 1.1, P < .001), compared with patients without mutations. Somatic mutations in AA patients with a disease duration of >6 months were associated with a 40% risk of transformation to MDS (P < .0002). Nearly one-fifth of AA patients harbor mutations in genes typically seen in myeloid malignancies that predicted for later transformation to MDS. PMID:25139356

  20. What is custom mutation analysis? Custom mutation analysis refers to testing of any gene for families with previously identified mutations associated

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    in an affected family member in a research laboratory, and the family is seeking prenatal or carrier testing Families with an identified mutation, who are interested in prenatal or carrier testing which. Prenatal, carrier or diagnostic testing can then be offered to any other individuals in the family. Testing

  1. Whole exome sequencing identifies a recurrent RQCD1 P131L mutation in cutaneous melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Stephen Q.; Behren, Andreas; Mar, Victoria J.; Woods, Katherine; Li, Jason; Martin, Claire; Sheppard, Karen E.; Wolfe, Rory; Kelly, John; Cebon, Jonathan; Dobrovic, Alexander; McArthur, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is often caused by mutations due to exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This study reports a recurrent somatic C > T change causing a P131L mutation in the RQCD1 (Required for Cell Differentiation1 Homolog) gene identified through whole exome sequencing of 20 metastatic melanomas. Screening in 715 additional primary melanomas revealed a prevalence of ~4%. This represents the first reported recurrent mutation in a member of the CCR4-NOT complex in cancer. Compared to tumors without the mutation, the P131L mutant positive tumors were associated with increased thickness (p = 0.02), head and neck (p = 0.009) and upper limb (p = 0.03) location, lentigo maligna melanoma subtype (p = 0.02) and BRAF V600K (p = 0.04) but not V600E or NRAS codon 61 mutations. There was no association with nodal disease (p = 0.3). Mutually exclusive mutations of other members of the CCR4-NOT complex were found in ~20% of the TCGA melanoma dataset suggesting the complex may play an important role in melanoma biology. Mutant RQCD1 was predicted to bind strongly to HLA-A0201 and HLA-Cw3 MHC1 complexes. From thirteen patients with mutant RQCD1, an anti-tumor CD8+ T cell response was observed from a single patient's peripheral blood mononuclear cell population stimulated with mutated peptide compared to wildtype indicating a neoantigen may be formed. PMID:25544760

  2. Exome sequencing identifies INPPL1 mutations as a cause of opsismodysplasia.

    PubMed

    Huber, Céline; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Bartholdi, Deborah; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Borochowitz, Zvi; Cavalcanti, Denise P; Frigo, Amandine; Nitschke, Patrick; Roume, Joelle; Santos, Heloísa G; Shalev, Stavit A; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2013-01-10

    Opsismodysplasia (OPS) is a severe autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by pre- and postnatal micromelia with extremely short hands and feet. The main radiological features are severe platyspondyly, squared metacarpals, delayed skeletal ossification, and metaphyseal cupping. In order to identify mutations causing OPS, a total of 16 cases (7 terminated pregnancies and 9 postnatal cases) from 10 unrelated families were included in this study. We performed exome sequencing in three cases from three unrelated families and only one gene was found to harbor mutations in all three cases: inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1). Screening INPPL1 in the remaining cases identified a total of 12 distinct INPPL1 mutations in the 10 families, present at the homozygote state in 7 consanguinous families and at the compound heterozygote state in the 3 remaining families. Most mutations (6/12) resulted in premature stop codons, 2/12 were splice site, and 4/12 were missense mutations located in the catalytic domain, 5-phosphatase. INPPL1 belongs to the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase family, a family of signal-modulating enzymes that govern a plethora of cellular functions by regulating the levels of specific phosphoinositides. Our finding of INPPL1 mutations in OPS, a severe spondylodysplastic dysplasia with major growth plate disorganization, supports a key and specific role of this enzyme in endochondral ossification. PMID:23273569

  3. Exome Sequencing Identifies INPPL1 Mutations as a Cause of Opsismodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Céline; Faqeih, Eissa Ali; Bartholdi, Deborah; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Borochowitz, Zvi; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Frigo, Amandine; Nitschke, Patrick; Roume, Joelle; Santos, Heloísa G.; Shalev, Stavit A.; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Le Merrer, Martine; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Opsismodysplasia (OPS) is a severe autosomal-recessive chondrodysplasia characterized by pre- and postnatal micromelia with extremely short hands and feet. The main radiological features are severe platyspondyly, squared metacarpals, delayed skeletal ossification, and metaphyseal cupping. In order to identify mutations causing OPS, a total of 16 cases (7 terminated pregnancies and 9 postnatal cases) from 10 unrelated families were included in this study. We performed exome sequencing in three cases from three unrelated families and only one gene was found to harbor mutations in all three cases: inositol polyphosphate phosphatase-like 1 (INPPL1). Screening INPPL1 in the remaining cases identified a total of 12 distinct INPPL1 mutations in the 10 families, present at the homozygote state in 7 consanguinous families and at the compound heterozygote state in the 3 remaining families. Most mutations (6/12) resulted in premature stop codons, 2/12 were splice site, and 4/12 were missense mutations located in the catalytic domain, 5-phosphatase. INPPL1 belongs to the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate 5-phosphatase family, a family of signal-modulating enzymes that govern a plethora of cellular functions by regulating the levels of specific phosphoinositides. Our finding of INPPL1 mutations in OPS, a severe spondylodysplastic dysplasia with major growth plate disorganization, supports a key and specific role of this enzyme in endochondral ossification. PMID:23273569

  4. Whole-genome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic NOTCH2 mutations in splenic marginal zone lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiel, Mark J.; Velusamy, Thirunavukkarasu; Betz, Bryan L.; Zhao, Lili; Weigelin, Helmut G.; Chiang, Mark Y.; Huebner-Chan, David R.; Bailey, Nathanael G.; Yang, David T.; Bhagat, Govind; Miranda, Roberto N.; Bahler, David W.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Lim, Megan S.

    2012-01-01

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL), the most common primary lymphoma of spleen, is poorly understood at the genetic level. In this study, using whole-genome DNA sequencing (WGS) and confirmation by Sanger sequencing, we observed mutations identified in several genes not previously known to be recurrently altered in SMZL. In particular, we identified recurrent somatic gain-of-function mutations in NOTCH2, a gene encoding a protein required for marginal zone B cell development, in 25 of 99 (?25%) cases of SMZL and in 1 of 19 (?5%) cases of nonsplenic MZLs. These mutations clustered near the C-terminal proline/glutamate/serine/threonine (PEST)-rich domain, resulting in protein truncation or, rarely, were nonsynonymous substitutions affecting the extracellular heterodimerization domain (HD). NOTCH2 mutations were not present in other B cell lymphomas and leukemias, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; n = 15), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL; n = 15), low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL; n = 44), hairy cell leukemia (HCL; n = 15), and reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 14). NOTCH2 mutations were associated with adverse clinical outcomes (relapse, histological transformation, and/or death) among SMZL patients (P = 0.002). These results suggest that NOTCH2 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis and progression of SMZL and are associated with a poor prognosis. PMID:22891276

  5. Complementary Genomic Screens Identify SERCA as a Therapeutic Target in NOTCH1 Mutated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roti, Giovanni; Carlton, Anne; Ross, Kenneth N.; Markstein, Michele; Pajcini, Kostandin; Su, Angela H.; Perrimon, Norbert; Pear, Warren S.; Kung, Andrew L.; Blacklow, Stephen C.; Aster, Jon C.; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Notch1 is a rational therapeutic target in several human cancers, but as a transcriptional regulator, it poses a drug discovery challenge. To identify Notch1 modulators, we performed two cell-based, high-throughput screens for small-molecule inhibitors and cDNA enhancers of a NOTCH1 allele bearing a leukemia-associated mutation. SERCA calcium channels emerged at the intersection of these complementary screens. SERCA inhibition preferentially impairs the maturation and activity of mutated Notch1 receptors and induces a G0/G1 arrest in NOTCH1-mutated human leukemia cells. A small-molecule SERCA inhibitor has on-target activity in two mouse models of human leukemia and interferes with Notch signaling in Drosophila. These studies “credential” SERCA as a therapeutic target in cancers associated with NOTCH1 mutations. PMID:23434461

  6. A novel method of identifying genetic mutations using an electrochemical DNA array

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, Junko; Takagi, Atsuko; Nakayama, Masato; Miya, Takahito; Miyahara, Takatoshi; Iwanaga, Tsuyoshi; Takenaka, Shigeori; Ikeda, Yasuyuki; Amano, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of a new type of DNA array chip that utilizes electrochemical reactions and a novel method of simultaneously identifying multiple genetic mutations on an array chip. The electrochemical array (ECA) uses a threading intercalator specific to double-stranded nucleotides, ferrocenylnaphthalene diimide (FND), as the indicator. ECA does not require target labeling, and the equipment is simple, durable and less expensive. The simultaneous multiple mutation detection (SMMD) system using an ECA chip and FND utilizes an enzyme to simultaneously distinguish several genetic mutations such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), insertion, deletion, translocation and short tandem repeat. We examined this SMMD system using an ECA chip, by detecting seven different mutations on the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene for 50 patients in a blind test. It turned out that all the results obtained were concordant with the sequencing results, demonstrating that this system is a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:15498924

  7. A novel method of identifying genetic mutations using an electrochemical DNA array.

    PubMed

    Wakai, Junko; Takagi, Atsuko; Nakayama, Masato; Miya, Takahito; Miyahara, Takatoshi; Iwanaga, Tsuyoshi; Takenaka, Shigeori; Ikeda, Yasuyuki; Amano, Masahiko; Urata, Tomohiro

    2004-01-01

    We describe the development of a new type of DNA array chip that utilizes electrochemical reactions and a novel method of simultaneously identifying multiple genetic mutations on an array chip. The electrochemical array (ECA) uses a threading intercalator specific to double-stranded nucleotides, ferrocenylnaphthalene diimide (FND), as the indicator. ECA does not require target labeling, and the equipment is simple, durable and less expensive. The simultaneous multiple mutation detection (SMMD) system using an ECA chip and FND utilizes an enzyme to simultaneously distinguish several genetic mutations such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), insertion, deletion, translocation and short tandem repeat. We examined this SMMD system using an ECA chip, by detecting seven different mutations on the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene for 50 patients in a blind test. It turned out that all the results obtained were concordant with the sequencing results, demonstrating that this system is a powerful tool for clinical applications. PMID:15498924

  8. Complementary genomic screens identify SERCA as a therapeutic target in NOTCH1 mutated cancer.

    PubMed

    Roti, Giovanni; Carlton, Anne; Ross, Kenneth N; Markstein, Michele; Pajcini, Kostandin; Su, Angela H; Perrimon, Norbert; Pear, Warren S; Kung, Andrew L; Blacklow, Stephen C; Aster, Jon C; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2013-03-18

    Notch1 is a rational therapeutic target in several human cancers, but as a transcriptional regulator, it poses a drug discovery challenge. To identify Notch1 modulators, we performed two cell-based, high-throughput screens for small-molecule inhibitors and cDNA enhancers of a NOTCH1 allele bearing a leukemia-associated mutation. Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) channels emerged at the intersection of these complementary screens. SERCA inhibition preferentially impairs the maturation and activity of mutated Notch1 receptors and induces a G0/G1 arrest in NOTCH1-mutated human leukemia cells. A small-molecule SERCA inhibitor has on-target activity in two mouse models of human leukemia and interferes with Notch signaling in Drosophila. These studies "credential" SERCA as a therapeutic target in cancers associated with NOTCH1 mutations. PMID:23434461

  9. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity.

    PubMed

    Dulak, Austin M; Stojanov, Petar; Peng, Shouyong; Lawrence, Michael S; Fox, Cameron; Stewart, Chip; Bandla, Santhoshi; Imamura, Yu; Schumacher, Steven E; Shefler, Erica; McKenna, Aaron; Carter, Scott L; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H; Auclair, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C; Guiducci, Candace; Beroukhim, Rameen; Zhou, Zhongren; Lin, Lin; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Chang, Andrew; Landrenau, Rodney; Pennathur, Arjun; Ogino, Shuji; Luketich, James D; Golub, Todd R; Gabriel, Stacey B; Lander, Eric S; Beer, David G; Godfrey, Tony E; Getz, Gad; Bass, Adam J

    2013-05-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation spectra from whole-exome sequencing of 149 EAC tumor-normal pairs, 15 of which have also been subjected to whole-genome sequencing. We identify a mutational signature defined by a high prevalence of A>C transversions at AA dinucleotides. Statistical analysis of exome data identified 26 significantly mutated genes. Of these genes, five (TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, ARID1A and PIK3CA) have previously been implicated in EAC. The new significantly mutated genes include chromatin-modifying factors and candidate contributors SPG20, TLR4, ELMO1 and DOCK2. Functional analyses of EAC-derived mutations in ELMO1 identifies increased cellular invasion. Therefore, we suggest the potential activation of the RAC1 pathway as a contributor to EAC tumorigenesis. PMID:23525077

  10. Linkage Study and Exome Sequencing Identify a BDP1 Mutation Associated with Hereditary Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Girotto, Giorgia; Abdulhadi, Khalid; Buniello, Annalisa; Vozzi, Diego; Licastro, Danilo; d'Eustacchio, Angela; Vuckovic, Dragana; Alkowari, Moza Khalifa; Steel, Karen P.; Badii, Ramin; Gasparini, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Loss is a common disorder accounting for at least 60% of prelingual deafness. GJB2 gene mutations, GJB6 deletion, and the A1555G mitochondrial mutation play a major role worldwide in causing deafness, but there is a high degree of genetic heterogeneity and many genes involved in deafness have not yet been identified. Therefore, there remains a need to search for new causative mutations. In this study, a combined strategy using both linkage analysis and sequencing identified a new mutation causing hearing loss. Linkage analysis identified a region of 40 Mb on chromosome 5q13 (LOD score 3.8) for which exome sequencing data revealed a mutation (c.7873 T>G leading to p.*2625Gluext*11) in the BDP1 gene (B double prime 1, subunit of RNA polymerase III transcription initiation factor IIIB) in patients from a consanguineous Qatari family of second degree, showing bilateral, post-lingual, sensorineural moderate to severe hearing impairment. The mutation disrupts the termination codon of the transcript resulting in an elongation of 11 residues of the BDP1 protein. This elongation does not contain any known motif and is not conserved across species. Immunohistochemistry studies carried out in the mouse inner ear showed Bdp1 expression within the endothelial cells in the stria vascularis, as well as in mesenchyme-derived cells surrounding the cochlear duct. The identification of the BDP1 mutation increases our knowledge of the molecular bases of Nonsyndromic Hereditary Hearing Loss and provides new opportunities for the diagnosis and treatment of this disease in the Qatari population. PMID:24312468

  11. Whole-exome sequencing identifies somatic ATRX mutations in pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Fishbein, Lauren; Khare, Sanika; Wubbenhorst, Bradley; DeSloover, Daniel; D'Andrea, Kurt; Merrill, Shana; Cho, Nam Woo; Greenberg, Roger A; Else, Tobias; Montone, Kathleen; LiVolsi, Virginia; Fraker, Douglas; Daber, Robert; Cohen, Debbie L; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PCC/PGL) are the solid tumour type most commonly associated with an inherited susceptibility syndrome. However, very little is known about the somatic genetic changes leading to tumorigenesis or malignant transformation. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing on a discovery set of 21 PCC/PGL and identify somatic ATRX mutations in two SDHB-associated tumours. Targeted sequencing of a separate validation set of 103 PCC/PGL identifies somatic ATRX mutations in 12.6% of PCC/PGL. PCC/PGL with somatic ATRX mutations are associated with alternative lengthening of telomeres and clinically aggressive behaviour. This finding suggests that loss of ATRX, an SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling protein, is important in the development of clinically aggressive PCC/PGL. PMID:25608029

  12. Whole exome sequencing identifies mutations in usher syndrome genes in profoundly deaf tunisian patients.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Lahbib, Saida; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Bechraoui, Rym; Marrakchi, Jihène; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Largueche, Leila; Ben Yahia, Salim; Kheirallah, Moncef; Elmatri, Leila; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3) are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys), in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24), and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*). Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss. PMID:25798947

  13. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in Usher Syndrome Genes in Profoundly Deaf Tunisian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Zied; Bonnet, Crystel; Zainine, Rim; Lahbib, Saida; Bouyacoub, Yosra; Bechraoui, Rym; Marrakchi, Jihène; Hardelin, Jean-Pierre; Louha, Malek; Largueche, Leila; Ben Yahia, Salim; Kheirallah, Moncef; Elmatri, Leila; Besbes, Ghazi; Abdelhak, Sonia; Petit, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by combined deafness-blindness. It accounts for about 50% of all hereditary deafness blindness cases. Three clinical subtypes (USH1, USH2, and USH3) are described, of which USH1 is the most severe form, characterized by congenital profound deafness, constant vestibular dysfunction, and a prepubertal onset of retinitis pigmentosa. We performed whole exome sequencing in four unrelated Tunisian patients affected by apparently isolated, congenital profound deafness, with reportedly normal ocular fundus examination. Four biallelic mutations were identified in two USH1 genes: a splice acceptor site mutation, c.2283-1G>T, and a novel missense mutation, c.5434G>A (p.Glu1812Lys), in MYO7A, and two previously unreported mutations in USH1G, i.e. a frameshift mutation, c.1195_1196delAG (p.Leu399Alafs*24), and a nonsense mutation, c.52A>T (p.Lys18*). Another ophthalmological examination including optical coherence tomography actually showed the presence of retinitis pigmentosa in all the patients. Our findings provide evidence that USH is under-diagnosed in Tunisian deaf patients. Yet, early diagnosis of USH is of utmost importance because these patients should undergo cochlear implant surgery in early childhood, in anticipation of the visual loss. PMID:25798947

  14. Three Novel Mutations in Porphobilinogen Deaminase Gene Identified in Russian Patients with Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. L. Surin; A. V. Luk'yanenko; I. V. Karpova; A. V. Misyurin; Ya. S. Pustovoit; A. V. Pivnik

    2001-01-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) is a key enzyme of the heme biosynthetic pathway. Defects in the PBGD gene lead to an autosomal dominant disease, acute intermittent porphyria (AIP). Almost all AIP patients with rare exceptions are heterozygous for the defective gene. To date, at least 160 different mutations causing AIP are identified. Extensive investigations along this line are conducted in many

  15. Single Gene Cricket Mutations: Effects on Behavior, Sensilla, Sensory Neurons, and Identified Interneurons

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Bentley

    1975-01-01

    Crickets are suitable for studying the effects of single gene mutations on single nerve cells. In one mutant, three classes of sensilla are lost sequentially. The absence of one class of mechanoreceptors throughout postembryonic development deprives certain sensory neurons of normal stimulation and results in abnormal physiological and structural development of an identified interneuron.

  16. Genome-Wide Linkage Analysis to Identify Genetic Modifiers of ALK Mutation Penetrance in Familial Neuroblastoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marcella Devoto; Claudia Specchia; Marci Laudenslager; Luca Longo; Hakon Hakonarson; John Maris; Yael Mossé

    2011-01-01

    Background: Neuroblastoma (NB) is an important childhood cancer with a strong genetic component related to disease susceptibility. Approximately 1% of NB cases have a positive family history. Following a genome-wide linkage analysis and sequencing of candidate genes in the critical region, we identified ALK as the major familial NB gene. Dominant mutations in ALK are found in more than 50%

  17. Exome sequencing identifies mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase mutations in infantile mitochondrial cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Götz, Alexandra; Tyynismaa, Henna; Euro, Liliya; Ellonen, Pekka; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ojala, Tiina; Hämäläinen, Riikka H; Tommiska, Johanna; Raivio, Taneli; Oresic, Matej; Karikoski, Riitta; Tammela, Outi; Simola, Kalle O J; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-05-13

    Infantile cardiomyopathies are devastating fatal disorders of the neonatal period or the first year of life. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of this group of diseases, but the underlying gene defects have been characterized in only a minority of cases, because tissue specificity of the manifestation hampers functional cloning and the heterogeneity of causative factors hinders collection of informative family materials. We sequenced the exome of a patient who died at the age of 10 months of hypertrophic mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with combined cardiac respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency. Rigorous data analysis allowed us to identify a homozygous missense mutation in AARS2, which we showed to encode the mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS). Two siblings from another family, both of whom died perinatally of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, had the same mutation, compound heterozygous with another missense mutation. Protein structure modeling of mtAlaRS suggested that one of the mutations affected a unique tRNA recognition site in the editing domain, leading to incorrect tRNA aminoacylation, whereas the second mutation severely disturbed the catalytic function, preventing tRNA aminoacylation. We show here that mutations in AARS2 cause perinatal or infantile cardiomyopathy with near-total combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in the heart. Our results indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying mutations in single patients and allows recognition of the genetic background in single-gene disorders of variable clinical manifestation and tissue-specific disease. Furthermore, we show that mitochondrial disorders extend to prenatal life and are an important cause of early infantile cardiac failure. PMID:21549344

  18. Exome Sequencing Identifies Mitochondrial Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase Mutations in Infantile Mitochondrial Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Alexandra; Tyynismaa, Henna; Euro, Liliya; Ellonen, Pekka; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Ojala, Tiina; Hämäläinen, Riikka H.; Tommiska, Johanna; Raivio, Taneli; Oresic, Matej; Karikoski, Riitta; Tammela, Outi; Simola, Kalle O.J.; Paetau, Anders; Tyni, Tiina; Suomalainen, Anu

    2011-01-01

    Infantile cardiomyopathies are devastating fatal disorders of the neonatal period or the first year of life. Mitochondrial dysfunction is a common cause of this group of diseases, but the underlying gene defects have been characterized in only a minority of cases, because tissue specificity of the manifestation hampers functional cloning and the heterogeneity of causative factors hinders collection of informative family materials. We sequenced the exome of a patient who died at the age of 10 months of hypertrophic mitochondrial cardiomyopathy with combined cardiac respiratory chain complex I and IV deficiency. Rigorous data analysis allowed us to identify a homozygous missense mutation in AARS2, which we showed to encode the mitochondrial alanyl-tRNA synthetase (mtAlaRS). Two siblings from another family, both of whom died perinatally of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, had the same mutation, compound heterozygous with another missense mutation. Protein structure modeling of mtAlaRS suggested that one of the mutations affected a unique tRNA recognition site in the editing domain, leading to incorrect tRNA aminoacylation, whereas the second mutation severely disturbed the catalytic function, preventing tRNA aminoacylation. We show here that mutations in AARS2 cause perinatal or infantile cardiomyopathy with near-total combined mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency in the heart. Our results indicate that exome sequencing is a powerful tool for identifying mutations in single patients and allows recognition of the genetic background in single-gene disorders of variable clinical manifestation and tissue-specific disease. Furthermore, we show that mitochondrial disorders extend to prenatal life and are an important cause of early infantile cardiac failure. PMID:21549344

  19. Exome and whole genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity

    PubMed Central

    Dulak, Austin M.; Stojanov, Petar; Peng, Shouyong; Lawrence, Michael S.; Fox, Cameron; Stewart, Chip; Bandla, Santhoshi; Imamura, Yu; Schumacher, Steven E.; Shefler, Erica; McKenna, Aaron; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Ramos, Alex H.; Auclair, Daniel; Thompson, Kristin; Sougnez, Carrie; Onofrio, Robert C.; Guiducci, Candace; Beroukhim, Rameen; Zhou, David; Lin, Lin; Lin, Jules; Reddy, Rishindra; Chang, Andrew; Luketich, James D.; Pennathur, Arjun; Ogino, Shuji; Golub, Todd R.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Lander, Eric S.; Beer, David G.; Godfrey, Tony E.; Getz, Gad; Bass, Adam J.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a five-year survival rate of 15%, identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation spectra from whole exome sequencing of 149 EAC tumors/normal pairs, 15 of which have also been subjected to whole genome sequencing. We identify a mutational signature defined by a high prevalence of A to C transversions at AA dinucleotides. Statistical analysis of exome data identified significantly mutated 26 genes. Of these genes, four (TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, and PIK3CA) have been previously implicated in EAC. The novel significantly mutated genes include chromatin modifying factors and candidate contributors: SPG20, TLR4, ELMO1, and DOCK2. Functional analyses of EAC-derived mutations in ELMO1 reveal increased cellular invasion. Therefore, we suggest a new hypothesis about the potential activation of the RAC1 pathway to be a contributor to EAC tumorigenesis. PMID:23525077

  20. Driver somatic mutations identify distinct disease entities within myeloid neoplasms with myelodysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Elena, Chiara; Gallì, Anna; Della Porta, Matteo G.; Travaglino, Erica; Pietra, Daniela; Pascutto, Cristiana; Ubezio, Marta; Bono, Elisa; Da Vià, Matteo C.; Brisci, Angela; Bruno, Francesca; Cremonesi, Laura; Ferrari, Maurizio; Boveri, Emanuela; Invernizzi, Rosangela; Campbell, Peter J.; Cazzola, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Our knowledge of the genetic basis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) has considerably improved. To define genotype/phenotype relationships of clinical relevance, we studied 308 patients with MDS, MDS/MPN, or acute myeloid leukemia evolving from MDS. Unsupervised statistical analysis, including the World Health Organization classification criteria and somatic mutations, showed that MDS associated with SF3B1-mutation (51 of 245 patients, 20.8%) is a distinct nosologic entity irrespective of current morphologic classification criteria. Conversely, MDS with ring sideroblasts with nonmutated SF3B1 segregated in different clusters with other MDS subtypes. Mutations of genes involved in DNA methylation, splicing factors other than SF3B1, and genes of the RAS pathway and cohesin complex were independently associated with multilineage dysplasia and identified a distinct subset (51 of 245 patients, 20.8%). No recurrent mutation pattern correlated with unilineage dysplasia without ring sideroblasts. Irrespective of driver somatic mutations, a threshold of 5% bone marrow blasts retained a significant discriminant value for identifying cases with clonal evolution. Comutation of TET2 and SRSF2 was highly predictive of a myeloid neoplasm characterized by myelodysplasia and monocytosis, including but not limited to, chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. These results serve as a proof of concept that a molecular classification of myeloid neoplasms is feasible. PMID:24970933

  1. The First Activating TSH Receptor Mutation in Transmembrane Domain 1 Identified in a Family with Nonautoimmune Hyperthyroidism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    HEIKE BIEBERMANN; TORSTEN SCHONEBERG; CLAUDIA HESS; JOHN GERMAK; THOMAS GUDERMANN; ANNETTE GRUTERS

    Sporadic and familial nonautoimmune hyperthyroidism are very rarely occurring diseases. Within the last years consti- tutively activating TSH receptor mutations were identified as one possible pathomechanism. Except for S281N in the extra- cellular N-terminal domain, all other germline mutations are located in the transmembrane domains 2, 3, 5, 6, and 7 of the TSH receptor, whereas no mutation was reported

  2. A novel APOB mutation identified by exome sequencing cosegregates with steatosis, liver cancer and hypocholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Cefalù, Angelo B; Pirruccello, James P; Noto, Davide; Gabriel, Stacey; Valenti, Vincenza; Gupta, Namrata; Spina, Rossella; Tarugi, Patrizia; Kathiresan, Sekar; Averna, Maurizio R

    2013-01-01

    Objective In familial hypobetalipoproteinemia (FHBL), fatty liver is a characteristic feature, and there are several reports of associated cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. We investigated a large kindred in which low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, fatty liver and hepatocarcinoma displayed an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. Approach and Results The proband was a 25 year-old female with low plasma cholesterol and hepatic steatosis. Low plasma levels of total cholesterol and fatty liver were observed in 10 more family members; 1 member was affected by liver cirrhosis and four more subjects died of either hepatocarcinoma or carcinoma on cirrhosis. To identify the causal mutation in this family, we performed exome sequencing in two participants with hypocholesterolemia and fatty liver. Approximately 22,400 single nucleotide variants were identified in each sample. After variant filtering, 300 novel shared variants remained. A nonsense variant, p.K2240X due to an A>T mutation in exon 26 of APOB (c.6718A>T) was identified and this variant was confirmed by Sanger sequencing. The gentotypic analysis of 16 family members in total showed that this mutation segregated with the low cholesterol trait. In addition, genotyping of the PNPLA3 p.I148M did not show significant frequency differences between carriers and non-carriers of the c.6718A>T APOB gene mutation. Conclusions We used exome sequencing to discover a novel nonsense mutation in exon 26 of APOB (p.K2240X) responsible for low cholesterol and fatty liver in a large kindred. This mutation may also be responsible for cirrhosis and liver cancer in this family. PMID:23723369

  3. Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

    2014-06-12

    Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor ?B pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ?50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ?50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

  4. Novel Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) Mutations Identified in Patients with Juvenile Myoclonic and Generalized Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Sapio, Matthew R.; Vessaz, Monique; Thomas, Pierre; Genton, Pierre; Fricker, Lloyd D.; Salzmann, Annick

    2015-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase A6 (CPA6) is a peptidase that removes C-terminal hydrophobic amino acids from peptides and proteins. The CPA6 gene is expressed in the brains of humans and animals, with high levels of expression during development. It is translated with a prodomain (as proCPA6), which is removed before secretion. The active form of CPA6 binds tightly to the extracellular matrix (ECM) where it is thought to function in the processing of peptides and proteins. Mutations in the CPA6 gene have been identified in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and febrile seizures. In the present study, we screened for CPA6 mutations in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and identified two novel missense mutations: Arg36His and Asn271Ser. Patients harboring these mutations also presented with generalized epilepsy. Neither of the novel mutations was found in a control population. Asn271 is highly conserved in CPA6 and other related metallocarboxypeptidases. Arg36 is present in the prodomain and is not highly conserved. To assess structural consequences of the amino acid substitutions, both mutants were modeled within the predicted structure of the enzyme. To examine the effects of these mutations on enzyme expression and activity, we expressed the mutated enzymes in human embryonic kidney 293T cells. These analyses revealed that Asn271Ser abolished enzymatic activity, while Arg36His led to a ~50% reduction in CPA6 levels in the ECM. Pulse-chase using radio-labeled amino acids was performed to follow secretion. Newly-synthesized CPA6 appeared in the ECM with peak levels between 2-8 hours. There was no major difference in time course between wild-type and mutant forms, although the amount of radiolabeled CPA6 in the ECM was lower for the mutants. Our experiments demonstrate that these mutations in CPA6 are deleterious and provide further evidence for the involvement of CPA6 mutations in the predisposition for several types of epilepsy. PMID:25875328

  5. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  6. Exome sequencing to identify de novo mutations in sporadic ALS trios

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Alessandra; Staahl, Brett T.; Jovicic, Ana; Couthouis, Julien; Fasolino, Maria; Raphael, Alya R.; Yamazaki, Tomohiro; Elias, Laura; Polak, Meraida; Kelly, Crystal; Williams, Kelly L.; Fifita, Jennifer A.; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Nicholson, Garth A.; King, Oliver D.; Reed, Robin; Crabtree, Gerald R.; Blair, Ian P.; Glass, Jonathan D.; Gitler, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    ALS is a devastating neurodegenerative disease whose causes are still poorly understood. To identify additional genetic risk factors, here we assess the role of de novo mutations in ALS by sequencing the exomes of 47 ALS patients and both of their unaffected parents (n=141 exomes). We found that amino acid-altering de novo mutations are enriched in genes encoding chromatin regulators, including the neuronal chromatin remodeling complex component SS18L1/CREST. CREST mutations inhibit activity-dependent neurite outgrowth in primary neurons, and CREST associates with the ALS protein FUS. These findings expand our understanding of the ALS genetic landscape and provide a resource for future studies into the pathogenic mechanisms contributing to sporadic ALS. PMID:23708140

  7. Mutations in Multidomain Protein MEGF8 Identify a Carpenter Syndrome Subtype Associated with Defective Lateralization

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Lloyd, Deborah; Jenkins, Dagan; Elçioglu, Nursel E.; Cooper, Christopher D.O.; Al-Sannaa, Nouriya; Annagür, Ali; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Hüning, Irina; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Goodship, Judith A.; Keavney, Bernard D.; Beales, Philip L.; Gileadi, Opher; McGowan, Simon J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2012-01-01

    Carpenter syndrome is an autosomal-recessive multiple-congenital-malformation disorder characterized by multisuture craniosynostosis and polysyndactyly of the hands and feet; many other clinical features occur, and the most frequent include obesity, umbilical hernia, cryptorchidism, and congenital heart disease. Mutations of RAB23, encoding a small GTPase that regulates vesicular transport, are present in the majority of cases. Here, we describe a disorder caused by mutations in multiple epidermal-growth-factor-like-domains 8 (MEGF8), which exhibits substantial clinical overlap with Carpenter syndrome but is frequently associated with abnormal left-right patterning. We describe five affected individuals with similar dysmorphic facies, and three of them had either complete situs inversus, dextrocardia, or transposition of the great arteries; similar cardiac abnormalities were previously identified in a mouse mutant for the orthologous Megf8. The mutant alleles comprise one nonsense, three missense, and two splice-site mutations; we demonstrate in zebrafish that, in contrast to the wild-type protein, the proteins containing all three missense alterations provide only weak rescue of an early gastrulation phenotype induced by Megf8 knockdown. We conclude that mutations in MEGF8 cause a Carpenter syndrome subtype frequently associated with defective left-right patterning, probably through perturbation of signaling by hedgehog and nodal family members. We did not observe any subject with biallelic loss-of function mutations, suggesting that some residual MEGF8 function might be necessary for survival and might influence the phenotypes observed. PMID:23063620

  8. Two novel SRY missense mutations reducing DNA binding identified in XY females and their mosaic fathers

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt-Ney, M.; Scherer, G. [Univ. of Freiburg (Germany); Thiele, H.; KaltwaBer, P. [Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg (Italy); Bardoni, B.; Cisternino, M. [Univ. of Pavia (Italy)

    1995-04-01

    Two novel mutations in the sex-determining gene SRY were identified by screening DNA from 30 sex-reversed XY females by using the SSCP assay. Both point mutations lead to an amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding high-mobility-group domain of the SRY protein. The first mutation, changing a serine at position 91 to glycine, was found in a sporadic case. The second mutation, leading to replacement of a highly conserved proline at position 125 with leucine, is shared by three members of the same family, two sisters and a half sister having the same father. The mutant SRY proteins showed reduced DNA-binding ability in a gel-shift assay. Analysis of lymphocyte DNA from the respective fathers revealed that they carry both the wild-type and the mutant version of the SRY gene. The fact that both fathers transmitted the mutant SRY copy to their offspring implies that they are mosaic for the SRY gene in testis as well as in blood, as a result of a mutation during early embryonic development. 30 refs., 5 figs.

  9. New de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia identified -Mental Wellness Today http://www.mentalwellnesstoday.com/...hizophrenia/schizophrenia-articles/16-shizophrenia-research/194-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified[10/10/2012 4:3

    E-print Network

    New de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia identified - Mental Wellness Today http://www.mentalwellnesstoday.com/...hizophrenia/schizophrenia-articles/16-shizophrenia-research/194-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified[10/10/2012 4 Articles Heart attack more likely in those with schizophrenia: Study Faith Can Help Mental Health Outcomes

  10. Massively parallel sequencing identifies the gene Megf8 with ENU-induced mutation causing heterotaxy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen; Alpert, Deanne; Francis, Richard; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Yu, Qing; Tansey, Terry; Sabol, Steven L.; Cui, Cheng; Bai, Yongli; Koriabine, Maxim; Yoshinaga, Yuko; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Chen, Feng; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Gunn, Teresa M.; Kramer, Kenneth L.; De Jong, Pieter J.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2009-01-01

    Forward genetic screens with ENU (N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea) mutagenesis can facilitate gene discovery, but mutation identification is often difficult. We present the first study in which an ENU- induced mutation was identified by massively parallel DNA sequencing. This mutation causes heterotaxy and complex congenital heart defects and was mapped to a 2.2-Mb interval on mouse chromosome 7. Massively parallel sequencing of the entire 2.2-Mb interval identified 2 single-base substitutions, one in an intergenic region and a second causing replacement of a highly conserved cysteine with arginine (C193R) in the gene Megf8. Megf8 is evolutionarily conserved from human to fruit fly, and is observed to be ubiquitously expressed. Morpholino knockdown of Megf8 in zebrafish embryos resulted in a high incidence of heterotaxy, indicating a conserved role in laterality specification. Megf8C193R mouse mutants show normal breaking of symmetry at the node, but Nodal signaling failed to be propagated to the left lateral plate mesoderm. Videomicroscopy showed nodal cilia motility, which is required for left–right patterning, is unaffected. Although this protein is predicted to have receptor function based on its amino acid sequence, surprisingly confocal imaging showed it is translocated into the nucleus, where it is colocalized with Gfi1b and Baf60C, two proteins involved in chromatin remodeling. Overall, through the recovery of an ENU-induced mutation, we uncovered Megf8 as an essential regulator of left–right patterning. PMID:19218456

  11. Mutations of ANK3 identified by exome sequencing are associated with autism susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Bi, Cheng; Wu, Jinyu; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Qi; Cai, Wanshi; Yu, Ping; Cai, Tao; Zhao, Mei; Jiang, Yong-hui; Sun, Zhong Sheng

    2012-12-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are common neurodevelopmental disorders with a strong genetic etiology. However, due to the extreme genetic heterogeneity of ASDs, traditional approaches for gene discovery are challenging. Next-generation sequencing technologies offer an opportunity to accelerate the identification of the genetic causes of ASDs. Here, we report the results of whole-exome sequence in a cohort of 20 ASD patients. By extensive bioinformatic analysis, we identified novel mutations in seven genes that are implicated in synaptic function and neurodevelopment. After sequencing an additional 47 ASD samples, we identified three different missense mutations in ANK3 in four unrelated ASD patients, one of which, c.4705T>G (p.S1569A), is a de novo mutation. Given the fact that ANK3 has been shown to strongly associate with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, our findings support an association between ANK3 mutations and ASD susceptibility and imply a shared molecular pathophysiology between ASDs and other neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:22865819

  12. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M; Thomas, Natalie L; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A; Browning, Sharon R; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F; Davis, Stephen R; Jordan, T William; MacGibbon, Alastair K H; Spelman, Richard J; Snell, Russell G

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties. PMID:25719731

  13. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D.; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M.; Thomas, Natalie L.; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A.; Browning, Sharon R.; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A.; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F.; Davis, Stephen R.; Jordan, T. William; MacGibbon, Alastair K. H.; Spelman, Richard J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties. PMID:25719731

  14. C9ORF72 repeat expansions in cases with previously identified pathogenic mutations

    PubMed Central

    van Blitterswijk, Marka; Baker, Matthew C.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Ghidoni, Roberta; Benussi, Luisa; Finger, Elizabeth; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek R.; Kelley, Brendan J.; Murray, Melissa E.; Rutherford, Nicola J.; Brown, Patricia E.; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Mullen, Bianca; Ash, Peter E.A.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Karydas, Anna; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Coppola, Giovanni; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Strong, Michael J.; Beach, Thomas G.; Knopman, David S.; Huey, Edward D.; Mesulam, Marsel; Bird, Thomas; White, Charles L.; Kertesz, Andrew; Geschwind, Dan H.; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Binetti, Giuliano; Miller, Bruce L.; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Boylan, Kevin B.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Dickson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To identify potential genetic modifiers contributing to the phenotypic variability that is detected in patients with repeat expansions in chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72), we investigated the frequency of these expansions in a cohort of 334 subjects previously found to carry mutations in genes known to be associated with a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases. Methods: A 2-step protocol, with a fluorescent PCR and a repeat-primed PCR, was used to determine the presence of hexanucleotide expansions in C9ORF72. For one double mutant, we performed Southern blots to assess expansion sizes, and immunohistochemistry to characterize neuropathology. Results: We detected C9ORF72 repeat expansions in 4 of 334 subjects (1.2% [or 1.8% of 217 families]). All these subjects had behavioral phenotypes and also harbored well-known pathogenic mutations in either progranulin (GRN: p.C466LfsX46, p.R493X, p.C31LfsX35) or microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT: p.P301L). Southern blotting of one double mutant with a p.C466LfsX46 GRN mutation demonstrated a long repeat expansion in brain (>3,000 repeats), and immunohistochemistry showed mixed neuropathology with characteristics of both C9ORF72 expansions and GRN mutations. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that co-occurrence of 2 evidently pathogenic mutations could contribute to the pleiotropy that is detected in patients with C9ORF72 repeat expansions. These findings suggest that patients with known mutations should not be excluded from further studies, and that genetic counselors should be aware of this phenomenon when advising patients and their family members. PMID:24027057

  15. MGH Cancer Center team identifies potential treatment target for KRAS-mutated colon cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Cancer Center have identified a new potential strategy for treating colon tumors driven by mutations in the KRAS gene, which usually resist both conventional and targeted treatments. In a paper appearing in the Feb. 17 issue of Cell, the team reports that targeting a later step in the pathway leading from KRAS activation to tumor growth may be able to halt the process.

  16. Mitochondrial cardiomyopathies: how to identify candidate pathogenic mutations by mitochondrial DNA sequencing, MITOMASTER and phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Michael V; Brandon, Martin C; Diegoli, Marta; Arbustini, Eloisa; Wallace, Douglas C

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations leading to mitochondrial dysfunction can cause cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Owing to a high mutation rate, mtDNA defects may occur at any nucleotide in its 16?569?bp sequence. Complete mtDNA sequencing may detect pathogenic mutations, which can be difficult to interpret because of normal ethnic/geographic-associated haplogroup variation. Our goal is to show how to identify candidate mtDNA mutations by sorting out polymorphisms using readily available online tools. The purpose of this approach is to help investigators in prioritizing mtDNA variants for functional analysis to establish pathogenicity. We analyzed complete mtDNA sequences from 29 Italian patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy or suspected disease. Using MITOMASTER and PhyloTree, we characterized 593 substitution variants by haplogroup and allele frequencies to identify all novel, non-haplogroup-associated variants. MITOMASTER permitted determination of each variant's location, amino acid change and evolutionary conservation. We found that 98% of variants were common or rare, haplogroup-associated variants, and thus unlikely to be primary cause in 80% of cases. Six variants were novel, non-haplogroup variants and thus possible contributors to disease etiology. Two with the greatest pathogenic potential were heteroplasmic, nonsynonymous variants: m.15132T>C in MT-CYB for a patient with hypertrophic dilated cardiomyopathy and m.6570G>T in MT-CO1 for a patient with myopathy. In summary, we have used our automated information system, MITOMASTER, to make a preliminary distinction between normal mtDNA variation and pathogenic mutations in patient samples; this fast and easy approach allowed us to select the variants for traditional analysis to establish pathogenicity. PMID:20978534

  17. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies TTC7A Mutations for Combined Immunodeficiency with Intestinal Atresias

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rui; Giliani, Silvia; Lanzi, Gaetana; Mias, George I.; Lonardi, Silvia; Dobbs, Kerry; Manis, John; Im, Hogune; Gallagher, Jennifer E.; Phanstiel, Douglas H.; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lacroute, Philippe; Bettinger, Keith; Moratto, Daniele; Weinacht, Katja; Montin, Davide; Gallo, Eleonora; Mangili, Giovanna; Porta, Fulvio; Notarangelo, Lucia D.; Pedretti, Stefania; Al-Herz, Waleed; Alfahdli, Wasmi; Comeau, Anne Marie; Traister, Russell S; Pai, Sung-Yun; Carella, Graziella; Facchetti, Fabio; Nadeau, Kari C.; Snyder, Michael; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Combined Immunodeficiency with Multiple Intestinal Atresias (CID-MIA) is a rare hereditary disease characterized by intestinal obstructions and profound immune defects. Objective We sought to determine the underlying genetic causes of CID-MIA by analyzing the exomic sequence of 5 patients and their healthy direct relatives from 5 unrelated families. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing on 5 CID-MIA patients and 10 healthy direct family members belonging to 5 unrelated families with CID-MIA. We also performed targeted Sanger sequencing for the candidate gene TTC7A on 3 additional CID-MIA patients. Results Through analysis and comparison of the exomic sequence of the individuals from these 5 families, we identified biallelic damaging mutations in the TTC7A gene, for a total of 7 distinct mutations. Targeted TTC7A gene sequencing in 3 additional unrelated patients with CID-MIA revealed biallelic deleterious mutations in two of them, as well as an aberrant splice product in the third patient. Staining of normal thymus showed that the TTC7A protein is expressed in thymic epithelial cells as well as in thymocytes. Moreover, severe lymphoid depletion was observed in the thymus and peripheral lymphoid tissues from two patients with CID-MIA. Conclusions We identified deleterious mutations of the TTC7A gene in 8 unrelated patients with CID-MIA and demonstrated that the TTC7A protein is expressed in the thymus. Our results strongly suggest that TTC7A gene defects cause CID-MIA. Clinical Implications Damaging mutations in the gene TTC7A should be scrutinized in patients with CID-MIA. Characterization of the role of this protein in the immune system and intestinal development, as well as in thymic epithelial cells may have important therapeutic implications. PMID:23830146

  18. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel LEPR mutations in individuals with severe early onset obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Richard; Cheung, Yee Him; Shen, Yufeng; Lanzano, Patricia; Mirza, Nazrat M.; Ten, Svetlana; Maclaren, Noel K.; Motaghedi, Roja; Han, Joan C.; Yanovski, Jack A.; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Chung, Wendy K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Obesity is a major public health problem that increases risk for a broad spectrum of co-morbid conditions. Despite evidence for a strong genetic contribution to susceptibility to obesity, previous efforts to discover the relevant genes using positional cloning have failed to account for most of the apparent genetic risk variance. Design and Methods Deploying a strategy combining analysis of exome sequencing data in extremely obese members of four consanguineous families with segregation analysis, we screened for causal genetic variants. Filter-based analysis and homozygosity mapping were used to identify and prioritize putative functional variants. Results We identified two novel frameshift mutations in the Leptin Receptor (LEPR) in two of the families. Conclusions These results provide proof-of-principle that whole-exome sequencing of families segregating for extreme obesity can identify causal pathogenic mutations. The methods described here can be extended to additional families segregating for extreme obesity and should enable the identification of mutations in novel genes that predispose to obesity. PMID:23616257

  19. A Differential Wiring Analysis of Expression Data Correctly Identifies the Gene Containing the Causal Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dalrymple, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) regulation is often post-translational. TF modifications such as reversible phosphorylation and missense mutations, which can act independent of TF expression level, are overlooked by differential expression analysis. Using bovine Piedmontese myostatin mutants as proof-of-concept, we propose a new algorithm that correctly identifies the gene containing the causal mutation from microarray data alone. The myostatin mutation releases the brakes on Piedmontese muscle growth by translating a dysfunctional protein. Compared to a less muscular non-mutant breed we find that myostatin is not differentially expressed at any of ten developmental time points. Despite this challenge, the algorithm identifies the myostatin ‘smoking gun’ through a coordinated, simultaneous, weighted integration of three sources of microarray information: transcript abundance, differential expression, and differential wiring. By asking the novel question “which regulator is cumulatively most differentially wired to the abundant most differentially expressed genes?” it yields the correct answer, “myostatin”. Our new approach identifies causal regulatory changes by globally contrasting co-expression network dynamics. The entirely data-driven ‘weighting’ procedure emphasises regulatory movement relative to the phenotypically relevant part of the network. In contrast to other published methods that compare co-expression networks, significance testing is not used to eliminate connections. PMID:19412532

  20. Genetic testing for sporadic hearing loss using targeted massively parallel sequencing identifies 10 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Guo, L; Ji, H; Sun, S; Chai, R; Wang, L; Li, H

    2014-05-22

    The genetic heterogeneity of non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) has hampered the identification of its pathogenic mutations. Several recent studies applied targeted genome enrichment (TGE) and massively parallel sequencing (MPS) to simultaneously screen a large set of known hearing loss (HL) genes. However, most of these studies were focused on familial cases. To evaluate the effectiveness of TGE and MPS on screening sporadic NSHL patients, we recruited 63 unrelated sporadic NSHL probands, who had various levels of HL and were excluded for mutations in GJB2, MT-RNR1, and SLC26A4 genes. TGE and MPS were performed on 131 known HL genes using the Human Deafness Panel oto-DA3 (Otogenetics Corporation., Norcross, GA). We identified 14 pathogenic variants in STRC, CATSPER2, USH2A, TRIOBP, MYO15A, GPR98, and TMPRSS3 genes in eight patients (diagnostic rate?=?12.7%). Among these variants, 10 were novel compound heterozygous mutations. The identification of pathogenic mutations could predict the progression of HL, and guide diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24853665

  1. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent SPOP, FOXA1 and MED12 mutations in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Christopher E; Baca, Sylvan C; Lawrence, Michael S; Demichelis, Francesca; Blattner, Mirjam; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; White, Thomas A; Stojanov, Petar; Van Allen, Eliezer; Stransky, Nicolas; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Chae, Sung-Suk; Boysen, Gunther; Auclair, Daniel; Onofrio, Robert C; Park, Kyung; Kitabayashi, Naoki; MacDonald, Theresa Y; Sheikh, Karen; Vuong, Terry; Guiducci, Candace; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Hussain, Wasay M; Ramos, Alex H; Winckler, Wendy; Redman, Michelle C; Ardlie, Kristin; Tewari, Ashutosh K; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Rupp, Niels; Wild, Peter J; Moch, Holger; Morrissey, Colm; Nelson, Peter S; Kantoff, Philip W; Gabriel, Stacey B; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Lander, Eric S; Getz, Gad; Rubin, Mark A; Garraway, Levi A

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide and causes over 250,000 deaths each year. Overtreatment of indolent disease also results in significant morbidity. Common genetic alterations in prostate cancer include losses of NKX3.1 (8p21) and PTEN (10q23), gains of AR (the androgen receptor gene) and fusion of ETS family transcription factor genes with androgen-responsive promoters. Recurrent somatic base-pair substitutions are believed to be less contributory in prostate tumorigenesis but have not been systematically analyzed in large cohorts. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 112 prostate tumor and normal tissue pairs. New recurrent mutations were identified in multiple genes, including MED12 and FOXA1. SPOP was the most frequently mutated gene, with mutations involving the SPOP substrate-binding cleft in 6-15% of tumors across multiple independent cohorts. Prostate cancers with mutant SPOP lacked ETS family gene rearrangements and showed a distinct pattern of genomic alterations. Thus, SPOP mutations may define a new molecular subtype of prostate cancer. PMID:22610119

  2. Two point mutations identified in emmer wheat generate null Wx-A1 alleles.

    PubMed

    Saito, M; Nakamura, T

    2005-01-01

    In this report, the Wx-A1 mutations carried by a Triticum dicoccoides line from Israel and a Triticum dicoccum line from Yugoslavia are characterized. A single nucleotide insertion in the T. dicoccoides null allele and a single nucleotide deletion in the T. dicoccum null allele each cause frameshift mutations that induce premature termination codons more than 55 nucleotides upstream of the last exon-exon junction. In both mutants, Wx-A1 transcripts were detectable in 10 day post-anthesis endosperm by relative RT-PCR. However, transcript levels of the T. dicoccoides and T. dicoccum null alleles were reduced to approximately 6.5 and 1.5% of wild-type, respectively. Therefore, the lack of Wx-A1 protein in the mutants appears to be largely due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. The two mutations described here arose independently, and are not related to either of the Wx-A1 mutations identified in common wheat. PMID:15592661

  3. A Novel COL4A5 Mutation Identified in a Chinese Han Family Using Exome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Xiaofei; Yuan, Jinzhong; Deng, Xiong; Xiao, Jingjing; Xu, Hongbo; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Guan, Liping; Xu, Fengping

    2014-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a monogenic disease of the basement membrane (BM), resulting in progressive renal failure due to glomerulonephropathy, variable sensorineural hearing loss, and ocular anomalies. It is caused by mutations in the collagen type IV alpha-3 gene (COL4A3), the collagen type IV alpha-4 gene (COL4A4), and the collagen type IV alpha-5 gene (COL4A5), which encodes type IV collagen ?3, ?4, and ?5 chains, respectively. To explore the disease-related gene in a four-generation Chinese Han pedigree of AS, exome sequencing was conducted on the proband, and a novel deletion mutation c.499delC (p.Pro167Glnfs*36) in the COL4A5 gene was identified. This mutation, absent in 1,000 genomes project, HapMap, dbSNP132, YH1 databases, and 100 normal controls, cosegregated with patients in the family. Neither sensorineural hearing loss nor typical COL4A5-related ocular abnormalities (dot-and-fleck retinopathy, anterior lenticonus, and the rare posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy) were present in patients of this family. The phenotypes of patients in this AS family were characterized by early onset-age and rapidly developing into end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Our discovery broadens the mutation spectrum in the COL4A5 gene associated with AS, which may also shed new light on genetic counseling for AS. PMID:25110662

  4. A novel homozygous mutation in SUCLA2 gene identified by exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lamperti, Costanza; Fang, Mingyan; Invernizzi, Federica; Liu, Xuanzhu; Wang, Hairong; Zhang, Qing; Carrara, Franco; Moroni, Isabella; Zeviani, Massimo; Zhang, Jianguo; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondrial disorders with multiple mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) enzyme deficiency and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are autosomal recessive conditions due to mutations in several nuclear genes necessary for proper mtDNA maintenance. In this report, we describe two Italian siblings presenting with encephalomyopathy and mtDNA depletion in muscle. By whole exome-sequencing and prioritization of candidate genes, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in the SUCLA2 gene in a highly conserved aminoacid residue. Although a recurrent mutation in the SUCLA2 gene is relatively frequent in the Faroe Islands, mutations in other populations are extremely rare. In contrast with what has been reported in other patients, methyl-malonic aciduria, a biomarker for this genetic defect, was absent in our proband and very mildly elevated in her affected sister. This report demonstrates that next-generation technologies, particularly exome-sequencing, are user friendly, powerful means for the identification of disease genes in genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited conditions, such as mitochondrial disorders. PMID:23010432

  5. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent SPOP, FOXA1 and MED12 mutations in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher E.; Baca, Sylvan C.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Demichelis, Francesca; Blattner, Mirjam; Theurillat, Jean-Philippe; White, Thomas A.; Stojanov, Petar; Van Allen, Eliezer; Stransky, Nicolas; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Chae, Sung-Suk; Boysen, Gunther; Auclair, Daniel; Onofrio, Robert; Park, Kyung; Kitabayashi, Naoki; MacDonald, Theresa Y.; Sheikh, Karen; Vuong, Terry; Guiducci, Candace; Cibulskis, Kristian; Sivachenko, Andrey; Carter, Scott L.; Saksena, Gordon; Voet, Douglas; Hussain, Wasay M.; Ramos, Alex H.; Winckler, Wendy; Redman, Michelle C.; Ardlie, Kristin; Tewari, Ashutosh K.; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Rupp, Niels; Wild, Peter J.; Moch, Holger; Morrissey, Colm; Nelson, Peter S.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Golub, Todd R.; Meyerson, Matthew; Lander, Eric S.; Getz, Gad; Rubin, Mark A.; Garraway, Levi A.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide and causes over 250,000 deaths each year1. Overtreatment of indolent disease also results in significant morbidity2. Common genetic alterations in prostate cancer include losses of NKX3.1 (8p21)3,4 and PTEN (10q23)5,6, gains of the androgen receptor gene (AR)7,8 and fusion of ETS-family transcription factor genes with androgen-responsive promoters9–11. Recurrent somatic base-pair substitutions are believed to be less contributory in prostate tumorigenesis12,13 but have not been systematically analyzed in large cohorts. Here we sequenced the exomes of 112 prostate tumor/normal pairs. Novel recurrent mutations were identified in multiple genes, including MED12 and FOXA1. SPOP was the most frequently mutated gene, with mutations involving the SPOP substrate binding cleft in 6–15% of tumors across multiple independent cohorts. SPOP-mutant prostate cancers lacked ETS rearrangements and exhibited a distinct pattern of genomic alterations. Thus, SPOP mutations may define a new molecular subtype of prostate cancer. PMID:22610119

  6. A novel homozygous mutation in SUCLA2 gene identified by exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lamperti, Costanza; Fang, Mingyan; Invernizzi, Federica; Liu, Xuanzhu; Wang, Hairong; Zhang, Qing; Carrara, Franco; Moroni, Isabella; Zeviani, Massimo; Zhang, Jianguo; Ghezzi, Daniele

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders with multiple mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) enzyme deficiency and depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are autosomal recessive conditions due to mutations in several nuclear genes necessary for proper mtDNA maintenance. In this report, we describe two Italian siblings presenting with encephalomyopathy and mtDNA depletion in muscle. By whole exome-sequencing and prioritization of candidate genes, we identified a novel homozygous missense mutation in the SUCLA2 gene in a highly conserved aminoacid residue. Although a recurrent mutation in the SUCLA2 gene is relatively frequent in the Faroe Islands, mutations in other populations are extremely rare. In contrast with what has been reported in other patients, methyl-malonic aciduria, a biomarker for this genetic defect, was absent in our proband and very mildly elevated in her affected sister. This report demonstrates that next-generation technologies, particularly exome-sequencing, are user friendly, powerful means for the identification of disease genes in genetically and clinically heterogeneous inherited conditions, such as mitochondrial disorders. PMID:23010432

  7. Whole-exome sequencing identifies compound heterozygous mutations in WDR62 in siblings with recurrent polymicrogyria.

    PubMed

    Murdock, David R; Clark, Gary D; Bainbridge, Matthew N; Newsham, Irene; Wu, Yuan-Qing; Muzny, Donna M; Cheung, Sau Wai; Gibbs, Richard A; Ramocki, Melissa B

    2011-09-01

    Polymicrogyria is a disorder of neuronal development resulting in structurally abnormal cerebral hemispheres characterized by over-folding and abnormal lamination of the cerebral cortex. Polymicrogyria is frequently associated with severe neurologic deficits including intellectual disability, motor problems, and epilepsy. There are acquired and genetic causes of polymicrogyria, but most patients with a presumed genetic etiology lack a specific diagnosis. Here we report using whole-exome sequencing to identify compound heterozygous mutations in the WD repeat domain 62 (WDR62) gene as the cause of recurrent polymicrogyria in a sibling pair. Sanger sequencing confirmed that the siblings both inherited 1-bp (maternal allele) and 2-bp (paternal allele) frameshift deletions, which predict premature truncation of WDR62, a protein that has a role in early cortical development. The probands are from a non-consanguineous family of Northern European descent, suggesting that autosomal recessive PMG due to compound heterozygous mutation of WDR62 might be a relatively common cause of PMG in the population. Further studies to identify mutation frequency in the population are needed. PMID:21834044

  8. New mutations in flagellar motors identified by whole genome sequencing in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The building of a cilium or flagellum requires molecular motors and associated proteins that allow the relocation of proteins from the cell body to the distal end and the return of proteins to the cell body in a process termed intraflagellar transport (IFT). IFT trains are carried out by kinesin and back to the cell body by dynein. Methods We used whole genome sequencing to identify the causative mutations for two temperature-sensitive flagellar assembly mutants in Chlamydomonas and validated the changes using reversion analysis. We examined the effect of these mutations on the localization of IFT81, an IFT complex B protein, the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain (DHC1b), and the dynein light intermediate chain (D1bLIC). Results The strains, fla18 and fla24, have mutations in kinesin-2 and cytoplasmic dynein, respectively. The fla18 mutation alters the same glutamic acid (E24G) mutated in the fla10-14 allele (E24K). The fla18 strain loses flagella at 32?C more rapidly than the E24K allele but less rapidly than the fla10-1 allele. The fla18 mutant loses its flagella by detachment rather than by shortening. The fla24 mutation falls in cytoplasmic dynein and changes a completely conserved amino acid (L3243P) in an alpha helix in the AAA5 domain. The fla24 mutant loses its flagella by shortening within 6 hours at 32?C. DHC1b protein is reduced by 18-fold and D1bLIC is reduced by 16-fold at 21?C compared to wild-type cells. We identified two pseudorevertants (L3243S and L3243R), which remain flagellated at 32?C. Although fla24 cells assemble full-length flagella at 21?C, IFT81 protein localization is dramatically altered. Instead of localizing at the basal body and along the flagella, IFT81 is concentrated at the proximal end of the flagella. The pseudorevertants show wild-type IFT81 localization at 21?C, but proximal end localization of IFT81 at 32?C. Conclusions The change in the AAA5 domain of the cytoplasmic dynein in fla24 may block the recycling of IFT trains after retrograde transport. It is clear that different alleles in the flagellar motors reveal different functions and roles. Multiple alleles will be important for understanding structure-function relationships. PMID:24229452

  9. Novel mutations causing biotinidase deficiency in individuals identified by newborn screening in Michigan including an unique intronic mutation that alters mRNA expression of the biotinidase gene.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Spencer, L; Nahhas, F; Miller, J; Fribley, A; Feldman, G; Conway, R; Wolf, B

    2014-07-01

    Biotinidase deficiency (BD) is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting in the inability to recycle the vitamin biotin. Individuals with biotinidase deficiency can develop neurological and cutaneous symptoms if they are not treated with biotin. To date, more than 165 mutations in the biotinidase gene (BTD) have been reported. Essentially all the mutations result in enzymatic activities with less than 10% of mean normal serum enzyme activity (profound biotinidase deficiency) with the exception of the c.1330G>C (p.D444H) mutation, which results in an enzyme having 50% of mean normal serum activity and causes partial biotinidase deficiency (10-30% of mean normal serum biotinidase activity) if there is a mutation for profound biotinidase deficiency on the second allele. We now reported eight novel mutations in ten children identified by newborn screening in Michigan from 1988 to the end of 2012. Interestingly, one intronic mutation, c.310-15delT, results in an approximately two-fold down-regulation of BTD mRNA expression by Quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). This is the first report of an intronic mutation in the BTD gene with demonstration of its effect on enzymatic activity by altering mRNA expression. This study identified three other mutations likely to cause partial biotinidase deficiency. These results emphasize the importance of full gene sequencing of BTD on patients with biotinidase deficiency to better understand the genotype and phenotype correlation in the future. PMID:24797656

  10. Genome Screen to Identify Susceptibility Genes for Parkinson Disease in a Sample without parkin Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Pankratz, Nathan; Nichols, William C.; Uniacke, Sean K.; Halter, Cheryl; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Cliff; Conneally, P. Michael; Foroud, Tatiana

    2002-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by bradykinesia, resting tremor, muscular rigidity, and postural instability, as well as by a clinically significant response to treatment with levodopa. Mutations in the ?-synuclein gene have been found to result in autosomal dominant PD, and mutations in the parkin gene produce autosomal recessive juvenile-onset PD. We have studied 203 sibling pairs with PD who were evaluated by a rigorous neurological assessment based on (a) inclusion criteria consisting of clinical features highly associated with autopsy-confirmed PD and (b) exclusion criteria highly associated with other, non-PD pathological diagnoses. Families with positive LOD scores for a marker in an intron of the parkin gene were prioritized for parkin-gene testing, and mutations in the parkin gene were identified in 22 families. To reduce genetic heterogeneity, these families were not included in subsequent genome-screen analysis. Thus, a total of 160 multiplex families without evidence of a parkin mutation were used in multipoint nonparametric linkage analysis to identify PD-susceptibility genes. Two models of PD affection status were considered: model I included only those individuals with a more stringent diagnosis of verified PD (96 sibling pairs from 90 families), whereas model II included all examined individuals as affected, regardless of their final diagnostic classification (170 sibling pairs from 160 families). Under model I, the highest LOD scores were observed on chromosome X (LOD score 2.1) and on chromosome 2 (LOD score 1.9). Analyses performed with all available sibling pairs (model II) found even greater evidence of linkage to chromosome X (LOD score 2.7) and to chromosome 2 (LOD score 2.5). Evidence of linkage was also found to chromosomes 4, 5, and 13 (LOD scores >1.5). Our findings are consistent with those of other linkage studies that have reported linkage to chromosomes 5 and X. PMID:12058349

  11. Suppressors of an Arabidopsis thaliana phyB Mutation Identify Genes That Control Light Signaling and Hypocotyl Elongation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason W. Reed; Rangasamy P. Elumalai; Joanne Chory

    1998-01-01

    Ambient light controls the development and physiology of plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana photoreceptor phytochrome B (PHYB) regulates developmental light responses at both seedling and adult stages. To identify genes that mediate control of development by light, we screened for suppressors of the long hypocotyl phenotype caused by a phyB mutation. Genetic analyses show that the shy (short hy pocotyl) mutations

  12. Targeted exome sequencing identified novel USH2A mutations in Usher syndrome families.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiu-Feng; Xiang, Ping; Chen, Jie; Xing, Dong-Jun; Huang, Na; Min, Qingjie; Gu, Feng; Tong, Yi; Pang, Chi-Pui; Qu, Jia; Jin, Zi-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a leading cause of deaf-blindness in autosomal recessive trait. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneities in USH make molecular diagnosis much difficult. This is a pilot study aiming to develop an approach based on next-generation sequencing to determine the genetic defects in patients with USH or allied diseases precisely and effectively. Eight affected patients and twelve unaffected relatives from five unrelated Chinese USH families, including 2 pseudo-dominant ones, were recruited. A total of 144 known genes of inherited retinal diseases were selected for deep exome resequencing. Through systematic data analysis using established bioinformatics pipeline and segregation analysis, a number of genetic variants were released. Eleven mutations, eight of them were novel, in the USH2A gene were identified. Biparental mutations in USH2A were revealed in 2 families with pseudo-dominant inheritance. A proband was found to have triple mutations, two of them were supposed to locate in the same chromosome. In conclusion, this study revealed the genetic defects in the USH2A gene and demonstrated the robustness of targeted exome sequencing to precisely and rapidly determine genetic defects. The methodology provides a reliable strategy for routine gene diagnosis of USH. PMID:23737954

  13. Perturbation of the mutated EGFR interactome identifies vulnerabilities and resistance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiannong; Bennett, Keiryn; Stukalov, Alexey; Fang, Bin; Zhang, Guolin; Yoshida, Takeshi; Okamoto, Isamu; Kim, Jae-Young; Song, Lanxi; Bai, Yun; Qian, Xiaoning; Rawal, Bhupendra; Schell, Michael; Grebien, Florian; Winter, Georg; Rix, Uwe; Eschrich, Steven; Colinge, Jacques; Koomen, John; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Haura, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that elucidating the interactome of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) forms that are mutated in lung cancer, via global analysis of protein–protein interactions, phosphorylation, and systematically perturbing the ensuing network nodes, should offer a new, more systems-level perspective of the molecular etiology. Here, we describe an EGFR interactome of 263 proteins and offer a 14-protein core network critical to the viability of multiple EGFR-mutated lung cancer cells. Cells with acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) had differential dependence of the core network proteins based on the underlying molecular mechanisms of resistance. Of the 14 proteins, 9 are shown to be specifically associated with survival of EGFR-mutated lung cancer cell lines. This included EGFR, GRB2, MK12, SHC1, ARAF, CD11B, ARHG5, GLU2B, and CD11A. With the use of a drug network associated with the core network proteins, we identified two compounds, midostaurin and lestaurtinib, that could overcome drug resistance through direct EGFR inhibition when combined with erlotinib. Our results, enabled by interactome mapping, suggest new targets and combination therapies that could circumvent EGFR TKI resistance. PMID:24189400

  14. Carrier and prenatal diagnostic strategy and newly identified mutations in Hungarian haemophilia A and B families.

    PubMed

    Bors, András; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Illés, Zsuzsanna; Jáger, Rita; Kardos, Mária; Marosi, Anikó; Nemes, László; Tordai, Attila

    2015-03-01

    Deficiencies of blood coagulation factors VIII and IX (haemophilia A and haemophilia B) represent the most common inherited bleeding disorders with a wide range of causative mutations. Carrier and prenatal diagnostics are preferably performed by direct mutation detection; however, in certain situations, indirect family studies may also be useful. We aimed to utilize a combination of direct and indirect techniques for carrier and prenatal diagnostics in both haemophilias in a single national centre. Two hundred and eleven haemophilia A families were investigated by screening for inversions of introns 1 and 22, and by family studies using polymorphic markers. Twenty-eight haemophilia A and 39 haemophilia B families were investigated by Sanger-sequencing of the coding regions. Among severe haemophilia A families, frequencies of intron 22 and 1 inversions were 82 out of 145 (57%) and two out of 145 (1.4%). Sequencing of the entire coding region of the respective factor gene was performed and 12 (haemophilia A) and 5 (haemophilia B) previously unpublished disease-causing mutations were identified. For genetic markers used for haemophilia A indirect family testing, heterozygosity rates varied between 137 out of 327 [42% intragenic BclI restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP], 168 out of 254 (66% intragenic F8Civs13CA) and 202 out of 261 (77% extragenic DXS15CA) with a combined rate of 92% (intragenic markers) and 97% (all three markers). For male fetuses, prenatal diagnostics was provided to 43 haemophilia A families (n?=?22 with direct mutation detection and n?=?21 by indirect family testing) and to three haemophilia B families. The combination of direct and indirect molecular genetics approaches is a successful and cost-effective approach to provide carrier and prenatal diagnostics and risk assessment for inhibitor formation. PMID:25255241

  15. NOTCH1 mutations identify a genetic subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with high risk of transformation and poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Villamor, N; Conde, L; Martínez-Trillos, A; Cazorla, M; Navarro, A; Beà, S; López, C; Colomer, D; Pinyol, M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Abrisqueta, P; Baumann, T; Delgado, J; Giné, E; González-Díaz, M; Hernández, J M; Colado, E; Payer, A R; Rayon, C; Navarro, B; José Terol, M; Bosch, F; Quesada, V; Puente, X S; López-Otín, C; Jares, P; Pereira, A; Campo, E; López-Guillermo, A

    2013-04-01

    NOTCH1 has been found recurrently mutated in a subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To analyze biological features and clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in CLL, we sequenced this gene in 565 patients. NOTCH1 mutations, found in 63 patients (11%), were associated with unmutated IGHV, high expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, trisomy 12, advanced stage and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Sequential analysis in 200 patients demonstrated acquisition of mutation in one case (0.5%) and disappearance after treatment in two. Binet A and B patients with NOTCH1-mutated had a shorter time to treatment. NOTCH1-mutated patients were more frequently refractory to therapy and showed shorter progression-free and overall survival after complete remission. Overall survival was shorter in NOTCH1-mutated patients, although not independently from IGHV. NOTCH1 mutation increased the risk of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma independently from IGHV, with this being validated in resampling tests of replicability. In summary, NOTCH1 mutational status, that was rarely acquired during the course of the disease, identify a genetic subgroup with high risk of transformation and poor outcome. This recently identified genetic subgroup of CLL patients deserves prospective studies to define their best management. PMID:23295735

  16. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for most cases of a rare lymphoma:

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified a gene mutation that underlies the vast majority of cases of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, a rare form of lymphoma that has eluded all previous efforts to find a genetic cause.

  17. Two novel mutations in the homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase gene identified in Chinese Han Child with Alkaptonuria.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongying; Zhang, Kaihui; Xu, Qun; Ma, Lixia; Lv, Xin; Sun, Ruopeng

    2015-03-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder of tyrosine metabolism, which is caused by a defect in the enzyme homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) with subsequent accumulation of homogentisic acid. Presently, more than 100 HGD mutations have been identified as the cause of the inborn error of metabolism across different populations worldwide. However, the HGD mutation is very rarely reported in Asia, especially China. In this study, we present mutational analyses of HGD gene in one Chinese Han child with AKU, which had been identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection of organic acids in urine samples. PCR and DNA sequencing of the entire coding region as well as exon-intron boundaries of HGD have been performed. Two novel mutations were identified in the HGD gene in this AKU case, a frameshift mutation of c.115delG in exon 3 and the splicing mutation of IVS5+3 A>C, a donor splice site of the exon 5 and exon-intron junction. The identification of these mutations in this study further expands the spectrum of known HGD gene mutations and contributes to prenatal molecular diagnosis of AKU. PMID:25153563

  18. rar mutations which increase artificial chromosome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identify transcription and recombination proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kipling, D; Tambini, C; Kearsey, S E

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to identify trans-acting factors involved in replication origin function, we have characterized the RAR3 and RAR5 genes, identified by mutations which increase the mitotic stability of artificial chromosomes whose replication is dependent on the activity of weak ARS elements. Sequence analysis has shown that the RAR3 gene is identical to GAL11/SPT13, which encodes a putative transcription factor involved in the expression of a wide range of genes. Change-of-function mutations that truncate the RAR3 protein appear to be required to enhance chromosome stability. In contrast, loss of the RAR5 protein results in enhanced chromosome stability, as if the protein is an inhibitor of ARS function. The RAR5 gene encodes the 175 kDa DNA strand transfer protein beta, an activity that can promote the transfer of a strand from a double-stranded DNA molecule to a complementary single strand. This observation implies that a presumed recombination activity can affect eukaryotic chromosomal replication. PMID:2027746

  19. Exome sequencing identifies CTSK mutations in patients originally diagnosed as intermediate osteopetrosis?

    PubMed Central

    Pangrazio, Alessandra; Puddu, Alessandro; Oppo, Manuela; Valentini, Maria; Zammataro, Luca; Vellodi, Ashok; Gener, Blanca; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Raza, Jamal; Atta, Irum; Vezzoni, Paolo; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Villa, Anna; Sobacchi, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal Recessive Osteopetrosis is a genetic disorder characterized by increased bone density due to lack of resorption by the osteoclasts. Genetic studies have widely unraveled the molecular basis of the most severe forms, while cases of intermediate severity are more difficult to characterize, probably because of a large heterogeneity. Here, we describe the use of exome sequencing in the molecular diagnosis of 2 siblings initially thought to be affected by “intermediate osteopetrosis”, which identified a homozygous mutation in the CTSK gene. Prompted by this finding, we tested by Sanger sequencing 25 additional patients addressed to us for recessive osteopetrosis and found CTSK mutations in 4 of them. In retrospect, their clinical and radiographic features were found to be compatible with, but not typical for, Pycnodysostosis. We sought to identify modifier genes that might have played a role in the clinical manifestation of the disease in these patients, but our results were not informative. In conclusion, we underline the difficulties of differential diagnosis in some patients whose clinical appearance does not fit the classical malignant or benign picture and recommend that CTSK gene be included in the molecular diagnosis of high bone density conditions. PMID:24269275

  20. Identifying essential Streptococcus sanguinis genes using genome-wide deletion mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Ge, Xiuchun; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Essential genes in pathogens are important for the development of antibacterial drugs. In this report, we described a protocol to identify essential genes in the Streptococcus sanguinis SK36 strain using genome-wide deletion mutation. A fusion PCR-based method is used to construct gene deletion fragments, which contain kanamycin resistance cassettes with two flanking arms of DNA upstream and downstream of the target gene. The linear fused PCR amplicons were transformed into S. sanguinis SK36 cells. No kanamycin-resistant transformants suggested the gene essentiality because the deletion of the essential gene renders a lethal phenotype of the transformants. The putative essential genes were further confirmed by independent transformations up to five attempts. The false nonessential genes were also identified by removing double-band mutants. PMID:25636610

  1. Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte escape mutations identified by HLA association favor those which escape and revert rapidly.

    PubMed

    Fryer, Helen R; Frater, John; Duda, Anna; Palmer, Duncan; Phillips, Rodney E; McLean, Angela R

    2012-08-01

    Identifying human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) immune escape mutations has implications for understanding the impact of host immunity on pathogen evolution and guiding the choice of vaccine antigens. One means of identifying cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations is to search for statistical associations between mutations and host human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I alleles at the population level. The impact of evolutionary rates on the strength of such associations is not well defined. Here, we address this topic using a mathematical model of within-host evolution and between-host transmission of CTL escape mutants that predicts the prevalence of escape mutants at the population level. We ask how the rates at which an escape mutation emerges in a host who bears the restricting HLA and reverts when transmitted to a host who does not bear the HLA affect the strength of an association. We consider the impact of these factors when using a standard statistical method to test for an association and when using an adaptation of that method that corrects for phylogenetic relationships. We show that with both methods, the average sample size required to identify an escape mutation is smaller if the mutation escapes and reverts quickly. Thus, escape mutations identified as HLA associated systematically favor those that escape and revert rapidly. We also present expressions that can be used to infer escape and reversion rates from cross-sectional escape prevalence data. PMID:22674992

  2. A genomic strategy for the functional validation of colorectal cancer genes identifies potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Grade, Marian; Hummon, Amanda B.; Camps, Jordi; Emons, Georg; Spitzner, Melanie; Gaedcke, Jochen; Hoermann, Patrick; Ebner, Reinhard; Becker, Heinz; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Caplen, Natasha J.; Ried, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Summary/Abstract Genes that are highly overexpressed in tumor cells can be required for tumor cell survival, and have the potential to be selective therapeutic targets. In an attempt to identify such targets, we combined a functional genomics and a systems biology approach to assess the consequences of RNAi-mediated silencing of overexpressed genes that were selected from 140 gene expression profiles from colorectal cancers (CRC) and matched normal mucosa. In order to identify credible models for in-depth functional analysis, we first confirmed the overexpression of these genes in 25 different CRC cell lines. We then identified five candidate genes that profoundly reduced the viability of CRC cell lines when silenced with either siRNAs or shRNAs, i.e., HMGA1, TACSTD2, RRM2, RPS2, and NOL5A. These genes were further studied by systematic analysis of comprehensive gene expression profiles generated following siRNA-mediated silencing. Exploration of these RNAi-specific gene expression signatures allowed the identification of the functional space in which the five genes operate, and showed enrichment for cancer specific signaling pathways, some known to be involved in CRC. By comparing the expression of the RNAi signature genes with their respective expression levels in an independent set of primary rectal carcinomas we could recapitulate these defined RNAi signatures, therefore establishing the biologically relevance of our observations. This strategy identified the signaling pathways that are affected by the prominent oncogenes HMGA1 and TACSTD2, established a yet unknown link between RRM2 and PLK1, and identified RPS2 and NOL5A as promising potential therapeutic targets in CRC. PMID:20473941

  3. Activated janus kinase 3 expression not by activating mutations identified in natural killer/T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Arakawa, Fumiko; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Niino, Daisuke; Kawano, Riko; Ohshima, Koichi

    2014-06-01

    Janus Kinase 3 (JAK3) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase, predominantly expressed in hematopoietic cells, that plays an essential role in hematopoiesis during T cell development. JAK3 somatic-activating mutations were identified in extranodal natural killer/T cell lymphomas (ENKTL) in recent cases in Singapore. We hypothesized these mutations might play an important role in the pathogenesis of T and NK cell neoplasms in other areas of the world. We performed JAK3 exon13 sequencing for different types of T and NK cell neoplasms including ENKTL (59 cases total). We identified four mutations in three (5.0%) cases. All of the mutations were from ENKTL cases (15.8%). Among the four newly found mutations, three are silent mutations and one introduces a stop codon, which was not an activating mutation as in the cases in Singapore. We detected four (30.8%) cases positive for phosphorylated JAK3 expression among 13 NKTCL cases when we performed JAK3 (phospho Y785) immunostaining on sections of ENKTL samples. It seems that phosphorylated JAK3 expression does not necessarily harbor exon 13 mutations. The mechanism responsible for activating expression of the gene will be a topic for further research. PMID:24965108

  4. A Computational-Experimental Approach Identifies Mutations That Enhance Surface Expression of an Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Nayak, Jagannath S.; Baltimore, David

    2011-01-01

    The His274Tyr (H274Y) oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance mutation causes a substantial decrease in the total levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in early isolates of human seasonal H1N1 influenza, and in the swine-origin pandemic H1N1. In seasonal H1N1, H274Y only became widespread after the occurrence of secondary mutations that counteracted this decrease. H274Y is currently rare in pandemic H1N1, and it remains unclear whether secondary mutations exist that might similarly counteract the decreased neuraminidase surface expression associated with this resistance mutation in pandemic H1N1. Here we investigate the possibility of predicting such secondary mutations. We first test the ability of several computational approaches to retrospectively identify the secondary mutations that enhanced levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in seasonal H1N1 shortly before the emergence of oseltamivir resistance. We then use the most successful computational approach to predict a set of candidate secondary mutations to the pandemic H1N1 neuraminidase. We experimentally screen these mutations, and find that several of them do indeed partially counteract the decrease in neuraminidase surface expression caused by H274Y. Two of the secondary mutations together restore surface-expressed neuraminidase activity to wildtype levels, and also eliminate the very slight decrease in viral growth in tissue-culture caused by H274Y. Our work therefore demonstrates a combined computational-experimental approach for identifying mutations that enhance neuraminidase surface expression, and describes several specific mutations with the potential to be of relevance to the spread of oseltamivir resistance in pandemic H1N1. PMID:21799795

  5. Exome sequencing identifies a novel MYH7 p.G407C mutation responsible for familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qianqian; Xu, Yuejuan; Wang, Xike; Guo, Ying; Xu, Rang; Sun, Kun; Chen, Sun

    2014-10-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), characterized by myocardial hypertrophy, is the most common cause of sudden cardiac arrest in young individuals. More than 270 mutations have been found to be responsible for familial HCM to date; mutations in MYH7, which encodes the ?-myosin heavy chain (?-MHC) and MYBPC3, which encodes the myosin binding protein C, are seen most often. This study aimed to screen a pathogenic mutation causing HCM in a large family and assess its possible impact on the function of the specific protein. Exome sequencing was applied in the proband for searching a novel mutation; segments bearing the specific mutation were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing. A novel p.G407C mutation in the ?-MHC gene (MYH7) was identified to be responsible for familial HCM in this family. The mutation may cause damage to the second structure of the protein despite the fact that patients bearing the mutation may have a relatively benign prognosis in this family. The clinical details of the p.G407C mutation are described for the first time in this study. Our report shows a good genotype-phenotype consistency and makes it possible for genetic counseling in this family. PMID:24963656

  6. Integrated Analysis of Mutation Data from Various Sources Identifies Key Genes and Signaling Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lin; Tang, Ruqi; Lian, Baofeng; Zhao, Yingjun; He, Xianghuo; Xie, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, a number of studies have performed genome or exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identified hundreds or even thousands of mutations in protein-coding genes. However, these studies have only focused on a limited number of candidate genes, and many important mutation resources remain to be explored. Principal Findings In this study, we integrated mutation data obtained from various sources and performed pathway and network analysis. We identified 113 pathways that were significantly mutated in HCC samples and found that the mutated genes included in these pathways contained high percentages of known cancer genes, and damaging genes and also demonstrated high conservation scores, indicating their important roles in liver tumorigenesis. Five classes of pathways that were mutated most frequently included (a) proliferation and apoptosis related pathways, (b) tumor microenvironment related pathways, (c) neural signaling related pathways, (d) metabolic related pathways, and (e) circadian related pathways. Network analysis further revealed that the mutated genes with the highest betweenness coefficients, such as the well-known cancer genes TP53, CTNNB1 and recently identified novel mutated genes GNAL and the ADCY family, may play key roles in these significantly mutated pathways. Finally, we highlight several key genes (e.g., RPS6KA3 and PCLO) and pathways (e.g., axon guidance) in which the mutations were associated with clinical features. Conclusions Our workflow illustrates the increased statistical power of integrating multiple studies of the same subject, which can provide biological insights that would otherwise be masked under individual sample sets. This type of bioinformatics approach is consistent with the necessity of making the best use of the ever increasing data provided in valuable databases, such as TCGA, to enhance the speed of deciphering human cancers. PMID:24988079

  7. Two missense mutations identified in venous thrombosis patients impair the inhibitory function of the protein Z dependent protease inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Young, Laura K; Birch, Nigel P; Browett, Peter J; Coughlin, Paul B; Horvath, Anita J; Van de Water, Neil S; Ockelford, Paul A; Harper, Paul L

    2012-05-01

    Protein Z-dependent protease inhibitor (ZPI) is a plasma inhibitor of factor (F)Xa and FXIa. In an earlier study, five mutations were identified within the ZPI gene of venous thrombosis patients and healthy controls. Two of these were nonsense mutations and three were missense mutations in important regions of the protein. Here we report that two of these latter three mutations, F145L and Q384R, impair the inhibitory function of ZPI in vitro. Recombinant wild-type and mutant proteins were prepared; stability in response to thermal challenge was similar. Inhibition of FXa in the presence of the cofactor protein Z was reduced 68-fold by the Q384R mutant; inhibition of FXIa by the F145L mutant was reduced two- to three-fold compared to the wild-type ZPI. An analysis of all five ZPI mutations was undertaken in a cohort of venous thrombosis patients (n=550) compared to healthy controls (n=600). Overall, there was a modest increase in incidence of these mutations in the thrombosis group (odds ratio 2.0, 1.05-3.7, p=0.044). However, in contrast to W324X (nonsense mutation), the Q384R missense mutation and R88X nonsense mutation were evenly distributed in patients and controls; F145L was rare. The final mutation (S143Y) was also rare and did not significantly alter ZPI function in laboratory studies. The F145L and particularly the Q384R mutation impaired the function of the coagulation inhibitor ZPI; however, there was no convincing association between these mutations and venous thrombosis risk. The functional role for ZPI in vivo has yet to be clarified. PMID:22399118

  8. Exome sequencing identifies titin mutations causing hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) in families of diverse ethnic origins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure (HMERF) was described in several North European families and recently linked to a titin gene (TTN) mutation. We independently studied HMERF-like diseases with the purpose to identify the cause, refine diagnostic criteria, and estimate the frequency of this disease among myopathy patients of various ethnic origins. Methods Whole exome sequencing analysis was carried out in a large U.S. family that included seven members suffering from skeletal muscle weakness and respiratory failure. Subsequent mutation screening was performed in further 45 unrelated probands with similar phenotypes. Studies included muscle strength evaluation, nerve conduction studies and concentric needle EMG, respiratory function test, cardiologic examination, and muscle biopsy. Results A novel TTN p.Gly30150Asp mutation was identified in the highly conserved A-band of titin that co-segregated with the disease in the U.S. family. Screening of 45 probands initially diagnosed as myofibrillar myopathy (MFM) but excluded based on molecular screening for the known MFM genes led to the identification of a previously reported TTN p.Cys30071Arg mutation in one patient. This same mutation was also identified in a patient with suspected HMERF. The p.Gly30150Asp and p.Cys30071Arg mutations are localized to a side chain of fibronectin type III element A150 of the 10th C-zone super-repeat of titin. Conclusions Missense mutations in TTN are the cause of HMERF in families of diverse origins. A comparison of phenotypic features of HMERF caused by the three known TTN mutations in various populations allowed to emphasize distinct clinical/pathological features that can serve as the basis for diagnosis. The newly identified p.Gly30150Asp and the p.Cys30071Arg mutation are localized to a side chain of fibronectin type III element A150 of the 10th C-zone super-repeat of titin. PMID:23514108

  9. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutated C12orf57 in Recessive Corpus Callosum Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Akizu, Naiara; Shembesh, Nuri M.; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg; Bastaki, Laila; Al-Tawari, Asma; Zaki, Maha S.; Koul, Roshan; Spencer, Emily; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur; Scott, Eric; Nickerson, Elizabeth; Gabriel, Stacey; da Gente, Gilberto; Li, Jiang; Deardorff, Matthew A.; Conlin, Laura K.; Horton, Margaret A.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the principal cerebral commissure connecting the right and left hemispheres. The development of the corpus callosum is under tight genetic control, as demonstrated by abnormalities in its development in more than 1,000 genetic syndromes. We recruited more than 25 families in which members affected with corpus callosum hypoplasia (CCH) lacked syndromic features and had consanguineous parents, suggesting recessive causes. Exome sequence analysis identified C12orf57 mutations at the initiator methionine codon in four different families. C12orf57 is ubiquitously expressed and encodes a poorly annotated 126 amino acid protein of unknown function. This protein is without significant paralogs but has been tightly conserved across evolution. Our data suggest that this conserved gene is required for development of the human corpus callosum. PMID:23453666

  10. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping in families with leber congenital amaurosis identifies mutations in AIPL1 and RDH12 genes.

    PubMed

    Yücel-Y?lmaz, Didem; Tarlan, Berçin; K?ratl?, Hayyam; Ozgül, R?za Köksal

    2014-12-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) causes severe visual impairment and blindness very early in life. Mutant alleles of several genes acting in different pathways, of which all have critical roles for normal retinal function, were involved in LCA development. The purpose of this study was to use genome-wide genotyping to identify LCA-causing loci in two Turkish families. Genome-wide genotyping and haplotype analysis were performed for prioritization of candidate genes for mutation screening in families with LCA. Identified informative critical choromosomal regions obtained by homozygosity mapping from the families were searched for overlapping of any LCA causative genes. Corresponding clinical phenotypes of the patients with identified mutations were evaluated. In this study, two families were shown to be linked to two different LCA loci covering retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) and aryl-hydrocarbon-interacting protein-like1 (AIPL1) genes. Mutation screening revealed a novel p.Gln141* mutation in the AIPL1 gene and a previously described p.Thr49Met mutation in the RDH12 gene in a homozygous state. Our patients with the RDH12 mutation had the distinct macular coloboma sign, and the patient with the AIPL1 mutation developed microphthalmia and severe widespread retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, in contrast to previously reported cases. It is currently evident that mutation screening needs to be done in at least 18 genes known to be associated with LCA. Thus, homozygosity mapping is an alternative technique to improve the molecular diagnosis in LCA, which is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases causing retinal degeneration. The patients without mutation in known genes may further be analyzed by using next-generation sequencing. PMID:25148430

  11. Manipulation of nonsense mediated decay identifies gene mutations in colon cancer Cells with microsatellite instability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yurij Ionov; Norma Nowak; Manuel Perucho; Sanford Markowitz; John K Cowell

    2004-01-01

    Cancer cells showing microsatellite instability (MSI) demonstrate a high frequency of acquired frameshift mutations that result in the generation of nonsense mutations. RNA transcripts carrying these nonsense mutations are usually targeted for degradation through the nonsense mediated decay (NMD) pathway. Blocking this pathway with drugs such as emitine, results in the ‘stabilization’ of these mutant transcripts, which can now be

  12. CEP290 Mutations Are Frequently Identified in the Oculo-Renal Form of Joubert Syndrome–Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brancati, Francesco ; Barrano, Giuseppe ; Silhavy, Jennifer L. ; Marsh, Sarah E. ; Travaglini, Lorena ; Bielas, Stephanie L. ; Amorini, Maria ; Zablocka, Dominika ; Kayserili, Hulya ; Al-Gazali, Lihadh ; Bertini, Enrico ; Boltshauser, Eugen ; D’Hooghe, Marc ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Fenerci, Elif Y. ; Hennekam, Raoul C. M. ; Kiss, Andrea ; Lees, Melissa M. ; Marco, Elysa ; Phadke, Shubha R. ; Rigoli, Luciana ; Romano, Stephane ; Salpietro, Carmelo D. ; Sherr, Elliott H. ; Signorini, Sabrina ; Stromme, Petter ; Stuart, Bernard ; Sztriha, Laszlo ; Viskochil, David H. ; Yuksel, Adnan ; Dallapiccola, Bruno ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Gleeson, Joseph G. 

    2007-01-01

    Joubert syndrome–related disorders (JSRDs) are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous conditions that share a midbrain-hindbrain malformation, the molar tooth sign (MTS) visible on brain imaging, with variable neurological, ocular, and renal manifestations. Mutations in the CEP290 gene were recently identified in families with the MTS-related neurological features, many of which showed oculo-renal involvement typical of Senior-Löken syndrome (JSRD-SLS phenotype). Here, we performed comprehensive CEP290-mutation analysis on two nonoverlapping cohorts of JSRD-affected patients with a proven MTS. We identified mutations in 19 of 44 patients with JSRD-SLS. The second cohort consisted of 84 patients representing the spectrum of other JSRD subtypes, with mutations identified in only two patients. The data suggest that CEP290 mutations are frequently encountered and are largely specific to the JSRD-SLS subtype. One patient with mutation displayed complete situs inversus, confirming the clinical and genetic overlap between JSRDs and other ciliopathies. PMID:17564967

  13. Characterization of Novel MSX1 Mutations Identified in Japanese Patients with Nonsyndromic Tooth Agenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Seishi; Machida, Junichiro; Kamamoto, Munefumi; Kimura, Masashi; Shibata, Akio; Tatematsu, Tadashi; Miyachi, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yujiro; Jezewski, Peter; Nakayama, Atsuo; Shimozato, Kazuo; Tokita, Yoshihito

    2014-01-01

    Since MSX1 and PAX9 are linked to the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic tooth agenesis, we performed detailed mutational analysis of these two genes sampled from Japanese patients. We identified two novel MSX1 variants with an amino acid substitution within the homeodomain; Thr174Ile (T174I) from a sporadic hypodontia case and Leu205Arg (L205R) from a familial oligodontia case. Both the Thr174 and Leu205 residues in the MSX1 homeodomain are highly conserved among different species. To define possible roles of mutations at these amino acids in the pathogenesis of nonsyndromic tooth agenesis, we performed several functional analyses. It has been demonstrated that MSX1 plays a pivotal role in hard tissue development as a suppressor for mesenchymal cell differentiation. To evaluate the suppression activity of the variants in mesenchymal cells, we used the myoD-promoter, which is one of convenient reporter assay system for MSX1. Although the gene products of these MSX1 variants are stable and capable of normal nuclear localization, they do not suppress myoD-promoter activity in differentiated C2C12 cells. To clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying our results, we performed further analyses including electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and co-immunoprecipitation assays to survey the molecular interactions between the mutant MSX1 proteins and the oligonucleotide DNA with MSX1 consensus binding motif or EZH2 methyltransferase. Since EZH2 is reported to interact with MSX1 and regulate MSX1 mediated gene suppression, we hypothesized that the T174I and L205R substitutions would impair this interaction. We conclude from the results of our experiments that the DNA binding ability of MSX1 is abolished by these two amino acid substitutions. This illustrates a causative role of the T174I and L205R MSX1 homeodomain mutations in tooth agenesis, and suggests that they may influence cell proliferation and differentiation resulting in lesser tooth germ formation in vivo. PMID:25101640

  14. Functional examination of MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 intronic mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 predispose to the development of colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome or hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer). These mutations include disease-causing frame-shift, nonsense, and splicing mutations as well as large genomic rearrangements. However, a large number of mutations, including missense, silent, and intronic variants, are classified as variants of unknown clinical significance. Methods Intronic MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 variants were investigated using in silico prediction tools and mini-gene assay to asses the effect on splicing. Results We describe in silico and in vitro characterization of nine intronic MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6 mutations identified in Danish colorectal cancer patients, of which four mutations are novel. The analysis revealed aberrant splicing of five mutations (MLH1 c.588?+?5G?>?A, MLH1 c.677?+?3A?>?T, MLH1 c.1732-2A?>?T, MSH2 c.1276?+?1G?>?T, and MSH2 c.1662-2A?>?C), while four mutations had no effect on splicing compared to wild type (MLH1 c.117-34A?>?T, MLH1 c.1039-8 T?>?A, MSH2 c.2459-18delT, and MSH6 c.3439-16C?>?T). Conclusions In conclusion, we classify five MLH1/MSH2 mutations as pathogenic, whereas four MLH1/MSH2/MSH6 mutations are classified as neutral. This study supports the notion that in silico prediction tools and mini-gene assays are important for the classification of intronic variants, and thereby crucial for the genetic counseling of patients and their family members. PMID:24090359

  15. GNAS Mutations Identify a Set of Right-Sided, RAS Mutant, Villous Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Fecteau, Ryan E.; Lutterbaugh, James

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the genetic frequency of GNAS activating mutations in colorectal cancer and the corresponding pathology of GNAS mutant tumors. Oncogenic mutations in GNAS have been described in a number of neoplasms including those of the pituitary, kidney, pancreas, and, more recently, in colon cancer. To ascertain the frequency in colon cancer we employed a sensitive pyrosequencing platform for mutation detection of the R201C and R201H GNAS hotspots in tumor samples representing all clinical stages. We additionally assayed for KRAS and BRAF mutations as previous reports have shown that these often co-occur with activating GNAS mutations. Of the 428 colon tumors assayed, mutations in GNAS were present in 10 of the samples (2.3%), indicating this is a significant, albeit infrequent, mutation in colorectal tumors. Nine GNAS mutant tumors (90%) harbored concomitant activating mutations in either the KRAS or BRAF oncogene, which was significantly greater than the mutation frequency of these genes in the tumor population (56%, p<0.0305). All ten of the GNAS mutant tumors arose in the right (proximal) colon (p<0.007), and 7 of 8 reviewed cases exhibited a marked villous morphology. Taken together, these data indicate that GNAS mutant colon tumors commonly have synchronous mutations in KRAS or BRAF, are right-sided in location, and are associated with a villous morphology. PMID:24498230

  16. Three novel ZBTB24 mutations identified in Japanese and Cape Verdean type 2 ICF syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Hirohisa; Unoki, Motoko; Ichiyanagi, Kenji; Kosho, Tomoki; Shigemura, Tomonari; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Velasco, Guillaume; Francastel, Claire; Picard, Capucine; Kubota, Takeo; Sasaki, Hiroyuki

    2013-07-01

    Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that shows DNA hypomethylation at pericentromeric satellite-2 and -3 repeats in chromosomes 1, 9 and 16. ICF syndrome is classified into two groups: type 1 (ICF1) patients have mutations in the DNMT3B gene and about half of type 2 (ICF2) patients have mutations in the ZBTB24 gene. Besides satellite-2 and -3 repeats, ?-satellite repeats are also hypomethylated in ICF2. In this study, we report three novel ZBTB24 mutations in ICF2. A Japanese patient was homozygous for a missense mutation (C383Y), and a Cape Verdean patient was compound heterozygous for a nonsense mutation (K263X) and a frame-shift mutation (C327W fsX54). In addition, the second Japanese patient was homozygous for a previously reported nonsense mutation (R320X). The C383Y mutation abolished a C2H2 motif in one of the eight zinc-finger domains, and the other three mutations caused a complete or large loss of the zinc-finger domains. Our immunofluorescence analysis revealed that mouse Zbtb24 proteins possessing a mutation corresponding to either C383Y or R320X are mislocalized from pericentrometic heterochromatin, suggesting the importance of the zinc-finger domains in proper intranuclear localization of this protein. We further revealed that the proper localization of wild-type Zbtb24 protein does not require DNA methylation. PMID:23739126

  17. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  18. Whole-exome sequencing identifies OR2W3 mutation as a cause of autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiangyu; Guan, Liping; Wu, Wei; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Long, Jirong; Wu, Na; Wu, Long; Xiang, Ying; Xu, Bin; Shen, Miaozhong; Chen, Yanhua; Wang, Yuewen; Yin, Ye; Li, Yingrui; Xu, Haiwei; Xu, Xun; Li, Yafei

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of inherited ocular diseases, is a genetic condition that causes retinal degeneration and eventual vision loss. Though some genes have been identified to be associated with RP, still a large part of the clinical cases could not be explained. Here we reported a four-generation Chinese family with RP, during which 6 from 9 members of the second generation affected the disease. To identify the genetic defect in this family, whole-exome sequencing together with validation analysis by Sanger sequencing were performed to find possible pathogenic mutations. After a pipeline of database filtering, including public databases and in-house databases, a novel missense mutation, c. 424 C > T transition (p.R142W) in OR2W3 gene, was identified as a potentially causative mutation for autosomal dominant RP. The mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype over four generations. This mutation was validated in another independent three-generation family. RT-PCR analysis also identified that OR2W3 gene was expressed in HESC-RPE cell line. The results will not only enhance our current understanding of the genetic basis of RP, but also provide helpful clues for designing future studies to further investigate genetic factors for familial RP. PMID:25783483

  19. Massively Parallel Validation of Cancer Mutations and Other Variants Identified by Whole Cancer Genome and Exome Sequencing - Georges Natsoulis, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2011

    Cancer.gov

    Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Parallel Validation of Cancer Mutations and Other Variants - Georges Natsoulis Massively Parallel Validation of Cancer Mutations and Other Variants Identified by Whole Cancer Genome and Exome Sequencing

  20. Suppressors of an Arabidopsis thaliana phyB mutation identify genes that control light signaling and hypocotyl elongation.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, J W; Elumalai, R P; Chory, J

    1998-01-01

    Ambient light controls the development and physiology of plants. The Arabidopsis thaliana photoreceptor phytochrome B (PHYB) regulates developmental light responses at both seedling and adult stages. To identify genes that mediate control of development by light, we screened for suppressors of the long hypocotyl phenotype caused by a phyB mutation. Genetic analyses show that the shy (short hypocotyl) mutations we have isolated fall in several loci. Phenotypes of the mutants suggest that some of the genes identified have functions in control of light responses. Other loci specifically affect cell elongation or expansion. PMID:9539443

  1. Frequent Mutation of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase (IDH)1 and IDH2 in Cholangiocarcinoma Identified Through Broad-Based Tumor Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Borger, Darrell R.; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Fan, Kenneth C.; Lopez, Hector U.; Fantin, Valeria R.; Straley, Kimberly S.; Schenkein, David P.; Hezel, Aram F.; Ancukiewicz, Marek; Liebman, Hannah M.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Clark, Jeffrey W.; Ryan, David P.; Deshpande, Vikram; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Ellisen, Leif W.; Zhu, Andrew X.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers of origin in the gallbladder and bile ducts are rarely curable with current modalities of cancer treatment. Our clinical application of broad-based mutational profiling for patients diagnosed with a gastrointestinal malignancy has led to the novel discovery of mutations in the gene encoding isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) in tumors from a subset of patients with cholangiocarcinoma. A total of 287 tumors from gastrointestinal cancer patients (biliary tract, colorectal, gastroesophageal, liver, pancreatic, and small intestine carcinoma) were tested during routine clinical evaluation for 130 site-specific mutations within 15 cancer genes. Mutations were identified within a number of genes, including KRAS (35%), TP53 (22%), PIK3CA (10%), BRAF (7%), APC (6%), NRAS (3%), AKT1 (1%), CTNNB1 (1%), and PTEN (1%). Although mutations in the metabolic enzyme IDH1 were rare in the other common gastrointestinal malignancies in this series (2%), they were found in three tumors (25%) of an initial series of 12 biliary tract carcinomas. To better define IDH1 and IDH2 mutational status, an additional 75 gallbladder and bile duct cancers were examined. Combining these cohorts of biliary cancers, mutations in IDH1 and IDH2 were found only in cholangiocarcinomas of intrahepatic origin (nine of 40, 23%) and in none of the 22 extrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas and none of the 25 gallbladder carcinomas. In an analysis of frozen tissue specimens, IDH1 mutation was associated with highly elevated tissue levels of the enzymatic product 2-hydroxyglutarate. Thus, IDH1 mutation is a molecular feature of cholangiocarcinomas of intrahepatic origin. These findings define a specific metabolic abnormality in this largely incurable type of gastrointestinal cancer and present a potentially new target for therapy. PMID:22180306

  2. New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified http://scicasts.com/bio/2039-disease-processes/4882-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified[11/12/2012 12:43:09 PM

    E-print Network

    New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified http://scicasts.com/bio/2039-disease Subscribe Advertise Partner Contact Us Genomics Proteomics Bioresearch Bio-IT Scientific Computing from Down syndrome Cell Line Lab Technology Researchers Model Human Disease in an Organ-on-a- Chip

  3. Molecular Analysis of a Recurrent Sarcoma Identifies a Mutation in FAF1

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Georg F.

    2015-01-01

    A patient presented with a recurrent sarcoma (diagnosed as leiomyosarcoma) 12 years after the removal of an initial cancer (diagnosed as extracompartmental osteosarcoma) distally on the same limb. Following surgery, the sarcoma and unaffected muscle and bone were subjected to measurements of DNA exome sequence, RNA and protein expression, and transcription factor binding. The investigation provided corroboration of the diagnosis leiomyosarcoma, as the major upregulations in this tumor comprise muscle-specific gene products and calcium-regulating molecules (calcium is an important second messenger in smooth muscle cells). A likely culprit for the disease is the point mutation S181G in FAF1, which may cause a loss of apoptotic function consecutive to transforming DNA damage. The RNA levels of genes for drug transport and metabolism were extensively skewed in the tumor tissue as compared to muscle and bone. The results suggest that the tumor represents a recurrence of a dormant metastasis from an originally misdiagnosed neoplasm. A loss of FAF1 function could cause constitutive WNT pathway activity (consistent with the downstream inductions of IGF2BP1 and E2F1 in this cancer). While the study has informed on drug transport and drug metabolism pharmacogenetics, it has fallen short of identifying a suitable target for molecular therapy. PMID:25861239

  4. The cry b Mutation Identifies Cryptochrome as a Circadian Photoreceptor in Drosophila

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ralf Stanewsky; Maki Kaneko; Patrick Emery; Bonnie Beretta; Karen Wager-Smith; Steve A Kay; Michael Rosbash; Jeffrey C Hall

    1998-01-01

    A new rhythm mutation was isolated based on its elimination of per-controlled luciferase cycling. Levels of period or timeless clock gene products in the mutant are flat in daily light–dark cycles or constant darkness (although PER and TIM oscillate normally in temperature cycles). Consistent with the fact that light normally suppresses TIM, cryb is an apparent null mutation in a

  5. Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel G. Jacobson; Tomas S. Aleman; Artur V. Cideciyan; Alexander Sumaroka; Sharon B. Schwartz; Elizabeth A. M. Windsor; Elias I. Traboulsi; Elise Heon; Steven J. Pittler; Ann H. Milam; Albert M. Maguire; Krzysztof Palczewski; Edwin M. Stone; Jean Bennett

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer

  6. Exome sequencing identifies highly recurrent MED12 somatic mutations in breast fibroadenoma.

    PubMed

    Lim, Weng Khong; Ong, Choon Kiat; Tan, Jing; Thike, Aye Aye; Ng, Cedric Chuan Young; Rajasegaran, Vikneswari; Myint, Swe Swe; Nagarajan, Sanjanaa; Nasir, Nur Diyana Md; McPherson, John R; Cutcutache, Ioana; Poore, Gregory; Tay, Su Ting; Ooi, Wei Siong; Tan, Veronique Kiak Mien; Hartman, Mikael; Ong, Kong Wee; Tan, Benita K T; Rozen, Steven G; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tan, Patrick; Teh, Bin Tean

    2014-08-01

    Fibroadenomas are the most common breast tumors in women under 30 (refs. 1,2). Exome sequencing of eight fibroadenomas with matching whole-blood samples revealed recurrent somatic mutations solely in MED12, which encodes a Mediator complex subunit. Targeted sequencing of an additional 90 fibroadenomas confirmed highly frequent MED12 exon 2 mutations (58/98, 59%) that are probably somatic, with 71% of mutations occurring in codon 44. Using laser capture microdissection, we show that MED12 fibroadenoma mutations are present in stromal but not epithelial mammary cells. Expression profiling of MED12-mutated and wild-type fibroadenomas revealed that MED12 mutations are associated with dysregulated estrogen signaling and extracellular matrix organization. The fibroadenoma MED12 mutation spectrum is nearly identical to that of previously reported MED12 lesions in uterine leiomyoma but not those of other tumors. Benign tumors of the breast and uterus, both of which are key target tissues of estrogen, may thus share a common genetic basis underpinned by highly frequent and specific MED12 mutations. PMID:25038752

  7. New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified | Columbia University Medical Center http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/news-room/2012/10/03/new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified/#.UKJgImdNKuJ[11/13/2012 9:59:28 AM

    E-print Network

    New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified | Columbia University Medical Center http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/news-room/2012/10/03/new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified/#.UKJgImdNKuJ[11/13/2012 9 Profiles | Map | RSS | Giving New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified October 3, 2012 New

  8. Frameshift mutation hotspot identified in Smith-Magenis syndrome: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Truong, Hoa T; Dudding, Tracy; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex syndrome involving intellectual disabilities, sleep disturbance, behavioural problems, and a variety of craniofacial, skeletal, and visceral anomalies. While the majority of SMS cases harbor an ~3.5 Mb common deletion on 17p11.2 that encompasses the retinoic acid induced-1 (RAI1) gene, some patients carry small intragenic deletions or point mutations in RAI1. We present data on two cases of Smith-Magenis syndrome with mutation of RAI1. Both cases are phenotypically consistent with SMS and RAI1 mutation but also have other anomalies not previously reported in SMS, including spontaneous pneumothoraces. These cases also illustrate variability in the SMS phenotype not previously shown for RAI1 mutation cases, including hearing loss, absence of self-abusive behaviours, and mild global delays. Sequencing of RAI1 revealed mutation of the same heptameric C-tract (CCCCCCC) in exon 3 in both cases (c.3103delC one case and and c.3103insC in the other), resulting in frameshift mutations. Of the seven reported frameshift mutations occurring in poly C-tracts in RAI1, four cases (~57%) occur at this heptameric C-tract. Collectively, these results indicate that this heptameric C-tract is a preferential hotspot for single nucleotide insertion/deletions (SNindels) and therefore, should be considered a primary target for analysis in patients suspected for mutations in RAI1. We expect that as more patients are sequenced for mutations in RAI1, the incidence of frameshift mutations in this hotspot will become more evident. PMID:20932317

  9. Exome sequencing of serous endometrial tumors identifies recurrent somatic mutations in chromatin-remodeling and ubiquitin ligase complex genes.

    PubMed

    Le Gallo, Matthieu; O'Hara, Andrea J; Rudd, Meghan L; Urick, Mary Ellen; Hansen, Nancy F; O'Neil, Nigel J; Price, Jessica C; Zhang, Suiyuan; England, Bryant M; Godwin, Andrew K; Sgroi, Dennis C; Hieter, Philip; Mullikin, James C; Merino, Maria J; Bell, Daphne W

    2012-12-01

    Endometrial cancer is the sixth most commonly diagnosed cancer in women worldwide, causing ~74,000 deaths annually. Serous endometrial cancers are a clinically aggressive subtype with a poorly defined genetic etiology. We used whole-exome sequencing to comprehensively search for somatic mutations within ~22,000 protein-encoding genes in 13 primary serous endometrial tumors. We subsequently resequenced 18 genes, which were mutated in more than 1 tumor and/or were components of an enriched functional grouping, from 40 additional serous tumors. We identified high frequencies of somatic mutations in CHD4 (17%), EP300 (8%), ARID1A (6%), TSPYL2 (6%), FBXW7 (29%), SPOP (8%), MAP3K4 (6%) and ABCC9 (6%). Overall, 36.5% of serous tumors had a mutated chromatin-remodeling gene, and 35% had a mutated ubiquitin ligase complex gene, implicating frequent mutational disruption of these processes in the molecular pathogenesis of one of the deadliest forms of endometrial cancer. PMID:23104009

  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing to Identify a Novel LMNA Gene Mutation Associated with Inherited Cardiac Conduction Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chu, Chia-Han; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Cheng, Chia-Yang; Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Jia-Lin; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Hsu, Lung-An

    2013-01-01

    Background Inherited cardiac conduction diseases (CCD) are rare but are caused by mutations in a myriad of genes. Recently, whole-exome sequencing has successfully led to the identification of causal mutations for rare monogenic Mendelian diseases. Objective To investigate the genetic background of a family affected by inherited CCD. Methods and Results We used whole-exome sequencing to study a Chinese family with multiple family members affected by CCD. Using the pedigree information, we proposed a heterozygous missense mutation (c.G695T, Gly232Val) in the lamin A/C (LMNA) gene as a candidate mutation for susceptibility to CCD in this family. The mutation is novel and is expected to affect the conformation of the coiled-coil rod domain of LMNA according to a structural model prediction. Its pathogenicity in lamina instability was further verified by expressing the mutation in a cellular model. Conclusions Our results suggest that whole-exome sequencing is a feasible approach to identifying the candidate genes underlying inherited conduction diseases. PMID:24349489

  11. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N. [Research Center of Medical Genetics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Institut fuer Molekularbiologische Diagnostik, Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Exome sequencing identifies secondary mutations of SETBP1 and JAK3 in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Okuno, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Hideki; Yoshida, Kenichi; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Takahashi, Mariko; Kon, Ayana; Sanada, Masashi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Makishima, Hideki; Wang, Xinan; Xu, Yinyan; Doisaki, Sayoko; Hama, Asahito; Nakanishi, Koji; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Nao; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Miyano, Satoru; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji

    2013-08-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is an intractable pediatric leukemia with poor prognosis whose molecular pathogenesis is poorly understood, except for somatic or germline mutations of RAS pathway genes, including PTPN11, NF1, NRAS, KRAS and CBL, in the majority of cases. To obtain a complete registry of gene mutations in JMML, whole-exome sequencing was performed for paired tumor-normal DNA from 13 individuals with JMML (cases), which was followed by deep sequencing of 8 target genes in 92 tumor samples. JMML was characterized by a paucity of gene mutations (0.85 non-silent mutations per sample) with somatic or germline RAS pathway involvement in 82 cases (89%). The SETBP1 and JAK3 genes were among common targets for secondary mutations. Mutations in the latter were often subclonal and may be involved in the progression rather than the initiation of leukemia, and these mutations associated with poor clinical outcome. Our findings provide new insights into the pathogenesis and progression of JMML. PMID:23832011

  13. Exome and whole-genome sequencing of esophageal adenocarcinoma identifies recurrent driver events and mutational complexity

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has risen 600% over the last 30 years. With a 5-year survival rate of ~15%, the identification of new therapeutic targets for EAC is greatly important. We analyze the mutation ...

  14. Biochemical Characterization of P4-ATPase Mutations Identified in Patients with Progressive Familial Intrahepatic Cholestasis*

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Alex; Chau, Christopher; Eaton, Christian; Foran, Emily; Kapur, Mridu; Prevatt, Edward; Belkin, Nathan; Kerr, David; Kohlin, Torvald; Williamson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the P4-ATPase ATP8B1 cause the inherited liver disease progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis. Several of these mutations are located in conserved regions of the transmembrane domain associated with substrate binding and transport. Assays for P4-ATPase-mediated transport in living yeast cells were developed and used to characterize the specificity and kinetic parameters of this transport. Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis mutations were introduced into the yeast plasma membrane P4-ATPase Dnf2p, and the effect of these mutations on its catalysis of phospholipid transport were determined. The results of these measurements have implications for the basis of the disease and for the mechanism of phospholipid transit through the enzyme during the reaction cycle. PMID:23060447

  15. An exploration of the communication preferences regarding genetic testing in individuals from families with identified breast\\/ovarian cancer mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paboda Ratnayake; Claire E. Wakefield; Bettina Meiser; Graeme Suthers; Melanie A. Price; Jessica Duffy; Kathy Tucker

    2011-01-01

    The responsibility for informing at-risk relatives of the availability of genetic testing for breast\\/ovarian cancer gene (BRCA1\\u000a or BRCA2) mutations currently falls on the probands. This study explored the support needs of individuals from families with\\u000a identified BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations when communicating about genetic risk and genetic testing with at-risk family members.\\u000a Thirty-nine semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with

  16. Five new mutations in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase gene identified in families with cutaneous porphyria.

    PubMed

    McManus, J F; Begley, C G; Sassa, S; Ratnaike, S

    1996-11-01

    We describe five new mutations in the uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (UROD) gene. All mutations were observed in conjunction with decreased erythrocyte UROD and clinical familial porphyria cutanea tarda (fPCT), (four families) or hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP), (one family). The fPCT mutations included three point mutations that resulted in amino acid substitutions: a lysine to glutamine at amino acid position 253 (exon 7); a glycine to arginine at position 318 (exon 10); an isoleucine to threonine at position 334 (exon 10). The lysine to glutamine at amino acid position 253 was found in conjunction with a single C nucleotide deletion in exon 8 on the same allele of the UROD gene in the same family. This deletion resulted in a shift in the reading frame and the introduction of a premature stop codon 8 amino acids downstream. In the fourth family, a 31-bp deletion (nucleotides 828-858: exon 8) of the coding region, resulted in a frameshift and the introduction of a stop codon 19 amino acids downstream. A point mutation was observed in an individual diagnosed with HEP, resulting in an alanine to glycine change at amino acid position 80 and was present on both alleles. All mutations were confirmed in at least one other family member. The impact of these mutations on the function of the UROD protein was examined using in vitro protein expression and with activity assessed using pentacarboxylic acid porphyrinogen I as a substrate for UROD. Although three mutations reduced UROD activity to < 15% of normal, one resulted in a UROD protein with 50% functional activity and the other had near normal activity. These results indicate that many different genetic lesions of the UROD gene are associated with fPCT. PMID:8896428

  17. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies Recessive PKHD1 Mutations in a Chinese Twin Family with Caroli Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Zhang, Hong; Zhao, Jing; Su, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations in PKHD1 cause autosomal recessive Caroli disease, which is a rare congenital disorder involving cystic dilatation of the intrahepatic bile ducts. However, the mutational spectrum of PKHD1 and the phenotype-genotype correlations have not yet been fully established. Methods Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on one twin sample with Caroli disease from a Chinese family from Shandong province. Routine Sanger sequencing was used to validate the WES and to carry out segregation studies. We also described the PKHD1 mutation associated with the genotype-phenotype of this twin. Results A combination of WES and Sanger sequencing revealed the genetic defect to be a novel compound heterozygous genotype in PKHD1, including the missense mutation c.2507 T>C, predicted to cause a valine to alanine substitution at codon 836 (c.2507T>C, p.Val836Ala), and the nonsense mutation c.2341C>T, which is predicted to result in an arginine to stop codon at codon 781 (c.2341C>T, p.Arg781*). This compound heterozygous genotype co-segregates with the Caroli disease-affected pedigree members, but is absent in 200 normal chromosomes. Conclusions Our findings indicate exome sequencing can be useful in the diagnosis of Caroli disease patients and associate a compound heterozygous genotype in PKHD1 with Caroli disease, which further increases our understanding of the mutation spectrum of PKHD1 in association with Caroli disease. PMID:24710345

  18. Systematic review of allelic exchange experiments aimed at identifying mutations that confer drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Nebenzahl-Guimaraes, Hanna; Jacobson, Karen R.; Farhat, Maha R.; Murray, Megan B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Improving our understanding of the relationship between the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of Mycobacterium tuberculosis will aid the development of more accurate molecular diagnostics for drug-resistant tuberculosis. Studies that use direct genetic manipulation to identify the mutations that cause M. tuberculosis drug resistance are superior to associational studies in elucidating an individual mutation's contribution to the drug resistance phenotype. Methods We systematically reviewed the literature for publications reporting allelic exchange experiments in any of the resistance-associated M. tuberculosis genes. We included studies that introduced single point mutations using specialized linkage transduction or site-directed/in vitro mutagenesis and documented a change in the resistance phenotype. Results We summarize evidence supporting the causal relationship of 54 different mutations in eight genes (katG, inhA, kasA, embB, embC, rpoB, gyrA and gyrB) and one intergenic region (furA-katG) with resistance to isoniazid, the rifamycins, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones. We observed a significant role for the strain genomic background in modulating the resistance phenotype of 21 of these mutations and found examples of where the same drug resistance mutations caused varying levels of resistance to different members of the same drug class. Conclusions This systematic review highlights those mutations that have been shown to causally change phenotypic resistance in M. tuberculosis and brings attention to a notable lack of allelic exchange data for several of the genes known to be associated with drug resistance. PMID:24055765

  19. Genetic mapping and exome sequencing identify 2 mutations associated with stroke protection in pediatric patients with sickle cell anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Vivien; Linder, Heidi; Howard, Thad A.; Wang, Yong-Dong; Hoppe, Carolyn C.; Aygun, Banu; Adams, Robert J.; Neale, Geoffrey A.; Ware, Russell E.

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is a devastating complication of sickle cell anemia (SCA), occurring in 11% of patients before age 20 years. Previous studies of sibling pairs have demonstrated a genetic component to the development of cerebrovascular disease in SCA, but few candidate genetic modifiers have been validated as having a substantial effect on stroke risk. We performed an unbiased whole-genome search for genetic modifiers of stroke risk in SCA. Genome-wide association studies were performed using genotype data from single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays, whereas a pooled DNA approach was used to perform whole-exome sequencing. In combination, 22 nonsynonymous variants were identified and represent key candidates for further in-depth study. To validate the association of these mutations with the risk for stroke, the 22 candidate variants were genotyped in an independent cohort of control patients (n = 231) and patients with stroke (n = 57) with SCA. One mutation in GOLGB1 (Y1212C) and another mutation in ENPP1 (K173Q) were confirmed as having significant associations with a decreased risk for stroke. These mutations were discovered and validated by an unbiased whole-genome approach, and future studies will focus on how these functional mutations may lead to protection from stroke in the context of SCA. PMID:23422753

  20. Application of next-generation sequencing to identify genes and mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP).

    PubMed

    Daiger, Stephen P; Bowne, Sara J; Sullivan, Lori S; Blanton, Susan H; Weinstock, George M; Koboldt, Daniel C; Fulton, Robert S; Larsen, David; Humphries, Peter; Humphries, Marian M; Pierce, Eric A; Chen, Rui; Li, Yumei

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our research is to identify genes and mutations causing autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). For this purpose we established a cohort of more than 250 independently ascertained families with adRP in the Houston Laboratory for Molecular Diagnosis of Inherited Eye Diseases. Affected members of each family were screened for disease-causing mutations in genes and gene regions that are commonly associated with adRP. By this approach, we detected mutations in 65?% of the families, leaving 85 families that are likely to harbor mutations outside of the "common" regions or in novel genes. Of these, 32 families were tested by several types of next-generation sequencing (NGS), including (a) targeted polymerase chain reaction (PCR) NGS, (b) whole exome NGS, and (c) targeted retinal-capture NGS. We detected mutations in 11 of these families (31?%) bringing the total detected in the adRP cohort to 70?%. Several large families have also been tested for linkage using Afymetrix single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. PMID:24664689

  1. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Mutations in GPR179 Leading to Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Audo, Isabelle; Bujakowska, Kinga; Orhan, Elise; Poloschek, Charlotte M.; Defoort-Dhellemmes, Sabine; Drumare, Isabelle; Kohl, Susanne; Luu, Tien D.; Lecompte, Odile; Zrenner, Eberhart; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Germain, Aurore; Michiels, Christelle; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Leroy, Bart P.; Munier, Francis L.; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Lorenz, Birgit; Friedburg, Christoph; Preising, Markus; Kellner, Ulrich; Renner, Agnes B.; Moskova-Doumanova, Veselina; Berger, Wolfgang; Wissinger, Bernd; Hamel, Christian P.; Schorderet, Daniel F.; De Baere, Elfride; Sharon, Dror; Banin, Eyal; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Bonneau, Dominique; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Le Meur, Guylene; Casteels, Ingele; Koenekoop, Robert; Long, Vernon W.; Meire, Francoise; Prescott, Katrina; de Ravel, Thomy; Simmons, Ian; Nguyen, Hoan; Dollfus, Hélène; Poch, Olivier; Léveillard, Thierry; Nguyen-Ba-Charvet, Kim; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Zeitz, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a heterogeneous retinal disorder characterized by visual impairment under low light conditions. This disorder is due to a signal transmission defect from rod photoreceptors to adjacent bipolar cells in the retina. Two forms can be distinguished clinically, complete CSNB (cCSNB) or incomplete CSNB; the two forms are distinguished on the basis of the affected signaling pathway. Mutations in NYX, GRM6, and TRPM1, expressed in the outer plexiform layer (OPL) lead to disruption of the ON-bipolar cell response and have been seen in patients with cCSNB. Whole-exome sequencing in cCSNB patients lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a homozygous missense mutation (c.1807C>T [p.His603Tyr]) in one consanguineous autosomal-recessive cCSNB family and a homozygous frameshift mutation in GPR179 (c.278delC [p.Pro93Glnfs?57]) in a simplex male cCSNB patient. Additional screening with Sanger sequencing of 40 patients identified three other cCSNB patients harboring additional allelic mutations in GPR179. Although, immunhistological studies revealed Gpr179 in the OPL in wild-type mouse retina, Gpr179 did not colocalize with specific ON-bipolar markers. Interestingly, Gpr179 was highly concentrated in horizontal cells and Müller cell endfeet. The involvement of these cells in cCSNB and the specific function of GPR179 remain to be elucidated. PMID:22325361

  2. Integrated mutational and cytogenetic analysis identifies new prognostic subgroups in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rasi, Silvia; Spina, Valeria; Bruscaggin, Alessio; Monti, Sara; Ciardullo, Carmela; Deambrogi, Clara; Khiabanian, Hossein; Serra, Roberto; Bertoni, Francesco; Forconi, Francesco; Laurenti, Luca; Marasca, Roberto; Dal-Bo, Michele; Rossi, Francesca Maria; Bulian, Pietro; Nomdedeu, Josep; Del Poeta, Giovanni; Gattei, Valter; Pasqualucci, Laura; Rabadan, Raul; Foà, Robin; Dalla-Favera, Riccardo; Gaidano, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    The identification of new genetic lesions in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) prompts a comprehensive and dynamic prognostic algorithm including gene mutations and chromosomal abnormalities and their changes during clonal evolution. By integrating mutational and cytogenetic analysis in 1274 CLL samples and using both a training-validation and a time-dependent design, 4 CLL subgroups were hierarchically classified: (1) high-risk, harboring TP53 and/or BIRC3 abnormalities (10-year survival: 29%); (2) intermediate-risk, harboring NOTCH1 and/or SF3B1 mutations and/or del11q22-q23 (10-year survival: 37%); (3) low-risk, harboring +12 or a normal genetics (10-year survival: 57%); and (4) very low-risk, harboring del13q14 only, whose 10-year survival (69.3%) did not significantly differ from a matched general population. This integrated mutational and cytogenetic model independently predicted survival, improved CLL prognostication accuracy compared with FISH karyotype (P < .0001), and was externally validated in an independent CLL cohort. Clonal evolution from lower to higher risk implicated the emergence of NOTCH1, SF3B1, and BIRC3 abnormalities in addition to TP53 and 11q22-q23 lesions. By taking into account clonal evolution through time-dependent analysis, the genetic model maintained its prognostic relevance at any time from diagnosis. These findings may have relevant implications for the design of clinical trials aimed at assessing the use of mutational profiling to inform therapeutic decisions. PMID:23243274

  3. Actin mutations that show suppression with fimbrin mutations identify a likely fimbrin-binding site on actin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerry E. Honts; Tanya S. Sandrock; Sharon M. Brower; Alison E. M. Adams

    1994-01-01

    Abstract. Actin interacts with a large number,of different proteins that modulate,its assembly,and medi- ate its functions. One such protein is the yeast actin- binding protein Sac6p, which is homologous to ver- tebrate fimbrin (Adams, A. E. M., D. Botstein, and D. G. Drubin. 1991. Nature (Lond.). 354:404--408.). Sac6p was originally identified both genetically (Adams, A. E. M., and D. Botstein.

  4. Mathematics Helps Identify Which Cancer Mutations Occur Early in Brain Cancer | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is that as cancer develops, it accumulates a large number of mutations. Several years ago, researchers in the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (Dana-Farber PS-OC) developed a computational model that can determine the order in which these mutations arise. Now, these investigators have extended their work to include known information about the signaling pathways, enabling them to explore which pathways are altered early or late in the development of the four major forms of glioblastoma.

  5. Two novel mutations identified in a type 3 von Willebrand disease patient.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Wanyan; Yu, Ziqiang; Yin, Jie; Su, Jian; Yang, Chunchen; Ruan, Changgeng

    2014-12-01

    von Willebrand disease (VWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder in humans. Caused by mutations in the von Willebrand factor (VWF) gene, these defects result in qualitatively abnormal variants of VWF (classified as type 2 VWD) or a decrease in VWF levels (types 1 and 3 VWD). Type 3 VWD is the most severe type and usually presented with undetectable VWF level. In this report, we describe a type 3 VWD patient. Molecular analysis of the whole VWF gene reveals two novel mutations, c.2480G>A (p.C827Y) in exon 19 and c.3897delT in exon 28. PMID:24914743

  6. ?1-Syntrophin Mutations Identified in Sudden Infant Death Syndrome Cause an Increase in Late Cardiac Sodium Current

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jianding; Van Norstrand, David W.; Medeiros-Domingo, Argelia; Valdivia, Carmen; Tan, Bi-hua; Ye, Bin; Kroboth, Stacie; Vatta, Matteo; Tester, David J.; January, Craig T.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is a leading cause of death during the first 6 months after birth. About 5%-10% of SIDS may stem from cardiac channelopathies like long QT syndrome (LQTS). We recently implicated mutations in ?1-syntrophin (SNTA1) as a novel cause of LQTS, whereby mutant SNTA1 released inhibition of associated neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) by the plasma membrane Ca-ATPase PMCA4b causing increased peak and late sodium current (INa) via S-nitrosylation of the cardiac sodium channel. This study determined the prevalence and functional properties of SIDS-associated SNTA1 mutations. Methods and Results Using PCR, DHPLC, and DNA sequencing of SNTA1's open reading frame, 6 rare (absent in 800 reference alleles) missense mutations (G54R, P56S, T262P, S287R, T372M and G460S) were identified in 8 (?3%) out of 292 SIDS cases. These mutations were engineered using PCR-based overlap-extension and were co-expressed heterologously with SCN5A, nNOS and PMCA4b in HEK293 cells. INa was recorded using the whole-cell method. A significant 1.4-1.5 fold increase in peak INa and 2.3-2.7 fold increase in late INa compared with controls was evident for S287R-, T372M-, and G460S-SNTA1, and was reversed by an nNOS inhibitor. These 3 mutations also caused a significant depolarizing shift in channel inactivation thereby increasing the overlap of the activation and inactivation curves to increase window current. Conclusions Abnormal biophysical phenotypes implicate mutations in SNTA1 as a novel pathogenic mechanism for the subset of channelopathic SIDS. Functional studies are essential to distinguish pathogenic perturbations in channel interacting proteins like ?1-syntrophin from similarly rare but innocuous ones. PMID:20009079

  7. Exome Sequencing Identifies GNB4 Mutations as a Cause of Dominant Intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Soong, Bing-Wen; Huang, Yen-Hua; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Huang, Chien-Chang; Pan, Hung-Chuan; Lu, Yi-Chun; Chien, Hsin-Ju; Liu, Tze-Tze; Chang, Ming-Hong; Lin, Kon-Ping; Tu, Pang-Hsien; Kao, Lung-Sen; Lee, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a heterogeneous group of inherited neuropathies. Mutations in approximately 45 genes have been identified as being associated with CMT. Nevertheless, the genetic etiologies of at least 30% of CMTs have yet to be elucidated. Using a genome-wide linkage study, we previously mapped a dominant intermediate CMT to chromosomal region 3q28–q29. Subsequent exome sequencing of two affected first cousins revealed heterozygous mutation c.158G>A (p.Gly53Asp) in GNB4, encoding guanine-nucleotide-binding protein subunit beta-4 (G?4), to cosegregate with the CMT phenotype in the family. Further analysis of GNB4 in an additional 88 unrelated CMT individuals uncovered another de novo mutation, c.265A>G (p.Lys89Glu), in this gene in one individual. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed that G?4 was abundant in the axons and Schwann cells of peripheral nerves and that expression of G?4 was significantly reduced in the sural nerve of the two individuals carrying the c.158G>A (p.Gly53Asp) mutation. In vitro studies demonstrated that both the p.Gly53Asp and p.Lys89Glu altered proteins impaired bradykinin-induced G-protein-coupled-receptor (GPCR) signaling, which was facilitated by the wild-type G?4. This study identifies GNB4 mutations as a cause of CMT and highlights the importance of G?4-related GPCR signaling in peripheral-nerve function in humans. PMID:23434117

  8. Exome sequencing identifies a novel and a recurrent BBS1 mutation in Pakistani families with Bardet-Biedl syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ajmal, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Neveling, Kornelia; Tayyab, Ali; Jaffar, Sulman; Sadeque, Ahmed; Ayub, Humaira; Abbasi, Nasir Mahmood; Riaz, Moeen; Micheal, Shazia; Gilissen, Christian; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Azam, Maleeha; Collin, Rob W. J.; Cremers, Frans P. M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To determine the genetic cause of Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) in two consanguineous Pakistani families. Methods Clinical characterization of the affected individuals in both families was performed with ophthalmic examination, electroretinography, electrocardiography, and liver and renal profiling. Seventeen genes are known to be associated with BBS, so exome sequencing was preferred over candidate gene sequencing. One affected individual from both families was selected for exome sequencing. Segregation of the identified variants was confirmed with Sanger sequencing. Results Retinitis pigmentosa, obesity, and learning difficulties were present in the affected individuals in both families. In family A, a sixth finger (polydactyly) of the proband’s sister was removed by a surgical operation leaving a scar on the little finger. Polydactyly was also present in both affected individuals from family B. All diagnostic symptoms were characteristic of BBS in both families. In both affected individuals from family A, exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous mutation (c.47+1G>T) in BBS1 that inactivates the splice donor site at the end of exon 1. In family B, a previously reported mutation, c.442G>A; p.(Asp148Asn), was detected. Conclusions Exome sequencing is an efficient and cost-effective technique for identifying mutations in genetically heterogeneous diseases. In addition, intrafamilial phenotypic variability in family A argues for the modifying effect of other still unknown modifier alleles. PMID:23559858

  9. Massively Parallel DNA Sequencing Successfully Identifies New Causative Mutations in Deafness Genes in Patients with Cochlear Implantation and EAS

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Maiko; Nishio, Shin-ya; Ikeda, Takuo; Fukushima, Kunihiro; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors, the most common etiology in severe to profound hearing loss, are one of the key determinants of Cochlear Implantation (CI) and Electric Acoustic Stimulation (EAS) outcomes. Satisfactory auditory performance after receiving a CI/EAS in patients with certain deafness gene mutations indicates that genetic testing would be helpful in predicting CI/EAS outcomes and deciding treatment choices. However, because of the extreme genetic heterogeneity of deafness, clinical application of genetic information still entails difficulties. Target exon sequencing using massively parallel DNA sequencing is a new powerful strategy to discover rare causative genes in Mendelian disorders such as deafness. We used massive sequencing of the exons of 58 target candidate genes to analyze 8 (4 early-onset, 4 late-onset) Japanese CI/EAS patients, who did not have mutations in commonly found genes including GJB2, SLC26A4, or mitochondrial 1555A>G or 3243A>G mutations. We successfully identified four rare causative mutations in the MYO15A, TECTA, TMPRSS3, and ACTG1 genes in four patients who showed relatively good auditory performance with CI including EAS, suggesting that genetic testing may be able to predict the performance after implantation. PMID:24130743

  10. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Dominant TNNT3 Mutation in a Large Family with Distal Arthrogryposis.

    PubMed

    Daly, Sarah B; Shah, Hitesh; O'Sullivan, James; Anderson, Beverley; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Williams, Simon; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Mueed Bidchol, Abdul; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G; Girisha, Katta M

    2014-08-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is a group of rare, clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders primarily characterized by congenital contractures of the distal limb joints without a neuromuscular disease. Mutations in at least 8 different genes have been shown to cause DA. Here, we report a 4-generation Indian family with 18 affected members presenting variable features of camptodactyly, brachydactyly, syndactyly, decreased flexion palmar creases, ulnar deviation of the hands, sandal gaps and club feet. We undertook exome sequencing of 3 distantly related affected individuals. Bioinformatics filtering revealed a known pathogenic missense mutation c.188G>A (p.Arg63His) in TNNT3 in all 3 affected individuals that segregated with the phenotype. The affected individuals exhibit significant phenotypic variability. This study demonstrates the value of exome sequencing helping to define the causative variant in genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:25337069

  11. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Dominant TNNT3 Mutation in a Large Family with Distal Arthrogryposis

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Sarah B.; Shah, Hitesh; O'Sullivan, James; Anderson, Beverley; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Williams, Simon; Al-Sheqaih, Nada; Mueed Bidchol, Abdul; Banka, Siddharth; Newman, William G.; Girisha, Katta M.

    2014-01-01

    Distal arthrogryposis (DA) is a group of rare, clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders primarily characterized by congenital contractures of the distal limb joints without a neuromuscular disease. Mutations in at least 8 different genes have been shown to cause DA. Here, we report a 4-generation Indian family with 18 affected members presenting variable features of camptodactyly, brachydactyly, syndactyly, decreased flexion palmar creases, ulnar deviation of the hands, sandal gaps and club feet. We undertook exome sequencing of 3 distantly related affected individuals. Bioinformatics filtering revealed a known pathogenic missense mutation c.188G>A (p.Arg63His) in TNNT3 in all 3 affected individuals that segregated with the phenotype. The affected individuals exhibit significant phenotypic variability. This study demonstrates the value of exome sequencing helping to define the causative variant in genetically heterogeneous disorders. PMID:25337069

  12. Syncope and recurrent ventricular tachycardia with a newly identified desmosomal gene mutation

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Sandeep; Chalfoun, Nagib; Finta, Bohuslav; Elmouchi, Darryl; Dahu, Musa; Woelfel, Alan; McNamara, Richard F; Fritz, Timothy; Schuitema, Jennifer I; Judson, Carly A; Gauri, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias in young people most commonly occur due to the presence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome or Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. We present a case in which the patient had exercise induced syncopal spells and was found to have ventricular tachycardia (VT) during both exercise stress testing and an electrophysiology study. Further genetic studies showed a previously unseen desmosomal gene mutation confirming the presence of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy (ARVC). PMID:24689027

  13. Genome-wide association studies identify two novel BMP15 mutations responsible for an atypical hyperprolificacy phenotype in sheep.

    PubMed

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-04-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E(-05) and 1E(-07). The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecX(Gr) and FecX(O) were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (p FecX (Gr) = 5.98E(-06) and p FecX(O) = 2.55E(-08)). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecX(Gr)/FecX(Gr), LS = 2.50 ± 0.65 versus FecX(+)/FecX(Gr), LS = 1.93 ± 0.42, p<1E(-03) and FecX(O)/FecX(O), OR = 3.28 ± 0.85 versus FecX(+)/FecX(O), OR = 2.02 ± 0.47, p<1E(-03)). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecX(Gr)/FecX(Gr) Grivette and homozygous FecX(O)/FecX(O) Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of women's fertility disorders. PMID:23637641

  14. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E?05 and 1E?07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr?=?5.98E?06 and pFecXO?=?2.55E?08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS?=?2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS?=?1.93±0.42, p<1E?03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR?=?3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR?=?2.02±0.47, p<1E?03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of women?s fertility disorders. PMID:23637641

  15. Exome sequencing identifies mutations in KIF14 as a novel cause of an autosomal recessive lethal fetal ciliopathy phenotype.

    PubMed

    Filges, I; Nosova, E; Bruder, E; Tercanli, S; Townsend, K; Gibson, W T; Röthlisberger, B; Heinimann, K; Hall, J G; Gregory-Evans, C Y; Wasserman, W W; Miny, P; Friedman, J M

    2014-09-01

    Gene discovery using massively parallel sequencing has focused on phenotypes diagnosed postnatally such as well-characterized syndromes or intellectual disability, but is rarely reported for fetal disorders. We used family-based whole-exome sequencing in order to identify causal variants for a recurrent pattern of an undescribed lethal fetal congenital anomaly syndrome. The clinical signs included intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), severe microcephaly, renal cystic dysplasia/agenesis and complex brain and genitourinary malformations. The phenotype was compatible with a ciliopathy, but not diagnostic of any known condition. We hypothesized biallelic disruption of a gene leading to a defect related to the primary cilium. We identified novel autosomal recessive truncating mutations in KIF14 that segregated with the phenotype. Mice with autosomal recessive mutations in the same gene have recently been shown to have a strikingly similar phenotype. Genotype-phenotype correlations indicate that the function of KIF14 in cell division and cytokinesis can be linked to a role in primary cilia, supported by previous cellular and model organism studies of proteins that interact with KIF14. We describe the first human phenotype, a novel lethal ciliary disorder, associated with biallelic inactivating mutations in KIF14. KIF14 may also be considered a candidate gene for allelic viable ciliary and/or microcephaly phenotypes. PMID:24128419

  16. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies FAM20A Mutations as a Cause of Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Hyperplasia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, James; Bitu, Carolina C.; Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Barron, Martin J.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Martelli-Júnior, Hercilio; dos Santos Neto, Pedro Eleuterio; Mansilla, Maria A.; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Black, Graeme C.M.; Dixon, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of biomineralization resulting from failure of normal enamel formation. AI is found as an isolated entity or as part of a syndrome, and an autosomal-recessive syndrome associating AI and gingival hyperplasia was recently reported. Using whole-exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in exon 2 of FAM20A that was not present in the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database (dbSNP), the 1000 Genomes database, or the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) Diversity Panel. Expression analyses indicated that Fam20a is expressed in ameloblasts and gingivae, providing biological plausibility for mutations in FAM20A underlying the pathogenesis of this syndrome. PMID:21549343

  17. Exome sequencing identifies a missense mutation in Isl1 associated with low penetrance otitis media in dearisch mice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Inflammation of the middle ear (otitis media) is very common and can lead to serious complications if not resolved. Genetic studies suggest an inherited component, but few of the genes that contribute to this condition are known. Mouse mutants have contributed significantly to the identification of genes predisposing to otitis media Results The dearisch mouse mutant is an ENU-induced mutant detected by its impaired Preyer reflex (ear flick in response to sound). Auditory brainstem responses revealed raised thresholds from as early as three weeks old. Pedigree analysis suggested a dominant but partially penetrant mode of inheritance. The middle ear of dearisch mutants shows a thickened mucosa and cellular effusion suggesting chronic otitis media with effusion with superimposed acute infection. The inner ear, including the sensory hair cells, appears normal. Due to the low penetrance of the phenotype, normal backcross mapping of the mutation was not possible. Exome sequencing was therefore employed to identify a non-conservative tyrosine to cysteine (Y71C) missense mutation in the Islet1 gene, Isl1Drsh. Isl1 is expressed in the normal middle ear mucosa. The findings suggest the Isl1Drshmutation is likely to predispose carriers to otitis media. Conclusions Dearisch, Isl1Drsh, represents the first point mutation in the mouse Isl1 gene and suggests a previously unrecognized role for this gene. It is also the first recorded exome sequencing of the C3HeB/FeJ background relevant to many ENU-induced mutants. Most importantly, the power of exome resequencing to identify ENU-induced mutations without a mapped gene locus is illustrated. PMID:21936904

  18. Identifying mutation regions for closely related individuals without a known pedigree

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Linkage analysis is the first step in the search for a disease gene. Linkage studies have facilitated the identification of several hundred human genes that can harbor mutations leading to a disease phenotype. In this paper, we study a very important case, where the sampled individuals are closely related, but the pedigree is not given. This situation happens very often when the individuals share a common ancestor 6 or more generations ago. To our knowledge, no algorithm can give good results for this case. Results To solve this problem, we first developed some heuristic algorithms for haplotype inference without any given pedigree. We propose a model using the parsimony principle that can be viewed as an extension of the model first proposed by Dan Gusfield. Our heuristic algorithm uses Clark’s inference rule to infer haplotype segments. Conclusions We ran our program both on the simulated data and a set of real data from the phase II HapMap database. Experiments show that our program performs well. The recall value is from 90% to 99% in various cases. This implies that the program can report more than 90% of the true mutation regions. The value of precision varies from 29% to 90%. When the precision is 29%, the size of the reported regions is three times that of the true mutation region. This is still very useful for narrowing down the range of the disease gene location. Our program can complete the computation for all the tested cases, where there are about 110,000 SNPs on a chromosome, within 20 seconds. PMID:22731852

  19. Researchers identify dozens of new de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia http://www.psypost.org/...earchers-identify-dozens-of-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-14228?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter[10/10/2012 4:38:00 PM

    E-print Network

    Researchers identify dozens of new de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia http://www.psypost.org/...earchers-identify-dozens-of-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-14228?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter[10/10/2012 4:38:00 PM] HOME » MENTAL HEALTH » SCHIZOPHRENIA & PSYCHOSIS » Researchers identify dozens

  20. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) rapidly identified a critical missense mutation (P236T) of bovine ACADVL gene affecting growth traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihuan; Dang, Yonglong; Zhang, Qingfeng; Qin, Qiaomei; Lei, Chuzhao; Chen, Hong; Lan, Xianyong

    2015-04-01

    Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain (ACADVL), encoding ACADVL protein, targets the inner mitochondrial membrane where it catalyzes the first step of the mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation pathway and plays an important role in body metabolism and oxidation of long chain fatty acid releasing energy. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is an easy-to-operate, rapid, inexpensive, and exact method for SNP genotyping. Herein, T-ARMS-PCR was carried out to detect a critical missense mutation (AC_000176:g.2885C>A; Pro236Thr) within the ACADVL gene in 644 individuals from two cattle breeds. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the T-ARMS-PCR at this locus, the genotype of the sampled individuals was also identified by PCR-RFLP. The concordance between these two methods was 98.76%. Statistical analysis showed that the bovine ACADVL gene had a significant effect on chest width (P<0.05), chest depth (P<0.05), and hip width (P<0.05) in the Qinchuan breed. The cattle with AA genotype had superior growth traits compared to cattle with AC and/or CC genotypes. The "A" allele had positive effects on growth traits. Therefore, T-ARMS-PCR can replace PCR-RFLP for rapid genotyping of this mutation, which could be used as a DNA marker for selecting individuals with superior growth traits in the Qinchuan breed. These findings contribute to breeding and genetics in beef cattle industry. PMID:25620159

  1. Mutational analysis of vaccinia virus topoisomerase identifies residues involved in DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, J; Shuman, S

    1997-01-01

    Vaccinia DNA topoisomerase catalyzes the cleavage and re-joining of DNA strands through a DNA-(3'-phosphotyrosyl)-enzyme intermediate formed at a specific target sequence, 5'-(C/T)CCTT downward arrow. The 314 aa protein consists of three protease-resistant structural domains demarcated by protease-sensitive interdomain segments referred to as the bridge and the hinge. The bridge is defined by trypsin-accessible sites at Arg80, Lys83 and Arg84. Photocrosslinking and proteolytic footprinting experiments suggest that residues near the interdomain bridge interact with DNA. To assess the contributions of specific amino acids to DNA binding and transesterification chemistry, we introduced alanine substitutions at 16 positions within a 24 aa segment from residues 63 to 86(DSKGRRQYFYGKMHVQNRNAKRDR). Assays of the rates of DNA relaxation under conditions optimal for the wild-type topoisomerase revealed significant mutational effects at six positions; Arg67, Tyr70, Tyr72, Arg80, Arg84 and Asp85. The mutated proteins displayed normal or near-normal rates of single-turnover transesterification to DNA. The effects of amino acid substitutions on DNA binding were evinced by inhibition of covalent adduct formation in the presence of salt and magnesium. The mutant enzymes also displayed diminished affinity for a subset of cleavage sites in pUC19 DNA. Tyr70 and Tyr72 were subjected to further analysis by replacement with Phe, His, Gln and Arg. At both positions, the aromatic moiety was important for DNA binding. PMID:9278486

  2. Tri-allelic pattern of short tandem repeats identifies the murderer among identical twins and suggests an embryonic mutational origin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Feng; Yang, Ying; Zhang, Xiao-Nan; Quan, Xiao-Liang; Wu, Yuan-Ming

    2015-05-01

    Monozygotic twins can be co-identified by genotyping of short tandem repeats (STRs); however, for distinguishing them, STR genotyping is ineffective, especially in the case of murder. Here, a rarely occurring tri-allelic pattern in the vWA locus (16, 18, 19) was identified only in the DNA of one identical twin, which could help to exonerate the innocent twin in a murder charge. This mutation was defined as primary through genotyping of the family and could be detected in blood, buccal and semen samples from the individual; however, two alternative allele-balanced di-allelic patterns (16, 18 or 16, 19) were detected in hair root sheath cells. Such a kind of segregation indicates a one-step mutation occurs in cell mitosis, which is after embryonic zygote formation and during the early development of the individual after the division of the blastocyte. Sequencing revealed the insertion between the allele 18 and 19 is a repeat unit of TAGA/TCTA (plus/minus strand), which belongs to "AGAT/ATCT"-based core repeats identified from all tri-allelic pattern reports recorded in the STR base and a detailed model was proposed for STR repeat length variation caused by false priming during DNA synthesis. Our model illustrates the possible origination of allele-balanced and unbalanced tri-allelic pattern, clarifies that the genotypes of parent-child mismatches, aberrant di-allelic patterns, and type 1 or 2 tri-allelic patterns should be considered as independent, but interconnected forms of STR mutation. PMID:25732248

  3. Characterization of New ACADSB Gene Sequence Mutations and Clinical Implications in Patients with 2-Methylbutyrylglycinuria Identified by Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Alfardan, Jaffar; Mohsen, Al-Walid; Copeland, Sara; Ellison, Jay; Keppen-Davis, Laura; Rohrbach, Marianne; Powell, Berkley R.; Gillis, Jane; Matern, Dietrich; Kant, Jeffrey; Vockley, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Short/branched chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SBCAD) deficiency, also known as 2-methylbutyryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, is a recently described autosomal recessive disorder of isoleucine metabolism. Most patients reported thus far have originated from a founder mutation in the Hmong Chinese population. While the first reported patients had severe disease, most of the affected Hmong have remained asymptomatic. In this study we describe 11 asymptomatic non-Hmong patients brought to medical attention by elevated C5-carnitine found by newborn screening and one discovered because of clinical symptoms. The diagnosis of SBCAD deficiency was determined by metabolite analysis of blood, urine, and fibroblast samples. PCR and bidirectional sequencing were performed on genomic DNA from five of the patients covering the entire SBCAD (ACADSB) gene sequence of 11 exons. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA from each patient identified variations in the SBCAD gene not previously reported. E. coli expression studies revealed that the missense mutations identified lead to inactivation or instability of the mutant SBCAD enzymes. These findings confirm that SBCAD deficiency can be identified through newborn screening by acylcarnitine analysis. Our patients have been well without treatment and call for careful follow-up studies to learn the true clinical impact of this disorder. PMID:20547083

  4. Whole-Exome Capture and Sequencing Identifies HEATR2 Mutation as a Cause of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    PubMed Central

    Horani, Amjad; Druley, Todd E.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Patel, Anand C.; Levinson, Benjamin T.; Van Arendonk, Laura G.; Thornton, Katherine C.; Giacalone, Joe C.; Albee, Alison J.; Wilson, Kate S.; Turner, Emily H.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Shendure, Jay; Bayly, Philip V.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Knowles, Michael R.; Brody, Steven L.; Dutcher, Susan K.; Ferkol, Thomas W.

    2012-01-01

    Motile cilia are essential components of the mucociliary escalator and are central to respiratory-tract host defenses. Abnormalities in these evolutionarily conserved organelles cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Despite recent strides characterizing the ciliome and sensory ciliopathies through exploration of the phenotype-genotype associations in model organisms, the genetic bases of most cases of PCD remain elusive. We identified nine related subjects with PCD from geographically dispersed Amish communities and performed exome sequencing of two affected individuals and their unaffected parents. A single autosomal-recessive nonsynonymous missense mutation was identified in HEATR2, an uncharacterized gene that belongs to a family not previously associated with ciliary assembly or function. Airway epithelial cells isolated from PCD-affected individuals had markedly reduced HEATR2 levels, absent dynein arms, and loss of ciliary beating. MicroRNA-mediated silencing of the orthologous gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in absent outer dynein arms, reduced flagellar beat frequency, and decreased cell velocity. These findings were recapitulated by small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of HEATR2 in airway epithelial cells from unaffected donors. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies in human airway epithelial cells showed that HEATR2 was localized to the cytoplasm and not in cilia, which suggests a role in either dynein arm transport or assembly. The identification of HEATR2 contributes to the growing number of genes associated with PCD identified in both individuals and model organisms and shows that exome sequencing in family studies facilitates the discovery of novel disease-causing gene mutations. PMID:23040496

  5. Whole-exome capture and sequencing identifies HEATR2 mutation as a cause of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Horani, Amjad; Druley, Todd E; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Patel, Anand C; Levinson, Benjamin T; Van Arendonk, Laura G; Thornton, Katherine C; Giacalone, Joe C; Albee, Alison J; Wilson, Kate S; Turner, Emily H; Nickerson, Deborah A; Shendure, Jay; Bayly, Philip V; Leigh, Margaret W; Knowles, Michael R; Brody, Steven L; Dutcher, Susan K; Ferkol, Thomas W

    2012-10-01

    Motile cilia are essential components of the mucociliary escalator and are central to respiratory-tract host defenses. Abnormalities in these evolutionarily conserved organelles cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Despite recent strides characterizing the ciliome and sensory ciliopathies through exploration of the phenotype-genotype associations in model organisms, the genetic bases of most cases of PCD remain elusive. We identified nine related subjects with PCD from geographically dispersed Amish communities and performed exome sequencing of two affected individuals and their unaffected parents. A single autosomal-recessive nonsynonymous missense mutation was identified in HEATR2, an uncharacterized gene that belongs to a family not previously associated with ciliary assembly or function. Airway epithelial cells isolated from PCD-affected individuals had markedly reduced HEATR2 levels, absent dynein arms, and loss of ciliary beating. MicroRNA-mediated silencing of the orthologous gene in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in absent outer dynein arms, reduced flagellar beat frequency, and decreased cell velocity. These findings were recapitulated by small hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of HEATR2 in airway epithelial cells from unaffected donors. Moreover, immunohistochemistry studies in human airway epithelial cells showed that HEATR2 was localized to the cytoplasm and not in cilia, which suggests a role in either dynein arm transport or assembly. The identification of HEATR2 contributes to the growing number of genes associated with PCD identified in both individuals and model organisms and shows that exome sequencing in family studies facilitates the discovery of novel disease-causing gene mutations. PMID:23040496

  6. A Novel NOTCH2 Mutation Identified in a Korean Family with Hajdu-Cheney Syndrome Showing Phenotypic Diversity.

    PubMed

    Han, Mi Seon; Ko, Jung Min; Cho, Tae-Joon; Park, Woong-Yang; Cheong, Hae Il

    2015-01-01

    Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HCS) and serpentine fibula-polycystic kidney syndrome (SFPKS) share many similarities, including craniofacial abnormalities, bony deformities, and renal involvement. Because mutations in exon 34 of NOTCH2 have been identified recently in both HCS and SFPKS patients, it has been suggested that these two syndromes be classed as the same disorder. A 3-year-old boy presented with polycystic kidneys and club feet detected during the fetal period; however, acroosteolysis and curved fibulae were not observed. His mother showed osteoporosis and had a history of compression fractures in the spine without renal anomalies. Although the same novel mutation in NOTCH2 was found in both the mother and her son, these patients displayed different clinical manifestations. In this report, we present a familial case of HCS in a boy and his mother that was suspected on physical examination and radiological findings. We speculate that HCS and SFPKS are a single disease entity with a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations associated with truncating mutations in exon 34 of NOTCH2. PMID:25696021

  7. Whole genome sequencing identifies SCN2A mutation in monozygotic twins with Ohtahara syndrome and unique neuropathologic findings.

    PubMed

    Touma, Marlin; Joshi, Mugdha; Connolly, Meghan C; Grant, P Ellen; Hansen, Anne R; Khwaja, Omar; Berry, Gerard T; Kinney, Hannah C; Poduri, Annapurna; Agrawal, Pankaj B

    2013-05-01

    Mutations in SCN2A gene cause a variety of epilepsy syndromes. We report a novel SCN2A-associated epilepsy phenotype in monozygotic twins with tonic seizures soon after birth and a suppression-burst electroencephalography (EEG) pattern. We reviewed the medical records, EEG tracings, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuropathologic findings, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on Twin B's DNA and Sanger sequencing (SS) on candidate gene mutations. Extensive neurometabolic evaluation and early neuroimaging studies were normal. Twin A died of an iatrogenic cause at 2 weeks of life. His neuropathologic examination was remarkable for dentate-olivary dysplasia and granule cell dispersion of the dentate gyrus. Twin B became seizure free at 8 months and was off antiepileptic drugs by 2 years. His brain MRI, normal at 2 months, revealed evolving brainstem and basal ganglia abnormalities at 8 and 15 months that resolved by 20 months. At 2.5 years, Twin B demonstrated significant developmental delay. Twin B's WGS revealed a heterozygous variant c.788C>T predicted to cause p.Ala263Val change in SCN2A and confirmed to be de novo in both twins by SS. In conclusion, we have identified a de novo SCN2A mutation as the etiology for Ohtahara syndrome in monozygotic twins associated with a unique dentate-olivary dysplasia in the deceased twin. PMID:23550958

  8. Whole genome sequencing identifies SCN2A mutation in monozygotic twins with Ohtahara Syndrome and unique neuropathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Touma, Marlin; Joshi, Mugdha; Connolly, Meghan C.; Grant, P. Ellen; Hansen, Anne R.; Khwaja, Omar; Berry, Gerard T.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Poduri, Annapurna; Agrawal, Pankaj B.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in SCN2A gene cause a variety of epilepsy syndromes. We report a novel SCN2A-associated epilepsy phenotype in monozygotic twins with tonic seizures soon after birth and a suppression-burst EEG pattern. We reviewed the medical records, EEG tracings, MRI, neuropathological findings, and performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on Twin B’s DNA and Sanger sequencing (SS) on candidate gene mutations. Extensive neurometabolic evaluation and early neuroimaging studies were normal. Twin A died of an iatrogenic cause at 2 weeks of life. His neuropathologic examination was remarkable for dentato-olivary dysplasia and granule cell dispersion of the dentate gyrus. Twin B became seizure-free at 8 months and was off anti-epileptic drugs by 2 years. His brain MRI, normal at 2 months, revealed evolving brainstem and basal ganglia abnormalities at 8 and 15 months that resolved by 20 months. At 2.5 years, Twin B demonstrated significant developmental delay. Twin B’s WGS revealed a heterozygous variant c.788C>T predicted to cause p.Ala263Val change in SCN2A and confirmed to be de novo in both twins by SS. In conclusion, we have identified a de novo SCN2A mutation as the etiology for Ohtahara syndrome in monozygotic twins associated with a unique dentate-olivary dysplasia in the deceased twin. PMID:23550958

  9. Erythrocyte Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency mutation identified in multiple breeds of domestic cats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Erythrocyte pyruvate kinase deficiency (PK deficiency) is an inherited hemolytic anemia that has been documented in the Abyssinian and Somali breeds as well as random bred domestic shorthair cats. The disease results from mutations in PKLR, the gene encoding the regulatory glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK). Multiple isozymes are produced by tissue-specific differential processing of PKLR mRNA. Perturbation of PK decreases erythrocyte longevity resulting in anemia. Additional signs include: severe lethargy, weakness, weight loss, jaundice, and abdominal enlargement. In domestic cats, PK deficiency has an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance with high variability in onset and severity of clinical symptoms. Results Sequence analysis of PKLR revealed an intron 5 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at position 304 concordant with the disease phenotype in Abyssinian and Somali cats. Located 53 nucleotides upstream of the exon 6 splice site, cats with this SNP produce liver and blood processed mRNA with a 13 bp deletion at the 3’ end of exon 5. The frame-shift mutation creates a stop codon at amino acid position 248 in exon 6. The frequency of the intronic SNP in 14,179 American and European cats representing 38 breeds, 76 western random bred cats and 111 cats of unknown breed is 6.31% and 9.35% when restricted to the 15 groups carrying the concordant SNP. Conclusions PK testing is recommended for Bengals, Egyptian Maus, La Perms, Maine Coon cats, Norwegian Forest cats, Savannahs, Siberians, and Singapuras, in addition to Abyssinians and Somalis as well an any new breeds using the afore mentioned breeds in out crossing or development programs. PMID:23110753

  10. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies LRIT3 Mutations as a Cause of Autosomal-Recessive Complete Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    PubMed Central

    Zeitz, Christina; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Hamel, Christian P.; Bujakowska, Kinga; Neuillé, Marion; Orhan, Elise; Zanlonghi, Xavier; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Michiels, Christelle; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Bocquet, Béatrice; Antonio, Aline; Audier, Claire; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Luu, Tien D.; Sennlaub, Florian; Nguyen, Hoan; Poch, Olivier; Dollfus, Hélène; Lecompte, Odile; Kohl, Susanne; Sahel, José-Alain; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.; Audo, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder. Two forms can be distinguished clinically: complete CSNB (cCSNB) and incomplete CSNB. Individuals with cCSNB have visual impairment under low-light conditions and show a characteristic electroretinogram (ERG). The b-wave amplitude is severely reduced in the dark-adapted state of the ERG, representing abnormal function of ON bipolar cells. Furthermore, individuals with cCSNB can show other ocular features such as nystagmus, myopia, and strabismus and can have reduced visual acuity and abnormalities of the cone ERG waveform. The mode of inheritance of this form can be X-linked or autosomal recessive, and the dysfunction of four genes (NYX, GRM6, TRPM1, and GPR179) has been described so far. Whole-exome sequencing in one simplex cCSNB case lacking mutations in the known genes led to the identification of a missense mutation (c.983G>A [p.Cys328Tyr]) and a nonsense mutation (c.1318C>T [p.Arg440?]) in LRIT3, encoding leucine-rich-repeat (LRR), immunoglobulin-like, and transmembrane-domain 3 (LRIT3). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of 89 individuals with CSNB identified another cCSNB case harboring a nonsense mutation (c.1151C>G [p.Ser384?]) and a deletion predicted to lead to a premature stop codon (c.1538_1539del [p.Ser513Cysfs?59]) in the same gene. Human LRIT3 antibody staining revealed in the outer plexiform layer of the human retina a punctate-labeling pattern resembling the dendritic tips of bipolar cells; similar patterns have been observed for other proteins implicated in cCSNB. The exact role of this LRR protein in cCSNB remains to be elucidated. PMID:23246293

  11. Homologous modeling of the lysosomal protective protein/carboxypeptidase L: structural and functional implications of mutations identified in galactosialidosis patients.

    PubMed

    Elsliger, M A; Potier, M

    1994-01-01

    The deficiency of the lysosomal protective protein/carboxypeptidase L (CARB L) causes the lysosomal storage disorder, galactosialidosis, characterized by neuraminidase and beta-galactosidase deficiencies in patients' cells. The three enzymes form a complex inside the lysosome, and the neuraminidase and beta-galactosidase deficiencies are secondary to CARB L deficiency. Sequence similarity and common enzymological properties suggest that the protomeric tertiary structure of CARB L is conserved within a family of serine carboxypeptidases which includes the yeast carboxypeptidase Y, killer expression I gene product and several plant carboxypeptidases. We used this homology to build a model of the CARB L structure based on the recently published X-ray atomic coordinates of the wheat carboxypeptidase II (CPDW-II) which shares 32% primary structure identity with CARB L. Small insertions and deletions were accommodated into the model structure by energy minimization using the DREIDING II force field. The C alpha atomic coordinates of the final CARB L model have a RMS shift of 1.01 A compared to the corresponding conserved residues in the CPDW-II template structure. The correct orientation of the homologous catalytic triad residues Ser150, His429 and Asp392, the potential energy calculations and the distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophillic residues in the structure all support the validity of the CARB L model. Most missense mutations identified in galactosialidosis patients were located in secondary structural elements except for the Tyr211-->Asn mutation which is in a loop. The other mutant residues have their side chains deeply buried in the central beta-sheet of the model structure except for the Phe412-->Val mutation which is located in the dimer interface. The predicted effects of specific mutations on CARB L structural stability correlates well with recently published transient expression studies of mutant CARB L (Shimmoto, M. et al., J. Clin. Invest., 91:2393-2399, 1993). PMID:8146124

  12. Two novel mutations in glucocerebrosidase, C23W and IVS7-1 G>A, identified in Type 1 Gaucher patients heterozygous for N370S.

    PubMed

    Jack, Alexandria; Amato, Dominick; Morris, Geoffrey; Choy, Francis Y M

    2014-03-15

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from deficient glucocerebrosidase activity. There have been nearly 300 mutations described to date. Novel mutations can potentially provide insight into the biochemical basis of the disease. Two novel mutations are described in two Type 1 Gaucher patients with N370S compound heterozygosity; a point mutation that causes an amino acid substitution at cysteine residue 23 for tryptophan, and a second point mutation within the splicing element at the 3' end of intron 7. Both mutations were identified by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of patient glucocerebrosidase genomic DNA. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was established for both novel mutations for efficient identification in future patients. Past literature suggests that mutations affecting cysteine residues involved in disulfide bridges, as well as mutations affecting splicing patterns of the glucocerebrosidase transcript, are detrimental to enzyme activity. However, compound heterozygosity with N370S, a mild mutation, will lead to a mild phenotype. The cases reported here support these past findings. PMID:24434810

  13. Translocation domain mutations affecting cellular toxicity identify the Clostridium difficile toxin B pore

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhifen; Park, Minyoung; Tam, John; Auger, Anick; Beilhartz, Greg L.; Lacy, D. Borden; Melnyk, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated with Clostridium difficile infection is caused by the actions of the homologous toxins TcdA and TcdB on colonic epithelial cells. Binding to target cells triggers toxin internalization into acidified vesicles, whereupon cryptic segments from within the 1,050-aa translocation domain unfurl and insert into the bounding membrane, creating a transmembrane passageway to the cytosol. Our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying pore formation and the subsequent translocation of the upstream cytotoxic domain to the cytosol is limited by the lack of information available regarding the identity and architecture of the transmembrane pore. Here, through systematic perturbation of conserved sites within predicted membrane-insertion elements of the translocation domain, we uncovered highly sensitive residues—clustered between amino acids 1,035 and 1,107—that when individually mutated, reduced cellular toxicity by as much as >1,000-fold. We demonstrate that defective variants are defined by impaired pore formation in planar lipid bilayers and biological membranes, resulting in an inability to intoxicate cells through either apoptotic or necrotic pathways. These findings along with the unexpected similarities uncovered between the pore-forming “hotspots” of TcdB and the well-characterized ?-helical diphtheria toxin translocation domain provide insights into the structure and mechanism of formation of the translocation pore for this important class of pathogenic toxins. PMID:24567384

  14. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Recurrent De Novo ZSWIM6 Mutation Associated with Acromelic Frontonasal Dysostosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Joshua D.; Hing, Anne V.; Clarke, Christine M.; Johnson, Nathan M.; Perez, Francisco A.; Park, Sarah S.; Horst, Jeremy A.; Mecham, Brig; Maves, Lisa; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Cunningham, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Acromelic frontonasal dysostosis (AFND) is a rare disorder characterized by distinct craniofacial, brain, and limb malformations, including frontonasal dysplasia, interhemispheric lipoma, agenesis of the corpus callosum, tibial hemimelia, preaxial polydactyly of the feet, and intellectual disability. Exome sequencing of one trio and two unrelated probands revealed the same heterozygous variant (c.3487C>T [p. Arg1163Trp]) in a highly conserved protein domain of ZSWIM6; this variant has not been seen in the 1000 Genomes data, dbSNP, or the Exome Sequencing Project. Sanger validation of the three trios confirmed that the variant was de novo and was also present in a fourth isolated proband. In situ hybridization of early zebrafish embryos at 24 hr postfertilization (hpf) demonstrated telencephalic expression of zswim6 and onset of midbrain, hindbrain, and retinal expression at 48 hpf. Immunohistochemistry of later-stage mouse embryos demonstrated tissue-specific expression in the derivatives of all three germ layers. qRT-PCR expression analysis of osteoblast and fibroblast cell lines available from two probands was suggestive of Hedgehog pathway activation, indicating that the ZSWIM6 mutation associated with AFND may lead to the craniofacial, brain and limb malformations through the disruption of Hedgehog signaling. PMID:25105228

  15. Jejunal Cancer with WRN Mutation Identified from Next-Generation Sequencing: A Case Study and Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christopher; Shiah, Her-Shyong; Hsu, Nan-Yung; Huang, Hsiu-Ying; Chu, Jan-Show; Yen, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Small bowel cancer is a rare, gastrointestinal cancer originating from the small intestines. Carcinogenesis in the jejunum, the middle segment of the small intestines, occurs less commonly than in the duodenum and ileum. Despite the increasing incidences globally, the cancer is still poorly understood, which includes lack of pathological understanding and etiological reasoning, as it seems to exhibit both similarities and differences with other types of cancers. A 76-year-old Asian man was presented with abdominal pain, which was later attributed to an adenocarcinoma in the jejunum. Initial immunoreactive staining results found no connections to colorectal cancer. The microsatellite instability test was further examined by immunohistochemistry which revealed them to be wild-type. From our exome-capture sequencing results, mutations of WRN may be important as they represent the only genetic defect in this jejunal cancer. The patient has since undergone surgical resection of his cancer and is currently being treated with chemotherapy. The pathology, genomic markers, and treatments are described along with literature review. PMID:25018888

  16. Exome-wide rare variant analysis identifies TUBA4A mutations associated with familial ALS.

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradley N; Ticozzi, Nicola; Fallini, Claudia; Gkazi, Athina Soragia; Topp, Simon; Kenna, Kevin P; Scotter, Emma L; Kost, Jason; Keagle, Pamela; Miller, Jack W; Calini, Daniela; Vance, Caroline; Danielson, Eric W; Troakes, Claire; Tiloca, Cinzia; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Lewis, Elizabeth A; King, Andrew; Colombrita, Claudia; Pensato, Viviana; Castellotti, Barbara; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Baas, Frank; ten Asbroek, Anneloor L M A; Sapp, Peter C; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; McLaughlin, Russell L; Polak, Meraida; Asress, Seneshaw; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luis; Simpson, Michael; van Rheenen, Wouter; Diekstra, Frank P; Lauria, Giuseppe; Duga, Stefano; Corti, Stefania; Cereda, Cristina; Corrado, Lucia; Sorarù, Gianni; Morrison, Karen E; Williams, Kelly L; Nicholson, Garth A; Blair, Ian P; Dion, Patrick A; Leblond, Claire S; Rouleau, Guy A; Hardiman, Orla; Veldink, Jan H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Pall, Hardev; Shaw, Pamela J; Turner, Martin R; Talbot, Kevin; Taroni, Franco; García-Redondo, Alberto; Wu, Zheyang; Glass, Jonathan D; Gellera, Cinzia; Ratti, Antonia; Brown, Robert H; Silani, Vincenzo; Shaw, Christopher E; Landers, John E

    2014-10-22

    Exome sequencing is an effective strategy for identifying human disease genes. However, this methodology is difficult in late-onset diseases where limited availability of DNA from informative family members prohibits comprehensive segregation analysis. To overcome this limitation, we performed an exome-wide rare variant burden analysis of 363 index cases with familial ALS (FALS). The results revealed an excess of patient variants within TUBA4A, the gene encoding the Tubulin, Alpha 4A protein. Analysis of a further 272 FALS cases and 5,510 internal controls confirmed the overrepresentation as statistically significant and replicable. Functional analyses revealed that TUBA4A mutants destabilize the microtubule network, diminishing its repolymerization capability. These results further emphasize the role of cytoskeletal defects in ALS and demonstrate the power of gene-based rare variant analyses in situations where causal genes cannot be identified through traditional segregation analysis. PMID:25374358

  17. Loss-of-Function Mutation in Tryptophan Hydroxylase2 Identified in Unipolar Major Depression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaodong Zhang; Raul R. Gainetdinov; Jean-Martin Beaulieu; Tatyana D. Sotnikova; Lauranell H. Burch; Redford B. Williams; David A. Schwartz; K. Ranga R. Krishnan; Marc G. Caron

    2005-01-01

    Dysregulation of central serotonin neurotransmission has been widely suspected as an important contributor to major depression. Here, we identify a (G1463A) single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the rate-limiting enzyme of neuronal serotonin synthesis, human tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (hTPH2). The functional SNP in hTPH2 replaces the highly conserved Arg441 with His, which results in ?80% loss of function in serotonin production when

  18. Mutations of the PKD1 gene among Japanese autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients, including one heterozygous mutation identified in members of the same family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michiko Mizoguchi; Takashi Tamura; Akiko Yamaki; Eiji Higashihara; Yoshiko Shimizu

    2001-01-01

    More than 80 mutations of the PKD1 gene have been reported, mostly in patients from Western Europe. New techniques are being used to detect an increasing number\\u000a of mutations, even in the homologous region of the PKD1 gene. Polymerase chain reaction–single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) or denaturing high-performance liquid\\u000a chromatography (DHPLC) analyses were performed in the present study to screen mutations

  19. A mutation in the pale aleurone color1 gene identifies a novel regulator of the maize anthocyanin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Selinger, D A; Chandler, V L

    1999-01-01

    By screening for new seed color mutations, we have identified a new gene, pale aleurone color1 (pac1), which when mutated causes a reduction in anthocyanin pigmentation. The pac1 gene is not allelic to any known anthocyanin biosynthetic or regulatory gene. The pac1-ref allele is recessive, nonlethal, and only reduces pigment in kernels, not in vegetative tissues. Genetic and molecular evidence shows that the pac1-ref allele reduces pigmentation by reducing RNA levels of the biosynthetic genes in the pathway. The mutant does not reduce the RNA levels of either of the two regulatory genes, b and c1. Introduction of an anthocyanin structural gene promoter (a1) driving a reporter gene into maize aleurones shows that pac1-ref kernels have reduced expression resulting from the action of the a1 promoter. Introduction of the reporter gene with constructs that express the regulatory genes b and c1 or the phlobaphene pathway regulator p shows that this reduction in a1-driven expression occurs in both the presence and absence of these regulators. Our results imply that pac1 is required for either b/c1 or p activation of anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression and that pac1 acts independently of these regulatory genes. PMID:9878628

  20. Combined NGS approaches identify mutations in the intraflagellar transport gene IFT140 in skeletal ciliopathies with early progressive kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Schmidts, Miriam; Frank, Valeska; Eisenberger, Tobias; Al Turki, Saeed; Bizet, Albane A; Antony, Dinu; Rix, Suzanne; Decker, Christian; Bachmann, Nadine; Bald, Martin; Vinke, Tobias; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Di Donato, Natalia; Neuhann, Theresa; Hartley, Jane L; Maher, Eamonn R; Bogdanovi?, Radovan; Peco-Anti?, Amira; Mache, Christoph; Hurles, Matthew E; Joksi?, Ivana; Gu?-Š?eki?, Marija; Dobricic, Jelena; Brankovic-Magic, Mirjana; Bolz, Hanno J; Pazour, Gregory J; Beales, Philip L; Scambler, Peter J; Saunier, Sophie; Mitchison, Hannah M; Bergmann, Carsten

    2013-05-01

    Ciliopathies are genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by variable expressivity and overlaps between different disease entities. This is exemplified by the short rib-polydactyly syndromes, Jeune, Sensenbrenner, and Mainzer-Saldino chondrodysplasia syndromes. These three syndromes are frequently caused by mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes affecting the primary cilia, which play a crucial role in skeletal and chondral development. Here, we identified mutations in IFT140, an IFT complex A gene, in five Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) and two Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MSS) families, by screening a cohort of 66 JATD/MSS patients using whole exome sequencing and targeted resequencing of a customized ciliopathy gene panel. We also found an enrichment of rare IFT140 alleles in JATD compared with nonciliopathy diseases, implying putative modifier effects for certain alleles. IFT140 patients presented with mild chest narrowing, but all had end-stage renal failure under 13 years of age and retinal dystrophy when examined for ocular dysfunction. This is consistent with the severe cystic phenotype of Ift140 conditional knockout mice, and the higher level of Ift140 expression in kidney and retina compared with the skeleton at E15.5 in the mouse. IFT140 is therefore a major cause of cono-renal syndromes (JATD and MSS). The present study strengthens the rationale for IFT140 screening in skeletal ciliopathy spectrum patients that have kidney disease and/or retinal dystrophy. PMID:23418020

  1. Combined NGS Approaches Identify Mutations in the Intraflagellar Transport Gene IFT140 in Skeletal Ciliopathies with Early Progressive Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Frank, Valeska; Eisenberger, Tobias; al Turki, Saeed; Bizet, Albane A.; Antony, Dinu; Rix, Suzanne; Decker, Christian; Bachmann, Nadine; Bald, Martin; Vinke, Tobias; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Donato, Natalia Di; Neuhann, Theresa; Hartley, Jane L.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Bogdanovi?, Radovan; Peco-Anti?, Amira; Mache, Christoph; Hurles, Matthew E.; Joksi?, Ivana; Gu?-Š?eki?, Marija; Dobricic, Jelena; Brankovic-Magic, Mirjana; Bolz, Hanno J.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Beales, Philip L.; Scambler, Peter J.; Saunier, Sophie; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Bergmann, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Ciliopathies are genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by variable expressivity and overlaps between different disease entities. This is exemplified by the short rib-polydactyly syndromes, Jeune, Sensenbrenner, and Mainzer-Saldino chondrodysplasia syndromes. These three syndromes are frequently caused by mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes affecting the primary cilia, which play a crucial role in skeletal and chondral development. Here, we identified mutations in IFT140, an IFT complex A gene, in five Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) and two Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MSS) families, by screening a cohort of 66 JATD/MSS patients using whole exome sequencing and targeted resequencing of a customized ciliopathy gene panel. We also found an enrichment of rare IFT140 alleles in JATD compared with nonciliopathy diseases, implying putative modifier effects for certain alleles. IFT140 patients presented with mild chest narrowing, but all had end-stage renal failure under 13 years of age and retinal dystrophy when examined for ocular dysfunction. This is consistent with the severe cystic phenotype of Ift140 conditional knockout mice, and the higher level of Ift140 expression in kidney and retina compared with the skeleton at E15.5 in the mouse. IFT140 is therefore a major cause of cono-renal syndromes (JATD and MSS). The present study strengthens the rationale for IFT140 screening in skeletal ciliopathy spectrum patients that have kidney disease and/or retinal dystrophy. PMID:23418020

  2. A founder AGL mutation causing glycogen storage disease type IIIa in Inuit identified through whole-exome sequencing: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau-Nepton, Isabelle; Okubo, Minoru; Grabs, Rosemarie; Mitchell, John; Polychronakos, Constantin; Rodd, Celia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Glycogen storage disease type III is caused by mutations in both alleles of the AGL gene, which leads to reduced activity of glycogen-debranching enzyme. The clinical picture encompasses hypoglycemia, with glycogen accumulation leading to hepatomegaly and muscle involvement (skeletal and cardiac). We sought to identify the genetic cause of this disease within the Inuit community of Nunavik, in whom previous DNA sequencing had not identified such mutations. Methods: Five Inuit children with a clinical and biochemical diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type IIIa were recruited to undergo genetic testing: 2 underwent whole-exome sequencing and all 5 underwent Sanger sequencing to confirm the identified mutation. Selected DNA regions near the AGL gene were also sequenced to identify a potential founder effect in the community. In addition, control samples from 4 adults of European descent and 7 family members of the affected children were analyzed for the specific mutation by Sanger sequencing. Results: We identified a homozygous frame-shift deletion, c.4456delT, in exon 33 of the AGL gene in 2 children by whole-exome sequencing. Confirmation by Sanger sequencing showed the same mutation in all 5 patients, and 5 family members were found to be carriers. With the identification of this mutation in 5 probands, the estimated prevalence of genetically confirmed glycogen storage disease type IIIa in this region is among the highest worldwide (1:2500). Despite identical mutations, we saw variations in clinical features of the disease. Interpretation: Our detection of a homozygous frameshift mutation in 5 Inuit children determines the cause of glycogen storage disease type IIIa and confirms a founder effect. PMID:25602008

  3. New mutation of the desmin gene identified in an extended Indian pedigree presenting with distal myopathy and cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Nalini, Atchayaram; Gayathri, Narayanappa; Richard, Pascale; Cobo, Ana-Maria; Urtizberea, J Andoni

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we describe a new mutation located in the coiled 1B domain of desmin and associated with a predominant cardiac involvement and a high degree of cardiac sudden death in a large Indian pedigree with 12 affected members. The index cases was 38-year-old man who presented with progressive difficulty in gripping footwear of 5 years duration with the onset in the left lower limb followed by right lower limb in 6 months. 3 years from onset, he developed lower limb proximal and truncal muscle weakness. There was mild atrophy of the shoulder girdle muscles with grade 3 weakness, moderate wasting of thigh and anterior leg muscles with proximal muscle weakness and foot drop. At 40 years, he had a pacemaker implanted. The 9 exons and intronic boundaries of the desmin gene were sequenced and a heterozygous nucleotide change c. 734A > G in exon 3 was identified. PMID:24441330

  4. Recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital nemaline myopathy with ophthalomoplegia identified through massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Eri; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kosho, Tomoki; Inaba, Yuji; Mitsuhashi, Satomi; Ishida, Takefumi; Baba, Atsushi; Koike, Kenichi; Nishino, Ichizo; Nonaka, Ikuya; Furukawa, Toru; Saito, Kayoko

    2012-04-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) is a group of congenital myopathies, characterized by the presence of distinct rod-like inclusions "nemaline bodies" in the sarcoplasm of skeletal muscle fibers. To date, ACTA1, NEB, TPM3, TPM2, TNNT1, and CFL2 have been found to cause NM. We have identified recessive RYR1 mutations in a patient with severe congenital NM, through high-throughput screening of congenital myopathy/muscular dystrophy-related genes using massively parallel sequencing with target gene capture. The patient manifested fetal akinesia, neonatal severe hypotonia with muscle weakness, respiratory insufficiency, swallowing disturbance, and ophthalomoplegia. Skeletal muscle histology demonstrated nemaline bodies and small type 1 fibers, but without central cores or minicores. Congenital myopathies, a molecularly, histopathologically, and clinically heterogeneous group of disorders are considered to be a good candidate for massively parallel sequencing. PMID:22407809

  5. Coding sequence mutations identified in MYH7, TNNT2, SCN5A, CSRP3, LBD3, and TCAP from 313 patients with familial or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hershberger, Ray E.; Parks, Sharie B.; Kushner, Jessica D.; Li, Duanxiang; Ludwigsen, Susan; Jakobs, Petra; Nauman, Deirdre; Burgess, Donna; Partain, Julie; Litt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background More than 20 genes have been reported to cause idiopathic and familial dilated cardiomyopathy (IDC/FDC), but the frequency of genetic causation remains poorly understood. Methods and Results Blood samples were collected and DNA prepared from 313 patients, 183 with FDC and 130 with IDC. Genomic DNA underwent bidirectional sequencing of six genes, and mutation carriers were followed up by evaluation of additional family members. We identified in 36 probands, 31 unique protein-altering variants (11.5% overall) that were not identified in 253 control subjects (506 chromosomes). These included 13 probands (4.2%) with 12 ?-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) mutations, nine probands (2.9%) with six different cardiac troponin T (TNNT2) mutations, eight probands (2.6%) carrying seven different cardiac sodium channel (SCN5A) mutations, three probands (1.0%) with three titin-cap or telethonin (TCAP) mutations, three probands (1.0%) with two LIM domain binding 3 (LDB3) mutations, and one proband (0.3%) with a muscle LIM protein (CSRP3) mutation. Four nucleotide changes did not segregate with phentoype and/or did not alter a conserved amino acid and were therefore considered unlikely to be disease-causing. Mutations in 11 probands were assessed as likely disease-causing, and in 21 probands were considered possibly disease-causing. These 32 probands included 14 of the 130 with IDC (10.8%) and 18 of 183 with FDC (9.8%) Conclusions Mutations of these six genes each account for a small fraction of the genetic cause of FDC/IDC. The frequency of possible or likely disease-causing mutations in these genes is similar for IDC and FDC. PMID:19412328

  6. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies a Causal RBM20 Mutation in a Large Pedigree with Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Quinn S.; Becker, Jason R.; Su, Yan R.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Weeke, Peter; D'Aoust, Laura; Ausborn, Natalie L.; Ramirez, Andrea H.; Pfotenhauer, Jean P.; Naftilan, Allen J.; Markham, Larry; Exil, Vernat; Roden, Dan M.; Hong, Charles C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole exome sequencing (WES) is a powerful technique for Mendelian disease gene discovery. However, variant prioritization remains a challenge. We applied WES to identify the causal variant in a large family with familial dilated cardiomyopathy (DMC) of unknown etiology. Methods and Results A large family with autosomal dominant, familial DCM was identified. Exome capture and sequencing was performed in 3 remotely related, affected subjects predicted to share <0.1% of their genomes by descent. Shared variants were filtered for rarity, evolutionary conservation, and predicted functional significance, and remaining variants were filtered against 71 locally generated exomes. Variants were also prioritized using the Variant Annotation Analysis and Search Tool (VAAST). Final candidates were validated by Sanger sequencing and tested for segregation. There were 664 shared heterozygous nonsense, missense, or splice site variants, of which 26 were rare (minor allele frequency ? 0.001 or not reported) in two public databases. Filtering against internal exomes reduced the number of candidates to 2, and of these, a single variant (c.1907 G>A) in RBM20, segregated with disease status and was absent in unaffected internal reference exomes. Bioinformatic prioritization with VAAST supported this result. Conclusions WES of remotely related DCM subjects from a large, multiplex family, followed by systematic filtering, identified a causal RBM20 mutation without the need for linkage analysis. PMID:23861363

  7. Whole exome sequencing identifies a POLRID mutation segregating in a father and two daughters with findings of Klippel-Feil and Treacher Collins syndromes.

    PubMed

    Giampietro, Philip F; Armstrong, Linlea; Stoddard, Alex; Blank, Robert D; Livingston, Janet; Raggio, Cathy L; Rasmussen, Kristen; Pickart, Michael; Lorier, Rachel; Turner, Amy; Sund, Sarah; Sobrera, Nara; Neptune, Enid; Sweetser, David; Santiago-Cornier, Alberto; Broeckel, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    We report on a father and his two daughters diagnosed with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) but with craniofacial differences (zygomatic and mandibular hypoplasia and cleft palate) and external ear abnormalities suggestive of Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). The diagnosis of KFS was favored, given that the neck anomalies were the predominant manifestations, and that the diagnosis predated later recognition of the association between spinal segmentation abnormalities and TCS. Genetic heterogeneity and the rarity of large families with KFS have limited the ability to identify mutations by traditional methods. Whole exome sequencing identified a nonsynonymous mutation in POLR1D (subunit of RNA polymerase I and II): exon2:c.T332C:p.L111P. Mutations in POLR1D are present in about 5% of individuals diagnosed with TCS. We propose that this mutation is causal in this family, suggesting a pathogenetic link between KFS and TCS. PMID:25348728

  8. Targeted High-Throughput Sequencing Identifies Pathogenic Mutations in KCNQ4 in Two Large Chinese Families with Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yun; Liu, Qiong; Wang, Dayong; Li, Qian; Lan, Lan; Li, Na; Guan, Jing; Yin, Zifang; Han, Bing; Zhao, Feifan; Zong, Liang; Xiong, Wenping; Yu, Lan; Song, Lijie; Yi, Xin; Yang, Ling; Petit, Christine; Wang, Qiuju

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL) is highly heterogeneous, among them, KCNQ4 is one of the most frequent disease-causing genes. More than twenty KCNQ4 mutations have been reported, but none of them were detected in Chinese mainland families. In this study, we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation in a five generation Chinese family with 84 members and a known KCNQ4 mutation in a six generation Chinese family with 66 members. Mutation screening of 30 genes for ADNSHL was performed in the probands from thirty large Chinese families with ADNSHL by targeted region capture and high-throughput sequencing. The candidate variants and the co-segregation of the phenotype were verified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and Sanger sequencing in all ascertained family members. Then we identified a novel KCNQ4 mutation p.W275R in exon 5 and a known KCNQ4 mutation p.G285S in exon 6 in two large Chinese ADNSHL families segregating with post-lingual high frequency-involved and progressive sensorineural hearing loss. This is the first report of KCNQ4 mutation in Chinese mainland families. KCNQ4, a member of voltage-gated potassium channel family, is likely to be a common gene in Chinese patients with ADNSHL. The results also support that the combination of targeted enrichment and high-throughput sequencing is a valuable molecular diagnostic tool for autosomal dominant hereditary deafness. PMID:25116015

  9. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a de novo TUBA1A mutation in a patient with sporadic malformations of cortical development: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Owing to the number of genetic mutations that contribute to malformations of cortical development, identification of causative mutations in candidate genes is challenging. To overcome these challenges, we performed whole-exome sequencing in this study. Case presentation A Japanese patient presented with microcephaly and severe developmental delay. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of colpocephaly associated with lateral ventricle dilatation and the presence of a simplified gyral pattern. Hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis were also noted. Because Sanger sequencing is expensive, laborious, and time-consuming, whole-exome sequencing was performed and a de novo missense mutation in TUBA1A (E27Q) was identified. Conclusion The novel mutation identified in this study was located in the genetic region that encodes the N-terminal domain of TUBA1A, a region of TUBA1A with few reported mutations. Retrospective assessment of the clinical and radiological features of this patient?i.e., microcephaly, lissencephaly (pachygyria) with cerebellar hypoplasia, and corpus callosum hypoplasia?indicated that the TUBA1A mutation did not lead to any contradictions. Because rapid and comprehensive mutation analysis by whole-exome sequencing is time- and cost-effective, it might be useful for genetic counseling of patients with sporadic malformations of cortical development. PMID:25053001

  10. 20 ans après: a second mutation in MAOA identified by targeted high-throughput sequencing in a family with altered behavior and cognition.

    PubMed

    Piton, Amélie; Poquet, Hélène; Redin, Claire; Masurel, Alice; Lauer, Julia; Muller, Jean; Thevenon, Julien; Herenger, Yvan; Chancenotte, Sophie; Bonnet, Marlène; Pinoit, Jean-Michel; Huet, Frédéric; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Jaeger, Anne-Sophie; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Jost, Bernard; Gérard, Bénédicte; Peoc'h, Katell; Launay, Jean-Marie; Faivre, Laurence; Mandel, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is characterized by an extraordinary genetic heterogeneity, with >250 genes that have been implicated in monogenic forms of ID. Because this complexity precluded systematic testing for mutations and because clinical features are often non-specific, for some of these genes only few cases or families have been unambiguously documented. It is the case of the X-linked gene encoding monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), for which only one nonsense mutation has been identified in Brunner syndrome, characterized in a single family by mild non-dysmorphic ID and impulsive, violent and aggressive behaviors. We have performed targeted high-throughput sequencing of 220 genes, including MAOA, in patients with undiagnosed ID. We identified a c.797_798delinsTT (p.C266F) missense mutation in MAOA in a boy with autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit and autoaggressive behavior. Two maternal uncles carry the mutation and have severe ID, with a history of maltreatment in early childhood. This novel missense mutation decreases MAOA enzymatic activity, leading to abnormal levels of urinary monoamines. The identification of this new point mutation confirms, for the first time since 1993, the monogenic implication of the MAOA gene in ID of various degrees, autism and behavioral disturbances. The variable expressivity of the mutation observed in male patients of this family may involve gene-environment interactions, and the identification of a perturbation in monoamine metabolism should be taken into account when prescribing psychoactive drugs in such patients. PMID:24169519

  11. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhaonong Hu; Yuzhe Du; Yoshiko Nomura; Ke Dong

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the

  12. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic MAP2K1 and MAP2K2 mutations in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Sergey I; Rimoldi, Donata; Iseli, Christian; Valsesia, Armand; Robyr, Daniel; Gehrig, Corinne; Harshman, Keith; Guipponi, Michel; Bukach, Olesya; Zoete, Vincent; Michielin, Olivier; Muehlethaler, Katja; Speiser, Daniel; Beckmann, Jacques S; Xenarios, Ioannis; Halazonetis, Thanos D; Jongeneel, C Victor; Stevenson, Brian J; Antonarakis, Stylianos E

    2012-02-01

    We performed exome sequencing to detect somatic mutations in protein-coding regions in seven melanoma cell lines and donor-matched germline cells. All melanoma samples had high numbers of somatic mutations, which showed the hallmark of UV-induced DNA repair. Such a hallmark was absent in tumor sample-specific mutations in two metastases derived from the same individual. Two melanomas with non-canonical BRAF mutations harbored gain-of-function MAP2K1 and MAP2K2 (MEK1 and MEK2, respectively) mutations, resulting in constitutive ERK phosphorylation and higher resistance to MEK inhibitors. Screening a larger cohort of individuals with melanoma revealed the presence of recurring somatic MAP2K1 and MAP2K2 mutations, which occurred at an overall frequency of 8%. Furthermore, missense and nonsense somatic mutations were frequently found in three candidate melanoma genes, FAT4, LRP1B and DSC1. PMID:22197931

  13. DFNA8/12 Caused by TECTA Mutations is the Most Identified Subtype of Non-syndromic Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Michael S.; Morín, Matías; Meyer, Nicole C.; Mayo, Fernando; Modamio-Hoybjor, Silvia; Mencía, Angeles; Olavarrieta, Leticia; Morales-Angulo, Carmelo; Nishimura, Carla J.; Workman, Heather; DeLuca, Adam P.; del Castillo, Ignacio; Taylor, Kyle R.; Tompkins, Bruce; Goodman, Corey W.; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Van Wesemael, Maarten; Lachlan, K.; Shearer, A. Eliot; Braun, Terry A.; Huygen, Patrick L.M.; Kremer, Hannie; Van Camp, Guy; Moreno, Felipe; Casavant, Thomas L.; Smith, Richard J.H.; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of DFNA8/DFNA12 (DFNA8/12), a type of autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), is unknown as comprehensive population-based genetic screening has not been conducted. We therefore completed unbiased screening for TECTA mutations in a Spanish cohort of 372 probands from ADNSHL families. Three additional families (Spanish, Belgian and English) known to be linked to DFNA8/12 were also included in the screening. In an additional cohort of 835 American ADNSHL families, we preselected 73 probands for TECTA screening based on audiometric data. In aggregate, we identified 23 TECTA mutations in this process. Remarkably 20 of these mutations are novel, more than doubling the number of reported TECTA ADNSHL mutations from 13 to 33. Mutations lie in all domains of the ?-tectorin protein, including those for the first time identified in the entactin domain, the vWFD1, vWFD2 and vWFD3 repeats, and the D1-D2 and TIL2 connectors. While the majority are private mutations, four of them – p.Cys1036Tyr, p.Cys1837Gly, p.Thr1866Met and p.Arg1890Cys – were observed in more than one unrelated family. For two of these mutations founder effects were also confirmed. Our data validate previously observed genotype-phenotype correlations in DFNA8/12 and introduce new correlations. Specifically, mutations in the N-terminal region of ?-tectorin (entactin domain, vWFD1 and vWFD2) lead to mid frequency NSHL, a phenotype previously associated only with mutations in the ZP domain. Collectively, our results indicate that DFNA8/12 hearing loss is a frequent type of ADNSHL. PMID:21520338

  14. Mutations in Caenorhabditis briggsae identify new genes important for limiting the response to EGF signaling during vulval development.

    PubMed

    Sharanya, Devika; Fillis, Cambree J; Kim, Jaeyoung; Zitnik, Edward M; Ward, Kelly A; Gallagher, Molly E; Chamberlin, Helen M; Gupta, Bhagwati P

    2015-01-01

    Studies of vulval development in the nematode C. elegans have identified many genes that are involved in cell division and differentiation processes. Some of these encode components of conserved signal transduction pathways mediated by EGF, Notch, and Wnt. To understand how developmental mechanisms change during evolution, we are doing a comparative analysis of vulva formation in C. briggsae, a species that is closely related to C. elegans. Here, we report 14 mutations in 7 Multivulva (Muv) genes in C. briggsae that inhibit inappropriate division of vulval precursors. We have developed a new efficient and cost-effective gene mapping method to localize Muv mutations to small genetic intervals on chromosomes, thus facilitating cloning and functional studies. We demonstrate the utility of our method by determining molecular identities of three of the Muv genes that include orthologs of Cel-lin-1 (ETS) and Cel-lin-31 (Winged-Helix) of the EGF-Ras pathway and Cel-pry-1 (Axin), of the Wnt pathway. The remaining four genes reside in regions that lack orthologs of known C. elegans Muv genes. Inhibitor studies demonstrate that the Muv phenotype of all four new genes is dependent on the activity of the EGF pathway kinase, MEK. One of these, Cbr-lin(gu167), shows modest increase in the expression of Cbr-lin-3/EGF compared to wild type. These results argue that while Cbr-lin(gu167) may act upstream of Cbr-lin-3/EGF, the other three genes influence the EGF pathway downstream or in parallel to Cbr-lin-3. Overall, our findings demonstrate that the genetic program underlying a conserved developmental process includes both conserved and divergent functional contributions. PMID:25627712

  15. Identifying potential functional impact of mutations and polymorphisms: linking heart failure, increased risk of arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Benoît; Charpentier, Flavien; Toumaniantz, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and clinicians have discovered several important concepts regarding the mechanisms responsible for increased risk of arrhythmias, heart failure, and sudden cardiac death. One major step in defining the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cardiac electrical behavior has been the identification of single mutations that greatly increase the risk for arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death by changing channel-gating characteristics. Indeed, mutations in several genes encoding ion channels, such as SCN5A, which encodes the major cardiac Na+ channel, have emerged as the basis for a variety of inherited cardiac arrhythmias such as long QT syndrome, Brugada syndrome, progressive cardiac conduction disorder, sinus node dysfunction, or sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, genes encoding ion channel accessory proteins, like anchoring or chaperone proteins, which modify the expression, the regulation of endocytosis, and the degradation of ion channel a-subunits have also been reported as susceptibility genes for arrhythmic syndromes. The regulation of ion channel protein expression also depends on a fine-tuned balance among different other mechanisms, such as gene transcription, RNA processing, post-transcriptional control of gene expression by miRNA, protein synthesis, assembly and post-translational modification and trafficking. The aim of this review is to inventory, through the description of few representative examples, the role of these different biogenic mechanisms in arrhythmogenesis, HF and SCD in order to help the researcher to identify all the processes that could lead to arrhythmias. Identification of novel targets for drug intervention should result from further understanding of these fundamental mechanisms. PMID:24065925

  16. Dozens of new de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia identified http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121003132420.htm[10/9/2012 1:10:35 PM

    E-print Network

    Dozens of new de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia identified http Mental Health Research Diseases and Conditions Genes Mind & Brain Schizophrenia Mental Health Disorders and Syndromes Reference Dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia BRCA2 Mutation Huntington's disease Science

  17. Whole-exome sequencing and functional studies identify RPS29 as a novel gene mutated in multicase Diamond-Blackfan anemia families.

    PubMed

    Mirabello, Lisa; Macari, Elizabeth R; Jessop, Lea; Ellis, Steven R; Myers, Timothy; Giri, Neelam; Taylor, Alison M; McGrath, Katherine E; Humphries, Jessica M; Ballew, Bari J; Yeager, Meredith; Boland, Joseph F; He, Ji; Hicks, Belynda D; Burdett, Laurie; Alter, Blanche P; Zon, Leonard; Savage, Sharon A

    2014-07-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a cancer-prone inherited bone marrow failure syndrome. Approximately half of DBA patients have a germ-line mutation in a ribosomal protein gene. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify disease-causing genes in 2 large DBA families. After filtering, 1 nonsynonymous mutation (p.I31F) in the ribosomal protein S29 (RPS29[AUQ1]) gene was present in all 5 DBA-affected individuals and the obligate carrier, and absent from the unaffected noncarrier parent in 1 DBA family. A second DBA family was found to have a different nonsynonymous mutation (p.I50T) in RPS29. Both mutations are amino acid substitutions in exon 2 predicted to be deleterious and resulted in haploinsufficiency of RPS29 expression compared with wild-type RPS29 expression from an unaffected control. The DBA proband with the p.I31F RPS29 mutation had a pre-ribosomal RNA (rRNA) processing defect compared with the healthy control. We demonstrated that both RPS29 mutations failed to rescue the defective erythropoiesis in the rps29(-/-) mutant zebra fish DBA model. RPS29 is a component of the small 40S ribosomal subunit and essential for rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis. We uncovered a novel DBA causative gene, RPS29, and showed that germ-line mutations in RPS29 can cause a defective erythropoiesis phenotype using a zebra fish model. PMID:24829207

  18. Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Smith, Catherine E; Mendillo, Marc L; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D

    2013-10-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1? mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

  19. Dominant Mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 Identify the Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease Active Site and an Exonuclease 1-Independent Mismatch Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Catherine E.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S.; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1? mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

  20. Targeted NGS gene panel identifies mutations in RSPH1 causing primary ciliary dyskinesia and a common mechanism for ciliary central pair agenesis due to radial spoke defects

    PubMed Central

    Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia; Schmidts, Miriam; Patel, Mitali; Jimenez, Gina; Liu, Hui; Thomas, Biju; Dixon, Mellisa; Hirst, Robert A.; Rutman, Andrew; Burgoyne, Thomas; Williams, Christopher; Scully, Juliet; Bolard, Florence; Lafitte, Jean-Jacques; Beales, Philip L.; Hogg, Claire; Yang, Pinfen; Chung, Eddie M.K.; Emes, Richard D.; O'Callaghan, Christopher; Bouvagnet, Patrice; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2014-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited chronic respiratory obstructive disease with randomized body laterality and infertility, resulting from cilia and sperm dysmotility. PCD is characterized by clinical variability and extensive genetic heterogeneity, associated with different cilia ultrastructural defects and mutations identified in >20 genes. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies therefore present a promising approach for genetic diagnosis which is not yet in routine use. We developed a targeted panel-based NGS pipeline to identify mutations by sequencing of selected candidate genes in 70 genetically undefined PCD patients. This detected loss-of-function RSPH1 mutations in four individuals with isolated central pair (CP) agenesis and normal body laterality, from two unrelated families. Ultrastructural analysis in RSPH1-mutated cilia revealed transposition of peripheral outer microtubules into the ‘empty’ CP space, accompanied by a distinctive intermittent loss of the central pair microtubules. We find that mutations in RSPH1, RSPH4A and RSPH9, which all encode homologs of components of the ‘head’ structure of ciliary radial spoke complexes identified in Chlamydomonas, cause clinical phenotypes that appear to be indistinguishable except at the gene level. By high-resolution immunofluorescence we identified a loss of RSPH4A and RSPH9 along with RSPH1 from RSPH1-mutated cilia, suggesting RSPH1 mutations may result in loss of the entire spoke head structure. CP loss is seen in up to 28% of PCD cases, in whom laterality determination specified by CP-less embryonic node cilia remains undisturbed. We propose this defect could arise from instability or agenesis of the ciliary central microtubules due to loss of their normal radial spoke head tethering. PMID:24518672

  1. Fifteen Novel EIF2B1-5 Mutations Identified in Chinese Children with Leukoencephalopathy with Vanishing White Matter and a Long Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haihua; Dai, Lifang; Chen, Na; Zang, Lili; Leng, Xuerong; Du, Li; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Yuwu; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Xiru; Wu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM) is one of the most prevalent inherited childhood white matter disorders, which caused by mutations in each of the five subunits of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B (EIF2B1-5). In our study, 34 out of the 36 clinically diagnosed children (94%) were identified to have EIF2B1-5 mutations by sequencing. 15 novel mutations were identified. CNVs were not detected in patients with only one mutant allele and mutation-negative determined by gene sequencing. There is a significantly higher incidence of patients with EIF2B3 mutations compared with Caucasian patients (32% vs. 4%). c.1037T>C (p.Ile346Thr) in EIF2B3 was confirmed to be a founder mutation in Chinese, which probably one of the causes of the genotypic differences between ethnicities. Our average 4.4 years-follow-up on infantile, early childhood and juvenile VWM children suggested a rapid deterioration in motor function. Episodic aggravation was presented in 90% of infantile cases and 71.4% of childhood cases. 10 patients died during the follow-up. The Kaplan-Meier curve showed that the median survival time is 8.83 ± 1.51 years. This is the largest sample of children in a VWM follow-up study, which is helpful for a more depth understanding about the natural course. PMID:25761052

  2. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 Are Identified in Individuals with Congenital Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A.; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P.; Plummer, Lacey; Chung, Wilson; Feng, Bihua; Beenken, Andrew; Clarke, Jeff; Pers, Tune H.; Dworzynski, Piotr; Keefe, Kimberley; Niedziela, Marek; Raivio, Taneli; Crowley, William F.; Seminara, Stephanie B.; Quinton, Richard; Hughes, Virginia A.; Kumanov, Philip; Young, Jacques; Yialamas, Maria A.; Hall, Janet E.; Van Vliet, Guy; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Rubenstein, John; Mohammadi, Moosa; Tsai, Pei-San; Sidis, Yisrael; Lage, Kasper; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ?12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 signaling and can be mutated in CHH. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in genes encoding a broader range of modulators of the FGFR1 pathway might contribute to the genetics of CHH as causal or modifier mutations. Thus, we aimed to (1) investigate whether CHH individuals harbor mutations in members of the so-called “FGF8 synexpression” group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS predicted FGF17 and IL17RD as the two top candidates in the entire proteome on the basis of a statistical test of their protein-protein interaction patterns to proteins known to be altered in CHH. Most of the FGF17 and IL17RD mutations altered protein function in vitro. IL17RD mutations were found only in KS individuals and were strongly linked to hearing loss (6/8 individuals). Mutations in genes encoding components of the FGF pathway are associated with complex modes of CHH inheritance and act primarily as contributors to an oligogenic genetic architecture underlying CHH. PMID:23643382

  3. Mutations in FGF17, IL17RD, DUSP6, SPRY4, and FLRT3 are identified in individuals with congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew A; Sykiotis, Gerasimos P; Plummer, Lacey; Chung, Wilson; Feng, Bihua; Beenken, Andrew; Clarke, Jeff; Pers, Tune H; Dworzynski, Piotr; Keefe, Kimberley; Niedziela, Marek; Raivio, Taneli; Crowley, William F; Seminara, Stephanie B; Quinton, Richard; Hughes, Virginia A; Kumanov, Philip; Young, Jacques; Yialamas, Maria A; Hall, Janet E; Van Vliet, Guy; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Rubenstein, John; Mohammadi, Moosa; Tsai, Pei-San; Sidis, Yisrael; Lage, Kasper; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2013-05-01

    Congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (CHH) and its anosmia-associated form (Kallmann syndrome [KS]) are genetically heterogeneous. Among the >15 genes implicated in these conditions, mutations in FGF8 and FGFR1 account for ~12% of cases; notably, KAL1 and HS6ST1 are also involved in FGFR1 signaling and can be mutated in CHH. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in genes encoding a broader range of modulators of the FGFR1 pathway might contribute to the genetics of CHH as causal or modifier mutations. Thus, we aimed to (1) investigate whether CHH individuals harbor mutations in members of the so-called "FGF8 synexpression" group and (2) validate the ability of a bioinformatics algorithm on the basis of protein-protein interactome data (interactome-based affiliation scoring [IBAS]) to identify high-quality candidate genes. On the basis of sequence homology, expression, and structural and functional data, seven genes were selected and sequenced in 386 unrelated CHH individuals and 155 controls. Except for FGF18 and SPRY2, all other genes were found to be mutated in CHH individuals: FGF17 (n = 3 individuals), IL17RD (n = 8), DUSP6 (n = 5), SPRY4 (n = 14), and FLRT3 (n = 3). Independently, IBAS predicted FGF17 and IL17RD as the two top candidates in the entire proteome on the basis of a statistical test of their protein-protein interaction patterns to proteins known to be altered in CHH. Most of the FGF17 and IL17RD mutations altered protein function in vitro. IL17RD mutations were found only in KS individuals and were strongly linked to hearing loss (6/8 individuals). Mutations in genes encoding components of the FGF pathway are associated with complex modes of CHH inheritance and act primarily as contributors to an oligogenic genetic architecture underlying CHH. PMID:23643382

  4. NOTCH1 mutations identify a chronic lymphocytic leukemia patient subset with worse prognosis in the setting of a rituximab-based induction and consolidation treatment.

    PubMed

    Bo, Michele Dal; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Pozzo, Federico; Ragusa, Dario; Bulian, Pietro; Rossi, Davide; Capelli, Giovanni; Rossi, Francesca Maria; Niscola, Pasquale; Buccisano, Francesco; Bomben, Riccardo; Zucchetto, Antonella; Maurillo, Luca; de Fabritiis, Paolo; Amadori, Sergio; Gaidano, Gianluca; Gattei, Valter; Del Poeta, Giovanni

    2014-10-01

    Induction therapy with fludarabine followed by rituximab and consolidation plus maintenance with rituximab improved response duration (RD) and overall survival (OS) in our patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The aim of our study was to investigate the clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in this setting of patients. The study included 123 progressive CLL patients homogeneously assigned to first-line induction treatment with fludarabine followed by rituximab. Fifty-nine patients either in complete remission (CR) minimal residual disease positive (MRD+) after induction (n = 39) or in partial remission (PR, n = 20) underwent consolidation/maintenance therapy with rituximab. Sixteen patients in CR MRD?+ or PR underwent observation only. The presence of NOTCH1 mutations was investigated by amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) PCR and by Sanger sequencing. NOTCH1 mutations occurred in 20 out of 123 (16.3 %) cases. Consolidated patients showed longer OS than unconsolidated patients (p = 0.030). Both NOTCH1 mutated and CR MRD+ or PR NOTCH1 mutated patients showed significantly shorter OS after treatment (p = 0.00014 and p = 0.0021, respectively). Moreover, NOTCH1 wild-type consolidated cases experienced significantly longer RD and OS than NOTCH1 mutated consolidated or not consolidated cases (p = 0.00001 and p = 0.018, respectively). Finally, the independent prognostic impact of NOTCH1 mutations for OS was confirmed in multivariate analysis (p < 0.001). The presence of NOTCH1 mutations identifies a CLL subset with worse prognosis in the setting of a rituximab-based induction and consolidation treatment. PMID:24923451

  5. A new human p34 protein kinase, CDK2, identified by complementation of a cdc28 mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is a homolog of Xenopus Eg1.

    PubMed Central

    Elledge, S J; Spottswood, M R

    1991-01-01

    The onset of S-phase and M-phase in both Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the function of the cdc2/CDC28 gene product, p34, a serine-threonine protein kinase. A human homolog, p34cdc2, was identified by functional complementation of the S.pombe cdc2 mutation (Lee and Nurse, 1987). Using a human cDNA expression library to search for suppressors of cdc28 mutations in S. cerevisiae, we have identified a second functional p34 homolog, CDK2 cell division kinase). This gene is expressed as a 2.1 kb transcript encoding a polypeptide of 298 amino acids. This protein retains nearly all of the amino acids highly conserved among previously identified p34 homologs from other species, but is considerably divergent from all previous p34cdc2 homologs, approximately 65% identity. This gene encodes the human homolog of the Xenopus Eg1 gene, sharing 89% amino acid identity, and defines a second sub-family of CDC2 homologs. A second chromosomal mutation which arose spontaneously was required to allow complementation of the cdc28-4 mutation by CDK2. This mutation blocked the ability of this strain to mate. These results suggest that the machinery controlling the human cell cycle is more complex than that for fission and budding yeast. Images PMID:1714386

  6. X-Linked Megalocornea Caused by Mutations in CHRDL1 Identifies an Essential Role for Ventroptin in Anterior Segment Development

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Tom R.; Matarin, Mar; Gardner, Jessica C.; Kelberman, Dan; Hassan, Hala; Ang, Wei; Michaelides, Michel; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Pennell, Craig E.; Yazar, Seyhan; Khor, Chiea C.; Aung, Tin; Yogarajah, Mahinda; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Moore, Anthony T.; Sowden, Jane C.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Mackey, David A.; Tuft, Stephen J.; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2012-01-01

    X-linked megalocornea (MGC1) is an ocular anterior segment disorder characterized by an increased cornea diameter and deep anterior chamber evident at birth and later onset of mosaic corneal degeneration (shagreen), arcus juvenilis, and presenile cataracts. We identified copy-number variation, frameshift, missense, splice-site and nonsense mutations in the Chordin-like 1 gene (CHRDL1) on Xq23 as the cause of the condition in seven MGC1 families. CHRDL1 encodes ventroptin, a bone morphogenic protein antagonist with a proposed role in specification of topographic retinotectal projections. Electrophysiological evaluation revealed mild generalized cone system dysfunction and, in one patient, an interhemispheric asymmetry in visual evoked potentials. We show that CHRDL1 is expressed in the developing human cornea and anterior segment in addition to the retina. We explored the impact of loss of ventroptin function on brain function and morphology in vivo. CHRDL1 is differentially expressed in the human fetal brain, and there is high expression in cerebellum and neocortex. We show that MGC1 patients have a superior cognitive ability despite a striking focal loss of myelination of white matter. Our findings reveal an unexpected requirement for ventroptin during anterior segment development and the consequences of a lack of function in the retina and brain. PMID:22284829

  7. Clinical Features: Mutations of the MEF2C gene [OMIM # 600662] have been identified in patients with severe mental retardation,

    E-print Network

    Das, Soma

    in patients with severe mental retardation, stereotypic movements, hypotonia, and epilepsy [1-4]. Patients can microdeletion of the 5q14.3 region or mutation is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic. Zweier, et al, 2010 detected four de novo mutations in MEF2C in 362 patients with severe mental

  8. Clinical Features: Mutations of the MEF2C gene [OMIM # 600662] have been identified in patients with severe mental retardation,

    E-print Network

    Gilad, Yoav

    in patients with severe mental retardation, stereotypic movements, hypotonia, and epilepsy [1-4]. Patients can of the 5q14.3 region or mutation is responsible for severe mental retardation with stereotypic movements. Zweier, et al, 2010 detected four de novo mutations in MEF2C in 362 patients with severe mental

  9. Clinical Features: Mutations of the MEF2C gene [OMIM # 600662] have been identified in patients with severe mental retardation,

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    Prenatal testing for a known mutation by sequence analysis Sample specifications: 2 T25 flasks of cultured, 83912 Turn-around time: 1-2 weeks Prenatal testing for a known mutation by deletion/duplication analysis and are typically de-novo. Germline mosaicism has not been reported but remains a possibility. Test methods: We

  10. Genotyping Cancer-Associated Genes in Chordoma Identifies Mutations in Oncogenes and Areas of Chromosomal Loss Involving CDKN2A, PTEN, and SMARCB1

    PubMed Central

    Choy, Edwin; MacConaill, Laura E.; Cote, Gregory M.; Le, Long P.; Shen, Jacson K.; Nielsen, Gunnlaugur P.; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Garraway, Levi A.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying chordoma pathogenesis are unknown. We therefore sought to identify novel mutations to better understand chordoma biology and to potentially identify therapeutic targets. Given the relatively high costs of whole genome sequencing, we performed a focused genetic analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer (Sequenom iPLEX genotyping). We tested 865 hotspot mutations in 111 oncogenes and selected tumor suppressor genes (OncoMap v. 3.0) of 45 human chordoma tumor samples. Of the analyzed samples, seven were identified with at least one mutation. Six of these were from fresh frozen samples, and one was from a paraffin embedded sample. These observations were validated using an independent platform using homogeneous mass extend MALDI-TOF (Sequenom hME Genotyping). These genetic alterations include: ALK (A877S), CTNNB1 (T41A), NRAS (Q61R), PIK3CA (E545K), PTEN (R130), CDKN2A (R58*), and SMARCB1 (R40*). This study reports on the largest comprehensive mutational analysis of chordomas performed to date. To focus on mutations that have the greatest chance of clinical relevance, we tested only oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that have been previously implicated in the tumorigenesis of more common malignancies. We identified rare genetic changes that may have functional significance to the underlying biology and potential therapeutics for chordomas. Mutations in CDKN2A and PTEN occurred in areas of chromosomal copy loss. When this data is paired with the studies showing 18 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at the locus for CDKN2A, 17 of 21 chordoma samples displaying copy loss at PTEN, and 3 of 4 chordoma samples displaying deletion at the SMARCB1 locus, we can infer that a loss of heterozygosity at these three loci may play a significant role in chordoma pathogenesis. PMID:24983247

  11. Whole-exome re-sequencing in a family quartet identifies POP1 mutations as the cause of a novel skeletal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Glazov, Evgeny A; Zankl, Andreas; Donskoi, Marina; Kenna, Tony J; Thomas, Gethin P; Clark, Graeme R; Duncan, Emma L; Brown, Matthew A

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing have enabled mapping of genes for monogenic traits in families with small pedigrees and even in unrelated cases. We report the identification of disease-causing mutations in a rare, severe, skeletal dysplasia, studying a family of two healthy unrelated parents and two affected children using whole-exome sequencing. The two affected daughters have clinical and radiographic features suggestive of anauxetic dysplasia (OMIM 607095), a rare form of dwarfism caused by mutations of RMRP. However, mutations of RMRP were excluded in this family by direct sequencing. Our studies identified two novel compound heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in POP1, which encodes a core component of the RNase mitochondrial RNA processing (RNase MRP) complex that directly interacts with the RMRP RNA domains that are affected in anauxetic dysplasia. We demonstrate that these mutations impair the integrity and activity of this complex and that they impair cell proliferation, providing likely molecular and cellular mechanisms by which POP1 mutations cause this severe skeletal dysplasia. PMID:21455487

  12. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies ALMS1, IQCB1, CNGA3, and MYO7A Mutations in Patients with Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xia; Wang, Hui; Cao, Ming; Li, Zhe; Chen, Xianfeng; Patenia, Claire; Gore, Athurva; Abboud, Emad B.; Al-Rajhi, Ali A.; Lewis, Richard A.; Lupski, James R.; Mardon, Graeme; Zhang, Kun; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard A.; Chen, Rui

    2014-01-01

    It has been well documented that mutations in the same retinal disease gene can result in different clinical phenotypes due to difference in the mutant allele and/or genetic background. To evaluate this, a set of consanguineous patient families with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) that do not carry mutations in known LCA disease genes was characterized through homozygosity mapping followed by targeted exon/whole-exome sequencing to identify genetic variations. Among these families, a total of five putative disease-causing mutations, including four novel alleles, were found for six families. These five mutations are located in four genes, ALMS1, IQCB1, CNGA3, and MYO7A. Therefore, in our LCA collection from Saudi Arabia, three of the 37 unassigned families carry mutations in retinal disease genes ALMS1, CNGA3, and MYO7A, which have not been previously associated with LCA, and 3 of the 37 carry novel mutations in IQCB1, which has been recently associated with LCA. Together with other reports, our results emphasize that the molecular heterogeneity underlying LCA, and likely other retinal diseases, may be highly complex. Thus, to obtain accurate diagnosis and gain a complete picture of the disease, it is essential to sequence a larger set of retinal disease genes and combine the clinical phenotype with molecular diagnosis. PMID:21901789

  13. A sodium channel mutation identified in Aedes aegypti selectively reduces cockroach sodium channel sensitivity to type I, but not type II pyrethroids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaonong; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroid insecticides. Numerous point mutations in sodium channel genes have been identified in pyrethroid-resistant insect species, and many have been confirmed to reduce or abolish sensitivity of channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes to pyrethroids. Recently, several novel mutations were reported in sodium channel genes of pyrethroid-resistant Aedes mosquito populations. One of the mutations is a phenylalanine (F) to cysteine (C) change in segment 6 of domain III (IIIS6) of the Aedes mosquito sodium channel. Curiously, a previous study showed that alanine substitution of this F did not alter the action of deltamethrin, a type II pyrethroid, on a cockroach sodium channel. In this study, we changed this F to C in a pyrethroid-sensitive cockroach sodium channel and examined mutant channel sensitivity to permethrin as well as five other type I or type II pyrethroids in Xenopus oocytes. Interestingly, the F to C mutation drastically reduced channel sensitivity to three type I pyrethroids, permethrin, NRDC 157 (a deltamethrin analogue lacking the ?-cyano group) and bioresemthrin, but not to three type II pyrethroids, cypermethrin, deltamethrin and cyhalothrin. These results confirm the involvement of the F to C mutation in permethrin resistance, and raise the possibility that rotation of type I and type II pyrethroids might be considered in the control of insect pest populations where this particular mutation is present. PMID:20869441

  14. KLF2 mutation is the most frequent somatic change in splenic marginal zone lymphoma and identifies a subset with distinct genotype

    E-print Network

    Clipson, Alexandra; Wang, Ming; de Leval, Laurence; Ashton-Key, Margaret; Wotherspoon, Andrew; Vassiliou, George; Bolli, Niccolo; Grove, Carolyn; Moody, Sarah; Ibarz, Leire Escudero; Gundem, Gunes; Brugger, Kim; Xue, Xuemin; Mi, Ella; Bench, Anthony; Scott, Mike; Liu, Hongxiang; Follows, George; Robles, Eloy F.; Climent, Jose Angel Martinez; Oscier, David; Watkins, A. James; Du, Ming-Qing

    2014-11-27

    sequencing identifies 488 frequent mutation of the SWI/SNF complex gene PBRM1 in renal carcinoma. Nature 2011; 469: 489 539-542. 490 22 Stephens PJ, Tarpey PS, Davies H, Van Loo P, Greenman C, Wedge DC et al. The landscape of 491 cancer genes...

  15. Expression studies of a novel splice site mutation in the LIPH gene identified in a Japanese patient with autosomal recessive woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ryota; Inui, Shigeki; Farooq, Muhammad; Ito, Masaaki; Shimomura, Yutaka

    2014-10-01

    Autosomal recessive woolly hair (ARWH) is characterized by short and tightly curled scalp hair without any obvious complications. The disease is known to be caused by either lipase H (LIPH) or LPAR6 genes. Proteins encoded by these two genes are closely related to each other in a lipid-signaling pathway that is believed to play crucial roles in hair follicle development and hair growth. In the Japanese population, most affected individuals with ARWH have been shown to carry two prevalent founder mutations in the LIPH gene, c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser) and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn), while other LIPH mutations have been occasionally identified. In this study, we analyzed a Japanese patient with ARWH, and identified compound heterozygous mutations in the LIPH gene, c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser) and c.982+5G>T. The latter one was a novel splice site mutation in intron 7. Expression studies using blood-derived RNA from the patient detected the LIPH transcript from the c.736T>A mutant allele, but not from the c.982+5G>T mutant allele. Furthermore, in vitro transcription assay in cultured cells showed that the mutation c.982+5G>T caused an aberrant splicing event, leading to a frame-shift and a premature termination codon (p.Met328Serfs*41). To the best of our knowledge, this is the second splice site mutation in the LIPH gene, and our findings further expand the spectrum of the LIPH mutations underlying ARWH. PMID:25271093

  16. A Pseudo-Full Mutation Identified in Fragile X Assay Reveals a Novel Base Change Abolishing an EcoRI Restriction Site

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shujian; Bass, Harold N.; Gao, Hanlin; Astbury, Caroline; Jamehdor, Mehdi R.; Qu, Yong

    2008-01-01

    Diagnostic testing for the fragile X syndrome is designed to detect the most common mutation, a CGG expansion in the 5?-untranslated region of the fragile X mental retardation (FMRI) gene. PCR can determine the number of CGG repeats less than 100, whereas Southern analysis can detect large premutations, full mutations, and their methylation status. Bands larger than 5.8 kb observed via Southern analysis are usually considered a methylated full mutation, causing fragile X syndrome in males and varied clinical presentations in females. We observed a 10.9-kb band on a Southern blot assay from an autistic girl with language delay. Further investigation identified a novel G-to-A transition at an EcoRI cleavage site, upstream of the CGG repeat region of the FMRI gene. This base change abolished the EcoRI restriction site, resulting in a 10.9-kb pseudo-full mutation. This G-to-A base change has not been previously reported and was not identified in a subsequent analysis of 105 male and 30 female patient samples. The clear 10.9-kb band detected on a Southern blot assay for fragile X syndrome mimics a large, methylated full mutation, which could result in a misdiagnosis without the benefit of family studies and further testing. PMID:18687789

  17. Targeted Next Generation Sequencing Identifies Novel Mutations in RP1 as a Relatively Common Cause of Autosomal Recessive Rod-Cone Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    El Shamieh, Said; Boulanger-Scemama, Elise; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Démontant, Vanessa; Condroyer, Christel; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina

    2015-01-01

    We report ophthalmic and genetic findings in families with autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy (arRCD) and RP1 mutations. Detailed ophthalmic examination was performed in 242 sporadic and arRCD subjects. Genomic DNA was investigated using our customized next generation sequencing panel targeting up to 123 genes implicated in inherited retinal disorders. Stringent filtering coupled with Sanger sequencing and followed by cosegregation analysis was performed to confirm biallelism and the implication of the most likely disease causing variants. Sequencing identified 9 RP1 mutations in 7 index cases. Eight of the mutations were novel, and all cosegregated with severe arRCD phenotype, found associated with additional macular changes. Among the identified mutations, 4 belong to a region, previously associated with arRCD, and 5 others in a region previously associated with adRCD. Our prevalence studies showed that RP1 mutations account for up to 2.5% of arRCD. These results point out for the necessity of sequencing RP1 when genetically investigating sporadic and arRCD. It further highlights the interest of unbiased sequencing technique, which allows investigating the implication of the same gene in different modes of inheritance. Finally, it reports that different regions of RP1 can also lead to arRCD. PMID:25692139

  18. Multiple mutations in katG and inhA identified in Thai isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Dhruba Kumar; Eampokalap, Boonchuay; Panitchakorn, Jarinee; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Khusmith, Srisin

    2007-03-01

    A total of 29 Thai multi-drug-resistant/isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were analyzed for mutations in katG from codons 254 to 549, inhA promoter and inhA open reading frame by DNA sequencing and single strand conformation polymorphism. Twenty-five multi-drug resistant isolates exhibited single point mutations (17 isolates at Ser315Thr plus Arg463Leu, 1 at Thr308Pro plus Arg463Leu, 7 at either Ser315Thr or Arg463Leu) while the other 4 isoniazid-resistant isolates had single point mutation only at Arg463Leu. Seven of 25 multi-drug-resistant isolates [4 at C(-15)T, 1 at T(-8)C; 1 at C(-15)T plus Ser94Ala and 1 at Ile21Val] and 2 of 4 isoniazid-resistant isolates [1 at C(-15)T, 1 at C (-15)T plus Ile21Thr] had mutations in inhA promoter and open reading frame, while the other 20 isolates had no mutation at any position. No frame shift mutation was observed in any tested isolates. This is the first report of two mutations, Trp308Pro of katG and T (-8)C of inhA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates. PMID:17539290

  19. Virulence-Associated Genome Mutations of Murine Rotavirus Identified by Alternating Serial Passages in Mice and Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Masatoshi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although significant clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed in many countries, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a cell culture-adapted murine rotavirus EB strain in mouse pups or in cell cultures alternately and repeatedly and fully sequenced all 11 genes of 21 virus samples passaged in mice or in cell cultures. Sequence analysis revealed that mouse-passaged viruses that regained virulence almost consistently acquired four kinds of amino acid (aa) substitutions in VP4 and substitution in aa 37 (Val to Ala) in NSP4. In addition, they gained and invariably conserved the 3? consensus sequence in NSP1. The molecular changes occurred along with the acquisition of virulence during passages in mice and then disappeared following passages in cell cultures. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed the aa 37 site as important for its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. IMPORTANCE Serial passage of a virulent wild-type virus in vitro often results in loss of virulence of the virus in an original animal host, while serial passage of a cell culture-adapted avirulent virus in vivo often gains virulence in an animal host. Actually, live attenuated virus vaccines were originally produced by serial passage in cell cultures. Although clinical efficacy and safety of rotavirus vaccines were recently revealed, the mechanism of their attenuation is not well understood. We passaged serially a murine rotavirus by alternating switch of host (mice or cell cultures) repeatedly and sequenced the eleven genes of the passaged viruses to identify mutations associated with the emergence or disappearance of virulence. Sequence analysis revealed that changes in three genes (VP4, NSP1, and NSP4) were associated with virulence in mice. Intraperitoneal injection of recombinant NSP4 proteins confirmed its diarrheagenic activity in mice. These genome changes are likely to be correlated with rotavirus virulence. PMID:24599996

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel FOXP3 Mutation in a 2-Generation Family With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Okou, David T.; Mondal, Kajari; Faubion, William A.; Kobrynski, Lisa J.; Denson, Lee A.; Mulle, Jennifer G.; Ramachandran, Dhanya; Xiong, Yuning; Svingen, Phyllis; Patel, Viren; Bose, Promita; Waters, Jon P.; Prahalad, Sampath; Cutler, David J.; Zwick, Michael E.; Kugathasan, Subra

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is heritable, but a total of 163 variants commonly implicated in IBD pathogenesis account for only 25% of the heritability. Rare, highly penetrant genetic variants may also explain mendelian forms of IBD and some of the missing heritability. To test the hypothesis that rare loss-of-function mutations can be causative, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on 5 members of a 2-generation family of European ancestry presenting with an early-onset and atypical form of IBD. Methods WES was performed for all of the 5 family members; the mother and 3 male offspring were affected, whereas the father was unaffected. Mapping, annotation, and filtering criteria were used to reduce candidate variants. For functional testing we performed forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) staining and a T-cell suppression assay. Results We identified a novel missense variant in exon 6 of the X-linked FOXP3 gene. The c.694A>C substitution in FOXP3 results in a cysteine-toglycine change at the protein position 232 that is completely conserved among all vertebrates. This variant (heterozygous in the mother and hemizygous in all 3 affected sons) did not impair FOXP3 protein expression, but significantly reduced the ability of the host's T regulatory cells to suppress an inappropriate autoimmune response. The variant results in a milder immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked phenotype with early-onset IBD. Conclusions Our study illustrates the successful application of WES for making a definitive molecular diagnosis in a case of multiply affected families, with atypical IBD-like phenotype. Our results also have important implications for disease biology and disease-directed therapeutic development. PMID:24792626

  1. A scalable method for molecular network reconstruction identifies properties of targets and mutations in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Edison; Szedlak, Anthony; Kang, Yunyi; Smith, Peyton; Smith, Nicholas; McBride, Madison; Finlay, Darren; Vuori, Kristiina; Mason, James; Ball, Edward D; Piermarocchi, Carlo; Paternostro, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    A key aim of systems biology is the reconstruction of molecular networks. We do not yet, however, have networks that integrate information from all datasets available for a particular clinical condition. This is in part due to the limited scalability, in terms of required computational time and power, of existing algorithms. Network reconstruction methods should also be scalable in the sense of allowing scientists from different backgrounds to efficiently integrate additional data. We present a network model of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current version (AML 2.1), we have used gene expression data (both microarray and RNA-seq) from 5 different studies comprising a total of 771 AML samples and a protein-protein interactions dataset. Our scalable network reconstruction method is in part based on the well-known property of gene expression correlation among interacting molecules. The difficulty of distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions is addressed by optimizing the coefficient of variation of gene expression, using a validated gold-standard dataset of direct interactions. Computational time is much reduced compared to other network reconstruction methods. A key feature is the study of the reproducibility of interactions found in independent clinical datasets. An analysis of the most significant clusters, and of the network properties (intraset efficiency, degree, betweenness centrality, and PageRank) of common AML mutations demonstrated the biological significance of the network. A statistical analysis of the response of blast cells from 11 AML patients to a library of kinase inhibitors provided an experimental validation of the network. A combination of network and experimental data identified CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6 and other kinases as potential therapeutic targets in AML. PMID:25844667

  2. Mutations in 12 genes for inherited ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinoma identified by massively parallel sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tom; Casadei, Silvia; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher C; Nord, Alex S; Thornton, Anne M; Roeb, Wendy; Agnew, Kathy J; Stray, Sunday M; Wickramanayake, Anneka; Norquist, Barbara; Pennington, Kathryn P; Garcia, Rochelle L; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2011-11-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and other tumor suppressor genes predispose to ovarian carcinomas, but the overall burden of disease due to inherited mutations is not known. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we screened for germ-line mutations in 21 tumor suppressor genes in genomic DNA from women with primary ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma. Subjects were consecutively enrolled at diagnosis and not selected for age or family history. All classes of mutations, including point mutations and large genomic deletions and insertions, were detected. Of 360 subjects, 24% carried germ-line loss-of-function mutations: 18% in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and 6% in BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK2, MRE11A, MSH6, NBN, PALB2, RAD50, RAD51C, or TP53. Six of these genes were not previously implicated in inherited ovarian carcinoma. Primary carcinomas were generally characterized by genomic loss of normal alleles of the mutant genes. Of women with inherited mutations, >30% had no family history of breast or ovarian carcinoma, and >35% were 60 y or older at diagnosis. More patients with ovarian carcinoma carry cancer-predisposing mutations and in more genes than previously appreciated. Comprehensive genetic testing for inherited carcinoma is warranted for all women with ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma, regardless of age or family history. Clinical genetic testing is currently done gene by gene, with each test costing thousands of dollars. In contrast, massively parallel sequencing allows such testing for many genes simultaneously at low cost. PMID:22006311

  3. Mutations in 12 genes for inherited ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinoma identified by massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Tom; Casadei, Silvia; Lee, Ming K.; Pennil, Christopher C.; Nord, Alex S.; Thornton, Anne M.; Roeb, Wendy; Agnew, Kathy J.; Stray, Sunday M.; Wickramanayake, Anneka; Norquist, Barbara; Pennington, Kathryn P.; Garcia, Rochelle L.; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 and other tumor suppressor genes predispose to ovarian carcinomas, but the overall burden of disease due to inherited mutations is not known. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we screened for germ-line mutations in 21 tumor suppressor genes in genomic DNA from women with primary ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma. Subjects were consecutively enrolled at diagnosis and not selected for age or family history. All classes of mutations, including point mutations and large genomic deletions and insertions, were detected. Of 360 subjects, 24% carried germ-line loss-of-function mutations: 18% in BRCA1 or BRCA2 and 6% in BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK2, MRE11A, MSH6, NBN, PALB2, RAD50, RAD51C, or TP53. Six of these genes were not previously implicated in inherited ovarian carcinoma. Primary carcinomas were generally characterized by genomic loss of normal alleles of the mutant genes. Of women with inherited mutations, >30% had no family history of breast or ovarian carcinoma, and >35% were 60 y or older at diagnosis. More patients with ovarian carcinoma carry cancer-predisposing mutations and in more genes than previously appreciated. Comprehensive genetic testing for inherited carcinoma is warranted for all women with ovarian, peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma, regardless of age or family history. Clinical genetic testing is currently done gene by gene, with each test costing thousands of dollars. In contrast, massively parallel sequencing allows such testing for many genes simultaneously at low cost. PMID:22006311

  4. [Founder effect of E180splice mutation in growth hormone receptor gene (GHR) identified in Brazilian patients with GH insensitivity].

    PubMed

    Jorge, Alexander A de Lima; Menezes Filho, Hamilton C de; Lins, Theresa S Soares; Guedes, Dulce Rondini; Damiani, Durval; Setian, Nuvarte; Arnhold, Ivo J Prado; Mendonça, Berenice B de

    2005-06-01

    We studied the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene in 6 patients with Laron syndrome (LS) from 4 unrelated families. Exons 2 to 10 were amplified by PCR using specific intronic pairs of primers. The PCR products were directly sequenced. Our results showed that all 6 patients carried a homozygous GAG>GAA mutation in codon 180 of exon 6. This mutation did not change the translated amino acid, but created an abnormal splice site deleting 8 amino acids from the extracellular domain of GHR. Members of all 4 kindreds with the E180splice mutation were genotyped for 4 polymorphic intragenic sites: The retention or exclusion of exon 3, single nucleotide polymorphisms present in exons 6 and 10, and intron 9 polymorphic site. All 6 patients presented the same haplotype. The E180splice mutation was first described in a population of Spanish descendants from the Andes of Southern Ecuador. This mutation was also found in oriental Jewish patients from Israel. Our families share the same intron-9 haplotype observed in Ecuadorian and Israeli patients. We conclude that the E180splice mutation is an important cause of LS in Brazil and there is probably a founder effect since our patients, Ecuadorian and Israeli patients share the same haplotype in intron 9. PMID:16543992

  5. Candidate Gene Analysis of Tooth Agenesis Identifies Novel Mutations in Six Genes and Suggests Significant Role for WNT and EDA Signaling and Allele Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  6. Candidate gene analysis of tooth agenesis identifies novel mutations in six genes and suggests significant role for WNT and EDA signaling and allele combinations.

    PubMed

    Arte, Sirpa; Parmanen, Satu; Pirinen, Sinikka; Alaluusua, Satu; Nieminen, Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Failure to develop complete dentition, tooth agenesis, is a common developmental anomaly manifested most often as isolated but also as associated with many developmental syndromes. It typically affects third molars or one or few other permanent teeth but severe agenesis is also relatively prevalent. Here we report mutational analyses of seven candidate genes in a cohort of 127 probands with non-syndromic tooth agenesis. 82 lacked more than five permanent teeth excluding third molars, called as oligodontia. We identified 28 mutations, 17 of which were novel. Together with our previous reports, we have identified two mutations in MSX1, AXIN2 and EDARADD, five in PAX9, four in EDA and EDAR, and nine in WNT10A. They were observed in 58 probands (44%), with a mean number of missing teeth of 11.7 (range 4 to 34). Almost all of these probands had severe agenesis. Only few of the probands but several relatives with heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A or EDAR conformed to the common type of non-syndromic tooth agenesis, incisor-premolar hypodontia. Mutations in MSX1 and PAX9 affected predominantly posterior teeth, whereas both deciduous and permanent incisors were especially sensitive to mutations in EDA and EDAR. Many mutations in EDAR, EDARADD and WNT10A were present in several families. Biallelic or heterozygous genotypes of WNT10A were observed in 32 and hemizygous or heterozygous genotypes of EDA, EDAR or EDARADD in 22 probands. An EDARADD variant were in seven probands present together with variants in EDAR or WNT10A, suggesting combined phenotypic effects of alleles in distinct genes. PMID:23991204

  7. Complete direct sequencing of the entire AR gene in 45 unrelated patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome: Mutations identified in 32 patients (18 novel mutations), no mutation detected in 13 other patients (29%)

    SciTech Connect

    Mebarki, F.; Forest, M.G.; Josso, N. [Hospital Debrousse, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The androgen insensivity syndrome (AIS) is a recessive X-linked disorder resulting from a deficient function of the androgen receptor (AR). The human AR gene has 3 functional domains: N-terminal encoded by exon 1, DNA-binding domain encoded by exons 2 and 3, and androgen-binding domain encoded by exons 4 to 8. In order to characterize the molecular defects of the AR gene in AIS, the entire coding regions and the intronic bording sequences of the AR gene were amplified by PCR before automatic direct sequencing in 45 patients. Twenty seven different point mutations were found in 32 unrelated AIS patients: 18 with a complete form (CAIS), 14 with a partial form (PAIS); 18 of these mutations are novel mutations, not published to date. Only 3 mutations were repeatedly found: R804H in 3 families; M780I in 3 families and R774C in 2 families. For 26 patients out of the 32 found to have a mutation, maternal DNA was collected and sequenced: 6 de novo mutations were detected (i.e. 23% of the cases). Finally, no mutation was detected in 13 patients (29%): 7 with CAIS and 6 familial severe PAIS. The latter all presented with perineal hypospadias, micropenis, 4 out of 6 being raised as girl. Diagnosis of AIS in these 13 families in whom no mutation was detected is supported by the following criteria: clinical data, familial history (2 or 3 index cases in the same family), familial segregation of the polymorphic CAG repeat of the AR gene. Mutations in intronic regions or the promoter of the AR gene could not explain all cases of AIS without mutations in the AR coding regions, because AR binding (performed in 9 out of 13) was normal in 6, suggesting the synthesis of an AR protein. This situation led us to speculate that another X-linked factor associated with the AR could be implicated in some cases of AIS.

  8. Combined exome and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations in ARMC4 as a cause of primary ciliary dyskinesia with defects in the outer dynein arm

    PubMed Central

    Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia; Munye, Mustafa M; James, Chela T; Schmidts, Miriam; Patel, Mitali; Rosser, Elisabeth M; Bacchelli, Chiara; Beales, Philip L; Scambler, Peter J; Hart, Stephen L; Danke-Roelse, Jeannette E; Sloper, John J; Hull, Sarah; Hogg, Claire; Emes, Richard D; Pals, Gerard; Moore, Anthony T; Chung, Eddie M K; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2014-01-01

    Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, genetically heterogeneous ciliopathy disorder affecting cilia and sperm motility. A range of ultrastructural defects of the axoneme underlie the disease, which is characterised by chronic respiratory symptoms and obstructive lung disease, infertility and body axis laterality defects. We applied a next-generation sequencing approach to identify the gene responsible for this phenotype in two consanguineous families. Methods and results Data from whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family, and whole-genome sequencing in the obligate carrier parents of a consanguineous Pakistani family was combined to identify homozygous loss-of-function mutations in ARMC4, segregating in all five affected individuals from both families. Both families carried nonsense mutations within the highly conserved armadillo repeat region of ARMC4: c.2675C>A; pSer892* and c.1972G>T; p.Glu658*. A deficiency of ARMC4 protein was seen in patient's respiratory cilia accompanied by loss of the distal outer dynein arm motors responsible for generating ciliary beating, giving rise to cilia immotility. ARMC4 gene expression is upregulated during ciliogenesis, and we found a predicted interaction with the outer dynein arm protein DNAI2, mutations in which also cause PCD. Conclusions We report the first use of whole-genome sequencing to identify gene mutations causing PCD. Loss-of-function mutations in ARMC4 cause PCD with situs inversus and cilia immotility, associated with a loss of the distal outer (but not inner) dynein arms. This addition of ARMC4 to the list of genes associated with ciliary outer dynein arm defects expands our understanding of the complexities of PCD genetics. PMID:24203976

  9. Factor X M402T: a homozygous missense mutation identified as the cause of cross-reacting material-reduced deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chikasawa, Yushi; Shinozawa, Keiko; Amano, Kagehiro; Ogata, Kyoichi; Hagiwara, Takeshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Inaba, Hiroshi; Fukutake, Katsuyuki

    2014-10-01

    We investigated a mildly hemorrhagic patient with factor X (FX) deficiency to identify the nature of his defect by comprehensive analyses. A 42-year-old Japanese man was admitted to our hospital for uncontrolled gingival hemorrhage. His FX activity based on prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and FX antigen were <1, 6.5 and 11 %, respectively. A homozygous M402T missense mutation (c.1205 t>c; p.Met402Thr) was identified in the FX gene (F10) from both the patient and his brother. The mutation was not detected in the F10 of 82 unrelated normal Japanese individuals. We studied the functional consequences of this mutation by expressing mutant FX-M402T protein in HEK293 cells. This analysis revealed that the antigen of the FX-M402T mutants was approximately 26 % that of the wild-type FX in conditioned media. The FX-specific activity of FX-M402T mutants measured by a one-stage clotting assay based upon PT and aPTT, and a chromogenic assay using Russell's viper venom in the concentrated media was 7.7, 31.7, and 41.2 % of wild type, respectively. The results suggest that the mutation FX-M402T may cause a secretion defect and a molecular abnormality in FX. PMID:25064371

  10. Next-generation sequencing to dissect hereditary nephrotic syndrome in mice identifies a hypomorphic mutation in Lamb2 and models Pierson’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Katherine R; Mason, Thomas; Rimmer, Andrew J; Crockford, Tanya L; Silver, Karlee L; Bouriez-Jones, Tiphaine; Hough, Tertius A; Chaudhry, Shirine; Roberts, Ian SD; Goodnow, Christopher C; Cornall, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The study of mutations causing the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in children has greatly advanced our understanding of the kidney filtration barrier. In particular, these genetic variants have illuminated the roles of the podocyte, glomerular basement membrane and endothelial cell in glomerular filtration. However, in a significant number of familial and early onset cases, an underlying mutation cannot be identified, indicating that there are likely to be multiple unknown genes with roles in glomerular permeability. We now show how the combination of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing could be used to identify the range of mutations affecting these pathways. Using this approach, we isolated a novel mouse strain with a viable nephrotic phenotype and used whole-genome sequencing to isolate a causative hypomorphic mutation in Lamb2. This discovery generated a model for one part of the spectrum of human Pierson’s syndrome and provides a powerful proof of principle for accelerating gene discovery and improving our understanding of inherited forms of renal disease. Copyright © 2013 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd PMID:24293254

  11. The Sac1 domain of SYNJ1 identified mutated in a family with early-onset progressive parkinsonism with generalized seizures

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Catharine E.; Karkheiran, Siamak; Powell, James C.; Cao, Mian; Makarov, Vladimir; Darvish, Hossein; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Walker, Ruth H.; Shahidi, Gholam Ali; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; De Camilli, Pietro; Yue, Zhenyu; Paisán-Ruiz, Coro

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the genetic causes underlying early-onset parkinsonism (EOP) in a consanguineous Iranian family. To attain this, homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing were performed. As a result, a homozygous mutation (c.773G>A; p.Arg258Gln) lying within the NH2-terminal Sac1-like inositol phosphatase domain of polyphosphoinositide phosphatase synaptojanin 1 (SYNJ1), which has been implicated in the regulation of endocytic traffic at synapses, was identified as the disease-segregating mutation. This mutation impaired the phosphatase activity SYNJ1 against its Sac1 domain substrates in vitro. We concluded that the SYNJ1 mutation identified here is responsible for the EOP phenotype seen in our patients probably due to deficiencies in its phosphatase activity and consequent impairment of its synaptic functions. Our finding not only opens new avenues of investigation in the synaptic dysfunction mechanisms associated with parkinsonism, but also suggests phosphoinositide metabolism as a novel therapeutic target for parkinsonism. PMID:23804563

  12. Genomic strategy identifies a missense mutation in WD-repeat domain 65 (WDR65) in an individual with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rorick, Nicholas K; Kinoshita, Akira; Weirather, Jason L; Peyrard-Janvid, Myriam; de Lima, Renata L L Ferreira; Dunnwald, Martine; Shanske, Alan L; Moretti-Ferreira, Danilo; Koillinen, Hannele; Kere, Juha; Mansilla, Maria A; Murray, Jeffrey C; Goudy, Steve L; Schutte, Brian C

    2011-06-01

    Genetic variation in the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) causes and contributes risk for oral clefting disorders. We hypothesized that genes regulated by IRF6 are also involved in oral clefting disorders. We used five criteria to identify potential IRF6 target genes; differential gene expression in skin taken from wild-type and Irf6-deficient murine embryos, localization to the Van der Woude syndrome 2 (VWS2) locus at 1p36-1p32, overlapping expression with Irf6, presence of a conserved predicted-binding site in the promoter region, and a mutant murine phenotype that was similar to the Irf6 mutant mouse. Previously, we observed altered expression for 573 genes; 13 were located in the murine region syntenic to the VWS2 locus. Two of these genes, Wdr65 and Stratifin, met 4 of 5 criteria. Wdr65 was a novel gene that encoded a predicted protein of 1,250 amino acids with two WD domains. As potential targets for Irf6 regulation, we hypothesized that disease-causing mutations will be found in WDR65 and Stratifin in individuals with VWS or VWS-like syndromes. We identified a potentially etiologic missense mutation in WDR65 in a person with VWS who does not have an exonic mutation in IRF6. The expression and mutation data were consistent with the hypothesis that WDR65 was a novel gene involved in oral clefting. PMID:21574244

  13. Exon capture analysis of G protein-coupled receptors identifies activating mutations in GRM3 in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, Todd D; Wei, Xiaomu; Cardenas-Navia, Isabel; Teer, Jamie K; Lin, Jimmy C; Walia, Vijay; Gartner, Jared; Jiang, Jiji; Cherukuri, Praveen F; Molinolo, Alfredo; Davies, Michael A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Rosenberg, Steven A; Margulies, Elliott H; Samuels, Yardena

    2012-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), the largest human gene family, are important regulators of signaling pathways. However, knowledge of their genetic alterations is limited. In this study, we used exon capture and massively parallel sequencing methods to analyze the mutational status of 734 GPCRs in melanoma. This investigation revealed that one family member, GRM3, was frequently mutated and that one of its mutations clustered within one position. Biochemical analysis of GRM3 alterations revealed that mutant GRM3 selectively regulated the phosphorylation of MEK, leading to increased anchorage-independent growth and migration. Melanoma cells expressing mutant GRM3 had reduced cell growth and cellular migration after short hairpin RNA–mediated knockdown of GRM3 or treatment with a selective MEK inhibitor, AZD-6244, which is currently being used in phase 2 clinical trials. Our study yields the most comprehensive map of genetic alterations in the GPCR gene family. PMID:21946352

  14. Glycosylation of the OCTN2 carnitine transporter: study of natural mutations identified in patients with primary carnitine deficiency.

    PubMed

    Filippo, Cristina Amat di San; Ardon, Orly; Longo, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    Primary carnitine deficiency is caused by impaired activity of the Na(+)-dependent OCTN2 carnitine/organic cation transporter. Carnitine is essential for entry of long-chain fatty acids into mitochondria and its deficiency impairs fatty acid oxidation. Most missense mutations identified in patients with primary carnitine deficiency affect putative transmembrane or intracellular domains of the transporter. Exceptions are the substitutions P46S and R83L located in an extracellular loop close to putative glycosylation sites (N57, N64, and N91) of OCTN2. P46S and R83L impaired glycosylation and maturation of OCTN2 transporters to the plasma membrane. We tested whether glycosylation was essential for the maturation of OCTN2 transporters to the plasma membrane. Substitution of each of the three asparagine (N) glycosylation sites with glutamine (Q) decreased carnitine transport. Substitution of two sites at a time caused a further decline in carnitine transport that was fully abolished when all three glycosylation sites were substituted by glutamine (N57Q/N64Q/N91Q). Kinetic analysis of carnitine and sodium-stimulated carnitine transport indicated that all substitutions decreased the Vmax for carnitine transport, but N64Q/N91Q also significantly increased the Km toward carnitine, indicating that these two substitutions affected regions of the transporter important for substrate recognition. Western blot analysis confirmed increased mobility of OCTN2 transporters with progressive substitutions of asparagines 57, 64 and/or 91 with glutamine. Confocal microscopy indicated that glutamine substitutions caused progressive retention of OCTN2 transporters in the cytoplasm, up to full retention (such as that observed with R83L) when all three glycosylation sites were substituted. Tunicamycin prevented OCTN2 glycosylation, but it did not impair maturation to the plasma membrane. These results indicate that OCTN2 is physiologically glycosylated and that the P46S and R83L substitutions impair this process. Glycosylation does not affect maturation of OCTN2 transporters to the plasma membrane, but the 3 asparagines that are normally glycosylated are located in a region important for substrate recognition and turnover rate. PMID:21126579

  15. Sloan-Kettering study finds testing for mutations identified in squamous cell lung cancer tumors helps personalize treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Screening lung cancer tumor samples for cancer-causing, or “driver,” genetic mutations can help physicians tailor patients’ treatments to target those specific mutations... Now, researchers from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have begun testing for three new genetic targets and found that together they occur in approximately 50 percent of patients with squamous cell carcinomas of the lung, which affects 40,000 Americans each year. Initial findings of the research will be presented on June 4 at the 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting.

  16. Whole-exome sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations in USH2A in Spanish patients with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Vidal, Cristina; González-del Pozo, María; Vela-Boza, Alicia; Santoyo-López, Javier; López-Domingo, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Marouschek, Carmen; Dopazo, Joaquin; Borrego, Salud

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is an inherited retinal dystrophy characterized by extreme genetic and clinical heterogeneity. Thus, the diagnosis is not always easily performed due to phenotypic and genetic overlap. Current clinical practices have focused on the systematic evaluation of a set of known genes for each phenotype, but this approach may fail in patients with inaccurate diagnosis or infrequent genetic cause. In the present study, we investigated the genetic cause of autosomal recessive RP (arRP) in a Spanish family in which the causal mutation has not yet been identified with primer extension technology and resequencing. Methods We designed a whole-exome sequencing (WES)-based approach using NimbleGen SeqCap EZ Exome V3 sample preparation kit and the SOLiD 5500×l next-generation sequencing platform. We sequenced the exomes of both unaffected parents and two affected siblings. Exome analysis resulted in the identification of 43,204 variants in the index patient. All variants passing filter criteria were validated with Sanger sequencing to confirm familial segregation and absence in the control population. In silico prediction tools were used to determine mutational impact on protein function and the structure of the identified variants. Results Novel Usher syndrome type 2A (USH2A) compound heterozygous mutations, c.4325T>C (p.F1442S) and c.15188T>G (p.L5063R), located in exons 20 and 70, respectively, were identified as probable causative mutations for RP in this family. Family segregation of the variants showed the presence of both mutations in all affected members and in two siblings who were apparently asymptomatic at the time of family ascertainment. Clinical reassessment confirmed the diagnosis of RP in these patients. Conclusions Using WES, we identified two heterozygous novel mutations in USH2A as the most likely disease-causing variants in a Spanish family diagnosed with arRP in which the cause of the disease had not yet been identified with commonly used techniques. Our data reinforce the clinical role of WES in the molecular diagnosis of highly heterogeneous genetic diseases where conventional genetic approaches have previously failed in achieving a proper diagnosis. PMID:24227914

  17. Newly identified mutations at the CSN1S1 gene in Ethiopian goats affect casein content and coagulation properties of their milk.

    PubMed

    Mestawet, T A; Girma, A; Adnøy, T; Devold, T G; Vegarud, G E

    2013-08-01

    Very high casein content and good coagulation properties previously observed in some Ethiopian goat breeds led to investigating the ?s1-casein (CSN1S1) gene in these breeds. Selected regions of the CSN1S1 gene were sequenced in 115 goats from 5 breeds (2 indigenous: Arsi-Bale and Somali, 1 exotic: Boer, and 2 crossbreeds: Boer × Arsi-Bale and Boer × Somali). The DNA analysis resulted in 35 new mutations: 3 in exons, 3 in the 5' untranslated region (UTR), and 29 in the introns. The mutations in exons that resulted in an amino acid shift were then picked to evaluate their influence on individual casein content (?s1-, ?s2-, ?-, and ?-CN), micellar size, and coagulation properties in the milk from the 5 goat breeds. A mutation at nucleotide 10657 (exon 10) involved a transversion: CAG?CCG, resulting in an amino acid exchange Gln77?Pro77. This mutation was associated with the indigenous breeds only. Two new mutations, at nucleotide 6072 (exon 4) and 12165 (exon 12), revealed synonymous transitions: GTC?GTT in Val15 and AGA?AGG in Arg100 of the mature protein. Transitions G?A and C?T at nucleotides 1374 and 1866, respectively, occurred in the 5' UTR, whereas the third mutation involved a transversion T?G at nucleotide location 1592. The goats were grouped into homozygote new (CC), homozygote reference (AA), and heterozygote (CA) based on the nucleotide that involved the transversion. The content of ?s1-CN (15.32g/kg) in milk samples of goats homozygous (CC) for this newly identified mutation, Gln77?Pro77 was significantly higher than in milks of heterozygous (CA; 9.05g/kg) and reference (AA; 7.61g/kg) genotype animals. The ?s2-, ?-, and ?-CN contents showed a similar pattern. Milk from goats with a homozygous new mutation had significantly lower micellar size. Milk from both homozygote and heterozygote new-mutation goats had significantly shorter coagulation rate and stronger gel than the reference genotype. Except the transversion, the sequence corresponded to allele A and presumably derived from it. Therefore, this allele is denoted by A3. All goats from the reference genotype (AA) were homozygous for the allele at nucleotide position 1374 and 1866, whereas all mutations in the 5' UTR existed in a heterozygous form in both heterozygous (CA) and the new mutation (CC) genotype. The newly identified mutation (CC) detected in some of the goat breeds is, therefore, important in selection for genetic improvement and high-quality milk for the emerging goat cheese-producing industries. The finding will also benefit farmers raising these goat breeds due to the increased selling price of goats. Further studies should investigate the effect of this amino acid exchange on the secondary and tertiary structure of the ?s1-CN molecule and on the susceptibility of peptide hydrolysis by digestive enzymes. PMID:23706484

  18. TCGA researchers identify potential drug targets, markers for leukemia risk; New study reveals relatively few mutations in AML genomes

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators for The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have detailed and broadly classified the genomic alterations that frequently underlie the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a deadly cancer of the blood and bone marrow. Their work paints a picture of a cancer marked by relatively few mutations compared to other types of cancer occurring in adults.

  19. A newly identified missense mutation in RET codon 666 is associated with the development of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Masanori; Hanamura, Toru; Ito, Ken-ichi; Uchino, Shinya; Sakurai, Akihiro; Komatsu, Mitsuhisa

    2014-11-28

    A 38-year-old woman with a thyroid nodule measuring approximately 2 cm was suspected to have medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) because of markedly elevated serum calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen levels. There were no signs of pheochromocytoma, whereas primary hyperparathyroidism was suspected based on the findings of inappropriate hypersecretion of parathyroid hormone although no parathyroid tumor was detected with imaging studies. RET mutation analysis revealed a novel germline missense mutation in codon 666, c.1997A>G (p.K666R). She underwent total thyroidectomy with lymphadenectomy and simultaneous total parathyroidectomy with autotransplantation of parathyroid tissue. She was given calcium lactate and alfacalcidol to prevent postoperative hypocalcemia. Pathological findings of the thyroid tumor were compatible with MTC, but the resected parathyroid glands were intact. To our knowledge, c.1997A>G (p.K666R) is a new RET mutation. This is a minor variant, but it is significant because of the possible pathogenicity in tumor formation. It is often difficult to determine whether MTC is generated as part of MEN2-related disease or familial MTC when it is a unique manifestation. In addition, it is still unclear whether all missense mutations in this codon reported previously will lead to the same clinical course and prognosis. Further careful observations of clinical presentation are required to determine the clinical features associated with this variant. PMID:25319874

  20. Copyright 1999 by the Genetics Society of America Suppressors of the Arabidopsis lsd5 Cell Death Mutation Identify Genes

    E-print Network

    Dangl, Jeff

    Copyright © 1999 by the Genetics Society of America Suppressors of the Arabidopsis lsd5 Cell Death hypersensitive reaction (HR). Arabidopsis lsd mutants that spontaneously exhibit cell death reminiscent of the HR disease resistance, one of these mutants, lsd5, was used to isolate new mutations that suppress its cell

  1. Clinical Features: Mutations of the MEF2C gene [OMIM # 600662] have been identified in patients with severe mental retardation,

    E-print Network

    Gilad, Yoav

    , 88386 x2 Turn-around time: 3-4 weeks Prenatal testing for a known mutation by sequence analysis Sample CPT codes: 83891, 83898 x4, 83894, 83912 Turn-around time: 1-2 weeks Prenatal testing for a known and are typically de-novo. Germline mosaicism has not been reported but remains a possibility. Test methods: We

  2. Exome sequencing identifies a DNAJB6 mutation in a family with dominantly-inherited limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    E-print Network

    Straight, Aaron

    -girdle muscular dystrophy Julien Couthouis a,1 , Alya R. Raphael a,1 , Carly Siskind b,1 , Andrew R. Findlay c,2 2014 Abstract Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy primarily affects the muscles of the hips and shoulders-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1D. Additional family members were Sanger sequenced and the mutation in DNAJB6

  3. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:20363167

  4. Genomic Profiling Identifies Novel Mutations and SNPs in ABCD1 Gene: A Molecular, Biochemical and Clinical Analysis of X-ALD Cases in India

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neeraj Kumar; Krishna Kant Taneja; Veena Kalra; Madhuri Behari; Satinder Aneja; Surendra Kumar Bansal; Mark R. Cookson

    2011-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encode the peroxisomal membrane protein. We conducted a genomic and protein expression study of susceptibility gene with its clinical and biochemical analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first preliminary comprehensive study in Indian population that identified

  5. Exome Sequencing and Systems Biology Converge to Identify Novel Mutations in the L-Type Calcium Channel, CACNA1C, Linked to Autosomal Dominant Long QT Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Boczek, Nicole J.; Best, Jabe M.; Tester, David J.; Giudicessi, John R.; Middha, Sumit; Evans, Jared M.; Kamp, Timothy J.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is the most common cardiac channelopathy with 15 elucidated LQTS-susceptibility genes. Approximately 20% of LQTS cases remain genetically elusive. Methods and Results We combined whole exome sequencing (WES) and bioinformatic/systems biology to identify the pathogenic substrate responsible for non-syndromic, genotype-negative, autosomal dominant LQTS in a multigenerational pedigree and established the spectrum and prevalence of variants in the elucidated gene among a cohort of 102 unrelated patients with “genotype-negative/phenotype-positive” LQTS. WES was utilized on three members within a genotype-negative/phenotype-positive family. Genomic triangulation combined with bioinformatic tools and ranking algorithms led to the identification of a CACNA1C mutation. This mutation, Pro857Arg-CACNA1C, co-segregated with the disease within the pedigree, was ranked by three disease-network algorithms as the most probable LQTS-susceptibility gene, and involves a conserved residue localizing to the PEST domain in the II–III linker. Functional studies reveal that Pro857Arg-CACNA1C leads to a gain-of-function with increased ICa,L and increased surface membrane expression of the channel compared to wildtype. Subsequent mutational analysis identified 3 additional variants within CACNA1C in our cohort of 102 unrelated cases of genotype-negative/phenotype-positive LQTS. Two of these variants also involve conserved residues within Cav1.2’s PEST domain. Conclusions This study provides evidence that coupling WES and bioinformatic/systems biology is an effective strategy for the identification of potential disease causing genes/mutations. The identification of a functional CACNA1C mutation co-segregating with disease in a single pedigree suggests that CACNA1C perturbations may underlie autosomal dominant LQTS in the absence of Timothy syndrome. PMID:23677916

  6. Diagnostic exome sequencing identifies two novel IQSEC2 mutations associated with X-linked intellectual disability with seizures: implications for genetic counseling and clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gandomi, Stephanie K; Farwell Gonzalez, K D; Parra, M; Shahmirzadi, L; Mancuso, J; Pichurin, P; Temme, R; Dugan, S; Zeng, W; Tang, Sha

    2014-06-01

    Intellectual disability is a heterogeneous disorder with a wide phenotypic spectrum. Over 1,700 OMIM genes have been associated with this condition, many of which reside on the X-chromosome. The IQSEC2 gene is located on chromosome Xp11.22 and is known to play a significant role in the maintenance and homeostasis of the brain. Mutations in IQSEC2 have been historically associated with nonsyndromic X-linked intellectual disability. Case reports of affected probands show phenotypic overlap with conditions associated with pathogenic MECP2, FOXG1, CDKL5, and MEF2C gene mutations. Affected individuals, however, have also been identified as presenting with additional clinical features including seizures, autistic-behavior, psychiatric problems, and delayed language skills. To our knowledge, only 5 deleterious mutations and 2 intragenic duplications have been previously reported in IQSEC2. Here we report two novel IQSEC2 de novo truncating mutations identified through diagnostic exome sequencing in two severely affected unrelated male probands manifesting developmental delay, seizures, hypotonia, plagiocephaly, and abnormal MRI findings. Overall, diagnostic exome sequencing established a molecular diagnosis for two patients in whom traditional testing methods were uninformative while expanding on the mutational and phenotypic spectrum. In addition, our data suggests that IQSEC2 may be more common than previously appreciated, accounting for approximately 9 % (2/22) of positive findings among patients with seizures referred for diagnostic exome sequencing. Further, these data supports recently published data suggesting that IQSEC2 plays a more significant role in the development of X-linked intellectual disability with seizures than previously anticipated. PMID:24306141

  7. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI identifies tumors with ALKF1174L mutation in genetically-engineered murine models of high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Yann; Glass, Laura; Hallsworth, Albert; George, Rani; Koh, Dow-Mu; Pearson, Andrew D J; Chesler, Louis; Robinson, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    The early identification of children presenting ALK(F1174L)-mutated neuroblastoma, which are associated with resistance to the promising ALK inhibitor crizotinib and a marked poorer prognosis, has become a clinical priority. In comparing the radiology of the novel Th-ALK(F1174L)/Th-MYCN and the well-established Th-MYCN genetically-engineered murine models of neuroblastoma using MRI, we have identified a marked ALK(F1174L)-driven vascular phenotype. We demonstrate that quantitation of the transverse relaxation rate R2* (s(-1)) using intrinsic susceptibility-MRI under baseline conditions and during hyperoxia, can robustly discriminate this differential vascular phenotype, and identify MYCN-driven tumors harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation with high specificity and selectivity. Intrinsic susceptibility-MRI could thus potentially provide a non-invasive and clinically-exploitable method to help identifying children with MYCN-driven neuroblastoma harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24667968

  8. Reduction in hepatic drug metabolizing CYP3A4 activities caused by P450 oxidoreductase mutations identified in patients with disordered steroid metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E. [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland)] [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland); Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, Department of Clinical Research, University of Bern, Tiefenaustrasse 120c, CH 3004 Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), metabolizes 50% of drugs in clinical use and requires NADPH-P450 reductase (POR). {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. {yields} We are reporting that mutations in POR may reduce CYP3A4 activity. {yields} POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X lost 99%, while A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% CYP3A4 activity. {yields} Reduction of CYP3A4 activity may cause increased risk of drug toxicities/adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major P450 present in human liver metabolizes approximately half the drugs in clinical use and requires electrons supplied from NADPH through NADPH-P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. In this study we examined the effect of mutations in POR on CYP3A4 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified CYP3A4 to perform kinetic studies. We are reporting that mutations in POR identified in patients with disordered steroidogenesis/Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) may reduce CYP3A4 activity, potentially affecting drug metabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had more than 99% loss of CYP3A4 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% activity. Loss of CYP3A4 activity may result in increased risk of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations.

  9. New Point Mutations in Surface and Core Genes of Hepatitis B Virus Associated with Acute on Chronic Liver Failure Identified by Complete Genomic Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Guohua; Zheng, Min; Cao, Qingyi; Chen, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify new viral biomarkers associated with acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) by complete genomic sequencing of HBV. Hepatitis B virus mutations associated with ACLF were screened by Illumina high-throughput sequencing in twelve ACLF cases and twelve age-matched mild chronic hepatitis B patients, which were validated in 438 chronic hepatitis B patients (80 asymptomatic carriers, 152 mild chronic hepatitis B patients, 102 severe chronic hepatitis B patients and 104 ACLF patients) by direct sequencing. The results of Illumina sequencing showed that the mutations at 7 sites (T216C, G285A, A1846T, G1896A, C1913A/G, A2159G, and A2189C) of 12 ACLF patients were significantly higher than those of 12 controls. In the validation cohorts, a significantly higher ratio of genotype B to C was found in patients with ACLF than in patients with non-ACLF. Multivariate analysis showed that T216C, G1896A, C1913A/G and A2159G/C were independent risk factors for ACLF. C216 in any combination, A/G1913 in any combination, and G/C2159 in any combination had high specificity for ACLF. In summary, T216C and A2159G/C mutations were novel factors independently associated with ACLF. Combined mutations in hepatitis B cases could play important roles in ACLF development. PMID:25849554

  10. In Southern Africa, Brown Oculocutaneous Albinism (BOCA) Maps to the OCA2 Locus on Chromosome 15q: P-Gene Mutations Identified

    PubMed Central

    Manga, Prashiela; Kromberg, Jennifer G. R.; Turner, Angela; Jenkins, Trefor; Ramsay, Michele

    2001-01-01

    In southern Africa, brown oculocutaneous albinism (BOCA) is a distinct pigmentation phenotype. In at least two cases, it has occurred in the same families as tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2), suggesting that it may be allelic, despite the fact that this phenotype was attributed to mutations in the TYRP1 gene in an American individual of mixed ancestry. Linkage analysis in five families mapped the BOCA locus to the same region as the OCA2 locus (maximum LOD 3.07; ?=0 using a six-marker haplotype). Mutation analysis of the human homologue of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene (P), in 10 unrelated individuals with BOCA revealed that 9 had one copy of the 2.7-kb deletion. No other mutations were identified. Additional haplotype studies, based on closely linked markers (telomere to centromere: D15S1048, D15S1019, D15S1533, P-gene 2.7-kb deletion, D15S219, and D15S156) revealed several BOCA-associated P haplotypes. These could be divided into two core haplotypes, suggesting that a limited number of P-gene mutations give rise to this phenotype. PMID:11179026

  11. In Southern Africa, brown oculocutaneous albinism (BOCA) maps to the OCA2 locus on chromosome 15q: P-gene mutations identified.

    PubMed

    Manga, P; Kromberg, J; Turner, A; Jenkins, T; Ramsay, M

    2001-03-01

    In southern Africa, brown oculocutaneous albinism (BOCA) is a distinct pigmentation phenotype. In at least two cases, it has occurred in the same families as tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2), suggesting that it may be allelic, despite the fact that this phenotype was attributed to mutations in the TYRP1 gene in an American individual of mixed ancestry. Linkage analysis in five families mapped the BOCA locus to the same region as the OCA2 locus (maximum LOD 3.07; theta=0 using a six-marker haplotype). Mutation analysis of the human homologue of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene (P), in 10 unrelated individuals with BOCA revealed that 9 had one copy of the 2.7-kb deletion. No other mutations were identified. Additional haplotype studies, based on closely linked markers (telomere to centromere: D15S1048, D15S1019, D15S1533, P-gene 2.7-kb deletion, D15S219, and D15S156) revealed several BOCA-associated P haplotypes. These could be divided into two core haplotypes, suggesting that a limited number of P-gene mutations give rise to this phenotype. PMID:11179026

  12. A comprehensive screen for TWIST mutations in patients with craniosynostosis identifies a new microdeletion syndrome of chromosome band 7p21.1.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D; Horsley, S W; Moloney, D M; Oldridge, M; Twigg, S R; Walsh, S; Barrow, M; Njølstad, P R; Kunz, J; Ashworth, G J; Wall, S A; Kearney, L; Wilkie, A O

    1998-01-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the TWIST gene (encoding a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor) have been identified in some cases of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Haploinsufficiency appears to be the pathogenic mechanism involved. To investigate the possibility that complete deletions of the TWIST gene also contribute to this disorder, we have developed a comprehensive strategy to screen for coding-region mutations and for complete gene deletions. Heterozygous TWIST mutations were identified in 8 of 10 patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and in 2 of 43 craniosynostosis patients with no clear diagnosis. In addition to six coding-region mutations, our strategy revealed four complete TWIST deletions, only one of which associated with a translocation was suspected on the basis of conventional cytogenetic analysis. This case and two interstitial deletions were detectable by analysis of polymorphic microsatellite loci, including a novel (CA)n locus 7.9 kb away from TWIST, combined with FISH; these deletions ranged in size from 3.5 Mb to >11.6 Mb. The remaining, much smaller deletion was detected by Southern blot analysis and removed 2,924 bp, with a 2-bp orphan sequence at the breakpoint. Significant learning difficulties were present in the three patients with megabase-sized deletions, which suggests that haploinsufficiency of genes neighboring TWIST contributes to developmental delay. Our results identify a new microdeletion disorder that maps to chromosome band 7p21.1 and that causes a significant proportion of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. PMID:9792856

  13. A comprehensive screen for TWIST mutations in patients with craniosynostosis identifies a new microdeletion syndrome of chromosome band 7p21.1.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D; Horsley, S W; Moloney, D M; Oldridge, M; Twigg, S R; Walsh, S; Barrow, M; Njølstad, P R; Kunz, J; Ashworth, G J; Wall, S A; Kearney, L; Wilkie, A O

    1998-11-01

    Mutations in the coding region of the TWIST gene (encoding a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor) have been identified in some cases of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. Haploinsufficiency appears to be the pathogenic mechanism involved. To investigate the possibility that complete deletions of the TWIST gene also contribute to this disorder, we have developed a comprehensive strategy to screen for coding-region mutations and for complete gene deletions. Heterozygous TWIST mutations were identified in 8 of 10 patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and in 2 of 43 craniosynostosis patients with no clear diagnosis. In addition to six coding-region mutations, our strategy revealed four complete TWIST deletions, only one of which associated with a translocation was suspected on the basis of conventional cytogenetic analysis. This case and two interstitial deletions were detectable by analysis of polymorphic microsatellite loci, including a novel (CA)n locus 7.9 kb away from TWIST, combined with FISH; these deletions ranged in size from 3.5 Mb to >11.6 Mb. The remaining, much smaller deletion was detected by Southern blot analysis and removed 2,924 bp, with a 2-bp orphan sequence at the breakpoint. Significant learning difficulties were present in the three patients with megabase-sized deletions, which suggests that haploinsufficiency of genes neighboring TWIST contributes to developmental delay. Our results identify a new microdeletion disorder that maps to chromosome band 7p21.1 and that causes a significant proportion of Saethre-Chotzen syndrome. PMID:9792856

  14. DFNA8\\/12 caused by TECTA mutations is the most identified subtype of nonsyndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. S. Hildebrand; M. Morin; N. C. Meyer; F. Mayo; S. Modamio-Hoybjor; A. Mencia; L. Olavarrieta; C. Morales-Angulo; C. J. Nishimura; H. Workman; A. P. DeLuca; I. del Castillo; K. R. Taylor; B. Tompkins; C. W. Goodman; I. Schrauwen; M. V. Wesemael; K. Lachlan; A. E. Shearer; T. A. Braun; P. L. M. Huygen; J. M. J. Kremer; G. van Camp; F. Moreno; T. L. Casavant; R. J. Smith; M. A. Moreno-Pelayo

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of DFNA8\\/DFNA12 (DFNA8\\/12), a type of autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss (ADNSHL), is unknown as comprehensive population-based genetic screening has not been conducted. We therefore completed unbiased screening for TECTA mutations in a Spanish cohort of 372 probands from ADNSHL families. Three additional families (Spanish, Belgian, and English) known to be linked to DFNA8\\/12 were also included in

  15. Genomic Analysis of hESC Pedigrees Identifies De Novo Mutations and Enables Determination of the Timing and Origin of Mutational Events

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Boscolo, Francesca S.; Amir, Hadar; Malcov, Mira; Amit, Ami; Laurent, Louise C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Given the association between mutational load and cancer, the observation that genetic aberrations are frequently found in human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) is of concern. Prior studies in human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have shown that deletions and regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) tend to arise during reprogramming and early culture, whereas duplications more frequently occur during long-term culture. For the corresponding experiments in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), we studied two sets of hESC lines: one including the corresponding parental DNA and the other generated from single blastomeres from four sibling embryos. Here, we show that genetic aberrations observed in hESCs can originate during preimplantation embryo development and/or early derivation. These early aberrations are mainly deletions and LOH, whereas aberrations arising during long-term culture of hESCs are more frequently duplications. Our results highlight the importance of close monitoring of genomic integrity and the development of improved methods for derivation and culture of hPSCs. PMID:24035391

  16. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel PLIN1 frameshift mutation identified in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Bottomley, W; Cho, YH; Gandotra, S; Mimmack, ML; Lim, K; Isaac, I; Patel, Satish; Saudek, V; O’Rahilly, S; Srinivasan, S; Greenfield, JR; Barroso, I; Campbell, LV; Savage, DB

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin-1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in PLIN1 were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and characterization of a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus (439fs) of perilipin-1 in two unrelated families. The mutation co-segregated with a similar phenotype including partial lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, extreme hypertriglyceridaemia and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in both families. Poor metabolic control despite maximal medical therapy prompted two patients to undergo bariatric surgery, with remarkably beneficial consequences. Functional studies indicated that expression levels of the mutant protein were lower than wild type protein and in stably tranfected pre-adipocytes the mutant protein was associated with smaller lipid droplets. Interestingly, unlike the previously reported 398 and 404 frameshift mutants, this variant binds and stabilizes ABHD5 expression, but still fails to inhibit basal lipolysis as effectively as wild type perilipin-1. Collectively, these findings highlight the physiological need for exquisite regulation of neutral lipid storage within adipocyte lipid droplets, as well as the possible metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery in this serious disease. PMID:25114292

  17. Clinical and molecular characterization of a novel PLIN1 frameshift mutation identified in patients with familial partial lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kozusko, Kristina; Tsang, Venessa H M; Bottomley, William; Cho, Yoon-Hi; Gandotra, Sheetal; Mimmack, Michael; Lim, Koini; Isaac, Iona; Patel, Satish; Saudek, Vladimir; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Srinivasan, Shubha; Greenfield, Jerry R; Barroso, Ines; Campbell, Lesley V; Savage, David B

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 1 is a lipid droplet coat protein predominantly expressed in adipocytes, where it inhibits basal and facilitates stimulated lipolysis. Loss-of-function mutations in the PLIN1 gene were recently reported in patients with a novel subtype of familial partial lipodystrophy, designated as FPLD4. We now report the identification and characterization of a novel heterozygous frameshift mutation affecting the carboxy-terminus (439fs) of perilipin 1 in two unrelated families. The mutation cosegregated with a similar phenotype including partial lipodystrophy, severe insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, extreme hypertriglyceridemia, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in both families. Poor metabolic control despite maximal medical therapy prompted two patients to undergo bariatric surgery, with remarkably beneficial consequences. Functional studies indicated that expression levels of the mutant protein were lower than wild-type protein, and in stably transfected preadipocytes the mutant protein was associated with smaller lipid droplets. Interestingly, unlike the previously reported 398 and 404 frameshift mutants, this variant binds and stabilizes ABHD5 expression but still fails to inhibit basal lipolysis as effectively as wild-type perilipin 1. Collectively, these findings highlight the physiological need for exquisite regulation of neutral lipid storage within adipocyte lipid droplets, as well as the possible metabolic benefits of bariatric surgery in this serious disease. PMID:25114292

  18. Genomic analysis of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas identifies three molecular subgroups and recurrent activating ACVR1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Buczkowicz, Pawel; Hoeman, Christine; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Pajovic, Sanja; Letourneau, Louis; Dzamba, Misko; Morrison, Andrew; Lewis, Peter; Bouffet, Eric; Bartels, Ute; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Agnihotri, Sameer; Ryall, Scott; Barszczyk, Mark; Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Bourgey, Mathieu; Bourque, Guillaume; Montpetit, Alexandre; Cordero, Francisco; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mangerel, Joshua; Tabori, Uri; Ho, King Ching; Huang, Annie; Taylor, Kathryn R.; Mackay, Alan; Bendel, Anne E; Nazarian, Javad; Fangusaro, Jason R; Karajannis, Matthias A.; Zagzag, David; Foreman, Nicholas K.; Donson, Andrew; Hegert, Julia V.; Smith, Amy; Chan, Jennifer; Lafay-Cousin, Lucy; Dunn, Sandra; Hukin, Juliette; Dunham, Chris; Scheinemann, Katrin; Michaud, Jean; Zelcer, Shayna; Ramsay, David; Cain, Jason; Brennan, Cameron; Souweidane, Mark M.; Jones, Chris; Allis, C. David; Brudno, Michael; Becher, Oren; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a fatal brain cancer that arises in the brainstem of children with no effective treatment and near 100% fatality. The failure of most therapies can be attributed to the delicate location of these tumors and choosing therapies based on assumptions that DIPGs are molecularly similar to adult disease. Recent studies have unraveled the unique genetic make-up of this brain cancer with nearly 80% harboring a K27M-H3.3 or K27M-H3.1 mutation. However, DIPGs are still thought of as one disease with limited understanding of the genetic drivers of these tumors. To understand what drives DIPGs we integrated whole-genome-sequencing with methylation, expression and copy-number profiling, discovering that DIPGs are three molecularly distinct subgroups (H3-K27M, Silent, MYCN) and uncovering a novel recurrent activating mutation in the activin receptor ACVR1, in 20% of DIPGs. Mutations in ACVR1 were constitutively activating, leading to SMAD phosphorylation and increased expression of downstream activin signaling targets ID1 and ID2. Our results highlight distinct molecular subgroups and novel therapeutic targets for this incurable pediatric cancer. PMID:24705254

  19. Whole-exome sequencing, without prior linkage, identifies a mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to identifying the defective gene in a family with an inherited disease is to find the disease locus through family studies. However, the rapid development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing facilitates a more direct approach. Here, we report the identification of a frameshift mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Whole-exome sequencing of three affected family members and subsequent filtering of shared variants, without prior genetic linkage, sufficed to identify the pathogenic variant. Simultaneous analysis of multiple family members confirms segregation, enhancing the power to filter the genetic variation found and leading to rapid identification of the pathogenic variant. LAMB3 encodes a subunit of Laminin-5, one of a family of basement membrane proteins with essential functions in cell growth, movement and adhesion. Homozygous LAMB3 mutations cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and enamel defects are seen in JEB cases. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of dominant AI due to a LAMB3 mutation in the absence of JEB. PMID:23632796

  20. Whole-exome sequencing, without prior linkage, identifies a mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Poulter, James A; El-Sayed, Walid; Shore, Roger C; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-01-01

    The conventional approach to identifying the defective gene in a family with an inherited disease is to find the disease locus through family studies. However, the rapid development and decreasing cost of next generation sequencing facilitates a more direct approach. Here, we report the identification of a frameshift mutation in LAMB3 as a cause of dominant hypoplastic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Whole-exome sequencing of three affected family members and subsequent filtering of shared variants, without prior genetic linkage, sufficed to identify the pathogenic variant. Simultaneous analysis of multiple family members confirms segregation, enhancing the power to filter the genetic variation found and leading to rapid identification of the pathogenic variant. LAMB3 encodes a subunit of Laminin-5, one of a family of basement membrane proteins with essential functions in cell growth, movement and adhesion. Homozygous LAMB3 mutations cause junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) and enamel defects are seen in JEB cases. However, to our knowledge, this is the first report of dominant AI due to a LAMB3 mutation in the absence of JEB. PMID:23632796

  1. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO15A gene in autosomal recessive hearing loss identified by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inherited genetic defects play an important role in congenital hearing loss, contributing to about 60% of deafness occurring in infants. Hereditary nonsyndromic hearing loss is highly heterogeneous, and most patients with a presumed genetic etiology lack a specific molecular diagnosis. Methods By whole exome sequencing, we identified responsible gene of family 4794 with autosomal recessively nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). We also used DNA from 56 Chinese familial patients with ARNSHL (autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss) and 108 ethnicity-matched negative samples to perform extended variants analysis. Results We identified MYO15A c.IVS25?+?3G?>?A and c.8375 T?>?C (p.V2792A) as the disease-causing mutations. Both mutations co-segregated with hearing loss in family 4794, but were absent in the 56 index patients and 108 ethnicity-matched controls. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the hearing loss of family 4794 was caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO15A. PMID:24206587

  2. In silico characterization of a novel pathogenic deletion mutation identified in XPA gene in a Pakistani family with severe xeroderma pigmentosum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP) is a rare skin disorder characterized by skin hypersensitivity to sunlight and abnormal pigmentation. The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic cause of a severe XP phenotype in a consanguineous Pakistani family and in silico characterization of any identified disease-associated mutation. Results The XP complementation group was assigned by genotyping of family for known XP loci. Genotyping data mapped the family to complementation group A locus, involving XPA gene. Mutation analysis of the candidate XP gene by DNA sequencing revealed a novel deletion mutation (c.654del A) in exon 5 of XPA gene. The c.654del A, causes frameshift, which pre-maturely terminates protein and result into a truncated product of 222 amino acid (aa) residues instead of 273 (p.Lys218AsnfsX5). In silico tools were applied to study the likelihood of changes in structural motifs and thus interaction of mutated protein with binding partners. In silico analysis of mutant protein sequence, predicted to affect the aa residue which attains coiled coil structure. The coiled coil structure has an important role in key cellular interactions, especially with DNA damage-binding protein 2 (DDB2), which has important role in DDB-mediated nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. Conclusions Our findings support the fact of genetic and clinical heterogeneity in XP. The study also predicts the critical role of DDB2 binding region of XPA protein in NER pathway and opens an avenue for further research to study the functional role of the mutated protein domain. PMID:24063568

  3. Multiplex genetic cancer testing identifies pathogenic mutations in TP53 and CDH1 in a patient with bilateral breast and endometrial adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Germline genetic testing for familial cancer syndromes is usually performed serially for the most likely genetic causes. In recent years the way genetic testing carried out has changed, as next generation sequencing now allows the simultaneous testing of multiple susceptibility genes at low costs. Case presentation Here, we present a female with bilateral breast cancer and endometrial adenocarcinoma. After simultaneous sequencing of 150 genes (890 kb) associated with hereditary cancer we identified pathogenic mutations in two high-penetrance genes, i.e. TP53 and CDH1 that would most likely not have been elucidated by serial screening of candidate genes. Conclusion As the two mutated genes are located on different chromosomes and cause different cancer syndromes these findings had a tremendous impact not only on genetic counseling of the index patient and her family but also on subsequent surveillance strategies. PMID:24373500

  4. Whole-genome DNA/RNA sequencing identifies truncating mutations in RBCK1 in a novel Mendelian disease with neuromuscular and cardiac involvement

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whole-exome sequencing has identified the causes of several Mendelian diseases by analyzing multiple unrelated cases, but it is more challenging to resolve the cause of extremely rare and suspected Mendelian diseases from individual families. We identified a family quartet with two children, both affected with a previously unreported disease, characterized by progressive muscular weakness and cardiomyopathy, with normal intelligence. During the course of the study, we identified one additional unrelated patient with a comparable phenotype. Methods We performed whole-genome sequencing (Complete Genomics platform), whole-exome sequencing (Agilent SureSelect exon capture and Illumina Genome Analyzer II platform), SNP genotyping (Illumina HumanHap550 SNP array) and Sanger sequencing on blood samples, as well as RNA-Seq (Illumina HiSeq platform) on transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. Results From whole-genome sequence data, we identified RBCK1, a gene encoding an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, as the most likely candidate gene, with two protein-truncating mutations in probands in the first family. However, exome data failed to nominate RBCK1 as a candidate gene, due to poor regional coverage. Sanger sequencing identified a private homozygous splice variant in RBCK1 in the proband in the second family, yet SNP genotyping revealed a 1.2Mb copy-neutral region of homozygosity covering RBCK1. RNA-Seq confirmed aberrant splicing of RBCK1 transcripts, resulting in truncated protein products. Conclusions While the exact mechanism by which these mutations cause disease is unknown, our study represents an example of how the combined use of whole-genome DNA and RNA sequencing can identify a disease-predisposing gene for a novel and extremely rare Mendelian disease. PMID:23889995

  5. Researchers identify dozens of new de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/cumc-rid100312.php[10/9/2012 1:11:24 PM

    E-print Network

    of schizophrenia. The mutations were found in the part of the genome that codes for proteins, known as the exome to schizophrenia. This is the first study of this scale to search for single nucleotide variations in the exomesResearchers identify dozens of new de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia http

  6. [Subchromosomal microdeletion identified by molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) in Rett syndrome girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations].

    PubMed

    Vorsanova, S G; Iurov, I Iu; Voinova, V Iu; Kurinnaia, O S; Zelenova, M A; Demidova, I A; Ulas, E V; Iurov, Iu B

    2013-01-01

    Molecular karyotyping using DNA microarrays (array CGH) was applied for identification of subchromosomal microdeletions in a cohort of 12 girls with clinical features of RETT syndrome, but negative for MECP2 gene mutations. Recurrent microdeletions of MECP2 gene in chromosome X (locus Xq28) were identified in 5 girls of 12 studied. Probably RTT girls with subchromosomic microdeletions in Xq28 could represent a special subtype of the disease, which appears as clinically milder than the classic form of disease. In one case, an atypical form of RTT was associated with genomic abnormalities affecting CDKL5 gene and region critical for microdeletion Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes (15q11.2). In addition, data are presented for the first time that genetic variation in regions 3p13, 3q27.1, and 1q21.1-1q21.2 could associate with RTT-like clinical manifestations. Without application of molecular karyotyping technology and bioinformatic method of assessing the pathogenic significance of genomic rearrangements these RTT-like girls negative for MECP2 gene mutations were considered as cases of idiopathic mental retardation associated with autism. It should be noted that absence of intragenic mutations in MECP2 gene is not sufficient criteria to reject the clinical diagnosis of RTT. To avoid errors in the genetic diagnosis of this genetically heterogeneous brain disease molecular cytogenetic studies using high resolution oligonucleotide array CGH (molecular karyotyping) are needed. PMID:24300809

  7. Modelling and mutational evidence identify the substrate binding site and functional elements in APC amino acid transporters.

    PubMed

    Vangelatos, Ioannis; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Sophianopoulou, Vicky; Diallinas, George

    2009-08-01

    The Amino acid-Polyamine-Organocation (APC) superfamily is the main family of amino acid transporters found in all domains of life and one of the largest families of secondary transporters. Here, using a sensitive homology threading approach and modelling we show that the predicted structure of APC members is extremely similar to the crystal structures of several prokaryotic transporters belonging to evolutionary distinct protein families with different substrate specificities. All of these proteins, despite having no primary amino acid sequence similarity, share a similar structural core, consisting of two V-shaped domains of five transmembrane domains each, intertwined in an antiparallel topology. Based on this model, we reviewed available data on functional mutations in bacterial, fungal and mammalian APCs and obtained novel mutational data, which provide compelling evidence that the amino acid binding pocket is located in the vicinity of the unwound part of two broken helices, in a nearly identical position to the structures of similar transporters. Our analysis is fully supported by the evolutionary conservation and specific amino acid substitutions in the proposed substrate binding domains. Furthermore, it allows predictions concerning residues that might be crucial in determining the specificity profile of APC members. Finally, we show that two cytoplasmic loops constitute important functional elements in APCs. Our work along with different kinetic and specificity profiles of APC members in easily manipulated bacterial and fungal model systems could form a unique framework for combining genetic, in-silico and structural studies, for understanding the function of one of the most important transporter families. PMID:19670073

  8. Whole-Exome Sequencing Identifies Homozygous AFG3L2 Mutations in a Spastic Ataxia-Neuropathy Syndrome Linked to Mitochondrial m-AAA Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Paola; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Teer, Jamie K.; Hansen, Nancy F.; Cruz, Pedro; Mullikin for the NISC Comparative Sequencing Program, James C.; Blakesley, Robert W.; Golas, Gretchen; Kwan, Justin; Sandler, Anthony; Fuentes Fajardo, Karin; Markello, Thomas; Tifft, Cynthia; Blackstone, Craig; Rugarli, Elena I.; Langer, Thomas; Gahl, William A.; Toro, Camilo

    2011-01-01

    We report an early onset spastic ataxia-neuropathy syndrome in two brothers of a consanguineous family characterized clinically by lower extremity spasticity, peripheral neuropathy, ptosis, oculomotor apraxia, dystonia, cerebellar atrophy, and progressive myoclonic epilepsy. Whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.1847G>A; p.Y616C) in AFG3L2, encoding a subunit of an m-AAA protease. m-AAA proteases reside in the mitochondrial inner membrane and are responsible for removal of damaged or misfolded proteins and proteolytic activation of essential mitochondrial proteins. AFG3L2 forms either a homo-oligomeric isoenzyme or a hetero-oligomeric complex with paraplegin, a homologous protein mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia type 7 (SPG7). Heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in AFG3L2 cause autosomal-dominant spinocerebellar ataxia type 28 (SCA28), a disorder whose phenotype is strikingly different from that of our patients. As defined in yeast complementation assays, the AFG3L2Y616C gene product is a hypomorphic variant that exhibited oligomerization defects in yeast as well as in patient fibroblasts. Specifically, the formation of AFG3L2Y616C complexes was impaired, both with itself and to a greater extent with paraplegin. This produced an early-onset clinical syndrome that combines the severe phenotypes of SPG7 and SCA28, in additional to other “mitochondrial” features such as oculomotor apraxia, extrapyramidal dysfunction, and myoclonic epilepsy. These findings expand the phenotype associated with AFG3L2 mutations and suggest that AFG3L2-related disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of spastic ataxias. PMID:22022284

  9. Association of the widespread A149P hereditary fructose intolerance mutation with newly identified sequence polymorphisms in the aldolase B gene

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, C.C.; Tolan, D.R. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is a potentially fatal autosomal recessive disease resulting from the catalytic deficiency of fructose 1-phosphate aldolase (aldolase B) in fructose-metabolizing tissues. The A149P mutation in exon 5 of the aldolase B gene, located on chromosome 9q2l.3-q22.2, is widespread and the most common HFI mutation, accounting for 57% of HFI chromosomes. The possible origin of this mutation was studied by linkage to polymorphisms within the aldolase B gene. DNA fragments of the aldolase B gene containing the polymorphic marker loci from HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele were amplified by PCR. Absolute linkage to a common Pvull RFLP allele was observed in 10 A149P homozygotes. In a more informative study, highly heterozygous polymorphisms were detected by direct sequence determination of a PCR-amplified aldolase B gene fragment. Two two-allele, single-base-pair polymorphisms, themselves in absolute linkage disequilibrium, in intron 8 (C at nucleotide 84 and A at nucleotide 105, or T at 84 and G at 105) of the aldolase B gene were identified. Mendelian segregation of these polymorphisms was confirmed in three families. Allele-specific oligonucleotide (ASO) hybridizations with probes for both sequence polymorphisms showed that 47% of 32 unrelated individuals were heterozygous at these loci; the calculated PIC value was .37. Finally, ASO hybridizations of PCR-amplified DNA from 15 HFI patients homozygous for the A149P allele with probes for these sequence polymorphisms revealed absolute linkage disequilibrium between the A149P mutation and the 84T/105G allele. These results are consistent with a single origin of the A149P allele and subsequent spread by genetic drift. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identifies a Mutation in the Thiamine Transporter 2 (SLC19A3) Gene Associated with Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Vernau, Karen M.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Brown, Emily A.; Cameron, Jessie M.; Huson, Heather J.; Higgins, Robert J.; Ackerley, Cameron; Sturges, Beverly K.; Dickinson, Peter J.; Puschner, Birgit; Giulivi, Cecilia; Shelton, G. Diane; Robinson, Brian H.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Bollen, Andrew W.; Bannasch, Danika L.

    2013-01-01

    Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy (AHE) has been previously proposed as a mitochondrial encephalopathy based on neuropathological similarities with human Leigh Syndrome (LS). We studied 11 Alaskan Husky dogs with AHE, but found no abnormalities in respiratory chain enzyme activities in muscle and liver, or mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear genes that cause LS in people. A genome wide association study was performed using eight of the affected dogs and 20 related but unaffected control AHs using the Illumina canine HD array. SLC19A3 was identified as a positional candidate gene. This gene controls the uptake of thiamine in the CNS via expression of the thiamine transporter protein THTR2. Dogs have two copies of this gene located within the candidate interval (SLC19A3.2 – 43.36–43.38 Mb and SLC19A3.1 – 43.411–43.419 Mb) on chromosome 25. Expression analysis in a normal dog revealed that one of the paralogs, SLC19A3.1, was expressed in the brain and spinal cord while the other was not. Subsequent exon sequencing of SLC19A3.1 revealed a 4bp insertion and SNP in the second exon that is predicted to result in a functional protein truncation of 279 amino acids (c.624 insTTGC, c.625 C>A). All dogs with AHE were homozygous for this mutation, 15/41 healthy AH control dogs were heterozygous carriers while 26/41 normal healthy AH dogs were wild type. Furthermore, this mutation was not detected in another 187 dogs of different breeds. These results suggest that this mutation in SLC19A3.1, encoding a thiamine transporter protein, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of AHE. PMID:23469184

  11. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5?/?), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5?/?) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  12. A specific screen for oligosaccharyltransferase mutations identifies the 9 kDa OST5 protein required for optimal activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, G; te Heesen, S; Gilmore, R; Zufferey, R; Aebi, M

    1997-01-01

    The central reaction in the process of N-linked protein glycosylation in eukaryotic cells, the transfer of the oligosaccharide Glc(3)Man(9)GlcNAc(2) from the lipid dolicholpyrophosphate to selected asparagine residues, is catalyzed by the oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase). This enzyme consists of multiple subunits; however, purification of the complex has revealed different results with respect to its protein composition. To determine how many different loci are required for OTase activity in vivo, we performed a novel, specific screen for mutants with altered OTase activity. Based on the synthetic lethal phenotype of OTase mutants in combination with a deficiency of dolicholphosphoglucose biosynthesis which results in non-glucosylated lipid-linked oligosaccharide, we identified seven complementation groups with decreased OTase activity. Beside the known OTase loci, STT3, OST1, WBP1, OST3, SWP1 and OST2, a novel locus, OST5, was identified. OST5 is an intron-containing gene encoding a putative membrane protein of 9.5 kDa present in highly purified OTase preparations. OST5 protein is not essential for growth but its depletion results in a reduced OTase activity. Suppression of an ost1 mutation by overexpression of OST5 indicates that this small membrane protein directly interacts with other OTase components, most likely with Ost1p. A strong genetic interaction with a stt3 mutation implies a role in complex assembly. PMID:9135133

  13. Potential RNA Binding Proteins in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Identified as Suppressors of Temperature-Sensitive Mutations in Npl3

    PubMed Central

    Henry, M.; Borland, C. Z.; Bossie, M.; Silver, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    The NPL3 gene of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with similarity to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Npl3p has been implicated in many nuclear-related events including RNA export, protein import, and rRNA processing. Several temperature-sensitive alleles of NPL3 have been isolated. We now report the sequence of these alleles. For one allele, npl3-1, four complementation groups of suppressors have been isolated. The cognate genes for the two recessive mutants were cloned. One of these is the previously known RNA15, which, like NPL3, also encodes a protein with similarity to the vertebrate hnRNP A/B protein family. The other suppressor corresponds to a newly defined gene we term HRP1, which also encodes a protein with similarity to the hnRNP A/B proteins of vertebrates. Mutations in HRP1 suppress all npl3 temperature-sensitive alleles but do not bypass an npl3 null allele. We show that HRP1 is essential for cell growth and that the corresponding protein is located in the nucleus. The discovery of two hnRNP homologues that can partially suppress the function of Np13p, also an RNA binding protein, will be discussed in terms of the possible roles for Npl3p in RNA metabolism. PMID:8770588

  14. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] Stefan://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  15. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] . Uniform://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  16. Mutational Analysis of Phytochrome B Identifies a Small COOH-Terminal- Domain Region Critical for Regulatory Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Doris Wagner; Peter H. Quail

    1995-01-01

    Overexpression of phytochrome B (phyB) in transgenic Arabidopsis results in enhanced deetiolation in red light. To define domains of phyB functionally important for its regulatory activity, we performed chemical mutagenesis of a phyB-overexpressing line and screened for phenotypic revertants in red light. Four phyB-transgene-linked revertants that retain parental levels of full-length, dimeric, and spectrally normal overexpressed phyB were identified among

  17. Molecular response assessment by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction after induction therapy in NPM1-mutated patients identifies those at high risk of relapse

    PubMed Central

    Hubmann, Max; Köhnke, Thomas; Hoster, Eva; Schneider, Stephanie; Dufour, Annika; Zellmeier, Evelyn; Fiegl, Michael; Braess, Jan; Bohlander, Stefan K.; Subklewe, Marion; Sauerland, Maria-Cristina; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Büchner, Thomas; Wörmann, Bernhard; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Spiekermann, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring minimal residual disease is an important way to identify patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. In this study we investigated the prognostic potential of minimal residual disease monitoring by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of NPM1 mutations in patients treated in the AMLCG 1999, 2004 and 2008 trials. Minimal residual disease was monitored - in aplasia, after induction therapy, after consolidation therapy, and during follow-up - in 588 samples from 158 patients positive for NPM1 mutations A, B and D (with a sensitivity of 10?6). One hundred and twenty-seven patients (80.4%) achieved complete remission after induction therapy and, of these, 56 patients (44.1%) relapsed. At each checkpoint, minimal residual disease cut-offs were calculated. After induction therapy a cut-off NPM1 mutation ratio of 0.01 was associated with a high hazard ratio of 4.26 and the highest sensitivity of 76% for the prediction of relapse. This was reflected in a cumulative incidence of relapse after 2 years of 77.8% for patients with ratios above the cut-off versus 26.4% for those with ratios below the cut-off. In the favorable subgroup according to European LeukemiaNet, the cut-off after induction therapy also separated the cohort into two prognostic groups with a cumulative incidence of relapse of 76% versus 6% after 2 years. Our data demonstrate that in addition to pre-therapeutic factors, the course of minimal residual disease in an individual is an important prognostic factor and could be included in clinical trials for the guidance of post-remission therapy. The trials from which data were obtained were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (#NCT01382147, #NCT00266136) and at the European Leukemia Trial Registry (#LN_AMLINT2004_230). PMID:24816240

  18. Oral and Craniofacial Manifestations and Two Novel Missense Mutations of the NTRK1 Gene Identified in the Patient with Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yudi; Liu, Xin; Yu, Ping; Xue, Yang; Ma, Shufang; Wei, Kewen; Jin, Yan; Wen, Lingying; Xuan, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare inherited disorder of the peripheral nervous system resulting from mutations in neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor 1 gene (NTRK1), which encodes the high-affinity nerve growth factor receptor TRKA. Here, we investigated the oral and craniofacial manifestations of a Chinese patient affected by autosomal-recessive CIPA and identified compound heterozygosity in the NTRK1 gene. The affected boy has multisystemic disorder with lack of reaction to pain stimuli accompanied by self-mutilation behavior, the inability to sweat leading to defective thermoregulation, and mental retardation. Oral and craniofacial manifestations included a large number of missing teeth, nasal malformation, submucous cleft palate, severe soft tissue injuries, dental caries and malocclusion. Histopathological evaluation of the skin sample revealed severe peripheral nerve fiber loss as well as mild loss and absent innervation of sweat glands. Ultrastructural and morphometric studies of a shed tooth revealed dental abnormalities, including hypomineralization, dentin hypoplasia, cementogenesis defects and a dysplastic periodontal ligament. Genetic analysis revealed a compound heterozygosity- c.1561T>C and c.2057G>A in the NTRK1 gene. This report extends the spectrum of NTRK1 mutations observed in patients diagnosed with CIPA and provides additional insight for clinical and molecular diagnosis. PMID:23799134

  19. A screen for dominant modifiers of ro(Dom), a mutation that disrupts morphogenetic furrow progression in Drosophila, identifies groucho and hairless as regulators of atonal expression.

    PubMed Central

    Chanut, F; Luk, A; Heberlein, U

    2000-01-01

    ro(Dom) is a dominant allele of rough (ro) that results in reduced eye size due to premature arrest in morphogenetic furrow (MF) progression. We found that the ro(Dom) stop-furrow phenotype was sensitive to the dosage of genes known to affect retinal differentiation, in particular members of the hedgehog (hh) signaling cascade. We demonstrate that ro(Dom) interferes with Hh's ability to induce the retina-specific proneural gene atonal (ato) in the MF and that normal eye size can be restored by providing excess Ato protein. We used ro(Dom) as a sensitive genetic background in which to identify mutations that affect hh signal transduction or regulation of ato expression. In addition to mutations in several unknown loci, we recovered multiple alleles of groucho (gro) and Hairless (H). Analysis of their phenotypes in somatic clones suggests that both normally act to restrict neuronal cell fate in the retina, although they control different aspects of ato's complex expression pattern. PMID:11063695

  20. Positional cloning and next-generation sequencing identified a TGM6 mutation in a large Chinese pedigree with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li-Li; Huang, Yuan-mao; Wang, Min; Zhuang, Xiao-e; Luo, Dong-feng; Guo, Shi-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-shun; Huang, Qing; Lin, Sheng-long; Wang, Shao-yuan

    2015-02-01

    An inherited predisposition to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is exceedingly rare, but the investigation of these families will aid in the delineation of the underlying mechanisms of the more common, sporadic cases. Three AML predisposition genes, RUNX1, CEBPA and GATA2, have been recognised, but the culprit genes in the majority of AML pedigrees remain obscure. We applied a combined strategy of linkage analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in an autosomal-dominant AML Chinese family with 11 cases in four generations. A genome-wide linkage scan using a 500K SNP genotyping array was conducted to identify a previously unreported candidate region on 20p13 with a maximum multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score of 3.56 (P=0.00005). Targeted NGS within this region and whole-exome sequencing (WES) revealed a missense mutation in TGM6 (RefSeq, NM_198994.2:c.1550T>G, p.(L517W)), which cosegregated with the phenotype in this family, and was absent in 530 healthy controls. The mutated amino acid was located in a highly conserved position, which may be deleterious and affect the activation of TGM6. Our results strongly support the candidacy of TGM6 as a novel familial AML-associated gene. PMID:24755948

  1. Genome-wide association study in BRCA1 mutation carriers identifies novel loci associated with breast and ovarian cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Couch, Fergus J; Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V O; Neuhausen, Susan L; Szabo, Csilla I; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H; Karlan, Beth Y; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L; Godwin, Andrew K; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Caligo, Maria A; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S; Southey, Melissa C; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Arun, Banu K; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B; van Leeuwen, Flora E; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E J; Gille, Johannes J P; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Blok, Marinus J; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; Rookus, Matti A; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A M; Wijnen, Juul T; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J; Side, Lucy E; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Z?owocka-Per?owska, El?bieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H F; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Blank, Stephanie V; Cohn, David E; Rodriguez, Gustavo C; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L; Loud, Jennifer T; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V; Buys, Saundra S; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B; Sokolenko, Anna P; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M; Agnarsson, Bjarni A; Lu, Karen H; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; James, Paul A; Hall, Per; Dunning, Alison M; Tessier, Daniel; Cunningham, Julie; Slager, Susan L; Wang, Chen; Hart, Steven

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P = 2.7 × 10(-8), HR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.09-1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P = 1.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.27, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P = 3.4 × 10(-8), HR = 1.20, 95% CI: 1.17-1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P = 2×10(-4)). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%-50% compared to 81%-100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers Identifies Novel Loci Associated with Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xianshu; McGuffog, Lesley; Lee, Andrew; Olswold, Curtis; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.; Soucy, Penny; Fredericksen, Zachary; Barrowdale, Daniel; Dennis, Joe; Gaudet, Mia M.; Dicks, Ed; Kosel, Matthew; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Lee, Adam; Bacot, François; Vincent, Daniel; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Peock, Susan; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Jakubowska, Anna; Investigators, kConFab; Radice, Paolo; Schmutzler, Rita Katharina; Domchek, Susan M.; Piedmonte, Marion; Singer, Christian F.; Friedman, Eitan; Thomassen, Mads; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Szabo, Csilla I.; Blanco, Ignacio; Greene, Mark H.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Garber, Judy; Phelan, Catherine M.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Montagna, Marco; Olah, Edith; Andrulis, Irene L.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Goldgar, David E.; Caldes, Trinidad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Osorio, Ana; Terry, Mary Beth; Daly, Mary B.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Hamann, Ute; Ramus, Susan J.; Ewart Toland, Amanda; Caligo, Maria A.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tung, Nadine; Claes, Kathleen; Beattie, Mary S.; Southey, Melissa C.; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Tischkowitz, Marc; Janavicius, Ramunas; John, Esther M.; Kwong, Ava; Diez, Orland; Balmaña, Judith; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Arun, Banu K.; Rennert, Gad; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Ganz, Patricia A.; Campbell, Ian; van der Hout, Annemarie H.; van Deurzen, Carolien H. M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Gómez Garcia, Encarna B.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne E. J.; Gille, Johannes J. P.; Ausems, Margreet G. E. M.; Blok, Marinus J.; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Devilee, Peter; Verhoef, Senno; van Os, Theo A. M.; Wijnen, Juul T.; Frost, Debra; Ellis, Steve; Fineberg, Elena; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Izatt, Louise; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Adlard, Julian; Eccles, Diana M.; Cook, Jackie; Brewer, Carole; Douglas, Fiona; Hodgson, Shirley; Morrison, Patrick J.; Side, Lucy E.; Donaldson, Alan; Houghton, Catherine; Rogers, Mark T.; Dorkins, Huw; Eason, Jacqueline; Gregory, Helen; McCann, Emma; Murray, Alex; Calender, Alain; Hardouin, Agnès; Berthet, Pascaline; Delnatte, Capucine; Nogues, Catherine; Lasset, Christine; Houdayer, Claude; Leroux, Dominique; Rouleau, Etienne; Prieur, Fabienne; Damiola, Francesca; Sobol, Hagay; Coupier, Isabelle; Venat-Bouvet, Laurence; Castera, Laurent; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Léoné, Mélanie; Pujol, Pascal; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Z?owocka-Per?owska, El?bieta; Gronwald, Jacek; Lubinski, Jan; Durda, Katarzyna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Viel, Alessandra; Peissel, Bernard; Bonanni, Bernardo; Melloni, Giulia; Ottini, Laura; Papi, Laura; Varesco, Liliana; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Peterlongo, Paolo; Volorio, Sara; Manoukian, Siranoush; Pensotti, Valeria; Arnold, Norbert; Engel, Christoph; Deissler, Helmut; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Gehrig, Andrea; Kast, Karin; Rhiem, Kerstin; Meindl, Alfons; Niederacher, Dieter; Ditsch, Nina; Plendl, Hansjoerg; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Engert, Stefanie; Sutter, Christian; Varon-Mateeva, Raymonda; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Weber, Bernhard H. F.; Arver, Brita; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Loman, Niklas; Rosenquist, Richard; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.; Blank, Stephanie V.; Cohn, David E.; Rodriguez, Gustavo C.; Small, Laurie; Friedlander, Michael; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Fink-Retter, Anneliese; Rappaport, Christine; Gschwantler-Kaulich, Daphne; Pfeiler, Georg; Tea, Muy-Kheng; Lindor, Noralane M.; Kaufman, Bella; Shimon Paluch, Shani; Laitman, Yael; Skytte, Anne-Bine; Gerdes, Anne-Marie; Pedersen, Inge Sokilde; Moeller, Sanne Traasdahl; Kruse, Torben A.; Jensen, Uffe Birk; Vijai, Joseph; Sarrel, Kara; Robson, Mark; Kauff, Noah; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Ejlertsen, Bent; Nielsen, Finn C.; Jønson, Lars; Andersen, Mette K.; Ding, Yuan Chun; Steele, Linda; Foretova, Lenka; Teulé, Alex; Lazaro, Conxi; Brunet, Joan; Pujana, Miquel Angel; Mai, Phuong L.; Loud, Jennifer T.; Walsh, Christine; Lester, Jenny; Orsulic, Sandra; Narod, Steven A.; Herzog, Josef; Sand, Sharon R.; Tognazzo, Silvia; Agata, Simona; Vaszko, Tibor; Weaver, Joellen; Stavropoulou, Alexandra V.; Buys, Saundra S.; Romero, Atocha; de la Hoya, Miguel; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Muranen, Taru A.; Duran, Mercedes; Chung, Wendy K.; Lasa, Adriana; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Miron, Alexander; Benitez, Javier; Senter, Leigha; Huo, Dezheng; Chan, Salina B.; Sokolenko, Anna P.; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Tihomirova, Laima; Friebel, Tara M.; Agnarsson, Bjarni A.

    2013-01-01

    BRCA1-associated breast and ovarian cancer risks can be modified by common genetic variants. To identify further cancer risk-modifying loci, we performed a multi-stage GWAS of 11,705 BRCA1 carriers (of whom 5,920 were diagnosed with breast and 1,839 were diagnosed with ovarian cancer), with a further replication in an additional sample of 2,646 BRCA1 carriers. We identified a novel breast cancer risk modifier locus at 1q32 for BRCA1 carriers (rs2290854, P?=?2.7×10?8, HR?=?1.14, 95% CI: 1.09–1.20). In addition, we identified two novel ovarian cancer risk modifier loci: 17q21.31 (rs17631303, P?=?1.4×10?8, HR?=?1.27, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38) and 4q32.3 (rs4691139, P?=?3.4×10?8, HR?=?1.20, 95% CI: 1.17–1.38). The 4q32.3 locus was not associated with ovarian cancer risk in the general population or BRCA2 carriers, suggesting a BRCA1-specific association. The 17q21.31 locus was also associated with ovarian cancer risk in 8,211 BRCA2 carriers (P?=?2×10?4). These loci may lead to an improved understanding of the etiology of breast and ovarian tumors in BRCA1 carriers. Based on the joint distribution of the known BRCA1 breast cancer risk-modifying loci, we estimated that the breast cancer lifetime risks for the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk are 28%–50% compared to 81%–100% for the 5% at highest risk. Similarly, based on the known ovarian cancer risk-modifying loci, the 5% of BRCA1 carriers at lowest risk have an estimated lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer of 28% or lower, whereas the 5% at highest risk will have a risk of 63% or higher. Such differences in risk may have important implications for risk prediction and clinical management for BRCA1 carriers. PMID:23544013

  3. The tamas gene, identified as a mutation that disrupts larval behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125).

    PubMed

    Iyengar, B; Roote, J; Campos, A R

    1999-12-01

    From a screen of pupal lethal lines of Drosophila melanogaster we identified a mutant strain that displayed a reproducible reduction in the larval response to light. Moreover, this mutant strain showed defects in the development of the adult visual system and failure to undergo behavioral changes characteristic of the wandering stage. The foraging third instar larvae remained in the food substrate for a prolonged period and died at or just before pupariation. Using a new assay for individual larval photobehavior we determined that the lack of response to light in these mutants was due to a primary deficit in locomotion. The mutation responsible for these phenotypes was mapped to the lethal complementation group l(2)34Dc, which we renamed tamas (translated from Sanskrit as "dark inertia"). Sequencing of mutant alleles demonstrated that tamas codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125). PMID:10581287

  4. A RANKL G278R mutation causing osteopetrosis identifies a functional amino acid essential for trimer assembly in RANKL and TNF.

    PubMed

    Douni, Eleni; Rinotas, Vagelis; Makrinou, Eleni; Zwerina, Jochen; Penninger, Josef M; Eliopoulos, Elias; Schett, Georg; Kollias, George

    2012-02-15

    Receptor activator of nuclear factor-?B ligand (RANKL), a trimeric tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member, is the central mediator of osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Functional mutations in RANKL lead to human autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO), whereas RANKL overexpression has been implicated in the pathogenesis of bone degenerative diseases such as osteoporosis. Following a forward genetics approach using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU)-mediated random mutagenesis, we generated a novel mouse model of ARO caused by a new loss-of-function allele of Rankl with a glycine-to-arginine mutation at codon 278 (G278R) at the extracellular inner hydrophobic F ?-strand of RANKL. Mutant mice develop severe osteopetrosis similar to Rankl-deficient mice, whereas exogenous administration of recombinant RANKL restores osteoclast formation in vivo. We show that RANKL(G278R) monomers fail to assemble into homotrimers, are unable to bind and activate the RANK receptor and interact with wild-type RANKL exerting a dominant-negative effect on its trimerization and function in vitro. Since G278 is highly conserved within the TNF superfamily, we identified that a similar substitution in TNF, G122R, also abrogated trimerization, binding to TNF receptor and consequently impaired TNF biological activity. Notably, SPD304, a potent small-molecule inhibitor of TNF trimerization that interacts with G122, also inhibited RANKL activity, suggesting analogous inhibitory mechanisms. Our results provide a new disease model for ARO and identify a functional amino acid in the TNF-like core domain essential for trimer formation both in RANKL and in TNF that could be considered a novel potential target for inhibiting their biological activities. PMID:22068587

  5. To the Root of the Curl: A Signature of a Recent Selective Sweep Identifies a Mutation That Defines the Cornish Rex Cat Breed

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Alhaddad, Hasan; Affolter, Verena K.; Brockman, Jeffrey; Haggstrom, Jens; Joslin, Shannon E. K.; Koehne, Amanda L.; Mullikin, James C.; Outerbridge, Catherine A.; Warren, Wesley C.; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    The cat (Felis silvestris catus) shows significant variation in pelage, morphological, and behavioral phenotypes amongst its over 40 domesticated breeds. The majority of the breed specific phenotypic presentations originated through artificial selection, especially on desired novel phenotypic characteristics that arose only a few hundred years ago. Variations in coat texture and color of hair often delineate breeds amongst domestic animals. Although the genetic basis of several feline coat colors and hair lengths are characterized, less is known about the genes influencing variation in coat growth and texture, especially rexoid – curly coated types. Cornish Rex is a cat breed defined by a fixed recessive curly coat trait. Genome-wide analyses for selection (di, Tajima’s D and nucleotide diversity) were performed in the Cornish Rex breed and in 11 phenotypically diverse breeds and two random bred populations. Approximately 63K SNPs were used in the analysis that aimed to localize the locus controlling the rexoid hair texture. A region with a strong signature of recent selective sweep was identified in the Cornish Rex breed on chromosome A1, as well as a consensus block of homozygosity that spans approximately 3 Mb. Inspection of the region for candidate genes led to the identification of the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 6 (LPAR6). A 4 bp deletion in exon 5, c.250_253_delTTTG, which induces a premature stop codon in the receptor, was identified via Sanger sequencing. The mutation is fixed in Cornish Rex, absent in all straight haired cats analyzed, and is also segregating in the German Rex breed. LPAR6 encodes a G protein-coupled receptor essential for maintaining the structural integrity of the hair shaft; and has mutations resulting in a wooly hair phenotype in humans. PMID:23826204

  6. A positive genotype–phenotype correlation in a large cohort of patients with Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia and Pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism and 33 newly identified mutations in the GNAS gene

    PubMed Central

    Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Brix, Bettina; Staedt, Pia; Struve, Dagmar; Reiz, Benedikt; Farida, Jennane; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Maternally inherited inactivating GNAS mutations are the most common cause of parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) leading to pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHPIa) due to Gs? deficiency. Paternally inherited inactivating mutations lead to isolated AHO signs characterizing pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). Mutations are distributed throughout the Gs? coding exons of GNAS and there is a lack of genotype–phenotype correlation. In this study, we sequenced exon 1–13 of GNAS in a large cohort of PHPIa- and PPHP patients and identified 58 different mutations in 88 patients and 27 relatives. Thirty-three mutations including 15 missense mutations were newly discovered. Furthermore, we found three hot spots: a known hotspot (p.D190MfsX14), a second at codon 166 (p.R166C), and a third at the exon 5 acceptor splice site (c.435 + 1G>A), found in 15, 5, and 4 unrelated patients, respectively. Comparing the clinical features to the molecular genetic data, a significantly higher occurrence of subcutaneous calcifications in patients harboring truncating versus missense mutations was demonstrated. Thus, in the largest cohort of PHPIa patients described to date, we extend the spectrum of known GNAS mutations and hot spots and demonstrate for the first time a correlation between the genetic defects and the expression of a clinical AHO-feature. PMID:25802881

  7. A positive genotype-phenotype correlation in a large cohort of patients with Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia and Pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism and 33 newly identified mutations in the GNAS gene.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Susanne; Werner, Ralf; Grötzinger, Joachim; Brix, Bettina; Staedt, Pia; Struve, Dagmar; Reiz, Benedikt; Farida, Jennane; Hiort, Olaf

    2015-03-01

    Maternally inherited inactivating GNAS mutations are the most common cause of parathyroid hormone (PTH) resistance and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) leading to pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHPIa) due to Gs? deficiency. Paternally inherited inactivating mutations lead to isolated AHO signs characterizing pseudo-pseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). Mutations are distributed throughout the Gs? coding exons of GNAS and there is a lack of genotype-phenotype correlation. In this study, we sequenced exon 1-13 of GNAS in a large cohort of PHPIa- and PPHP patients and identified 58 different mutations in 88 patients and 27 relatives. Thirty-three mutations including 15 missense mutations were newly discovered. Furthermore, we found three hot spots: a known hotspot (p.D190MfsX14), a second at codon 166 (p.R166C), and a third at the exon 5 acceptor splice site (c.435 + 1G>A), found in 15, 5, and 4 unrelated patients, respectively. Comparing the clinical features to the molecular genetic data, a significantly higher occurrence of subcutaneous calcifications in patients harboring truncating versus missense mutations was demonstrated. Thus, in the largest cohort of PHPIa patients described to date, we extend the spectrum of known GNAS mutations and hot spots and demonstrate for the first time a correlation between the genetic defects and the expression of a clinical AHO-feature. PMID:25802881

  8. Positive Selection Detection in 40,000 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Sequences Automatically Identifies Drug Resistance and Positive Fitness Mutations in HIV Protease and Reverse Transcriptase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lamei Chen; Alla Perlina; Christopher J. Lee

    2004-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of AIDS, due to the very high mutation rate of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and subsequent rapid development of resistance to new drugs. Identification of mutations associated with drug resistance is critical for both individualized treatment selection and new drug design. We have performed an automated mutation analysis of HIV Type

  9. Clinical Features and Molecular Genetics: Mutations in the ARX gene have been identified in patients with X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    Turn-around time: 3-4 weeks Prenatal testing for a known mutation by sequence analysis Sample and MRX may have mutations in the ARX gene [2,3]. Test methods: We offer mutation analysis of all coding sample for this testing. ARX sequencing analysis Sample specifications: 3 to10 cc of blood in a purple

  10. A Genetic Screen for Dominant Modifiers of a cyclin E Hypomorphic Mutation Identifies Novel Regulators of S-Phase Entry in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Brumby, Anthony; Secombe, Julie; Horsfield, Julie; Coombe, Michelle; Amin, Nancy; Coates, Deborah; Saint, Robert; Richardson, Helena

    2004-01-01

    Cyclin E together with its kinase partner Cdk2 is a critical regulator of entry into S phase. To identify novel genes that regulate the G1- to S-phase transition within a whole animal we made use of a hypomorphic cyclin E mutation, DmcycEJP, which results in a rough eye phenotype. We screened the X and third chromosome deficiencies, tested candidate genes, and carried out a genetic screen of 55,000 EMS or X-ray-mutagenized flies for second or third chromosome mutations that dominantly modified the DmcycEJP rough eye phenotype. We have focused on the DmcycEJP suppressors, S(DmcycEJP), to identify novel negative regulators of S-phase entry. There are 18 suppressor gene groups with more than one allele and several genes that are represented by only a single allele. All S(DmcycEJP) tested suppress the DmcycEJP rough eye phenotype by increasing the number of S phases in the postmorphogenetic furrow S-phase band. By testing candidates we have identified several modifier genes from the mutagenic screen as well as from the deficiency screen. DmcycEJP suppressor genes fall into the classes of: (1) chromatin remodeling or transcription factors; (2) signaling pathways; and (3) cytoskeletal, (4) cell adhesion, and (5) cytoarchitectural tumor suppressors. The cytoarchitectural tumor suppressors include scribble, lethal-2-giant-larvae (lgl), and discs-large (dlg), loss of function of which leads to neoplastic tumors and disruption of apical-basal cell polarity. We further explored the genetic interactions of scribble with S(DmcycEJP) genes and show that hypomorphic scribble mutants exhibit genetic interactions with lgl, scab (?PS3-integrin—cell adhesion), phyllopod (signaling), dEB1 (microtubule-binding protein—cytoskeletal), and moira (chromatin remodeling). These interactions of the cytoarchitectural suppressor gene, scribble, with cell adhesion, signaling, cytoskeletal, and chromatin remodeling genes, suggest that these genes may act in a common pathway to negatively regulate cyclin E or S-phase entry. PMID:15454540

  11. Mutational Analysis Identifies Residues Crucial for Homodimerization of Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88 (MyD88) and for Its Function in Immune Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Loiarro, Maria; Volpe, Elisabetta; Ruggiero, Vito; Gallo, Grazia; Furlan, Roberto; Maiorino, Chiara; Battistini, Luca; Sette, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is an adaptor protein that transduces intracellular signaling pathways evoked by the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs). MyD88 is composed of an N-terminal death domain (DD) and a C-terminal Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain, separated by a short region. Upon ligand binding, TLR/IL-1Rs hetero- or homodimerize and recruit MyD88 through their respective TIR domains. Then, MyD88 oligomerizes via its DD and TIR domain and interacts with the interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases (IRAKs) to form the Myddosome complex. We performed site-directed mutagenesis of conserved residues that are located in exposed regions of the MyD88-TIR domain and analyzed the effect of the mutations on MyD88 signaling. Our studies revealed that mutation of Glu183, Ser244, and Arg288 impaired homodimerization of the MyD88-TIR domain, recruitment of IRAKs, and activation of NF-?B. Moreover, overexpression of two green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged MyD88 mini-proteins (GFP-MyD88151–189 and GFP-MyD88168–189), comprising the Glu183 residue, recapitulated these effects. Importantly, expression of these dominant negative MyD88 mini-proteins competed with the function of endogenous MyD88 and interfered with TLR2/4-mediated responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1) and in human primary monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Thus, our studies identify novel residues of the TIR domain that are crucially involved in MyD88 homodimerization and TLR signaling in immune cells. PMID:24019529

  12. In silico reversal of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) identifies the origins of repeat families and uncovers obscured duplicated genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James K Hane; Richard P Oliver

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a fungal genome defence mechanism guarding against transposon invasion. RIP mutates the sequence of repeated DNA and over time renders the affected regions unrecognisable by similarity search tools such as BLAST. RESULTS: DeRIP is a new software tool developed to predict the original sequence of a RIP-mutated region prior to the occurrence of RIP.

  13. IDH1 and IDH2 Gene Mutations Identify Novel Molecular Subsets Within De Novo Cytogenetically Normal Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Cancer and Leukemia Group B Study

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Guido; Maharry, Kati; Wu, Yue-Zhong; Radmacher, Michael D.; Mrózek, Krzysztof; Margeson, Dean; Holland, Kelsi B.; Whitman, Susan P.; Becker, Heiko; Schwind, Sebastian; Metzeler, Klaus H.; Powell, Bayard L.; Carter, Thomas H.; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Wetzler, Meir; Carroll, Andrew J.; Baer, Maria R.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Larson, Richard A.; Bloomfield, Clara D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To analyze the frequency and associations with prognostic markers and outcome of mutations in IDH genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenases in adult de novo cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML). Patients and Methods Diagnostic bone marrow or blood samples from 358 patients were analyzed for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations by DNA polymerase chain reaction amplification/sequencing. FLT3, NPM1, CEBPA, WT1, and MLL mutational analyses and gene- and microRNA-expression profiling were performed centrally. Results IDH mutations were found in 33% of the patients. IDH1 mutations were detected in 49 patients (14%; 47 with R132). IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, were detected in 69 patients (19%; 13 with R172 and 56 with R140). R172 IDH2 mutations were mutually exclusive with all other prognostic mutations analyzed. Younger age (< 60 years), molecular low-risk (NPM1-mutated/FLT3-internal tandem duplication–negative) IDH1-mutated patients had shorter disease-free survival than molecular low-risk IDH1/IDH2-wild-type (wt) patients (P = .046). R172 IDH2-mutated patients had lower complete remission rates than IDH1/IDH2wt patients (P = .007). Distinctive microarray gene- and microRNA-expression profiles accurately predicted R172 IDH2 mutations. The highest expressed gene and microRNAs in R172 IDH2-mutated patients compared with the IDH1/IDH2wt patients were APP (previously associated with complex karyotype AML) and miR-1 and miR-133 (involved in embryonal stem-cell differentiation), respectively. Conclusion IDH1 and IDH2 mutations are recurrent in CN-AML and have an unfavorable impact on outcome. The R172 IDH2 mutations, previously unreported in AML, characterize a novel subset of CN-AML patients lacking other prognostic mutations and associate with unique gene- and microRNA-expression profiles that may lead to the discovery of novel, therapeutically targetable leukemogenic mechanisms. PMID:20368543

  14. Gain-of-function mutations identify amino acids within transmembrane domains of the yeast vacuolar transporter Zrc1 that determine metal specificity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huilan; Burton, Damali; Li, Liangtao; Warner, David E.; Phillips, John D.; Ward, Diane McVEY; Kaplan, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Cation diffusion facilitator transporters are found in all three Kingdoms of life and are involved in transporting transition metals out of the cytosol. The metals they transport include Zn2+, Co2+, Fe2+, Cd2+, Ni2+ and Mn2+; however, no single transporter transports all metals. Previously we showed that a single amino acid mutation in the yeast vacuolar zinc transporter Zrc1 changed its substrate specificity from Zn2+ to Fe2+ and Mn2+ [Lin, Kumanovics, Nelson, Warner, Ward and Kaplan (2008) J. Biol. Chem. 283, 33865–33873]. Mutant Zrc1 that gained iron transport activity could protect cells with a deletion in the vacuolar iron transporter (CCC1) from high iron toxicity. Utilizing suppression of high iron toxicity and PCR mutagenesis of ZRC1, we identified other amino acid substitutions within ZRC1 that changed its metal specificity. All Zrc1 mutants that transported Fe2+ could also transport Mn2+. Some Zrc1 mutants lost the ability to transport Zn2+, but others retained the ability to transport Zn2+. All of the amino acid substitutions that resulted in a gain in Fe2+ transport activity were found in transmembrane domains. In addition to alteration of residues adjacent to the putative metal-binding site in two transmembrane domains, alteration of residues distant from the binding site affected substrate specificity. These results suggest that substrate selection involves co-operativity between transmembrane domains. PMID:19538181

  15. Clinical Features and Molecular Genetics: Mutations in the ARX gene have been identified in patients with X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia

    E-print Network

    Ober, Carole

    /cryptogenic infantile spasms [2], and X-linked mental retardation (MRX) [3]. Preliminary findings and ongoing studies:359-69. 2. Stromme et al." Mutations in the human ortholog of Aristaless cause X-linked mental retardation expressed in the telencephalon, is mutated in X-linked mental retardation". (2002) Hum. Mol. Genet. 11

  16. Clinical Features and Molecular Genetics: Mutations in the ARX gene have been identified in patients with X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia

    E-print Network

    Das, Soma

    /cryptogenic infantile spasms [2], and X-linked mental retardation (MRX) [3]. Preliminary findings and ongoing studies. Stromme et al." Mutations in the human ortholog of Aristaless cause X-linked mental retardation expressed in the telencephalon, is mutated in X-linked mental retardation". (2002) Hum. Mol. Genet. 11

  17. Targeted next-generation sequencing detects point mutations, insertions, deletions and balanced chromosomal rearrangements as well as identifies novel leukemia-specific fusion genes in a single procedure

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V Grossmann; A Kohlmann; H-U Klein; S Schindela; S Schnittger; F Dicker; M Dugas; W Kern; T Haferlach; C Haferlach

    2011-01-01

    DNA sequence enrichment from complex genomic samples using microarrays enables targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS). In this study, we combined 454 shotgun pyrosequencing with long oligonucleotide sequence capture arrays. We demonstrate the detection of mutations including point mutations, deletions and insertions in a cohort of 22 patients presenting with acute leukemias and myeloid neoplasms. Importantly, this one-step methodological procedure also allowed

  18. A novel point mutation at codon 146 of the K- ras gene in a human colorectal cancer identified by the polymerase chain reaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Satoshi Orita; Takatsugu Higashi; Yasuhito Kawasaki; Atsuko Harada; Hisanaga Igarashi; Takushi Monden; Hideki Morimoto; Takashi Shimano; Takesada Mori; Jun Miyoshi

    1991-01-01

    In this report, point mutations of the K-ras gene at codon 146 were analyzed in 25 cases of colon cancer, 4 cases of lung cancer, and 41 cases of lymphoid malignancy. A codon 146 mutation substituting threonine (ACA) for alanine (GCA) was detected in the tumor tissue of a patient with colon cancer and was not detected in the normal

  19. Evolutionary Action Score of TP53 Identifies High-Risk Mutations Associated with Decreased Survival and Increased Distant Metastases in Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Neskey, David M; Osman, Abdullah A; Ow, Thomas J; Katsonis, Panagiotis; McDonald, Thomas; Hicks, Stephanie C; Hsu, Teng-Kuei; Pickering, Curtis R; Ward, Alexandra; Patel, Ameeta; Yordy, John S; Skinner, Heath D; Giri, Uma; Sano, Daisuke; Story, Michael D; Beadle, Beth M; El-Naggar, Adel K; Kies, Merrill S; William, William N; Caulin, Carlos; Frederick, Mitchell; Kimmel, Marek; Myers, Jeffrey N; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    TP53 is the most frequently altered gene in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, with mutations occurring in over two-thirds of cases, but the prognostic significance of these mutations remains elusive. In the current study, we evaluated a novel computational approach termed evolutionary action (EAp53) to stratify patients with tumors harboring TP53 mutations as high or low risk, and validated this system in both in vivo and in vitro models. Patients with high-risk TP53 mutations had the poorest survival outcomes and the shortest time to the development of distant metastases. Tumor cells expressing high-risk TP53 mutations were more invasive and tumorigenic and they exhibited a higher incidence of lung metastases. We also documented an association between the presence of high-risk mutations and decreased expression of TP53 target genes, highlighting key cellular pathways that are likely to be dysregulated by this subset of p53 mutations that confer particularly aggressive tumor behavior. Overall, our work validated EAp53 as a novel computational tool that may be useful in clinical prognosis of tumors harboring p53 mutations. Cancer Res; 75(7); 1527-36. ©2015 AACR. PMID:25634208

  20. Somatic mosaicism for a newly identified splice-site mutation in a patient with adenosine deaminase-deficient immunodeficiency and spontaneous clinical recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Yang, D.R.; Israni, A.; Huie, M.L. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (United States)); Ownby, D.R. (Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Absent or severely reduced adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity produces inherited immunodeficiency of varying severity, with defects of both cellular and humoral immunity. The authors report somatic mosaicism as the basis for a delayed presentation and unusual course of a currently healthy young adult receiving no therapy. He was diagnosed at age 2[1/2] years because of life-threatening pneumonia, recurrent infections, failure of normal growth, and lymphopenia, but he retained significant cellular immune function. A fibroblast cell line and a B cell line, established at diagnosis, lacked ADA activity and were heteroallelic for a splice-donor-site mutation in IVS 1 (+1GT[yields]CT) and a missense mutation (Arg101Gln). All clones (17/17) isolated from the B cell mRNA carried the missense mutation, indicating that the allele with the splice-site mutation produced unstable mRNA. In striking contrast, a B cell line established at age 16 years expressed 50% of normal ADA; 50% had the missense mutation. Genomic DNA contained the missense mutation but not the splice-site mutation. All three cell lines were identical for multiple polymorphic markers and the presence of a Y chromosome. In vivo somatic mosaicism was demonstrated in genomic DNA from peripheral blood cells obtained at 16 years of age, in that less than half the DNA carried the splice-site mutation (P<.0.02, vs. original B cell line). Consistent with mosaicism, erythrocyte content of the toxic metabolite deoxyATP was only minimally elevated. Somatic mosaicism could have arisen either by somatic mutation or by reversion at the site of mutation. Selection in vivo for ADA normal hematopoietic cells may have played a role in the return to normal health, in the absence of therapy. 57 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. The ang3 mutation identified the ribosomal protein gene RPL5B with a role in cell expansion during organ growth.

    PubMed

    Van Minnebruggen, Annemie; Neyt, Pia; De Groeve, Steven; Coussens, Griet; Ponce, María Rosa; Micol, José Luis; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    The role of translation in the regulation of higher plant growth and development is not well understood. Mutational analysis is a powerful tool to identify and study the function of genes related to a biological process, such as growth. Here we analyzed functionally the angusta3 (ang3) narrow leaf mutant. The AG3 gene was cloned by fine mapping combined with candidate gene sequencing and it corresponded to the ribosomal protein gene RPL5B. Based on amino acid sequence homology, promoter DNA sequence homology and in silico gene expression analysis, RPL5B was found to be putatively functionally redundant with RPL5A. The morphological analysis of ang3 mutants showed that the leaf lamina area was significantly reduced from the third rosette leaf on, mainly because of decreased width. Cellular analysis of the abaxial epidermal cell layer of the third leaf indicated that the cell number in the mutant was similar to that of the wild type, but the cell size was significantly reduced. We postulate that the reduced cell expansion in the epidermis contributes to the narrow shape of ang3 leaves. Growth was also significantly impaired in hypocotyls and primary roots, hinting at a general role for RPL5B in organ growth, unrelated to dorsiventral axis formation. Comparison of the transcriptome of the shoot apices of the mutant and the wild type revealed a limited number of differentially expressed genes, such as MYB23 and MYB5, of which the lower expression in the ang3 mutant correlated with reduced trichome density. Our data suggest that translation is an important level of control of growth and development in plants. PMID:19878482

  2. Disease-causing mutations in cis with the common arylsulfatase A pseudodeficiency allele compound the difficulties in accurately identifying patients and carriers of metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rafi, Mohammad A; Coppola, Stephanie; Liu, Shu Ling; Rao, Han Zhi; Wenger, David A

    2003-06-01

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is a lysosomal storage disorder most often caused by mutations in the sulfatide sulfatase or arylsulfatase A (ASA) gene. This results in the storage of sulfatides in the peripheral and central nervous systems as well as in the kidneys. Patients with MLD exhibit a wide range of clinical features presenting from the late infantile period to adulthood. Testing for this disease is performed on a majority of the patient samples received for diagnostic testing in the authors' laboratory. If low ASA activity is measured, additional testing is required to confirm the diagnosis due to several factors. ASA activity is also low in individuals with multiple sulfatase deficiency and in individuals with copies of the so-called pseudodeficiency (Pd) allele. Due to the high frequency of the common Pd allele, it is possible for individuals, both with and without neurologic disease, to have low ASA activity but not have MLD. Unfortunately, the finding of the Pd mutation by molecular analysis does not rule out a diagnosis of MLD. In a recent 25 month period, this laboratory diagnosed 52 patients with MLD, and of these, 13 patients from 10 families had one or two copies of the Pd mutation. Sequencing of the ASA gene in these 10 families revealed four new mutations in cis with the Pd allele (S43R, R84Q, R311X, and E329R) and two additional new mutations (R299W, C488R). Six patients had previously reported mutations on the Pd background. Thus, a total of 14 mutations have been found to occur in cis with the Pd allele. We estimate that 1-2% of Pd alleles will have a disease-causing mutation, and this complicates the identification of patients and the assignment of risk for a couple when a copy of the Pd allele is detected. PMID:12809637

  3. A Novel Mutation in the Von Hippel-Lindau Tumor Suppressor Gene Identified in a Patient Presenting with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Yun Hyi; Ahn, Chang Ho; Jung, Chan-Hyeon; Lee, Jie Eun; Kim, Lee-Kyung; Kwak, Soo Heon; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an autosomal dominantly inherited, multisystemic tumor syndrome caused by mutations in the VHL gene. To date, more than 1,000 germline and somatic mutations of the VHL gene have been reported. We present a novel mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene that presented with gestational diabetes mellitus. Methods A 30-year-old woman presented with gestational diabetes mellitus. She sequentially showed multiple pancreatic cysts, spinal cord hemangioblastoma, cerebellar hemangioblastoma, and clear cell type renal cell carcinomas. Also, her father and brother had brain hemangioblastomas. Each of the three exons of the VHL gene was individually amplified by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing was performed using an ABI 3730 DNA analyzer. Results DNA sequence analysis to determine the presence of VHL mutation in her family revealed del291C, a novel frameshift mutation. Conclusion We found a novel mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene that presented with gestational diabetes mellitus. PMID:24396697

  4. A founder synonymous COL7A1 mutation in three Danish families with dominant dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa identifies exonic regulatory sequences required for exon 87 splicing.

    PubMed

    Covaciu, C; Grosso, F; Pisaneschi, E; Zambruno, G; Gregersen, P A; Sommerlund, M; Hertz, J M; Castiglia, D

    2011-09-01

    Dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa pruriginosa (DEB-Pr) (OMIM 604129) represents a distinct variant within the DEB clinical spectrum. It is characterized by intense pruritus and distinctive nodular prurigo-like and/or hypertrophic lichenoid lesions mainly localized on the arms, legs and upper shoulders. DEB-Pr is caused by either dominant (DDEB-Pr) or recessive mutations in the COL7A1 gene encoding type VII collagen (COLVII). The full spectrum of COL7A1 mutations in DEB-Pr remains elusive and the genotype-phenotype correlation is largely incomplete. Here, we report and functionally characterize a previously unrecognized translationally silent exonic COL7A1 mutation that results in skipping of exon 87 and is associated with DDEB-Pr phenotypes in several members of three apparently unrelated Danish families. A haplotype segregation study suggested a common ancestor in these kindred. Functional splicing analysis of the mutant exon by a COL7A1 minigene construct and computational prediction for splicing regulatory cis-sequences prove that the mutation alters the activity of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) critical for exon inclusion. These findings substantiate for the first time the involvement of an ESE mutation in the pathogenesis of DEB and have implications for genetic counselling of Danish families with DDEB. PMID:21574979

  5. Novel c.191C>G (p.Pro64Arg) MPV17 mutation identified in two pairs of unrelated Polish siblings with mitochondrial hepatoencephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Piekutowska-Abramczuk, D; Pronicki, M; Strawa, K; Karkuci?ska-Wi?ckowska, A; Szyma?ska-D?bi?ska, T; Fidzia?ska, A; Wi?ckowski, M R; Jurkiewicz, D; Ciara, E; Jankowska, I; Sykut-Cegielska, J; Krajewska-Walasek, M; P?oski, R; Pronicka, E

    2014-06-01

    This study reports clinical, biochemical and histopathological findings associated with a novel homozygous MPV17 mutation in four patients with mitochondrial depletion syndrome. The severe course of the disease, which started in the first weeks of life, was dominated by a failure to thrive, hypotonia and liver dysfunction, with relatively mild neurological involvement. All affected infants died by 1?year of age. Laboratory findings included progressive liver failure (hypertransaminasaemia, icterus, and coagulopathy), recurrent hypoglycaemia, lactic acidaemia, hyperferritinaemia, and increased transferrin saturation. Histological and ultrastructural analyses uncovered significant lipid accumulation in hepatocytes and myocytes. A severe decrease in the mitochondrial/nuclear DNA (mtDNA/nDNA) ratio was found post-mortem in the livers (and in one muscle specimen) of both examined patients. Oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS) Western blotting revealed low levels of complexes I, III and IV subunits. The highlights of our findings are as follows: (i) The novel p.Pro64Arg mutation is the second recurrent MPV17 mutation reported. The phenotype associated with the p.Pro64Arg mutation differs from the phenotype of the relatively common p.Arg50Gln mutation, suggesting the existence of a genotype-phenotype correlation. (ii) Tissues collected from patients during autopsy may be useful for both mtDNA/nDNA ratio assessment and OXPHOS Western blotting. PMID:23829229

  6. The Drosophila ribosomal protein L14-encoding gene, identified by a novel Minute mutation in a dense cluster of previously undescribed genes in cytogenetic region 66D

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Sæbøe-Larssen; B. Urbanczyk Mohebi; A. Lambertsson

    1997-01-01

    The Minute phenotype results from mutations at?>50 loci scattered throughout the genome of Drosophila. Common traits of the\\u000a Minute phenotype are short and thin bristles, slow development, and recessive lethality. Here, we report a novel P-element induced Minute mutation, P{lacW}M(3)66D\\u000a \\u000a 1\\u000a , that maps to region 66D on chromosome 3L. Flies heterozygous for P{lacW}M(3)66D\\u000a \\u000a 1\\u000a have a strong Minute phenotype.

  7. Camurati-Engelmann disease with obesity in a newly identified family carrying a missense p.Arg156Cys mutation in the TGFB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Collet, Corinne; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine

    2013-08-01

    We report on a family affected by Camurati-Engelmann disease, characterized by radiological signs limited to the tibia, and associated with overweight or obesity, which is not a known feature of this disorder. The affected patients were heterozygous for a c.466C > T mutation (which predicts p.Arg156Cys) in the latency associated protein (LAP)-coding domain of the TGFB1 gene. This mutation had previously been reported once in another family with a similar, atypical phenotype, which suggests a possible phenotype/genotype relationship. PMID:23824952

  8. Use of the Ligase Detection Reaction-Polymerase Chain Reaction to Identify Point Mutations in Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Niederhauser; L. Kaempf; I. Heinzer

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect point mutations in extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) genes in a background of wild-type\\u000a (non-ESBL-producing) bacteria using a highly sensitive and specific method developed for this purpose. The ligase detection\\u000a reaction-polymerase chain reaction (LDR-PCR) method was used to test different ESBL-producing strains and clinical isolates\\u000a for a specific point mutation in the bla SHV-ESBL

  9. Dozens Of New De Novo Genetic Mutations Identified In Schizophrenia | Today Topics http://www.todaytopics.com/...ia/3761/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=twitter&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+healthtopicstoday+%28Today+Topics%29[10/10/2012 4:40:17 PM

    E-print Network

    Dozens Of New De Novo Genetic Mutations Identified In Schizophrenia | Today Topics http In Schizophrenia Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC ) researchers have identified dozens of new spontaneous genetic mutations that play a significant role in the development of schizophrenia, adding to the growing

  10. Clinical Features and Molecular Genetics: Mutations in the ARX gene have been identified in patients with X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia

    E-print Network

    Gilad, Yoav

    /cryptogenic infantile spasms [2], and X-linked mental retardation (MRX) [3]. Preliminary findings and ongoing studies in the human ortholog of Aristaless cause X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy". (2002) Nature Genet. 30, is mutated in X-linked mental retardation". (2002) Hum. Mol. Genet. 11:981-991. Committed to CUSTOMIZED

  11. Clinical Features and Molecular Genetics: Mutations in the ARX gene have been identified in patients with X-linked lissencephaly with ambiguous genitalia

    E-print Network

    Das, Soma

    /cryptogenic infantile spasms (2), and X-linked mental retardation (MRX) (3). Preliminary findings and ongoing studies in the human ortholog of Aristaless cause X-linked mental retardation and epilepsy. Nat Genet 2002: 30: 441 in the telencephalon, is mutated in X-linked mental retardation. Hum Mol Genet 2002: 11: 981-991. Committed

  12. Mutations in the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP) identify limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2I as a milder allelic variant of congenital muscular dystrophy MDC1C

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin Brockington; Yeliz Yuva; Paola Prandini; Susan C. Brown; Silvia Torelli; Matthew A. Benson; Ralf Herrmann; Louise V. B. Anderson; Rumaisa Bashir; Jean-Marc Burgunder; Shari Fallet; Norma Romero; Michel Fardeau; Volker Straub; Gillian Storey; Christine Pollitt; Isabelle Richard; Caroline A. Sewry; Kate Bushby; Thomas Voit; Derek J. Blake; Francesco Muntoni

    2001-01-01

    The limb girdle and congenital muscular dystrophies (LGMD and CMD) are characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and dystrophic muscle changes. The onset of symptoms in CMD is within the first few months of life, whereas in LGMD they can occur in late childhood, adolescence or adult life. We have recently demonstrated that the fukutin-related protein gene (FKRP) is mutated in

  13. Novel CIC Point Mutations and an Exon-Spanning, Homozygous Deletion Identified in Oligodendroglial Tumors by a Comprehensive Genomic Approach Including Transcriptome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Eisenreich, Sophie; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; Szafranski, Karol; Campos Valenzuela, Jaime A.; Rump, Andreas; Nigro, Janice M.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Gerlach, Eva-Maria; Hackmann, Karl; Schröck, Evelin; Krex, Dietmar; Kaderali, Lars; Schackert, Gabriele; Platzer, Matthias; Klink, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumors form a distinct subgroup of gliomas, characterized by a better response to treatment and prolonged overall survival. Most oligodendrogliomas and also some oligoastrocytomas are characterized by a unique and typical unbalanced translocation, der(1,19), resulting in a 1p/19q co-deletion. Candidate tumor suppressor genes targeted by these losses, CIC on 19q13.2 and FUBP1 on 1p31.1, were only recently discovered. We analyzed 17 oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas by applying a comprehensive approach consisting of RNA expression analysis, DNA sequencing of CIC, FUBP1, IDH1/2, and array CGH. We confirmed three different genetic subtypes in our samples: i) the “oligodendroglial” subtype with 1p/19q co-deletion in twelve out of 17 tumors; ii) the “astrocytic” subtype in three tumors; iii) the “other” subtype in two tumors. All twelve tumors with the 1p/19q co-deletion carried the most common IDH1 R132H mutation. In seven of these tumors, we found protein-disrupting point mutations in the remaining allele of CIC, four of which are novel. One of these tumors also had a deleterious mutation in FUBP1. Only by integrating RNA expression and array CGH data, were we able to discover an exon-spanning homozygous microdeletion within the remaining allele of CIC in an additional tumor with 1p/19q co-deletion. Therefore we propose that the mutation rate might be underestimated when looking at sequence variants alone. In conclusion, the high frequency and the spectrum of CIC mutations in our 1p/19q-codeleted tumor cohort support the hypothesis that CIC acts as a tumor suppressor in these tumors, whereas FUBP1 might play only a minor role. PMID:24086756

  14. Novel CIC point mutations and an exon-spanning, homozygous deletion identified in oligodendroglial tumors by a comprehensive genomic approach including transcriptome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Eisenreich, Sophie; Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil; Szafranski, Karol; Campos Valenzuela, Jaime A; Rump, Andreas; Nigro, Janice M; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Gerlach, Eva-Maria; Hackmann, Karl; Schröck, Evelin; Krex, Dietmar; Kaderali, Lars; Schackert, Gabriele; Platzer, Matthias; Klink, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendroglial tumors form a distinct subgroup of gliomas, characterized by a better response to treatment and prolonged overall survival. Most oligodendrogliomas and also some oligoastrocytomas are characterized by a unique and typical unbalanced translocation, der(1,19), resulting in a 1p/19q co-deletion. Candidate tumor suppressor genes targeted by these losses, CIC on 19q13.2 and FUBP1 on 1p31.1, were only recently discovered. We analyzed 17 oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas by applying a comprehensive approach consisting of RNA expression analysis, DNA sequencing of CIC, FUBP1, IDH1/2, and array CGH. We confirmed three different genetic subtypes in our samples: i) the "oligodendroglial" subtype with 1p/19q co-deletion in twelve out of 17 tumors; ii) the "astrocytic" subtype in three tumors; iii) the "other" subtype in two tumors. All twelve tumors with the 1p/19q co-deletion carried the most common IDH1 R132H mutation. In seven of these tumors, we found protein-disrupting point mutations in the remaining allele of CIC, four of which are novel. One of these tumors also had a deleterious mutation in FUBP1. Only by integrating RNA expression and array CGH data, were we able to discover an exon-spanning homozygous microdeletion within the remaining allele of CIC in an additional tumor with 1p/19q co-deletion. Therefore we propose that the mutation rate might be underestimated when looking at sequence variants alone. In conclusion, the high frequency and the spectrum of CIC mutations in our 1p/19q-codeleted tumor cohort support the hypothesis that CIC acts as a tumor suppressor in these tumors, whereas FUBP1 might play only a minor role. PMID:24086756

  15. K-rasG12V mediated lung tumor models identified three new quantitative trait loci modifying events post-K-ras mutation.

    PubMed

    Saito, Hiromitsu; Suzuki, Noboru

    2014-10-01

    A high incidence of oncogenic K-ras mutations is observed in lung adenocarcinoma of human cases and carcinogen-induced animal models. The process of oncogenic K-ras-mediated lung adenocarcinogenesis can be dissected into two parts: pre- and post-K-ras mutation. Adoption of transgenic lines containing a flox-K-rasG12V transgene eliminates the use of chemical carcinogens and enables us to study directly crucial events post-K-ras mutation without considering the cellular events involved with oncogenic K-ras mutation, e.g., distribution and metabolism of chemical carcinogens, DNA repair, and somatic recombination by host factors. We generated two mouse strains C57BL/6J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs) and A/J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs) in which K-rasG12V can be transcribed from the cytomegalovirus early enhancer/chicken beta actin promoter in virtually any tissue. Upon K-rasG12V induction in lung epithelial cells by an adenovirus expressing the Cre recombinase, the number of tumors in the C57BL/6J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs/+) mouse line was 12.5 times that in the A/J-Ryr2(tm1Nobs/+) mouse line. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis revealed that new three modifier loci, D3Mit19, D3Mit45 and D11Mit20, were involved in the differential susceptibility between the two lines. In addition, we found that differential expression of the wild-type K-ras gene, which was genetically turn out to be anti-oncogenic activity on K-rasG12V, could not account for the different susceptibility in our two K-rasG12V-mediated lung tumor models. Thus, we provide a genetic system that enables us to explore new downstream modifiers post-K-ras mutation. PMID:25245290

  16. Exome sequencing identifies DYNC2H1 mutations as a common cause of asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome) without major polydactyly, renal or retinal involvement

    PubMed Central

    Schmidts, Miriam; Arts, Heleen H; Bongers, Ernie M H F; Yap, Zhimin; Oud, Machteld M; Antony, Dinu; Duijkers, Lonneke; Emes, Richard D; Stalker, Jim; Yntema, Jan-Bart L; Plagnol, Vincent; Hoischen, Alexander; Gilissen, Christian; Forsythe, Elisabeth; Lausch, Ekkehart; Veltman, Joris A; Roeleveld, Nel; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Kutkowska-Kazmierczak, Anna; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Elçio?lu, Nursel; van Maarle, Merel C; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Devriendt, Koenraad; Smithson, Sarah F; Wellesley, Diana; Verbeek, Nienke E; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Kayserili, Hulya; Scambler, Peter J; Beales, Philip L; Knoers, Nine VAM; Roepman, Ronald; Mitchison, Hannah M

    2013-01-01

    Background Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) is a rare, often lethal, recessively inherited chondrodysplasia characterised by shortened ribs and long bones, sometimes accompanied by polydactyly, and renal, liver and retinal disease. Mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes cause JATD, including the IFT dynein-2 motor subunit gene DYNC2H1. Genetic heterogeneity and the large DYNC2H1 gene size have hindered JATD genetic diagnosis. Aims and methods To determine the contribution to JATD we screened DYNC2H1 in 71 JATD patients JATD patients combining SNP mapping, Sanger sequencing and exome sequencing. Results and conclusions We detected 34 DYNC2H1 mutations in 29/71 (41%) patients from 19/57 families (33%), showing it as a major cause of JATD especially in Northern European patients. This included 13 early protein termination mutations (nonsense/frameshift, deletion, splice site) but no patients carried these in combination, suggesting the human phenotype is at least partly hypomorphic. In addition, 21 missense mutations were distributed across DYNC2H1 and these showed some clustering to functional domains, especially the ATP motor domain. DYNC2H1 patients largely lacked significant extra-skeletal involvement, demonstrating an important genotype–phenotype correlation in JATD. Significant variability exists in the course and severity of the thoracic phenotype, both between affected siblings with identical DYNC2H1 alleles and among individuals with different alleles, which suggests the DYNC2H1 phenotype might be subject to modifier alleles, non-genetic or epigenetic factors. Assessment of fibroblasts from patients showed accumulation of anterograde IFT proteins in the ciliary tips, confirming defects similar to patients with other retrograde IFT machinery mutations, which may be of undervalued potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:23456818

  17. Exome sequencing identifies MXRA5 as a novel cancer gene frequently mutated in non–small cell lung carcinoma from Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    You, Ming

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer has become the top killer among malignant tumors in China and is significantly associated with somatic genetic alterations. We performed exome sequencing of 14 non–small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLCs) with matched adjacent normal lung tissues extracted from Chinese patients. In addition to the lung cancer–related genes (TP53, EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and ROS1), this study revealed “novel” genes not previously implicated in NSCLC. Especially, matrix-remodeling associated 5 was the second most frequently mutated gene in NSCLC (first is TP53). Subsequent Sanger sequencing of matrix-remodeling associated 5 in an additional sample set consisting of 52 paired tumor-normal DNA samples revealed that 15% of Chinese NSCLCs contained somatic mutations in matrix-remodeling associated 5. These findings, together with the results from pathway analysis, strongly indicate that altered extracellular matrix-remodeling may be involved in the etiology of NSCLC. PMID:22696596

  18. Occult ovarian cancers identified at risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy in a prospective cohort of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Friebel, Tara M.; Garber, Judy E.; Isaacs, Claudine; Matloff, Ellen; Eeles, Rosalind; Evans, D. Gareth; Rubinstein, Wendy; Singer, Christian F.; Rubin, Stephen; Lynch, Henry T.; Daly, Mary B.; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Ganz, Patricia A.; Pichert, Gabriella; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Tomlinson, Gail; Tung, Nadine; Blum, Joanne L.; Couch, Fergus; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) is widely used for cancer risk reduction in BRCA1 or BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) mutation carriers. Occult ovarian/fallopian tube cancers (OOC) detected at the time of RRSO have been reported in several studies with wide variability in reported prevalence. We estimated the prevalence of OOC in a prospective cohort of 647 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers from 18 centers (PROSE consortium) who under-went RRSO between 2001 and 2008. OOC was detected in 16 of 647 women (2.5%). The mean age at RRSO was 51.7 in those with OOC versus 46.6 in those without OOC (P = 0.017). Twelve of the 16 OOCs (75%) were diagnosed in women with BRCA1 mutations. Thirty-eight percent of women with OOC had stage 1 cancer versus none of the women in the PROSE database diagnosed with ovarian cancer outside of screening. Among 385 women (60%) in whom pathology reports were available for central review, 246 (64%) RRSOs were performed at participating PROSE centers while 139 (36%) were performed at local sites. Ovarian and fallopian tube tissues removed at major genetics referral centers were significantly more likely to have been examined in toto compared to specimens obtained at non-referral centers (75% vs. 30%, P < 0.001). Our results confirm that OOC may be found at the time of RRSO in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers and suggest that OOC are of a more favorable stage than cancers found outside RRSO. An unacceptably high proportion of pathologic examinations did not adequately examine ovaries and fallopian tubes obtained at RRSO. PMID:20180014

  19. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Mutations of SMPX, which Encodes the Small Muscle Protein, X-Linked, as a Cause of Progressive Hearing Impairment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margit Schraders; Jaap Oostrik; Hao Hu; Sriram Kannan; Hannie Kremer

    2011-01-01

    In a Dutch family with an X-linked postlingual progressive hearing impairment, a critical linkage interval was determined to span a region of 12.9 Mb flanked by the markers DXS7108 and DXS7110. This interval overlaps with the previously described DFNX4 locus and contains 75 annotated genes. Subsequent next-generation sequencing (NGS) detected one variant within the linkage interval, a nonsense mutation in

  20. Mutations in Conserved Residues of the C. elegans microRNA Argonaute ALG-1 Identify Separable Functions in ALG-1 miRISC Loading and Target Repression

    PubMed Central

    Zinovyeva, Anna Y.; Bouasker, Samir; Simard, Martin J.; Hammell, Christopher M.; Ambros, Victor

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs function in diverse developmental and physiological processes by regulating target gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. ALG-1 is one of two Caenorhabditis elegans Argonautes (ALG-1 and ALG-2) that together are essential for microRNA biogenesis and function. Here, we report the identification of novel antimorphic (anti) alleles of ALG-1 as suppressors of lin-28(lf) precocious developmental phenotypes. The alg-1(anti) mutations broadly impair the function of many microRNAs and cause dosage-dependent phenotypes that are more severe than the complete loss of ALG-1. ALG-1(anti) mutant proteins are competent for promoting Dicer cleavage of microRNA precursors and for associating with and stabilizing microRNAs. However, our results suggest that ALG-1(anti) proteins may sequester microRNAs in immature and functionally deficient microRNA Induced Silencing Complexes (miRISCs), and hence compete with ALG-2 for access to functional microRNAs. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that ALG-1(anti) proteins display an increased association with Dicer and a decreased association with AIN-1/GW182. These findings suggest that alg-1(anti) mutations impair the ability of ALG-1 miRISC to execute a transition from Dicer-associated microRNA processing to AIN-1/GW182 associated effector function, and indicate an active role for ALG/Argonaute in mediating this transition. PMID:24763381

  1. Characterizing the Molecular Basis of Attenuation of Marek's Disease Virus via In Vitro Serial Passage Identifies De Novo Mutations in the Helicase-Primase Subunit Gene UL5 and Other Candidates Associated with Reduced Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Evin; Dunn, John R.; Perumbakkam, Sudeep; Niikura, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by the oncogenic Gallid herpesvirus 2, commonly known as Marek's disease virus (MDV). MD vaccines, the primary control method, are often generated by repeated in vitro serial passage of this highly cell-associated virus to attenuate virulent MDV strains. To understand the genetic basis of attenuation, we used experimental evolution by serially passing three virulent MDV replicates generated from an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone. All replicates became completely or highly attenuated, indicating that de novo mutation, and not selection among quasispecies existing in a strain, is the primary driving force for the reduction in virulence. Sequence analysis of the attenuated replicates revealed 41 to 95 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) at 2% or higher frequency in each population and several candidate genes containing high-frequency, nonsynonymous mutations. Five candidate mutations were incorporated into recombinant viruses to determine their in vivo effect. SNVs within UL42 (DNA polymerase auxiliary subunit) and UL46 (tegument) had no measurable influence, while two independent mutations in LORF2 (a gene of unknown function) improved survival time of birds but did not alter disease incidence. A fifth SNV located within UL5 (helicase-primase subunit) greatly reduced in vivo viral replication, increased survival time of birds, and resulted in only 0 to 11% disease incidence. This study shows that multiple genes, often within pathways involving DNA replication and transcriptional regulation, are involved in de novo attenuation of MDV and provides targets for the rational design of future MD vaccines. IMPORTANCE Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a very important pathogen in chickens that costs the worldwide poultry industry $1 billion to $2 billion annually. Marek's disease (MD) vaccines, the primary control method, are often produced by passing virulent strains in cell culture until attenuated. To understand this process, we identified all the changes in the viral genome that occurred during repeated cell passage. We find that a single mutation in the UL5 gene, which encodes a viral protein necessary for DNA replication, reduces disease incidence by 90% or more. In addition, other candidate genes were identified. This information should lead to the development of more effective and rationally designed MD vaccines leading to improved animal health and welfare and lower costs to consumers. PMID:24648463

  2. Mutational analysis of the EMCV 2A protein identifies a nuclear localization signal and an eIF4E binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Groppo, Rachel; Brown, Bradley A.; Palmenberg, Ann C., E-mail: acpalmen@wisc.ed

    2011-02-05

    Cardioviruses have a unique 2A protein (143 aa). During genome translation, the encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) 2A is released through a ribosome skipping event mitigated through C-terminal 2A sequences and by subsequent N-terminal reaction with viral 3C{sup pro}. Although viral replication is cytoplasmic, mature 2A accumulates in nucleoli shortly after infection. Some protein also transiently associates with cytoplasmic 40S ribosomal subunits, an activity contributing to inhibition of cellular cap-dependent translation. Cardiovirus sequences predict an eIF4E binding site (aa 126-134) and a nuclear localization signal (NLS, aa 91-102), within 2A, both of which are functional during EMCV infection. Point mutations preventing eIF4E:2A interactions gave small-plaque phenotype viruses, but still inhibited cellular cap-dependent translation. Deletions within the NLS motif relocalized 2A to the cytoplasm and abrogated the inhibition of cap-dependent translation. A fusion protein linking the 2A NLS to eGFP was sufficient to redirect the reporter to the nucleus but not into nucleoli.

  3. Genetic evaluation based on family history and Her2 status correctly identifies TP53 mutations in very early onset breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Fostira, F; Konstantopoulou, I; Mavroudis, D; Tryfonopoulos, D; Yannoukakos, D; Voutsinas, G E

    2015-04-01

    Currently, hereditary breast cancer is being attributed to more than 20 genes of differing penetrance. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 are still the genes of reference for breast cancer susceptibility, extreme breast cancer phenotypes may be the result of deleterious alleles of other genes. Here, we report three families with early-onset breast cancer that were initially referred for BRCA1/BRCA2 genetic testing. They were diagnosed with breast cancer at an extraordinarily early age. On the basis of their extensive family history, which included multiple cancer types, and their Her2 status, they were suspected for Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Indeed, all three probands were found to harbor TP53 tumor suppressor gene mutations. These included p.C275X, described here for the first time, as well as p.R213X and p.Y220C, which have been described in the past. Our conclusion is that decisions on genetic analysis for inherited early onset breast cancer should always be based on detailed pedigree information, combined with Her2 status. PMID:24702488

  4. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POL? and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  5. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POL? and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  6. 250K Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Array Karyotyping Identifies Acquired Uniparental Disomy and Homozygous Mutations, Including Novel Missense Substitutions of c-Cbl, in Myeloid Malignancies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew J. Dunbar; Lukasz P. Gondek; Christine L. O'Keefe; Hideki Makishima; Manjot S. Rataul; Hadrian Szpurka; Xiao Fei Wang; Michael A. McDevitt; Jaroslaw P. Maciejewski

    Two types of acquired loss of heterozygosity are possible in cancer: deletions and copy-neutral uniparental disomy (UPD). Conventionally, copy number losses are identified using metaphase cytogenetics, whereas detection of UPD is accom- plished by microsatellite and copy number analysis and as such, is not often used clinically. Recently, introduction of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays has allowed for the systematic

  7. Lampe1: An ENU-Germline Mutation Causing Spontaneous Hepatosteatosis Identified through Targeted Exon-Enrichment and Next-Generation Sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rachel Sheridan; Kristin Lampe; Shiva Kumar Shanmukhappa; Patrick Putnam; Mehdi Keddache; Senad Divanovic; Jorge Bezerra; Kasper Hoebe

    2011-01-01

    Using a small scale ENU mutagenesis approach we identified a recessive germline mutant, designated Lampe1 that exhibited growth retardation and spontaneous hepatosteatosis. Low resolution mapping based on 20 intercrossed Lampe1 mice revealed linkage to a ?14 Mb interval on the distal site of chromosome 11 containing a total of 285 genes. Exons and 50 bp flanking sequences within the critical

  8. Mutational analysis of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI suggests that among the 13 known Fanconi Anemia genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition.

    PubMed

    García, María J; Fernández, Victoria; Osorio, Ana; Barroso, Alicia; Fernández, Fernando; Urioste, Miguel; Benítez, Javier

    2009-11-01

    Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare recessive syndrome characterized by cellular hypersensitivity to DNA-cross-linking agents. To date, 13 FA complementation groups have been described and all 13 genes associated to each of these groups have been currently identified. Three of the known FA genes are also high-risk (FANCD1/BRCA2) or moderate-risk (FANCN/PALB2 and FANCJ/BRIP1) breast cancer susceptibility genes, which makes all members of the FA pathway particularly attractive breast cancer candidate genes. Most FA genes have been screened for mutations in breast cancer families negative for BRCA1/2 mutations but the role of FANCL, FANCM and the recently identified FANCI has not been evaluated to date. This fact and novel data sustaining greater functional relevance of the three genes within the FA pathway prompted us to scrutinize all coding sequences and splicing sites of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in 95 BRCA1/2-negative index cases from Spanish high-risk breast cancer families. We identified 68 sequence variants of which 24 were coding and 44 non-coding. Six exonic and 26 non-coding variants had not been described previously. None of the coding changes caused clearly pathogenic changes and computational analysis of all non-described intronic variants did not revealed major impact in splicing. With the present study, all known FA genes have been evaluated within the context of breast cancer high-risk predisposition. Our results rule out a major role of FANCI, FANCL and FANCM in familial breast cancer susceptibility, suggesting that among the 13 known FA genes, only FANCD1/BRCA2 plays a major role in high-risk breast cancer predisposition. PMID:19737859

  9. A minimal ligand binding pocket within a network of correlated mutations identified by multiple sequence and structural analysis of G protein coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven helical transmembrane proteins that function as signal transducers. They bind ligands in their extracellular and transmembrane regions and activate cognate G proteins at their intracellular surface at the other side of the membrane. The relay of allosteric communication between the ligand binding site and the distant G protein binding site is poorly understood. In this study, GREMLIN [1], a recently developed method that identifies networks of co-evolving residues from multiple sequence alignments, was used to identify those that may be involved in communicating the activation signal across the membrane. The GREMLIN-predicted long-range interactions between amino acids were analyzed with respect to the seven GPCR structures that have been crystallized at the time this study was undertaken. Results GREMLIN significantly enriches the edges containing residues that are part of the ligand binding pocket, when compared to a control distribution of edges drawn from a random graph. An analysis of these edges reveals a minimal GPCR binding pocket containing four residues (T1183.33, M2075.42, Y2686.51 and A2927.39). Additionally, of the ten residues predicted to have the most long-range interactions (A1173.32, A2726.55, E1133.28, H2115.46, S186EC2, A2927.39, E1223.37, G902.57, G1143.29 and M2075.42), nine are part of the ligand binding pocket. Conclusions We demonstrate the use of GREMLIN to reveal a network of statistically correlated and functionally important residues in class A GPCRs. GREMLIN identified that ligand binding pocket residues are extensively correlated with distal residues. An analysis of the GREMLIN edges across multiple structures suggests that there may be a minimal binding pocket common to the seven known GPCRs. Further, the activation of rhodopsin involves these long-range interactions between extracellular and intracellular domain residues mediated by the retinal domain. PMID:22748306

  10. Expression and mutation analyses implicate ARHGAP29 as the etiologic gene for the cleft lip with or without cleft palate locus identified by genome wide association on chromosome 1p22

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Elizabeth J; Mansilla, M Adela; Biggs, Leah C; Schuette, Kristi; Bullard, Steve; Cooper, Margaret; Dunnwald, Martine; Lidral, Andrew C; Marazita, Mary L; Beaty, Terri H; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2012-01-01

    Background Nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P) is a common birth defect with complex etiology reflecting the action of multiple genetic and/or environmental factors. Genome wide association studies have successfully identified five novel loci associated with NSCL/P including a locus on 1p22.1 near the ABCA4 gene. Since neither expression analysis nor mutation screening support a role for ABCA4 in NSCL/P, we investigated the adjacent gene ARHGAP29. Methods Mutation screening for ARHGAP29 protein coding exons was conducted in 180 individuals with NSCL/P and controls from the US and the Philippines. Nine exons with variants in ARHGAP29 were then screened in an independent set of 872 cases and 802 controls. Arhgap29 expression was evaluated using in situ hybridization in murine embryos. Results Sequencing of ARHGAP29 revealed eight potentially deleterious variants in cases including a frameshift and a nonsense variant. Arhgap29 showed craniofacial expression and was reduced in a mouse deficient for Irf6, a gene previously shown to have a critical role in craniofacial development. Conclusion The combination of genome wide association, rare coding sequence variants, craniofacial specific expression and interactions with IRF6 support a role for ARHGAP29 in NSCL/P and as the etiologic gene at the 1p22 GWAS locus for NSCL/P. This work suggests a novel pathway in which the IRF6 gene regulatory network interacts with the Rho pathway via ARHGAP29. PMID:23008150

  11. Mutations linked to breast cancer treatment resistance

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a type of mutation that develops after breast cancer patients take anti-estrogen therapies. The mutations explain one reason why patients often become resistant to this therapy.

  12. Mutation discovery in bacterial genomes

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    , a gastric pathogen implicated in peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer4,5. H. pylori infections are oftenMutation discovery in bacterial genomes: metronidazole resistance in Helicobacter pylori Thomas J it to study metronidazole resistance in H. pylori. CGS identified mutations in several genes, most likely

  13. Molecular Modeling of the ErbB4/HER4 Kinase in the Context of the HER4 Signaling Network Helps Rationalize the Effects of Clinically Identified HER4 Somatic Mutations on the Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Telesco, Shannon E.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Radhakrishnan, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    In the ErbB/HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases, the deregulation of the EGFR/ErbB1/HER1, HER2/ErbB2, and HER3/ErbB3 kinases is associated with several cancers, while the HER4/ErbB4 kinase has been shown to play an anti-carcinogenic role in certain tumors. We present molecular and network models of HER4/ErbB4 activation and signaling in order to elucidate molecular mechanisms of activation and to help rationalize the effects of the clinically identified HER4 somatic mutants. Our molecular-scale simulations identify the important role played by the interactions within the juxtamembrane region during the activation process. Our results also support the hypothesis that the HER4 mutants may heterodimerize but not activate, resulting in blockage of the HER4-STAT5 differentiation pathway, in favor of the proliferative PI3K/AKT pathway. Translating our molecular simulation results into a cellular pathway model of wild type versus mutant HER4 signaling, we are able to recapitulate the major features of the PI3K/AKT and JAK/STAT activation downstream of HER4. Our model predicts that the signaling downstream of the wild type HER4 is enriched for the JAK-STAT pathway, whereas downstream of the mutant HER4 is enriched for the PI3K/AKT pathway. HER4 mutations may hence constitute a cellular shift from a program of differentiation to that of proliferation. PMID:24318637

  14. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph?) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph? MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  15. Calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-10-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph(-)) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph(-) MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  16. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations. PMID:20574428

  17. Analysis of the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes by PCR amplification and scanning by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis identifies only COL1A1 mutations in 15 patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type I: identification of common sequences of null-allele mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Körkkö, J; Ala-Kokko, L; De Paepe, A; Nuytinck, L; Earley, J; Prockop, D J

    1998-01-01

    Although >90% of patients with osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) have been estimated to have mutations in the COL1A1 and COL1A2 genes for type I procollagen, mutations have been difficult to detect in all patients with the mildest forms of the disease (i.e., type I). In this study, we first searched for mutations in type I procollagen by analyses of protein and mRNA in fibroblasts from 10 patients with mild OI; no evidence of a mutation was found in 2 of the patients by the protein analyses, and no evidence of a mutation was found in 5 of the patients by the RNA analyses. We then searched for mutations in the original 10 patients and in 5 additional patients with mild OI, by analysis of genomic DNA. To assay the genomic DNA, we established a consensus sequence for the first 12 kb of the COL1A1 gene and for 30 kb of new sequences of the 38-kb COL1A2 gene. The sequences were then used to develop primers for PCR for the 103 exons and exon boundaries of the two genes. The PCR products were first scanned for heteroduplexes by conformation-sensitive gel electrophoresis, and then products containing heteroduplexes were sequenced. The results detected disease-causing mutations in 13 of the 15 patients and detected two additional probable disease-causing mutations in the remaining 2 patients. Analysis of the data developed in this study and elsewhere revealed common sequences for mutations causing null alleles. PMID:9443882

  18. ?-Globin Mutations in Egyptian Patients With ?-Thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Elmezayen, Ammar D; Kotb, Samia M; Sadek, Nadia A; Abdalla, Ebtesam M

    2015-01-01

    ?-thalassemia is a common hereditary disorder, particularly in Middle Eastern countries. More than 200 mutations in the ? globin gene have been reported; most are point mutations in functionally important regions (HBB; OMIM #141900)). The spectrum of mutations varies significantly between different geographical regions; only a few common mutations of ?-globin cause ?-thalassemia in each population. The aim of this study was to determine the spectrum of mutations that cause ?-thalassemia in the North Coast of Egypt and to investigate their correlation with the phenotypic severity of ?-thalassemia. We carried out our study with a total of 47 Egyptian patients (25 male and 22 female) confirmed to have ?-thalassemia. Evaluation of ?-thalassemia mutations revealed the presence of 10 ?-globin mutations. The most frequently encountered mutations were intronic: IVS 1.6 [T>C] (27.66%) and IVS 1.110 [G>A] (22.35%), followed by IVS 2.848 [C>A], IVS 1.1 (G>A), and IVS 2.745 [C>G]. We observed the exonic and promoter mutations less frequently. A homozygous mutation was found in 24 patients (51%) and compound heterozygous mutations were found in 13 patients (28%). However, in 9 patients (19%), we identified only 1 mutation. In 1 patient (2%), we detected no mutation. The detection rate of the method that we used in our population was 88% (83 of the tested 94 alleles). The results we obtained did not reveal any correlation between genotype and phenotype among patients with ?-thalassemia. PMID:25617386

  19. Expanding the phenotype of LMNA mutations in dilated cardiomyopathy and functional consequences of these mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sebillon, P; Bouchier, C; Bidot, L; Bonne, G; Ahamed, K; Charron, P; Drouin-Garraud, V; Millaire, A; Desrumeaux, G; Benaiche, A; Charniot, J; Schwartz, K; Villard, E; Komajda, M

    2003-01-01

    Aims: Mutations in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) have been reported to be involved in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) associated with conduction system disease and/or skeletal myopathy. The aim of this study was to perform a mutational analysis of LMNA in a large white population of patients affected by dilated cardiomyopathy with or without associated symptoms. Methods: We performed screening of the coding sequence of LMNA on DNA samples from 66 index cases, and carried out cell transfection experiments to examine the functional consequences of the mutations identified. Results: A new missense (E161K) mutation was identified in a family with early atrial fibrillation and a previously described (R377H) mutation in another family with a quadriceps myopathy associated with DCM. A new mutation (28insA) leading to a premature stop codon was identified in a family affected by DCM with conduction defects. No mutation in LMNA was found in cases with isolated dilated cardiomyopathy. Functional analyses have identified potential physiopathological mechanisms involving identified mutations, such as haploinsufficiency (28insA) or intermediate filament disorganisation (E161K, R377H). Conclusion: For the first time, a specific phenotype characterised by early atrial fibrillation is associated with LMNA mutation. Conversely, mutations in LMNA appear as a rare cause of isolated dilated cardiomyopathy. The variable phenotypes observed in LMNA-DCM might be explained by the variability of functional consequences of LMNA mutations. PMID:12920062

  20. Somatic mutation, genomic variation, and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one's parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease-even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example-resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

  1. Somatic Mutation, Genomic Variation, and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one’s parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease—even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example—resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

  2. Gefitinib Treatment in EGFR Mutated Caucasian NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Ostoros, Gyula; Cobo, Manuel; Ciuleanu, Tudor; Cole, Rebecca; McWalter, Gael; Walker, Jill; Dearden, Simon; Webster, Alan; Milenkova, Tsveta; McCormack, Rose

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In the phase IV, open-label, single-arm study NCT01203917, first-line gefitinib 250 mg/d was effective and well tolerated in Caucasian patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (previously published). Here, we report EGFR mutation analyses of plasma-derived, circulating-free tumor DNA. Methods: Mandatory tumor and duplicate plasma (1 and 2) baseline samples were collected (all screened patients; n = 1060). Preplanned, exploratory analyses included EGFR mutation (and subtype) status of tumor versus plasma and between plasma samples. Post hoc, exploratory analyses included efficacy by tumor and plasma EGFR mutation (and subtype) status. Results: Available baseline tumor samples were 1033 of 1060 (118 positive of 859 mutation status known; mutation frequency, 13.7%). Available plasma 1 samples were 803 of 1060 (82 positive of 784 mutation status known; mutation frequency, 10.5%). Mutation status concordance between 652 matched tumor and plasma 1 samples was 94.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 92.3–96.0) (comparable for mutation subtypes); test sensitivity was 65.7% (95% CI, 55.8–74.7); and test specificity was 99.8% (95% CI, 99.0–100.0). Twelve patients of unknown tumor mutation status were subsequently identified as plasma mutation-positive. Available plasma 2 samples were 803 of 1060 (65 positive of 224 mutation status-evaluable and -known). Mutation status concordance between 224 matched duplicate plasma 1 and 2 samples was 96.9% (95% CI, 93.7–98.7). Objective response rates are as follows: mutation-positive tumor, 70% (95% CI, 60.5–77.7); mutation-positive tumor and plasma 1, 76.9% (95% CI, 65.4–85.5); and mutation-positive tumor and mutation-negative plasma 1, 59.5% (95% CI, 43.5–73.7). Median progression-free survival (months) was 9.7 (95% CI, 8.5–11.0; 61 events) for mutation-positive tumor and 10.2 (95% CI, 8.5–12.5; 36 events) for mutation-positive tumor and plasma 1. Conclusion: The high concordance, specificity, and sensitivity demonstrate that EGFR mutation status can be accurately assessed using circulating-free tumor DNA. Although encouraging and suggesting that plasma is a suitable substitute for mutation analysis, tumor tissue should remain the preferred sample type when available. PMID:25122430

  3. Recurrent and founder mutations in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    van der Zwaag, P.A.; Cox, M.G.P.J.; van der Werf, C.; Wiesfeld, A.C.P.; Jongbloed, J.D.H.; Dooijes, D.; Bikker, H.; Jongbloed, R.; Suurmeijer, A.J.H.; van den Berg, M.P.; Hofstra, R.M.W.; Hauer, R.N.W.; Wilde, A.A.M.; van Tintelen, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy/dysplasia (ARVC/D) is an inherited cardiac disease with reduced penetrance and a highly variable expression. Mutations in the gene encoding the plakophilin-2 gene (PKP2) are detected in about 50% of ARVC/D patients. The p.Arg79X mutation in PKP2 has been identified in Europe and North America and has been functionally characterised. We evaluated the prevalence of the p.Arg79X mutation in PKP2 in the Dutch population. Methods Twelve index patients and 41 family members were evaluated in three university hospitals in the Netherlands. The diagnosis of ARVC/D was established according to the recently revised Task Force Criteria. Segregation of the p.Arg79X mutation was studied and haplotypes were reconstructed to determine whether the p.Arg79X mutation was a recurrent or a founder mutation. Results The p.Arg79X mutation in PKP2 was identified in 12 index patients. Haplotype analysis revealed a shared haplotype among Dutch p.Arg79X mutation carriers, indicating a common founder. Six index patients (50%) had a first- or second-degree relative who had died of sudden cardiac death below 40 years of age. At age 60, only 60% of the mutation carriers had experienced any symptoms. There was no significant difference in symptom-free survival and event-free survival between men and women. Conclusion We have identified the largest series of patients with the same desmosome gene mutation in ARVC/D reported to date. This p.Arg79X mutation in PKP2 is a founder mutation in the Dutch population. The phenotypes of PKP2 p.Arg79X mutation carriers illustrate the clinical variability and reduced penetrance often seen in ARVC/D. (Neth Heart J 2010;18:583-91.) PMID:21301620

  4. Epilepsy caused by CDKL5 mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maija Castrén; Eija Gaily; Carola Tengström; Jaana Lähdetie; Hayley Archer; Sirpa Ala-Mello

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been identified in female patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and severe mental retardation with a Rett-like phenotype. Subsequently CDKL5 mutations were shown to be associated with more diverse phenotypes including mild epilepsy and autism without epilepsy. Furthermore, CDKL5 mutations were found in patients with Angelman-like phenotype. The severity of epilepsy

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans dnj-14, the orthologue of the DNAJC5 gene mutated in adult onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis, provides a new platform for neuroprotective drug screening and identifies a SIR-2.1-independent action of resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Sudhanva S.; Johnson, James R.; McCue, Hannah V.; Chen, Xi; Edmonds, Matthew J.; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Graham, Margaret E.; Jenn, Robert C.; Barclay, Jeff W.; Burgoyne, Robert D.; Morgan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Adult onset neuronal lipofuscinosis (ANCL) is a human neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive neuronal dysfunction and premature death. Recently, the mutations that cause ANCL were mapped to the DNAJC5 gene, which encodes cysteine string protein alpha. We show here that mutating dnj-14, the Caenorhabditis elegans orthologue of DNAJC5, results in shortened lifespan and a small impairment of locomotion and neurotransmission. Mutant dnj-14 worms also exhibited age-dependent neurodegeneration of sensory neurons, which was preceded by severe progressive chemosensory defects. A focussed chemical screen revealed that resveratrol could ameliorate dnj-14 mutant phenotypes, an effect mimicked by the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram. In contrast to other worm neurodegeneration models, activation of the Sirtuin, SIR-2.1, was not required, as sir-2.1; dnj-14 double mutants showed full lifespan rescue by resveratrol. The Sirtuin-independent neuroprotective action of resveratrol revealed here suggests potential therapeutic applications for ANCL and possibly other human neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24947438

  6. [Somatic mutations of the P53 gene in stomach cancer].

    PubMed

    Beliavskaia, V A; Vardosanidze, K V; Oreshkova, S F; Blinov, A G; Ternovo?, V A; Blinov, V M; Cherdyntseva, N V; Voevoda, M I

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with a study of p53 gene somatic mutations in tumor cell genomes from patients with stomach cancers of different histological patterns. It used sequential and molecular cloning methods. The former involved amplicones characterized by abnormal volatility following SSCP analysis of plasmids from 9 tumors. Replacement nucleotides were identified in 4 tumors (intestinal--2, diffuse--2). Among 8 mutations were 1 single-nucleotide deletion in codon-249 with shifting sensing frame and one targeted mutation. Five of the former were missens-mutations which caused amino acid replacement while the other two silent mutations did not. Exon-assisted analysis of p53 ("wild") gene identified cells with stable structure in each tumor (1 mutation--2; 3 mutations--2 including genuinely-paired mutations in 1 exon). All mutations occurred in structurally and functionally important codons. Our evidence corroborated earlier data of SSCP analysis on tumor cell presence in populations with variable p53 genomes. PMID:20552890

  7. Confidence-based Somatic Mutation Evaluation and Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    de Graaf, Jos; Wagner, Meike; Paret, Claudia; Kneip, Christoph; Türeci, Özlem; Diken, Mustafa; Britten, Cedrik; Kreiter, Sebastian; Koslowski, Michael; Castle, John C.; Sahin, Ugur

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) has enabled high throughput discovery of somatic mutations. Detection depends on experimental design, lab platforms, parameters and analysis algorithms. However, NGS-based somatic mutation detection is prone to erroneous calls, with reported validation rates near 54% and congruence between algorithms less than 50%. Here, we developed an algorithm to assign a single statistic, a false discovery rate (FDR), to each somatic mutation identified by NGS. This FDR confidence value accurately discriminates true mutations from erroneous calls. Using sequencing data generated from triplicate exome profiling of C57BL/6 mice and B16-F10 melanoma cells, we used the existing algorithms GATK, SAMtools and SomaticSNiPer to identify somatic mutations. For each identified mutation, our algorithm assigned an FDR. We selected 139 mutations for validation, including 50 somatic mutations assigned a low FDR (high confidence) and 44 mutations assigned a high FDR (low confidence). All of the high confidence somatic mutations validated (50 of 50), none of the 44 low confidence somatic mutations validated, and 15 of 45 mutations with an intermediate FDR validated. Furthermore, the assignment of a single FDR to individual mutations enables statistical comparisons of lab and computation methodologies, including ROC curves and AUC metrics. Using the HiSeq 2000, single end 50 nt reads from replicates generate the highest confidence somatic mutation call set. PMID:23028300

  8. Mutations affecting development of the zebrafish ear

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jarema Malicki; Alexander F. Schier; Lilianna Solnica-Krezel; Derek L. Stemple; Stephan C. F. Neuhauss; Didier Y. R. Stainier; Salim Abdelilah; Zehava Rangini; Fried Zwartkruis; Wolfgang Driever

    In a large scale screen for genetic defects in zebrafish embryogenesis we identified mutations affecting several aspects of ear development, including: specification of the otic placode, growth of the otic vesicle (otocyst), otolith formation, morphogenesis of the semicircular canals and differentiation of the otic capsule. Here we report initial phenotypic and genetic characterization of 20 of these mutations defining 13

  9. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  10. Mutational analysis of Escherichia coli DNA ligase identifies amino acids required for nick-ligation in vitro and for in vivo complementation of the growth of yeast cells deleted for CDC9 and LIG4.

    PubMed

    Sriskanda, V; Schwer, B; Ho, C K; Shuman, S

    1999-10-15

    We report that the NAD-dependent Escherichia coli DNA ligase can support the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deleted singly for CDC9 or doubly for CDC9 plus LIG4. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of E.coli DNA ligase led to the identification of seven amino acids (Lys115, Asp117, Asp285, Lys314, Cys408, Cys411 and Cys432) that are essential for nick-joining in vitro and for in vivo complementation in yeast. The K314A mutation uniquely resulted in accumulation of the DNA-adenylate intermediate. Alanine substitutions at five other positions (Glu113, Tyr225, Gln318, Glu319 and Cys426) did not affect in vivo complementation and had either no effect or only a modest effect on nick-joining in vitro. The E113A and Y225A mutations increased the apparent K (m)for NAD (to 45 and 76 microM, respectively) over that of the wild-type E. coli ligase (3 microM). These results are discussed in light of available structural data on the adenylylation domains of ATP- and NAD-dependent ligases. We observed that yeast cells containing only the 298-amino acid Chlorella virus DNA ligase (a 'minimal' eukaryotic ATP-dependent ligase consisting only of the catalytic core domain) are relatively proficient in the repair of DNA damage induced by UV irradiation or treatment with MMS, whereas cells containing only E.coli ligase are defective in DNA repair. This suggests that the structural domains unique to yeast Cdc9p are not essential for mitotic growth, but may facilitate DNA repair. PMID:10497258

  11. Glucocerebrosidase mutations in primary parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Asselta, Rosanna; Rimoldi, Valeria; Siri, Chiara; Cilia, Roberto; Guella, Ilaria; Tesei, Silvana; Soldà, Giulia; Pezzoli, Gianni; Duga, Stefano; Goldwurm, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Mutations in the lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene increase the risk of Parkinson's Disease (PD). We determined the frequency and relative risk of major GBA mutations in a large series of Italian patients with primary parkinsonism. Methods We studied 2766 unrelated consecutive patients with clinical diagnosis of primary degenerative parkinsonism (including 2350 PD), and 1111 controls. The entire cohort was screened for mutations in GBA exons 9 and 10, covering approximately 70% of mutations, including the two most frequent defects, p.N370S and p.L444P. Results Four known mutations were identified in heterozygous state: 3 missense mutations (p.N370S, p.L444P, and p.D443N), and the splicing mutation IVS10+1G>T, which results in the in-frame exon-10 skipping. Molecular characterization of 2 additional rare variants, potentially interfering with splicing, suggested a neutral effect. GBA mutations were more frequent in PD (4.5%, RR = 7.2, CI = 3.3–15.3) and in Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) (13.8%, RR = 21.9, CI = 6.8–70.7) than in controls (0.63%). but not in the other forms of parkinsonism such as Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP, 2%), and Corticobasal Degeneration (CBD, 0%). Considering only the PD group, GBA-carriers were younger at onset (52 ± 10 vs. 57 ± 10 years, P < 0.0001) and were more likely to have a positive family history of PD (34% vs. 20%, P < 0.001). Conclusion GBA dysfunction is relevant for synucleinopathies, such as PD and DLB, except for MSA, in which pathology involves oligodendrocytes, and the tauopathies PSP and CBD. The risk of developing DLB is three-fold higher than PD, suggesting a more aggressive phenotype. PMID:25249066

  12. Epilepsy caused by CDKL5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Castrén, Maija; Gaily, Eija; Tengström, Carola; Lähdetie, Jaana; Archer, Hayley; Ala-Mello, Sirpa

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been identified in female patients with early onset epileptic encephalopathy and severe mental retardation with a Rett-like phenotype. Subsequently CDKL5 mutations were shown to be associated with more diverse phenotypes including mild epilepsy and autism without epilepsy. Furthermore, CDKL5 mutations were found in patients with Angelman-like phenotype. The severity of epilepsy associated with CDKL5 mutations was recently shown to correlate with the type of CDKL5 mutations and epilepsy was identified to involve three distinct sequential stages. Here, we describe the phenotype of a severe form of neurodevelopmental disease in a female patient with a de novo nonsense mutation of the CDKL5 gene c.175C > T (p.R59X) affecting the catalytic domain of CDKL5 protein. Mutations in the CDKL5 gene are less common in males and can be associated with a genomic deletion as found in our male patient with a deletion of 0.3 Mb at Xp22.13 including the CDKL5 gene. We review phenotypes associated with CDKL5 mutations and examine putative relationships between the clinical epilepsy phenotype and the type of the mutation in the CDKL5 gene. PMID:20493745

  13. Mutational Analysis of the Tyrosine Phosphatome in Colorectal Cancers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhenghe Wang; Dong Shen; D. Williams Parsons; Alberto Bardelli; Jason Sager; Steve Szabo; Janine Ptak; Natalie Silliman; Brock A. Peters; Michiel S. van der Heijden; Giovanni Parmigiani; Hai Yan; Tian-Li Wang; Greg Riggins; Steven M. Powell; James K. V. Willson; Sanford Markowitz; Kenneth W. Kinzler; Bert Vogelstein; Victor E. Velculescu

    2004-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation, regulated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and kinases (PTKs), is important in signaling pathways underlying tumorigenesis. A mutational analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase gene superfamily in human cancers identified 83 somatic mutations in six PTPs (PTPRF, PTPRG, PTPRT, PTPN3, PTPN13, PTPN14), affecting 26% of colorectal cancers and a smaller fraction of lung, breast, and gastric cancers. Fifteen mutations

  14. A Haplotype Framework for Cystic Fibrosis Mutations in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Elahi, Elahe; Khodadad, Ahmad; Kupershmidt, Ilya; Ghasemi, Fereshteh; Alinasab, Babak; Naghizadeh, Ramin; Eason, Robert G.; Amini, Mahshid; Esmaili, Mehran; Esmaeili Dooki, Mohammad R.; Sanati, Mohammad H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.

    2006-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive profile of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mutations and their corresponding haplotypes in the Iranian population. All of the 27 CFTR exons of 60 unrelated Iranian CF patients were sequenced to identify disease-causing mutations. Eleven core haplotypes of CFTR were identified by genotyping six high-frequency simple nucleotide polymorphisms. The carrier frequency of 2.5 in 100 (1 in 40) was estimated from the frequency of heterozygous patients and suggests that contrary to popular belief, cystic fibrosis may be a common, under-diagnosed disease in Iran. A heterogeneous mutation spectrum was observed at the CFTR locus in 60 cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from Iran. Twenty putative disease-causing mutations were identified on 64 (53%) of the 120 chromosomes. The five most common Iranian mutations together represented 37% of the expected mutated alleles. The most frequent mutation, ?F508 (p.F508del), represented only 16% of the expected mutated alleles. The next most frequent mutations were c.1677del2 (p.515fs) at 7.5%, c.4041C>G (p.N1303K) at 5.6%, c.2183AA>G (p.684fs) at 5%, and c.3661A>T (p.K1177X) at 2.5%. Three of the five most frequent Iranian mutations are not included in a commonly used panel of CF mutations, underscoring the importance of identifying geographic-specific mutations in this population. PMID:16436643

  15. SOX10 mutations mimic isolated hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Pingault, V; Faubert, E; Baral, V; Gherbi, S; Loundon, N; Couloigner, V; Denoyelle, F; Noël-Pétroff, N; Ducou Le Pointe, H; Elmaleh-Bergès, M; Bondurand, N; Marlin, S

    2014-09-25

    Ninety genes have been identified to date that are involved in non-syndromic hearing loss, and more than 300 different forms of syndromic hearing impairment have been described. Mutations in SOX10, one of the genes contributing to syndromic hearing loss, induce a large range of phenotypes, including several subtypes of Waardenburg syndrome and Kallmann syndrome with deafness. In addition, rare mutations have been identified in patients with isolated signs of these diseases. We used the recent characterization of temporal bone imaging aspects in patients with SOX10 mutations to identify possible patients with isolated hearing loss due to SOX10 mutation. We selected 21 patients with isolated deafness and temporal bone morphological defects for mutational screening. We identified two SOX10 mutations and found that both resulted in a non-functional protein in vitro. Re-evaluation of the two affected patients showed that both had previously undiagnosed olfactory defects. Diagnosis of anosmia or hyposmia in young children is challenging, and particularly in the absence of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), SOX10 mutations can mimic non-syndromic hearing impairment. MRI should complete temporal bones computed tomographic scan in the management of congenital deafness as it can detect brain anomalies, cochlear nerve defects, and olfactory bulb malformation in addition to inner ear malformations. PMID:25256313

  16. GJC2 Missense Mutations Cause Human Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, Robert E.; Baty, Catherine J.; Kimak, Mark A.; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Lawrence, Elizabeth C.; Franke-Snyder, Marlise; Meriney, Stephen D.; Feingold, Eleanor; Finegold, David N.

    2010-01-01

    Lymphedema is the clinical manifestation of defects in lymphatic structure or function. Mutations identified in genes regulating lymphatic development result in inherited lymphedema. No mutations have yet been identified in genes mediating lymphatic function that result in inherited lymphedema. Survey microarray studies comparing lymphatic and blood endothelial cells identified expression of several connexins in lymphatic endothelial cells. Additionally, gap junctions are implicated in maintaining lymphatic flow. By sequencing GJA1, GJA4, and GJC2 in a group of families with dominantly inherited lymphedema, we identified six probands with unique missense mutations in GJC2 (encoding connexin [Cx] 47). Two larger families cosegregate lymphedema and GJC2 mutation (LOD score = 6.5). We hypothesize that missense mutations in GJC2 alter gap junction function and disrupt lymphatic flow. Until now, GJC2 mutations were only thought to cause dysmyelination, with primary expression of Cx47 limited to the central nervous system. The identification of GJC2 mutations as a cause of primary lymphedema raises the possibility of novel gap-junction-modifying agents as potential therapy for some forms of lymphedema. PMID:20537300

  17. Molecular analyses of novel ASAH1 mutations causing Farber lipogranulomatosis: analyses of exonic splicing enhancer inactivating mutation.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, M D; Chaudhary, A K; Kiran, M; Reddy, V; Nagarajaram, H A; Dalal, A; Bashyam, L; Suri, D; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Kabra, M; Puri, R D; RamaDevi, R; Kapoor, S; Danda, S

    2014-12-01

    Farber lipogranulomatosis is a rare autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the ASAH1 gene. In the largest ever study, we identified and characterized ASAH1 mutations from 11 independent Farber disease (FD) families. A total of 13 different mutations were identified including 1 splice, 1 polypyrimidine tract (PPT) deletion and 11 missense mutations. Eleven mutations were exclusive to the Indian population. The IVS6+4A>G splice and IVS5-16delTTTTC PPT deletion mutations resulted in skipping of exon 6 precluding thereby the region responsible for cleavage of enzyme precursor. A missense mutation (p.V198A) resulted in skipping of exon 8 due to inactivation of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE) element. This is the first report of mutations affecting PPT and ESE in the ASAH1 gene resulting in FD. PMID:24355074

  18. MUSK, a new target for mutations causing congenital myasthenic syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Frederic Chevessier; Brice Faraut; Aymeric Ravel-Chapuis; Pascale Richard; Karen Gaudon; Stephanie Bauche ´; Cassandra Prioleau; Ruth Herbst; Evelyne Goillot; Christine Ioos; Jean-Philippe Azulay; Shahram Attarian; Jean-Paul Leroy; Emmanuel Fournier; Claire Legay; Laurent Schaeffer; Jeanine Koenig; Michel Fardeau; Bruno Eymard; Jean Pouget; Daniel Hantaõ

    2004-01-01

    We report the first case of a human neuromuscular transmission dysfunction due to mutations in the gene encoding the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK). Gene analysis identified two heteroallelic mutations, a frameshift mutation (c.220insC) and a missense mutation (V790M). The muscle biopsy showed dramatic pre- and postsynaptic structural abnormalities of the neuromuscular junction and severe decrease in acetylcholine receptor (AChR)

  19. Frequent lack of GNAS mutations in colorectal adenocarcinoma associated with GNAS-mutated villous adenoma.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shigeki; Ogawa, Reiko; Oshiro, Taihei; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kushima, Ryoji; Kanai, Yae

    2014-04-01

    Colorectal villous adenoma is thought to be associated with a high risk of progression to adenocarcinoma. To better characterize the genetic alterations involved in colorectal carcinogenesis related to villous adenoma, we analyzed mutations in APC, BRAF, KRAS, TP53, and GNAS in 12 colorectal adenocarcinomas associated with villous adenomas. APC, KRAS, and BRAF mutations were identified in five, 11, and one lesion, respectively, and most of these mutations were shared between the villous adenoma and the adenocarcinoma components in the respective lesions, except in one lesion with APC mutations and in two lesions with KRAS mutations. TP53 mutations were observed exclusively in four adenocarcinoma components, consistent with their role in the progression from adenoma to adenocarcinoma. Activating GNAS mutations were found in nine villous adenomas; however, unexpectedly, these mutations were shared only in three associated adenocarcinomas. Notably, all six adenocarcinomas with discordant GNAS mutation statuses were nonmucinous type, whereas all the other adenocarcinomas, including three adenocarcinomas associated with GNAS wild-type villous adenomas, were mucinous type. The current study suggests that GNAS-mutated villous adenomas may not necessarily be direct precursors of associated adenocarcinomas. At the same time, our observations support the role of activating GNAS mutations in increased mucin production in colorectal neoplasms. PMID:24470207

  20. Pathway-Driven Discovery of Rare Mutational Impact on Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Identifying driver mutation is important in understanding disease mechanism and future application of custom tailored therapeutic decision. Functional analysis of mutational impact usually focuses on the gene expression level of the mutated gene itself. However, complex regulatory network may cause differential gene expression among functional neighbors of the mutated gene. We suggest a new approach for discovering rare mutations that have real impact in the context of pathway; the philosophy of our method is iteratively combining rare mutations until no more mutations can be added under the condition that the combined mutational event can statistically discriminate pathway level mRNA expression between groups with and without mutational events. Breast cancer patients with somatic mutation and mRNA expression were analyzed by our approach. Our approach is shown to sensitively capture mutations that change pathway level mRNA expression, concurrently discovering important mutations previously reported in breast cancer such as TP53, PIK3CA, and RB1. In addition, out of 15,819 genes considered in breast cancer, our approach identified mutational events of 32 genes showing pathway level mRNA expression differences. PMID:24883302

  1. Identifying Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COSI

    2009-01-01

    In this environmental science activity (page 3 of the PDF), leaners will identify and explain the causes of erosion. They will observe the effects of erosion on the surrounding area and further explore examples of erosion online. An extension activity allows learners to make a hands-on model of soil erosion. Though this was created as a pre-visit activity for a workshop about water flow and erosion, it makes a great stand-alone activity as well!

  2. Evidence for mutation showers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jicheng; Gonzalez, Kelly D; Scaringe, William A; Tsai, Kimberly; Liu, Ning; Gu, Dongqing; Li, Wenyan; Hill, Kathleen A; Sommer, Steve S

    2007-05-15

    Mutants in the Big Blue transgenic mouse system show spontaneous clustered multiple mutations with unexpectedly high frequency, consistent with chronocoordinate events. We tested the prediction that the multiple mutations seen within the lacI mutation target sometimes occur in the context of chronocoordinate multiple mutations spanning multiple kilobases (mutation showers). Additional sequencing of mutants was performed in regions immediately flanking the lacI region (total of 10.7 kb). Nineteen additional mutations were found outside the lacI region ("ectomutations") from 10 mutants containing two or more lacI mutations, whereas only one ectomutation was found in 130 mutants with a single mutation (P < 0.0001). The mutation showers had an average of approximately one mutation per 3 kb. Four mutants showed closely spaced double mutations in the new sequence, and analysis of the spacing between these mutations revealed significant clustering (P = 0.0098). To determine the extent of the mutation showers, regions (8.5 kb total) remote from the lacI region (approximately 16-17 kb away) were sequenced. Only two additional ectomutations were found in these remote regions, consistent with mutation showers that generally do not extend more than approximately 30 kb. We conclude that mutation showers exist and that they constitute at least 0.2% and possibly 1% or more of mutational events observed in this system. The existence of mutation showers has implications for oncogenesis and evolution, raising the possibilities of "cancer in an instant" and "introns as sponges to reduce the deleterious impact of mutation showers." PMID:17485671

  3. Mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in malignant hyperthermia: Detection of a novel Tyr to ser mutation in a pedigree with associated centrl cores

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. A. Quane; K. E. Keating; J. M. S. Healy

    1994-01-01

    The ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) has been shown to be mutated in a small number of malignant hyperthermia (MH) predigrees. Missense mutations in this gene have also been identified in two families with central core disease (CCD), a rare myopathy closely associated with MH. In an effort to identify other RYR1 mutations responsible for MH and CCD, we used a

  4. Multiple mutations and mutation combinations in the sodium channel of permethrin resistant mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Lee; Reid, William R.; Xu, Qiang; Dong, Ke; Liu, Nannan

    2012-01-01

    A previous study identified 3 nonsynonymous and 6 synonymous mutations in the entire mosquito sodium channel of Culex quinquefasciatus, the prevalence of which were strongly correlated with levels of resistance and increased dramatically following insecticide selection. However, it is unclear whether this is unique to this specific resistant population or is a common mechanism in field mosquito populations in response to insecticide pressure. The current study therefore further characterized these mutations and their combinations in other field and permethrin selected Culex mosquitoes, finding that the co-existence of all 9 mutations was indeed correlated with the high levels of permethrin resistance in mosquitoes. Comparison of mutation combinations revealed several common mutation combinations presented across different field and permethrin selected populations in response to high levels of insecticide resistance, demonstrating that the co-existence of multiple mutations is a common event in response to insecticide resistance across different Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquito populations. PMID:23110250

  5. Evidence that proximal multiple mutations in Big Blue ® transgenic mice are dependent events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria L Buettner; Kathleen A Hill; William A Scaringe; Steve S Sommer

    2000-01-01

    To characterize the nature of multiple mutations in the tissues of an intact animal, the Big Blue® transgenic mouse mutation detection system was used to examine 1459 mutants from eight normal tissues and 507 mutants from 11 tumors. Multiple mutations occurred and predominantly doublet mutants were identified (i.e. two mutations within one mutant lacI gene), but multiplets of up to

  6. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis gene in men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc De Braekeleer; Claude Férec

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationship between mutations in the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene (CFTR mutations) and congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD). Two CFTR mutations were identified in 14.5% of the 449 men with CBAVD thus far reported in the literature while one CFTR mutation was found in another 48.1%. CBAVD appears to be a heterogeneous genetic condition,

  7. A novel germline mutation in Big Blue mice.

    PubMed

    Crabbe, Rory A; Prtenjaca, Anita; Tarnowski, Heather E; Hill, Kathleen A

    2009-03-01

    The Big Blue lacI mutation detection assay is well validated and has permitted detailed analysis of spontaneous mutations in individual tissues over the lifespan of the mouse. In a recent assay of spontaneous mutations, a novel lacI mutation (C354T) recurred in six of seven mutants with a second mutation. The frequency of spontaneous doublets (mutants with two nontandem mutations) was elevated 2.7-fold over that previously reported (Hill KA et al., [2004b]: Mutat Res 554:223-240) for normal tissues (6.3 x 10(-7) herein vs. 2.36 x 10(-7)). The average spacing between mutations in the doublets (237 bp) was greater than previously reported for spontaneous doublets. The frequency of C354T as a "hitchhiker" mutation in doublets was consistent with a germline mutation in one of 38 mutation targets in the Big Blue mouse genome. C354T is a missense mutation at a CpG dinucleotide producing a conservative amino acid change (Ala109Val) and a very light blue mutant phenotype. Mutant phenotypes of doublets with C354T were typical of the second mutation. C354T was observed in mutants from five tissues of five Big Blue mice. A bidirectional-PCR amplification of specific alleles (Bi-PASA) assay detected C354T in genomic DNA from multiple tissues of five Big Blue mice. These observations are consistent with a novel lacI C354T germline mutation in Big Blue mice that introduces a significant artifact in the analysis of spontaneous mutations. This finding reiterates the importance of identifying all mutations and examining new mutations in the context of our increasingly detailed knowledge of features of spontaneous murine mutations. PMID:19107908

  8. KIT gene exon 11 mutations in canine malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Chu, Pei-Yi; Pan, Siou-Li; Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Lee, Jihjong; Yeh, Lih-Seng; Liao, Albert T

    2013-05-01

    The proto-oncogene KIT encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase which has been shown to be upregulated in canine melanomas. KIT mutations lead to constitutive phosphorylation and activation of KIT in the absence of ligand binding. The presence of KIT mutations and KIT protein expression was examined in a cohort of 49 dogs with canine malignant melanoma. An exon 11 synonymous nucleotide 1743C?T mutation was identified in five cases in which one also harbored a L579P mutation. Tumors that harbored the KIT exon 11 mutation(s) correlated significantly with disease recurrence (P = 0.05). All 36 melanomas available for immunohistochemical analysis showed either weak (16 cases, 44.4%) or strong (20 cases, 55.6%) expression of the KIT protein. The five KIT mutation carriers were all strongly positive for KIT by immunohistochemical staining. These findings suggest that a subset of canine malignant melanomas harbors a KIT exon 11 mutation. PMID:23069279

  9. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E. [and others

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  10. How old is this mutation? - a study of three Ashkenazi Jewish founder mutations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several founder mutations leading to increased risk of cancer among Ashkenazi Jewish individuals have been identified, and some estimates of the age of the mutations have been published. A variety of different methods have been used previously to estimate the age of the mutations. Here three datasets containing genotype information near known founder mutations are reanalyzed in order to compare three approaches for estimating the age of a mutation. The methods are: (a) the single marker method used by Risch et al., (1995); (b) the intra-allelic coalescent model known as DMLE, and (c) the Goldgar method proposed in Neuhausen et al. (1996), and modified slightly by our group. The three mutations analyzed were MSH2*1906 G->C, APC*I1307K, and BRCA2*6174delT. Results All methods depend on accurate estimates of inter-marker recombination rates. The modified Goldgar method allows for marker mutation as well as recombination, but requires prior estimates of the possible haplotypes carrying the mutation for each individual. It does not incorporate population growth rates. The DMLE method simultaneously estimates the haplotypes with the mutation age, and builds in the population growth rate. The single marker estimates, however, are more sensitive to the recombination rates and are unstable. Mutation age estimates based on DMLE are 16.8 generations for MSH2 (95% credible interval (13, 23)), 106 generations for I1037K (86-129), and 90 generations for 6174delT (71-114). Conclusions For recent founder mutations where marker mutations are unlikely to have occurred, both DMLE and the Goldgar method can give good results. Caution is necessary for older mutations, especially if the effective population size may have remained small for a long period of time. PMID:20470408

  11. Mutation Clustering Shamaila Hussain

    E-print Network

    Singer, Jeremy

    Mutation Clustering Shamaila Hussain shamaila.2.hussain@kcl.ac.uk Student Number: 0425528/2008 Department of Computer Science September 5, 2008 #12;Abstract Mutation testing, a type of white box testing quality. This form of testing deals with mutating parts of the program intentionally and then detecting

  12. Mutation accumulation in Tetrahymena

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Patrícia H Brito; Elsa Guilherme; Helena Soares; Isabel Gordo

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The rate and fitness effects of mutations are key in understanding the evolution of every species. Traditionally, these parameters are estimated in mutation accumulation experiments where replicate lines are propagated in conditions that allow mutations to randomly accumulate without the purging effect of natural selection. These experiments have been performed with many model organisms but we still lack empirical

  13. Driver and passenger mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pon, Julia R; Marra, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing has allowed identification of millions of somatic mutations and epigenetic changes in cancer cells. A key challenge in interpreting cancer genomes and epigenomes is distinguishing which genetic and epigenetic changes are drivers of cancer development. Frequency-based and function-based approaches have been developed to identify candidate drivers; we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of these methods as well as their latest refinements. We focus particularly on identification of the types of drivers most likely to be missed, such as genes affected by copy number alterations, mutations in noncoding regions, dysregulation of microRNA, epigenetic changes, and mutations in chromatin modifiers. PMID:25340638

  14. Novel recurrently mutated genes in African American colon cancers.

    PubMed

    Guda, Kishore; Veigl, Martina L; Varadan, Vinay; Nosrati, Arman; Ravi, Lakshmeswari; Lutterbaugh, James; Beard, Lydia; Willson, James K V; Sedwick, W David; Wang, Zhenghe John; Molyneaux, Neil; Miron, Alexander; Adams, Mark D; Elston, Robert C; Markowitz, Sanford D; Willis, Joseph E

    2015-01-27

    We used whole-exome and targeted sequencing to characterize somatic mutations in 103 colorectal cancers (CRC) from African Americans, identifying 20 new genes as significantly mutated in CRC. Resequencing 129 Caucasian derived CRCs confirmed a 15-gene set as a preferential target for mutations in African American CRCs. Two predominant genes, ephrin type A receptor 6 (EPHA6) and folliculin (FLCN), with mutations exclusive to African American CRCs, are by genetic and biological criteria highly likely African American CRC driver genes. These previously unsuspected differences in the mutational landscapes of CRCs arising among individuals of different ethnicities have potential to impact on broader disparities in cancer behaviors. PMID:25583493

  15. Mutational characterization of ATP7B gene in 103 Wilson's disease patients from Southern China: identification of three novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhisheng; Huang, Yeqing; Liu, Aiqun; Diao, Shengpeng; Yu, Qingyun; Peng, Zhongxing; Hong, Mingfan

    2014-10-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive inheritance disorder of copper metabolism due to mutations in the ATP7B gene. The distribution of ATP7B gene mutations is diverse in different population. This study aimed to examine the genotypes of the ATP7B mutant alleles in WD patients from Southern China. Genomic DNA was extracted from 103 WD patients and 60 healthy patients. Mutations were screened and detected by DNA sequencing. A total of 51 different ATP7B mutations were identified in WD patients, including six homozygous, 51 compound heterozygous, and 39 single heterozygotes. Three mutations were found to be novel, including one missense mutation (c.2549C>T) and two frameshift mutations (c.3851_3876del and c.1057delC). The most frequent mutations are Arg778Leu (18.93%), Ile1148Thr (8.74%), and Pro992Leu (4.37%). Different from the published results of early studies, Ile1148Thr was found to be the second common mutation in our cohort. The highest mutation detection rate was on exon 8 (43.69%), followed by exon 16 (24.27%), and exon 12 (17.48%). The total mutation detection rate on exon 8, 12, and 16 was 85.44%. No ATP7B gene mutation was found in healthy patients. In conclusion, we identified three novel mutations and Ile1148Thr as another hotspot mutation in WD patients from Southern China. Most of the mutations can be detected by screening exon 8, 12, and 16. Our research has further enriched the mutation spectrum of the ATP7B gene in Chinese and may help to develop genetic screening strategies of WD. PMID:25089800

  16. NMNAT1 mutations cause Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Marni J; Zhang, Qi; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Kannabiran, Chitra; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Chakarova, Christina; Audo, Isabelle; Mackay, Donna S; Zeitz, Christina; Borman, Arundhati Dev; Staniszewska, Magdalena; Shukla, Rachna; Palavalli, Lakshmi; Mohand-Said, Saddek; Waseem, Naushin H; Jalali, Subhadra; Perin, Juan C; Place, Emily; Ostrovsky, Julian; Xiao, Rui; Bhattacharya, Shomi S; Consugar, Mark; Webster, Andrew R; Sahel, José-Alain; Moore, Anthony T; Berson, Eliot L; Liu, Qin; Gai, Xiaowu; Pierce, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is an infantile-onset form of inherited retinal degeneration characterized by severe vision loss1, 2. Two-thirds of LCA cases are caused by mutations in 17 known disease genes3 (RetNet Retinal Information Network). Using exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense mutation (c.25G>A, p.Val9Met) in NMNAT1 as likely disease-causing in two siblings of a consanguineous Pakistani kindred affected by LCA. This mutation segregated with disease in their kindred, including in three other children with LCA. NMNAT1 resides in the previously identified LCA9 locus and encodes the nuclear isoform of nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme in nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) biosynthesis4, 5. Functional studies showed the p.Val9Met mutation decreased NMNAT1 enzyme activity. Sequencing NMNAT1 in 284 unrelated LCA families identified 14 rare mutations in 13 additional affected individuals. These results are the first to link an NMNAT isoform to disease and indicate that NMNAT1 mutations cause LCA. PMID:22842227

  17. Novel recurrently mutated genes and a prognostic mutation signature in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jun; Wu, William K K; Li, Xiangchun; He, Jun; Li, Xiao-Xing; Ng, Simon S M; Yu, Chang; Gao, Zhibo; Yang, Jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Qiaoxiu; Liang, Qiaoyi; Pan, Yi; Tong, Joanna H; To, Ka F; Wong, Nathalie; Zhang, Ning; Chen, Jie; Lu, Youyong; Lai, Paul B S; Chan, Francis K L; Li, Yingrui; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-01-01

    Background Characterisation of colorectal cancer (CRC) genomes by next-generation sequencing has led to the discovery of novel recurrently mutated genes. Nevertheless, genomic data has not yet been used for CRC prognostication. Objective To identify recurrent somatic mutations with prognostic significance in patients with CRC. Method Exome sequencing was performed to identify somatic mutations in tumour tissues of 22 patients with CRC, followed by validation of 187 recurrent and pathway-related genes using targeted capture sequencing in additional 160 cases. Results Seven significantly mutated genes, including four reported (APC, TP53, KRAS and SMAD4) and three novel recurrently mutated genes (CDH10, FAT4 and DOCK2), exhibited high mutation prevalence (6–14% for novel cancer genes) and higher-than-expected number of non-silent mutations in our CRC cohort. For prognostication, a five-gene-signature (CDH10, COL6A3, SMAD4, TMEM132D, VCAN) was devised, in which mutation(s) in one or more of these genes was significantly associated with better overall survival independent of tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) staging. The median survival time was 80.4?months in the mutant group versus 42.4?months in the wild type group (p=0.0051). The prognostic significance of this signature was successfully verified using the data set from the Cancer Genome Atlas study. Conclusions The application of next-generation sequencing has led to the identification of three novel significantly mutated genes in CRC and a mutation signature that predicts survival outcomes for stratifying patients with CRC independent of TNM staging. PMID:24951259

  18. Early p53 mutations in nondysplastic Barrett's tissue detected by the restriction site mutation (RSM) methodology

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, G J S; Doak, S H; Griffiths, A P; Tofazzal, N; Shah, V; Baxter, J N; Parry, J M

    2003-01-01

    Barrett's oesophagus is a premalignant condition whose incidence is rising dramatically. Molecular markers are urgently needed to identify Barrett's patients at the highest risk of cancer progression. To this end, we have used a rapid molecular technique, restriction site mutation (RSM), to detect low-frequency mutations in the p53 tumour suppressor gene in premalignant Barrett's tissues of cancer-free patients. In total, 38 endoscopically diagnosed Barrett's patients with a range of histological stages of Barrett's progression, plus four control patients without Barrett's oesophagus, were analysed for early p53 mutations. Tissue samples taken from these patients (93 samples in total) were analysed for the presence of low-frequency p53 mutations at hotspot codons: 175, 213, 248, 249, 282. In total, 13 of the 38 Barrett's patients were shown to possess a p53 mutation in at least one sample (no mutations in the four control patients). Although no statistically significant associations were found, p53 mutations reflected histological progression in Barrett's patients with p53 mutations found in 30% of metaplasia patients (P=0.4) and low-grade dysplasia patients (P=0.33) and 45% of high-grade dysplasia patients (P=0.15). Detected p53 mutations were mainly GC to AT transitions at CpG sites. PMID:12698195

  19. A mutation screen in patients with Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Bögershausen, Nina; Alanay, Yasemin; Simsek Kiper, Pelin Ozlem; Plume, Nadine; Keupp, Katharina; Pohl, Esther; Pawlik, Barbara; Rachwalski, Martin; Milz, Esther; Thoenes, Michaela; Albrecht, Beate; Prott, Eva-Christina; Lehmkühler, Margret; Demuth, Stephanie; Utine, Gülen Eda; Boduroglu, Koray; Frankenbusch, Katja; Borck, Guntram; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Yigit, Gökhan; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is one of the classical, clinically well-known multiple anomalies/mental retardation syndromes, mainly characterized by a very distinctive facial appearance in combination with additional clinical signs such as developmental delay, short stature, persistent fingerpads, and urogenital tract anomalies. In our study, we sequenced all 54 coding exons of the recently identified MLL2 gene in 34 patients with Kabuki syndrome. We identified 18 distinct mutations in 19 patients, 11 of 12 tested de novo. Mutations were located all over the gene and included three nonsense mutations, two splice-site mutations, six small deletions or insertions, and seven missense mutations. We compared frequencies of clinical symptoms in MLL2 mutation carriers versus non-carriers. MLL2 mutation carriers significantly more often presented with short stature and renal anomalies (p = 0.026 and 0.031, respectively), and in addition, MLL2 carriers obviously showed more frequently a typical facial gestalt (17/19) compared with non-carriers (9/15), although this result was not statistically significant (p = 0.1). Mutation-negative patients were subsequently tested for mutations in ten functional candidate genes (e.g. MLL, ASC2, ASH2L, and WDR5), but no convincing causative mutations could be found. Our results indicate that MLL2 is the major gene for Kabuki syndrome with a wide spectrum of de novo mutations and strongly suggest further genetic heterogeneity. PMID:21607748

  20. De novo discovery of mutated driver pathways in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vandin, Fabio; Upfal, Eli; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    2012-01-01

    Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are enabling genome-wide measurements of somatic mutations in large numbers of cancer patients. A major challenge in the interpretation of these data is to distinguish functional “driver mutations” important for cancer development from random “passenger mutations.” A common approach for identifying driver mutations is to find genes that are mutated at significant frequency in a large cohort of cancer genomes. This approach is confounded by the observation that driver mutations target multiple cellular signaling and regulatory pathways. Thus, each cancer patient may exhibit a different combination of mutations that are sufficient to perturb these pathways. This mutational heterogeneity presents a problem for predicting driver mutations solely from their frequency of occurrence. We introduce two combinatorial properties, coverage and exclusivity, that distinguish driver pathways, or groups of genes containing driver mutations, from groups of genes with passenger mutations. We derive two algorithms, called Dendrix, to find driver pathways de novo from somatic mutation data. We apply Dendrix to analyze somatic mutation data from 623 genes in 188 lung adenocarcinoma patients, 601 genes in 84 glioblastoma patients, and 238 known mutations in 1000 patients with various cancers. In all data sets, we find groups of genes that are mutated in large subsets of patients and whose mutations are approximately exclusive. Our Dendrix algorithms scale to whole-genome analysis of thousands of patients and thus will prove useful for larger data sets to come from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and other large-scale cancer genome sequencing projects. PMID:21653252

  1. Novel KRAS Gene Mutations in Sporadic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naser, Walid M.; Shawarby, Mohamed A.; Al-Tamimi, Dalal M.; Seth, Arun; Al-Quorain, Abdulaziz; Nemer, Areej M. Al; Albagha, Omar M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this article, we report 7 novel KRAS gene mutations discovered while retrospectively studying the prevalence and pattern of KRAS mutations in cancerous tissue obtained from 56 Saudi sporadic colorectal cancer patients from the Eastern Province. Methods Genomic DNA was extracted from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded cancerous and noncancerous colorectal tissues. Successful and specific PCR products were then bi-directionally sequenced to detect exon 4 mutations while Mutector II Detection Kits were used for identifying mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61. The functional impact of the novel mutations was assessed using bioinformatics tools and molecular modeling. Results KRAS gene mutations were detected in the cancer tissue of 24 cases (42.85%). Of these, 11 had exon 4 mutations (19.64%). They harbored 8 different mutations all of which except two altered the KRAS protein amino acid sequence and all except one were novel as revealed by COSMIC database. The detected novel mutations were found to be somatic. One mutation is predicted to be benign. The remaining mutations are predicted to cause substantial changes in the protein structure. Of these, the Q150X nonsense mutation is the second truncating mutation to be reported in colorectal cancer in the literature. Conclusions Our discovery of novel exon 4 KRAS mutations that are, so far, unique to Saudi colorectal cancer patients may be attributed to environmental factors and/or racial/ethnic variations due to genetic differences. Alternatively, it may be related to paucity of clinical studies on mutations other than those in codons 12, 13, 61 and 146. Further KRAS testing on a large number of patients of various ethnicities, particularly beyond the most common hotspot alleles in exons 2 and 3 is needed to assess the prevalence and explore the exact prognostic and predictive significance of the discovered novel mutations as well as their possible role in colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:25412182

  2. SMAL: A Resource of Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wen; Ning, Lu-Wen; Ye, Yuan-Nong; Li, Shi-Jie; Zhou, Hui-Qi; Huang, Jian; Guo, Feng-Biao

    2014-05-01

    Mutation is the ultimate source of genetic variation and evolution. Mutation accumulation (MA) experiments are an alternative approach to study de novo mutation events directly. We have constructed a resource of Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Lines (SMAL; http://cefg.uestc.edu.cn/smal), which contains all the current publicly available MA lines identified by high-throughput sequencing. We have relocated and mapped the mutations based on the most recent genome annotations. A total of 5,608 single base mutations and 540 other mutations were obtained and are recorded in the current version of the SMAL database. The integrated data in SMAL provide detailed information that can be used in new theoretical analyses. We believe that the SMAL resource will help researchers better understand the processes of genetic variation and the incidence of disease. PMID:24531082

  3. Telomerase mutations in smokers with severe emphysema.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Susan E; Chen, Julian J L; Podlevsky, Joshua D; Alder, Jonathan K; Hansel, Nadia N; Mathias, Rasika A; Qi, Xiaodong; Rafaels, Nicholas M; Wise, Robert A; Silverman, Edwin K; Barnes, Kathleen C; Armanios, Mary

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the essential telomerase genes TERT and TR cause familial pulmonary fibrosis; however, in telomerase-null mice, short telomeres predispose to emphysema after chronic cigarette smoke exposure. Here, we tested whether telomerase mutations are a risk factor for human emphysema by examining their frequency in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Across two independent cohorts, we found 3 of 292 severe COPD cases carried deleterious mutations in TERT (1%). This prevalence is comparable to the frequency of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency documented in this population. The TERT mutations compromised telomerase catalytic activity, and mutation carriers had short telomeres. Telomerase mutation carriers with emphysema were predominantly female and had an increased incidence of pneumothorax. In families, emphysema showed an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, along with pulmonary fibrosis and other telomere syndrome features, but manifested only in smokers. Our findings identify germline mutations in telomerase as a Mendelian risk factor for COPD susceptibility that clusters in autosomal dominant families with telomere-mediated disease including pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25562321

  4. Novel ?eta (?)-Thalassemia Mutation in Turkish Children.

    PubMed

    Ulasli, Mustafa; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Kirkbes, Sevil; Bay, Ali; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Bayraktar, Recep; Igci, Mehri; Ergun, Sercan; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Aytekin, Elif; Arslan, Ahmet

    2015-06-01

    Beta (?)-thalassemia is the most frequently observed hereditary blood disorder in the world. It is characterized by deficiency of hemoglobin ?-globin gene and is also a profoundly heterogeneous both at the molecular and clinical level. In the case of ?-thalassemia, there is reduced (?(+) type) or absent (?(o) type) synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. ?-Thalassemia clinically occurs in three main forms: major, intermedia and minor according to requirement of transfusion. The objective of this study was to evaluate ?-thalassemia mutations in 89 patients ranging from 2 months to 16 years of age, who enrolled to Medical School Research and Training Hospital, Gaziantep University. The direct DNA sequence analysis was performed for mutation scanning of ?-globin gene. 89 children with ?-Thalassemia including all types were analyzed, 16 different ?-thalassemia mutations were detected. We have also identified a novel mutation (HBB.c.-80delT, rs397509430) in the promoter region (-30 TATA box) of ?-globin gene, and clinical data of patient having novel mutation was given. The ?-Thalassemia mutations were determined as ?-Thalassemia major type in 42 patients (47.19 %), ?-Thalassemia intermedia in 4 (4.49 %), ?-Thalassemia minor in 43, (48.31 %) patients. The most frequent mutation was IVS I-110 G>A, followed by IVS I-1 G>A, IVS I-6 T>C, IVS II-1 G>A, respectively. PMID:25825561

  5. Mitochondrial DNA replication and disease: insights from DNA polymerase ? mutations

    PubMed Central

    Stumpf, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    DNA polymerase ? (pol ?), encoded by POLG, is responsible for replicating human mitochondrial DNA. About 150 mutations in the human POLG have been identified in patients with mitochondrial diseases such as Alpers syndrome, progressive external ophthalmoplegia, and ataxia-neuropathy syndromes. Because many of the mutations are described in single citations with no genotypic family history, it is important to ascertain which mutations cause or contribute to mitochondrial disease. The vast majority of data about POLG mutations has been generated from biochemical characterizations of recombinant pol ?. However, recently, the study of mitochondrial dysfunction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mouse models provides important in vivo evidence for the role of POLG mutations in disease. Also, the published 3D-structure of the human pol ? assists in explaining some of the biochemical and genetic properties of the mutants. This review summarizes the current evidence that identifies and explains disease-causing POLG mutations. PMID:20927567

  6. Novel pathogenic mutations and skin biopsy analysis in Knobloch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar; Kague, Erika; Bagatini, Kelly; Tu, Hongmin; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Carvalhaes, Lorenza; Gava, Elisandra; de Oliveira, Gisele; Godoi, Paulo; Oliva, Glaucius; Kitten, Gregory; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Passos-Bueno, Maria-Rita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To facilitate future diagnosis of Knobloch syndrome (KS) and better understand its etiology, we sought to identify not yet described COL18A1 mutations in KS patients. In addition, we tested whether mutations in this gene lead to absence of the COL18A1 gene product and attempted to better characterize the functional effect of a previously reported missense mutation. Methods Direct sequencing of COL18A1 exons was performed in KS patients from four unrelated pedigrees. We used immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsies to evaluate the presence of type XVIII collagen in four KS patients carrying two already described mutations: c.3277C>T, a nonsense mutation, and c.3601G>A, a missense mutation. Furthermore, we determined the binding properties of the mutated endostatin domain p.A1381T (c.3601G>A) to extracellular matrix proteins using ELISA and surface plasmon resonance assays. Results We identified four novel mutations in COL18A1, including a large deletion involving exon 41. Skin biopsies from KS patients revealed lack of type XVIII collagen in epithelial basement membranes and blood vessels. We also found a reduced affinity of p.A1381T endostatin to some extracellular matrix components. Conclusions COL18A1 mutations involved in Knobloch syndrome have a distribution bias toward the coding exons of the C-terminal end. Large deletions must also be considered when point mutations are not identified in patients with characteristic KS phenotype. We report, for the first time, lack of type XVIII collagen in KS patients by immunofluorescent histochemistry in skin biopsy samples. As a final point, we suggest the employment of this technique as a preliminary and complementary test for diagnosis of KS in cases when mutation screening either does not detect mutations or reveals mutations of uncertain effect, such as the p.A1381T change. PMID:19390655

  7. Prevalence of rare mitochondrial DNA mutations in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Lebre, Anne Sophie; Jardel, Claude; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Hoarau, Claire; Maoulida, Hassani; Charrier, Nathanaël; Gai, Xiaowu; Xie, Hongbo M; Ferre, Marc; Fragaki, Konstantina; Hardy, Gaëlle; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte; Marlin, Sandrine; Dhaenens, Claire Marie; Slama, Abdelhamid; Rocher, Christophe; Paul Bonnefont, Jean; Rötig, Agnès; Aoutil, Nadia; Gilleron, Mylène; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Reynier, Pascal; Ceresuela, Jennifer; Jonard, Laurence; Devos, Aurore; Espil-Taris, Caroline; Martinez, Delphine; Gaignard, Pauline; Le Quan Sang, Kim-Hanh; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Falk, Marni J; Florentz, Catherine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases are rare disorders whose prevalence is estimated around 1 in 5000. Patients are usually tested only for deletions and for common mutations of mtDNA which account for 5–40% of cases, depending on the study. However, the prevalence of rare mtDNA mutations is not known. Methods We analysed the whole mtDNA in a cohort of 743 patients suspected of manifesting a mitochondrial disease, after excluding deletions and common mutations. Both heteroplasmic and homoplasmic variants were identified using two complementary strategies (Surveyor and MitoChip). Multiple correspondence analyses followed by hierarchical ascendant cluster process were used to explore relationships between clinical spectrum, age at onset and localisation of mutations. Results 7.4% of deleterious mutations and 22.4% of novel putative mutations were identified. Pathogenic heteroplasmic mutations were more frequent than homoplasmic mutations (4.6% vs 2.8%). Patients carrying deleterious mutations showed symptoms before 16?years of age in 67% of cases. Early onset disease (<1?year) was significantly associated with mutations in protein coding genes (mainly in complex I) while late onset disorders (>16?years) were associated with mutations in tRNA genes. MTND5 and MTND6 genes were identified as ‘hotspots’ of mutations, with Leigh syndrome accounting for the large majority of associated phenotypes. Conclusions Rare mitochondrial DNA mutations probably account for more than 7.4% of patients with respiratory chain deficiency. This study shows that a comprehensive analysis of mtDNA is essential, and should include young children, for an accurate diagnosis that is now accessible with the development of next generation sequencing technology. PMID:23847141

  8. Germ-line and somatic DICER1 mutations in pineoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    de Kock, Leanne; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Miller, Suzanne; Choong, Catherine S.; Gottardo, Nicholas G.; Kees, Ursula R.; Rednam, Surya P.; van Hest, Liselotte P.; Jongmans, Marjolijn C.; Jhangiani, Shalini; Lupski, James R.; Zacharin, Margaret; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Huang, Annie; Priest, John R.; Perry, Arie; Mueller, Sabine; Albrecht, Steffen; Malkin, David; Grundy, Richard G.

    2015-01-01

    Germ-line RB-1 mutations predispose to pineoblastoma (PinB), but other predisposing genetic factors are not well established. We recently identifed a germ-line DICER1 mutation in a child with a PinB. This was accompanied by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the wild-type allele within the tumour. We set out to establish the prevalence of DICER1 mutations in an opportunistically ascertained series of PinBs. Twenty-one PinB cases were studied: eighteen cases had not undergone previous testing for DICER1 mutations; three patients were known carriers of germ-line DICER1 mutations. The eighteen PinBs were sequenced by Sanger and/or Fluidigm-based next-generation sequencing to identify DICER1 mutations in blood gDNA and/or tumour gDNA. Testing for somatic DICER1 mutations was also conducted on one case with a known germ-line DICER1 mutation. From the eighteen PinBs, we identified four deleterious DICER1 mutations, three of which were germ line in origin, and one for which a germ line versus somatic origin could not be determined; in all four, the second allele was also inactivated leading to complete loss of DICER1 protein. No somatic DICER1 RNase IIIb mutations were identified. One PinB arising in a germ-line DICER1 mutation carrier was found to have LOH. This study suggests that germ-line DICER1 mutations make a clinically significant contribution to PinB, establishing DICER1 as an important susceptibility gene for PinB and demonstrates PinB to be a manifestation of a germ-line DICER1 mutation. The means by which the second allele is inactivated may differ from other DICER1-related tumours. PMID:25022261

  9. All-codon scanning identifies p53 cancer rescue mutations

    E-print Network

    Lathrop, Richard H.

    ,2 , Linda V. Hall1 , Kirsty Salmon1 , G. Wesley Hatfield1,3,4 , Richard H. Lathrop1,2,5, * and Peter Kaiser6 of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, 4 Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, 5 Department with modified properties. We describe the fast and simple All- Codon Scanning (ACS) strategy that creates

  10. Distinct clinical characteristics of myeloproliferative neoplasms with calreticulin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Krahling, Tunde; Balassa, Katalin; Halm, Gabriella; Bors, Andras; Koszarska, Magdalena; Batai, Arpad; Dolgos, Janos; Csomor, Judit; Egyed, Miklos; Sipos, Andrea; Remenyi, Peter; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Somatic insertions/deletions in the calreticulin gene have recently been discovered to be causative alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms. A combination of qualitative and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, fragment-sizing, high resolution melting and Sanger-sequencing was applied for the detection of three driver mutations (in Janus kinase 2, calreticulin and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene genes) in 289 cases of essential thrombocythemia and 99 cases of primary myelofibrosis. In essential thrombocythemia, 154 (53%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 96 (33%) calreticulin, 9 (3%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 30 triple-negative (11%) cases were identified, while in primary myelofibrosis 56 (57%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 25 (25%) calreticulin, 7 (7%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 11 (11%) triple-negative cases were identified. Patients positive for the calreticulin mutation were younger and had higher platelet counts compared to Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive counterparts. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with essential thrombocythemia showed a lower risk of developing venous thrombosis, but no difference in overall survival. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with primary myelofibrosis had a better overall survival compared to that of the Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive (P=0.04) or triple-negative cases (P=0.01). Type 2 calreticulin mutation occurred more frequently in essential thrombocythemia than in primary myelofibrosis (P=0.049). In essential thrombocythemia, the calreticulin mutational load was higher than the Janus kinase 2 mutational load (P<0.001), and increased gradually in advanced stages. Calreticulin mutational load influenced blood counts even at the time point of diagnosis in essential thrombocythemia. We confirm that calreticulin mutation is associated with distinct clinical characteristics and explored relationships between mutation type, load and clinical outcome. PMID:24895336

  11. Screening for Germ-Line Rearrangements and Regulatory Mutations in BRCA1 Led to the Identification of Four New Deletions1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nadine Puget; Dominique Stoppa-Lyonnet; Olga M. Sinilnikova; Sabine Pages; Henry T. Lynch; Gilbert M. Lenoir; Sylvie Mazoyer

    1999-01-01

    Most previous BRCA1 mutation screening studies conducted on breast cancer families were aimed at identifying mutations in the coding se- quence and splice sites. Mutations in the promoter and untranslated regions, and large rearrangements are missed by standard mutation detection strategies. To look specifically for such germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene, we have analyzed a series of 27 American

  12. Emerging patterns of somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Ian R.; Takahashi, Koichi; Futreal, P. Andrew; Chin, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    The advance in technological tools for massively parallel, high-throughput sequencing of DNA has enabled the comprehensive characterization of somatic mutations in large number of tumor samples. Here, we review recent cancer genomic studies that have assembled emerging views of the landscapes of somatic mutations through deep sequencing analyses of the coding exomes and whole genomes in various cancer types. We discuss the comparative genomics of different cancers, including mutation rates, spectrums, and roles of environmental insults that influence these processes. We highlight the developing statistical approaches used to identify significantly mutated genes, and discuss the emerging biological and clinical insights from such analyses as well as the challenges ahead translating these genomic data into clinical impacts. PMID:24022702

  13. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöll?si, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  14. Human somatic mutation assays as biomarkers of carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, P.J.E.; Smith, M.T. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Hooper, K. (California Dept. of Health Services, Berkeley (United States))

    1991-08-01

    This paper describes four assays that detect somatic gene mutations in humans: the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase assay, the glycophorin A assay, the HLA-A assay, and the sickle cell hemoglobin assay. Somatic gene mutations can be considered a biomarker of carcinogenesis, and assays for somatic mutation may assist epidemiologists in studies that attempt to identify factors associated with increased risks of cancer. Practical aspects of the use of these assays are discussed.

  15. The spectrum of Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) mutations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Touitou

    2001-01-01

    Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is the prototype of a group of inherited inflammatory disorders. The gene (MEFV) responsible for this disease, comprises 10 exons and 781 codons. Twenty-nine mutations, most located in the last exon, have been identified so far. It is unclear whether all are true disease-causing mutations. Five founder mutations, V726A, M694V, M694I, M680I and E148Q account for

  16. Molecular characterization of gallbladder cancer using somatic mutation profiling.

    PubMed

    Javle, Milind; Rashid, Asif; Churi, Chaitanya; Kar, Siddhartha; Zuo, Mingxin; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Nogueras-Gonzalez, Graciela M; Janku, Filip; Shroff, Rachna T; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicholas; Curley, Steven; Mills, Gordon; Roa, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    Gallbladder cancer is relatively uncommon, with a high incidence in certain geographic locations, including Latin America, East and South Asia, and Eastern Europe. Molecular characterization of this disease has been limited, and targeted therapy options for advanced disease remain an open area of investigation. In the present study, surgical pathology obtained from resected gallbladder cancer cases (n = 72) was examined for the presence of targetable, somatic mutations. All cases were formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE). Two approaches were used: (a) mass spectroscopy-based profiling for 159 point ("hot spot") mutations in 33 genes commonly involved in solid tumors and (b) next-generation sequencing (NGS) platform that examined the complete coding sequence of in 182 cancer-related genes. Fifty-seven cases were analyzed for hot spot mutations; and 15, for NGS. Fourteen hot spot mutations were identified in 9 cases. Of these, KRAS mutation was significantly associated with poor survival on multivariate analysis. Other targetable mutations included PIK3CA (n = 2) and ALK (n = 1). On NGS, 26 mutations were noted in 15 cases. TP53 and PI3 kinase pathway (STK11, RICTOR, TSC2) mutations were common. One case had FGF10 amplification, whereas another had FGF3-TACC gene fusion, not previously described in gallbladder cancer. In conclusion, somatic mutation profiling using archival FFPE samples from gallbladder cancer is feasible. NGS, in particular, may be a useful platform for identifying novel mutations for targeted therapy. PMID:24508317

  17. Renal Aplasia in Humans Is Associated with RET Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Michael A.; Safford, Shawn D.; Reeves, Justin G.; Jackson, Margaret E.; Freemerman, Alex J.

    2008-01-01

    In animal models, kidney formation is known to be controlled by the proteins RET, GDNF, and GFRA1; however, no human studies to date have shown an association between abnormal kidney development and mutation of these genes. We hypothesized that stillborn fetuses with congenital renal agenesis or severe dysplasia would possess mutations in RET, GDNF, or GFRA1. We assayed for mutations in these genes in 33 stillborn fetuses that had bilateral or unilateral renal agenesis (29 subjects) or severe congenital renal dysplasia (4 subjects). Mutations in RET were found in 7 of 19 fetuses with bilateral renal agenesis (37%) and 2 of 10 fetuses (20%) with unilateral agenesis. In two fetuses, there were two different RET mutations found, and a total of ten different sequence variations were identified. We also investigated whether these mutations affected RET activation; in each case, RET phosphorylation was either absent or constitutively activated. A GNDF mutation was identified in only one fetus with unilateral agenesis; this subject also had two RET mutations. No GFRA1 mutations were seen in any fetuses. These data suggest that in humans, mutations in RET and GDNF may contribute significantly to abnormal kidney development. PMID:18252215

  18. Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Studies in

    E-print Network

    Keightley, Peter

    Spontaneous Mutation Accumulation Studies in Evolutionary Genetics Daniel L. Halligan and Peter D of mutation effects, dominance, epistasis, genotype-environment interaction, mutation rate Abstract Mutation accumulation (MA) experiments, in which mutations are allowed to drift to fixation in inbred lines, have been

  19. Mutational analysis of genes coding for cell surface proteins in colorectal cancer cell lines reveal novel altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Bruna R.; Bettoni, Fabiana; Koyama, Fernanda C.; Navarro, Fabio C.P.; Perez, Rodrigo O.; Mariadason, John; Sieber, Oliver M.; Strausberg, Robert L.; Simpson, Andrew J.G.; Jardim, Denis L.F.; Reis, Luiz Fernando L.; Parmigiani, Raphael B.; Galante, Pedro A.F.; Camargo, Anamaria A.

    2014-01-01

    We carried out a mutational analysis of 3,594 genes coding for cell surface proteins (Surfaceome) in 23 colorectal cancer cell lines, searching for new altered pathways, druggable mutations and mutated epitopes for targeted therapy in colorectal cancer. A total of 3,944 somatic non-synonymous substitutions and 595 InDels, occurring in 2,061 (57%) Surfaceome genes were catalogued. We identified 48 genes not previously described as mutated in colorectal tumors in the TCGA database, including genes that are mutated and expressed in >10% of the cell lines (SEMA4C, FGFRL1, PKD1, FAM38A, WDR81, TMEM136, SLC36A1, SLC26A6, IGFLR1). Analysis of these genes uncovered important roles for FGF and SEMA4 signaling in colorectal cancer with possible therapeutic implications. We also found that cell lines express on average 11 druggable mutations, including frequent mutations (>20%) in the receptor tyrosine kinases AXL and EPHA2, which have not been previously considered as potential targets for colorectal cancer. Finally, we identified 82 cell surface mutated epitopes, however expression of only 30% of these epitopes was detected in our cell lines. Notwithstanding, 92% of these epitopes were expressed in cell lines with the mutator phenotype, opening new venues for the use of “general” immune checkpoint drugs in this subset of patients. PMID:25193853

  20. Mutation profiles of phenylketonuria in Quebec populations: evidence of stratification and novel mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Rozen, R.; Mascisch, A.; Lambert, M.; Laframboise, R.; Scriver, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Independent phenylketonuria (PKU) chromosomes (n = 109) representing 80% of a proband cohort in Quebec province carry 18 different identified mutations in 20 different mutation/haplotype combinations. The study reported here, the third in a series on Quebec populations, was done in the Montreal region and predominantly on French Canadians. It has identified three novel mutations (A309D, D338Y, and 1054/1055delG[352fs]) and one unusual mutation/RFLP haplotype combination (E280K on Hp 2). The relative frequencies and distribution of PKU mutations were then compared in three regions and population subsets (eastern Quebec, French Canadian; western Quebec, French Canadian; and Montreal, non-French Canadian). The distributions of the prevalent and rare mutations are nonrandom and provide evidence for genetic stratification. The latter and the presence of eight unusual mutation/haplotype combinations in Quebec families with European ancestries (the aforementioned four and M1V, I65T, S349P, and R408W on Hp 1) corroborate demographic and anthropologic evidence, from elsewhere, for different origins of French Canadians in eastern and western Quebec. Images Figure 1 PMID:7913581

  1. Mutational landscape and significance across 12 major cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Vandin, Fabio; Ye, Kai; Niu, Beifang; Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Zhang, Qunyuan; McMichael, Joshua F.; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Miller, Christopher A.; Welch, John S.; Walter, Matthew J.; Wendl, Michael C.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ding, Li

    2014-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has used the latest sequencing and analysis methods to identify somatic variants across thousands of tumours. Here we present data and analytical results for point mutations and small insertions/deletions from 3,281 tumours across 12 tumour types as part of the TCGA Pan-Cancer effort. We illustrate the distributions of mutation frequencies, types and contexts across tumour types, and establish their links to tissues of origin, environmental/carcinogen influences, and DNA repair defects. Using the integrated data sets, we identified 127 significantly mutated genes from well-known(forexample, mitogen-activatedprotein kinase, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase,Wnt/?-catenin and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling pathways, and cell cycle control) and emerging (for example, histone, histone modification, splicing, metabolism and proteolysis) cellular processes in cancer. The average number of mutations in these significantly mutated genes varies across tumour types; most tumours have two to six, indicating that the numberof driver mutations required during oncogenesis is relatively small. Mutations in transcriptional factors/regulators show tissue specificity, whereas histone modifiers are often mutated across several cancer types. Clinical association analysis identifies genes having a significant effect on survival, and investigations of mutations with respect to clonal/subclonal architecture delineate their temporal orders during tumorigenesis. Taken together, these results lay the groundwork for developing new diagnostics and individualizing cancer treatment. PMID:24132290

  2. Hypokalemic periodic paralysis mutations: Confirmation of mutation and analysis of founder effect

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christie L. S. Grosson; Jesus Esteban; Diane McKenna-Yasek; James F. Gusella; Robert H. Brown

    1996-01-01

    In three families with hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HOPP) we have confirmed the presence of a missense mutation (arginine 528 to histidine) within the gene CACNLIA3 encoding the ?1 subunit of the L-type, voltage-sensitive calcium channel. Additionally, we have identified two novel polymorphisms within this gene located in close proximity to the mutation. Haplotype analysis using these and other polymorphisms indicates

  3. Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome Is Caused by IFIH1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Oda, Hirotsugu; Nakagawa, Kenji; Abe, Junya; Awaya, Tomonari; Funabiki, Masahide; Hijikata, Atsushi; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Funatsuka, Makoto; Ohshima, Yusei; Sugawara, Yuji; Yasumi, Takahiro; Kato, Hiroki; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ohara, Osamu; Fujita, Takashi; Heike, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a rare, genetically determined early-onset progressive encephalopathy. To date, mutations in six genes have been identified as etiologic for AGS. Our Japanese nationwide AGS survey identified six AGS-affected individuals without a molecular diagnosis; we performed whole-exome sequencing on three of these individuals. After removal of the common polymorphisms found in SNP databases, we were able to identify IFIH1 heterozygous missense mutations in all three. In vitro functional analysis revealed that IFIH1 mutations increased type I interferon production, and the transcription of interferon-stimulated genes were elevated. IFIH1 encodes MDA5, and mutant MDA5 lacked ligand-specific responsiveness, similarly to the dominant Ifih1 mutation responsible for the SLE mouse model that results in type I interferon overproduction. This study suggests that the IFIH1 mutations are responsible for the AGS phenotype due to an excessive production of type I interferon. PMID:24995871

  4. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mutations can make profound impact on the evolution and improvement of a self-pollinated crop such as lettuce. Since it is nontransgenic, mutation breeding is more acceptable to consumers. Combined with genomic advances in new technologies like TILLING, mutagenesis is becoming an even more powerfu...

  5. Mutation of Chromosomes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Access Excellence N:Excellence; Access REV:2005-03-12 END:VCARD

    2005-03-12

    Illustration of the mutation of chromosomes. A permanent structural alteration in DNA. In most cases, such DNA changes either have no effect or cause harm, but occasionally a mutation can improve an organism's chance of surviving and passing the beneficial change on to its descendants.

  6. Network-based stratification of tumor mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hofree, Matan; Shen, John P.; Carter, Hannah; Gross, Andrew; Ideker, Trey

    2013-01-01

    Many forms of cancer have multiple subtypes with different causes and clinical outcomes. Somatic tumor genomes provide a rich new source of data for uncovering these subtypes but have proven difficult to compare as two tumors rarely share the same mutations. Here, we introduce a method called Network Based Stratification (NBS) which integrates somatic tumor genomes with gene networks. This approach allows for stratification of cancer into informative subtypes by clustering together patients with mutations in similar network regions. We demonstrate NBS in ovarian, uterine and lung cancer cohorts from The Cancer Genome Atlas. For each tissue, NBS identifies clear subtypes that are predictive of clinical outcomes such as patient survival, response to therapy or tumor histology. We identify network regions characteristic of each subtype and show how mutation-derived subtypes can be used to train an mRNA expression signature which provides similar information in the absence of DNA sequence. PMID:24037242

  7. Mayo Clinic breast cancer study finds new type of mutation

    Cancer.gov

    Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered a new class of molecular mutation in various forms of breast cancer, a finding that may shed new light on development and growth of different types of breast tumors. Called fusion transcripts, the mutated forms of RNA may also provide a way to identify tumor subtypes and offer new strategies to treat them, investigators say.

  8. Longevity of Indy mutant Drosophila not attributable to Indy mutation

    E-print Network

    Gems, David

    LETTER Longevity of Indy mutant Drosophila not attributable to Indy mutation In their recent study in PNAS, Neretti et al. (1) identify mito- chondrial defects in male Drosophila melanogaster by cotransporter gene mutations in Drosophila. Science 290:2137-2140. 3. Toivonen JM, et al. (2007) No influence

  9. DISCOVERY OF MUTATED SUBNETWORKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL DATA IN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Raphael, Ben J.

    DISCOVERY OF MUTATED SUBNETWORKS ASSOCIATED WITH CLINICAL DATA IN CANCER FABIO VANDIN, PATRICK CLAY,pclay,eli,braphael}@cs.brown.edu A major goal of cancer sequencing projects is to identify genetic alterations that determine clinical phenotypes, such as survival time or drug response. Somatic mutations in cancer are typically very diverse

  10. Lung cancer: Intragenic ERBB2 kinase mutations in tumours

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Stephens; Chris Hunter; Graham Bignell; Sarah Edkins; Helen Davies; Jon Teague; Claire Stevens; Sarah O'Meara; Raffaella Smith; Adrian Parker; Andy Barthorpe; Matthew Blow; Lisa Brackenbury; Adam Butler; Oliver Clarke; Jennifer Cole; Ed Dicks; Angus Dike; Anja Drozd; Ken Edwards; Simon Forbes; Rebecca Foster; Kristian Gray; Chris Greenman; Kelly Halliday; Katy Hills; Vivienne Kosmidou; Richard Lugg; Andy Menzies; Janet Perry; Robert Petty; Keiran Raine; Lewis Ratford; Rebecca Shepherd; Alexandra Small; Yvonne Stephens; Calli Tofts; Jennifer Varian; Sofie West; Sara Widaa; Andrew Yates; Francis Brasseur; Colin S. Cooper; Adrienne M. Flanagan; Margaret Knowles; Suet Y. Leung; David N. Louis; Leendert H. J. Looijenga; Bruce Malkowicz; Marco A. Pierotti; Bin Teh; Georgia Chenevix-Trench; Barbara L. Weber; Siu T. Yuen; Grace Harris; Peter Goldstraw; Andrew G. Nicholson; P. Andrew Futreal; Richard Wooster; Michael R. Stratton

    2004-01-01

    The protein-kinase family is the most frequently mutated gene family found in human cancer and faulty kinase enzymes are being investigated as promising targets for the design of antitumour therapies. We have sequenced the gene encoding the transmembrane protein tyrosine kinase ERBB2 (also known as HER2 or Neu) from 120 primary lung tumours and identified 4% that have mutations within

  11. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More

    PubMed Central

    Kirches, E

    2011-01-01

    Leber’s hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the ‘primary LHON mutations’ to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs. PMID:21886454

  12. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  13. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay Kendall Leukaemia Fund and others.) PMID:24325359

  14. Novel USH2A mutations in Japanese Usher syndrome type 2 patients: marked differences in the mutation spectrum between the Japanese and other populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hiroshi Nakanishi; Masafumi Ohtsubo; Satoshi Iwasaki; Yoshihiro Hotta; Shin-ichi Usami; Kunihiro Mizuta; Hiroyuki Mineta; Shinsei Minoshima

    2011-01-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa and hearing loss. USH type 2 (USH2) is the most common type of USH and is frequently caused by mutations in USH2A. In a recent mutation screening of USH2A in Japanese USH2 patients, we identified 11 novel mutations in 10 patients and found the possible frequent mutation c.8559-2A>G

  15. Diverse growth hormone receptor gene mutations in Laron syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, M.A.; Francke, U. (Stanford Univ. School of Medicine, CA (United States)); Gracia, R.; Rosenbloom, A.; Toledo, S.P.A. (Univ. Autonoma, Madrid (Spain)); Chernausek, S. (Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Guevara-Aguirre, J. (Institute of Endocrinology, Metabolism, and Reproduction, Quito (Ecuador)); Hopp, M. (Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa)); Rosenbloom, A.; Argente, J. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States)); Toledo, S.P.A. (Univ. of Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1993-05-01

    To better understand the molecular genetic basis and genetic epidemiology of Laron syndrome (growth-hormone insensitivity syndrome), the authors analysed the growth-hormone receptor (GHR) genes of seven unrelated affected individuals from the United States, South America, Europe, and Africa. They amplified all nine GHR gene exons and splice junctions from these individuals by PCR and screened the products for mutations by using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). They identified a single GHR gene fragment with abnormal DGGE results for each affected individual, sequenced this fragment, and, in each case, identified a mutation likely to cause Laron syndrome, including two nonsense mutations (R43X and R217X), two splice-junction mutations, (189-1 G to T and 71+1 G to A), and two frameshift mutations (46 del TT and 230 del TA or AT). Only one of these mutations, R43X, has been previously reported. Using haplotype analysis, they determined that this mutation, which involves a CpG dinucleotide hot spot, likely arose as a separate event in this case, relative to the two prior reports of R43X. Aside from R43X, the mutations identified are unique to patients from particular geographic regions. Ten GHR gene mutations have now been described in this disorder. The authors conclude that Laron syndrome is caused by diverse GHR gene mutations, including deletions, RNA processing defects, translational stop codons, and missense codons. All the identified mutations involve the extracellular domain of the receptor, and most are unique to particular families or geographic areas. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Mutational spectrum of adult T-ALL.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Martin; Vosberg, Sebastian; Schlee, Cornelia; Heesch, Sandra; Schwartz, Stefan; Gökbuget, Nicola; Hoelzer, Dieter; Graf, Alexander; Krebs, Stefan; Bartram, Isabelle; Blum, Helmut; Brüggemann, Monika; Hecht, Jochen; Bohlander, Stefan K; Greif, Philipp A; Baldus, Claudia D

    2015-02-20

    Novel target discovery is warranted to improve treatment in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) patients. We provide a comprehensive study on mutations to enhance the understanding of therapeutic targets and studied 81 adult T-ALL patients. NOTCH1 exhibitedthe highest mutation rate (53%). Mutation frequencies of FBXW7 (10%), WT1 (10%), JAK3 (12%), PHF6 (11%), and BCL11B (10%) were in line with previous reports. We identified recurrent alterations in transcription factors DNM2, and RELN, the WNT pathway associated cadherin FAT1, and in epigenetic regulators (MLL2, EZH2). Interestingly, we discovered novel recurrent mutations in the DNA repair complex member HERC1, in NOTCH2, and in the splicing factor ZRSR2. A frequently affected pathway was the JAK/STAT pathway (18%) and a significant proportion of T-ALL patients harboured mutations in epigenetic regulators (33%), both predominantly found in the unfavourable subgroup of early T-ALL. Importantly, adult T-ALL patients not only showed a highly heterogeneous mutational spectrum, but also variable subclonal allele frequencies implicated in therapy resistance and evolution of relapse. In conclusion, we provide novel insights in genetic alterations of signalling pathways (e.g. druggable by ?-secretase inhibitors, JAK inhibitors or EZH2 inhibitors), present in over 80% of all adult T-ALL patients, that could guide novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:25595890

  17. Hot spot mutations in adenosine deaminase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschhorn, R.; Tzall, S.; Ellenbogen, A. (New York Univ. Medical School, NY (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The authors have previously characterized mutant adenosine deaminase enzymes in seven children with partial ADA deficiency. Six children shared common origins, suggesting a common progenitor. However, they found evidence for multiple phenotypically different mutant enzymes. They hypothesized that many of the mutations would be at CpG dinucleotides, hot spots at which spontaneous deamination of 5-methylcytosine results in C to T or G to A transitions. Digestion of DNA from these children with Msp I and Taq I, enzymes recognizing CpG dinucleotides, identified three different mutations, each correlating with expression of a different mutant enzyme. Sequencing of cDNA clones and genomic DNA amplified by polymerase chain reaction confirmed the presence of C to T or G to A transitions at CpG dinucleotides. To determine the true frequency of hot spot mutation in these children, consecutively ascertained through a newborn screening program, they sequenced cDNA from the remaining alleles. Two others were hot spot mutations each again resulting in expression of a phenotypically different mutant enzyme. These seven mutations account for all 14 chromosomes in these children. There is thus a very high frequency of hot spot mutations in partial ADA deficiency. They were able to correlate genotype and phenotype and to dissect the activity of individual mutant alleles.

  18. TILLING: practical single-nucleotide mutation discovery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Luca Comai; Steven Henikoff

    2006-01-01

    Summary In the post-genomic sequencing era, an expanding portfolio of genomic technologies has been applied to the study of gene function. Reverse genetics approaches that provide targeted inactivation of genes identified by sequence analysis include TILLING (for Targeting Local Lesions IN Genomes). TILLING searches the genomes of mutagenized organisms for mutations in a chosen gene, typically single base-pair substitutions. This

  19. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF DNA REPLICATION IN BACTERIA: DNAB MUTATIONS THAT SUPPRESS DNAC MUTATIONS AND DNAQ MUTATIONS THAT SUPPRESS DNAE MUTATIONS IN SALMONELLA UPHZMURZUM

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RUSSELL MAURER; BARBARA C. OSMOND; DAVID BOTSTEIN

    We have isolated and characterized extragenic suppressors of mutations in two different target genes that affect DNA replication in Salmonella typhimu- rium. Both the target and the suppressor genes are functional homologues of known replication genes of E. coli that were identified in intergeneric comple- mentation tests. Our results point to interactions in vivo involving the dnaB and dnaC proteins

  20. COL4A3 mutations cause focal segmental glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingyuan; Wu, Xiaoxi; Ren, Hong; Wang, Weiming; Wang, Zhaohui; Pan, Xiaoxia; Hao, Xu; Tong, Jun; Ma, Jun; Ye, Zhibin; Meng, Guoyu; Zhu, Yufei; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Landian; Chen, Nan

    2014-12-01

    Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a histologically identifiable glomerular injury often leading to proteinuria and renal failure. To identify its causal genes, whole-exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were performed on a large Chinese cohort that comprised 40 FSGS families, 50 sporadic FSGS patients, 9 independent autosomal recessive Alport's syndrome (ARAS) patients, and 190 ethnically matched healthy controls. Patients with extrarenal manifestations, indicating systemic diseases or other known hereditary renal diseases, were excluded. Heterozygous COL4A3 mutations were identified in five (12.5%) FSGS families and one (2%) sporadic FSGS patient. All identified mutations disrupted highly conserved protein sequences and none of them was found in either public databases or the 190 healthy controls. Of the FSGS patients with heterozygous COL4A3 mutations, segmental thinning of the glomerular base membrane (GBM) was only detected in the patient with electronic microscopy examination results available. Five ARAS patients (55.6%) had homozygous or compound-heterozygous mutations in COL4A3 or COL4A4. Serious changes in the GBM, hearing loss, and ocular abnormalities were found in 100%, 80%, and 40% of the ARAS patients, respectively. Overall, a new subgroup of FSGS patients resulting from heterozygous COL4A3 mutations was identified. The mutations are relatively frequent in families diagnosed with inherited forms of FSGS. Thus, we suggest screening for COL4A3 mutations in familial FSGS patients. PMID:25596306

  1. Mutations in ANTXR1 Cause GAPO Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stránecký, Viktor; Hoischen, Alexander; Hartmannová, Hana; Zaki, Maha S.; Chaudhary, Amit; Zudaire, Enrique; Nosková, Lenka; Barešová, Veronika; P?istoupilová, Anna; Hoda?ová, Kate?ina; Sovová, Jana; H?lková, Helena; Piherová, Lenka; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; de Silva, Deepthi; Senanayake, Manouri P.; Farrag, Sameh; Zeman, Ji?í; Martásek, Pavel; Baxová, Alice; Afifi, Hanan H.; St. Croix, Brad; Brunner, Han G.; Temtamy, Samia; Kmoch, Stanislav

    2013-01-01

    The genetic cause of GAPO syndrome, a condition characterized by growth retardation, alopecia, pseudoanodontia, and progressive visual impairment, has not previously been identified. We studied four ethnically unrelated affected individuals and identified homozygous nonsense mutations (c.262C>T [p.Arg88*] and c.505C>T [p.Arg169*]) or splicing mutations (c.1435–12A>G [p.Gly479Phefs*119]) in ANTXR1, which encodes anthrax toxin receptor 1. The nonsense mutations predictably trigger nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, resulting in the loss of ANTXR1. The transcript with the splicing mutation theoretically encodes a truncated ANTXR1 containing a neopeptide composed of 118 unique amino acids in its C terminus. GAPO syndrome’s major phenotypic features, which include dental abnormalities and the accumulation of extracellular matrix, recapitulate those found in Antxr1-mutant mice and point toward an underlying defect in extracellular-matrix regulation. Thus, we propose that mutations affecting ANTXR1 function are responsible for this disease’s characteristic generalized defect in extracellular-matrix homeostasis. PMID:23602711

  2. MEFV mutations in Northwest of Iran: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bonyadi, Morteza Jabbarpour; Gerami, Sousan Mir Najd; Somi, Mohammad Hossein; Dastgiri, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of fever accompanied by peritonitis, pleurisy, and arthritis. FMF affects mainly Mediterranean populations and is caused by mutations in the familial Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency and distribution of MEFV mutations in Iranian Azerbaijanis with FMF. Materials and Methods: Medical records of 1330 Iranian Azerbaijanis who were diagnosed with FMF according to Tel-Hashomer criteria from May 2006 to April 2013 were reviewed and 10 MEFV mutations were found in affected individuals. Results: 243 patients (18.27%) were homozygous, 370 (27.82%) were compound heterozygous and 717 (53.91%) were identified as heterozygous for one of the studied mutations. Of the studied mutations, M694V, E148Q, V726A, M680I, and M694I accounted for 42%, 21%, 19%, 14% and 2% of mutations respectively. Conclusion: In our study, M694V was found to be the most prevalent mutation. M694I, the most common mutation among Arabs, is rare in this cohort. Allele frequencies of the common mutations in our studied population have some similarities to those of the Turkish population reported previously. However, M680I is less common in our cohort. PMID:25810876

  3. Mutation and Extinction: The Role of Variable Mutational Effects, Synergistic Epistasis, Beneficial Mutations, and Degree of Outcrossing

    E-print Network

    Lynch, Michael

    Mutation and Extinction: The Role of Variable Mutational Effects, Synergistic Epistasis, Beneficial AND EXTINCTION: THE ROLE OF VARIABLE MUTATIONAL EFFECTS, SYNERGISTIC EPISTASIS, BENEFICIAL MUTATIONS of extinction. These include the presence of synergistic epistasis, which can reduce the rate of mutation

  4. Spectrum, frequency and penetrance of OPA1 mutations in dominant optic atrophy.

    PubMed

    Toomes, C; Marchbank, N J; Mackey, D A; Craig, J E; Newbury-Ecob, R A; Bennett, C P; Vize, C J; Desai, S P; Black, G C; Patel, N; Teimory, M; Markham, A F; Inglehearn, C F; Churchill, A J

    2001-06-15

    Dominant optic atrophy (DOA) is the commonest form of inherited optic neuropathy. Although heterogeneous, a major locus has been mapped to chromosome 3q28 and the gene responsible, OPA1, was recently identified. We therefore screened a panel of 35 DOA patients for mutations in OPA1. This revealed 14 novel mutations and a further three known mutations, which together accounted for 20 of the 35 families (57%) included in this study. This more than doubles the number of OPA1 mutations reported in the literature, bringing the total to 25. These are predominantly null mutations generating truncated proteins, strongly suggesting that the mechanism underlying DOA is haploinsufficiency. The mutations are largely family-specific, although a common 4 bp deletion in exon 27 (eight different families) and missense mutations in exons 8 (two families) and 9 (two families) have been identified. Haplotype analysis of individuals with the exon 27 2708del(TTAG) mutation suggests that this is a mutation hotspot and not an ancient mutation, thus excluding a major founder effect at the OPA1 locus. The mutation screening in this study also identified a number of asymptomatic individuals with OPA1 mutations. A re-calculation of the penetrance of this disorder within two of our families indicates figures as low as 43 and 62% associated with the 2708del(TTAG) mutation. If haploinsufficiency is the mechanism underlying DOA it is unlikely that this figure will be mutation-specific, indicating that the penetrance in DOA is much lower than the 98% reported previously. To investigate whether Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) could be caused by mutations in OPA1 we also screened a panel of 28 LHON patients who tested negatively for the three major LHON mutations. No mutations were identified in any LHON patients, indicating that DOA and LHON are genetically distinct. PMID:11440989

  5. Clinical and genetic characterization of manifesting carriers of DMD mutations.

    PubMed

    Soltanzadeh, Payam; Friez, Michael J; Dunn, Diane; von Niederhausern, Andrew; Gurvich, Olga L; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Sampson, Jacinda B; Pestronk, Alan; Connolly, Anne M; Florence, Julaine M; Finkel, Richard S; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Medne, Livija; Mendell, Jerry R; Mathews, Katherine D; Wong, Brenda L; Sussman, Michael D; Zonana, Jonathan; Kovak, Karen; Gospe, Sidney M; Gappmaier, Eduard; Taylor, Laura E; Howard, Michael T; Weiss, Robert B; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2010-08-01

    Manifesting carriers of DMD gene mutations may present diagnostic challenges, particularly in the absence of a family history of dystrophinopathy. We review the clinical and genetic features in 15 manifesting carriers identified among 860 subjects within the United Dystrophinopathy Project, a large clinical dystrophinopathy cohort whose members undergo comprehensive DMD mutation analysis. We defined manifesting carriers as females with significant weakness, excluding those with only myalgias/cramps. DNA extracted from peripheral blood was used to study X-chromosome inactivation patterns. Among these manifesting carriers, age at symptom onset ranged from 2 to 47 years. Seven had no family history and eight had male relatives with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Clinical severity among the manifesting carriers varied from a DMD-like progression to a very mild Becker muscular dystrophy-like phenotype. Eight had exonic deletions or duplications and six had point mutations. One patient had two mutations (an exonic deletion and a splice site mutation), consistent with a heterozygous compound state. The X-chromosome inactivation pattern was skewed toward non-random in four out of seven informative deletions or duplications but was random in all cases with nonsense mutations. We present the results of DMD mutation analysis in this manifesting carrier cohort, including the first example of a presumably compound heterozygous DMD mutation. Our results demonstrate that improved molecular diagnostic methods facilitate the identification of DMD mutations in manifesting carriers, and confirm the heterogeneity of mutational mechanisms as well as the wide spectrum of phenotypes. PMID:20630757

  6. Gene Mutations Gene a finite segment of DNA specified

    E-print Network

    Massey, Thomas N.

    mutation to be expressed. · Over 500 recessive diseases have been identified. · These include sickle cell of that age and sex. #12;Mammalian Cell Culture Studies · Mammalian cell cultures were stressed by absence

  7. Computational Method Uncovers Mutations That Drive Cancer | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer gene sequencing initiatives, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas project, are finding thousands of gene mutations in cancer cells, and making sense of all these genetic alterations is proving to be as big a challenge as identifying them. In an attempt to identify the most important of these mutations, researchers at Columbia University and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have developed a computation method that can identify so-called driver mutations in human melanomas.

  8. Algorithms for Detecting Significantly Mutated Pathways in Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandin, Fabio; Upfal, Eli; Raphael, Benjamin J.

    Recent genome sequencing studies have shown that the somatic mutations that drive cancer development are distributed across a large number of genes. This mutational heterogeneity complicates efforts to distinguish functional mutations from sporadic, passenger mutations. Since cancer mutations are hypothesized to target a relatively small number of cellular signaling and regulatory pathways, a common approach is to assess whether known pathways are enriched for mutated genes. However, restricting attention to known pathways will not reveal novel cancer genes or pathways. An alterative strategy is to examine mutated genes in the context of genome-scale interaction networks that include both well characterized pathways and additional gene interactions measured through various approaches. We introduce a computational framework for de novo identification of subnetworks in a large gene interaction network that are mutated in a significant number of patients. This framework includes two major features. First, we introduce a diffusion process on the interaction network to define a local neighborhood of "influence" for each mutated gene in the network. Second, we derive a two-stage multiple hypothesis test to bound the false discovery rate (FDR) associated with the identified subnetworks. We test these algorithms on a large human protein-protein interaction network using mutation data from two recent studies: glioblastoma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas and lung adenocarcinoma samples from the Tumor Sequencing Project. We successfully recover pathways that are known to be important in these cancers, such as the p53 pathway. We also identify additional pathways, such as the Notch signaling pathway, that have been implicated in other cancers but not previously reported as mutated in these samples. Our approach is the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate a computationally efficient strategy for de novo identification of statistically significant mutated subnetworks. We anticipate that our approach will find increasing use as cancer genome studies increase in size and scope.

  9. Linkage and mutational analysis of familial Alzheimer disease kindreds for the APP gene region

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Kamino; L. Anderson; S. Odahl; E. Nemens; T. D. Bird; G. D. Schellenberg; E. M. Wijsman; W. Kukall; E. Larson; L. L. Heston

    1992-01-01

    A large number of familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) kindreds were examined to determine whether mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene could be responsible for the disease. Previous studies have identified three mutations at APP codon 717 which are pathogenic for Alzheimer disease (AD). Samples from affected subjects were examined for mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the

  10. Early Onset Familial Alzheimer's Disease: Is a Mutation Predictive of Pathology?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas Galasko

    In patients with familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) with early onset, mutations have been identified in three genes: Presenilin 1 (PS1), Presenilin 2 (PS2) and amyloid protein precursor (APP). Although many different mutations have been recorded for each gene, in most cases the clinical picture is typical of AD, with earlier onset than in sporadic AD. The question of whether mutations

  11. Ligand-and mutation-induced conformational selection in the CCR5 chemokine G

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ligand- and mutation-induced conformational selection in the CCR5 chemokine G protein show that a sin- gle-point mutation in a GPCR can dramatically alter the available low different binding site pharmacophore. To validate our predictions, we identified 11 singly mutated CCR5

  12. Brief Report:MECP2 Mutations in People without Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suter, Bernhard; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Zoghbi, Huda Y.; Glaze, Daniel G.; Neul, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in "Methyl-CpG-Binding protein 2" ("MECP2") are commonly associated with the neurodevelopmental disorder Rett syndrome (RTT). However, some people with RTT do not have mutations in "MECP2," and interestingly there have been people identified with "MECP2" mutations that do not have the clinical…

  13. Butyrate sensitive suppressor of position-effect variegation mutations in drosophila melanogaster

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Reuter; R. Dorn; H. J. Hoffmann

    1982-01-01

    Mutations at a locus on chromosome II of D. melanogaster suppressing position-effect variegation mutations have been identified which display recessive butyrate sensitivity. Survival of homozygous mutant flies is significantly reduced on medium containing sodium n-butyrate. The butyrate sensitive suppressor mutations are further characterized by recessive female sterility and reduced survival of homozygotes. Complementation analysis showed their allelism. The locus of

  14. Mutation Hotspots Due to Sunlight in the p53 Gene of Nonmelanoma Skin Cancers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annemarie Ziegler; David J. Leffell; Subrahmanyam Kunala; Harsh W. Sharma; Mae Gailani; Jeffrey A. Simon; Alan J. Halperin; Howard P. Baden; Philip E. Shapiro; Allen E. Bale; Douglas E. Brash

    1993-01-01

    To identify the sites in the p53 tumor suppressor gene most susceptible to carcinogenic mutation by sunlight, the entire coding region of 27 basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) of the skin was sequenced. Fifty-six percent of tumors contained mutations, and these were UV-like: primarily CC --> TT or C --> T changes at dipyrimidine sites. Such mutations can alter more than

  15. Identification of factor VIII gene mutations and carrier detection in Korean haemophilia A patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J.-Y. HAN; J.-N. LEE; S.-Y. LEE; I.-J. KIM; C.-M KIM

    2007-01-01

    Haemophilia A is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by heterogeneous mutations in the factor VIII gene. More than 900 mutations within the FVIII coding and untranslated regions have been identified. The most common defects is an inversion in the FVIII gene that accounts for nearly 40-50% of individuals with severe haemophilia A. Point mutations, deletions and insertions are responsible for

  16. Nature and frequency of mutations in the argininosuccinate synthetase gene that cause classical citrullinemia

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keiko Kobayashi; Hiroshige Kakinoki; Tomoko Fukushige; Nazma Shaheen; Hiroki Terazono; Takeyori Saheki

    1995-01-01

    Citrullinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a genetic deficiency of argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS). So far 20 mutations in ASS mRNA have been identified in human classical citrullinemia, including 14 single base changes causing missense mutations in the coding sequence of the enzyme, 4 mutations associated with an absence of exons 5, 6, 7, or 13 in mRNA, 1

  17. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis gene locus within the population of the Northwest of England

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Super; M. J. Schwarz

    1992-01-01

    A large group of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) from the Northwest of England were analysed for mutations within the CF gene. Eleven separate mutations were identified comprising 91.5% of the responsible genes. Molecular confirmation of a CF diagnosis becomes possible in 84% of cases. Only 1.19% of cases negative for the nine mutations have CF. The results of molecular

  18. A Novel Missense Mutation in POMT1 Modulates the Severe Congenital Muscular Dystrophy Phenotype Associated with POMT1 Nonsense Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie E.; Conta, Jessie H.; Winder, Thomas L.; Willer, Tobias; Eskuri, Jamie M.; Haas, Richard; Patterson, Kathleen; Campbell, Kevin P.; Moore, Steven A.; Gospe, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in POMT1 lead to a group of neuromuscular conditions ranging in severity from Walker-Warburg syndrome to limb girdle muscular dystrophy. We report two male siblings, ages 19 and 14, and an unrelated 6-year old female with early onset muscular dystrophy and intellectual disability with minimal structural brain anomalies and no ocular abnormalities. Compound heterozygous mutations in POMT1 were identified including a previously reported nonsense mutation (c.2167dupG; p.Asp723Glyfs*8) associated with Walker-Warburg syndrome and a novel missense mutation in a highly conserved region of the protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 protein (c.1958C>T; p.Pro653Leu). This novel variant reduces the phenotypic severity compared to patients with homozygous c.2167dupG mutations or compound heterozygous patients with a c.2167dupG mutation and a wide range of other mutant POMT1 alleles. PMID:24491487

  19. Mutations of the SRY-responsive enhancer of SOX9 are uncommon in XY gonadal dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Georg, I; Bagheri-Fam, S; Knower, K C; Wieacker, P; Scherer, Gerd; Harley, V R

    2010-01-01

    During mouse sex determination, SRY upregulates the core testis-specific enhancer of Sox9, TESCO. Mutations in human SRY are found in one third of cases with XY pure gonadal dysgenesis (XY GD; Swyer syndrome), while two thirds remain unexplained. Heterozygous SOX9 mutations can cause XY GD in association with the skeletal malformation syndrome campomelic dysplasia. We hypothesized that human TESCO mutations could cause isolated XY GD. Sixty-six XY GD cases with an intact SRY were analyzed for TESCO point mutations or deletions. No mutations were identified. We conclude that TESCO mutations are not a common cause of XY GD. PMID:20838034

  20. Disease-Associated Mutations That Alter the RNA Structural Ensemble

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew Halvorsen; Joshua S. Martin; Sam Broadaway; Alain Laederach

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide

  1. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: an Updated Framework for the Second Decade of HAART

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.; Schapiro, Jonathan M.

    2008-01-01

    More than 200 mutations are associated with antiretroviral resistance to drugs belonging to six licensed antiretroviral classes. More than 50 reverse transcriptase mutations are associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance including M184V, thymidine analog mutations, mutations associated with non-thymidine analog containing regimens, multi-nucleoside resistance mutations, and several recently identified accessory mutations. More than 40 reverse transcriptase mutations are associated with nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance including major primary and secondary mutations, non-polymorphic minor mutations, and polymorphic accessory mutations. More than 60 mutations are associated with protease inhibitor resistance including major protease, accessory protease, and protease cleavage site mutations. More than 30 integrase mutations are associated with the licensed integrase inhibitor raltegravir and the investigational inhibitor elvitegravir. More than 15 gp41 mutations are associated with the fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide. CCR5 inhibitor resistance results from mutations that promote gp120 binding to an inhibitor-bound CCR5 receptor or CXCR4 tropism; however, the genotypic correlates of these processes are not yet well characterized. PMID:18615118

  2. p53 gene mutation: software and database.

    PubMed Central

    Béroud, C; Soussi, T

    1998-01-01

    A large number of different mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene have been identified in all types of cancer. As of October, 1997, this database (http:// perso.curie.fr/tsoussi ) contained >7500 mutations. Such a substantial increase since our previous reports should enable epidemiological analyses which were not previously possible. In order to analyse these new data, the UMD software has been improved. A new Web version of the UMD software enables online analysis of the database. The present report describes various improvements since the last release of the database. PMID:9399836

  3. A novel somatic FGFR3 mutation in primary lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinmura, Kazuya; Kato, Hisami; Matsuura, Shun; Inoue, Yusuke; Igarashi, Hisaki; Nagura, Kiyoko; Nakamura, Satoki; Maruyama, Kyoko; Tajima, Mari; Funai, Kazuhito; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Tanahashi, Masayuki; Niwa, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Haruhiko

    2014-03-01

    The recent discovery of mutations and fusions of oncokinase genes in a subset of lung cancers (LCs) is of considerable clinical interest, since LCs containing such mutations or fusion transcripts are reportedly sensitive to kinase inhibitors. To better understand the role of the recently identified fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations and fusions in pulmonary carcinogenesis, we examined 214 LCs for mutations in the mutation cluster region of the FGFR3 gene using sequencing analysis. We also examined 190 LCs for the FGFR3-TACC3 and FGFR3-BAIAP2L1 fusion transcripts using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis. Although the expression of FGFR3-TACC3 and FGFR3-BAIAP2L1 fusion transcripts was not detected in any of the carcinomas, somatic FGFR3 mutations were detected in two (0.9%) LCs. The two mutations were the same, i.e., p.R248H. That was a novel mutation occurring in the same codon as p.R248C, for which an oncogenic potential has previously been shown. Increased FGFR3 expression was shown in the two LCs containing the FGFR3 p.R248H mutation using qPCR. Histologically, both carcinomas were squamous cell carcinomas, therefore the incidence of the FGFR3 mutation among the squamous cell carcinoma cases was calculated as 3.2% (2/63). When we examined other co-occurring genetic abnormalities, one case exhibited a p53 p.R273C mutation, while the other case exhibited PIK3CA and SOX2 amplifications. The above results suggest that an FGFR3 p.R248H mutation is involved in the carcinogenesis of a subset of LCs and may contribute to the elucidation of the characteristics of FGFR3 mutation-positive LCs in the future. PMID:24452392

  4. Splicing mutation analysis reveals previously unrecognized pathways in lymph node-invasive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dorman, Stephanie N.; Viner, Coby; Rogan, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations reported in large-scale breast cancer (BC) sequencing studies primarily consist of protein coding mutations. mRNA splicing mutation analyses have been limited in scope, despite their prevalence in Mendelian genetic disorders. We predicted splicing mutations in 442 BC tumour and matched normal exomes from The Cancer Genome Atlas Consortium (TCGA). These splicing defects were validated by abnormal expression changes in these tumours. Of the 5,206 putative mutations identified, exon skipping, leaky or cryptic splicing was confirmed for 988 variants. Pathway enrichment analysis of the mutated genes revealed mutations in 9 NCAM1-related pathways, which were significantly increased in samples with evidence of lymph node metastasis, but not in lymph node-negative tumours. We suggest that comprehensive reporting of DNA sequencing data should include non-trivial splicing analyses to avoid missing clinically-significant deleterious splicing mutations, which may reveal novel mutated pathways present in genetic disorders. PMID:25394353

  5. Identification of fifteen novel PHEX gene mutations in Finnish patients with hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Tyynismaa, H; Kaitila, I; Näntö-Salonen, K; Ala-Houhala, M; Alitalo, T

    2000-04-01

    We have carried out a mutation screening of the PHEX gene in Finnish patients with hypophosphatemia. A total of 100% (5/5) of the familial HYP patients (X-linked hypophosphatemia) and 93% (14/15) of the sporadic cases were found to carry a mutation in the PHEX gene. We identified 18 mutations, of which 15 were novel. We report also a new polymorphism 46bp upstream of exon 16. Two families were segregating the same nonsense mutation in exon 1 (R20X), but since this mutation has been previously reported in three independent studies, we consider it to be a mutational hotspot rather than a Finnish founder mutation. We did not find PHEX gene mutations in two additional hypophosphatemia families in which the mode of inheritance was other than X-linked dominant. Also, no mutation could be detected in a patient with suspected oncogenic osteomalacia (OHO). PMID:10737991

  6. Intronic splicing mutations in PTCH1 cause Gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bholah, Zaynab; Smith, Miriam J; Byers, Helen J; Miles, Emma K; Evans, D Gareth; Newman, William G

    2014-09-01

    Gorlin syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple early-onset basal cell carcinoma, odontogenic keratocysts and skeletal abnormalities. It is caused by heterozygous mutations in the tumour suppressor PTCH1. Routine clinical genetic testing, by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to confirm a clinical diagnosis of Gorlin syndrome, identifies a mutation in 60-90 % of cases. We undertook RNA analysis on lymphocytes from ten individuals diagnosed with Gorlin syndrome, but without known PTCH1 mutations by exonic sequencing or MLPA. Two altered PTCH1 transcripts were identified. Genomic DNA sequence analysis identified an intron 7 mutation c.1068-10T>A, which created a strong cryptic splice acceptor site, leading to an intronic insertion of eight bases; this is predicted to create a frameshift p.(His358Alafs*12). Secondly, a deep intronic mutation c.2561-2057A>G caused an inframe insertion of 78 intronic bases in the cDNA transcript, leading to a premature stop codon p.(Gly854fs*3). The mutations are predicted to cause loss of function of PTCH1, consistent with its tumour suppressor function. The findings indicate the importance of RNA analysis to detect intronic mutations in PTCH1 not identified by routine screening techniques. PMID:24659465

  7. Evidence for an ancient BRCA1 mutation in breast cancer patients of yoruban ancestry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bifeng Zhang; James D. Fackenthal; Qun Niu; Dezheng Huo; Walmy E. Sveen; Tiffani DeMarco; Clement A. Adebamowo; Temidayo Ogundiran; Olufunmilayo I. Olopade

    2009-01-01

    Background\\u000a BRCA1 recurrent mutations have rarely been assessed in non-founder populations. Still, identifying such mutations could be important\\u000a for designing genetic testing strategies for high-risk breast\\/ovarian cancer families in non-founder populations. Objective To determine whether the recurrent BRCA1 Y101X mutation identified in Yoruban breast cancer patients represents a single historical mutation event, and determine\\u000a the prevalence of this mutation in

  8. Integrated analysis of recurrent properties of cancer genes to identify novel drivers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneity of cancer genomes in terms of acquired mutations complicates the identification of genes whose modification may exert a driver role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we present a novel method that integrates expression profiles, mutation effects, and systemic properties of mutated genes to identify novel cancer drivers. We applied our method to ovarian cancer samples and were able to identify putative drivers in the majority of carcinomas without mutations in known cancer genes, thus suggesting that it can be used as a complementary approach to find rare driver mutations that cannot be detected using frequency-based approaches. PMID:23718799

  9. The presence of two different infantile Tay-Sachs disease mutations in a Cajun population

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. A. McDowell; M. G. Blitzer; E. H. Mules; P. Fabacher; E. Shapira

    1992-01-01

    A study was undertaken to characterize the mutation(s) responsible for Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) in a Cajun population in southwest Louisiana and to identify the origins of these mutations. Eleven of 12 infantile TSD alleles examined in six families had the [beta]-hexosaminidase A (Hex A) [alpha]-subunit exon 11 insertion mutation that is present in approximately 70% of Ashkenazi Jewish TSD heterozygotes.

  10. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation analysis in 86 early onset breast\\/ovarian cancer patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A M Garvin; M Attenhofer-Haner; R J Scott

    1997-01-01

    Eighty-six women fulfilling specific selection criteria were studied for germline mutations in two breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, using the protein truncation test (PTT). Nine germline mutations were identified, six in BRCA1 and three in BRCA2. Of the six BRCA1 mutations, three have previously been described and three are new, and for BRCA2, one is a new mutation

  11. MECP2 and CDKL5 gene mutation analysis in Chinese patients with Rett syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mei-rong Li; Hong Pan; Xin-Hua Bao; Yu-Zhi Zhang; Xi-Ru Wu

    2007-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding\\u000a protein2 (MECP2) gene. In this study, the MECP2 sequences in 121 unrelated Chinese patients with classical or atypical RTT were screened for deletions and mutations. In\\u000a all, we identified 45 different MECP2 mutations in 102 of these RTT patients. The p. T158M mutation

  12. Muscle disease caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene (ACTA1)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Sparrowa; Kristen J. Nowakb; Hayley J. Durlingb; Alan H. Beggse; Carina Wallgren-Petterssonf; Norma Romerog; Ikuya Nonakah; Nigel G. Laingb

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene (ACTA1) associated with congenital myopathy with excess of thin myofilaments, nemaline myopathy and intranuclear rod myopathy were first described in 1999. At that time, only 15 different missense mutations were known in ACTA1. More than 60 mutations have now been identified. This review analyses this larger spectrum of mutations in ACTA1. It investigates

  13. Muscle disease caused by mutations in the skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene ( ACTA1)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John C. Sparrow; Kristen J. Nowak; Hayley J. Durling; Alan H. Beggs; Carina Wallgren-Pettersson; Norma Romero; Ikuya Nonaka; Nigel G. Laing

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in the skeletal muscle alpha-actin gene (ACTA1) associated with congenital myopathy with excess of thin myofilaments, nemaline myopathy and intranuclear rod myopathy were first described in 1999. At that time, only 15 different missense mutations were known in ACTA1. More than 60 mutations have now been identified. This review analyses this larger spectrum of mutations in ACTA1. It investigates

  14. The phenotypic expression of three MSH2 mutations in large Newfoundland families with Lynch syndrome

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susan Stuckless; Patrick S. Parfrey; Michael O. Woods; Janet Cox; G. William Fitzgerald; Jane S. Green; Roger C. Green

    2007-01-01

    To compare the phenotypic expression of three different MSH2 mutations causing Lynch syndrome, 290 family members at 50% risk of inheriting a mutation were studied. Two truncating mutations\\u000a of the MSH2 gene have been identified in Newfoundland: an exon 8 deletion in five families (N=74 carriers) and an exon 4–16 deletion in one family (N=65 carriers). The third mutation was

  15. UPenn study shows risk of breast and ovarian cancer may differ by type of BRCA1, BRCA2 mutation

    Cancer.gov

    In a study involving more than 31,000 women with cancer-causing mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, researchers identified mutations that are associated with significantly different risks of breast and ovarian cancers.

  16. Expanding the phenotype of GMPPB mutations.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Ghaoui, Roula; Ravenscroft, Gianina; Johnsen, Russell D; Davis, Mark R; Corbett, Alastair; Reddel, Stephen; Sue, Carolyn M; Liang, Christina; Waddell, Leigh B; Kaur, Simranpreet; Lek, Monkol; North, Kathryn N; MacArthur, Daniel G; Lamont, Phillipa J; Clarke, Nigel F; Laing, Nigel G

    2015-04-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a heterogeneous group of diseases with a broad phenotypic spectrum ranging from severe disorders with congenital muscle weakness, eye and brain structural abnormalities and intellectual delay to adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophies without mental retardation. Most frequently the disease onset is congenital or during childhood. The exception is FKRP mutations, in which adult onset is a common presentation. Here we report eight patients from five non-consanguineous families where next generation sequencing identified mutations in the GMPPB gene. Six patients presented as an adult or adolescent-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, one presented with isolated episodes of rhabdomyolysis, and one as a congenital muscular dystrophy. This report expands the phenotypic spectrum of GMPPB mutations to include limb-girdle muscular dystrophies with adult onset with or without intellectual disability, or isolated rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25681410

  17. Mutational profiling of second primary lung cancers in patients who have received radiation for the treatment of Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Bond, David Alan; Dunavin, Neil; Otterson, Gregory Alan

    2015-03-01

    Lung cancer (LC) represents the most common solid tumor in survivors of Hodgkin's disease (HD), and the assessment of the mutational status of oncogenic driver mutations in LC is now standard. We compiled clinical and mutation data (EGFR, KRAS, and ALK) from the medical records of patients with LC and a remote history of HD. 13 cases of LC following HD were seen, including seven with mutational data. Two had EGFR mutations, none had KRAS mutations or ALK translocations. Our conclusions are limited by the small sample size, however this report reinforces the need to identify driver mutations in lung cancers. PMID:25615851

  18. A de novo mutation in NKX2.5 associated with atrial septal defects, ventricular noncompaction, syncope and sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Ping; Saarel, Elizabeth; Bai, Ying; Luo, Chunyan; Lv, Qiulun; Xu, Yan; Wang, Fan; Fan, Chun; Younoszai, Adel; Chen, Qiuyun; Tu, Xin; Wang, Qing K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in transcription factor NKX2.5 cause congenital heart disease (CHD). We identified a CHD family with atrial septal defects (ASDs), atrioventricular block, ventricular noncompaction, syncope and sudden death. Our objective is to identify the disease-causing mutation in the CHD family. Methods Direct DNA sequence analysis was used to identify the CHD mutation. The functional effects of the mutation were characterized by a luciferase reporter assay and immunostaining. Results A novel, de novo 2-bp insertion (c.512insGC) was identified in exon 2 of NKX2.5. Mutation c.512insGC co-segregates with CHD in the family, and is not present in 200 controls. Functional studies indicate that the c.512insGC mutation impedes nuclear localization of NKX2.5 and causes a total loss of transactivation activity of NKX2.5. Furthermore, no NKX2.5 mutation was identified in 125 sporadic Chinese CHD patients. Conclusions (1) NKX2.5 mutation c.512insGC is associated with ASDs, syncope and sudden death. It is the second de novo mutation identified in NKX2.5. (2) NKX2.5 mutations are rare in sporadic CHD patients. (3) This study for the first time identifies association between a NKX2.5 mutation and ventricular noncompaction. Our results significantly expand the phenotypic spectrum of NKX2.5 mutations. PMID:20932824

  19. Genomic sequencing of colorectal adenocarcinomas identifies a recurrent VTI1A-TCF7L2 fusion

    E-print Network

    Lander, Eric S.

    Prior studies have identified recurrent oncogenic mutations in colorectal adenocarcinoma and have surveyed exons of protein-coding genes for mutations in 11 affected individuals. Here we report whole-genome sequencing from ...

  20. Screening for mutations causing X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency in the IL2R? chain gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paula A. Clark; Tracy Lester; Sally Genet; Alison M. Jones; Rudi Hendriks; Roland J. Levinsky; Christine Kinnon

    1995-01-01

    Mutations in the common gamma chain (?c or IL2RG) of the interleukin-2, -4, -7, -9 and -15 receptors have been found to cause X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDX1). We report here on the mutations identified in a further ten families. Two of the mutations identified have occurred twice in unrelated families, indicating two possible mutational hotspots. Seven of the mutations,

  1. Jagged1 (JAG1) mutation detection in an Australian Alagille syndrome population.

    PubMed

    Heritage, M L; MacMillan, J C; Colliton, R P; Genin, A; Spinner, N B; Anderson, G J

    2000-11-01

    Alagille syndrome (AGS) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by abnormal development of the liver, heart, skeleton, eye, and face. Mutations in the Jagged1 gene (JAG1) have been found to result in the AGS phenotype and both protein truncating mutations and missense mutations have been identified. Using single stranded conformational polymorphism analysis we have screened 22 AGS affected individuals from 19 families for mutations within Jagged1. Twelve distinct Jagged1 mutations were identified in 15 (68.2%) of the 22 AGS cases, seven of which are novel. The mutations include three small deletions (25%), two small insertions (16.6%), three missense mutations (25%), two nonsense mutations (16.6%), and two splice-site mutations (16.6%). These mutations are spread across the entire coding sequence of the gene and most are localized to highly conserved motifs of the protein predicted to be important for Jagged1 function. One-half of the mutations found in this study are located between exons 9 and 12, a region constituting only 12% of the coding sequence. A splice-donor site mutation in intron 11 was shown to cause aberrant splicing of Jagged1 mRNA, consequently terminating translation prematurely in exon 12. The results of this study are consistent with the proposal that either haploinsufficiency for wild type Jagged1 and/or dominant negative effects produced by mutated Jagged1 are responsible for the AGS phenotype. PMID:11058898

  2. DNAJC13 mutations in Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Rajput, Alex; Milnerwood, Austen J.; Shah, Brinda; Szu-Tu, Chelsea; Trinh, Joanne; Yu, Irene; Encarnacion, Mary; Munsie, Lise N.; Tapia, Lucia; Gustavsson, Emil K.; Chou, Patrick; Tatarnikov, Igor; Evans, Daniel M.; Pishotta, Frederick T.; Volta, Mattia; Beccano-Kelly, Dayne; Thompson, Christina; Lin, Michelle K.; Sherman, Holly E.; Han, Heather J.; Guenther, Bruce L.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Bernard, Virginie; Ross, Colin J.; Appel-Cresswell, Silke; Stoessl, A. Jon; Robinson, Christopher A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Aasly, Jan O.; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Hentati, Faycal; Gibson, Rachel A.; McPherson, Peter S.; Girard, Martine; Rajput, Michele; Rajput, Ali H.; Farrer, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    A Saskatchewan multi-incident family was clinically characterized with Parkinson disease (PD) and Lewy body pathology. PD segregates as an autosomal-dominant trait, which could not be ascribed to any known mutation. DNA from three affected members was subjected to exome sequencing. Genome alignment, variant annotation and comparative analyses were used to identify shared coding mutations. Sanger sequencing was performed within the extended family and ethnically matched controls. Subsequent genotyping was performed in a multi-ethnic case–control series consisting of 2928 patients and 2676 control subjects from Canada, Norway, Taiwan, Tunisia, and the USA. A novel mutation in receptor-mediated endocytosis 8/RME-8 (DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser) was found to segregate with disease. Screening of cases and controls identified four additional patients with the mutation, of which two had familial parkinsonism. All carriers shared an ancestral DNAJC13 p.Asn855Ser haplotype and claimed Dutch–German–Russian Mennonite heritage. DNAJC13 regulates the dynamics of clathrin coats on early endosomes. Cellular analysis shows that the mutation confers a toxic gain-of-function and impairs endosomal transport. DNAJC13 immunoreactivity was also noted within Lewy body inclusions. In late-onset disease which is most reminiscent of idiopathic PD subtle deficits in endosomal receptor-sorting/recycling are highlighted by the discovery of pathogenic mutations VPS35, LRRK2 and now DNAJC13. With this latest discovery, and from a neuronal perspective, a temporal and functional ecology is emerging that connects synaptic exo- and endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, endosomal recycling and the endo-lysosomal degradative pathway. Molecular deficits in these processes are genetically linked to the phenotypic spectrum of parkinsonism associated with Lewy body pathology. PMID:24218364

  3. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); and others

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific r