Science.gov

Sample records for tail biopsy collection

  1. Adverse effects of vapocoolant and topical anesthesia for tail biopsy of preweanling mice.

    PubMed

    Braden, Gillian C; Brice, Angela K; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-05-01

    Tail biopsy of laboratory mice for genotyping purposes has been studied extensively to develop refinements for this common procedure. Our prior work assessed tail vertebral development in different mouse strains (age, 3 to 42 d) and analyzed behavior and activity in mice (age, 21 to 45 d) biopsied under isoflurane anesthesia. To assess the effects of biopsy on preweanling mice, we here evaluated BALB/cAnNCrl mice (n = 80; age, 18 to 21 d) that received topical vapocoolant (ethyl chloride), topical anesthetic (Cetacaine), or isoflurane anesthesia before undergoing a 5-mm or sham biopsy. Control mice did not receive any anesthetic intervention. Regardless of the anesthetic used, acute observation scores indicative of distress were increased at 10 min after biopsy, and locomotor activity was decreased, in biopsied compared with control mice. Acute observation scores at 10 min after biopsy were higher in mice that received ethyl chloride compared with isoflurane or no anesthesia. Microscopic analysis revealed that inflammatory changes in the distal tail remained elevated until 7 d after biopsy and were higher in tails exposed to ethyl chloride. Our findings indicate that vapocoolant, topical anesthesia, and inhaled isoflurane do not enhance the wellbeing of preweanling mice undergoing tail biopsy. Due to the lack of appreciable benefits and the presence of notable adverse effects, using vapocoolants or Cetacaine for this tail biopsy procedure in laboratory mice is unadvisable and we encourage the removal of these agents from institutional tail biopsy guidelines. PMID:26045455

  2. Adverse Effects of Vapocoolant and Topical Anesthesia for Tail Biopsy of Preweanling Mice

    PubMed Central

    Braden, Gillian C; Brice, Angela K; Hankenson, F Claire

    2015-01-01

    Tail biopsy of laboratory mice for genotyping purposes has been studied extensively to develop refinements for this common procedure. Our prior work assessed tail vertebral development in different mouse strains (age, 3 to 42 d) and analyzed behavior and activity in mice (age, 21 to 45 d) biopsied under isoflurane anesthesia. To assess the effects of biopsy on preweanling mice, we here evaluated BALB/cAnNCrl mice (n = 80; age, 18 to 21 d) that received topical vapocoolant (ethyl chloride), topical anesthetic (Cetacaine), or isoflurane anesthesia before undergoing a 5-mm or sham biopsy. Control mice did not receive any anesthetic intervention. Regardless of the anesthetic used, acute observation scores indicative of distress were increased at 10 min after biopsy, and locomotor activity was decreased, in biopsied compared with control mice. Acute observation scores at 10 min after biopsy were higher in mice that received ethyl chloride compared with isoflurane or no anesthesia. Microscopic analysis revealed that inflammatory changes in the distal tail remained elevated until 7 d after biopsy and were higher in tails exposed to ethyl chloride. Our findings indicate that vapocoolant, topical anesthesia, and inhaled isoflurane do not enhance the wellbeing of preweanling mice undergoing tail biopsy. Due to the lack of appreciable benefits and the presence of notable adverse effects, using vapocoolants or Cetacaine for this tail biopsy procedure in laboratory mice is unadvisable and we encourage the removal of these agents from institutional tail biopsy guidelines. PMID:26045455

  3. Emergent Data-Networks from Long-Tail Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, M.; Kumar, P.; Marini, L.; Hedstrom, M.; Myers, J. D.; Plale, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Synthesis of scientific data coming from individuals and small research group activities, known as long-tail data, with the existing resources elucidates useful scientific knowledge. In general, long-tail data are irreplaceable, expensive to reproduce, infrequently reused, follow no predefined data model, and they are often bounded in different information systems. The contextual relationships across the many attributes among such data in a data collection are herewith defined as data-network. These relationships have the potential to provide deep insights for the scientific challenges that require multidisciplinary interaction by identifying a new data object in the broader context of other data objects, and characterizing its spatial and temporal dependencies with others. Despite the advancement that has been achieved in various geoscience information models, it is not always straightforward to identify and characterize the contextual relationships among long-tail data because information models focus on profiling data attributes more than exploring data tie-ins. To address this need, we have designed the Long Tail Data Networks (LTDN) engine, which depends on a context-based approach to analyze the data attributes, predict data contextual relationships, and publish these relationships as a RDF graph. The engine groups data using their geographic location in spatial collections, and applies binary logic predicates to analyze the spatial, temporal, and variable attributes associated with data entities of each spatial collection to infer their relationships. Here we present the design of the LTDN engine and demonstrate its application for predicting the latent connectivity among long-tail data collections. To demonstrate the capabilities of the engine, we implemented this approach within the Sustainable Environment Actionable Data (SEAD) environment, an open-source semantic content repository that supports long-tail data curation and preservation, and show how relationships among datasets can be extracted. Results of this work demonstrates the capabilities of LTDN engine to predict the latent connectivity among long-tail geoscience data across their domain boundaries, as well as temporal and spatial windows to establish dynamic Web-based data-networks in the Semantic Web context.

  4. Skin Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Your Best Self Smart Snacking Losing Weight Safely Skin Biopsy KidsHealth > Teens > Body > Skin Stuff > Skin Biopsy ... Preparation The Procedure Safety Results What Is a Skin Biopsy and Who Would Need One? In a ...

  5. Liver biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Biopsy - liver; Percutaneous biopsy ... the biopsy needle to be inserted into the liver. This is often done by using ultrasound. The ... the chance of damage to the lung or liver. The needle is removed quickly. Pressure will be ...

  6. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    A liver biopsy is a medical procedure performed in order to obtain a small sample of the liver. This is ... small scar. The most common reasons for a liver biopsy include the evaluation of: ? Jaundice ? Liver inflammation (hepatitis) ? ...

  7. Tail-vein collection of blood: (mouse) Mice will be either manually or mechanically restraint for blood collection. The tip of tail will be

    E-print Network

    . If the mouse is older than 21 days, the animals will be anesthetized (Isoflurane or Ketamine/eye will be used. Genotyping: GFP (mouse) The investigator will wear specialized goggles to genotype live will be cleaned with clidox and wiped with alcohol between animals. If biopsy of mice older than 3 weeks of age

  8. Liver Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... for a liver biopsy by talking with a health care provider having blood tests arranging for a ride home fasting before the ... for a liver biopsy by talking with a health care provider having blood tests arranging for a ride home fasting before the ...

  9. Kidney Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... More Information American Kidney Fund National Kidney Foundation Kidney and Urologic Disease Organizations Many organizations provide support ... Disease Organizations?? . (PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Kidney Biopsy Page Content On this page: What is ...

  10. Skin lesion biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Punch biopsy; Shave biopsy; Skin biopsy; Biopsy - skin ... There are several ways to do a skin biopsy. Most procedures can be done in your provider's office or an outpatient medical office. It will take about 15 minutes. Which procedure ...

  11. Collection Efficiency and Ice Accretion Characteristics of Two Full Scale and One 1/4 Scale Business Jet Horizontal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Papadakis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Collection efficiency and ice accretion calculations have been made for a series of business jet horizontal tail configurations using a three-dimensional panel code, an adaptive grid code, and the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion code. The horizontal tail models included two full scale wing tips and a 25 percent scale model. Flow solutions for the horizontal tails were generated using the PMARC panel code. Grids used in the ice accretion calculations were generated using the adaptive grid code ICEGRID. The LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion program was used to calculate impingement efficiency and ice shapes. Ice shapes typifying rime and mixed icing conditions were generated for a 30 minute hold condition. All calculations were performed on an SGI Octane computer. The results have been compared to experimental flow and impingement data. In general, the calculated flow and collection efficiencies compared well with experiment, and the ice shapes appeared representative of the rime and mixed icing conditions for which they were calculated.

  12. Evaluation of methods for the isolation of high quality RNA from bovine and cervine hide biopsies.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Jaime L; Holman, Patricia J; Olafson, Pia U; Pruett, John H; Riggs, Penny K

    2013-02-01

    Molecular investigations of the ruminant response to ectoparasites at the parasite-host interface are critically dependent upon the quality of RNA. The complexity of ruminant skin decreases the capacity to obtain high quality RNA from biopsy samples, which directly affects the reliability of data produced by gene expression experiments. Two methods for isolating total RNA from skin were compared and the use of 4M guanidinium isothiocyanate (GITC) during frozen storage of the specimens was evaluated. In addition, the best procedure for RNA isolation from bovine skin punch biopsies was also tested on white-tailed deer skin biopsies. Skin biopsy punches were collected and frozen prior to pulverization for RNA isolation. Total RNA quantity and integrity were determined by spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis technology, respectively. Significantly increased total RNA yield (P < 0.05) and higher integrity (P < 0.05) were obtained with a TRI Reagent® isolation method. Freezing and subsequent storage of bovine skin punch biopsies in 4 M GITC did not affect the amount or integrity of total RNA recovered by either RNA isolation method. However, quantity and integrity of total RNA extracted with the TRI Reagent method were again significantly higher than with the alternate technique, confirming it as the superior method. The TRI Reagent isolation method also yielded high quality total RNA from white-tailed deer skin punch biopsies, suggesting the usefulness of this method for obtaining RNA of a quality suitable for gene expression studies in other ruminant species. PMID:22924936

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi not detected in widespread Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) collected from white-tailed deer in Tennessee.

    PubMed

    Rosen, M E; Hamer, S A; Gerhardt, R R; Jones, C J; Muller, L I; Scott, M C; Hickling, G J

    2012-11-01

    Lyme disease (LD), caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and transmitted in the eastern United States by blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis Say, is classified as nonendemic in Tennessee and surrounding states in the Southeast. Low incidence of LD in these states has been attributed, in part, to vector ticks being scarce or absent; however, tick survey data for many counties are incomplete or out of date. To improve our knowledge of the distribution, abundance, and Borrelia spp. prevalence of I. scapularis, we collected ticks from 1,018 hunter-harvested white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmerman)) from 71 of 95 Tennessee counties in fall 2007 and 2008. In total, 160 deer (15.7%) from 35 counties were infested with adult I. scapularis; 30 of these counties were new distributional records for this tick. The mean number of I. scapularis collected per infested deer was 5.4 +/- 0.6 SE. Of the 883 I. scapularis we removed from deer, none were positive for B. burgdorferi and one tested positive for B. miyamotoi. Deer are not reservoir hosts for B. burgdorferi; nevertheless, past surveys in northern LD-endemic states have readily detected B. burgdoreferi in ticks collected from deer. We conclude that I. scapularis is far more widespread in Tennessee than previously reported. The absence of detectable B. burgdorferi infection among these ticks suggests that the LD risk posed by I. scapularis in the surveyed areas of Tennessee is much lower than in LD-endemic areas of the Northeast and upper Midwest. PMID:23270178

  14. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  15. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  16. Polar body biopsy.

    PubMed

    Montag, Markus; Köster, Maria; Strowitzki, Thomas; Toth, Bettina

    2013-09-01

    Polar body biopsy combined with array comparative genomic hybridization allows detection of maternal chromosomal aberrations. Although it has limitations, it can be seen as an alternative to blastomere and trophectoderm biopsy. PMID:23796365

  17. Diagnostic accuracy of rectal mucosa biopsy testing for chronic wasting disease within white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herds in North America:Effects of age,sex,polymorphism at PRNP codon 96,and disease progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An effective live animal diagnostic test is needed to assist in the control of chronic wasting disease (CWD), which has spread through captive and wild herds of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Canada and the United States. In the present study, the diagnostic accuracy of rectal mucosa ...

  18. Skin biopsy: Biopsy issues in specific diseases.

    PubMed

    Elston, Dirk M; Stratman, Erik J; Miller, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    Misdiagnosis may result from biopsy site selection, technique, or choice of transport media. Important potential sources of error include false-negative direct immunofluorescence results based on poor site selection, uninformative biopsy specimens based on both site selection and technique, and spurious interpretations of pigmented lesions and nonmelanoma skin cancer based on biopsy technique. Part I of this 2-part continuing medical education article addresses common pitfalls involving site selection and biopsy technique in the diagnosis of bullous diseases, vasculitis, panniculitis, connective tissue diseases, drug eruptions, graft-versus-host disease, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, hair disorders, and neoplastic disorders. Understanding these potential pitfalls can result in improved diagnostic yield and patient outcomes. PMID:26702794

  19. Total and methylmercury in soft tissues of white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla) and Osprey (Pandion haliaetus) collected in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kalisinska, Elzbieta; Gorecki, Jerzy; Lanocha, Natalia; Okonska, Anna; Melgarejo, Javier B; Budis, Halina; Rzad, Izabella; Golas, Jerzy

    2014-11-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination in piscivorous birds, especially methylmercury (MeHg), has been drawing much attention worldwide in regard to its bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food chains. In this study on Hg in the soft tissues of white-tailed eagles (n = 22) and ospreys (n = 2) from Poland, total Hg (THg) range was 0.15-47.6 while MeHg range was 0.11-8.05 mg kg?¹ dry weight. In both species, median THg and MeHg concentrations were lower in the muscle and brain than in the liver and kidney. Median nephric residues were just under 3 and 5 mgTHg kg?¹ or 0.9 and 3.7 mgMeHg kg?¹ for white-tailed eagle and osprey, respectively. In Norwegian data from the 1970s and in our results, MeHg in the muscle of white-tailed eagle was ~60 % THg (%MeHg = MeHg/THg × 100), lower than in other piscivorous birds. A clear similarity in THg tissue levels was found between Polish and German populations of white-tailed eagles. PMID:24870933

  20. Delayed culture of Leishmania in skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Dedet, J P; Pratlong, F; Pradinaud, R; Moreau, B

    1999-01-01

    Between January 1997 and October 1998, 16 skin biopsies collected from 13 patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis in French Guiana were inoculated in culture medium after travel for 3-17 days from the place of biopsy to the culture laboratory in France. Each biopsy fragment was introduced near the flame of a Bunsen burner into the transport medium (RPMI medium supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum) which was maintained at ambient temperature during postal delivery to France. In France the biopsies were ground in sterile saline before being inoculated into NNN culture tubes. The cultures were incubated at 25 degrees C and subcultured every week until the 5th week. The cultures were positive in 9 cases, remained negative in 4, and were contaminated in 3 cases. Positive results were obtained at all seasons and for 3 different Leishmania species. The study indicates that delayed culture can yield useful results from biopsies taken in field conditions. PMID:10717763

  1. Development of biopsy gun for aspiration and drug injection.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun Guy; Cho, Sung Ho; Cho, Chang Nho; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2015-04-01

    Tumor samples are required for pathological examinations, and different instruments are generally used to obtain samples of different types of tumors. Among the many methods available for obtaining tumor tissues, gun biopsy is widely used because it is much simpler than incisional biopsy and can collect many more samples than aspiration biopsy. However, conventional biopsy guns cannot simultaneously perform biopsy aspiration, bleeding prevention, and marker injection. In this study, we developed a biopsy gun that can simultaneously perform biopsy aspiration and sample collection, in addition to injecting a styptic agent and marker to prevent bleeding and contamination in the biopsy track. We then used a prototype to evaluate the feasibility of the developed device. The collectable sample size was also assessed. Performance of the biopsy aspiration feature was also evaluated, including the maximum aspiration viscosity. Finally, we tested the maximum amount of drug that can be injected. We found that the biopsy gun developed here is an alternative tool for biopsy collection with improved procedure safety and diagnostic accuracy. PMID:24990254

  2. Bone marrow biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Biopsy - bone marrow ... A bone marrow biopsy may be done in the health care provider's office or in a hospital. The sample may ... This captures a tiny sample, or core, of bone marrow within the needle. The sample and needle are ...

  3. Trephine lung biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, J. R.; Jones, R. L.; Mielke, B.; King, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    Forty-five percutaneous trephine lung biopsies using the Steel apparatus were performed on 38 patients. Tissue was obtained on 42 occasions (94%) leading to histological or culture diagnosis in 33 patients (87%). Pneumothoraces (12 patients), bleeding into the airways or pleural space (4 patients), and tumour seeding along the needle track (1 patient) occurred in 38% of biopsy attempts (45% of patients). In contrast to the Vim-Silverman technique, the Steel trephine appears to produce a higher tissue yield and superior specimens for histological study. Trephine lung biopsy is comparable to open lung biopsy in providing positive diagnoses. With anticipation and expeditious management of complications, trephine lung biopsy is both safe and useful in the diagnosis of pulmonary disease. ImagesFIG. 1AFIG. 2AFIG. 2BFIG. 3AFIG. 3B PMID:4691104

  4. Multiple Biopsies and Detection of Cervical Cancer Precursors at Colposcopy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Walker, Joan L.; Gold, Michael A.; Smith, Katie M.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Mathews, Cara; Dunn, S. Terence; Zhang, Roy; Moxley, Katherine; Bishop, Erin; Tenney, Meaghan; Nugent, Elizabeth; Graubard, Barry I.; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with abnormal cervical cancer screening results are referred to colposcopy and biopsy for diagnosis of cervical cancer precursors (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions [HSILs]). Colposcopy with a single biopsy can miss identification of HSILs. No systematic study has quantified the improved detection of HSIL by taking multiple lesion-directed biopsies. Methods The Biopsy Study was an observational study of 690 women referred to colposcopy after abnormal cervical cancer screening results. Up to four directed biopsies were taken from distinct acetowhite lesions and ranked by colposcopic impression. A nondirected biopsy of a normal-appearing area was added if fewer than four directed biopsies were taken. HSIL identified by any biopsy was the reference standard of disease used to evaluate the incremental yield and sensitivity of multiple biopsies. Results In the overall population, sensitivities for detecting HSIL increased from 60.6% (95% CI, 54.8% to 66.6%) from a single biopsy to 85.6% (95% CI, 80.3% to 90.2%) after two biopsies and to 95.6% (95% CI, 91.3% to 99.2%) after three biopsies. A significant increase in sensitivity of multiple biopsies was observed in all subgroups. The highest increase in yield of HSIL was observed for women with a high-grade colposcopic impression, HSIL cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 positivity. Only 2% of all HSILs diagnosed in the participants were detected by biopsies of normal-appearing transformation zone. Conclusion Collection of additional lesion-directed biopsies during colposcopy increased detection of histologic HSIL, regardless of patient characteristics. Taking additional biopsies when multiple lesions are present should become the standard practice of colposcopic biopsy. PMID:25422481

  5. Liver biopsy (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    A liver biopsy is not a routine procedure, but is performed when it is necessary to determine the presence of liver disease and to look for malignancy, cysts, parasites, or other pathology. The actual procedure is only slightly uncomfortable. ...

  6. Biopsy - biliary tract

    MedlinePLUS

    ... signs of cancer, disease, or infection in the biopsy sample. ... the bile ducts ( cholangiocarcinoma ) Cysts in the liver Liver cancer Pancreatic cancer Swelling and scarring of the bile ducts ( primary sclerosing cholangitis )

  7. Breast biopsy - stereotactic

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of stereotactic breast biopsy in the management of breast disease. In: Cameron JL, Cameron AM, eds. Current Surgical ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014. Katz VL, Dotters D. Breast diseases: diagnosis and treatment of benign and malignant disease. ...

  8. Sentinel node biopsy (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    Sentinel node biopsy is a technique which helps determine if a cancer has spread (metastasized), or is ... retrieve it for analysis. The concept of the "sentinel" node, or the first node to drain the ...

  9. Biopsies in uveal melanoma.

    PubMed

    Midena, Edoardo; Parrozzani, Raffaele

    2012-01-01

    The ability to obtain the proper clinical diagnosis in cases of suspected intraocular tumors has greatly advanced during the past 50 years. The clinical characteristics of most intraocular tumors (size, shape, color, and texture) are detectable by skilled ophthalmoscopic examination and, with the use of adjunctive techniques (mainly ultrasonography), the proper diagnosis can be reached without invasive procedures. Notwithstanding, some intraocular tumors need to be biopsied to obtain a reliable diagnosis. In the cytogenetic era, intraocular tumor management is changing, and tumor-sampling procedures are becoming the main prognostic (and theoretically also diagnostic) tools for uveal melanoma. In spite of the widespread use of biopsies in general surgical practice, in ophthalmic oncology, indications and contraindications for biopsy continue to be under debate. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate the role of uveal melanoma biopsy in current clinical practice. PMID:22042015

  10. Lung needle biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... if you have certain lung diseases such as emphysema. Usually, a collapsed lung after a biopsy does ... any type Bullae (enlarged alveoli that occur with emphysema) Cor pulmonale Cysts of the lung Pulmonary hypertension ...

  11. Salivary gland biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    Biopsy - salivary gland ... You have several pairs of salivary glands that drain into your mouth: A major pair in front of the ears (parotid glands) Another major pair beneath your jaw (submandibular ...

  12. Pleural needle biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the pleural membrane. Pleural biopsy can diagnose tuberculosis , cancer, and other diseases. If a closed pleural ... lung cancer , malignant mesothelioma , and metastatic pleural tumor ) Tuberculosis A disease caused by a virus, fungus, or ...

  13. A snail in the long tail: a new Plekocheilus species collected by the ‘Comisión Científica del Pacífico’ (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Amphibulimidae)

    PubMed Central

    Breure, Abraham S. H.; Araujo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Among the historical collection gathered by the ‘Comisión Científica del Pacífico’ during 1862–1865, type material was found of one of the species described on the basis of the material collected shortly afterwards. Inspection of the types revealed that only one specimen may be considered as type material of Bulimus aristaceus Crosse, 1869; this specimen is now designated as the lectotype. The other specimens are described as a new species, Plekocheilus (Plekocheilus) cecepeus. PMID:26312021

  14. A snail in the long tail: a new Plekocheilus species collected by the 'Comisión Científica del Pacífico' (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Amphibulimidae).

    PubMed

    Breure, Abraham S H; Araujo, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Among the historical collection gathered by the 'Comisión Científica del Pacífico' during 1862-1865, type material was found of one of the species described on the basis of the material collected shortly afterwards. Inspection of the types revealed that only one specimen may be considered as type material of Bulimusaristaceus Crosse, 1869; this specimen is now designated as the lectotype. The other specimens are described as a new species, Plekocheilus (Plekocheilus) cecepeus. PMID:26312021

  15. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous core needle biopsy in pancreatic tumor diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Tyng, Chiang J; Almeida, Maria Fernanda A; Barbosa, Paula NV; Bitencourt, Almir GV; Berg, José Augusto AG; Maciel, Macello S; Coimbra, Felipe JF; Schiavon, Luiz Henrique O; Begnami, Maria Dirlei; Guimarães, Marcos D; Zurstrassen, Charles E; Chojniak, Rubens

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the techniques, results, and complications related to computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous core needle biopsies of solid pancreatic lesions. METHODS: CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of solid pancreatic lesions performed at a cancer reference center between January 2012 and September 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Biopsy material was collected with a 16-20 G Tru-Core needle (10-15 cm; Angiotech, Vancouver, CA) using a coaxial system and automatic biopsy gun. When direct access to the lesion was not possible, indirect (transgastric or transhepatic) access or hydrodissection and/or pneumodissection maneuvers were used. Characteristics of the patients, lesions, procedures, and histologic results were recorded using a standardized form. RESULTS: A total of 103 procedures included in the study were performed on patients with a mean age of 64.8 year (range: 39-94 year). The mean size of the pancreatic lesions was 45.5 mm (range: 15-195 mm). Most (75/103, 72.8%) procedures were performed via direct access, though hydrodissection and/or pneumodissection were used in 22.2% (23/103) of cases and indirect transhepatic or transgastric access was used in 4.8% (5/103) of cases. Histologic analysis was performed on all biopsies, and diagnoses were conclusive in 98.1% (101/103) of cases, confirming 3.9% (4/103) of tumors were benign and 94.2% (97/103) were malignant; results were atypical in 1.9% (2/103) of cases, requiring a repeat biopsy to diagnose a neuroendocrine tumor, and surgical resection to confirm a primary adenocarcinoma. Only mild/moderate complications were observed in 9/103 patients (8.7%), and they were more commonly associated with biopsies of lesions located in the head/uncinate process (n = 8), than of those located in the body/tail (n = 1) of the pancreas, but this difference was not significant. CONCLUSION: CT-guided biopsy of a pancreatic lesion is a safe procedure with a high success rate, and is an excellent option for minimally invasive diagnosis. PMID:25834323

  16. Tail Buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdrashitov, G.

    1943-01-01

    An approximate theory of buffeting is here presented, based on the assumption of harmonic disturbing forces. Two cases of buffeting are considered: namely, for a tail angle of attack greater and less than the stalling angle, respectively. On the basis of the tests conducted and the results of foreign investigators, a general analysis is given of the nature of the forced vibrations the possible load limits on the tail, and the methods of elimination of buffeting.

  17. Breast Biopsy System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Charge Coupled Devices (CCDs) are high technology silicon chips that connect light directly into electronic or digital images, which can be manipulated or enhanced by computers. When Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) scientists realized that existing CCD technology could not meet scientific requirements for the Hubble Space Telescope Imagining Spectrograph, GSFC contracted with Scientific Imaging Technologies, Inc. (SITe) to develop an advanced CCD. SITe then applied many of the NASA-driven enhancements to the manufacture of CCDs for digital mammography. The resulting device images breast tissue more clearly and efficiently. The LORAD Stereo Guide Breast Biopsy system incorporates SITe's CCD as part of a digital camera system that is replacing surgical biopsy in many cases. Known as stereotactic needle biopsy, it is performed under local anesthesia with a needle and saves women time, pain, scarring, radiation exposure and money.

  18. Thyroid gland biopsy (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    The thyroid is a gland located in the neck. It is a part of the endocrine (hormone) system, and plays a major role in regulating ... sample of cells is needed from the thyroid gland a fine needle biopsy can be performed. During ...

  19. PanMetaDocs - A tool for collecting and managing the long tail of "small science data"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Ulbricht, D.

    2011-12-01

    In the early days of thinking about cyberinfrastructure the focus was on "big science data". Today, the challenge is not anymore to store several terabytes of data, but to manage data objects in a way that facilitates their re-use. Key to re-use by a user as a data consumer is proper documentation of the data. Also, data consumers need discovery metadata to find the data they need and they need descriptive metadata to be able to use the data they retrieved. Thus, data documentation faces the challenge to extensively and completely describe these objects, hold the items easily accessible at a sustainable cost level. However, data curation and documentation do not rank high in the everyday work of a scientist as a data producer. Data producers are often frustrated by being asked to provide metadata on their data over and over again, information that seemed very obvious from the context of their work. A challenge to data archives is the wide variety of metadata schemata in use, which creates a number of maintenance and design challenges of its own. PanMetaDocs addresses these issues by allowing an uploaded files to be described by more than one metadata object. PanMetaDocs, which was developed from PanMetaWorks, is a PHP based web application that allow to describe data with any xml-based metadata schema. Its user interface is browser based and was developed to collect metadata and data in collaborative scientific projects situated at one or more institutions. The metadata fields can be filled with static or dynamic content to reduce the number of fields that require manual entries to a minimum and make use of contextual information in a project setting. In the development of PanMetaDocs the business logic of panMetaWorks is reused, except for the authentication and data management functions of PanMetaWorks, which are delegated to the eSciDoc framework. The eSciDoc repository framework is designed as a service oriented architecture that can be controlled through a REST interface to create version controlled items with metadata records in XML format. PanMetaDocs utilizes the eSciDoc items model to add multiple metadata records that describe uploaded files in different metadata schemata. While datasets are collected and described, shared to collaborate with other scientists and finally published, data objects are transferred from a shared data curation domain into a persistent data curation domain. Through an RSS interface for recent datasets PanMetaWorks allows project members to be informed about data uploaded by other project members. The implementation of the OAI-PMH interface can be used to syndicate data catalogs to research data portals, such as the panFMP data portal framework. Once data objects are uploaded to the eSciDoc infrastructure it is possible to drop the software instance that was used for collecting the data, while the compiled data and metadata are accessible for other authorized applications through the institution's eSciDoc middleware. This approach of "expendable data curation tools" allows for a significant reduction in costs for software maintenance as expensive data capture applications do not need to be maintained indefinitely to ensure long term access to the stored data.

  20. Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Irvine Pregnant? What to Expect Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow KidsHealth > Parents > Doctors & Hospitals > Medical Tests & Exams > Aspiration and Biopsy: Bone Marrow Print A A A Text Size What's in ...

  1. Common Data Elements for Muscle Biopsy Reporting.

    PubMed

    Dastgir, Jahannaz; Rutkowski, Anne; Alvarez, Rachel; Cossette, Stacy A; Yan, Ke; Hoffmann, Raymond G; Sewry, Caroline; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Goebel, Hans-Hilmar; Bonnemann, Carsten; Lawlor, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Context .- There is no current standard among myopathologists for reporting muscle biopsy findings. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has recently launched a common data element (CDE) project to standardize neuromuscular data collected in clinical reports and to facilitate their use in research. Objective .- To develop a more-uniform, prospective reporting tool for muscle biopsies, incorporating the elements identified by the CDE project, in an effort to improve reporting and educational resources. Design .- The variation in current biopsy reporting practice was evaluated through a study of 51 muscle biopsy reports from self-reported diagnoses of genetically confirmed or undiagnosed muscle disease from the Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry. Two reviewers independently extracted data from deidentified reports and entered them into the revised CDE format to identify what was missing and whether or not information provided on the revised CDE report (complete/incomplete) could be successfully interpreted by a neuropathologist. Results .- Analysis of the data highlighted showed (1) inconsistent reporting of key clinical features from referring physicians, and (2) considerable variability in the reporting of pertinent positive and negative histologic findings by pathologists. Conclusions .- We propose a format for muscle-biopsy reporting that includes the elements in the CDE checklist and a brief narrative comment that interprets the data in support of a final interpretation. Such a format standardizes cataloging of pathologic findings across the spectrum of muscle diseases and serves emerging clinical care and research needs with the expansion of genetic-testing therapeutic trials. PMID:26132600

  2. High-intensity focused ultrasound for liver biopsy hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Cheri; Wang, Hesheng; Zhou, Yun; Dogra, Vikram; Exner, Agata; Bhatt, Shweta; Haaga, John; Stowe, Nicholas

    2001-05-01

    In vivo experiments were conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of HIFU application to control postliver biopsy hemorrhage. Yorkshire pigs were anesthetized and their livers were surgically exposed. Core biopsies (n=74) were performed on the exposed hepatic parenchyma with 14-gauge (n=41) and 18-gauge (n=33) core biopsy needles that were inserted 1.5-2 cm deep into the liver. Hemorrhage was determined from the weight of the blood collected from each biopsy puncture site using surgical sponges immediately after biopsy needle retraction. To stop hemorrhage, immediate HIFU was applied to the needle entry site (n=44) after needle retraction. HIFU was generated using a piezoelectric (PZT) transducer (diameter=42 mm, F number=1.2) at 4.23 MHz. Whole-blood clotting times were measured at various times throughout the experiments. Mean blood loss from control biopsy sites using a 14-gauge needle (n=18) was 1.78 g, while mean blood loss using an 18-gauge needle (n=10) was 1.22 g (two 14-gauge-needle control biopsies were excluded). Virtually no blood loss was measured from the biopsy needle entry site after HIFU application for both 14- and 18-gauge-needle biopsies. Ultrasound imaging demonstrated a marked difference between control sites and HIFU-treated sites where successful hemostasis was achieved.

  3. Wind-tunnel Investigation of End-plate Effects of Horizontal Tails on a Vertical Tail Compared with Available Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Harry E

    1946-01-01

    A vertical-tail model with stub fuselage was tested in combination with various simulated horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and location on the aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical tail. Available theoretical data on end-plate effects were collected and presented in the form most suitable for design purposes. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the measured and theoretical end-plate effects of horizontal tails on vertical tails, and the data indicated that the end-plate effect was determined more by the location of the horizontal tail than by the span of the horizontal tail. The horizontal tail gave most end-plate effect when located near either tip of the vertical tail and, when located near the base of the vertical tail, the end-plate effect was increased by moving the horizontal tail rearward.

  4. Percutaneous Aspiration Lung Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, D. E.; Thompson, D. W.; Pudden, B. J. E.

    1971-01-01

    A total of 182 percutaneous trans-thoracic aspiration biopsies were performed in 164 patients over a three-year period. In malignant neoplasms arising in the lung the diagnostic accuracy rate was 84%. In the non-malignant localized parenchymal lesions the accuracy drops considerably unless the lesion is cystic or cavitary. Some patients with non-parenchymal lesions were selected to assess further the value of this procedure. It proved much less rewarding in lesions of the chest wall, diaphragm and also in diffuse parenchymal disease. These lesions may be more accurately identified by other methods of biopsy. Lesions presenting as a mediastinal mass are an intermediate group and in selected cases helpful information can often be obtained by small-bore needle aspiration, particularly if a pericardial, bronchogenic or thymic cyst is suspected. Recent reports have shown that the aspiration of pulmonary lesions can be utilized to obtain viable tumour cells for chemosensitivity testing. The aspiration of nodular pulmonary lesions should be considered when a diagnosis is not forthcoming from the usual investigative means, since there has been little morbidity and no mortality in the series. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4(a)FIG. 4(b)FIG. 5 PMID:4923390

  5. Remote biopsy darting and marking of polar bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pagano, Anthony M.; Peacock, Elizabeth; McKinney, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Remote biopsy darting of polar bears (Ursus maritimus) is less invasive and time intensive than physical capture and is therefore useful when capture is challenging or unsafe. We worked with two manufacturers to develop a combination biopsy and marking dart for use on polar bears. We had an 80% success rate of collecting a tissue sample with a single biopsy dart and collected tissue samples from 143 polar bears on land, in water, and on sea ice. Dye marks ensured that 96% of the bears were not resampled during the same sampling period, and we recovered 96% of the darts fired. Biopsy heads with 5 mm diameters collected an average of 0.12 g of fur, tissue, and subcutaneous adipose tissue, while biopsy heads with 7 mm diameters collected an average of 0.32 g. Tissue samples were 99.3% successful (142 of 143 samples) in providing a genetic and sex identification of individuals. We had a 64% success rate collecting adipose tissue and we successfully examined fatty acid signatures in all adipose samples. Adipose lipid content values were lower compared to values from immobilized or harvested polar bears, indicating that our method was not suitable for quantifying adipose lipid content.

  6. Heavy Tails Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Heavy Tails Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail of Mathematics Washington State University MMR2011, Beijing Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal Dependence MMR2011, Beijing 1 / 26 #12;Heavy Tails Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities

  7. Gram stain of tissue biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... stain of tissue biopsy test involves using crystal violet stain to test a sample of tissue taken ... microscope slide. The specimen is stained with crystal violet stain and goes through more processing before it ...

  8. Celiac Disease Diagnosis: Endoscopic Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Fiction Symptoms Screening Diagnosis Treatment Factsheets ... how celiac disease is diagnosed Only a biopsy lets you know for sure If screening tests and/or symptoms suggest celiac disease, your doctor ...

  9. Bone biopsy in haematological disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, R; Frisch, B; Bartl, R

    1982-01-01

    Bone marrow biopsies are now widely used in the investigation and follow-up of many diseases. Semi-thin sections of 8216 undecalcified biopsies of patients with haematological disorders were studied. Observations were made on the cytopenias and the myelodysplastic syndromes, the acute leukaemias the myeloproliferative disorders, Hodgkin's disease and the malignant lymphomas including multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukaemia and angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsies are essential for the differential diagnosis of most cytopenias and for the early recognition of fibrosis which most frequently occurred as a consequence of megakaryocytic proliferation in the myeloproliferative disorders. Different patterns of bone marrow involvement were found in the lymphoproliferative disorders and both their type and extent constituted factors of prognostic significance. A survey of the literature is given and the conclusion is drawn that bone marrow biopsies provide indispensible information for the diagnostic evaluation and the follow-up of patients with haematological disorders. Images PMID:7040489

  10. Tail gut cyst.

    PubMed

    Rao, G Mallikarjuna; Haricharan, P; Ramanujacharyulu, S; Reddy, K Lakshmi

    2002-01-01

    The tail gut is a blind extension of the hindgut into the tail fold just distal to the cloacal membrane. Remnants of this structure may form tail gut cyst. We report a 14-year-old girl with tail gut cyst that presented as acute abdomen. The patient recovered after cyst excision. PMID:12546176

  11. Temporal artery biopsy size does not matter.

    PubMed

    Kaptanis, Sarantos; Perera, Joanne K; Halkias, Constantine; Caton, Nadine; Alarcon, Lida; Vig, Stella

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to clarify whether positive temporal artery biopsies had a greater sample length than negative biopsies in temporal arteritis. It has been suggested that biopsy length should be at least 1 cm to improve diagnostic accuracy. A retrospective review of 149 patients who had 151 temporal artery biopsies was conducted. Twenty biopsies were positive (13.3%), 124 negative (82.1%) and seven samples were insufficient (4.6%). There was no clinically significant difference in the mean biopsy size between positive (0.7 cm) and negative samples (0.65 cm) (t-test: p =?.43 NS). Ninety-four patients fulfilled all three ACR criteria prior to biopsy (62.3%) and four patients (2.6%) changed ACR score from 2 to 3 after biopsy. Treatment should not be delayed in anticipation of the biopsy or withheld in the case of a negative biopsy if the patient's symptoms improve. PMID:24347135

  12. Protocol biopsies for renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rush, David

    2010-01-01

    Protocol biopsies in renal transplantation are those that are procured at predetermined times post renal transplantation, regardless of renal function. These biopsies have been useful to study the natural history of the transplanted kidney as they have detected unexpected - i.e. "subclinical" pathology. The most significant subclinical pathologies that have been detected with protocol biopsies have been acute lesions, such as cellular and antibody mediated rejection, and chronic lesions, such as interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy, and transplant glomerulopathy. The potential benefit of early recognition of the above lesions is that their early treatment may result in improved long-term outcomes. Conversely, the identification of normal histology on a protocol biopsy, may inform us about the safety of reduction in overall immunosuppression. Our centre, as well as others, is attempting to develop non-invasive methods of immune monitoring of renal transplant patients. However, we believe that until such methods have been developed and validated, the protocol biopsy will remain an indispensable tool for the complete care of renal transplant patients. PMID:20061686

  13. Vacuum enhanced cutaneous biopsy instrument

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Joseph (St. Petersburg, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A syringe-like disposable cutaneous biopsy instrument equipped with a tubular blade at its lower end, and designed so that a vacuum is created during use, said vacuum serving to retain undeformed a plug of tissue cut from a patient's skin.

  14. Obtaining research biopsies during pediatric colonoscopy: Safety and adverse events

    PubMed Central

    Mait-Kaufman, Jennifer; Kahn, Stacie; Tomer, Gitit

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the safety profile of acquiring additional intestinal biopsies for research purposes in children undergoing a medically indicated colonoscopy. METHODS: A retrospective review of 122 pediatric patients who underwent colonoscopy over a 9 mo time period was completed. 38/122 participants consented to a research study in which 4 additional biopsies were obtained, in addition to routine biopsies. The outcomes after colonoscopy were measured in the research participants, and compared to 84 control participants who did not consent for the study. Groups were compared with regard to number of biopsies obtained, underlying diagnosis, and both serious and minor adverse outcomes. Data was collected including: age, gender, race, indication, diagnosis, number of biopsies obtained per case and post procedure adverse events. Medical records were reviewed and a questionnaire was completed by each of the ten gastroenterologists who performed procedures during the study. Physicians were asked about individual patient outcomes to ensure that all adverse events, such as perforation, excessive bleeding, infection, and minor gastrointestinal outcomes, were captured and included. RESULTS: The research group had more biopsies obtained (mean = 13.58 ± 4.21) compared to controls (mean = 9.33 ± 4.40), P ? 0.0001, however there was no difference in adverse events. Serious outcomes, defined as perforation, bleeding and infection, did not occur, in either group. As such, the relationship between serious adverse events and number of biopsies obtained was not determined. Minor gastrointestinal outcomes, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea or vomiting, were reported in 21 patients (8 research participants and 13 control participants) however the incidence of minor gastrointestinal outcomes between the two groups did not vary significantly, P = 0.45. Additionally, the mean number of biopsies obtained in patients who had a minor outcome (mean = 12.1 ± 0.77), compared to those with no adverse outcome (mean = 10.34 ± 0.5), revealed no statistical difference between the groups (P = 0.12), suggesting that number of biopsies is not associated with incidence of minor adverse events. CONCLUSION: Patients participating in research requiring acquisition of additional biopsies for research purposes alone, are not at an increased risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:26140101

  15. Sentinel lymph node biopsy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alsaif, Abdulaziz A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To report our experience in sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in early breast cancer. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January 2005 and December 2014. There were 120 patients who underwent SLNB with frozen section examination. Data collected included the characteristics of patients, index tumor, and sentinel node (SN), SLNB results, axillary recurrence rate and SLNB morbidity. Results: There were 120 patients who had 123 cancers. Sentinel node was identified in 117 patients having 120 tumors (97.6% success rate). No SN was found intraoperatively in 3 patients. Frozen section results showed that 95 patients were SN negative, those patients had no immediate axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), whereas 25 patients were SN positive and subsequently had immediate ALND. Upon further examination of the 95 negative SN’s by hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) and immunohistochemical staining for doubtful H&E cases, 10 turned out to have micrometastases (6 had delayed ALND and 4 had no further axillary surgery). Median follow up of patients was 35.5 months and the mean was 38.8 months. There was one axillary recurrence observed in the SN negative group. The morbidity of SLNB was minimal. Conclusion: The obtainable results from our local experience in SLNB in breast cancer, concur with that seen in published similar literature in particular the axillary failure rate. Sentinel lymph node biopsy resulted in minimal morbidity. PMID:26318461

  16. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Waiting ... topics below to get started. Testing Biopsy and Cytology Specimens for Cancer How is cancer diagnosed? Types ...

  17. When Heavy-Tailed and Light-Tailed Flows Compete: The Response Time Tail Under

    E-print Network

    Nair, Jayakrishnan U.

    When Heavy-Tailed and Light-Tailed Flows Compete: The Response Time Tail Under Generalized Max tail under generalized max-weight policies in settings where the traffic flows are highly asymmetric. Specifically, we study an extreme setting with two traffic flows, one heavy-tailed, and one light-tailed

  18. Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Copulas

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Toronto, May 27 2014 Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas University of Toronto, May 27 2014 1 / 22 #12;Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Let X = (X1

  19. Biopsies

    MedlinePLUS

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  20. Biopsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2/2017 2017 AOCD Spring Current Concepts in Dermatology Meeting more Latest News 4/3/2014 The Burning Truth 12/19/2013 Osteopathic Training Statement 7/2/2013 The Truth About Tanning 4/24/2013 Sun Safety IQ Online Surveys About AOCD The AOCD was recognized in ...

  1. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided liver biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Parth J.; Majithia, Raj; Diehl, David L.; Baron, Todd H.

    2015-01-01

    Liver biopsy remains the cornerstone in the diagnosis and management of liver disorders. Results of liver biopsy can often drive therapeutic decision-making. Unfortunately, studies have shown conventional biopsy techniques to carry significant sampling variability that can potentially impact patient care. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is gaining traction as an alternative method of biopsy. For parenchymal disease, it can decrease sampling variability. It offers a more targeted approach for focal lesions. Its diagnostic yield and limited adverse event profile make it a promising approach for liver biopsy. PMID:26020041

  2. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Parth J; Majithia, Raj; Diehl, David L; Baron, Todd H

    2015-01-01

    Liver biopsy remains the cornerstone in the diagnosis and management of liver disorders. Results of liver biopsy can often drive therapeutic decision-making. Unfortunately, studies have shown conventional biopsy techniques to carry significant sampling variability that can potentially impact patient care. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is gaining traction as an alternative method of biopsy. For parenchymal disease, it can decrease sampling variability. It offers a more targeted approach for focal lesions. Its diagnostic yield and limited adverse event profile make it a promising approach for liver biopsy. PMID:26020041

  3. Prostate Biopsy for the Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Cheng William; Amalou, Hayet; Xu, Sheng; Turkbey, Baris; Yan, Pingkun; Kruecker, Jochen; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Wood, Bradford J

    2015-01-01

    Prostate biopsies are usually performed by urologists in the office setting using transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance. The current standard of care involves obtaining 10–14 cores from different anatomical sections. These biopsies are usually not directed into a specific lesion as most prostate cancers are not visible on TRUS. Color-Doppler, ultrasound contrast agents, elastography, MRI, and MRI/ultrasound fusion are proposed as imaging methods to guide prostate biopsies. Prostate MRI and fusion biopsy create opportunities for diagnostic and interventional radiologists to play an increasingly important role in the screening, evaluation, diagnosis, targeted biopsy, surveillance and focal therapy of the prostate cancer patient. PMID:24581731

  4. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis in Welsh pony embryos after biopsy and cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Guignot, F; Reigner, F; Perreau, C; Tartarin, P; Babilliot, J M; Bed'hom, B; Vidament, M; Mermillod, P; Duchamp, G

    2015-11-01

    Preimplantation genetic diagnosis and embryo cryopreservation are important tools to improve genetic management in equine species with marked consequences on the economic value, health, biodiversity, and preservation of the animals. This study aimed to develop a biopsy method at the blastocyst stage that provides viable genotyped cryopreserved Welsh pony embryos. Embryos were collected at d 6.75 to 7 after ovulation. Biopsies were performed with either a microblade or a micropipette. After biopsy, embryos were cryopreserved. The survival rate of biopsied embryos was evaluated on fresh and cryopreserved embryos either 24 h after in vitro culture or after transfer to recipients. Fresh and nonbiopsied embryos were used as controls. Sex, coat color genes, myotony (neuromuscular disorder) diagnosis, and markers of parentage were investigated using PCR on biopsied cells after whole-genome amplification and on remaining embryos. The embryo survival rate after transfer was not affected by the micropipette biopsy (50%, = 8; 43%, = 7; and 50%, = 12, at d 30 for fresh biopsied embryos, vitrified biopsied embryos, and control embryos, respectively) but was significantly reduced by the use of microblade biopsy: 9 ( = 11) vs. 67% ( = 12) for control embryos. Successful sex determination was achieved for 82% ( = 28) of the micropipette biopsies and 100% ( = 50) of the microblade biopsies. Sex determined on biopsied cells was found to correspond completely (100%) with that determined on the remaining embryo ( = 37). More than 90% of the parentage checking markers, coat color, and myotony diagnosis were successfully determined on biopsies obtained with either a micropipette or a microblade. Mendelian incompatibility (7.5 and 5.5%) and embryo genotyping errors (6.6 and 8.6%) were low and not significantly different between the 2 methods. In conclusion, for the first time, pregnancy at Day 30 was obtained after transfer of Welsh pony biopsied and vitrified embryos >300 ?m in diameter to recipient pony mares. The biopsied cells collected enabled multigenetic embryo diagnoses to be performed to a high degree of accuracy. The micropipette biopsy is the better method to apply on Welsh pony embryos. PMID:26641042

  5. Transjugular Renal Biopsy: Our Experience and Technical Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    See, Teik Choon; Thompson, Barbara C.; Howie, Alexander J.; Karamshi, M.; Papadopoulou, Anthie M.; Davies, Neil; Tibballs, Jonathan

    2008-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to describe the indications for and technique of transjugular renal biopsy (TJRB) and evaluate the efficacy and complications of this method. We performed a retrospective review of 59 patients who underwent TJRB using the Quick-core needle biopsy system (Cook, Letchworth, UK) over a 4-year period. The indications for obtaining renal biopsy included acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, nephrotic syndrome, and proteinuria with or without other associated disease. Indications for the transjugular approach included coagulopathy, biopsy of a solitary kidney or essentially single functioning kidney, simultaneous renal and hepatic biopsy, morbid obesity, and failed percutaneous biopsy. All but four cases were performed via the right internal jugular vein. The right, left, or both renal veins were cannulated in 41, 14, and 4 cases, respectively. Combined liver and renal biopsies were obtained in seven cases. Diagnostic biopsy specimens were obtained in 56 of 59 patients (95%). The number and size of tissue cores ranged from 1 to 9 mm and from 1 to 20 mm, respectively. The mean numbers of glomeruli per procedure on light microscopy and electron microscopy were 10.3 and 2.6, respectively. Specimens for immunohistology were acquired in 49 cases, of which 40 were adequate. Of the 56 successful TJRB procedures, 34 (61%) were associated with isolated capsular perforation (19), contained subcapsular leak (10), isolated collecting system puncture (1), and concurrent collecting system and capsular perforation (4). There was a significant increase in capsular perforation with six or more needle passes, although no significant correlation was seen between number of needle passes and complication. Six patients had minor complications defined as hematuria or loin pain. Seven patients developed major complications, of whom five received blood transfusion alone. Two required intervention: in one an arteriocalyceal fistula was embolized and the patient was temporarily dialyzed; the remaining patient required ureteric stenting. In conclusion, TJRB provides an adequate yield for diagnosis. Complication rates are relatively high, but patients are also at high risk from the conventional percutaneous approach. Patient selection and optimization are critical to avoid major complications.

  6. Blood Chemistry of Free-Ranging and Captive White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Melanie Love

    2012-07-16

    Blood samples were collected from 602 white-tailed deer (WTD) (Odocoileus virginianus) between October 2008 – October 2009, from 15 different counties throughout Texas. White-tailed deer were evaluated for serum biochemical ...

  7. Basics of kidney biopsy: A nephrologist's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, S. K.; Sethi, S.; Dinda, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of the kidney biopsy is one of the major events in the history of nephrology. Primary indications of kidney biopsy are glomerular hematuria/proteinuria with or without renal dysfunction and unexplained renal failure. Kidney biopsy is usually performed in prone position but in certain situations, supine and lateral positions may be required. Biopsy needles have changed with times from Vim–Silverman needle to Tru-cut needle to spring-loaded automatic gun. The procedure has also changed from blind bedside kidney biopsy to ultrasound marking to real-time ultrasound guidance to rarely computerized tomography guidance and laparoscopic and open biopsy. In very specific situations, transjugular kidney biopsy may be required. Most of the centers do kidney biopsy on short 1-day admission, whereas some take it as an outdoor procedure. For critical interpretation of kidney biopsy, adequate sample and clinical information are mandatory. Tissue needs to be stained with multiple stains for delineation of various components of kidney tissue. Many consider that electron microscopy (EM) is a must for all kidney biopsies, but facilities for EM are limited even in big centers. Sophisticated tests such as immunohistochemistry and in-situ hybridization are useful adjuncts for definitive diagnosis in certain situations. PMID:23960337

  8. Clean tailing reclamation: Tailing reprocessing for sulfide removal and vegetation establishment

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, S.R.; Kruegar, J.

    1997-12-31

    Mine wastes exhibiting elevated heavy metal concentrations are widespread causes of resource degradation in the western US and elsewhere. This problem is further exacerbated by the presence of pyrite that oxidizes upon exposure to the atmosphere resulting in acid generation. Since pyrite was not recovered as a mineral of economic value during mining, it was disposed of in waste piles and tailing ponds that are now a source of acid generation and release of metals to the environment. Tailing cleaning, or sulfide mineral recovery through reprocessing, was evaluated as an innovative reclamation technology. Tailing materials, from both operational and abandoned mines, were collected to evaluate the feasibility of sulfide mineral recovery. Successful mineral separation was performed resulting in a low volume metal sulfide concentrate and a high volume cleaned silicate media. Total metal concentrations were decreased in the cleaned tailing material and elevated in the sulfide concentrate compared with the original tailing chemistry. In greenhouse trials, vegetation establishment in cleaned tailing material was compared with plant growth in topsoil and lime-amended tailings. While vegetation performance was best in the topsoil control, both lime-amended and cleaned tailings displayed adequate plant growth.

  9. Evaluation of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio prior to prostate biopsy to predict biopsy histology: Results of 1836 patients

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Mehmet Ilker; Hamidi, Nurullah; Suer, Evren; Tangal, Semih; Huseynov, Adil; Ibi?, Arif

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluate the role of NLR prior to prostate biopsy to predict biopsy histology and Gleason score in patients with prostate cancer. Methods: In this retrospective study, we evaluated data of patients underwent prostate biopsy between May 2005 and March 2015. We collected the following data: age, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy histology, Gleason score (GS) in prostate cancer patients, neutrophil counts, and lymphocyte counts. Patients were grouped as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate cancer, and prostatitis. The Chi square test was used to compare categorical variables and analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied for continuous variables. Results: Data of 1836 patients were investigated. The mean age, total PSA and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) of the population were 66.8 ± 8.17 years, 9.38 ± 4.7 ng/dL, and 3.11 ± 1.71, respectively. Patients were divided as follows: 625 in the group with BPH history, 600 in the prostatitis group, and 611 in the prostate cancer histology group. The mean NLR of the prostatitis group was higher compared to the prostate cancer and BPH groups (p = 0.0001). The mean NLR of the prostate cancer group was significantly higher compared to the BPH group (p = 0.002). The GS 8–10 group had a significantly higher mean NLR compared to GS 5–6 (3.64 vs. 2.54, p = 0.0001) and GS 7 (3.64 vs. 2.58, p = 0.0001) patients. Conclusions: NLR was found to differ with regard to histology of prostate biopsy and higher GS was associated with higher NLR in patients with prostate cancer. However prostatitis prevents the use of NLR in predicting prostate cancer before a prostate biopsy. Also, the retrospective nature and lack of multivariate analysis in this study somewhat limits the relevance of these results. PMID:26600880

  10. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second multi-phase research program for tailplane icing (TIP II) to develop test methodologies and tailplane performance and handling qualities evaluation tools. The main objectives of this new NASA/Industry/Academia collaborative research programs were: (1) define and evaluate a sub-scale wind tunnel test methodology for determining tailplane performance degradation due to icing. (2) develop an experimental database of tailplane aerodynamic performance with and without ice contamination for a range of tailplane configurations. Wind tunnel tests were planned with representative general aviation aircraft, i.e., the Learjet 45, and a twin engine low speed aircraft. This report summarizes the research performed during the first year of the study, and outlines the work tasks for the second year.

  11. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  12. Monitoring pool-tail fines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunte, K.; Potyondy, J. P.; Abt, S. R.; Swingle, K. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fine sediment < 2 and < 6 mm deposited in pool-tail areas of mountain streams is often measured to monitor changes in the supply of fines (e.g., by dam removal, bank erosion, or watershed effects including fires and road building) or to assess the status and trend of aquatic ecosystems. Grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric bedmaterial samples are typically used to quantify pool-tail fines. Grid-count results exhibit a high degree of variability not only among streams and among operators, but also among crews performing a nearly identical procedure (Roper et al. 2010). Variability is even larger when diverse methods are employed, each of which quantifies fines in a different way: grid counts visually count surface fines on small patches within the pool-tail area, pebble counts pick up and tally surface particles along (riffle) transects, and volumetric samples sieve out fines from small-scale bulk samples; and even when delimited to pool-tail areas, individual methods focus on different sampling locales. Two main questions were analyzed: 1) Do pool-tail fines exhibit patterns of spatial variability and are some grid count schemes more likely to provide accurate results than others. 2) How and why does the percentage of fines vary among grid counts, pebble counts, and volumetric samples. In a field study, grids were placed at 7 locales in two rows across the wetted width of 10 pool tails in a 14-m wide 3rd order coarse gravel-bed mountain stream with <4% sand and <8% < 6 mm. Several pebble count transects were placed across each pool-tail area, and three volumetric samples were collected in each of three pool tails. Pebble and grid counts both indicated a fining trend towards one or both banks, sometimes interrupted by a secondary peak of fines within the central half of the wetted width. Among the five sampling schemes tested, grid counts covering the wetted width with 7 locales produced the highest accuracy and the least variability among the pools of the reach. Pebble counts between the two waterlines indicated 2-3 times more fines than grid counts, likely because grid counts did not extend exactly up to the waterline. However, when confined to the central 50% of the wetted width, grid counts indicated 1.2 and 1.6 times more fines < 2 and < 6 mm than pebble counts, likely because the plexiglass viewer used with grid counts improved the visibility of the bed. Volumetric armor layer samples (particles > 90 mm removed) indicated 1.4 and 1.2 times more fines < 2 and < 6 mm than grid counts at the same locales, while subarmor samples had 8-9 times more fines. In conclusion, methodological differences and the specific sampling locales selected by a method affect comparability of sampling results. Grid count accuracy and precision may be improved by extending both the width coverage and the sample size within a pool tail.

  13. Association between pre–biopsy white blood cell count and prostate biopsy – related sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Bulut, Suleyman; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Gokkaya, Cevdet Serkan; Akdemir, Alp Ozgur; Erkmen, Akif Ersoy; Memis, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite all preventive measures and improved biopsy techniques, serious, life–threatening complications of prostate biopsy, including sepsis, still exist. In the present study, in order to identify the risk factors that may be associated with sepsis development after prostate–biopsy, we aimed to analyze retrospectively the data of our patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound–guided prostate biopsy. Material and methods We retrospectively reviewed the data of 889 patients who underwent prostate biopsy at our clinic. We compared pre–biopsy parameters (age, prostate volume, white blood cell (WBC) count, fasting blood glucose, free and total prostate specific antigen levels) between patients who developed sepsis and those who were sepsis–free following prostate biopsy. Results 28 patients (3.1%) developed sepsis. Among the risk factors evaluated, only pre–biopsy WBC count was found to be a significant risk factor for biopsy–related sepsis. A 5.1 fold increase was detected in the risk for sepsis development, when the cut–off value of WBC was accepted as 11.165/?L, OR: 5.1 (95% CI: 2.3–11.5). The post–biopsy sepsis development rate in patients with pre–biopsy WBC count greater and less than 11.165/?L was 13.7% (n = 10) and 3% (n = 18) respectively. Conclusions Patients with a pre–biopsy WBC count greater than 11.165/?L should be informed of the increased risk of developing post–biopsy sepsis. PMID:25914844

  14. Human tails and pseudotails.

    PubMed

    Dao, A H; Netsky, M G

    1984-05-01

    A case of a tail in a 2-week-old infant is reported, and findings from a review of 33 previously reported cases of true tails and pseudotails are summarized. The true, or persistent, vestigial tail of humans arises from the most distal remnant of the embryonic tail. It contains adipose and connective tissue, central bundles of striated muscle, blood vessels, and nerves and is covered by skin. Bone, cartilage, notochord, and spinal cord are lacking. The true tail arises by retention of structures found normally in fetal development. It may be as long as 13 cm, can move and contract, and occurs twice as often in males as in females. A true tail is easily removed surgically, without residual effects. It is rarely familial. Pseudotails are varied lesions having in common a lumbosacral protrusion and a superficial resemblance to persistent vestigial tails. The most frequent cause of a pseudotail in a series of ten cases obtained from the literature was an anomalous prolongation of the coccygeal vertebrae. Additional lesions included two lipomas, and one each of teratoma, chondromegaly , glioma, and a thin, elongated parasitic fetus. PMID:6373560

  15. Digital electron microscopic examination of human sural nerve biopsies.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K A; Brown, M S; Harmon, L; Greene, D A

    2003-12-01

    Diabetic peripheral polyneuropathy is characterized by axonal degeneration and regeneration as well as by Schwann cell and microvascular changes. These changes have been described at both the light (LM) and the electron microscopic (EM) levels; however, EM has not been applied to large clinical trials. Our goal was to adapt the rigorous techniques used for quantifying human biopsies with LM image analysis to accommodate ultrastructural analyses. We applied digital image capture and analysis to the ultrastructural examination of axons in sural nerve biopsies from diabetic patients enrolled in a multicenter clinical trial. The selection of sural nerve biopsies was based on the quality of specimen fixation, absence of physical distortion, and nerve fascicle size (> or =100,000; < or =425,000 microm2). Thin sections were collected on formvar-coated slot grids, stabilized with carbon and scanned on a Phillips CM100 transmission electron microscope. Digital images were captured with a Kodak Megaplus 1.6 camera. A montage was constructed using software derived from aerial mapping applications, and this virtual image was viewed by EM readers. Computer-assisted analyses included identification and labeling of individual axons and axons within regenerating clusters. The average density of regenerating myelinated axon clusters per mm2 was 65.8 +/- 5.1, range of 0-412 (n = 193). These techniques increase the number of samples that may be analyzed by EM and extend the use of this technique to clinical trials using tissue biopsies as a primary endpoint. PMID:14641650

  16. Malignant Mesothelioma Diagnosed by Bronchoscopic Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yeon-Hee; Choi, Jae-Woo; Jung, Sang-Ok; Cho, Min-Ji; Kang, Da-Hyun; Chung, Chae-Uk; Park, Dong-Il; Moon, Jae-Young; Park, Hee-Sun; Jung, Sung-Soo; Kim, Ju-Ock; Kim, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a rare malignant neoplasm that arises from mesothelial surfaces of the pleural cavity, peritoneal cavity, tunica vaginalis, or pericardium. Typically, pleural fluid cytology or closed pleural biopsy, surgical intervention (video thoracoscopic biopsy or open thoracotomy) is conducted to obtain pleural tissue specimens. However, endobronchial lesions are rarely seen and cases diagnosed from bronchoscopic biopsy are also rarely reported. We reported the case of a 77-year-old male who was diagnosed as malignant mesothelioma on bronchoscopic biopsy from obstructing masses of the endobronchial lesion. PMID:26175790

  17. Photoacoustic biopsy: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Tomlins, Scott A.; Siddiqui, Javed; Davis, Mandy A.; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Wei, John T.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) measurements encode the information associated with both physical microstructures and chemical contents in biological tissues. A two-dimensional physio-chemical spectrogram (PCS) can be formulated by combining the power spectra of PA signals acquired at a series of optical wavelengths. The analysis of PCS, or namely PA physio-chemical analysis (PAPCA), enables the quantification of the concentrations and the spatial distributions of a variety of chemical components in the tissue. The chemical components and their distribution are the two major features observed in the biopsy procedures which have been regarded as the gold standard of the diagnosis of many diseases. Taking non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and prostate cancer for example, this study investigates the feasibility of PAPCA in characterizing the histopathological changes in the diseased conditions in biological tissue. A catheter based setup facilitating measurement in deep tissues was also proposed and tested.

  18. Multiple biopsies are superior to a single biopsy in detecting cervical cancer precursors

    Cancer.gov

    Performing multiple biopsies during a procedure known as colposcopy—visual inspection of the cervix—is more effective than performing only a single biopsy of the worst-appearing area for detecting cervical cancer precursors. This multiple biopsy approach may help to detect disease early and avoid repeated biopsies for women with initial negative findings, according to a new study by Nicolas Wentzensen, M.D., Ph.D., in DCEG's Hormonal and Reproductive Epidemiology Branch, and colleagues.

  19. Wagging tail vibration absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, R. G.; Humphrey, P. W.

    1969-01-01

    A 750-foot cantilever length of extendible-tape boom (very low stiffness) was considered as the main system to be damped. A number of tail lengths were tried from 20 feet to 80 feet after which 40 feet was investigated further as a desirable compromise between performance and practical lengths. A 40-foot damping tail produced a damping effect on the main boom for the first mode equivalent in decay rate to 3.1 percent of critical damping. In this case the spring-hinge and tail were tuned to the main boom first mode frequency and the hinge damping was set at 30 percent of critical based on the tail properties. With this same setting, damping of the second mode was .4 percent and the third mode .1 percent.

  20. Page 1 of 20 Planning of Prostate Cancer Biopsies and Interpretation of Biopsy Results, Using Rules

    E-print Network

    Serfling, Robert

    Page 1 of 20 Planning of Prostate Cancer Biopsies and Interpretation of Biopsy Results, Using Rules;Page 2 of 20 PURPOSE: To address challenges of avoiding over- and under-treatment of prostate cancer screening more acceptable and beneficial. KEY WORDS: Prostate, cancer, volume, biopsy, decision

  1. Molecular profile of liquid biopsies: next generation biomarkers to improve lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Molecular profiling of liquid biopsies is now emerging as pivotal for cancer biomarker discovery. The low-invasive nature of the approach used for collecting biospecimens (i.e. blood, urine, saliva, etc.) may allow a widespread application of novel molecular diagnostics based on liquid biopsies. This is relevant, for example, in cancer screening programmes where it is essential to reduce costs and the complexity of screening tests in order to increase study compliance and effectiveness. Here, I discuss recent advances in biomarkers for the early cancer detection and prediction of chemotherapy response based on the molecular profiling of liquid biopsies. PMID:26635902

  2. Geochemistry of Metals from mine tailing in Taxco Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton-Bermea, O.; ARMIENTA, A.; BARRERA, M.; TALAVERA, O.; HERNANDEZ, E.

    2001-12-01

    The mining district of Taxco in Central Mexico has been exploited since prehispanic times. The processing of metals produced tailings with high heavy metal concentrations. Those tailings constitute a potential risk to the environment. To assess the effects of the mine tailing on water quality, tailing samples and water samples from rivers, wells and tailing effluents were collected and analyzed for Cu, Zn, As and Pb. Metals were analyzed with by ICP-MS. Tailing samples were leached with water to determine pH and sulfate concentration. The highest metal contents were found in the samples with a pH acid. As, Pb and Zn are over the drinking water standards in some of the water samples.

  3. Between residual tail dependence and

    E-print Network

    Gilleland, Eric

    Between residual tail dependence and Hüsler­Reiss triangular arrays 1. Tail Dependence Parameters 2. Maxima of Normal Random Vectors 3. Testing Tail Dependence Based on Radial Component 4. An Application Between residual tail­dependence and Hüsler­Reiss triangular arrays R.­D. Reiss joint work with M. Frick

  4. Efficacy of transbronchial biopsy in pulmonary vaculitides.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, A; Holl-Ulrich, K; Dalhoff, K; Reuter, M; Gross, W L

    1997-12-01

    This study was performed to determine the value of transbronchial biopsy (TBB) in patients with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides and mild-to-moderate pulmonary involvement. Included in the study were 19 patients with Wegener's granulomatosis (WG) and six patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) with evidence of active pulmonary disease but without gross parenchymal lesions accessible by radiologically guided biopsy. All of the patients had undergone staging examinations which included TBB taken from peripheral lung tissue and from any focal tracheobronchial lesions. Any suspicious lesion in the upper respiratory tract was biopsied by an otolaryngologist and the number of positive biopsies was compared with that of TBB. In the WG patients, only two out of 17 biopsies of alveolar tissue yielded histopathological findings supporting the diagnosis of WG. In five WG patients, ulcerative or exophytic airway lesions were found whose histopathologies were invariably positive. Otolaryngological examination revealed abnormal findings in 19 WG patients and biopsies from these sites yielded positive results in 13 instances. In CSS, TBB produced a diagnostically helpful histopathology in four of six cases and biopsies from the upper respiratory tract were positive in five out of six cases. We conclude that transbronchial biopsies of alveolar tissue are seldom positive in Wegener's granulomatosis patients with mild-to-moderate pulmonary disease unless they are taken from grossly abnormal lung areas. Conversely, ulcerative, exophytic or stenotic tracheobronchial lesions had a high rate of positive findings. These results further suggest that the upper rather than the lower respiratory tract should be the biopsy site of first choice in Wegener's granulomatosis. In Churg-Strauss syndrome, the upper and lower respiratory tract seem to yield a roughly equal number of positive biopsies. PMID:9493653

  5. Uranium mill tailings stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-02-01

    Uranium mill tailings pose a potential radiation health hazard to the public. Therefore, stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is needed to minimize radon exhalation and other environmental hazards. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing U tailings is the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other hazardous materials within uranium tailings. This approach is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Results of these studies indicate that a radon flux reduction of greater than 99% can be obtained using either a poured-on/sprayed-on seal (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick) or an admixture seal (2.5 to 12.7 cm thick) containing about 18 wt % residual asphalt. A field test was carried out in June 1979 at the Grand Junction tailings pile in order to demonstrate the sealing process. A reduction in radon flux ranging from 4.5 to greater than 99% (76% average) was achieved using a 15.2-cm (6-in.) admix seal with a sprayed-on top coat. A hydrostatic stabilizer was used to apply the admix. Following compaction, a spray coat seal was applied over the admix as the final step in construction of a radon seal. Overburden was applied to provide a protective soil layer over the seal. Included in part of the overburden was a herbicide to prevent root penetration.

  6. 21 CFR 878.4755 - Absorbable lung biopsy plug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable lung biopsy plug. 878.4755 Section 878...Surgical Devices § 878.4755 Absorbable lung biopsy plug. (a) Identification. A preformed (polymerized) absorbable lung biopsy plug is intended to...

  7. Muscle Biopsy Evaluation in Neuromuscular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Nanette C.; Oskarsson, Björn; Jin, Lee-Way

    2014-01-01

    Synopsis Muscle biopsy is a commonly ordered diagnostic procedure, used by clinicians who evaluate patients with weakness suspected to be caused by muscle disease. This article reviews the indications for a muscle biopsy, and then serves as a step-by-step guide reviewing the processes of muscle selection through to interpreting the biopsy report. The goal of this article is to aid the clinician in preparing for a muscle biopsy procedure so that they may avoid common pitfalls and obtain optimal results from this minimally invasive procedure. We review the basic anatomical structure of normal muscle to provide a foundation for understanding common patterns of pathologic change observed in muscle disease, and then present both common and disease-specific histopathologic findings, focused for illustrative purposes on a select group of neuromuscular diseases. PMID:22938878

  8. Pharmacokinetics of a single intramuscular injection of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Sadar, Miranda J; Hawkins, Michelle G; Byrne, Barbara A; Cartoceti, Andrew N; Keel, Kevin; Drazenovich, Tracy L; Tell, Lisa A

    2015-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and adverse effects at the injection site of ceftiofur crystalline-free acid (CCFA) following IM administration of 1 dose to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). ANIMALS 7 adult nonreleasable healthy red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES In a randomized crossover study, CCFA (10 or 20 mg/kg) was administered IM to each hawk and blood samples were obtained. After a 2-month washout period, administration was repeated with the opposite dose. Muscle biopsy specimens were collected from the injection site 10 days after each sample collection period. Pharmacokinetic data were calculated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of ceftiofur for various bacterial isolates were assessed. RESULTS Mean peak plasma concentrations of ceftiofur-free acid equivalent were 6.8 and 15.1 ?g/mL for the 10 and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively. Mean times to maximum plasma concentration were 6.4 and 6.7 hours, and mean terminal half-lives were 29 and 50 hours, respectively. Little to no muscle inflammation was identified. On the basis of a target MIC of 1 ?g/mL and target plasma ceftiofur concentration of 4 ?g/mL, dose administration frequencies for infections with gram-negative and gram-positive organisms were estimated as every 36 and 45 hours for the 10 mg/kg dose and every 96 and 120 hours for the 20 mg/kg dose, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Study results suggested that CCFA could be administered IM to red-tailed hawks at 10 or 20 mg/kg to treat infections with ceftiofur-susceptible bacteria. Administration resulted in little to no inflammation at the injection site. Additional studies are needed to evaluate effects of repeated CCFA administration. PMID:26618733

  9. REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND, SHOWING AIRCRAFT NUMBER (319), HORIZONTAL STABILIZER, TAIL CONE AND COOLING CTS FOR THE AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), MECHANIC PAUL RIDEOUT IS LOWERING THE BALANCE PANELS ON THE STABILIZERS FOR LUBRICATION AND INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  10. On tails of perpetuities

    E-print Network

    Hitczenko, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    We establish an upper bound on the tails of a random variable that arises as a solution of a stochastic difference equation. In the non--negative case our bound is similar to a lower bound obtained by Goldie and Gr\\"ubel in 1996.

  11. Effects of Tail Clipping on Larval Performance and Tail Regeneration Rates in the Near Eastern Fire Salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Ori; Polevikove, Antonina; Blank, Lior; Goedbloed, Daniel; Küpfer, Eliane; Gershberg, Anna; Koplovich, Avi; Blaustein, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tail-tip clipping is a common technique for collecting tissue samples from amphibian larvae and adults. Surprisingly, studies of this invasive sampling procedure or of natural tail clipping – i.e., bites inflicted by predators including conspecifics - on the performance and fitness of aquatic larval stages of urodeles are scarce. We conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects of posterior tail clipping (~30 percent of tail) on Near Eastern fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) larvae. In a laboratory study, we checked regeneration rates of posterior tail-tip clipping at different ages. Regeneration rates were hump-shaped, peaking at the age of ~30 days and then decreasing. This variation in tail regeneration rates suggests tradeoffs in resource allocation between regeneration and somatic growth during early and advanced development. In an outdoor artificial pond experiment, under constant larval densities, we assessed how tail clipping of newborn larvae affects survival to, time to, and size at metamorphosis. Repeated measures ANOVA on mean larval survival per pond revealed no effect of tail clipping. Tail clipping had correspondingly no effect on larval growth and development expressed in size (mass and snout-vent length) at, and time to, metamorphosis. We conclude that despite the given variation in tail regeneration rates throughout larval ontogeny, clipping of 30% percent of the posterior tail area seems to have no adverse effects on larval fitness and survival. We suggest that future use of this imperative tool for the study of amphibian should take into account larval developmental stage during the time of application and not just the relative size of the clipped tail sample. PMID:26065683

  12. The technique of ultrasound guided prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Romics, Imre

    2004-11-01

    This article discusses the preparations for ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, the conditions used and the process of performing a biopsy. The first step in preparing the patient is a cleansing enema before biopsy. Every author proposes the use of a preoperative antibiotic based prophylaxis. Differences may be found in the type, dosage and the duration of this preoperative application, which can last from 2 h to 2 days. For anaesthesia, lidocaine has been proposed, which may be used as a gel applied in the rectum or in the form of a prostate infiltrate. Quite a few colleagues administer a brief intravenous narcosis. A major debate goes on in respect of defining the number of biopsy samples needed. Hodge proposed sextant biopsy in 1989, for which we had false negative findings in 20% of all cases. Because of this, it has recently been suggested that eight or rather ten samples be taken. There are some who question even this. Twelve biopsy samples do offer an advantage compared to six, although in the case of eight this is not the case. We shall present an in depth discussion of the various opinions on the different numbers of biopsies samples required. For the sample site, the apex, the base and the middle part are proposed, and (completing the process) two additional samples can also be taken from the transition zone (TZ), since 20% of all prostate cancers originate from TZ. In case of a palpable nodule or any lesion made visible by TRUS, an additional, targeted, biopsy has to be performed. Certain new techniques like the 3-D Doppler, contrast, intermittent and others shall also be presented. The control of the full length of samples taken by a gun, as well as the proper conservation of the samples, are parts of pathological processing and of the technical tasks. A repeated biopsy is necessary in the case of PIN atypia, beyond which the author also discusses other indications for a repeated biopsy. We may expect the occurrence of direct postoperative complications and it is necessary to know how to treat these. PMID:15455255

  13. Thresher sharks use tail-slaps as a hunting strategy.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Simon P; Turner, John R; Gann, Klemens; Silvosa, Medel; D'Urban Jackson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The hunting strategies of pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus) were investigated at Pescador Island in the Philippines. It has long been suspected that thresher sharks hunt with their scythe-like tails but the kinematics associated with the behaviour in the wild are poorly understood. From 61 observations recorded by handheld underwater video camera between June and October 2010, 25 thresher shark shunting events were analysed. Thresher sharks employed tail-slaps to debilitate sardines at all times of day. Hunting events comprised preparation, strike, wind-down recovery and prey item collection phases, which occurred sequentially. Preparation phases were significantly longer than the others, presumably to enable a shark to windup a tail-slap. Tail-slaps were initiated by an adduction of the pectoral fins, a manoeuvre that changed a thresher shark's pitch promoting its posterior region to lift rapidly, and stall its approach. Tail-slaps occurred with such force that they may have caused dissolved gas to diffuse out of the water column forming bubbles. Thresher sharks were able to consume more than one sardine at a time, suggesting that tail-slapping is an effective foraging strategy for hunting schooling prey. Pelagic thresher sharks appear to pursue sardines opportunistically by day and night, which may make them vulnerable to fisheries. Alopiids possess specialist pectoral and caudal fins that are likely to have evolved, at least in part, for tail-slapping. The evidence is now clear; thresher sharks really do hunt with their tails. PMID:23874415

  14. Thresher Sharks Use Tail-Slaps as a Hunting Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Simon P.; Turner, John R.; Gann, Klemens; Silvosa, Medel; D'Urban Jackson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The hunting strategies of pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus) were investigated at Pescador Island in the Philippines. It has long been suspected that thresher sharks hunt with their scythe-like tails but the kinematics associated with the behaviour in the wild are poorly understood. From 61 observations recorded by handheld underwater video camera between June and October 2010, 25 thresher shark shunting events were analysed. Thresher sharks employed tail-slaps to debilitate sardines at all times of day. Hunting events comprised preparation, strike, wind-down recovery and prey item collection phases, which occurred sequentially. Preparation phases were significantly longer than the others, presumably to enable a shark to windup a tail-slap. Tail-slaps were initiated by an adduction of the pectoral fins, a manoeuvre that changed a thresher shark's pitch promoting its posterior region to lift rapidly, and stall its approach. Tail-slaps occurred with such force that they may have caused dissolved gas to diffuse out of the water column forming bubbles. Thresher sharks were able to consume more than one sardine at a time, suggesting that tail-slapping is an effective foraging strategy for hunting schooling prey. Pelagic thresher sharks appear to pursue sardines opportunistically by day and night, which may make them vulnerable to fisheries. Alopiids possess specialist pectoral and caudal fins that are likely to have evolved, at least in part, for tail-slapping. The evidence is now clear; thresher sharks really do hunt with their tails. PMID:23874415

  15. Percutaneous Biopsy of Osteoid Osteomas Prior to Percutaneous Treatment Using Two Different Biopsy Needles

    SciTech Connect

    Laredo, Jean-Denis Hamze, Bassam; Jeribi, Riadh

    2009-09-15

    Biopsy is usually performed as the first step in percutaneous treatment of osteoid osteomas prior to laser photocoagulation. At our institution, 117 patients with a presumed diagnosis of osteoid osteoma had a trephine biopsy before a percutaneous laser photocoagulation. Biopsies were made using two different types of needles. A Bonopty biopsy needle (14-gauge cannula, 16-gauge trephine needle; Radi Medical Systems, Uppsala, Sweden) was used in 65 patients, and a Laurane biopsy needle (11-gauge cannula, 12.5-gauge trephine needle; Laurane Medical, Saint-Arnoult, France) in 43 patients. Overall biopsy results were positive for osteoid osteoma in 83 (70.9%) of the 117 cases. The Laurane needle provided a significantly higher positive rate (81.4%) than the Bonopty needle (66.1%; p < 0.05). This difference was not due to the size of the nidus, which was similar in the two groups (p < 0.05) and may be an effect of differences in needle caliber (12.5 vs. 14 gauge) as well as differences in needle design. The rate of positive biopsy results obtained in the present series with the Laurane biopsy needle is, to our knowledge, the highest rate reported in series dealing with percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and laser photocoagulation of osteoid osteomas.

  16. Liver biopsy: complications and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Thampanitchawong, Pornpen; Piratvisuth, Teerha

    1999-01-01

    AIM: To study the complications and the risk factors of percutaneous liver biopsy, and to compare the complication rate between the periods o f 1987-1993 and 1994-1996. METHODS: Medical records of all patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy between January 1, 1987 to September 31, 1996 in Songklanagarind Hospital were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 484 percutaneous liver biopsies performed. The total complication rate was 6.4%, of which 4.5% were due to major bleeding; the death rate was 1.6%. The important risk factors correlated with bleeding complications and deaths were a platelet count of 70 × 109/L or less, a prolonged prothrombin time of > 3 s over control, or a prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time of > 10 s over control. Although physician inexperience was not statistically significantly associated with bleeding complications and deaths, there was a reduction of death rate from 2.2% in 1987-1993 to 0% in 1993-1996. This reduction is thought to result from both increased experience o f senior staff and increased supervision of residents. CONCLUSIONS: Screening of platelet count, prothrombin time, and activated partial thromboplastin time should be done and need to be corrected in case of abnormality before liver biopsy. Percutaneous liver biopsy should be performed or supervised by an expert in gastrointestinal diseases, especially in high risk cases. PMID:11819452

  17. Skin biopsy: Identifying and overcoming errors in the skin biopsy pathway.

    PubMed

    Stratman, Erik J; Elston, Dirk M; Miller, Stanley J

    2016-01-01

    The skin biopsy pathway involves numerous communication requirements, technical events, human handoffs, and cognitive decisions. Every step in the process has an error rate >0. To deliver the highest quality care, dermatologists obtaining skin biopsy specimens should implement systems in their office to minimize errors. This includes the prevention of wrong-site surgery, which in most instances involves accurate communication of the correct biopsy location to the performing surgeon. Part II of this continuing medical education article presents techniques for assessing and planning improvement to the skin biopsy pathway in your office, and provides a simple online quality improvement activity that allows Board-certified dermatologists the opportunity to potentially improve aspects of the skin biopsy process in their own practices, and in the process obtain Maintenance of Certification credit. PMID:26702795

  18. Chest Wall Dissemination of Nocardiosis after Percutaneous Transthoracic Needle Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamoto, Hiroshi Inaba, Yoshitaka; Yamaura, Hidekazu; Sato, Yozo; Kamiya, Mika; Miyazaki, Masaya; Arai, Yasuaki; Horio, Yoshitsugu

    2007-07-15

    We described a case of chest wall dissemination after percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy. A 65-year-old man had a lung nodule which was suspected to be lung carcinoma. He underwent percutaneous transthoracic needle biopsy using an 18G semiautomated biopsy needle and pathologic diagnosis showed organizing pneumonia. Two months after the biopsy, chest wall dissemination occurred. Implantation of carcinoma along the biopsy route was suspected, but the mass was actually due to pulmonary nocardiosis.

  19. Reliability of receptor assessment on core needle biopsy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Seferina, S C; Nap, M; van den Berkmortel, F; Wals, J; Voogd, A C; Tjan-Heijnen, V C G

    2013-04-01

    We compared the breast core needle biopsy and the resection specimen with respect to estrogen (ER), progesterone (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status to identify predictors for discordant findings. We retrospectively collected data from 526 newly diagnosed breast cancer patients. ER, PR and HER2 status had been assessed in both the core needle biopsy and resection specimen. The assessment of ER by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in core needle biopsy was false negative in 26.5% and false positive in 6.8% of patients. For the PR status the false negative and false positive results of core needle biopsy were 29.6% and 10.3%, respectively. The results of the HER2 status, as determined by IHC and silver in situ hybridization (SISH), were false negative in 5.4% and false positive in 50.0%. We need to be aware of the problem of false negative and false positive test results in ER, PR and HER2 assessment in core needle biopsy and the potential impact on adjuvant systemic treatment. With current techniques, we recommend using the resection specimen to measure these receptors in patients without neoadjuvant treatment. A better alternative might be the use of tissue microarray, combining both core needle biopsy and resection specimen. PMID:23269610

  20. DETAIL VIEW OF CLASSIFIER, TAILINGS LAUNDER TROUGH, LINE SHAFTS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF CLASSIFIER, TAILINGS LAUNDER TROUGH, LINE SHAFTS, AND CONCENTRATION TABLES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. SLURRY EXITING THE BALL MILL WAS COLLECTED IN AN AMALGAMATION BOX (MISSING) FROM THE END OF THE MILL, AND INTRODUCED INTO THE CLASSIFIER. THE TAILINGS LAUDER IS ON THE GROUND AT LOWER RIGHT. THE LINE SHAFTING ABOVE PROVIDED POWER TO THE CONCENTRATION TABLES BELOW AT CENTER RIGHT. - Gold Hill Mill, Warm Spring Canyon Road, Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  2. Best way to perform a punch biopsy.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Cherit, Judith; Gutiérrez Mendoza, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Nail punch biopsy is used to obtain a tissue sample for the diagnosis and treatment of nail diseases. The best results will be possible if the surgeon is familiar with the anatomy and physiology of the nail apparatus. A punch biopsy can be used in all regions of the nail apparatus in the presence or absence of nail plate. When the procedure is performed with a careful handling of the anatomic site and specimen, in most cases a successful diagnosis can be achieved. PMID:25828717

  3. Collective instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  4. Sedoanalgesia With Midazolam and Fentanyl Citrate Controls Probe Pain During Prostate Biopsy by Transrectal Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Fábio Hissachi; Chambó, Renato Caretta; Agostinho, Aparecido Donizeti; Trindade Filho, José Carlos Souza

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess the pain intensity of patients administered midazolam and fentanyl citrate before undergoing transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Materials and Methods This was a study in patients with different indications for prostate biopsy in whom 5 mg of midazolam and 50 µg of fentanyl citrate was administered intravenously 3 minutes before the procedure. After biopsy, pain was assessed by use of a visual analogue scale (VAS) in three stages: VAS 1, during probe introduction; VAS 2, during needle penetration into prostate tissue; and VAS 3, in the weeks following the exam. Pain intensity at these different times was tested with stratification by age, race, education, prostate volume, rebiopsy, and anxiety before biopsy. Pain was ranked according to the following scores: 0 (no pain), 1-3 (mild pain), 4-7 (moderate pain), and 8-10 (severe pain). Statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon two-tailed tests with a significance of 5%. Results Pain intensity was not influenced by any risk factors. The mean VAS 1 score was 1.95±1.98, the mean VAS 2 score was 2.73±2.55, and the mean VAS 3 score was 0.3±0.9, showing greater pain at the time of needle penetration than in other situations (VAS 2>VAS 1>VAS 3, p=0.0013, p=0.0001, respectively). Seventy-five percent of patients reported a VAS pain scale of less than 3.1 or mild pain. Conclusions Intravenous sedation and analgesia with midazolam and fentanyl citrate is a good method for reducing pain caused by prostate biopsy, even during probe insertion. PMID:24578806

  5. The geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the plasma sheet and lobe regions of the magnetotail, focusing principally on large-scale processes or microprocesses with some large-scale effects. Consideration is given to quiet and average structures, not necessarily related to activity phases, with quasi-steady convection aspects, and with the characteristics of dynamic phases including acceleration mechanisms and single particle aspects. Attention is given to various activity models, average and quiet time properties, properties and effects of magnetospheric convection, dynamics of the magnetotail, and the near tail, substorm current wedge.

  6. The role of ultrasonography and automatic-needle biopsy in outpatient percutaneous liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Lindor, K D; Bru, C; Jorgensen, R A; Rakela, J; Bordas, J M; Gross, J B; Rodes, J; McGill, D B; Reading, C C; James, E M; Charboneau, J W; Ludwig, J; Batts, K P; Zinsmeister, A R

    1996-05-01

    The risk of complications from percutaneous liver biopsy is low, but discomfort is common and complications require hospitalization in approximately 4% of patients. The optimal method of performing these biopsies is unknown. The goal of our study was to determine whether the use of ultrasonography in the biopsy room immediately prior to or during the procedure would lessen the risk of complications and to compare the safety and efficacy in obtaining tissue by use of a Trucut needle versus an automatic biopsy needle. Between 1992 and 1994, 836 patients were entered into a randomized study (489 in Rochester, MN; 347 in Barcelona, Spain). Patients were randomized immediately prior to liver biopsy into four groups: Trucut needle, or automatic biopsy needle, and with or without ultrasonography. Fisher's Exact Test and a logistic regression model were also used to assess the effect of needle and ultrasonography on the odds for complications. The four biopsy groups were well-matched at entry with respect to age, sex, underlying liver disease, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and platelet count. The use of ultrasound was associated with a decreased rate of hospitalization for pain, hypotension, or bleeding (2 vs. 9, P < .05). No difference in safety was found between the two types of needles. The number of passes needed to obtain specimens was similar for all four groups. The average length of the specimen was slightly greater with ultrasonographic-guided biopsies (1.7 mm vs. 1.6 mm, P < .05) and with biopsies obtained using the automatic biopsy needle when compared with the Trucut needle (1.7 mm vs. 1.5 mm, P < .05), but this did not seem to be clinically important. The addition of ultrasonography reduces complications in patients undergoing percutaneous liver biopsy. The type of needle appears to offer little difference in safety or yield of diagnostic tissue. The use of ultrasonography for guidance of percutaneous liver biopsy will lead to a lower rate of complications. The value of this benefit must be weighed against the added cost of ultrasonographic guidance. PMID:8621137

  7. Transvenous Transjugular Renal Core Biopsy with a Redesigned Biopsy Set Including a Blunt-Tipped Needle

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Bahramipour, Philip; Mele, Christopher; Hinrichs, Clay R.; Barone, Alison; Abujudeh, Hani

    2002-03-15

    A novel 19-gauge, blunt-tipped, side cutting single throw, 70-cm long transjugular needle, specifically designed for transvenous kidney biopsy, was used in seven patients with high risk for bleeding. A mean of 4 device-passes (3-6) per patient resulted in a satisfactory specimen for pathological diagnosis. Immediate post-biopsy non enhanced CT was performed to evaluate for bleeding at the biopsy site. All patients were observed for 2 hr after the procedure. No clinically significant immediate or late complication was noted.

  8. External validation of extended prostate biopsy nomogram

    PubMed Central

    Minárik, Ivo; Sieger, Tomáš; Babjuk, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Historical nomograms for the prediction of cancer on prostate biopsy, developed in the sextant biopsy era are no more accurate today. The aim of this study was an independent external validation of a 10-core biopsy nomogram by Chun et al. (2007). Material and methods A total of 322 patients who presented for their initial biopsy in a tertiary care center and had all the necessary data available were included in the retrospective analysis. To validate the nomogram, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and calibration plots were constructed. Results Area under the ROC curve calculated for our data using the nomogram was 0.773, similar to that reported originally. However, the nomogram systematically overestimated prostate cancer risk, which, for our data, could be resolved by subtracting 24 points from the total number of points of the nomogram. Conclusions The nomogram yielded overall good predictive accuracy as measured by the area under the ROC curve, but it systematically overestimated PC probability in individual patients. However, we showed how the nomogram could easily be adapted to our patient sample, resolving the bias issue. PMID:26251732

  9. Fluorescence as a guide to bronchial biopsy.

    PubMed Central

    Homasson, J P; Bonniot, J P; Angebault, M; Renault, P; Carnot, F; Santelli, G

    1985-01-01

    The presence of fluorescence was assessed in 34 unselected patients undergoing bronchoscopy, 11 of whom suffered from bronchial carcinoma. Bronchoscopic inspection was carried out with white light and then repeated with blue light after the injection of 2 ml of 10% sodium fluoresceinate. Fluorescence was graded visually. Seventy six pairs of biopsy specimens were obtained. Of 38 specimens from non fluorescent areas, histological appearances were normal in 34. Slight inflammation was observed in three biopsy specimens, and in one there was evidence of tumour even though the specimen was obtained some distance from the primary tumour. Of 38 biopsy specimens from fluorescent areas, histological examination showed appearances of moderate inflammation in 10, severe inflammation in 10, tuberculosis in one, and carcinoma in 11. In six instances histological appearances were normal. Five normal subjects who were smokers were also examined by the same technique. Appearances of metaplasia were found more often in areas showing fluorescence than in areas not showing fluorescence. Bronchial fluorescence is considered to be related to alteration in vascularity and is not specific for carcinoma. The most fluorescent areas are generally the most pathological and visible tumour is very fluorescent, but moderate degrees of fluorescence are difficult to interpret. Biopsy of every fluorescent area seems excessive. PMID:3969654

  10. Optimization of prostate biopsy: review of technique and complications.

    PubMed

    Bjurlin, Marc A; Wysock, James S; Taneja, Samir S

    2014-05-01

    A 12-core systematic biopsy that incorporates apical and far-lateral cores in the template distribution allows maximal cancer detection and avoidance of a repeat biopsy while minimizing the detection of insignificant prostate cancers. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided prostate biopsy has an evolving role in both initial and repeat prostate biopsy strategies, potentially improving sampling efficiency, increasing the detection of clinically significant cancers, and reducing the detection of insignificant cancers. Hematuria, hematospermia, and rectal bleeding are common complications of prostate needle biopsy, but are generally self-limiting and well tolerated. All men should receive antimicrobial prophylaxis before biopsy. PMID:24725491

  11. Perpetuities with thin tails revisited

    E-print Network

    Hitczenko, Pawe?; 10.1214/09-AAP603

    2009-01-01

    We consider the tail behavior of random variables $R$ which are solutions of the distributional equation $R\\stackrel{d}{=}Q+MR$, where $(Q,M)$ is independent of $R$ and $|M|\\le 1$. Goldie and Gr\\"{u}bel showed that the tails of $R$ are no heavier than exponential and that if $Q$ is bounded and $M$ resembles near 1 the uniform distribution, then the tails of $R$ are Poissonian. In this paper, we further investigate the connection between the tails of $R$ and the behavior of $M$ near 1. We focus on the special case when $Q$ is constant and $M$ is nonnegative.

  12. Consistent and reproducible outcomes of blastocyst biopsy and aneuploidy screening across different biopsy practitioners: a multicentre study involving 2586 embryo biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Capalbo, Antonio; Ubaldi, Filippo Maria; Cimadomo, Danilo; Maggiulli, Roberta; Patassini, Cristina; Dusi, Ludovica; Sanges, Federica; Buffo, Laura; Venturella, Roberta; Rienzi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is blastocyst biopsy and quantitative real-time PCR based comprehensive chromosome screening a consistent and reproducible approach across different biopsy practitioners? SUMMARY ANSWER The blastocyst biopsy approach provides highly consistent and reproducible laboratory and clinical outcomes across multiple practitioners from different IVF centres when all of the embryologists received identical training and use similar equipment. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Recently there has been a trend towards trophectoderm (TE) biopsy in preimplantation genetic screening (PGS)/preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) programmes. However, there is still a lack of knowledge about the reproducibility that can be obtained from multiple biopsy practitioners in different IVF centres in relation also to blastocysts of different morphology. Although it has been demonstrated that biopsy at the blastocyst stage has no impact on embryo viability, it remains a possibility that less experienced individual biopsy practitioners or laboratories performing TE biopsy may affect certain outcomes. We investigated whether TE biopsy practitioners can have an impact on the quality of the genetic test and the subsequent clinical outcomes. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This longitudinal cohort study, between April 2013 and December 2014, involved 2586 consecutive blastocyst biopsies performed at three different IVF centres and the analysis of 494 single frozen euploid embryo transfer cycles (FEET). PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Seven biopsy practitioners performed the blastocyst biopsies in the study period and quantitative PCR was used for comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS). The same practitioner performed both the biopsy and tubing procedures for each blastocyst they biopsied. To investigate the quality of the biopsied samples, the diagnostic rate, sample-specific concurrence and the cell number retrieved in the biopsy were evaluated for each biopsy operator. Clinical outcomes following FEET cycles were stratified by biopsy operator and compared. Cellularity of the biopsy sample was also correlated with clinical outcomes. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE The seven practitioners performed 2586 biopsies, five in centre IVF-1 and one in each of the other two IVF centres (IVF-2 and IVF-3). Overall, 2437 out of 2586 (94.2%) blastocyst biopsies resulted in a conclusive diagnosis, 119 (4.6%) showed a nonconcurrent result and 30 (1.2%) failed to amplify, suggesting the absence of TE cells in the test tube or presence of degenerated/lysed cells only. Among the samples producing a conclusive diagnosis, a mean concurrence value of 0.253 (95% CI = 0.250–0.257) was observed. Logistic regression analysis adjusted for confounding factors showed no differences in the diagnosis rate and in the concurrence of the genetic analysis between different biopsy practitioners. An overall mean number of 7.32 cells (95% CI = 6.82–7.81; range 2–15) were predicted from all biopsies. Higher cellularity was significantly associated with a better quality of the CCS diagnosis (P < 0.01) and with the conclusive diagnosis rate, with nonconcurrent samples showing significantly lower numbers of cells (2.1; 95% CI=1.5–2.7) compared with samples resulting in a conclusive diagnosis (mean cells number 7.5; 95% CI = 7.1–7.9, P < 0.01). However, no differences were recorded between different biopsy practitioners regarding cellularity of the biopsy. Finally, logistic analysis showed no impact of the biopsy practitioners on the observed ongoing rates of implantation, biochemical pregnancy loss and miscarriage after the FEET cycles. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION These data come from a restricted set of laboratories where all of the embryologists received identical training and use identical equipment. A single TE biopsy method and CCS technology was used and these data particularly apply to PGS programmes using blastocyst biopsy without zona opening at the cleavage stage and using qPCR-based CCS. To make firm conclusions on the po

  13. 3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, LOOKING NORTHEAST. A SIX-FOOT SCALE IS LOCATED AGAINST WALL ON LEFT. PURPOSE OF TANK IS UNKNOWN, BUT APPEARS TO HAVE FALLEN FROM ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION AT THE MILL SITE, UP AND TO THE RIGHT OF THIS VIEW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. Comparison of MR/Ultrasound Fusion–Guided Biopsy With Ultrasound-Guided Biopsy for the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Turkbey, Baris; George, Arvin K.; Rothwax, Jason; Shakir, Nabeel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Parnes, Howard L.; Linehan, W. Marston; Merino, Maria J.; Simon, Richard M.; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Targeted magnetic resonance (MR)/ultrasound fusion prostate biopsy has been shown to detect prostate cancer. The implications of targeted biopsy alone vs standard extended-sextant biopsy or the 2 modalities combined are not well understood. Objective To assess targeted vs standard biopsy and the 2 approaches combined for the diagnosis of intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Design, Setting, And Participants Prospective cohort study of 1003 men undergoing both targeted and standard biopsy concurrently from 2007 through 2014 at the National Cancer Institute in the United States. Patients were referred for elevated level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or abnormal digital rectal examination results, often with prior negative biopsy results. Risk categorization was compared among targeted and standard biopsy and, when available, whole-gland pathology after prostatectomy as the “gold standard.” Interventions Patients underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging to identify regions of prostate cancer suspicion followed by targeted MR/ultrasound fusion biopsy and concurrent standard biopsy. Main Outcomes And Measures The primary objective was to compare targeted and standard biopsy approaches for detection of high-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score ?4 + 3); secondary end points focused on detection of low-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score 3 + 3 or low-volume 3 + 4) and the biopsy ability to predict whole-gland pathology at prostatectomy. Results Targeted MR/ultrasound fusion biopsy diagnosed 461 prostate cancer cases, and standard biopsy diagnosed 469 cases. There was exact agreement between targeted and standard biopsy in 690 men (69%) undergoing biopsy. Targeted biopsy diagnosed 30% more high-risk cancers vs standard biopsy (173 vs 122 cases, P < .001) and 17% fewer low-risk cancers (213 vs 258 cases, P < .001). When standard biopsy cores were combined with the targeted approach, an additional 103 cases (22%) of mostly low-risk prostate cancer were diagnosed (83% low risk, 12% intermediate risk, and 5% high risk). The predictive ability of targeted biopsy for differentiating low-risk from intermediate- and high-risk disease in 170 men with whole-gland pathology after prostatectomy was greater than that of standard biopsy or the 2 approaches combined (area under the curve, 0.73, 0.59, and 0.67, respectively; P < .05 for all comparisons). Conclusions and Relevance Among men undergoing biopsy for suspected prostate cancer, targeted MR/ultrasound fusion biopsy, compared with standard extended-sextant ultrasound-guided biopsy, was associated with increased detection of high-risk prostate cancer and decreased detection of low-risk prostate cancer. Future studies will be needed to assess the ultimate clinical implications of targeted biopsy. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00102544 PMID:25626035

  15. Low yield of routine duodenal biopsies for evaluation of abdominal pain

    PubMed Central

    Dubin, Sterling M; Kwong, Wilson T; Kalmaz, Denise; Savides, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the yield of biopsying normal duodenal mucosa for investigation of abdominal pain. METHODS: This is a retrospective chart review of consecutive patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) with duodenal biopsies of normal appearing duodenal mucosa for an indication that included abdominal pain. All the patients in this study were identified from an electronic endoscopy database at a single academic medical center and had an EGD with duodenal biopsies performed over a 4-year period. New diagnoses that were made as a direct result of duodenal biopsies were identified. All duodenal pathology reports and endoscopy records were reviewed for indications to perform the examination as well as the findings; all the medical records were reviewed. Exclusion criteria included age less than 18 years, duodenal mass, nodule, or polyp, endoscopic duodenitis, duodenal scalloping, known celiac disease, positive celiac serology, Crohns disease, or history of bone marrow transplant. Information was collected in a de-identified database with pertinent demographic information including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, and descriptive statistics were performed. RESULTS: About 300 patients underwent EGD with biopsies of benign appearing or normal appearing duodenal mucosa. The mean age of patients was 44.1 ± 16.8 years; 189 of 300 (63%) were female. A mean of 4.3 duodenal biopsies were performed in each patient. In the subgroup of patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss the mean age was 43.4 ± 16.3 years. Duodenal biopsies performed for an indication that included abdominal pain resulting in 4 new diagnoses (3 celiac disease and 1 giardiasis) for an overall yield of 1.3%. 183 patients with abdominal pain without anemia, diarrhea, or weight loss (out of the total 300 patients) underwent duodenal biopsy of duodenal mucosa resulting in three new diagnoses (two cases of celiac disease and one giardiasis) for a yield of 1.6%. Duodenal biopsies of 19 HIV patients presenting for evaluation of abdominal pain did not reveal any new diagnoses. Information pertaining to new diagnoses is provided. CONCLUSION: Routine biopsy of normal appearing duodena in patients with abdominal pain should be reserved for those with a high pre-test probability given its low diagnostic yield. PMID:26139995

  16. Radial Endobronchial Ultrasound (EBUS) Guided Suction Catheter-Biopsy in Histological Diagnosis of Peripheral Pulmonary Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Zaric, Bojan; Stojsic, Vladimir; Carapic, Vladimir; Kovacevic, Tomi; Stojanovic, Goran; Panjkovic, Milana; Kioumis, Ioannis; Darwiche, Kaid; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Stratakos, Grigoris; Tsavlis, Drosos; Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Pitsiou, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Sachpekidis, Nikos; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Perin, Branislav

    2016-01-01

    Background: EBUS guided trans-bronchial biopsy became routine in diagnosis of peripheral pulmonary lesions (PPL). Suction catheter-biopsy is a technique for obtaining a tissue sample from peripheral lung parenchyma. Aim of this study was to evaluate diagnostic efficiency, feasibility and safety of EBUS guided suction catheter-biopsy (SCB) in comparison to trans-bronchial biopsy (TBB) in diagnosis of PPL. The main intention was to demonstrate non-inferiority of the technique over trans-bronchial biopsy, especially when used under navigation of the EBUS. Methods: Radial EBUS probe (UM-3R, Olympus Co, Japan.) without guiding sheath was used to navigate suction catheter and TBB forceps to the PPL. The catheter was connected to the collection canister via vacuum pump. The SCB specimens were fixed with 10% buffered formalin. Results: There were 168 patients enrolled in this study; 69.9% males and 30.1% females. Main lesion diameter was 4.1±1.9 cm. Majority of patients, 131(77.9%) were diagnosed with lung cancer. Per-biopsy calculated sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for EBUS-SCB were 92.4%, 100%, 100% and 67.7%, respectively. Corresponding values for EBUS-TBB were 92.3%, 100%, 100% and 69.7%. Only the size of the lesion significantly influenced (p=0.005) diagnostic performance. Complications occurred in 2 patients; one pneumothorax and one excessive bleeding. Conclusion: EBUS guided SCB is efficient, feasible and safe in diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer. The technique is complementary to trans-bronchial biopsy. PMID:26722354

  17. 21 CFR 876.1075 - Gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...instrument. (a) Identification. A gastroenterology-urology biopsy instrument is a device used to remove, by cutting or aspiration, a specimen of tissue for microscopic examination. This generic type of device includes the biopsy punch,...

  18. A biopsy procedure for determining filet and predicting whole-fish mercury concentration.

    PubMed

    Peterson, S A; Van Sickle, J; Hughes, R M; Schacher, J A; Echols, S F

    2005-01-01

    Although mercury contamination of fish is a widespread phenomenon, its regional evaluation is hindered by the reluctance of permitting agencies to grant collection permits, problems in securing adequate freezer space, and time to process whole, large fish or filets. We evaluated mercury concentrations in 210 filet biopsies from 65 sites in 12 western states relative to whole-body mercury concentration in the same fish. We found a highly significant relationship (r(2) = 0.96) between biopsy and whole-fish mercury concentrations for 13 piscivorous and nonpiscivorous fish species. We concluded that relative to conventional fish-tissue sampling and analysis procedures for whole fish or filets, the biopsy procedure for mercury in fish tissue is nonlethal, less cumbersome, more likely to be permitted by fisheries agencies, and a precise and accurate means for determining both filet and whole-fish mercury concentrations. PMID:15657811

  19. Emerging platforms using liquid biopsy to detect EGFR mutations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Wei-Lun; Wei, Fang; Su, Wu-Chou; Wong, David T

    2015-01-01

    Advances in target therapies for lung cancer have enabled detection of gene mutations, specifically those of EGFR. Assays largely depend on the acquisition of tumor tissue biopsy, which is invasive and may not reflect the genomic profile of the tumor at treatment due to tumor heterogeneity or changes that occur during treatment through acquired resistance. Liquid biopsy, a blood test that detects evidence of cancer cells or tumor DNA, has generated considerable interest for its ability to detect EGFR mutations. However, its clinical application is limited by complicated collection methods and the need for technique-dependent platforms. Recently, simpler techniques for EGFR mutant detection in urine or saliva samples have been developed. This review focuses on advances in liquid biopsy and discusses its potential for clinical implementation in lung cancer. PMID:26420338

  20. Electromagnetic induction for mapping textural contrasts of mine tailing deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, Grey S.; Tuller, Markus; Jones, Scott B.; Heinse, Robert; Meding, Mercer S.

    2013-02-01

    Mine tailings present an important legacy of past and present ore-extraction activities in the Desert Southwest. Inactive mine tailings have no immediate economic role in current mining operations, yet from an environmental point of view it is important that such deposits are stabilized to prevent mass movement, wind or water erosion, leaching of chemicals such as acid mine drainage, and to reduce visual blight. In the presented study, we assess the potential for inferring textural properties of mine tailing deposits with electromagnetic induction (EMI) mapping as a means of informing efforts to establish vegetation at mine waste sites. EMI measurements of apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) and tailing samples were collected at a mine waste site in Southern Arizona, USA and used to test empirical and theoretical relationships between ECa and physical and mineralogical properties using linear and Gaussian process regression. Sensitivity analyses of a semi-theoretical and a regression model of ECa as a function of tailing properties indicated that volumetric clay fraction in the top 60 cm was a primary influence on bulk electrical conductivity along with water content, conductivity of the soil water and the presence of conductive minerals hematite and pyrite. At this site, latitude and longitude were better predictors of clay content than ECa, and while it was possible to obtain information about the spatial distribution of tailing texture using EMI, simple Kriging of texture data was a more powerful textural mapping technique. We conclude that EMI is a useful tool for mapping tailing texture at waste deposit sites, but due to physical and chemical heterogeneity of tailing deposits, it is necessary to collect more in situ samples than are needed for agricultural applications.

  1. The relationship of GH and LEP gene polymorphisms with fat-tail measurements (fat-tail dimensions) in fat-tailed Makooei breed of Iranian sheep

    PubMed Central

    Hajihosseinlo, Abbas; Jafari, Shoja; Ajdary, Marziyeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to investigate the association of GH and LEP genes’ single-nucleotide polymorphisms with fat-tail measurements (fat-tail dimensions) in Makooei sheep. Materials and Methods: DNA was extracted from whole blood samples collected from 100 sheep. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products were subjected to single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) denaturation and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Data were collected at the Makooei Sheep Breeding Station in Makoo (36°, 35?S and 48°, 22?E) of West Azerbaijan province. Climatically, this location has temperate summers and cold winters and receives a mean annual rainfall of about 400 mm. Ewes are raised in an annual breeding cycle starting in September. In general, the flock is managed under a semi-migratory system. Results: In the tested Makooei sheep population, significant statistical results were found in all traits of fat-tail measurements for GH and LEP genes. Individuals with the G4, L4 genotype of GH and LEP genes had lower tail length (rump length), fat thickness (the thick rump), and tail width (rump width) when compared to those of individuals with other genotypes (P < 0.05). In addition, the results demonstrated that individuals with the G5, L5 genotype of GH and LEP genes had superiority of tail length (rump length) and fat thickness (the thick rump) compared to those individuals with other genotypes (P < 0.05). Individuals with the G2, L2 genotype of GH and LEP genes had superiority of tail width (rump width) compared individuals with other genotypes (P < 0.05). Conclusion: These results confirmed potential usefulness of GH and LEP genes in marker-assisted selection programs of sheep breeding. PMID:26605211

  2. Endoscopic mucosal biopsies are useful in distinguishing granulomatous colitis due to Crohn's disease from tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Pulimood, A; Ramakrishna, B; Kurian, G; Peter, S; Patra, S; Mathan, V; Mathan, M

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Intestinal tuberculosis and Crohn's disease are chronic granulomatous disorders that are difficult to differentiate histologically.?AIMS—To characterise distinctive diagnostic features of tuberculosis and Crohn's disease in mucosal biopsy specimens obtained at colonoscopy.?METHODS—Selected histological parameters were evaluated retrospectively in a total of 61 biopsy sites from 20 patients with tuberculosis and 112 biopsy sites from 20 patients with Crohn's disease. The patients were chosen on the basis of clinical history, colonoscopic findings, diagnostic histology, and response to treatment.?RESULTS—The histological parameters characteristic of tuberculosis were multiple (mean number of granulomas per section: 5.35), large (mean widest diameter: 193 µm), confluent granulomas often with caseating necrosis. Other features were ulcers lined by conglomerate epithelioid histiocytes and disproportionate submucosal inflammation. The features characteristic of Crohn's disease were infrequent (mean number of granulomas per section: 0.75), small (mean widest diameter: 95 µm) granulomas, microgranulomas (defined as poorly organised collections of epithelioid histiocytes), focally enhanced colitis, and a high prevalence of chronic inflammation, even in endoscopically normal appearing areas.?CONCLUSIONS—The type and frequency of granulomas, presence or absence of ulcers lined by epithelioid histiocytes and microgranulomas, and the distribution of chronic inflammation have been identified as histological parameters that can be used to differentiate tuberculosis and Crohn's disease in mucosal biopsy specimens obtained at colonoscopy.???Keywords: tuberculosis; Crohn's disease; mucosal biopsy; histology PMID:10486361

  3. Comparison of Swabbing and Biopsy for Studying the Flora of the Bovine Uterus

    PubMed Central

    Messier, S.; Higgins, R.; Couture, Y.; Morin, M.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy of uterine biopsy as a sampling procedure for bacteriological examination, and to assess the importance of obligate anaerobes in the bovine uterus. The aerobic and anaerobic uterine flora of cows with postpartum metritis, cows in postpartum period without metritis and repeat-breeder cows was examined by using swab and biopsy sampling techniques. Obligate anaerobes were isolated in all the 11 cows with postpartum metritis and in three of the five normal cows. No obligate anaerobes were isolated from the six repeatbreeder cows. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in the number of bacterial isolates obtained from samples collected by biopsy and by swabbing. A total of 72 isolates was obtained with the biopsies compared to 48 by swabbing. Obligate anaerobes make up an important part of the postpartum uterine bacterial flora, and it seems that in some instances uterine biopsy would be more satisfactory than swabbing for bacteriological examination of the uterus. PMID:17422427

  4. 21 CFR 878.4755 - Absorbable lung biopsy plug.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Absorbable lung biopsy plug. 878.4755 Section 878...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Surgical Devices § 878.4755 Absorbable lung biopsy plug. (a) Identification. A preformed (polymerized) absorbable lung biopsy plug is intended to...

  5. Performance of skin biopsies by general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    McWilliam, L J; Knox, F; Wilkinson, N; Oogarah, P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate and appraise skin biopsies performed by general practitioners and compare their performance with that of hospital doctors. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis of histology records. SETTING--University hospital. SUBJECTS--Records of 292 skin biopsy specimens obtained by general practitioners and 324 specimens obtained by general and plastic surgeons. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Clinical and pathological diagnoses and completeness of excision. RESULTS--The number of specimens received from hospital surgeons and general practitioners increased over the study period; the proportion of specimens from general practitioners rose from 17/1268 (1.3%) in 1984 to 201/2387 (8.7%) in 1990. The range of diagnoses was similar among hospital and general practitioner cases, although malignancy was commoner in hospital cases (63/324 (19%) v 14/292 (5%) in general practitioner cases; chi 2 = 28, p less than 0.00001). Completeness of excision was less common among general practitioners than hospital surgeons (150/233 (3/15 malignant) v 195/232 (57/63); chi 2 = 22, p less than 0.00001). CONCLUSIONS--The increase in minor surgery has implications for the staffing and finance of histopathology departments. General practitioners must be given proper training in performing skin biopsies, and all specimens should be sent for examination. PMID:1747616

  6. Imaging, procedural, and clinical variables associated with tumor yield on bone biopsy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Rana R.; Zukotynski, Katherine A.; Werner, Lillian; Voznesensky, Olga; Wu, Jim S.; Smith, Stacy E.; Jiang, Zhenyang; Melnick, Kevin; Yuan, Xin; Kantoff, Philip W.; Montgomery, Bruce; Balk, Steven P.; Taplin, Mary-Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanisms driving disease progression is fundamental to identifying new therapeutic targets for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Due to the prevalence of bone metastases in mCRPC, obtaining sufficient tumor tissue for analysis has historically been a challenge. In this exploratory analysis, we evaluated imaging, procedural, and clinical variables associated with tumor yield on image-guided bone biopsy in men with mCRPC. Methods Clinical data were collected prospectively from men with mCRPC enrolled on a phase II trial with serial metastasis biopsies performed according to standard clinical protocol. Imaging was retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the percent positive biopsy cores (PPC), calculated as the number of positive cores divided by the total number of cores collected per biopsy. Results Twenty-nine men had 39 bone biopsies. Seventy-seven percent of bone biopsies had at least 1 positive biopsy core. We determined that lesion size and distance from the skin to the lesion edge correlated with tumor yield on biopsy (median PPC 75% versus 42% for lesions > 8.8 cm3 versus ? 8.8 cm3, respectively, p=0.05; median PPC 33% versus 71% for distance ? 6.1 versus < 6.1 cm, respectively, p=0.02). There was a trend towards increased tumor yield in patients with increased uptake on radionuclide bone scan, higher calcium levels, and shorter duration of osteoclast-targeting therapy, though this was not statistically significant. Ten men had 14 soft tissue biopsies. All soft tissue biopsies had at least 1 positive biopsy core. Conclusions This exploratory analysis suggests there are imaging, procedural, and clinical variables which impact image-guided bone biopsy yield. In order to maximize harvest of prostate cancer tissue, we have incorporated a prospective analysis of the metrics described here as part of a multi-institutional project aiming to use molecular characterization of mCRPC tumors to direct individual therapy. PMID:25091040

  7. A plea for the biopsy marker: how, why and why not clipping after breast biopsy?

    PubMed

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle; Lalonde, Lucie; David, Julie; Darai, Emile; Uzan, Serge; Trop, Isabelle

    2012-04-01

    In the last decade, percutaneous breast biopsies have become a standard for the management of breast diseases. Biopsy clips allow for precise lesion localization, thus minimizing the volume of breast to be resected at the time of surgery. With the development of many imaging techniques (including mammography, sonography, and breast magnetic resonance imaging), one of the challenges of the multidisciplinary became to synthesize all informations obtained from the various imaging procedures. The use of biopsy markers after percutaneous biopsy is one of the keys for optimal patient management, helping the radiologist to deal with multiple lesions, to insure correlation across different imaging modalities and to follow-up benign lesions, helping the oncologist by marking a tumor prior to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, helping the surgeon by facilitating preoperative needle localization, to precisely mark the margins of extensive disease and to guide intraoperative tumor resection, and helping the pathologist to insure the lesion of interest has been removed and to identify the region of interest in a mastectomy specimen. We believe biopsy clip markers should be deployed after all percutaneous interventions and present in this review the arguments to support this statement. Minimal indications for clip deployment will also be detailed. PMID:22042370

  8. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  9. Fatal haemorrhage following liver biopsy in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, D R; Mann, D; Coker, R J; Miller, R F; Glazer, G; Goldin, R D; Lucas, S B; Weber, J N; De Cock, K M

    1996-01-01

    A retrospective review of all 248 liver biopsies performed in patients with HIV infection at two referral centres in London over a 12 year period revealed five cases of major bleeding following biopsy, with four deaths. The risk of major bleeding was 2.0%, and mortality was 1.6% following liver biopsy. The risk of bleeding as much higher than in published series of biopsies done in patients without HIV infection, owing in part to the high prevalence of thrombocytopaenia and clotting abnormalities in patients with HIV infection. HIV infection per se may also increase the risk of bleeding following liver biopsy. PMID:8655172

  10. Imaging-guided Parenchymal Liver Biopsy: How We Do It

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, Gopal R; David, Sheehan; Bermudez-Allende, Myriam; Sarwat, Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Liver biopsies are performed for both focal and nonfocal lesions (parenchymal). In our center, majority of liver biopsies are performed for parenchymal liver disease. Parenchymal liver biopsy plays a key role in the diagnosis of various diffuse liver dysfunctions. Results of the biopsy help grade the disease, facilitating prognostication, which helps in planning specific treatment strategies. Imaging guidance is gaining wide acceptance as the standard procedure. Ultrasound (US) guidance is currently considered the most cost-effective and safe way to perform parenchymal liver biopsies. Radiologists worldwide and particularly in the United States are increasingly performing this procedure. Radiologists performing biopsies generally use the cutting needle. Different needle sizes, techniques and preference for biopsy of the right or left lobe have been described. We attribute these preferences to prior training and individual radiologist's comfort level. We describe the algorithm followed at our institution for performing percutaneous US-guided parenchymal liver biopsy. While clinical societies have recommended a minimum of 40 liver biopsies as a requirement for proficiency of clinicians, specific to radiology trainees/fellows interested in pursuing a career in intervention, we feel a total of 20 liver biopsies (includes assisted and independently performed biopsies under supervision) should be adequate training. PMID:21966627

  11. Endobronchial cryobiopsy or forceps biopsy for lung cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Zafer; Gunay, Ersin; Hoca, Nevin Taci; Yilmaz, Aydin; Demirag, Funda; Gunay, Sibel; Sipit, Tugrul; Kurt, Emine Bahar

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive procedures such as bronchoscopic biopsy, bronchial washing, and bronchial brushing are widely used in diagnosis of lung cancers. The mean diagnostic rate with bronchoscopic forceps biopsy is 74% in central tumors. This study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of cryobiopsies in histopathological diagnosis. METHODS: Forty-one patients who had interventional bronchoscopy were included in this study. Three forceps biopsies and one cryobiopsy with cryorecanalization probe were obtained from each subject. Biopsies interpretations were done by one expert pathologist. RESULTS: Hemorrhage was the only complication in both procedures. There was no significant difference between these two procedures in the incidence of hemorrhage (P > 0.05). Mean diameters of samples taken with forceps biopsy and cryoprobe biopsy were 0.2 and 0.8 cm, respectively (P < 0.001). Thirty-two patients (78%) were diagnosed with forceps biopsies, and 38 patients (92.7%) were diagnosed with cryoprobe biopsies (P = 0.031). CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that cryoprobe biopsies were more successful than forceps biopsies in diagnosis. Nevertheless, further investigations are warranted to determine an efficacy of cryoprobe biopsy procedures and a rationale to use as a part of routine flexible bronchoscopy. PMID:20981186

  12. Heavy-tailed random matrices

    E-print Network

    Z. Burda; J. Jurkiewicz

    2009-11-08

    We discuss non-Gaussian random matrices whose elements are random variables with heavy-tailed probability distributions. In probability theory heavy tails of the distributions describe rare but violent events which usually have dominant influence on the statistics. They also completely change universal properties of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of random matrices. We concentrate here on the universal macroscopic properties of (1) Wigner matrices belonging to the Levy basin of attraction, (2) matrices representing stable free random variables and (3) a class of heavy-tailed matrices obtained by parametric deformations of standard ensembles.

  13. Arsenic bioaccessibility in gold mine tailings of Delita, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Toujaguez, R; Ono, F B; Martins, V; Cabrera, P P; Blanco, A V; Bundschuh, J; Guilherme, L R G

    2013-11-15

    A bioaccessibility test was carried out in four tailings collected at a former mining area in Delita, Cuba. A previous risk assessment study identified arsenic (As) as the main critical contaminant in this area and showed that the tailings had high As concentrations (up to 3.5%). This study aimed at: (i) evaluating As bioaccessibility in four tailings (R1, R2, R3 and R4) from a gold mining area to obtain a better health risk estimate; and, (ii) identifying the mineral phases responsible for most of the bioaccessible As using XRD, SEM-EDS, and XAS. The results showed that bioaccessible As in the tailings ranged from 0.65 to 40.5%. The main factors influencing As bioaccessibility were a high occurrence of amorphous iron arsenate; occurrence, even at low content, of iron oxyhydroxides and stability of mineral phases in the environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Although arsenopyrite, arsenates and goethite were confirmed by mineralogical methods such as optical microscopy, XRD, and SEM-EDS, XAS showed that scorodite-oxidation state As(+V)-was dominant in most of the tailings. This confirms that the low bioaccessibility of As in most of the tailings is due to the slow kinetics of As release from scorodite. PMID:23428178

  14. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  15. Postsacral vertebral morphology in relation to tail length among primates and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gabrielle A

    2015-02-01

    Tail reduction/loss independently evolved in a number of mammalian lineages, including hominoid primates. One prerequisite to appropriately contextualizing its occurrence and understanding its significance is the ability to track evolutionary changes in tail length throughout the fossil record. However, to date, the bony correlates of tail length variation among living taxa have not been comprehensively examined. This study quantifies postsacral vertebral morphology among living primates and other mammals known to differ in relative tail length (RTL). Linear and angular measurements with known biomechanical significance were collected on the first, mid-, and transition proximal postsacral vertebrae, and their relationship with RTL was assessed using phylogenetic generalized least-squares regression methods. Compared to shorter-tailed primates, longer-tailed primates possess a greater number of postsacral vertebral features associated with increased proximal tail flexibility (e.g., craniocaudally longer vertebral bodies), increased intervertebral body joint range of motion (e.g., more circularly shaped cranial articular surfaces), and increased leverage of tail musculature (e.g., longer spinous processes). These observations are corroborated by the comparative mammalian sample, which shows that distantly related short-tailed (e.g., Phascolarctos, Lynx) and long-tailed (e.g., Dendrolagus, Acinonyx) nonprimate mammals morphologically converge with short-tailed (e.g., Macaca tonkeana) and long-tailed (e.g., Macaca fascicularis) primates, respectively. Multivariate models demonstrate that the variables examined account for 70% (all mammals) to 94% (only primates) of the variance in RTL. Results of this study may be used to infer the tail lengths of extinct primates and other mammals, thereby improving our understanding about the evolution of tail reduction/loss. PMID:25132483

  16. Assessment of Phytostabilization Success in Metalliferous Acid Mine Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Root, R. A.; Hammond, C.; Amistadi, M. K.; Maier, R. M.; Chorover, J.

    2014-12-01

    Legacy mine tailings are a significant source of metal(loid)s due to wind and water erosion, especially in the arid southwest, and exposure to fugative dusts presents a health risk to surrounding populations. Compost assisted phytostabilization has been implemented to reduce off site emissions at the Iron King Mine U.S. Superfund Site in central Arizona, concurrent with a greenhouse mesocosm study for detailed study of subsurface mechanisms. Quantification of plant available toxic metal(loid)s in the amended tailings was accessed with a targeted single extraction of diethylenetriaminepentaactic acid (DTPA). Greenhouse mesocosms (1m dia, 0.4 m deep), run in triplicate, mimicked field treatments with: i) tailings only control (TO), ii) tailings plus 15 wt% compost (TC), iii) TC + quailbush seeds (TCA), and iv) TC + buffalo grass seeds (TCB). Core samples collected at 3-month intervals for 1 year were dissected by depth (10 cm each) for analysis. DTPA results indicated that compost treated samples decreased plant availability of Al, As, Cd, Cu, Fe, and Pb but increased Mn and Zn compared with TO. TCB decreased plant available metal(loid)s at all depths, whereas TCA plant available Al, As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn and Zn increased in the deeper 20-30cm and 30-40 cm relative to TCB. Samples from the greenhouse were compared to tailings from both the field site and tailings impacted soils used to grow vegetables. Mineral transformations and metal complexation, in the pre- and post-extracted tailings were analyzed by synchrotron transmission XRD and FTIR spectroscopy. The temporal change in plant available metal(loid)s in response to phytostabilization indicates mineralogical alteration that improves soil quality by reducing plant available metal(loid)s. These results will aid in the understanding and efficacy of phytostabilization as a means of remediating and reducing toxicity on mine tailings as well as providing information on health risk management in the region.

  17. Tail Risk Measures Heavy-Tail Asymptotics: Regular Variation Multivariate Risks Concluding Remarks Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Tail Risk Measures Heavy-Tail Asymptotics: Regular Variation Multivariate Risks Concluding Remarks Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk Haijun Li Department of Mathematics Washington State University Humboldt Univ-Berlin Haijun Li Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk Humboldt Univ-Berlin 1 / 26 #12

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF ASSEMBLAGE A GIARDIA IN WHITE-TAILED DEER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fecal samples were collected from hunter killed white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) during a managed hunt in a central Maryland county. Fecal samples were cleaned of debris and concentrated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation and stained with MerIFluor reagents. Stained samples were exami...

  19. Morphogenesis of the T4 tail and tail fibers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been made during the past ten years in elucidating the structure of the bacteriophage T4 tail by a combination of three-dimensional image reconstruction from electron micrographs and X-ray crystallography of the components. Partial and complete structures of nine out of twenty tail structural proteins have been determined by X-ray crystallography and have been fitted into the 3D-reconstituted structure of the "extended" tail. The 3D structure of the "contracted" tail was also determined and interpreted in terms of component proteins. Given the pseudo-atomic tail structures both before and after contraction, it is now possible to understand the gross conformational change of the baseplate in terms of the change in the relative positions of the subunit proteins. These studies have explained how the conformational change of the baseplate and contraction of the tail are related to the tail's host cell recognition and membrane penetration function. On the other hand, the baseplate assembly process has been recently reexamined in detail in a precise system involving recombinant proteins (unlike the earlier studies with phage mutants). These experiments showed that the sequential association of the subunits of the baseplate wedge is based on the induced-fit upon association of each subunit. It was also found that, upon association of gp53 (gene product 53), the penultimate subunit of the wedge, six of the wedge intermediates spontaneously associate to form a baseplate-like structure in the absence of the central hub. Structure determination of the rest of the subunits and intermediate complexes and the assembly of the hub still require further study. PMID:21129200

  20. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be attributed to iron-bearing sulfide (and oxide) minerals present in the mill tailings. However, the concentration of available Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions can be reduced by the precipitation of insoluble ferric hydroxides (Fe(OH ){sub 3}) by seawater due to its near neutral pH. In such case, the oxidation of a sulfide mineral is inhibited due to the absence of an oxidizing agent (viz. oxygen and/or Fe{sup 3+} ions). The experiments carried out in this study provided a better understanding of behavior of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in subaqueous conditions and may be useful for further investigation of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in other environments.

  1. Tail Dependence for Heavy-Tailed Scale Mixtures of Multivariate Distributions

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Tail Dependence for Heavy-Tailed Scale Mixtures of Multivariate Distributions Haijun Li Yannan Sun September 2009 Abstract The tail dependence of multivariate distributions is frequently studied via the tool, to evaluate the tail dependence of heavy-tailed scale mixtures of multivariate distributions, whose copulas

  2. Tail Mean Estimation is More Efficient than Tail Median: Evidence From the Exponential Power Distribution

    E-print Network

    Pearce, Kent

    Tail Mean Estimation is More Efficient than Tail Median: Evidence From the Exponential Power the relative efficiency of the empirical "tail median" vs. "tail mean" as esti- mators of location under random that the quantile of the untruncated EPD (population tail median) and mean of the left-truncated EPD (population

  3. Satellite Tagging and Biopsy Sampling of Killer Whales at Subantarctic Marion Island: Effectiveness, Immediate Reactions and Long-Term Responses

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Ryan R.; Oosthuizen, W. Chris; Péron, Guillaume; Cory Toussaint, Dawn; Andrews, Russel D.; de Bruyn, P. J. Nico

    2014-01-01

    Remote tissue biopsy sampling and satellite tagging are becoming widely used in large marine vertebrate studies because they allow the collection of a diverse suite of otherwise difficult-to-obtain data which are critical in understanding the ecology of these species and to their conservation and management. Researchers must carefully consider their methods not only from an animal welfare perspective, but also to ensure the scientific rigour and validity of their results. We report methods for shore-based, remote biopsy sampling and satellite tagging of killer whales Orcinus orca at Subantarctic Marion Island. The performance of these methods is critically assessed using 1) the attachment duration of low-impact minimally percutaneous satellite tags; 2) the immediate behavioural reactions of animals to biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; 3) the effect of researcher experience on biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; and 4) the mid- (1 month) and long- (24 month) term behavioural consequences. To study mid- and long-term behavioural changes we used multievent capture-recapture models that accommodate imperfect detection and individual heterogeneity. We made 72 biopsy sampling attempts (resulting in 32 tissue samples) and 37 satellite tagging attempts (deploying 19 tags). Biopsy sampling success rates were low (43%), but tagging rates were high with improved tag designs (86%). The improved tags remained attached for 26±14 days (mean ± SD). Individuals most often showed no reaction when attempts missed (66%) and a slight reaction–defined as a slight flinch, slight shake, short acceleration, or immediate dive–when hit (54%). Severe immediate reactions were never observed. Hit or miss and age-sex class were important predictors of the reaction, but the method (tag or biopsy) was unimportant. Multievent trap-dependence modelling revealed considerable variation in individual sighting patterns; however, there were no significant mid- or long-term changes following biopsy sampling or tagging. PMID:25375329

  4. Renal Biopsy Findings in Acute Renal Failure in the Cohort of Patients in the Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    López-Gómez, Juan M.; Rivera, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Renal biopsy in acute renal failure of unknown origin provides irreplaceable information for diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This study analyzed the frequency and clinicopathologic correlations of renal native biopsied acute renal failure in Spain during the period 1994 through 2006. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: Acute renal failure was defined as a rapid deterioration of glomerular filtration rate, with or without oligoanuria or rapidly progressive renal insufficiency, including acute-on-chronic renal failure. Patients who were younger than 15 yr were considered children, those between 15 and 65 yr adults, and those >65 elderly. Results: Between 1994 and 2006, data on 14,190 native renal biopsies were collected from 112 renal units in Spain. Of these, 16.1% (2281 biopsies) were diagnosed with acute renal failure. The prevalence of the main clinical syndromes was different in the three age groups: Biopsy-confirmed acute renal failure in children was 5.7%, in adults was 12.5%, and in elderly increased significantly to 32.9%. The prevalence of biopsy-confirmed acute renal failure according to cause was as follows: Vasculitis, 23.3%; acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, 11.3%; and crescentic glomerulonephritis types 1 and 2, 10.1%. The prevalence of the different causes differed significantly according to age group. Conclusions: The Spanish Registry of Glomerulonephritis provides useful information about renal histopathology in biopsy-confirmed acute renal failure. The prevalence of vasculitis and crescentic glomerulonephritis is high, especially in elderly patients. These data obtained from a national large registry highlight the value of renal biopsy in undetermined acute renal failure. PMID:18354075

  5. Satellite tagging and biopsy sampling of killer whales at subantarctic Marion Island: effectiveness, immediate reactions and long-term responses.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Ryan R; Oosthuizen, W Chris; Péron, Guillaume; Cory Toussaint, Dawn; Andrews, Russel D; de Bruyn, P J Nico

    2014-01-01

    Remote tissue biopsy sampling and satellite tagging are becoming widely used in large marine vertebrate studies because they allow the collection of a diverse suite of otherwise difficult-to-obtain data which are critical in understanding the ecology of these species and to their conservation and management. Researchers must carefully consider their methods not only from an animal welfare perspective, but also to ensure the scientific rigour and validity of their results. We report methods for shore-based, remote biopsy sampling and satellite tagging of killer whales Orcinus orca at Subantarctic Marion Island. The performance of these methods is critically assessed using 1) the attachment duration of low-impact minimally percutaneous satellite tags; 2) the immediate behavioural reactions of animals to biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; 3) the effect of researcher experience on biopsy sampling and satellite tagging; and 4) the mid- (1 month) and long- (24 month) term behavioural consequences. To study mid- and long-term behavioural changes we used multievent capture-recapture models that accommodate imperfect detection and individual heterogeneity. We made 72 biopsy sampling attempts (resulting in 32 tissue samples) and 37 satellite tagging attempts (deploying 19 tags). Biopsy sampling success rates were low (43%), but tagging rates were high with improved tag designs (86%). The improved tags remained attached for 26±14 days (mean ± SD). Individuals most often showed no reaction when attempts missed (66%) and a slight reaction-defined as a slight flinch, slight shake, short acceleration, or immediate dive-when hit (54%). Severe immediate reactions were never observed. Hit or miss and age-sex class were important predictors of the reaction, but the method (tag or biopsy) was unimportant. Multievent trap-dependence modelling revealed considerable variation in individual sighting patterns; however, there were no significant mid- or long-term changes following biopsy sampling or tagging. PMID:25375329

  6. Biopsy of Different Oral Soft Tissues Lesions by KTP and Diode Laser: Histological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Umberto; Russo, Claudia; Lo Giudice, Rossella; Visca, Paolo; Migliau, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Oral biopsy aims to obtain clear and safe diagnosis; it can be performed by scalpel or laser. The controversy in this latter application is the thermal alteration due to tissue heating. The aim of this study is the histological evaluation of margins of “in vivo” biopsies collected by diode and KTP lasers. Material and Methods. 17 oral benign lesions biopsies were made by diode 808?nm (SOL, DenMatItalia, Italy) and KTP 532?nm (SmartLite, DEKA, Italy). Samples were observed at OM LEICA DM 2000; margin alterations were evaluated through Leica Application Suite 3.4. Results. Epithelial and connective damages were assessed for each pathology with an average of 0.245?mm and a standard deviation of ±0.162?mm in mucoceles, 0.382?mm ± 0.149?mm in fibromas, 0.336?mm ± 0.106?mm in hyperkeratosis, 0.473?mm ± 0.105?mm in squamous hyperplasia, 0.182?mm in giant cell granuloma, and 0.149?mm in melanotic macula. Discussion. The histologic aspect of lesions influenced the response to laser, whereas the greater inflammation and cellularity were linked with the higher thermal signs. Many artifacts were also associated to histologic procedures. Conclusion. Both tested lasers permitted sure histologic diagnosis. However, it is suggested to enlarge biopsies of about 0.5?mm, to avoid thermal alterations, especially in inflammatory lesions like oral lichen planus. PMID:25405233

  7. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4075 Endomyocardial biopsy device. (a) Identification. An...

  8. Diagnostic yield of renal biopsies: a retrospective single center review

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous studies have examined the spectrum of diseases identified with a kidney biopsy and the complications of the procedure. However, few studies have examined the utility of the test to clarify the diagnosis and guide treatment of pediatric patients. This retrospective, single-center chart review was performed to test the hypothesis that at least 80% of native kidney biopsies provide clinically valuable information that rationally guides diagnosis and patient management. Methods 200 biopsies performed between January 1, 2000 and June 30, 2008 were reviewed. A scheme composed of six categories was devised to classify the utility of each kidney biopsy. Results 196 complete case files were available for review. Twenty-four (12.2%) biopsies did not shed light on the diagnosis and were unhelpful in patient management – 21 biopsies (10.7%) were non-diagnostic and 3 (1.5%) failed to yield enough tissue for examination. The number of unhelpful biopsies did not cluster in any specific disease entity. Conclusion Our findings provide guidance to nephrologists about the total risk of a kidney biopsy, including uninformative results, when seeking informed consent for the procedure. The results suggest an appropriate balance has been reached which maximizes the use of kidney biopsies while minimizing the risk of this invasive procedure (word count: 202). PMID:19460162

  9. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate.

  10. Percutaneous renal biopsy as an outpatient procedure.

    PubMed Central

    Alebiosu, Christopher O.; Kadiri, Solomon

    2004-01-01

    Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) is a safe and effective tool in the diagnosis and management of renal disease. It is the gold standard for evaluating renal parenchymal disease. It is both useful for diagnosis and monitoring progress of renal diseases. Where facilities and personnel are available to carry out the procedure in developing countries, it has become increasingly difficult for patients to pay for hospital admission fees, the procedure, and processing of the samples obtained. Information on the success rate and safety of the procedure is of interest to nephrologists for cost-benefit considerations and medicolegal purposes. This paper reports the outcome of outpatient PRB done among patients of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. With the use of ultrasound guidance, PRB remains a safe procedure and can be done on an outpatient basis. PMID:15481751

  11. Role of bone biopsy in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Al Badr, Wisam; Martin, Kevin J

    2009-01-01

    Renal osteodystrophy (ROD), the abnormal bone histology that occurs in the context of kidney disease, is a disease spectrum and not a uniform progressive bone disease. It is an important component of the broad disturbances of bone and mineral metabolism associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD). There are multiple pathogenetic factors which contribute to the histological abnormalities seen on bone biopsy. The patients with ROD are rarely symp-tomatic in the early stages of CKD. It is also noteworthy that the clinical manifestations are usually preceded by biochemical changes that are insidious and subtle. This makes it difficult for the clinician to suspect the presence of bone and mineral metabolism abnormalities without direct testing. The serum calcium, phosphorus, and alkaline phosphatase levels are usually normal until late in the course of CKD. The main screening test for abnormal bone and mineral metabolism is the measurement of parathyroid hormone which is also somewhat delayed. The clinical signs and symptoms are also challenging to interpret because of their slow and non-specific nature which may include vague, ill-defined, bone aches and pains, and muscle weakness. The gold standard for diagnosis of ROD is bone biopsy with mineralized bone histology after double tetracycline labeling, iron staining and aluminum staining. The currently used histomorphometric descriptions of bone histology are not well integrated clinically and a new nomenclature that is clinically more relevant and useful has been proposed. Additional studies are required to define the spectrum of ROD in the current therapeutic era, and to find clinically useful non-invasive biomarkers to improve the treatment and monitoring of the abnormal bone in the setting of CKD. PMID:19112214

  12. Real-time ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy with needle guide by nephrologists decreases post-biopsy complications

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Narayan; Kumar, Shashi; Manjunath, Revanasiddappa; Bhadauria, Dharmendra; Kaul, Anupama; Sharma, Raj K; Gupta, Amit; Lal, Hira; Jain, Manoj; Agrawal, Vinita

    2015-01-01

    Background Percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) can result in serious complications. The study is aimed to compare the biopsy yield and complications rate of the real-time ultrasonagram (USG)-guided PRB and needle tracking with and without needle guide in two different study periods. Methods We compared the yield and complications of 2138 kidney biopsies performed in two different periods, 1510 biopsies during the first period from April 2004–December 2010 and 628 biopsies during second period from January 2011–March 2013. All biopsies in both periods were performed by nephrologists. Radiologists provided the real-time image without needle guide during the first period while nephrologists performed both imaging and biopsy with needle guide during the second period. Results Of all the 2138 patients, 226 (10.5%) patients developed 118 minor and 108 major complications. Only 13 (2.1%) major complications occurred in the second period and 95 (6.7%) in the first period (P < 0.001). The relative risk of developing a major complication without guide was 3.04 times greater than that of the biopsies performed with use of the guide. The mean number of glomeruli per biopsy obtained during the second period (17.98 ± 6.75) was significantly greater than that of the first period (14.14 ± 6.01) (P = 0.004). The number of passes to acquire adequate tissue (P = 0.001) and percentage of cortex on biopsy (P = 0.001) were also significantly better in the second period. The optimal observation period post biopsy is 24 h. Conclusions Real-time USG imaging supported by needle guide device is associated with better biopsy yield and fewer complications. PMID:25815170

  13. Observing the Moon's Sodium Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Majd; Smith, Steven; Martinis, Carlos R.; Wilson, Jody; Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Mendillo, Michael

    Observations of the sodium (Na) tail of the Moon were made near times of new Moon between April and November 2006. Filtered images (Na D1+D2) were made from the El Leoncito Observatory in Argentina using the Boston University All-Sky Imager (ASI). Four of the eight new Moon periods had clear skies, and images from those nights were calibrated to absolute brightness levels in Rayleighs (R) using standard stars. Results reveal variability in the brightness of the Moon's sodium tail that may be linked to enhanced contributions from meteor showers.

  14. The non-invasive biopsy--will urinary proteomics make the renal tissue biopsy redundant?

    PubMed

    Bramham, K; Mistry, H D; Poston, L; Chappell, L C; Thompson, A J

    2009-08-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly advancing technique which gives functional insight into gene expression in living organisms. Urine is an ideal medium for study as it is readily available, easily obtained and less complex than other bodily fluids. Considerable progress has been made over the last 5 years in the study of urinary proteomics as a diagnostic tool for renal disease. Advantages over the traditional renal biopsy include accessibility, safety, the possibility of serial sampling and the potential for non-invasive prognostic and diagnostic monitoring of disease and an individual's response to treatment. Urinary proteomics is now moving from a discovery phase in small studies to a validation phase in much larger numbers of patients with renal disease. Whilst there are still some limitations in methodology, which are assessed in this review, the possibility of urinary proteomics replacing the invasive tissue biopsy for diagnosis of renal disease is becoming an increasingly realistic option. PMID:19553250

  15. Solitary Osteochondroma in a Ring-Tailed Lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Hope, Katharine L; Boedeker, Nancy C; Gordon, Sebastian S; Walsh, Timothy F

    2015-08-01

    A 20-y-old, male, ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) presented with a large, firm mass on the proximal caudolateral left femur. The animal displayed no clinical signs associated with the mass. Radiographs revealed a mineralized mass protruding from the femur, with an intact femoral cortex. Histopathology diagnosed osteochondroma in view of the presence of a peripheral layer of cartilage with progressive endochondral ossification and typical remodeling of bony trabeculae. The mass grew quickly after the initial biopsy, and a second surgery to debulk 95% of the tumor was performed. Histopathologic features of the larger samples were similar to those of the initial biopsies, with the cartilage layer being discontinuous and development of bone from some borders progressing directly from a periost-like layer. Nineteen months after the second surgery, the mass had regrown and extended further proximally on the femur toward the epiphysis, but the animal remained asymptomatic, and additional debulking was not attempted. This report is the first description of an osteochondroma in a prosimian and describes unique behavior of the tumor compared with osteochondromas found in humans, dogs, and cats. PMID:26310465

  16. Diffuse reflectance imaging: a tool for guided biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Subhash, Narayanan; Manju, Stephen; Nisha, Unni G.; Beena, Valappil T.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of premalignant or malignant oral lesions depends on the quality of the biopsy, adequate clinical information and correct interpretation of the biopsy results. The major clinical challenge is to precisely locate the biopsy site in a clinically suspicious lesion. Dips due to oxygenated hemoglobin absorption have been noticed at 545 and 575 nm in the diffusely reflected white light spectra of oral mucosa and the intensity ratio R545/R575 has been found suited for early detection of oral pre-cancers. A multi-spectral diffuse reflectance (DR) imaging system has been developed consisting of an electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) camera and a liquid crystal tunable filter for guiding the clinician to an optimal biopsy site. Towards this DR images were recorded from 27 patients with potentially malignant lesions on their tongue (dorsal, lateral and ventral sides) and from 44 healthy controls at 545 and 575 nm with the DR imaging system. False colored ratio image R545/R575 of the lesion provides a visual discerning capability that helps in locating the most malignant site for biopsy. Histopathological report of guided biopsy showed that out of the 27 patients 16 were cancers, 9 pre-cancers and 2 lichen planus. In this clinical trial DR imaging has correctly guided 25 biopsy sites, yielding a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 98%, thereby establishing the potential of DR imaging as a tool for guided biopsy.

  17. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Surgical Devices § 870.4075 Endomyocardial biopsy device. (a) Identification....

  18. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  19. Impact of genotyping on outcome of prostatic biopsies: a multicenter prospective study.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Drouin, Sarah; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine; Bigot, Pierre; Azzouzi, Abdel-Rahmène; Koutlidis, Nicolas; Cormier, Luc; Gaffory, Cécile; Rouprêt, Morgan; Sèbe, Philippe; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Haab, François; Cussenot, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with prostate cancer (PCa) risk and tumor aggressiveness in retrospective studies. To assess the value of genotyping in a clinical setting, we evaluated the correlation between three genotypes (rs1447295 and rs6983267[8q24] and rs4054823[17p12]) and prostatic biopsy outcome prospectively in a French population of Caucasian men. Five hundred ninety-eight patients with prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) >4 ng/mL or abnormal digital rectal examination (DRE) participated in this prospective, multicenter study. Age, familial history of PCa, body mass index (BMI), data of DRE, International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) score, PSA value and prostatic volume were collected prospectively before prostatic biopsy. Correlation between genotypes and biopsy outcome (positive or negative) and Gleason score (?6 or >6) were studied by univariate and multivariable analysis. rs1447295 and rs6983267 risk variants were found to be associated with the presence of PCa in univariate analysis. rs6983267 genotype remained significantly linked to a positive biopsy (odds ratio [OR] = 1.66, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.06-2.59, P = 0.026) in multivariable analysis, but rs1447295 genotype did not (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 0.89-2.43, P = 0.13).When biopsy outcome was stratified according to Gleason score, risk variants of rs1447295 were associated with aggressive disease (Gleason score ?7) in univariate and multivariable analysis (OR = 2.05 95% CI: 1.10-3.79, P = 0.023). rs6983267 GG genotype was not related to aggressiveness. The results did not reach significance concerning rs4054823 for any analysis. This inaugural prospective evaluation thus confirmed potential usefulness of genotyping PCa assessment. Ongoing clinical evaluation of larger panels of SNPs will detail the actual impact of genetic markers on clinical practice. PMID:21308149

  20. Flat epithelial atypia diagnosed on core needle biopsy—Clinical challenge

    PubMed Central

    Polom, Karol; Murawa, Dawid; Murawa, Pawe?

    2012-01-01

    Aim This paper describes our experience of 20 cases identified in the FEA vacuum core biopsy. Background Screening mammography has contributed to the increased recognition of early cancer, premalignant and preinvasive breast lesions. A premalignant lesion called FEA (flat epithelial atypia), although rarely recognized as the only lesion in the core biopsy, is a major challenge in clinical proceedings. Increasing recognition is associated with an increasing use of the vacuum core biopsy as a tool for verifying nonpalpable lesions identified by mammography, and suspected of being breast cancer. Materials and methods Of 4326 mammotome biopsies performed at our institution in 2000–2006, FEA was diagnosed in 20 patients (0.46%). These patients underwent surgery for reexcsion. Data were collected for clinical, radiological and pathological findings to assess factors associated with the underestimation of invasive lesions. Results Among 20 patients with FEA diagnosis, the mean age was 59.6, range 52–71. When compared to the ADH group (mean age 55.45), the FEA patients were found to be statistically significantly older (p = 0.0002). Two patients 2/20 (10%) showed underestimation, with invasive cancer on the final pathology were G1 tubular cancer T1b, and G2 lobular cancer T1a. Conclusion Although FEA is rarely diagnosed as the only lesion in a core biopsy, the ever more common use of this diagnostic technique forces us to establish a clear clinical practice. The problem is the underestimation of invasive lesions in the case of primary diagnosis of FEA. It seems that some percent of these cases can be identified by certain radiological or pathological features, thus helping implement appropriate clinical management. PMID:24377006

  1. Recent advances in image-guided targeted prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anna M; Elbuluk, Osama; Mertan, Francesca; Sankineni, Sandeep; Margolis, Daniel J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in the United States that results in over 30,000 deaths per year. The current state of prostate cancer diagnosis, based on PSA screening and sextant biopsy, has been criticized for both overdiagnosis of low-grade tumors and underdiagnosis of clinically significant prostate cancers (Gleason score ?7). Recently, image guidance has been added to perform targeted biopsies of lesions detected on multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) scans. These methods have improved the ability to detect clinically significant cancer, while reducing the diagnosis of low-grade tumors. Several approaches have been explored to improve the accuracy of image-guided targeted prostate biopsy, including in-bore MRI-guided, cognitive fusion, and MRI/transrectal ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy. This review will examine recent advances in these image-guided targeted prostate biopsy techniques. PMID:25596716

  2. CT-directed robotic biopsy testbed: motivation and concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kevin R.; Stoianovici, Dan S.; Glossop, Neil D.; Gary, Kevin A.; Onda, Sumiyo; Cody, Richard; Lindisch, David; Stanimir, Alexandru; Mazilu, Dumitru; Patriciu, Alexandru; Watson, Vance; Levy, Elliot

    2001-05-01

    As a demonstration platform, we are developing a robotic biopsy testbed incorporating a mobile CT scanner, a small needle driver robot, and an optical localizer. This testbed will be used to compare robotically assisted biopsy to the current manual technique, and allow us to investigate software architectures for integrating multiple medical devices. This is a collaboration between engineers and physicians from three universities and a commercial vendor. In this paper we describe the CT-directed biopsy technique, review some other biopsy systems including passive and semi- autonomous devices, describe our testbed components, and present our software architecture. This testbed is a first step in developing the image-guided, robotically assisted, physician directed, biopsy systems of the future.

  3. Aspiration biopsy of testis: another method for histologic examination

    SciTech Connect

    Nseyo, U.O.; Englander, L.S.; Huben, R.P.; Pontes, J.E.

    1984-08-01

    The most important method for evaluating the pathogenesis of male infertility is open testicular biopsy. Herein the authors describe a method of aspiration biopsy of testis for histologic examination. Sexually mature dogs and rats treated with chemotherapeutic agents and ionizing radiation were followed with periodic testicular aspiration biopsy during and after treatment. The histologic findings from the aspiration biopsy compare with the results of routine histologic examination in assessing spermatogenetic activity and delineating pathologic changes. The puncture in the experimental animals was performed under general anesthesia. In human patients testicular biopsy could be done under local anesthesia in an outpatient clinic. The procedure would be less painful, minimally invasive, and more cost-effective.

  4. Black-Tailed Prairie Dog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Black-tailed prairie dogs are quite susceptible to sylvatic plague, but a new plague vaccine put in their food shows significant promise in the laboratory. The prairie dogs transmit the disease to endangered black-footed ferrets, who eat the prairie dogs and are also quite susceptible to the disease...

  5. Instanton Calculus of Lifshitz Tails

    E-print Network

    Sho Yaida

    2012-04-30

    For noninteracting particles moving in a Gaussian random potential, there exists a disagreement in the literature on the asymptotic expression for the density of states in the tail of the band. We resolve this discrepancy. Further we illuminate the physical facet of instantons appearing in replica and supersymmetric derivations with another derivation employing a Lagrange multiplier field.

  6. Tidal tails around globular clusters

    E-print Network

    M. Montuori; R. Capuzzo-Dolcetta; P. Di Matteo; P. Miocchi

    2007-09-04

    We present the results of detailed N-body simulations of clusters moving in a realistic Milky Way (MW) potential. The strong interaction with the bulge and the disk of the Galaxy leads to the formation of tidal tails, emanating from opposite sides of the cluster. Their orientation and morphology may be interpreted easily in terms of a comoving frame of coordinates.

  7. The role of biopsy in incidental renal tumours?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Marhoon, Mohammed S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Historically, the biopsy of renal masses was not advocated, and to date there remains some controversy on the role of biopsy for renal masses in making treatment decisions. With the widespread use of imaging methods, the incidental diagnosis of renal masses has increased, necessitating renal biopsies to better plan the management of these tumours. Here I review previous reports to define the role of biopsy in incidental renal tumours. Methods Data were obtained from English-language studies listed in PubMed on the use of renal biopsy for evaluating incidental solid small renal tumours. Results The biopsy of small renal tumours is increasingly accepted due to: the increase in the incidence of small renal tumours; the finding that a significant number of these tumours are benign; the availability of new management options, such as ablative therapy and surveillance strategies; that imaging alone is unable to predict the biological behaviour of these tumours; and advances in the pathological evaluation of the biopsies. The biopsy procedure has an acceptable complication rate but is not free of limitations. The current recommendations for the use of renal biopsy in small renal tumours are: to help in differentiating benign from malignant renal tumours; before or during ablative therapies and during the follow-up after ablative therapies, for defining treatment success or failure; and to exclude nonrenal cell primary tumours (metastasis and lymphoma) or benign conditions (abscess), which may not require surgery. Conclusions The biopsy of small renal tumours is a safe and accurate procedure, and can help in the planning of definitive patient management.

  8. Computed tomography-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions: rate of diagnostic success and complications*

    PubMed Central

    Maciel, Macello Jose Sampaio; Tyng, Chiang Jeng; Barbosa, Paula Nicole Vieira Pinto; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Matushita Junior, João Paulo Kawaoka; Zurstrassen, Charles Edouard; Chung, Wu Tu; Chojniak, Rubens

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the rates of diagnostic success and complications of computed tomography (CT)-guided percutaneous biopsy of bone lesions suspected for malignancy. Materials and Methods Retrospective study including 186 cases of CT-guided percutaneous biopsies of bone lesions in the period from January, 2010 to December, 2012. All the specimens were obtained with 8-10 gauge needles. The following data were collected: demographics, previous history of malignancy, data related to the lesion, to the procedure, and to histological results. Results Most patients were women (57%), and the mean age was 53.0 ± 16.4 years. In 139 cases (74.6%), there was diagnostic suspicion of metastasis and the most common primary tumors were breast (32.1%) and prostate (11.8%). The bones most commonly involved were spine (36.0%), hip (32.8%) and long bones (18.3%). Complications occurred in only three cases (1.6%) including bone fracture, paresthesia with functional impairment, and needle breakage requiring surgical removal. The specimens collected from 183 lesions (98.4%) were considered appropriate for diagnosis. Malignant results were more frequently found in patients who had a suspected secondary lesion and history of known malignancy (p < 0.001), and in patients who underwent PET/CT-guided procedures (p = 0.011). Conclusion CT-guided percutaneous biopsy is a safe and effective procedure for the diagnosis of suspicious bone lesions. PMID:25741100

  9. Tail use in bioinspired quadrupedal locomotion

    E-print Network

    Briggs, Randall (Randall Miller)

    2012-01-01

    Tails are seen in nature to be used in an amazing number of different applications. Many of these applications seen in nature may be of use to bioinspired roboticists in the future. I have provided a brief review of tail ...

  10. From metallurgical coal tailings to thermal fuel

    SciTech Connect

    van den Broek, J.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    McIntyre Mines in Canada recover coal from washery tailings slurry. The tailings are dewatered in Bird screen bowl centrifuges and thermally dried in Joy Holo-Flite dryers. The coal recovered is burned in a power station.

  11. Lobster Tail Ice Formation on Aerosurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Glace Ice formation commonly refered to as 'Lobster Tail' by scientists and engineers, is caused to form on the leading edge of a aircraft tail section in the icing research tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  12. Experimental persistent infection with bovine viral diarrhea virus in white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Passler, Thomas; Walz, Paul H; Ditchkoff, Stephen S; Givens, M Daniel; Maxwell, Herris S; Brock, Kenny V

    2007-06-21

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infections cause substantial economic losses to the cattle industries. Persistently infected (PI) cattle are the most important reservoir for BVDV. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are the most abundant species of wild ruminants in the United States and contact between cattle and deer is common. If the outcome of fetal infection of white-tailed deer is similar to cattle, PI white-tailed deer may pose a threat to BVDV control programs. The objective of this study was to determine if experimental infection of pregnant white-tailed deer with BVDV would result in the birth of PI offspring. Nine female and one male white-tailed deer were captured and housed at a captive deer isolation facility. After natural mating had occurred, all does were inoculated intranasally at approximately 50 days of pregnancy with 10(6) CCID(50) each of a BVDV 1 (BJ) and BVDV 2 (PA131) strain. Although no clinical signs of BVDV infection were observed or abortions detected, only one pregnancy advanced to term. On day 167 post-inoculation, one doe delivered a live fawn and a mummified fetus. The fawn was translocated to an isolation facility to be hand-raised. The fawn was determined to be PI with BVDV 2 by serial virus isolation from serum and white blood cells, immunohistochemistry on skin biopsy, and RT-PCR. This is the first report of persistent infection of white-tailed deer with BVDV. Further research is needed to assess the impact of PI white-tailed deer on BVDV control programs in cattle. PMID:17353103

  13. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker and Brain Biopsy Findings in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkö, Okko T.; Lumela, Miikka; Rummukainen, Jaana; Nerg, Ossi; Seppälä, Toni T.; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Koivisto, Anne M.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Puli, Lakshman; Savolainen, Sakari; Soininen, Hilkka; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Hiltunen, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leinonen, Ville

    2014-01-01

    Background The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. Objective To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP) and amyloid beta (A?) isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relation to brain biopsy A? and hyperphosphorylated tau (HP?) findings. Methods The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders), 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD), and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against A? and HP?. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (A?42, p-tau, total tau), non-AD-related A? isoforms (A?38, A?40), sAPP isoforms (sAPP?, sAPP?), proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL), interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein) were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. Results Lumbar CSF levels of sAPP? were lower (p<0.05) in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPP? showed a similar trend (p?=?0.06). CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to A? or HP? in the brain biopsy. Quantified A? load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of A?42 in ventricular (r?=??0.295, p?=?0.003) and lumbar (r?=??0.356, p?=?0.01) samples, while the levels of A?38 and A?40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001) were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure. Conclusions The role of sAPP isoforms in iNPH seems to be independent from the amyloid cascade. No neuroinflammatory background was observed in iNPH or AD. PMID:24638077

  14. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter A. (Pleasanton, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Walnut Creek, CA); Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures, including minimal specimen handling, smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 .mu.m or greater), micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens, low cost, disposable, fabrication process which renders sterile parts, and ease of use. The cutter is a "cheese-grater" style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  15. Microfabricated instrument for tissue biopsy and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Krulevitch, P.A.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A.; Benett, W.J.

    1999-11-16

    This invention relates to a microfabricated biopsy/histology instrument which has several advantages over the conventional procedures. The advantages include: minimal specimen handling; smooth cutting edges with atomic sharpness capable of slicing very thin specimens (approximately 2 {mu}m or greater); micro-liter volumes of chemicals for treating the specimens; low cost; disposable; fabrication process which renders sterile parts; and ease of use. The cutter is a cheese-grater style design comprising a block or substrate of silicon and which uses anisotropic etching of the silicon to form extremely sharp and precise cutting edges. As a specimen is cut, it passes through the silicon cutter and lies flat on a piece of glass which is bonded to the cutter. Microchannels are etched into the glass or silicon substrates for delivering small volumes of chemicals for treating the specimen. After treatment, the specimens can be examined through the glass substrate. For automation purposes, microvalves and micropumps may be incorporated. Also, specimens in parallel may be cut and treated with identical or varied chemicals. The instrument is disposable due to its low cost and thus could replace current expensive microtome and histology equipment.

  16. Sentinel node biopsy in early vulvar cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cicco, C De; Sideri, M; Bartolomei, M; Grana, C; Cremonesi, M; Fiorenza, M; Maggioni, A; Bocciolone, L; Mangioni, C; Colombo, N; Paganelli, G

    2000-01-01

    Lymph node pathologic status is the most important prognostic factor in vulvar cancer; however, complete inguinofemoral node dissection is associated with significant morbidity. Lymphoscintigraphy associated with gamma-probe guided surgery reliably detects sentinel nodes in melanoma and breast cancer patients. This study evaluates the feasibility of the surgical identification of sentinel groin nodes using lymphoscintigraphy and a gamma-detecting probe in patients with early vulvar cancer. Technetium-99m-labelled colloid human albumin was administered perilesionally in 37 patients with invasive epidermoid vulvar cancer (T1–T2) and lymphoscintigraphy performed the day before surgery. An intraoperative gamma-detecting probe was used to identify sentinel nodes during surgery. A complete inguinofemoral node dissection was then performed. Sentinel nodes were submitted separately to pathologic evaluation. A total of 55 groins were dissected in 37 patients. Localization of the SN was successful in all cases. Eight cases had positive nodes: in all the sentinel node as positive; the sentinel node was the only positive node in five cases. Twenty-nine patients showed negative sentinel nodes: all of them were negative for lymph node metastases. Lymphoscintigraphy and sentinel-node biopsy under gamma-detecting probe guidance proved to be an easy and reliable method for the detection of sentinel node in early vulvar cancer. This technique may represent a true advance in the direction of less aggressive treatments in patients with vulvar cancer. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646880

  17. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-print Network

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach/Communications #12;3 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Operating Uranium Mill Tailings (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61

  18. Heavy Tails in Insurance Sren Asmussen

    E-print Network

    eqf21/008 Heavy Tails in Insurance Søren Asmussen Vicky Fasen and Claudia Klüppelberg Abstract. Keywords: compound Poisson process, Cramér-Lundberg model, integrated tail distribution, Pollaczek of heavy­tailed distribution functions, subexponential distribu- tion functions are a special class which

  19. Selective Tail Call Elimination Yasuhiko Minamide

    E-print Network

    Minamide, Yasuhiko

    Selective Tail Call Elimination Yasuhiko Minamide Institute of Information Sciences and Electronics University of Tsukuba and PRESTO, JST minamide@is.tsukuba.ac.jp Abstract. Tail calls are expected not to consume stack space in most functional languages. However, there is no support for tail calls in some

  20. Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines

    E-print Network

    Núñez-Queija, Rudesindo

    Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Sindo N´u~nez-Queija based on joint ITC´u~nez-Queija CWI & TU/e #12;Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Part I ­ Introduction and Methodology Tales to tell: · traffic measurements and statistical analysis · traffic modeling · heavy-tailed

  1. Tales of the Tail: Hardware, OS, and Application-level Sources of Tail Latency

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Richard

    Tales of the Tail: Hardware, OS, and Application-level Sources of Tail Latency Jialin Li, Naveen Kr-scale parallel implemen- tations. To deliver fast responses, the median and tail laten- cies of a service tail latency in high throughput servers executing on multi-core machines. We model these network

  2. High-Resolution Rapid Diagnostic Imaging of Whole Prostate Biopsies Using Video-Rate Fluorescence Structured Illumination Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Kimbrell, Hillary Z; Sholl, Andrew B; Tulman, David B; Elfer, Katherine N; Schlichenmeyer, Tyler C; Lee, Benjamin R; Lacey, Michelle; Brown, J Quincy

    2015-10-01

    Rapid assessment of prostate core biopsy pathology at the point-of-procedure could provide benefit in a variety of clinical situations. Even with advanced transrectal ultrasound guidance and saturation biopsy protocols, prostate cancer can be missed in up to half of all initial biopsy procedures. In addition, collection of tumor specimens for downstream histologic, molecular, and genetic analysis is hindered by low tumor yield due to inability to identify prostate cancer grossly. However, current point-of-procedure pathology protocols, such as frozen section analysis (FSA), are destructive and too time- and labor-intensive to be practical or economical. Ex vivo microscopy of the excised specimens, stained with fast-acting fluorescent histology dyes, could be an attractive nondestructive alternative to FSA. In this work, we report the first demonstration of video-rate structured illumination microscopy (VR-SIM) for rapid high-resolution diagnostic imaging of prostate biopsies in realistic point-of-procedure timeframes. Large mosaic images of prostate biopsies stained with acridine orange are rendered in seconds and contain excellent contrast and detail, exhibiting close correlation with corresponding hematoxylin and eosin histology. A clinically relevant review of VR-SIM images of 34 unfixed and uncut prostate core biopsies by two independent pathologists resulted in an area under the receiver operative curve (AUC) of 0.82-0.88, with a sensitivity ranging from 63% to 88% and a specificity ranging from 78% to 89%. When biopsies contained more than 5% tumor content, the sensitivity improved to 75% to 92%. The image quality, speed, minimal complexity, and ease of use of VR-SIM could prove to be features in favor of adoption as an alternative to destructive pathology at the point-of-procedure. Cancer Res; 75(19); 4032-41. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26282168

  3. Neuropathological alterations in diabetic truncal neuropathy: evaluation by skin biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lauria, G.; McArthur, J.; Hauer, P.; Griffin, J.; Cornblath, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To describe the neuropathological features in skin biopsies from patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy.?METHODS—Three patients with diabetic truncal neuropathy underwent skin biopsies from both symptomatic and asymptomatic regions of the chest and trunk. After local anaesthesia, biopsies were performed using a 3 mm diameter punch device (Acupunch). Intraepidermal nerve fibres (IENFs), the most distal processes of small myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibres, were identified after staining with PGP 9.5 as previously described.?RESULTS—Diabetes was diagnosed at the time of the neurological presentation in two, and one was a known diabetic patient. All three had associated sensory-motor polyneuropathy. In all, skin biopsies showed a marked reduction of both epidermal and dermal nerve fibres in the symptomatic dermatomes, compared with skin from asymptomatic truncal areas. In one patient, a follow up skin biopsy when symptoms had improved showed a return of IENFs.?CONCLUSIONS—In diabetic truncal neuropathy, skin biopsies from symptomatic regions show a loss of IENFs. After clinical recovery, there is a return of the IENF population, suggesting that improvement occurs by nerve regeneration. These findings suggest that sensory nerve fibre injury in diabetic truncal neuropathy is distal to or within the sensory ganglia. Skin biopsy provides a possible tool for understanding the pathophysiology of the disease.?? PMID:9810952

  4. Brain biopsy in AIDS. Diagnostic value and consequence.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, C J; Gjerris, F; Pedersen, H; Jensen, F K; Wagn, P

    1994-01-01

    Nineteen male patients with AIDS were investigated by biopsy of brain lesions. Six patients had progressive multiple leucoencephalopathy and no specific treatment was given. Toxoplasmosis (two patients), bacterial abscesses (two cases), viral encephalitis (two patients) and only gliosis (two cases) accounted for almost half of the cases. A fungal infection, a lymphoma and a sarcoma-like tumour were found in three patients. In two patients the biopsy was not diagnostic: one had only necrosis and one had normal findings. The biopsy findings gave reason for modifying the treatment in only three cases. The mean survival rate was relatively short, only 76 days with a range from 1 to 1041 days. Two patients were in a very bad clinical condition at the time of biopsy and one died of a haemorrhagic complication due to the biopsy. In ten cases an autopsy was carried out. In five cases there was agreement between the biopsy and autopsy findings. In the other five cases the autopsy findings differed widely. In our experience we can recommend cerebral biopsy in patients with AIDS only after treatment for toxoplasmosis and mainly to estimate the prognosis. PMID:7942191

  5. Does Prebiopsy, Nonsterile Ultrasonography Gel Affect Biopsy-Site Asepsis?

    SciTech Connect

    Gurel, Kamil Karabay, Oguz; Gurel, Safiye; Hildebolt, Charles

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the use of nonsterile gel, prior to antiseptic procedures in ultrasonography (US)-guided percutaneous biopsies, results in contamination of the biopsy site. Materials and Methods. Patients referred for US-guided percutaneous biopsies were included in this study. Transmission material used for US evaluation before biopsy-site antiseptic procedures were performed was either nonsterile gel or sterile saline. Patients were randomly assigned to two groups: nonsterile gel (n = 30) and sterile saline (n = 30). Before the transmission material was used and after antiseptic procedures were performed, microbial swabs of a 10-cm{sup 2}-diameter area were obtained at the biopsy site. Swabs were also obtained from the gel, saline, and povidine-iodine. Inoculated specimen plates were incubated at 37{sup o}C under aerobic conditions, and the numbers of colony-forming units recorded. Nominal logistic regression analysis was used to calculate the odds of postantisepsis bacterial growth (after antiseptic procedures were performed) based on group, gender, coincidental disease (diabetes, chronic renal failure, and malignancy), biopsy-site location (head and neck or breast and abdomen), and local factors (skin fold, skin tag, and hair). Results. The following odds ratios (adjusted for the other variables) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated: (1) group (2.9 [0.8-11.1]; p = 0.10); (2) gender (1.2 [0.3-5.2]; p = 0.78); (3) coincidental disease (7.6 [0.9-166.7]; p = 0.09); (4) biopsy site location (6.2 [1.4-31.3]; p = 0.02); and (5) local factors (7.0 [1.6-36.0]; p = 0.01). No bacterial growth occurred with swabs obtained from gel, povidine-iodine, or saline. Conclusion. We conclude that nonsterile gel used prior to percutaneous biopsy does not affect biopsy-site asepsis.

  6. Genetic Divesity of Cultivated and Wild Type Peanuts Evaluated with M13-Tailed SSR Markers and Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty-one peanut genomic SSR markers with a M13-tail attached were used to assess the genetic diversity in the peanut mini core collection, which is maintained by the USDA, ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit (USDA, ARS, PGRCU). The M13-tailed method was effective in discriminating indi...

  7. Augmented Reality Guidance for Needle Biopsies: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Phantoms

    E-print Network

    State, Andrei

    Augmented Reality Guidance for Needle Biopsies: A Randomized, Controlled Trial in Phantoms Michael-guided needle biopsy to biopsies performed using a 3D Augmented Reality (AR) guidance system. Fifty core for augmented reality, p

  8. Fulminant sepsis after liver biopsy: A long forgotten complication?

    PubMed

    Claudi, Corinna; Henschel, Martin; Vogel, Jürgen; Schepke, Michael; Biecker, Erwin

    2013-04-16

    We report on a 74-year-old patient with recurrent cholangitis and a large juxtapapillary duodenal diverticulum. Despite drainage of the common bile duct by an endoscopically placed stent, the elevated liver enzymes normalized only partially. To rule out other possible causes of liver injury, a percutaneous liver biopsy was done. After the liver biopsy the patient developed fulminant septic shock and died within 24 h. We discuss the possible causes of the septic shock following percutaneous liver biopsy in our patient and give a concise overview of the literature. PMID:24303461

  9. [Bone biopsies of cortical bone segments (technique, evaluation)].

    PubMed

    Pfister, A; Ochsner, P E; Jundt, G

    1993-12-01

    13 drill biopsies were microscopically examined and evaluated in respect of their histologic quality. 8 biopsies were obtained with a diamond hollow cutter, the other 5 specimens were sampled with a modified milling cutter according to Burkhardt. Regarding proper evaluation of bone biopsies e.g. in cases of osteomyelitis, factors as presence of bone marrow cavity or drill powder play an important role. Considering these factors the modified milling cutter according to Burkhardt yields, precise and careful handling provided, better results than the diamond hollow cutter. PMID:8147260

  10. MRI-Targeted Biopsies versus Systematic Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Biopsies for the Diagnosis of Localized Prostate Cancer in Biopsy Naïve Men

    PubMed Central

    Peltier, Alexandre; Aoun, Fouad; Lemort, Marc; Kwizera, Félix; Paesmans, Marianne; Van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. To compare, in the same cohort of men, the detection of clinically significant disease in standard (STD) cores versus multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) targeted (TAR) cores. Material and Methods. A prospective study was conducted on 129 biopsy naïve men with clinical suspicion of prostate cancer. These patients underwent prebiopsy mpMRI with STD systematic biopsies and TAR biopsies when lesions were found. The agreement between the TAR and the STD protocols was measured using Cohen's kappa coefficient. Results. Cancer detection rate of MRI-targeted biopsy was 62.7%. TAR protocol demonstrated higher detection rate of clinically significant disease compared to STD protocol. The proportion of cores positive for clinically significant cancer in TAR cores was 28.9% versus 9.8% for STD cores (P < 0.001). The proportion of men with clinically significant cancer and the proportion of men with Gleason score 7 were higher with the TAR protocol than with the STD protocol (P = 0.003; P = 0.0008, resp.). Conclusion. mpMRI improved clinically significant prostate cancer detection rate compared to STD protocol alone with less tissue sampling and higher Gleason score. Further development in imaging as well as multicentre studies using the START recommendation is needed to elucidate the role of mpMRI targeted biopsy in the management of prostate cancer. PMID:25692142

  11. Heavy metal contamination in tailings and rocksamples from an abandoned goldminein Southwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Gbadebo, A M; Ekwue, Y A

    2014-01-01

    Active and abandoned primary and secondary goldmines have been observed to be major sources of metals into the environment. This study assessed the level of metal concentrations in rock and tailing samples collected from the abandoned primary goldmine site at Iperindo. A total of five rock and ten tailing samples were collected for this study. The tailing samples were subjected to physicochemical analysis using standard methods. The samples were analyzed for metals using inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry technique. The results obtained indicated that tailings were acidic (pH 5.02), with electrical conductivity 133.4 ?S/cm, cation exchange capacity 8.95 meq/100 g, available phosphorus was 4.74 mg/L, organic carbon 5.58 %, and organic matter 9.63 %. The trends for metal concentrations within the samples were in the order: Zn?>?Cu?>?Co?>?Pb?>?Cr?>?As?>?Cd for rock samples, Cu?>?Zn?>?Cr?>?Pb?>?As?>?Co?>?Cd in tailing samples. Cd, Pb, and Zn in the rock were above the Abundance of Elements in Average Crustal Rocks standards. Principal component analysis showed higher variations among samples in Iperindo. Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Cu, As, and Zn were strongly loaded to principal component 1, with these metals significantly contributing to variations in 65.76 % of rock and 53.24 % of tailing. This study suggests that the metal concentration in tailings is a reflection of the metal composition of the rocks. PMID:23949700

  12. What Makes a Tidal Tail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Konstantopoulos, I.; Charlton, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are famous for creating some of the most visually stunning scenes in astronomy, particularly in the cases of tidal tails. These chaotic regions are known to house breeding grounds for young stellar clusters, as shown through past imaging and spectroscopic studies, but the underlying material remains a mystery. While we know that gas is easily stripped from the parent galaxies, what about the stars? The presence of an older stellar population is crucial to dynamical simulations of tidal tails, but has not yet been confirmed by observation. We use the twin tidal tails of NGC3256 as a case study for determining the presence of an old, underlying stellar population. Newly acquired ugriz Gemini data allows us to distinguish between young and old stars, while previous HST data pinpoints the locations of these objects. Deep imaging surveys have often been used to detect tidal features, including these ancient relics, but our survey will be the first to measure the colors of such objects. This will lead us to place constraints on the original composition of the material that was ejected from the interacting/merging galaxies, and the star formation history.

  13. Arsenic mobility in soils impacted by tailings at Zimapán, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora Armienta, M.; Resendiz, Isabel; Múgica, Violeta; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Ceniceros, Nora

    2014-05-01

    The Zimapán mining zone, in Central México is one of the worldwide sites known for As contamination. For more than 20 years and until recently, As-rich groundwater, mainly due to mineralization in a limestone aquifer, was an important source of As exposure to the inhabitants. In addition, decades of ore processing have produced hazardous wastes (tailings), many of them settled in the town outskirts. Although mineralogical and chemical differences exist among the various deposits; every one has high As contents (up to several thousands mg/kg) and other toxic elements that may be released to the nearby soils. To assess As mobility in soils impacted by tailings, total and sequential fractionation determinations were performed in 120 superficial and 40 cm depth samples collected at various distances near three of the impoundments. Higher total As concentrations were measured in the dry (up to 51,534 mg/kg) with respect to the rainy season (up to 23,570 mg/kg) indicating the occurrence of As wash off by rain. Although concentrations were lower in the deep regarding the superficial samples at most sites, As contents reached several thousands mg/kg at 40 cm depth indicating also its vertical transport that may reach the shallow aquifer. Sequential extractions showed differences between soils impacted by highly oxidized (red) tailings and low oxidized (gray) deposits. Most of the As occurs in the Fe-Mn oxides fraction (up to 92%) followed by the organic matter and sulfides fraction (up to 52 %) in soils close to red tailings, while organic matter and sulfide fraction contain most of the As (up to 95%) in soil samples close to low-oxidized deposits. Arsenic proportion in the residual fraction increased with distance from oxidized tailings. Low pH values (from 2.0 to 2.5) in superficial soils revealed the influence of acid mine drainage at distances up to 40 m from the red deposit. In contrast, the lowest pH was 7.1 in soils impacted by low-oxidized deposits, reflecting the limestone environment. Arsenic airborne transport was evidenced by the presence of a total As concentration of 30,780 mg/kg in soils collected at 120 m in front of the tailings crossing a ravine. Although sequential extraction showed that most of the As is present in relatively low-mobility fractions, total As concentrations indicate that tailings impoundments constitute another source of environmental As exposure.

  14. A tissue stabilization device for MRI-guided breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Patriciu, Alexandru; Chen, Maggie; Iranpanah, Behzad; Sirouspour, Shahin

    2014-09-01

    We present a breast tissue stabilization device that can be used in magnetic resonance imaging-guided biopsy. The device employs adjustable support plates with an optimized geometry to minimize the biopsy target displacement using smaller compression than the conventional parallel plates approach. It is expected that the reduced compression will cause less patient discomfort and improve image quality by enhancing the contrast intake. Precomputed optimal positions of the stabilization plates for a given biopsy target location are provided in a look-up table. The results of several experiments with a prototype of the device carried out on chicken breast tissue demonstrate the effectiveness of the new design when compared with conventional stabilization methods. The proposed stabilization mechanism provides excellent flexibility in selecting the needle insertion point and can be used in manual as well as robot-assisted biopsy procedures. PMID:25023957

  15. Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson's

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson’s - Mar 20 2014 A simple outpatient procedure that involves ... gifts are tax deductible. Donate Now Source Date: Mar 20 2014 About PDF About PDF PDF People ...

  16. Design of an endoscopic biopsy needle with flexural members

    E-print Network

    Figueredo, Stacy L. (Stacy Lee), 1981-

    2006-01-01

    As a minimally invasive means of extracting a tissue sample from a patient, current endoscopic biopsy needles generally do not preserve tissue histology and often require multiple attempts to obtain a tissue sample. This ...

  17. Vertical tail buffeting of fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2000-04-01

    Vertical tail buffeting at high angles of attack is a phenomenon associated with the impact of vortical flows generated by the aircraft on the fins. This poses a serious problem for both single- and twin-tail fighter aircraft from the point of view of combat maneuverability and structural integrity. The research activities to understand the flow physics with an aim to alleviate buffet loads were quite intense during the period from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Most of the investigations were carried out on the F/A-18 mainly because of two international programs involving countries that operate the F/A-18 in their air force. This review begins with a description of the water tunnel experiments showing some flow visualization results of the leading-edge extension (LEX) burst vortical flows. Wind tunnel studies on a 1/9 scale F/A-18 model in Australia, a 1/6.65 scale model in the United Kingdom, a 6% scale model in Canada, 12%, 16% and full-scale models in the United States are summarized. Scale effects can be deduced from the various sub- and full-scale models tested. Flight test results conducted on the High Alpha Research Vehicle in the United States and on an instrumented CF-18 test aircraft in Canada are presented. The accuracy of analytical methods utilizing wind tunnel data to predict buffet loads at flight conditions is discussed. The use of CFD to compute vertical fin buffeting is challenging and requires a large amount of computing power. A brief exposure to the methodology is given and results from the only available computational case study carried out by NASA Ames are compared with wind tunnel and flight test data. A short introduction to statistical non-stationary effects is given. Hysteresis effect of the LEX vortex burst on the buffet loads is discussed, and a statistical non-stationary buffet prediction method is outlined. This review provides a useful reference to the results collected from the High Alpha Technology Program, The Technical Cooperation Program and the International Follow-On Structural Test Project which together form an extremely valuable data base for vertical tail buffeting studies.

  18. Fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/Computed Tomography-Guided Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Cerci, Juliano J; Tabacchi, Elena; Bogoni, Mateos

    2016-01-01

    PET/computed tomography (CT) combines the anatomic information from CT with PET metabolic characterization. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET is helpful to differentiate malignant lesions from benign ones, that usually show lower or no uptake. However, active inflammation or infectious disease might also present FDG uptake. Studies confirm the great value of PET/CT as the imaging method of choice for guiding biopsy procedures. Novel PET radiopharmaceuticals are also being investigated for guiding biopsies. PMID:26590444

  19. Low coherence interferometry approach for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ernest W.; Gardecki, Joseph; Pitman, Martha; Wilsterman, Eric J.; Patel, Ankit; Tearney, Guillermo J.; Iftimia, Nicusor

    2014-11-01

    We present portable preclinical low-coherence interference (LCI) instrumentation for aiding fine needle aspiration biopsies featuring the second-generation LCI-based biopsy probe and an improved scoring algorithm for tissue differentiation. Our instrument and algorithm were tested on 38 mice with cultured tumor mass and we show the specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value of tumor detection of over 0.89, 0.88, and 0.96, respectively.

  20. The future perspectives in transrectal prostate ultrasound guided biopsy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung Ii; Lee, Hak Jong

    2014-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common neoplasms in men. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systematic biopsy has a crucial role in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. However, it shows limited value with gray-scale ultrasound alone because only a small number of malignancies are visible on TRUS. Recently, new emerging technologies in TRUS-guided prostate biopsy were introduced and showed high potential in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. High echogenicity of ultrasound contrast agent reflect the increased status of angiogenesis in tumor. Molecular imaging for targeting specific biomarker can be also used using ultrasound contrast agent for detecting angiogenesis or surface biomarker of prostate cancer. The combination of TRUS-guided prostate biopsy and ultrasound contrast agents can increase the accuracy of prostate cancer diagnosis. Elastography is an emerging ultrasound technique that can provide the information regarding tissue elasticity and stiffness. Tumors are usually stiffer than the surrounding soft tissue. In two types of elastography techniques, shearwave elastography has many potential in that it can provide quantitative information on tissue elasticity. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from high resolution morphologic and functional magnetic resonance (MR) technique enables to detect more prostate cancers. The combination of functional techniques including apparent diffusion coefficient map from diffusion weighted imaging, dynamic contrast enhanced MR and MR spectroscopy are helpful in the localization of the prostate cancer. MR-ultrasound (US) fusion image can enhance the advantages of both two modalities. With MR-US fusion image, targeted biopsy of suspicious areas on MRI is possible and fusion image guided biopsy can provide improved detection rate. In conclusion, with recent advances in multiparametric-MRI, and introduction of new US techniques such as contrast-enhanced US and elastography, TRUS-guided biopsy may evolve toward targeted biopsies rather than systematic biopsy for getting information reflecting the exact status of the prostate. PMID:25599070

  1. Reducing breast biopsies by ultrasonographic analysis and a modified self-organizing map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Greenleaf, James F.; Gisvold, John J.

    1997-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that visual evaluation of ultrasound images could decrease negative biopsies of breast cancer diagnosis. However, visual evaluation requires highly experienced breast sonographers. The objective of this study is to develop computerized radiologist assistant to reduce breast biopsies needed for evaluating suspected breast cancer. The approach of this study utilizes a neural network and tissue features extracted from digital sonographic breast images. The features include texture parameters of breast images: characteristics of echoes within and around breast lesions, and geometrical information of breast tumors. Clusters containing only benign lesions in the feature space are then identified by a modified self- organizing map. This newly developed neural network objectively segments population distributions of lesions and accurately establishes benign and equivocal regions.t eh method was applied to high quality breast sonograms of a large number of patients collected with a controlled procedure at Mayo Clinic. The study showed that the number of biopsies in this group of women could be decreased by 40 percent to 59 percent with high confidence and that no malignancies would have been included in the nonbiopsied group. The advantages of this approach are that it is robust, simple, and effective and does not require highly experienced sonographers.

  2. Short-term clinical outcome of laparoscopic liver biopsy in dogs: 106 cases (2003-2013).

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Heidi L; Mayhew, Philipp D; Giuffrida, Michelle A; Brown, Dottie C; Culp, William T N; Runge, Jeffrey J

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the operative technique, complications, and conversion rates for laparoscopic liver biopsy (LLB) in dogs and evaluate short-term clinical outcome for dogs that underwent the procedure. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 106 client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed to identify dogs that underwent an LLB with a single-port or multiport technique at either of 2 veterinary teaching hospitals from August 2003 to September 2013. Demographic and laboratory data, preoperative administration of fresh frozen plasma, procedural and diagnostic information, intraoperative complications, and survival to discharge were recorded. The LLB specimens were obtained with 5-mm laparoscopic biopsy cup forceps and a grasp-and-twist technique. RESULTS Prior to surgery, 25 of 94 (27%) dogs had coagulopathy (prothrombin time or partial thromboplastin time greater than the facility reference ranges, regardless of platelet count). Twenty-one dogs were thrombocytopenic, 14 had ascites, and 14 received fresh frozen plasma transfusion before surgery. In all cases, biopsy samples collected were of sufficient size and quality for histopathologic evaluation. Two dogs required conversion to an open laparotomy because of splenic laceration during initial port placement. One hundred one of 106 dogs survived to discharge; 5 were euthanized during hospitalization owing to progression of liver disease and poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Single-port and multiport LLB were found to be effective, minimally invasive diagnostic techniques with a low rate of complications. Results suggested LLB can be safely used in dogs with underlying coagulopathies and advanced liver disease. PMID:26684095

  3. Value of brain biopsy in neurodegenerative disease in childhood.

    PubMed Central

    Boltshauser, E; Wilson, J

    1976-01-01

    During the period 1968-1974, 45 children with suspected neurodegenerative syndromes underwent brain biopsy of the right frontal lobe. The histological examination was normal in 44% and nonspecifically abnormal in 43% of the specimens. In 13% a specific histological abnormality was found, namely 3 with spongy degeneration, 1 Alexander's leucodystrophy, 1 metachromatic leucodystrophy, and 1 pachygyria. Chemical analysis by thin-layer chromatography had little to offer in this series, being specifically abnormal only in the case of metachromatic leucodystrophy and nonspecifically abnormal in 6 cases. Postoperative generalized convulsions occurred in 3 children and a mild hemiparesis contralateral to the site of biopsy was noted in one patient. Comparing the outcome of the group having histologically normal biopsies with the group having nonspecifically abnormal ones it is concluded that frontal biopsy is not of such high prognostic value as has been claimed in previous reports. Some flexibility in the choice of the biopsy site is suggested. The specimens should be examined by chemical analysis as well as electron microscope in addition to the routine histological and histochemical methods. The neurodegenerative disorders of childhood which are at present identifiable in life only by brain biopsy are listed. PMID:1275537

  4. Enhancing the safety of tailings management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Meggyes, T.; Niederleithinger, E.; Witt, K.J.; Csovari, M.; Kreft-Burman, K.; Engels, J.; McDonald, C.; Roehl, K.E.

    2008-07-01

    Unsafe tailings management facilities (TMFs) have caused serious accidents in Europe threatening human health/life and the environment. While advanced design, construction and management procedures are available, their implementation requires greater emphasis. An integrated research project funded by the European Union was carried out between 2002 and 2005 with the overall goal of improving the safety of TMFs (Sustainable Improvement in Safety of Tailings Facilities - TAILSAFE, http://www.tailsafe.com/). The objective of TAILSAFE was to develop and apply methods of parameter evaluation and measurement for the assessment and improvement of the safety state of tailings facilities, with particular attention to the stability of tailings dams and slurries, the special risks inherent when such materials include toxic or hazardous wastes, and authorization and management procedures for tailings facilities. Aspects of tailings facilities design, water management and slurry transport, non-destructive and minimally intrusive testing methods, monitoring and the application of sensors, intervention and remediation options were considered in TAILSAFE. A risk reduction framework (the TAILSAFE Parameter Framework) was established to contribute to the avoidance of catastrophic accidents and hazards from tailings facilities. Tailings from the mining and primary processing of metals, minerals and coal were included within the scope of TAILSAFE. The project focused on the avoidance of hazards by developing procedures and methods for investigating and improving the stability of tailings dams and tailings bodies.

  5. Transrectal-ultrasound prostatic biopsy preparation: rectal enema vs. mechanical bowel preparation

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Riccardo; Presicce, Fabrizio; Bellangino, Mariangela; Agro, Enrico Finazzi; Gambrosier, Matteo Bonetto; Trucchi, Alberto; Petta, Stefano; Tubaro, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Transrectal prostate biopsy (TRUSbx) is the standard for the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Different bowel preparations are used for patients undergoing TRUSbx. The aim of our study was to compare two different bowel preparations for TRUSbx. Material and methods From May 2012 and onwards, a selected group of men undergoing TRUS 12-core prostate biopsy were enrolled into a prospective database. Patients were randomized 1:1 to receive a rectal enema (Group A) the night before the procedure or polyethylene glycol 34.8 grams/4 liters of water the day before the procedure (Group B). A VAS scale to evaluate the patients’ discomfort according to the two preparations was collected. The same antibiotic prophylaxis was performed in both groups. All complications were prospectively recorded and graded according to the Clavien Classification System (CCS). Results A total of 198 patients were consecutively enrolled. Mean age was 67.5 ±7.9 years, mean body mass index (BMI) was 27.1 ±4.2 Kg/m2, mean PSA value was 9.3 ±12.6 ng/ml and the mean prostatic volume was 60.6 ±29 ml. 97 patients were enrolled in Group A and 101 in Group B. Overall post-biopsy morbidity rate was 60%. No significant differences for low-grade and high-grade complications was observed between the two groups. Patients receiving the rectal enema presented with a significantly lower VAS score (3.1 ±1.1 vs. 5.9 ±1.7; p = 0.02). Conclusions Our study confirmed that a rectal enema should be considered as the standard bowel preparation in patients undergoing a TRUS biopsy; it is as effective as PEG and associated with less discomfort. PMID:26251750

  6. CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy with novel steerable biopsy canula: ex-vivo evaluation in ventilated porcine lung explants.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Philipp J; Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K W; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-01

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 +/- 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 +/- 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 +/- 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 +/- 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 +/- 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion. PMID:19967366

  7. CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Lung Biopsy with Novel Steerable Biopsy Canula: Ex-Vivo Evaluation in Ventilated Porcine Lung Explants

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Philipp J. Fabel, Michael; Bolte, Hendrik; Schaefer, Fritz K. W.; Jahnke, Thomas; Heller, Martin; Lammer, Johannes; Biederer, Juergen

    2010-08-15

    The purpose was to evaluate ex-vivo a prototype of a novel biopsy canula under CT fluoroscopy-guidance in ventilated porcine lung explants in respiratory motion simulations. Using an established chest phantom for porcine lung explants, n = 24 artificial lesions consisting of a fat-wax-Lipiodol mixture (approx. 70HU) were placed adjacent to sensible structures such as aorta, pericardium, diaphragm, bronchus and pulmonary artery. A piston pump connected to a reservoir beneath a flexible silicone reconstruction of a diaphragm simulated respiratory motion by rhythmic inflation and deflation of 1.5 L water. As biopsy device an 18-gauge prototype biopsy canula with a lancet-like, helically bended cutting edge was used. The artificial lesions were punctured under CT fluoroscopy-guidance (SOMATOM Sensation 64, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; 30mAs/120 kV/5 mm slice thickness) implementing a dedicated protocol for CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy. The mean-diameter of the artificial lesions was 8.3 {+-} 2.6 mm, and the mean-distance of the phantom wall to the lesions was 54.1 {+-} 13.5 mm. The mean-displacement of the lesions by respiratory motion was 14.1 {+-} 4.0 mm. The mean-duration of CT fluoroscopy was 9.6 {+-} 5.1 s. On a 4-point scale (1 = central; 2 = peripheral; 3 = marginal; 4 = off target), the mean-targeted precision was 1.9 {+-} 0.9. No misplacement of the biopsy canula affecting adjacent structures could be detected. The novel steerable biopsy canula proved to be efficient in the ex-vivo set-up. The chest phantom enabling respiratory motion and the steerable biopsy canula offer a feasible ex-vivo system for evaluating and training CT fluoroscopy-guided lung biopsy adapted to respiratory motion.

  8. Optimizing prostate needle biopsy through 3D simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jianchao; Kaplan, Charles; Xuan, Jian Hua; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Lynch, John H.; Freedman, Matthew T.; Mun, Seong K.

    1998-06-01

    Prostate needle biopsy is used for the detection of prostate cancer. The protocol of needle biopsy that is currently routinely used in the clinical environment is the systematic sextant technique, which defines six symmetric locations on the prostate surface for needle insertion. However, this protocol has been developed based on the long-term observation and experience of urologists. Little quantitative or scientific evidence supports the use of this biopsy technique. In this research, we aim at developing a statistically optimized new prostate needle biopsy protocol to improve the quality of diagnosis of prostate cancer. This new protocol will be developed by using a three-dimensional (3-D) computer- based probability map of prostate cancer. For this purpose, we have developed a computer-based 3-D visualization and simulation system with prostate models constructed from the digitized prostate specimens, in which the process of prostate needle biopsy can be simulated automatically by the computer. In this paper, we first develop an interactive biopsy simulation mode in the system, and evaluate the performance of the automatic biopsy simulation with the sextant biopsy protocol by comparing the results by the urologist using the interactive simulation mode with respect to 53 prostate models. This is required to confirm that the automatic simulation is accurate and reliable enough for the simulation with respect to a large number of prostate models. Then we compare the performance of the existing protocols using the automatic biopsy simulation system with respect to 107 prostate models, which will statistically identify if one protocol is better than another. Since the estimation of tumor volume is extremely important in determining the significance of a tumor and in deciding appropriate treatment methods, we further investigate correlation between the tumor volume and the positive core volume with 89 prostate models. This is done in order to develop a method to estimate the tumor volume from the corresponding positive core volumes. Finally, we propose an algorithm for developing a statistically optimized prostate needle biopsy protocol. Preliminary experimental results are also presented.

  9. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy: A Libyan experience

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, A.; Tarsin, R.; ElHabbash, B.; Zagan, N.; Markus, R.; Drebeka, S.; AbdElmola, K.; Shawish, T.; Shebani, A.; AbdElmola, T.; ElUsta, A.; Ehtuish, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    This study was done to assess the safety and efficacy of ultrasound-guided percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB), to ascertain the risk factors for complications and determine the optimal period of observation. The radiologist (A.M.) at the National Organ Transplant Centre, Central Hospital, Tripoli, Libya, performed 86 PRBs between February 1, 2006, and January 31, 2008, using an automated biopsy gun with 16-gauge needle. Coagulation profile was done in all the patients. All patients were kept on strict bed rest for six hours post-procedure. Eighty six renal biopsies were performed on 78 patients referred from rheumatology department and eight post-kidney transplant recipients; 23 were males with age range 15 – 56 years and 63 females with age range 16 – 66 years. A mean of 17.5 glomeruli were present in each specimen. A glomerular yield of less than five glomeruli was seen in four biopsies. Class I lupus nephritis (LN) was seen in 1 patient, class II lupus nephritis in 7 patients, class III LN in 13 patients and class IV LN in 29 patients. All the eight renal allografts were diagnosed as acute tubular necrosis or acute interstitial rejection. The risk of post-biopsy bleeding was higher in women, older patients and higher PTT. The overall complication rate was 5.8%. Three complications were observed within six hours of biopsy. No late complication was seen. PRB under real-time ultrasound-guidance is a safe and efficacious procedure to establish the histological diagnosis and should be done as out-patient procedure. Observation time of six hours post-biopsy is optimal. PMID:20835320

  10. Sulfur Biogeochemistry of Athabasca Oilsands Composite Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. A.; Kendra, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands tailings are important, globally relevant, S reservoirs, known to contain active and diverse microbial communities. As evidenced by increasing S emissions from the oil sands, active biogeochemical S cycling within composite tailings (CT, a mixture of tailings, post-processed sand and gypsum, used for dry reclamation), is likely; however the S biogeochemistry of these residues has not been investigated to date. With surface mining of Alberta's oil sands spanning over 142,000 square km and accelerated production, these tailings-based landscapes will become increasingly prevalent with the potential for significant environmental impacts. The objectives here, were thus to characterize depth dependent S biogeochemistry of a 40 meter CT deposit (Fort McMurray, AB, CANADA). Drill samples were collected in December of 2012 from 5 depths spanning 36 m in the CT deposit, for geochemical, metagenomic and functional enrichment analyses. Results establish widespread microbial S biogeochemical cycling within the CT deposit. Porewater H2S was detected extensively throughout the deposit with background levels ranging from 14-23 ?M and a concentrated pocket of 300 ?M occurring at depth. Porewater Fe(II) (1-40 ?M) was detected only within surficial depth samples. Current Fe(II) concentrations are not sufficient to sequester the levels of H2S generated by CT, indicating CT may become a net source of S emissions, as generated H2S at depth migrates to the surface, in untreated CT deposits. Metagenomic (454 pyrosequencing) characterization revealed highly diverse CT microbial communities, with 21 different phyla encountered overall and 1/3 of these presenting as candidate divisions. The cultivation independent identification of several known IRB and sulphate (SRB) reducing bacteria within these communities was consistent with observed positive growth in IRB and SRB functional metabolic enrichments. Furthermore, two depth dependent structurally distinct communities emerged: a surficial CT zone of Fe(III) reduction and an underlying zone of sulphate reduction, from multivariate statistical analyses of phylogenetic data (UniFrac http://bmf.colorado.edu/unifrac). The emergence of a distinct IRB surficial zone, despite ~65% of the total bacterial community putatively having the capacity for Fe(III) reduction over the entire deposit depth and evident and increasing Fe(III) sources down core, suggests limitation of Fe(III) reducing bacteria (IRB) through some other factor. Indeed UniFrac analyses identified that the differentiation in microbial communities occurring in these Fe and S zones was driven by environmental parameters of DOC, ORP and salinity; revealing that IRB may be unable to access the more complex OC constituents of these materials. Pilot reclamation for CT is currently focusing on capping CT with a freshwater fen, which may provide a more labile OC source for CT associated IRB, potentially stimulating greater H2S sequestration through FeS formation. These processes will be evaluated in the on-going assessment of S biogeochemistry within untreated and treated CT as pilot reclamation proceeds.

  11. Ecotechnological approach for consolidation of uranium tailings.

    PubMed

    Soni, Prafulla; Singh, Lal

    2011-07-01

    Present study has been undertaken to consolidate radioactivity in uranium mill tailings at Jaduguda, Jharkhand, India.Tailings that remain after processing of ore are released in tailing ponds specially designed for the purpose. The degraded tailing ponds have been capped with 30 cm. thick soil cover. For cosolidation of radioactivity in the tailings firstly the selected plant species should not have any socioeconomic relevance in that area and secondly, uptake of uranium by selected plants has to be low to avoid its dissemination in any form in environment. Seven native plant species of forestry origin were used for experimental trials. Above ground growth has been measured for two years under ex- situ and in- situ conditions. Distribution and concentration of uranium have been evaluated in tailing pond soil as well as tailings. Uranium uptake by plants has been evaluated and discussed in this paper. The highest concentration of uranium has been found in the order as: in tailings > soil cover on tailings > roots of selected plant species > shoots of all the selected species. These results show that among seven species tried Jatropha gossypifolia and Furcraea foetida have lowest uptake (below detectable limit), while Saccharum spontaneum and Pogostemon benghalense have comparatively higher uptake among the studied species. PMID:23029938

  12. Wean-Tail Log.xls

    Cancer.gov

    A SP #: ________________ _ Investigator: _________________ WEAN / TAIL CLIP LOG Strain: ___________________ Room Number: ___________________ STRAIN CODE WEAN DATE # ? # ? COMMENTS WATER A OR B # CAGES DOB TAILCLIP DATE CAGE / LITTER

  13. Quantum scattering theory on graphs with tails

    E-print Network

    Martin Varbanov; Todd A. Brun

    2009-06-18

    We consider quantum walks on a finite graphs to which infinite tails are attached. We explore how the propagating and bound states depend on the structure of the finite graph. The S-matrix for such graphs is defined. Its unitarity is proved as well as some other of its properties such as its transformation under time reversal. A spectral decomposition of the identity for the Hamiltonian of the graph is derived using its eigenvectors. We derive formulas for the S-matrix of a graph under certain operation such as cutting a tail, attaching a tail or connecting two tails to form an edge.

  14. A Tale of Two Tails: Exploring Stellar Populations in the Tidal Tails of NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy interactions can inject material into the intergalactic medium via violent gravitational dynamics, often visualized in tidal tails. The composition of these tails has remained a mystery, as previous studies have focused on detecting tidal features, rather than the composite material itself. We have developed an observing program using deep, multiband imaging to probe the chaotic regions of tidal tails in search for an underlying stellar population. NGC 3256's twin tidal tails serve as a case study for this new technique. Our results show color values of u - g = 1.15 and r - i = 0.08 for the Western tail, and u - g = 1.33 and r - i = 0.22 for the Eastern tail, corresponding to discrepant ages between the tails of approximately 320 Myr and 785 Myr, respectively. With the interaction age of the system measured at 400 Myr, we find the stellar light in Western tail to be dominated by disrupted star clusters formed during and after the interaction, whereas the light from the Eastern tail is dominated by a 10 Gyr population originating from the host galaxies. We fit the Eastern tail color to a Mixed Stellar Population (MSP) model comprised 94% by mass of a 10 Gyr stellar population, and 6% of a 309 Myr population. We find 52% of the bolometric flux originating from this 10 Gyr population. We also detect a blue to red color gradient in each tail, running from galactic center to tail tip. In addition to tidal tail light, we detect 29 star cluster candidates (SCCs) in the Western tail and 19 in the Eastern, with mean ages of 282 Myr and 98 Myr respectively. Interestingly, we find an excess of very blue SCCs in the Eastern tail as compared to the Western tail, marking a recent, small episode of star formation.

  15. Shake a Tail Feather: The Evolution of the Theropod Tail into a Stiff Aerodynamic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Michael; Gatesy, Stephen M.; Upchurch, Paul; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Theropod dinosaurs show striking morphological and functional tail variation; e.g., a long, robust, basal theropod tail used for counterbalance, or a short, modern avian tail used as an aerodynamic surface. We used a quantitative morphological and functional analysis to reconstruct intervertebral joint stiffness in the tail along the theropod lineage to extant birds. This provides new details of the tail’s morphological transformation, and for the first time quantitatively evaluates its biomechanical consequences. We observe that both dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased along the non-avian theropod lineage (between nodes Theropoda and Paraves). Our results show how the tail structure of non-avian theropods was mechanically appropriate for holding itself up against gravity and maintaining passive balance. However, as dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased, the tail may have become more effective for dynamically maintaining balance. This supports our hypothesis of a reduction of dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness in shorter tails. Along the avian theropod lineage (Avialae to crown group birds), dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness increased overall, which appears to contradict our null expectation. We infer that this departure in joint stiffness is specific to the tail’s aerodynamic role and the functional constraints imposed by it. Increased dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness may have facilitated a gradually improved capacity to lift, depress, and swing the tail. The associated morphological changes should have resulted in a tail capable of producing larger muscular forces to utilise larger lift forces in flight. Improved joint mobility in neornithine birds potentially permitted an increase in the range of lift force vector orientations, which might have improved flight proficiency and manoeuvrability. The tail morphology of modern birds with tail fanning capabilities originated in early ornithuromorph birds. Hence, these capabilities should have been present in the early Cretaceous, with incipient tail-fanning capacity in the earliest pygostylian birds. PMID:23690987

  16. CT Guided Bone Biopsy Using a Battery Powered Intraosseous Device

    SciTech Connect

    Schnapauff, Dirk Marnitz, Tim Freyhardt, Patrick Collettini, Federico; Hartwig, Kerstin; Joehrens, Korinna; Hamm, Bernd Kroencke, Thomas Gebauer, Bernhard

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of a battery powered intraosseous device to perform CT-fluoroscopy guided bone biopsy. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 12 patients in whom bone specimen were acquired from different locations under CT-fluoroscopy guidance using the OnControl bone marrow biopsy system (OBM, Vidacare, Shavano Park, TX, USA). Data of the 12 were compared to a historic cohort in whom the specimen were acquired using the classic Jamshidi Needle, as reference needle using manual force for biopsy. Results: Technical success was reached in 11 of 12 cases, indicated by central localisation of the needle within the target lesion. All specimen sampled were sufficient for histopathological workup. Compared to the historical cohort the time needed for biopsy decreased significantly from 13 {+-} 6 to 6 {+-} 4 min (P = 0.0001). Due to the shortened intervention time the radiation dose (CTDI) during CT-fluoroscopy was lowered significantly from 169 {+-} 87 to 111 {+-} 54 mGy Multiplication-Sign cm (P = 0.0001). Interventional radiologists were confident with the performance of the needle especially when using in sclerotic or osteoblastic lesions. Conclusion: The OBM is an attractive support for CT-fluoroscopy guided bone biopsy which is safe tool and compared to the classical approach using the Jamshidi needle leading to significantly reduced intervention time and radiation exposure.

  17. Association of Cervical Biopsy with HIV Type 1 Genital Shedding Among Women on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Victoria G.; Liegler, Teri; Cohen, Craig R.; Sawaya, George F.; Smith-McCune, Karen; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 genital shedding is associated with increased HIV-1 transmission risk. Inflammation and ulceration are associated with increased shedding, while highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been shown to have a protective effect. We sought to examine the impact of cervical biopsies, a routine component of cervical cancer screening, on HIV-1 genital RNA levels in HIV-infected women on HAART. We enrolled HIV-1-infected women undergoing cervical biopsy for diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 in this prospective cohort study. All were stable on HAART for at least 3 months. Clinical and demographic information as well as plasma HIV-1 viral load were collected at the baseline visit. Specimens for cervical HIV-1 RNA were collected immediately prior to biopsy, and 2 and 7 days afterward. Quantitative PCR determined HIV-1 concentration in cervical specimens at each time point to a lower limit of detection of 40 copies/specimen. Among the 30 participants, five (16.6%) women had detectable cervical HIV-1 RNA at baseline, of whom four (80%) had detectable HIV-1 RNA after cervical biopsy, with no significant increase in viral load in the follow-up specimens. Only one woman (3.3%) with undetectable baseline cervical HIV-1 RNA had detection postbiopsy. Detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA was the only factor associated with baseline cervical HIV-1 RNA. In women on HAART, an increase in cervical HIV-1 RNA detection or concentration was not associated with cervical biopsy. These findings help provide safety data regarding cervical cancer screening and diagnosis in HIV-infected women and inform postprocedure counseling. PMID:23594240

  18. A Dog Tail for Utility Robots Exploring Affective Properties of Tail Movement

    E-print Network

    A Dog Tail for Utility Robots Exploring Affective Properties of Tail Movement Ashish Singh, James E}@cs.umanitoba.ca Abstract. We present a dog-tail interface for utility robots, as a means of com- municating high-level robotic state through affect. This interface leverages peo- ple's general knowledge of dogs

  19. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa. PMID:25776548

  20. Uses of skin biopsy for sensory and autonomic nerve assessment.

    PubMed

    Myers, M Iliza; Peltier, Amanda C

    2013-01-01

    Skin biopsy is a valuable diagnostic tool for small-fiber-predominant neuropathy by the quantification of intraepidermal nerve fiber density (IENFD). It has the unique advantage of being a minimally invasive procedure with the potential for longitudinal evaluation of both sensory and autonomic fibers. Unmyelinated small fibers are not otherwise quantified objectively with such a level of sensitivity as has been reported with IENFD. Recent advances include an expansion of the skin punch biopsy technique to evaluate larger myelinated fibers and mechanoreceptors, and recent work has also focused on additional methods of quantifying dermal fibers and densely innervated autonomic structures. This review discusses current work using skin biopsy for the pathologic analysis of peripheral nerve fibers in neuropathy of various causes as well as its use in clinical trials. PMID:23250768

  1. The role of laparoscopic biopsies in lumbar spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Corpataux, J M; Halkic, N; Wettstein, M; Dusmet, M

    2000-11-01

    The infection of an intervertebral disk is a serious condition. The diagnosis often is elusive and difficult to make. It is imperative to have appropriate microbiologic specimens before the initiation of treatment. We report the case of a 51-year-old woman with lumbar spondylodiscitis caused by infection after the placement of an epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan confirmed the diagnosis, but computed tomography (CT)-guided fine-needle biopsy did not yield adequate material for a microbiologic diagnosis. Laparoscopic biopsies of the involved disk provided good specimens and a diagnosis of Propionibacterium acnes infection. We believe that this minimally invasive procedure should be performed when CT-guided fine-needle biopsy fails to yield a microbiologic diagnosis in spondylodiscitis. PMID:11285529

  2. The role of laparoscopic biopsies in lumbar spondylodiscitis.

    PubMed

    Corpataux, J M; Halkic, N; Wettstein, M; Dusmet, M

    2000-12-01

    Infection of an intervertebral disk is a serious condition. Diagnosis often is elusive and difficult. It is imperative to obtain appropriate microbiological specimens before initiation of treatment. The authors describe a 51-year-old woman with lumbar spondylodiscitis that was because of infection after the placement of an epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis, but computed tomography-guided fine needle biopsy did not provide adequate material for a microbiologic diagnosis. Laparoscopic biopsies of the involved disk provided good specimens and a diagnosis of Propionibacterium acnes infection. The authors believe that this minimally invasive procedure should be performed when computed tomography-guided fine needle biopsy does not provide a microbiologic diagnosis in spondylodiscitis. PMID:11147923

  3. Underestimation of cancer in case of diagnosis of atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) by vacuum assisted core needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Polom, Karol; Murawa, Dawid; Kurzawa, Pawe?; Michalak, Micha?; Murawa, Pawe?

    2012-01-01

    Background With the introduction of mammography screening, we are more often dealing with the diagnosis of precancerous and preinvasive breast lesions. An increasing number of patients are observed to show a premalignant change of ADH (atypical ductal hyperplasia). It also involves a wider use of the vacuum assisted core biopsy as a tool for verifying nonpalpable changes identified by mammography. Aim This paper describes our experience of 134 cases of ADH diagnosed at Mammotome® vacuum core needle biopsy. Material and methods Of 4326 mammotomic biopsies performed at our institution in 2000–2006, ADH was diagnosed in 134 patients (3.1%). Patients underwent surgery to remove the suspected lesion. All histopathological blocks were again reviewed by one pathologist. Clinical, radiological and pathological data were collected for statistical evaluation. Results Underestimation of invasive changes occurred in 12 patients (9%). The only clinicopathologic feature of statistical significance radiologically and pathologically was the presence of radial scar in the mammography. Conclusions More frequent diagnosis of precancerous changes in the mammotomic breast biopsy forces us to establish a clear clinical practice. The problem is the underestimation of invasive changes. The occurrence of radial scar on mammography for diagnosis of the presence of ADH increases the risk of invasive changes. PMID:24377013

  4. Trans-rectal interventional MRI: initial prostate biopsy experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Bernadette M.; Behluli, Meliha R.; Feller, John F.; May, Stuart T.; Princenthal, Robert; Winkel, Alex; Kaminsky, David B.

    2010-02-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the prostate gland when evaluated along with T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images (DWI) and their corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps can yield valuable information in patients with rising or elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels1. In some cases, patients present with multiple negative trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsies, often placing the patient into a cycle of active surveillance. Recently, more patients are undergoing TRIM for targeted biopsy of suspicious findings with a cancer yield of ~59% compared to 15% for second TRUS biopsy2 to solve this diagnostic dilemma and plan treatment. Patients were imaged in two separate sessions on a 1.5T magnet using a cardiac phased array parallel imaging coil. Automated CAD software was used to identify areas of wash-out. If a suspicious finding was identified on all sequences it was followed by a second imaging session. Under MRI-guidance, cores were acquired from each target region3. In one case the microscopic diagnosis was prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), in the other it was invasive adenocarcinoma. Patient 1 had two negative TRUS biopsies and a PSA level of 9ng/mL. Patient 2 had a PSA of 7.2ng/mL. He underwent TRUS biopsy which was negative for malignancy. He was able to go on to treatment for his prostate carcinoma (PCa)4. MRI may have an important role in a subset of patients with multiple negative TRUS biopsies and elevated or rising PSA.

  5. Tail Mean Estimation is More E#cient than Tail Median: Evidence From the Exponential Power Distribution

    E-print Network

    Pearce, Kent

    Tail Mean Estimation is More E#cient than Tail Median: Evidence From the Exponential Power the relative e#ciency of the empirical ``tail median'' vs. ''tail mean'' as esti­ mators of location under so that the quantile of the untruncated EPD (population tail median) and mean of the left

  6. Observing the Lunar Sodium Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Majd; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Smith, S.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2008-09-01

    One of the sources of Sodium gas from the lunar regolith is due to meteoroid impact. Near the time of New Moon, Sodium atoms escaping the Moon's exosphere are driven by photon pressure into the anti-sunward direction where they become gravitationally focused by the Earth forming a tail-like structure. Observations made from the El Leoncito Observatory in Argentina using a Boston University All Sky Imager show evidence of the this structure in the form of a spot. Observations were made between April 2006 and June 2008 on the nights nearest New Moon and the two nights that follow. The brightness of the spot was calibrated in Rayleighs using standard stars. A correction for geometry effects was made to account for the Sun-Earth-Moon angle. Data was analyzed for possible correlation with meteor showers.

  7. Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; McFadden, James P; Larson, Davin; Carlson, Charles W; Mende, Stephen B; Frey, Harald; Phan, Tai; Sibeck, David G; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Auster, Uli; Donovan, Eric; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Russell, Christopher T; Runov, Andrei; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Kepko, Larry

    2008-08-15

    Magnetospheric substorms explosively release solar wind energy previously stored in Earth's magnetotail, encompassing the entire magnetosphere and producing spectacular auroral displays. It has been unclear whether a substorm is triggered by a disruption of the electrical current flowing across the near-Earth magnetotail, at approximately 10 R(E) (R(E): Earth radius, or 6374 kilometers), or by the process of magnetic reconnection typically seen farther out in the magnetotail, at approximately 20 to 30 R(E). We report on simultaneous measurements in the magnetotail at multiple distances, at the time of substorm onset. Reconnection was observed at 20 R(E), at least 1.5 minutes before auroral intensification, at least 2 minutes before substorm expansion, and about 3 minutes before near-Earth current disruption. These results demonstrate that substorms are likely initiated by tail reconnection. PMID:18653845

  8. Skin Biopsy and Patient-Specific Stem Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells permits the development of next-generation patient-specific systems biology models reflecting personalized genomics profiles to better understand pathophysiology. In this chapter, we describe how to create a patient-specific iPS cell line. There are three major steps: (1) performing a skin biopsy procedure on the patient; (2) extracting human fibroblast cells from the skin biopsy tissue; and (3) reprogramming patient-specific fibroblast cells into the pluripotent stem cell stage. PMID:26141312

  9. Needle tract seeding following percutaneous biopsy of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Hariom; Lozinskiy, Mikhail; Wallace, David M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old man underwent computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of a suspicious renal mass. Two months later he underwent partial nephrectomy. Histology revealed a 30-mm clear cell renal cell carcinoma, up to Fuhrman grade 3. An area of the capsule was interrupted, which corresponded to a hemorrhagic area on the cortical surface. Under microscopy, this area showed a tongue of tumor tissue protruding through the renal capsule. A tumor deposit was found in the perinephric fat. These features suggest that tumor seeding may have occurred during the needle biopsy. PMID:26366280

  10. Uranium mill tailings remedial action technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Gee, G.W.

    1984-01-01

    The uranium milling process involves the hydrometallurgical extraction of uranium from ores and the resultant generation of large quantities of waste referred to as tailings. Uranium mill tailings have been identified as requiring remediation because they contain residual radioactive material that is not removed in the milling process. Potential radiation exposure can result from direct contact with the tailings, from radon gas emitted by the tailings, and from radioactive contamination of groundwater. As a result, the technology developed under the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Uranium Recovery Program have focused on radon control, groundwater contamination and the long-term protection of the containment system. This paper briefly summarizes the UMTRAP and NRC remedial action technology development. 33 references, 9 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Vortex control for tail buffet alleviation on a twin-tail fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Dhanvada M.; Puram, C. K.; Shah, Gautam H.

    1989-01-01

    Two aerodynamic concepts proposed for alleviating high-alpha tail buffet characteristics of a LEX (Leading Edge Extension) vortex dominated twin-tail fighter configuration were explored in low-speed tunnel tests on generic models via flow visualizations, 6-component balance measurements and monitoring of tail dynamics. Passive dorsal-fin extensions of the vertical tails, and an active LEX arrangement with up-deflected edge sections were evaluated as independent means of re-structuring the adverse vortical flow environment in the tail region. Each of these techniques successfully reduced the buffet as measured by the root-mean-square of tail accelerometer output, particularly at post-stall angles of attack when the baseline configuration was characterized by high buffet intensity. Used in combination, the two concepts indicated significant tail buffet relief with relatively minor impact on the high-alpha configuration aerodynamics.

  12. Tail effects on yaw stability in birds.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2007-12-01

    Bird tails, which are an aerodynamic surface in the horizontal plane, are treated with regard to their effects on yaw stability. Reference is made to wings of very small aspect ratio similar to the values of bird tails in order to identify features which are significant for the aerodynamic yawing moment characteristics due to sideslip. It is shown that there are yawing moments of considerable magnitude for this aspect ratio region. Furthermore, the lift coefficient, which also exerts an influence, is included in the treatment of yaw stability. To show more concretely the addressed effects for birds, the yawing moment characteristics of the wing-tail combination of a pigeon, which is considered as a representative example, are treated in detail. For this purpose, a sophisticated aerodynamic method capable to deal with the mutual flow interactions between the tail and the wing is used to compute results of high precision. The yawing moment characteristics of the pigeon wing-tail combination with respect to the sideslip angle and the lift coefficient are determined, with emphasis placed on the contribution of the tail. It is shown that there is a significant contribution of the tail to yaw stability. The findings of this paper on the contribution of the tail to the yawing moment characteristics are supported by an evaluation of existing experimental data. Furthermore, the physical mechanisms are considered which are the reasons for the stabilizing role of the tail. These effects concern the contribution of the drag acting at the tail to the yawing moment. In addition, it is shown that extended legs and feet, when exposed to the airflow, can contribute to yaw stability. PMID:17904581

  13. Dust tail striae: Lessons from recent comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G.; Battams, K.

    2014-07-01

    Striae are features rarely observed in cometary dust tails. These are near-linear structures that, unlike synchronic bands, are not aligned with the nucleus position, and have only been clearly observed in a few high-production-rate comets, including C/1957 P1 (Mrkos), C/1962 C1 (Seki-Lines), C/1975 V1 (West), and C/1996 O1 (Hale-Bopp). The formation of striae is difficult to explain, but several scenarios for their creation have been proposed [1]. These include that of Sekanina & Farrell [2], who proposed that striae are the result of a two-step fragmentation process, where parent particles are released from the nucleus which, after a delay, all fragment over a very short period of time. The fragmentation products then separate according to their ? parameter, i.e., the degree to which the particles are influenced by radiation pressure force compared to gravitational force, to form the linear structures we observe as striae. Although there are issues with identifying a process through which many particles will collectively delay their break-up and then fragment within a short period, this scenario does fit many observations well [3]. Other proposed scenarios are more complex, including the formation of striae through a continuous cascade of fragmentation to ever smaller particle sizes [4]. As these formation scenarios result in different distributions of dust-particle sizes within individual striae, the processes occurring may therefore be identifiable if these distributions can be inferred. If the fragmentation processes taking place can be identified, then, in turn, more could be learnt about the structure of the original dust grains that go on to form these sometimes beautiful tail structures. Here, we present the analysis of striae in several comets observed from space by the SOHO LASCO coronagraph [5] and SECCHI heliospheric imagers aboard the twin STEREO spacecraft [6]. The comets studied are C/2002 V1 (NEAT) in January 2002, C/2006 P1 (McNaught) during its perihelion passage in January-February 2007, and the complex striae of C/2011 L4 (Pan-STARRS) in March 2013. We simulate the formation of individual striae in these comets, and successfully reproduce many aspects of their morphology and dynamics. The results are compared to those of other striae models, and we attempt to gauge the influence on non-gravitational forces acting on these comets' dust populations. The inferences that can be drawn regarding the comets' dust populations are discussed.

  14. Mercury's Tail Current Sheet from MESSENGER Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Asad, M.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    We have estimated the spatial variations in the position and average thickness of Mercury's magnetospheric tail current sheet from orbital magnetic field data collected by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. We have investigated the changes in these average properties with varying solar wind conditions and magnetospheric activity. The time-averaged thickness of the current sheet was obtained from superposed epoch analysis (SEA) of the 1-s-averaged vector magnetic field data within ± 10 min of the identified magnetic equator position at different down-tail distances. The average thickness was then estimated from a given SEA by identifying the time interval during which the field completed a rotation from the sunward to the anti-sunward direction, or vice versa, accompanied by a depression in the field magnitude. We have found that the current sheet has a thickness of ~0.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) close to the planet (~ 1.1 RM) and thins to ~0.2 RM in the far tail region (~2.8 RM). We examined individual orbits to catalogue the existence and number of current sheet crossings encountered on each orbit. These data allow us to (1) determine whether the thickness obtained from the SEA is an actual thickness or an apparent thickness controlled by rapid motions of the current sheet, and (2) estimate the statistical likelihood of observing the current sheet as a function of down-tail distance. For example, some magnetically quiet orbits that cross the magnetic equator at down-tail distances greater than 2 RM do not record a current sheet crossing and appear to cross closed field lines in the vicinity of the magnetic equator, even though they lie in a region in which the tail current sheet is usually observed. This result suggests that the inner (near-planet) edge of the current sheet is not stationary but may move anti-sunward (or sunward) under quiet (or active) magnetospheric conditions.

  15. Pathology Reporting of Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy: A Proposal of the Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chan Kwon; Min, Hye Sook; Park, Hyo Jin; Song, Dong Eun; Kim, Jang Hee; Park, So Yeon; Yoo, Hyunju; Shin, Mi Kyung

    2015-01-01

    In recent years throughout Korea, the use of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (CNB) has become common for the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules. However, there is no consensus on the pathology reporting system for thyroid CNB. The Korean Endocrine Pathology Thyroid Core Needle Biopsy Study Group held a conference on thyroid CNB pathology and developed guidelines through contributions from the participants. This article discusses the outcome of the discussions that led to a consensus on the pathology reporting of thyroid CNB. PMID:26081825

  16. Tamarind tree seed dispersal by ring-tailed lemurs.

    PubMed

    Mertl-Millhollen, Anne S; Blumenfeld-Jones, Kathryn; Raharison, Sahoby Marin; Tsaramanana, Donald Raymond; Rasamimanana, Hantanirina

    2011-10-01

    In Madagascar, the gallery forests of the south are among the most endangered. Tamarind trees (Tamarindus indica) dominate these riverine forests and are a keystone food resource for ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta). At Berenty Reserve, the presence of tamarind trees is declining, and there is little recruitment of young trees. Because mature tamarinds inhibit growth under their crowns, seeds must be dispersed away from adult trees if tree recruitment is to occur. Ring-tailed lemurs are likely seed dispersers; however, because they spend much of their feeding, siesta, and sleeping time in tamarinds, they may defecate a majority of the tamarind seeds under tamarind trees. To determine whether they disperse tamarind seeds away from overhanging tamarind tree crowns, we observed two troops for 10 days each, noted the locations of feeding and defecation, and collected seeds from feces and fruit for germination. We also collected additional data on tamarind seedling recruitment under natural conditions, in which seedling germination was abundant after extensive rain, including under the canopy. However, seedling survival to 1 year was lower when growing under mature tamarind tree crowns than when growing away from an overhanging crown. Despite low fruit abundance averaging two fruits/m(3) in tamarind crowns, lemurs fed on tamarind fruit for 32% of their feeding samples. Daily path lengths averaged 1,266 m, and lemurs deposited seeds throughout their ranges. Fifty-eight percent of the 417 recorded lemur defecations were on the ground away from overhanging tamarind tree crowns. Tamarind seeds collected from both fruit and feces germinated. Because lemurs deposited viable seeds on the ground away from overhanging mature tamarind tree crowns, we conclude that ring-tailed lemurs provide tamarind tree seed dispersal services. PMID:21629992

  17. Single-Institution Results of Image-Guided Nonplugged Percutaneous Versus Transjugular Liver Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Hardman, Rulon L.; Perrich, Kiley D.; Silas, Anne M.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review patients who underwent transjugular and image-guided percutaneous biopsy and compare the relative risk of ascites, thrombocytopenia, and coagulopathy. Materials and Methods: From August 2001 through February 2006, a total of 238 liver biopsies were performed. The radiologist reviewed all patient referrals for transjugular biopsy. These patients either underwent transjugular biopsy or were reassigned to percutaneous biopsy (crossover group). Patients referred to percutaneous image-guided liver biopsy underwent this same procedure. Biopsies were considered successful if a tissue diagnosis could be made from the samples obtained. Results: A total of 36 transjugular biopsies were performed with 3 total (8.3%) and 1 major (2.8%) complications. A total of 171 percutaneous biopsies were performed with 10 (5.8%) total and 3 (1.8%) major complications. The crossover group showed a total of 4 (12.9%) complications with 1 (3.2%) major complication. Sample adequacy was 91.9% for transjugular and 99.5% for percutaneous biopsy. Conclusion: Both transjugular and percutaneous liver biopsy techniques are efficacious and safe. Contraindications such as thrombocytopenia, coagulopathy, and ascites are indicators of greater complications but are not necessarily prevented by transjugular biopsy. Percutaneous biopsy more frequently yields a diagnostic specimen than transjugular biopsy.

  18. Fiber bundle based endomicroscopy prototype with two collection channels for simultaneous coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and second harmonic generation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengfan; Satira, Zachary A.; Wang, Xi; Xu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Xu; Wong, Kelvin; Chen, Shufen; Xin, Jianguo; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2014-02-01

    Label-free multiphoton imaging is promising for replacing biopsy and could offer new strategies for intraoperative or surgical applications. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging could provide lipid-band contrast, and second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging is useful for imaging collagen, tendon and muscle fibers. A combination of these two imaging modalities could provide rich information and this combination has been studied by researchers to investigate diseases through microscopy imaging. The combination of these two imaging modalities in endomicroscopy imaging has been rarely investigated. In this research, a fiber bundle consisted of one excitation fiber and 18 collection fibers was developed in our endomicroscopy prototype. The 18 collection fibers were divided into two collection channels with 9 fibers in each channel. These two channels could be used together as one channel for effective signal collection or used separately for simplifying detection part of the system. Differences of collection pattern of these two channels were investigated. Collection difference of central excitation fiber and surrounding 18 fibers was also investigated, which reveals the potential ability of this system to measure forward to backward (F/B) ratio in SHG imaging. CARS imaging of mouse adipocyte and SHG imaging of mouse tail tendon were performed to demonstrate the CARS and SHG tissue imaging performance of this system. Simultaneous CARS and SHG imaging ability of this system was demonstrated by mouse tail imaging. This fiber bundle based endomicroscopy imaging prototype, offers a promising platform for constructing efficient fiber-based CARS and SHG multimodal endomicroscopes for label free intraoperative imaging applications.

  19. 75 FR 62445 - Otter Tail Valley Railroad Company, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Otter Tail County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ...TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. AB 330 (Sub-No. 4X)] Otter Tail Valley Railroad Company, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-- in Otter Tail County, MN Otter Tail Valley Railroad Company, Inc. (OTVR) filed a verified notice...

  20. Biopsy Needle Detection in Transrectal Ultrasound Alper Ayvacia

    E-print Network

    Soatto, Stefano

    , Fusion, Prior knowledge. 1. Introduction Prostate cancer affects one in six men in the western world and specificity in detecting prostate cancer. Efforts have been made to create image guidance applications prostate biopsy has been shown as a very promising approach to yield better clinical outcome than

  1. Quality Checking and Mining Nephrology Biopsy Data Milos Radovanovi

    E-print Network

    Radovanovich, Milos

    originate from the electronic patient record TBase© . One of the grave problems after kidney transplantationQuality Checking and Mining Nephrology Biopsy Data Milos Radovanovi Dept. of Mathematics. of Mathematics and Informatics University of Novi Sad Novi Sad, Serbia kurba@dmi.uns.ac.rs Danilo Schmidt

  2. The role of skin biopsy in diagnosis of panniculitides.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, C; Lentini, F; Borroni, G

    2013-08-01

    Several factors hamper the clinical and histologic diagnosis of panniculitis. Clinically the patients tend to present with erythematous subcutaneous nodules with quite a monotonous appearance, without additional symptoms. Histopathologically, as the subcutaneous fat responds to a variety of insults in a limited number of forms, there are sometimes subtle pathologic differences among the conditions. Although the biopsy plays a critical role in the diagnostic process of a panniculitis, a series of prerequisites must be met in order to obtain as much information as possible from this procedure. If the biopsy is inadequate, i.e., does not include sufficient subcutaneous fat or the site of sampling site/biopsy timing is wrong, histopathologic assessment is limited and the correct diagnosis may be delayed and further sampling may be required. This article introduces the reader to the field of panniculitides under the histopathologic perspective through a brief description of the normal histology of subcutaneous fat. I also includes the definition of the types of fat necrosis, role of biopsy of panniculitis and its rules and pitfalls, up to a microscopic approach of a slide. PMID:23900157

  3. [Renal needle biopsy under echography. Apropos of 413 examinations].

    PubMed

    Desrentes, M; Eynard, J P; Konde, L; Ba, A A; Morcillo, J L; Favre, Y

    1990-01-01

    Blindly executed for a long period with only X-ray detection, renal biopsy benefits nowadays of precision and security of real-time echoguiding. The authors describe their technique without bondage between needle and transducer and comment their results about 413 examinations. PMID:2131183

  4. Interventional MRI of the breast: lesion localisation and biopsy.

    PubMed

    Heywang-Köbrunner, S H; Heinig, A; Pickuth, D; Alberich, T; Spielmann, R P

    2000-01-01

    With the growing use of breast MRI an increasing need exists for reliable MR-guided preoperative localisation or even MR-guided needle biopsy. In this article an overview is given of the different approaches and the present state of the art. With closed magnets the following approaches have been made: freehand localisation (similar to CT-guided freehand localisation), and freehand localisation combined with a frameless stereotaxic system operating with support by ultrasound. One localisation device for supine localisation and a thermoplastic mesh for breast stabilisation have been reported. Most investigators have used compression devices to immobilize the breast and prevent shift during needle insertion. Thus far, one immobilisation and aiming device has been designed for open magnets. A small number of experiences exist with interventions on open MR units using a navigation system. Wire localisations are presently a well-established procedure. Magnetic-resonance-guided needle biopsy has been accomplished in closed systems as well as by the use of breast immobilisation devices. However, problems still exist due to severe needle artefacts, tissue shift during the intervention and fast equalization of contrast enhancement in lesions with surrounding tissue. Therefore, needle biopsy is not recommended for lesions < 10 mm. Magnetic-resonance-guided vacuum biopsy is somewhat more invasive but promises to solve most of these problems. PMID:10663716

  5. Quantification of Spatial Structure of Human Proximal Tibial Bone Biopsies

    E-print Network

    Prohaska, Steffen

    , Hindenburgdamm 20, 12203 Berlin, Germany bDepartment of Connective Tissue Biology, Institute of Anatomy quantitatively the structural composition of bone tissue from 3D data sets of hu- man tibia bone biopsies technique is able to quantify the structural loss of the bone tissue and may help to diagnose and to monitor

  6. Hyperspectral Colon Biopsy Classification into Normal and Malignant Categories

    E-print Network

    Rajpoot, Nasir

    for colon and rectal cancer) is the most common cause of death for cancers in the Western world and cure of colon cancer can be improved by efficiently clas- sifying the colon tissue cells from biopsy slides into normal and malignant classes. This report presents the classification of hyperspectral colon

  7. Percutaneous biopsy for risk stratification of renal masses

    PubMed Central

    Blute, Michael L.; Drewry, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of abdominal imaging has led to identification of more patients with incidental renal masses, and renal mass biopsy (RMB) has become a popular method to evaluate unknown renal masses prior to definitive treatment. Pathologic data obtained from biopsy may be used to guide decisions for treatment and may include the presence or absence of malignant tumor, renal cell cancer subtype, tumor grade and the presence of other aggressive pathologic features. However, prior to using RMB for risk stratification, it is important to understand whether RMB findings are equivalent to pathologic analysis of surgical specimens and to identify any potential limitations of this approach. This review outlines the advantages and limitations of the current studies that evaluate RMB as a guide for treatment decision in patients with unknown renal masses. In multiple series, RMB has demonstrated low morbidity and a theoretical reduction in cost, if patients with benign tumors are identified from biopsy and can avoid subsequent treatment. However, when considering the routine use of RMB for risk stratification, it is important to note that biopsy may underestimate risk in some patients by undergrading, understaging or failing to identify aggressive tumor features. Future studies should focus on developing treatment algorithms that integrate RMB to identify the optimal use in risk stratification of patients with unknown renal masses. PMID:26425141

  8. Percutaneous biopsy for risk stratification of renal masses.

    PubMed

    Blute, Michael L; Drewry, Anna; Abel, Edwin Jason

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of abdominal imaging has led to identification of more patients with incidental renal masses, and renal mass biopsy (RMB) has become a popular method to evaluate unknown renal masses prior to definitive treatment. Pathologic data obtained from biopsy may be used to guide decisions for treatment and may include the presence or absence of malignant tumor, renal cell cancer subtype, tumor grade and the presence of other aggressive pathologic features. However, prior to using RMB for risk stratification, it is important to understand whether RMB findings are equivalent to pathologic analysis of surgical specimens and to identify any potential limitations of this approach. This review outlines the advantages and limitations of the current studies that evaluate RMB as a guide for treatment decision in patients with unknown renal masses. In multiple series, RMB has demonstrated low morbidity and a theoretical reduction in cost, if patients with benign tumors are identified from biopsy and can avoid subsequent treatment. However, when considering the routine use of RMB for risk stratification, it is important to note that biopsy may underestimate risk in some patients by undergrading, understaging or failing to identify aggressive tumor features. Future studies should focus on developing treatment algorithms that integrate RMB to identify the optimal use in risk stratification of patients with unknown renal masses. PMID:26425141

  9. Epidural abscess with associated spondylodiscitis following prostatic biopsy.

    PubMed

    Dobson, G; Cowie, C J A; Holliman, D

    2015-07-01

    Spondylodiscitis is often iatrogenic in nature. We report the case of a 69-year-old man presenting with spondylodiscitis and associated epidural abscess following transrectal ultrasonography guided prostate biopsy despite ciprofloxacin cover. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spondylodiscitis secondary to fluoroquinolone resistant Escherichia coli. PMID:26264110

  10. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  12. 21 CFR 870.4075 - Endomyocardial biopsy device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endomyocardial biopsy device. 870.4075 Section 870.4075 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... procedure to remove samples of tissue from the inner wall of the heart. (b) Classification. Class...

  13. Vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy as a diagnostic and therapeutic method in lesions radiologically suspicious of breast fibroadenoma

    PubMed Central

    Po?om, Karol; Murawa, Dawid; Nowaczyk, Piotr; Adamczyk, Beata; Giles, Elizabeth; Fertsch, Sonia; Michalak, Michal; Murawa, Pawe?

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment of breast fibroadenoma remains a subject of clinical discussion. Recommended methods include clinical observation or surgical excision of the lesion. The procedure involves hospitalisation and anaesthesia, leaving a scar on the breast. Aim The aim of this study was to present the Centre's experience in removing lesions radiologically suspicious of fibroadenoma by means of an ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted core-needle biopsy as an alternative to a classical surgery. Materials and methods Between March 2007 and April 2010, 196 ultrasound-guided vacuum-assisted biopsies were performed in the Mammotome Biopsy Laboratory of the 1st Surgical Oncology and General Surgery Department at the Greater Poland Cancer Centre in Pozna?. The procedure was delivered to female patients aged 17–91 years (mean 40.8, median 39). Qualified for removal were ultrasound identified lesions described as fibroadenomas. Results The average size of excised lesions according to pre-biopsy ultrasound image was 13.53 ± 8.92 mm (median 11 mm, range 4–60 mm). In 184 cases (93.9%), benign lesions were found in the final histopathologic examination. Pre-cancer lesions were found in 10 cases, and invasive lesions in two cases. Overall, after follow-up ultrasound examination, four patients were qualified for subsequent surgical resection of lesions that had been left behind. Conclusion Vacuum core-needle biopsy is an effective tool enabling removal of breast fibroadenomas. It combines features of a lesion resection and histopathologic material collection providing an access with minimum invasiveness. PMID:24376952

  14. Kidney biopsy in west of Iran: Complications and histopathological findings

    PubMed Central

    Rahbar, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this retrospective study, we reviewed the medical records and histopathology findings of 135 patients who underwent renal biopsies at two special hospitals affiliated to Kermanshah medical university during a six-year period (2003-2007). All were performed using Tru-Cut needle under ultrasound guidance. Twenty four specimens were unsatisfactory. There were 38 males (34.2%) and 73 females (65.7%) in 111 patients with adequate specimens (each specimen has more than 5 glomeruli); the mean age was 16.5 years (range 2-64 years). Side effects of the renal biopsies included pain at the site of biopsy in 2 (2.7%), gross hematuria in 1 (0.9%). Nephrotic syndrome was the most common indication for biopsy followed by acute renal failure of unknown etiology and nephritic syndrome. Primary glomerular disease was reported in 78 patients (70.2%) and also secondary glomerular disease in 33 patients (29.7%). Among the primary glomerulonephritis disease, minimal change disease and membranous glomerulonephritis were the commonest findings in children below the age of 16 years. Minimal change disease ranked first in adults whole membranous glomerular disease and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis were more common in the elderly. In all patients lupus glomerular disease was the commonest secondary glomerular disease. We conclude that study on renal biopsy makes final diagnosis which is associated with an acceptably low rate of complications in our practice, and in all, the patterns of renal histology in our study vary slightly from those reported from other countries. PMID:20368927

  15. Vacuum-assisted breast biopsy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, Hai-Lin; Hong, Jisun

    2014-05-01

    Sonographic examination of the breast with state-of-the-art equipment has become an essential part of the clinical work-up of breast lesions and a valuable adjunct to mammographic screening and physical examination. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and core-needle biopsy (CNB) are well-established, valuable techniques that are still used in most cases, whereas vacuum-assisted breast biopsy (VABB) is a more recent technique. VABB has proven clinical value and can be used under sonographic, mammographic, and magnetic resonance imaging guidance. The main indication for the use of VABB is for biopsies of clustered microcalcifications, which are usually performed under stereotactic guidance. This method has been proven reliable and should replace surgical biopsies. The ultrasound-guided procedure is still more a matter of discussion, but it should also replace surgical biopsies for nodular lesions, and it should even replace surgery for the complete removal of benign lesions. This viewpoint is gradually gaining acceptance. Different authors have shown increased diagnostic accuracy of VABB compared to FNA and CNB. VABB particularly leads to less histological underestimation. The other indications for VABB are palpable or nonpalpable nodular lesions or American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System 3 and 4A lesions. For masses that are likely benign or indeterminate, we attempt to completely remove the lesion to eliminate uncertainty on later follow-up images. VABB offers the best possible histological sampling and aids avoidance of unnecessary operations. VABB complications include bleeding or pain during the procedure, as well as postoperative pain, hemorrhaging, and hematomas. But, these hemorrhaging could be controlled by the post-procedural compression and bed resting. Overall, VABB is a reliable sampling technique with few complications, is relatively easy to use, and is well-tolerated by patients. The larger amount of extracted tissue reduces sampling error. PMID:25083505

  16. Muscleworms, Parelaphostrongylus andersoni (Nematoda: Protostrongylidae), discovered in Columbia white-tailed deer from Oregon and Washington: Implications for biogeography and host associations.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Host and geographic distribution for Parelaphostrongylus andersoni, considered a characteristic nematode infecting white-tailed deer, remain poorly defined particularly in the region of western North America. Fecal samples collected from the northern population of Columbia white-tailed deer (Odocoi...

  17. Preliminary findings of a molecular survey for the presence of B. bovis and B. bigemina in cattle fever ticks and white-tailed deer from south Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White-tailed deer are an alternative host for Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. (B.) annulatus, collectively referred to as cattle fever ticks. Dense white-tailed deer populations in south Texas complicate efforts by the National Cattle Fever Tick Eradication Program to keep the U.S. free o...

  18. A de Sitter Farey Tail

    E-print Network

    Alejandra Castro; Nima Lashkari; Alexander Maloney

    2011-09-21

    We consider quantum Einstein gravity in three dimensional de Sitter space. The Euclidean path integral is formulated as a sum over geometries, including both perturbative loop corrections and non-perturbative instanton corrections coming from geometries with non-trivial topology. These non-trivial geometries have a natural physical interpretation. Conventional wisdom states that the sphere is the unique Euclidean continuation of de Sitter space. However, when considering physics only in the causal patch of a single observer other Euclidean geometries, in this case lens spaces, contribute to physical observables. This induces quantum gravitational effects which lead to deviations from the standard thermal behaviour obtained by analytic continuation from the three sphere. The sum over these geometries can be formulated as a sum over cosets of the modular group; this is the de Sitter analog of the celebrated "black hole Farey tail." We compute the vacuum partition function including the sum over these geometries. Perturbative quantum corrections are computed to all orders in perturbation theory using the relationship between Einstein gravity and Chern-Simons theory, which is checked explicitly at tree and one-loop level using heat kernel techniques. The vacuum partition function, including all instanton and perturbative corrections, is shown to diverge in a way which can not be regulated using standard field theory techniques.

  19. Relevance of compartmental anatomic guidelines for biopsy of musculoskeletal tumors: Retrospective review of 363 biopsies over a 6-year period

    E-print Network

    2012-01-01

    unplanned excision of a soft-tissue sarcoma of an extremity.grade extremity soft tissue sarcomas: factors predictive ofsoft-tissue mass in the posterior compartment, with the tip of the biopsy needle identified (arrow); pathologic examination revealed synovial sarcoma.

  20. Clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided prostate biopsy: Preliminary experience

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Adam J.; Westphalen, Antonio C.; Kurhanewicz, John; Wang, Zhen J.; Carroll, Peter R.; Simko, Jeffry P.; Coakley, Fergus V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the potential clinical utility of endorectal MRI-guided biopsy in patients with known or suspected prostate cancer. Methods We prospectively recruited 24 men with known or suspected prostate cancer in whom MRI-guided biopsy was clinically requested after multiparametric endorectal MRI showed one or more appropriate targets. One to six 18-gauge biopsy cores were obtained from each patient. Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy results and post MRI-guided biopsy complications were also recorded. Results MRI-guided biopsy was positive in 5 of 7 patients with suspected prostate cancer (including 2 of 4 with prior negative ultrasound-guided biopsies), in 8 of 12 with known untreated prostate cancer (including 5 where MRI-guided biopsy demonstrated a higher Gleason score than ultrasound guided biopsy results), and in 3 of 5 with treated cancer. MRI-guided biopsies had a significantly higher maximum percentage of cancer in positive cores when compared to ultrasound guided biopsy (mean of 37 ± 8% versus 13 ± 4%; p = 0.01). No serious post-biopsy complications occurred. Conclusion Our preliminary experience suggests endorectal MRI-guided biopsy may safely contribute to the management of patients with known or suspected prostate cancer by making a new diagnosis of malignancy, upgrading previously diagnosed disease, or diagnosing local recurrence. PMID:24924999

  1. Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture

    SciTech Connect

    M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31

    Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

  2. The Distant Sodium Tail of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Models of the sodium atmosphere of Mercury predict the possible existence of a cornet-like sodium tail. Detection and mapping of the predicted sodium tail would provide quantitative data on the energy of the process that produces sodium atoms from the planetary surface. Previous efforts to detect the sodium tail by means of observations done during daylight hours have been only partially successful because scattered sunlight obscured the weak sodium emissions in the tail. However, at greatest eastern elongation around the March equinox in the northern hemisphere, Mercury can be seen as an evening star in astronomical twilight. At this time, the intensity of scattered sunlight is low enough that sodium emissions as low as 500 Rayleighs can be detected. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. A WONDROUS TALE OF A SPERM TAIL

    E-print Network

    Lindemann, Charles

    energies to the study of sperm tails. It has al- ways been, and still is to this day, a minor source. program and continue to work in his research laboratory, and that is more or less the happy ending

  4. BIOMECHANICS. Why the seahorse tail is square.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Adriaens, Dominique; Hatton, Ross L; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Whereas the predominant shapes of most animal tails are cylindrical, seahorse tails are square prisms. Seahorses use their tails as flexible grasping appendages, in spite of a rigid bony armor that fully encases their bodies. We explore the mechanics of two three-dimensional-printed models that mimic either the natural (square prism) or hypothetical (cylindrical) architecture of a seahorse tail to uncover whether or not the square geometry provides any functional advantages. Our results show that the square prism is more resilient when crushed and provides a mechanism for preserving articulatory organization upon extensive bending and twisting, as compared with its cylindrical counterpart. Thus, the square architecture is better than the circular one in the context of two integrated functions: grasping ability and crushing resistance. PMID:26138983

  5. OPERATING PLAN TAILINGS CELLS AND EVAPORATION PONDS

    E-print Network

    OPERATING PLAN TAILINGS CELLS AND EVAPORATION PONDS PIÑON RIDGE MILL Energy Fuels Resources ..........................................................................................4 3.0 EVAPORATION POND DESIGN....................................................................14 5.0 EVAPORATION PONDS OPERATING AND MONITORING PROCEDURES ....17 5.1 Standard Operating Procedures

  6. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    SciTech Connect

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher; Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Knezek, Patricia M. E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu E-mail: cgroppi@asu.edu E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au

    2013-09-10

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 {mu}m [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous H{alpha} sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter H{alpha} source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation.

  7. Postprandial Responses to Lipid and Carbohydrate Ingestion in Repeated Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Biopsies in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Dordevic, Aimee L.; Pendergast, Felicity J.; Morgan, Han; Villas-Boas, Silas; Caldow, Marissa K.; Larsen, Amy E.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Cameron-Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a primary site of meta-inflammation. Diet composition influences adipose tissue metabolism and a single meal can drive an inflammatory response in postprandial period. This study aimed to examine the effect lipid and carbohydrate ingestion compared with a non-caloric placebo on adipose tissue response. Thirty-three healthy adults (age 24.5 ± 3.3 year (mean ± standard deviation (SD)); body mass index (BMI) 24.1 ± 3.2 kg/m2, were randomised into one of three parallel beverage groups; placebo (water), carbohydrate (maltodextrin) or lipid (dairy-cream). Subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue biopsies and serum samples were collected prior to (0 h), as well as 2 h and 4 h after consumption of the beverage. Adipose tissue gene expression levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) increased in all three groups, without an increase in circulating TNF-?. Serum leptin (0.6-fold, p = 0.03) and adipose tissue leptin gene expression levels (0.6-fold, p = 0.001) decreased in the hours following the placebo beverage, but not the nutrient beverages. Despite increased inflammatory cytokine gene expression in adipose tissue with all beverages, suggesting a confounding effect of the repeated biopsy method, differences in metabolic responses of adipose tissue and circulating adipokines to ingestion of lipid and carbohydrate beverages were observed. PMID:26140541

  8. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Joseph C; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits. PMID:26430636

  9. The utility of surgical lung biopsy in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This retrospective study evaluated the utility and safety of surgical lung biopsy (SLB) in cancer patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Methods All cases of critically ill patients with cancer and diagnosed with ARDS who underwent SLB in a tertiary care hospital from January 2002 to July 2009 were reviewed. Clinical data including patient baseline characteristics, surgical complications, pathological findings, treatment alterations, and survival outcomes were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Results A total of 16 critically ill patients with cancer diagnosed with ARDS who underwent SLB were enrolled. The meantime from ARDS onset to SLB was 3.0?±?1.5 days. All SLB specimens offered a pathological diagnosis, and specific diagnoses were made in 9 of 16 patients. Biopsy findings resulted in a change in therapy in 11 of 16 patients. Overall, the SLB surgical complication rate was 19% (3/16). SLB did not directly cause the observed operative mortality. The ICU mortality rate was 38% (6/16). Patients who switched therapies after SLB had a trend toward decreased mortality than patients without a change in therapy (27% versus 60%; P?=?0.299). Conclusions In selected critically ill cancer patients with ARDS, SLB had a high diagnostic yield rate and an acceptable surgical complication rate. PMID:23680446

  10. Optoacoustic imaging of the prostate: development toward image-guided biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Fronheiser, Matthew; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-03-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) tomography has demonstrated utility in identifying blood-rich malignancies in breast tissue. We describe the development and characterization of a laser OA imaging system for the prostate (LOIS-P). The system consists of a fiber-coupled Q-switched laser operating at 757 nm, a commercial 128-channel ultrasonic probe, a digital signal processor, and software that uses the filtered radial back-projection algorithm for image reconstruction. The system is used to reconstruct OA images of a blood-rich lesion induced in vivo in a canine prostate. OA images obtained in vivo are compared to images acquired using ultrasound, the current gold standard for guiding biopsy of the prostate. Although key structural features such as the urethra could be identified with both imaging techniques, a bloody lesion representing a highly vascularized tumor could only be clearly identified in OA images. The advantages and limitations of both forward and backward illumination modes are also evaluated by collecting OA images of phantoms simulating blood vessels within tissue. System resolution is estimated to be 0.2 mm in the radial direction of the acoustic array. The minimum detectable pressure signal is 1.83 Pa. Our results encourage further development toward a dual-modality OA/ultrasonic system for prostate imaging and image-guided biopsy.

  11. Any detectable thyroglobulin in lymph node biopsy washouts suggests local recurrence in differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Natalie Su-Jing; Maher, Richard; Learoyd, Diana Louise

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of local recurrence detection in differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) is increased by measuring thyroglobulin in needle washouts from lymph node fine-needle aspiration biopsies (FNA-Tg). Recent studies have proposed minimum diagnostic threshold values for FNA-Tg and have reported interference from Tg antibodies (Tg Ab), leading to low or false-negative results. The aim of this study was to assess the utility of FNA-Tg in the diagnosis of local DTC recurrence in patients referred to a single pathology service used by our tertiary teaching hospital, the first such study in an Australian cohort. Data were collected from the pathology service database for FNA-Tg over an 18-month period, and the results of 69 FNA-Tg samples from 57 patients were obtained. FNA-Tg findings were compared with cytology and histology when patients proceeded to surgery. Using the functional sensitivity as the cut-off, detectable FNA-Tg (?0.9??g/l) had a sensitivity of 95.7%, specificity of 50% and positive predictive value of 95.7%. Our results suggest that detectable FNA-Tg leads to histological confirmation of local nodal DTC recurrence and would support a decision to proceed to surgery. Serum Tg Ab can, however, interfere with FNA-Tg measurements. Thus, we now recommend routine use of FNA-Tg washouts in all lymph node FNA biopsies for the detection of DTC recurrence. PMID:25125556

  12. Optoacoustic imaging of the prostate: development toward image-guided biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Conjusteau, André; Fronheiser, Matthew; Bell, Brent A.; Motamedi, Massoud; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-01-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) tomography has demonstrated utility in identifying blood-rich malignancies in breast tissue. We describe the development and characterization of a laser OA imaging system for the prostate (LOIS-P). The system consists of a fiber-coupled Q-switched laser operating at 757 nm, a commercial 128-channel ultrasonic probe, a digital signal processor, and software that uses the filtered radial back-projection algorithm for image reconstruction. The system is used to reconstruct OA images of a blood-rich lesion induced in vivo in a canine prostate. OA images obtained in vivo are compared to images acquired using ultrasound, the current gold standard for guiding biopsy of the prostate. Although key structural features such as the urethra could be identified with both imaging techniques, a bloody lesion representing a highly vascularized tumor could only be clearly identified in OA images. The advantages and limitations of both forward and backward illumination modes are also evaluated by collecting OA images of phantoms simulating blood vessels within tissue. System resolution is estimated to be 0.2 mm in the radial direction of the acoustic array. The minimum detectable pressure signal is 1.83 Pa. Our results encourage further development toward a dual-modality OA?ultrasonic system for prostate imaging and image-guided biopsy. PMID:20459232

  13. The Sodium Tail of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  14. The sodium tail of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  15. Four Tails Problems for Dynamical Collapse Theories

    E-print Network

    Kelvin J. McQueen

    2015-01-23

    The primary quantum mechanical equation of motion entails that measurements typically do not have determinate outcomes, but result in superpositions of all possible outcomes. Dynamical collapse theories (e.g. GRW) supplement this equation with a stochastic Gaussian collapse function, intended to collapse the superposition of outcomes into one outcome. But the Gaussian collapses are imperfect in a way that leaves the superpositions intact. This is the tails problem. There are several ways of making this problem more precise. But many authors dismiss the problem without considering the more severe formulations. Here I distinguish four distinct tails problems. The first (bare tails problem) and second (structured tails problem) exist in the literature. I argue that while the first is a pseudo-problem, the second has not been adequately addressed. The third (multiverse tails problem) reformulates the second to account for recently discovered dynamical consequences of collapse. Finally the fourth (tails problem dilemma) shows that solving the third by replacing the Gaussian with a non-Gaussian collapse function introduces new conflict with relativity theory.

  16. EXPOSURE OF WHITE TAILED DEER TO BOVINE DIARRHEA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of white tail deer as a reservoir of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been a point of controversy. The objective of this project was to observe the infectivity of BVDV white tail deer isolates in white tailed deer. Eight white tailed deer fawn 2-4 weeks in age were divided int...

  17. Fat tail statistics and beyond Joachim Peinke1

    E-print Network

    Peinke, Joachim

    Fat tail statistics and beyond Joachim Peinke1 , Malte Siefert1 , Stephan Barth1 , Christoph Renner analysis and fat tail statistics in the context of L´evy distributions are compared with a stochastic are governed by nongaussian statistics, displaying fat tails, also called heavy tails, have gained considerable

  18. A Dog Tail For Communicating Robotic States Ashish Singh

    E-print Network

    A Dog Tail For Communicating Robotic States Ashish Singh Department of Computer Science University University of Manitoba Winnipeg, MB, Canada young@cs.umanitoba.ca Abstract--We present a dog-tail interface basic dog tail language (e.g., tail wagging means happy). This knowledge can be leveraged to understand

  19. On Weak Tail Domination of Random Vectors Rafal Latala #

    E-print Network

    Latala, Rafal

    On Weak Tail Domination of Random Vectors Rafal Latala # Abstract Motivated by a question of Krzysztof Oleszkiewicz we study a no­ tion of weak tail domination of random vectors. We show that if the dominating random variable is su#ciently regular then weak tail dom­ ination implies strong tail domination

  20. Tail Distortion Risk and Its Asymptotic Analysis Revision: March 2012

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Tail Distortion Risk and Its Asymptotic Analysis Li Zhu Haijun Li May 2011 Revision: March 2012 of potential loss under a scenario probability measure. In this paper, the tail distortion risk measure is introduced to assess tail risks of excess losses modeled by the right tails of loss distributions

  1. Lattice-Search Runtime Distributions May Be Heavy-Tailed

    E-print Network

    Page Jr., C. David

    Lattice-Search Runtime Distributions May Be Heavy-Tailed Filip Zelezn´y1, Ashwin Srinivasan2, David than exponentially and have "heavy tails". Procedures characterized by heavy-tailed runtime domains that heavy-tailed phenomena can be observed in ILP, namely in the search for a clause

  2. A Tail-Recursive Machine with Stack Inspection

    E-print Network

    Tobin-Hochstadt, Sam

    A Tail-Recursive Machine with Stack Inspection JOHN CLEMENTS and MATTHIAS FELLEISEN Northeastern with a global tail call optimization policy; that an implementation of such a language must allocate memory for a source-code tail call, and a program that uses only tail calls (and no other memory- allocating construct

  3. Heavy-Tailed Phenomena in Satisfiability and Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    E-print Network

    Crato, Nuno

    Heavy-Tailed Phenomena in Satisfiability and Constraint Satisfaction Problems Carla P. Gomes (gomes characterized by very long tails or "heavy tails". We will show that these distributions are best characterized by Mandelbrot. We also show how random restarts can effectively eliminate heavy-tailed behavior. Furthermore

  4. Prostate Biopsy Using Transrectal Ultrasonography; The Optimal Number of Cores Regarding Cancer Detection Rate and Complications

    PubMed Central

    Ghafoori, Mahyar; Velayati, Meysam; Aliyari Ghasabeh, Mounes; Shakiba, Madjid; Alavi, Manijeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Transrectal ultrasound guided biopsy of the prostate is the most common modality used to diagnose prostate cancer. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal number of cores at prostate biopsy, which have the most diagnostic value with least adverse effects. Patients and Materials: Transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) guided biopsy was performed in 180 patients suspicious for prostate cancer due to either abnormal rectal examination or elevated PSA. The patients were divided randomly into three groups of six-core, twelve-core and eighteen-core biopsies. The detection rate of prostate cancer in each group with the rate of post biopsy urinary infection and prostatitis were compared. Results: Prostate cancer was diagnosed in 8 (13.3%), 21 (35%) and 24 (40%) patients in six, twelve and eighteen core biopsy groups, respectively. Urinary tract infection and prostatitis occurred in 17 (28.3%), 23 (38.3%) and 35 (58.3%) patients in six, twelve and eighteen core biopsy groups, respectively. Considering the detection rate of prostate cancer, there was a significant difference between 6 and 12 core biopsy groups (P = 0.006) and 12-core biopsies detected more cases of prostate cancer, but there was no significant difference between 12 and 18 core biopsy groups (P = 0.572). Considering the infection rate, there was no significant difference between 6 and 12 core biopsy groups (P = 0.254), but there was a significant difference between 12 and 18 core biopsy groups (P = 0.028) and infectious complications occurred more frequently in 18-core biopsy group. Conclusions: The best balance between detection rate of prostate cancer and infectious complications of biopsies achieved in twelve-core biopsy protocol. Twelve-core biopsy enhances the rate of prostate cancer detection with minimum adverse effects. PMID:26060552

  5. Skin Biopsy, the Allergists' Tool: How to Interpret a Report.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Brett H; Gavino, Aries Caesar P; Gavino, Alde Carlo P

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory dermatoses are frequently encountered by the allergist, and histologic evaluation achieved through skin biopsy can be of tremendous value clinically. There is no substitute for a thorough history and physical exam; however, the skin biopsy is a simple, in-office procedure with little risk of complication that can provide invaluable information when a diagnosis is uncertain. Histopathologically, many inflammatory eruptions can look similar or overlap, but information provided by the dermatopathologist can help the clinician render or refine the clinical diagnosis and guide management. This review will discuss descriptive elements contained in the pathology report to provide a framework that can be used by the allergist to comfortably and confidently diagnose inflammatory dermatologic conditions. PMID:26310278

  6. Electron microscopic study of infantile renal biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Kádár, A; Molnár, E; Bucsky, P; Láncos, F; Jellinek, H

    1977-01-01

    Out of 54 open renal biopsies performed on children, 17 were selected and studied not only by light microscopy but also by electron microscopy. Statistical-mathematical analysis of basement membrane thickness-measurements was carried out. It is concluded that electron microscopic investigation of the renal biopsy material is required in selected cases involving diagnostic or therapeutic problems. In nephrotic syndrome it may help above all to separate minimal changes from early forms or glomerular lesion of the focal sclerosing type. Electron microscopy can also be useful in any of the mono- and oligosymptomatic renal diseases. In those cases only electron microscopy makes it possible to provide exact morphological diagnosis which is necessary to the proper therapy. PMID:590422

  7. Assessing mineral density in small trephined jawbone biopsy specimens.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H; Eijsink-Smeets, R; van Lingen, A; van Waas, R

    1999-08-01

    This study reports the test of the hypothesis that mineral density can be precisely assessed in small trephined jawbone biopsy specimens. Mineral density was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Ten fresh and ten histologically processed specimens, which were not the same, were measured. The coefficient of variations (CVs) for the alcohol stored and the histologic specimens by DEXA were respectively 1.60 and 1.71%. The CVs by pQCT for the total bone density in the alcohol stored and the histologic specimens were respectively 0.07 and 0.16%, for the trabecular bone density 0.69 and 1.04% and for the cortical bone density 0.07 and 0.12%. It was concluded that DEXA and pQCT are precise for mineral density assessment of small trephined jawbone biopsy specimens both alcohol stored and histologically processed. PMID:10551074

  8. Application of statistical cancer atlas for 3D biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Ramkrishnan; Shen, Dinggang; Davatzikos, Christos; Crawford, E. David; Barqawi, Albaha; Werahera, Priya; Kumar, Dinesh; Suri, Jasjit S.

    2008-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in males in the United States and the second leading cause of cancer death. While the exact cause is still under investigation, researchers agree on certain risk factors like age, family history, dietary habits, lifestyle and race. It is also widely accepted that cancer distribution within the prostate is inhomogeneous, i.e. certain regions have a higher likelihood of developing cancer. In this regard extensive work has been done to study the distribution of cancer in order to perform biopsy more effectively. Recently a statistical cancer atlas of the prostate was demonstrated along with an optimal biopsy scheme achieving a high detection rate. In this paper we discuss the complete construction and application of such an atlas that can be used in a clinical setting to effectively target high cancer zones during biopsy. The method consists of integrating intensity statistics in the form of cancer probabilities at every voxel in the image with shape statistics of the prostate in order to quickly warp the atlas onto a subject ultrasound image. While the atlas surface can be registered to a pre-segmented subject prostate surface or instead used to perform segmentation of the capsule via optimization of shape parameters to segment the subject image, the strength of our approach lies in the fast mapping of cancer statistics onto the subject using shape statistics. The shape model was trained from over 38 expert segmented prostate surfaces and the atlas registration accuracy was found to be high suggesting the use of this method to perform biopsy in near real time situations with some optimization.

  9. Are the days of closed pleural biopsy over? Yes

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Dharmesh

    2015-01-01

    In the modern management of pleural diseases, thoracoscopy has a clear advantage over closed pleural biopsy. By way of its high yield, both in malignant pleural disease and pleural Tuberculosis – the two commonest cause of undiagnosed pleural effusion, thoracoscopy has the added advantage of faster symptom relief and offering effective pleurodesis. This makes it an attractive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure of choice and features high in the algorithms of many international guidelines on the approach to pleural diseases.

  10. Biopsychronology: live confocal imaging of biopsies to assess organ function.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Imtiaz; Fries, Dietmar; Streif, Werner; Aigner, Felix; Hengster, Paul; Troppmair, Jakob; Hermann, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Prolonged ischemia (I) times caused by organ procurement and transport are main contributors to a decrease in organ function, which is further enhanced during reperfusion (R). This combined damage, referred to as ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), is a main contributor to delayed graft function, which leads to costly and lengthy follow-up treatments or even organ loss. Methods to monitor the status of a graft prior to transplantation are therefore highly desirable to optimize the clinical outcome. Here, we propose the use of fine needle biopsies, which are analyzed by real-time live confocal microscopy. Such a combination provides information about the functional and structural integrity of an organ within a few minutes. To confirm the feasibility of this approach, we obtained fine needle biopsies from rodent kidneys and exposed them to various stress conditions. Following the addition of a range of live stains, biopsies were monitored for mitochondrial function, cell viability, and tissue integrity using confocal live cell imaging. Our data demonstrate that this procedure requires minimal time for sample preparation and data acquisition and is well suitable to record organ damage resulting from unphysiological stress. PMID:24750326

  11. Immunohistochemical Characterization of Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Muscle Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Statland, Jeffrey M; Odrzywolski, Karen J; Shah, Bharati; Henderson, Don; Fricke, Alex F.; van der Maarel, Silvère M; Tapscott, Stephen J; Tawil, Rabi

    2015-01-01

    Background Posited pathological mechanisms in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD) include activation in somatic tissue of normally silenced genes, increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, and induction of apoptosis. Objective To determine the histopathological changes in FSHD muscle biopsies and compare to possible pathological mechanisms of disease. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study on quadriceps muscle biopsies from 32 genetically confirmed FSHD participants, compared to healthy volunteers and myotonic dystrophy type 1 as disease controls. Biopsies were divided into groups to evaluate apoptosis rates, capillary density, myonuclear and satellite cell counts. Results Apoptosis rates were increased in FSHD (n=10, 0.74%) compared to myotonic dystrophy type 1 (n=10, 0.14%, P=0.003) and healthy volunteers (n=14, 0.13%, P=0.002). Apoptosis was higher in FSHD patients with the smallest residual D4Z4 fragments. Capillary density was decreased in FSHD1 (n=10, 316 capillaries/mm2) compared to healthy volunteers (n=15, 448 capillaries/mm2, P=0.001). No differences were seen in myonuclear or satellite cell counts. Conclusions Preliminary evidence for increased apoptosis rates and reduced capillary density may reflect histopathological correlates of disease activity in FSHD. The molecular-pathological correlates to these changes warrants further investigation. PMID:26345300

  12. Lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy of operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodier, J F; Routiot, T; Mignotte, H; Janser, J C; Bremond, A; David, E; Barlier, C; Ghnassia, J P; Treilleux, I; Chassagne, C; Velten, M

    2000-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of sentinel node biopsy for invasive breast cancer and the predictability of axillary node status. Between January 1996 and June 1997 a total of 73 patients underwent patent blue dye lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy followed by standard (level I and II) axillary node dissection (one bilateral procedure). The sentinel node was identified in 82.4% (61/74) of the cases and was predictive of axillary status in 96.7% (59/61). The false-negative rate of the procedure was 8.0% (2/25). The sentinel node was involved in 37.7% (23/61) and was the only one invaded in 30.4% (7/23). The sensitivity of the procedure was 92% (CI95% 74-99%) and its specificity 100%. It is currently considered to be an attractive new procedure undergoing evaluation in prospective controlled trials. This study confirmed the reliability and reproducibility of intraoperative lymphatic mapping and sentinel node biopsy. This is the first step toward a new era of minimally invasive axillary surgery for breast cancer. PMID:11071466

  13. Three different anesthesia techniques for a comfortable prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    ?ahin, Adnan; Ceylan, Cavit; Gazel, Eymen; Odaba?, Öner

    2015-01-01

    Aim: In this paper, we aimed to compare the efficacy of three different anesthesia techniques applied in 90 cases of which transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) -guided prostate biopsies were taken. Materials and Methods: Between February 2012 and July 2012, TRUS-guided 16 core biopsies were taken from 90 patients who comply the study criteria. Patients were randomly divided into three groups each of which consists of 30 individuals. Group 1: Was applied periprostatic block anesthesia; Group 2: Was administered intrarectal lidocaine gel; Group 3: Was applied pudendal block. Visual analog scale (VAS) of patients in groups was evaluated. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the mean ages, prostate-specific antigen values of three groups. Although pain ratings of Groups 2 and 3 were high, no significant difference was present between each other (P > 0.05). In Groups 1 and 2, the difference between VASs was significant. In the group where periprostatic block was applied, pain ratings were significantly low compared with the other two groups (P = 0.0001). Discussion: Enabling pain and discomfort control in patients is very important during TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. In our study, we observed that the periprostatic block enables more comfortable compared with patient groups with intrarectal lidocaine gel and pudendal block and better reduction in pain scores. PMID:26229322

  14. Submandibular Gland Biopsy for the Diagnosis of Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Beach, Thomas G.; Adler, Charles H.; Dugger, Brittany N.; Serrano, Geidy; Hidalgo, Jose; Henry-Watson, Jonette; Shill, Holly A.; Sue, Lucia I.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2013-01-01

    The clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease (PD) is incorrect in 30% or more of subjects, particularly at the time of symptom onset. Because Lewy-type ?-synucleinopathy (LTS) is present in the submandibular glands of PD patients, we assessed the feasibility of submandibular gland biopsy for diagnosing PD. We performed immunohistochemical staining for LTS in sections of large segments (simulating open biopsy) and needle cores of submandibular gland from 128 autopsied and neuropathologically classified subjects, including 28 PD, 5 incidental Lewy body disease, 5 progressive supranuclear palsy ([PSP] 3 with concurrent PD), 3 corticobasal degeneration, 2 multiple system atrophy, 22 Alzheimer disease with Lewy bodies (ADLB), 16 Alzheimer disease without Lewy bodies and 50 normal elderly. Immunoreactive nerve fibers were present in large submandibular gland sections of all 28 PD subjects (including 3 that also had PSP); 3 ADLB subjects were also positive, but none of the other subjects were positive. Cores from frozen submandibular glands taken with 18 gauge needles (total length 15–38 mm, between 10 and 118 sections per subject examined) were positive for LTS in 17 of 19 PD patients. These results suggest that biopsy of the submandibular gland may be a feasible means of improving PD clinical diagnostic accuracy. This would be particularly advantageous for subject selection in early-stage clinical trials, for invasive therapies or for verifying other biomarker studies. PMID:23334596

  15. Review Variance Tail Probabilities Markov's Inequality Chebyshev's Inequality Examples of Tail Bounds Multiple Random Variables CMPSCI 240: Reasoning about Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    McGregor, Andrew

    Review Variance Tail Probabilities Markov's Inequality Chebyshev's Inequality Examples of Tail Bounds Multiple Random Variables CMPSCI 240: Reasoning about Uncertainty Lecture 11: Variance and Tail Bounds Andrew McGregor University of Massachusetts Last Compiled: March 5, 2015 #12;Review Variance Tail

  16. Linker Histone Tails and N-Tails of Histone H3 Are Redundant: Scanning Force Microscopy Studies of Reconstituted Fibers

    E-print Network

    Leuba, Sanford

    Linker Histone Tails and N-Tails of Histone H3 Are Redundant: Scanning Force Microscopy Studies and the N-terminal tail of core histone H3 to extended chromatin fiber structure by scanning force of the linker histones and a structural redundancy of the tails of linker histones and of histone H3

  17. Plasma entry into the distant tail lobes - ISEE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gosling, J. T.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Mccomas, D. J.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE-3 measurements indicate that a broad mantle-like boundary layer plasma often exists within the distant geomagnetic tail lobes at all latitudes, directly adjacent to the tail magnetopause. The presence of this boundary layer at large tail distances indicates that plasma from the magnetosheath often crosses the magnetopause locally along much of the length of the tail, and is evidence that the tail is 'open'.

  18. Development and validation of risk score for predicting positive repeat prostate biopsy in patients with a previous negative biopsy in a UK population

    E-print Network

    Rochester, Mark A; Pashayan, Nora; Matthews, Fiona E; Doble, Andrew; McLoughlin, John

    2009-07-16

    of positive repeat biopsies, based on sextant prostate biopsy data [11]. It was suggested that the model could be improved through adding free-to-total PSA ratio and pros- tate volume to the calculation. The aim of this study was to use a similar approach... [11]. This data and previous studies were, however, based on initial sextant biopsies. In our study, the rate of positive biopsies remained steady at 30%, and the distri- bution of cancer grade did not change suggesting that even in the era of extended...

  19. Characterization of magnetite nanoparticles for SQUID-relaxometry and magnetic needle biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Adolphi, Natalie L.; Huber, Dale L.; Jaetao, Jason E.; Bryant, Howard C.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Fegan, Danielle L.; Venturini, Eugene L.; Monson, Todd C.; Tessier, Trace E.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Bergemann, Christian; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles (Chemicell SiMAG-TCL) were characterized by SQUID-relaxometry, susceptometry, and TEM. The magnetization detected by SQUID-relaxometry was 0.33% of that detected by susceptometry, indicating that the sensitivity of SQUID-relaxometry could be significantly increased through improved control of nanoparticle size. The relaxometry data were analyzed by the moment superposition model (MSM) to determine the distribution of nanoparticle moments. Analysis of the binding of CD34-conjugated nanoparticles to U937 leukemia cells revealed 60,000 nanoparticles per cell, which were collected from whole blood using a prototype magnetic biopsy needle, with a capture efficiency of >65% from a 750 µl sample volume in 1 minute. PMID:20161153

  20. Prostatic abscess after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy. Case report

    PubMed Central

    DELL’ATTI, L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Prostatic abscess (PA) is an uncommon complication after transrectal ultrasonography-guided prostate biopsy with possible heavy outcome too. In this case report (a 68-year-old patient) prostatic abscess presents non specific symptoms: dysuria, supra-pubic pain, urinary frequency, fever 36.0°C (96.8°F). Full blood count, serum urea, electrolytes, liver function test and serum amylase were all normal. There was no growth in his urine culture. Diagnosis is based on digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasonography. With transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) we observed a hypoechoic area that contained inhomogeneus material. Color and power Doppler sonography showed a hypovascular fluid collection surrounded by perilesional increased parenchymal flow. TRUS-guided aspiration was performed with an 18 Gauge Chiba needle and the pathogen identified was Escherichia Coli. TRUS of the prostate 1 month later showed complete resolution of the PA and patient remained free of any lower urinary tract symptoms. PMID:24629811

  1. Electromagnetic-Tracked Biopsy under Ultrasound Guidance: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hakime, Antoine Deschamps, Frederic; Marques De Carvalho, Enio Garcia; Barah, Ali; Auperin, Anne; Baere, Thierry De

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate the accuracy and safety of electromagnetic needle tracking for sonographically guided percutaneous liver biopsies. Methods: We performed 23 consecutive ultrasound-guided liver biopsies for liver nodules with an electromagnetic tracking of the needle. A sensor placed at the tip of a sterile stylet (18G) inserted in a coaxial guiding trocar (16G) used for biopsy was localized in real time relative to the ultrasound imaging plane, thanks to an electromagnetic transmitter and two sensors on the ultrasound probe. This allows for electronic display of the needle tip location and the future needle path overlaid on the real-time ultrasound image. Distance between needle tip position and its electronic display, number of needle punctures, number of needle pull backs for redirection, technical success (needle positioned in the target), diagnostic success (correct histopathology result), procedure time, and complication were evaluated according to lesion sizes, depth and location, operator experience, and 'in-plane' or 'out-of-plane' needle approach. Results: Electronic display was always within 2 mm from the real position of the needle tip. The technical success rate was 100%. A single needle puncture without repuncture was used in all patients. Pull backs were necessary in six patients (26%) to obtain correct needle placement. The overall diagnostic success rate was 91%. The overall true-positive, true-negative, false-negative, and failure rates of the biopsy were 100% (19/19) 100% (2/2), 0% (0/23), and 9% (2/23). The median total procedure time from the skin puncture to the needle in the target was 30 sec (from 5-60 s). Lesion depth and localizations, operator experience, in-plane or out-of-plane approach did not affect significantly the technical, diagnostic success, or procedure time. Even when the tumor size decreased, the procedure time did not increase. Conclusions: Electromagnetic-tracked biopsy is accurate to determine needle tip position and allows fast and accurate needle placement in targeted liver nodules.

  2. Cancer detection rates of different prostate biopsy regimens in patients with renal failure.

    PubMed

    Ho?can, Mustafa Burak; Özorak, Alper; Oksay, Taylan; Perk, Hakk?; Arma?an, Abdullah; Soyupek, Sedat; Serel, Tekin Ahmet; Ko?ar, Alim

    2014-07-01

    We aimed to evaluate the cancer detection rates of 6-, 10-, 12-core biopsy regimens and the optimal biopsy protocol for prostate cancer diagnosis in patients with renal failure. A total of 122 consecutive patients with renal failure underwent biopsy with age-specific prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels up to 20 ng/mL. The 12-core biopsy technique (sextant biopsy + lateral base, lateral mid-zone, lateral apex, bilaterally) performed to all patients. Pathology results were examined separately for each sextant, 10-core that exclude parasagittal mid-zones from 12-cores (10a), 10-core that exclude apex zones from 12-cores (10b) and 12-core biopsy regimens. Of 122 patients, 37 (30.3%) were positive for prostate cancer. The cancer detection rates for sextant, 10a, 10b and 12 cores were 17.2%, 29%, 23.7% and 30.7%, respectively. Biopsy techniques of 10a, 10b and 12 cores increased the cancer detection rates by 40%, 27.5% and 43.2% among the sextant technique, respectively. Biopsy techniques of 10a and 12 cores increased the cancer detection rates by 17.1% and 21.6% among 10b biopsy technique, respectively. There were no statistical differences between 12 core and 10a core about cancer detection rate. Adding lateral cores to sextant biopsy improves the cancer detection rates. In our study, 12-core biopsy technique increases the cancer detection rate by 5.4% among 10a core but that was not statistically different. On the other hand, 12-core biopsy technique includes all biopsy regimens. We therefore suggest 12-core biopsy or minimum 10-core strategy incorporating six peripheral biopsies with elevated age- specific PSA levels up to 20 ng/mL in patients with renal failure. PMID:24797801

  3. How to Interpret Thyroid Biopsy Results: A Three-Year Retrospective Interventional Radiology Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Oppenheimer, Jason D. Kasuganti, Deepa; Nayar, Ritu; Chrisman, Howard B.; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Nemcek, Albert A.; Ryu, Robert K.

    2010-08-15

    Results of thyroid biopsy determine whether thyroid nodule resection is appropriate and the extent of thyroid surgery. At our institution we use 20/22-gauge core biopsy (CBx) in conjunction with fine-needle aspiration (FNA) to decrease the number of passes and improve adequacy. Occasionally, both ultrasound (US)-guided FNA and CBx yield unsatisfactory specimens. To justify clinical recommendations for these unsatisfactory thyroid biopsies, we compare rates of malignancy at surgical resection for unsatisfactory biopsy results against definitive biopsy results. We retrospectively reviewed a database of 1979 patients who had a total of 2677 FNA and 663 CBx performed by experienced interventional radiologists under US guidance from 2003 to 2006 at a tertiary-care academic center. In 451 patients who had surgery following biopsy, Fisher's exact test was used to compare surgical malignancy rates between unsatisfactory and malignant biopsy cohorts as well as between unsatisfactory and benign biopsy cohorts. We defined statistical significance at P = 0.05. We reported an overall unsatisfactory thyroid biopsy rate of 3.7% (100/2677). A statistically significant higher rate of surgically proven malignancies was found in malignant biopsy patients compared to unsatisfactory biopsy patients (P = 0.0001). The incidence of surgically proven malignancy in unsatisfactory biopsy patients was not significantly different from that in benign biopsy patients (P = 0.8625). In conclusion, an extremely low incidence of malignancy was associated with both benign and unsatisfactory thyroid biopsy results. The difference in incidence between these two groups was not statistically significant. Therefore, patients with unsatisfactory biopsy specimens can be reassured and counseled accordingly.

  4. Conformational Properties of R-Tubulin Tail Peptide: Implications for Tail-Body Interaction

    E-print Network

    Pal, Debnath

    Conformational Properties of R-Tubulin Tail Peptide: Implications for Tail-Body Interaction Debnath-terminal segments of the R/ -tubulins are flexible regions rich in acidic amino acid residues. It is generally believed that these regions play crucial roles in tubulin polymerization and interaction with many ligands

  5. Tail asymptotics for the supercritical GaltonWatson process in the heavy-tailed case 1

    E-print Network

    Korshunov, Dmitry

    classification: Primary: 60J80; Secondary: 60F10, 60G70 1 Introduction Let Zn be a supercritical Galton­WatsonTail asymptotics for the supercritical Galton­Watson process in the heavy-tailed case 1 Denis and University of Munich Abstract As well known, for a supercritical Galton­Watson process Zn whose off- spring

  6. machinery can physically interact with this tail (911). Proteins that bind to this tail have

    E-print Network

    Graziano, Michael

    RNA amounts for these mutants are injected. Indeed, because of the nonlinearity of the oocyte expression acids 433 to 584) bound weakly to GST­N-Tail, but this binding was not in- hibited by the N­N-Tail peptide was added to a lysate of COS-7 cells [0.2% Triton X-100 in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS

  7. Can concurrent core biopsy and fine needle aspiration biopsy improve the false negative rate of sonographically detectable breast lesions?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to determine the accuracy of concurrent core needle biopsy (CNB) and fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) for breast lesions and to estimate the false-negative rate using the two methods combined. Methods Over a seven-year period, 2053 patients with sonographically detectable breast lesions underwent concurrent ultrasound-guided CNB and FNAB. The sonographic and histopathological findings were classified into four categories: benign, indeterminate, suspicious, and malignant. The histopathological findings were compared with the definitive excision pathology results. Patients with benign core biopsies underwent a detailed review to determine the false-negative rate. The correlations between the ultrasonography, FNAB, and CNB were determined. Results Eight hundred eighty patients were diagnosed with malignant disease, and of these, 23 (2.5%) diagnoses were found to be false-negative after core biopsy. After an intensive review of discordant FNAB results, the final false-negative rate was reduced to 1.1% (p-value = 0.025). The kappa coefficients for correlations between methods were 0.304 (p-value < 0.0001) for ultrasound and FNAB, 0.254 (p-value < 0.0001) for ultrasound and CNB, and 0.726 (p-value < 0.0001) for FNAB and CNB. Conclusions Concurrent CNB and FNAB under ultrasound guidance can provide accurate preoperative diagnosis of breast lesions and provide important information for appropriate treatment. Identification of discordant results using careful radiological-histopathological correlation can reduce the false-negative rate. PMID:20637074

  8. GENOTYPE CHARACTERIZATION OF Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis ISOLATED FROM HUMAN AND CANINE BIOPSIES WITH AMERICAN CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    FERREIRA, Lasaro Teixeira; GOMES, Aparecida Helena de Souza; PEREIRA-CHIOCCOLA, Vera Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: American tegumentary leishmaniasis (ATL) can be caused by Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis complex. The evolution of ATL initially results in lesions and can develop into disseminated or diffuse forms. The genetic diversity of L. (V.) braziliensis in some endemic areas of Brazil has been poorly studied, such as in the state of São Paulo. This study analyzed the genetic diversity of L. (V.) braziliensis isolates collected from patients and dogs with LTA from the state of São Paulo. Methods: Leishmaniasis diagnosis was determined by PCR. The 132 biopsies were collected in different regions of Sao Paulo State, Brazil (36 municipalities). The genetic characterization of L. (V.) braziliensis isolates was tested by RFLP-PCR using DNA extracted from biopsies. The primer set amplified a specific region of Leishmania internal transcribed spacers of the ribosomal DNA locus. Results: Of the 132 samples, 52 (40%) were completely genotyped by RFLP-PCR (44 from human patients and eight from dogs). The results showed nine distinct patterns. The majority of the genotyped samples were from Sorocaba (30), and the others were distributed among 14 other municipalities. The first pattern was more frequent (29 samples), followed by pattern 2 (nine samples) and pattern 3 (three samples). Patterns 4, 6, 7, 8 and 9 were composed of two samples each and pattern 5 of one sample. Conclusion: These results suggest that polymorphic strains of L. (V.) braziliensis circulate in the state of São Paulo. These data agree with studies from other regions of Brazil, showing great variability among the natural populations of endemic foci. PMID:26200968

  9. A protocol to correct for intra- and interspecific variation in tail hair growth to align isotope signatures of segmentally cut tail hair to a common time line

    PubMed Central

    Burnik Šturm, Martina; Pukazhenthi, Budhan; Reed, Dolores; Ganbaatar, Oyunsaikhan; Sušnik, Stane; Haymerle, Agnes; Voigt, Christian C; Kaczensky, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Rationale In recent years, segmental stable isotope analysis of hair has been a focus of research in animal dietary ecology and migration. To correctly assign tail hair segments to seasons or even Julian dates, information on tail hair growth rates is a key parameter, but is lacking for most species. Methods We (a) reviewed the literature on tail hair growth rates in mammals; b) made own measurements of three captive equid species; (c) measured ?2H, ?13C and ?15N values in sequentially cut tail hairs of three sympatric, free-ranging equids from the Mongolian Gobi, using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS); and (d) collected environmental background data on seasonal variation by measuring ?2H values in precipitation by IRMS and by compiling pasture productivity measured by remote sensing via the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Results Tail hair growth rates showed significant inter- and intra-specific variation making temporal alignment problematic. In the Mongolian Gobi, high seasonal variation of ?2H values in precipitation results in winter lows and summer highs of ?2H values of available water sources. In water-dependent equids, this seasonality is reflected in the isotope signatures of sequentially cut tails hairs. Conclusions In regions which are subject to strong seasonal patterns we suggest identifying key isotopes which show strong seasonal variation in the environment and can be expected to be reflected in the animal tissue. The known interval between the maxima and minima of these isotope values can then be used to correctly temporally align the segmental stable isotope signature for each individual animal. © 2015 The Authors. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26044272

  10. Observing The Extended Lunar Sodium Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Majd; Mendillo, M.

    2009-09-01

    A Boston University all-sky camera situated in the El Leoncito Observatory in Argentina has been monitoring the skies nightly since April 2006 to study mesospheric phenomena. One of the several filters used for this CCD camera system is for narrow-band sodium (D1 + D2) emission. In addition to terrestrial effects, observations capture low level brightness features traced to lunar origin. In what is considered to be the largest continuous dataset for lunar sodium, this work represents the results of over 3 years of monitoring the extended tail of the Moon. The extended lunar sodium tail can be observed by this method for a few nights centered on New Moon. The brightness of the extended lunar tail is calibrated in Rayleighs using standard stars. We use the time history of brightness variations, from month to month, as a proxy for studying variability in mechanisms responsible for the generation of lunar sodium capable of escape. The period of our observations of the extended lunar sodium tail overlaps with an epoch of minimal solar activity, as well as years of non-prominent meteor showers, resulting in minimal variations in some of the main source processes. Thus we see no strong correlations between tail brightness and potential sources (solar photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering, micro-meteor impacts). Further progress awaits a more favorable period of potential source variations.

  11. THE DUST TAIL OF ASTEROID (3200) PHAETHON

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Li Jing; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears {approx}>350'' (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius {approx}1 {mu}m and a combined mass {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures ({approx}1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

  12. X-ray Tail in NGC 7619

    E-print Network

    Dong-Woo Kim; Eunhyeuk Kim; Giuseppina Fabbiano; Ginevra Trinchieri

    2008-09-25

    We present new observational results of NGC 7619, an elliptical galaxy with a prominent X-ray tail and a dominant member of the Pegasus group. With Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, we confirm the presence of a long X-ray tail in the SW direction; moreover, we identify for the first time a sharp discontinuity of the X-ray surface brightness in the opposite (NE) side of the galaxy. The density, temperature and pressure jump at the NE discontinuity suggest a Mach number ~1, corresponding to a galaxy velocity of ~500 km s-1, relative to the surrounding hot gas. Spectral analysis of these data shows that the Iron abundance of the hot gaseous medium is much higher (1-2 solar) near the center of NGC 7619 and in the tail extending from the core than in the surrounding regions (tail is originated from the galaxy. The possible origin of the head-tail structure is either on-going ram-pressure stripping or sloshing. The morphology of the structure is more in line with a ram pressure stripping phenomenon, while the position of NGC 7619 at the center of the Pegasus I group, and its dominance, would prefer sloshing.

  13. The Tidal Tails of NGC 5466

    E-print Network

    M. Fellhauer; N. W. Evans; V. Belokurov; M. I. Wilkinson; G. Gilmore

    2007-06-18

    The study of substructure in the stellar halo of the Milky Way has made a lot of progress in recent years, especially with the advent of surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Here, we study the newly discovered tidal tails of the Galactic globular cluster NGC 5466. By means of numerical simulations, we reproduce the shape, direction and surface density of the tidal tails, as well as the structural and kinematical properties of the present-day NGC 5466. Although its tails are very extended in SDSS data (> 45 degrees), NGC 5466 is only losing mass slowly at the present epoch and so can survive for probably a further Hubble time. The effects of tides at perigalacticon and disc crossing are the dominant causes of the slow dissolution of NGC 5466, accounting for about 60 % of the mass loss over the course of its evolution. The morphology of the tails provides a constraint on the proper motion -- the observationally determined proper motion has to be refined (within the stated error margins) to match the location of the tidal tails.

  14. Comparative analysis of laparoscopic and ultrasound-guided biopsy methods for gene expression analysis in transgenic goats.

    PubMed

    Melo, C H; Sousa, F C; Batista, R I P T; Sanchez, D J D; Souza-Fabjan, J M G; Freitas, V J F; Melo, L M; Teixeira, D I A

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare laparoscopic (LP) and ultrasound-guided (US) biopsy methods to obtain either liver or splenic tissue samples for ectopic gene expression analysis in transgenic goats. Tissue samples were collected from human granulocyte colony stimulating factor (hG-CSF)-transgenic bucks and submitted to real-time PCR for the endogenous genes (Sp1, Baff, and Gapdh) and the transgene (hG-CSF). Both LP and US biopsy methods were successful in obtaining liver and splenic samples that could be analyzed by PCR (i.e., sufficient sample sizes and RNA yield were obtained). Although the number of attempts made to obtain the tissue samples was similar (P > 0.05), LP procedures took considerably longer than the US method (P = 0.03). Finally, transgene transcripts were not detected in spleen or liver samples. Thus, for the phenotypic characterization of a transgenic goat line, investigation of ectopic gene expression can be made successfully by LP or US biopsy, avoiding the traditional approach of euthanasia. PMID:26345799

  15. Revegetation and rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beedlow, P.A.

    1984-05-01

    Guidelines for using vegetation and rock to protect inactive uranium mill tailings from erosion were developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technology Development program. Information on soils, climate, and vegetation were collected for 20 inactive tailings sites in the western United States. Sites were grouped according to similarities in climate and vegetation. Soil loss for those sites was characterized using the Universal Soil Loss Equation. Test plots were used to evaluate (1) the interaction between vegetation and sealant barrier systems and (2) the effects of surface rock on soil water and vegetation. Lysimeter and simulation studies were used to direct and support field experiments. 49 references, 17 figures, 16 tables.

  16. Accuracy evaluation of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Walter J.; Nye, Jonathan A.; Schuster, David M.; Nieh, Peter T.; Master, Viraj A.; Votaw, John R.; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions.

  17. Accuracy Evaluation of a 3D Ultrasound-guided Biopsy System.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Walter J; Nye, Jonathan A; Schuster, David M; Nieh, Peter T; Master, Viraj A; Votaw, John R; Fei, Baowei

    2013-03-14

    Early detection of prostate cancer is critical in maximizing the probability of successful treatment. Current systematic biopsy approach takes 12 or more randomly distributed core tissue samples within the prostate and can have a high potential, especially with early disease, for a false negative diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to determine the accuracy of a 3D ultrasound-guided biopsy system. Testing was conducted on prostate phantoms created from an agar mixture which had embedded markers. The phantoms were scanned and the 3D ultrasound system was used to direct the biopsy. Each phantom was analyzed with a CT scan to obtain needle deflection measurements. The deflection experienced throughout the biopsy process was dependent on the depth of the biopsy target. The results for markers at a depth of less than 20 mm, 20-30 mm, and greater than 30 mm were 3.3 mm, 4.7 mm, and 6.2 mm, respectively. This measurement encapsulates the entire biopsy process, from the scanning of the phantom to the firing of the biopsy needle. Increased depth of the biopsy target caused a greater deflection from the intended path in most cases which was due to an angular incidence of the biopsy needle. Although some deflection was present, this system exhibits a clear advantage in the targeted biopsy of prostate cancer and has the potential to reduce the number of false negative biopsies for large lesions. PMID:24392206

  18. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha

    2015-01-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a ‘gold standard’ surgical biopsy or a “blind” closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to ‘blind’ closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates. PMID:26150917

  19. Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.; Bochsler, P.N.; Hall, S.M.; Gidlewski, T.; O'Rourke, K. I.; Spraker, T.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    In September 2002, chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disorder of captive and wild cervids, was diagnosed in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from a captive farm in Wisconsin. The facility was subsequently quarantined, and in January 2006 the remaining 76 deer were depopulated. Sixty animals (79%) were found to be positive by immunohistochemical staining for the abnormal prion protein (PrPCWD) in at least one tissue; the prevalence of positive staining was high even in young deer. Although none of the deer displayed clinical signs suggestive of CWD at depopulation, 49 deer had considerable accumulation of the abnormal prion in the medulla at the level of the obex. Extraneural accumulation of the abnormal protein was observed in 59 deer, with accumulation in the retropharyngeal lymph node in 58 of 59 (98%), in the tonsil in 56 of 59 (95%), and in the rectal mucosal lymphoid tissue in 48 of 58 (83%). The retina was positive in 4 deer, all with marked accumulation of prion in the obex. One deer was considered positive for PrPCWD in the brain but not in the extraneural tissue, a novel observation in white-tailed deer. The infection rate in captive deer was 20-fold higher than in wild deer. Although weakly related to infection rates in extraneural tissues, prion genotype was strongly linked to progression of prion accumulation in the obex. Antemortem testing by biopsy of rectoanal mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (or other peripheral lymphoid tissue) may be a useful adjunct to tonsil biopsy for surveillance in captive herds at risk for CWD infection.

  20. Design of tailing dam using red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Subrat; Sahoo, Tapaswini; Das, Sarat

    2013-06-01

    Red mud, waste industrial product from aluminum industries produced approximately 75 million tonnes every year with less than half of this is used. Storage of this unutilized red mud takes vast tracts of usable land and pollutes, land, air and water. Construction of high embankments, under passes, flyovers, tailing dams uses vast tract of natural resources (top soil) is also matter of concern as its takes thousands of years to form the natural soil. This paper discusses use of red mud for construction of tailing dam based on laboratory findings and finite element analysis. The geotechnical properties such as plasticity, compaction, permeability, shear strength characteristics and dispersion of red mud are presented. Stability and seepage analysis of tailing dams as per finite element analysis using the above geotechnical parameters is presented.

  1. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  2. Development of a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cool, Derek; Sherebrin, Shi; Izawa, Jonathan; Fenster, Aaron

    2007-03-01

    Biopsy of the prostate using ultrasound guidance is the clinical gold standard for diagnosis of prostate adenocarinoma. However, because early stage tumors are rarely visible under US, the procedure carries high false-negative rates and often patients require multiple biopsies before cancer is detected. To improve cancer detection, it is imperative that throughout the biopsy procedure, physicians know where they are within the prostate and where they have sampled during prior biopsies. The current biopsy procedure is limited to using only 2D ultrasound images to find and record target biopsy core sample sites. This information leaves ambiguity as the physician tries to interpret the 2D information and apply it to their 3D workspace. We have developed a 3D ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy system that provides 3D intra-biopsy information to physicians for needle guidance and biopsy location recording. The system is designed to conform to the workflow of the current prostate biopsy procedure, making it easier for clinical integration. In this paper, we describe the system design and validate its accuracy by performing an in vitro biopsy procedure on US/CT multi-modal patient-specific prostate phantoms. A clinical sextant biopsy was performed by a urologist on the phantoms and the 3D models of the prostates were generated with volume errors less than 4% and mean boundary errors of less than 1 mm. Using the 3D biopsy system, needles were guided to within 1.36 +/- 0.83 mm of 3D targets and the position of the biopsy sites were accurately localized to 1.06 +/- 0.89 mm for the two prostates.

  3. Are Repeat Prostate Biopsies Safe? A Cohort Analysis From the SEARCH Database

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Ryan P.; Stroup, Sean P.; Schroeck, Florian R.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Millard, Frederick; Terris, Martha K.; Aronson, William J.; Presti, Joseph C.; Amling, Christopher L.; Kane, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Patients question whether multiple biopsy sessions cause worse prostate cancer outcomes. Therefore, we investigated whether there is an association between the number of prior biopsy sessions and biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Materials and Methods: Men in the SEARCH (Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital) database who underwent radical prostatectomy between 1988 and 2010 after a known number of prior biopsies were included in the analysis. Number of biopsy sessions (range 1 to 8) was examined as a continuous and categorical (1, 2 and 3 to 8) variable. Biochemical recurrence was defined as a prostate specific antigen greater than 0.2 ng/ml, 2 values at 0.2 ng/ml or secondary treatment for an increased prostate specific antigen. The association between number of prior biopsy sessions and biochemical recurrence was analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from biochemical recurrence were compared among the groups. Results Of the 2,739 men in the SEARCH database who met the inclusion criteria 2,251 (82%) had only 1 biopsy, 365(13%) had 2 biopsies and 123 (5%) had 3 or more biopsies. More biopsy sessions were associated with higher prostate specific antigen (p <0.001), greater prostate weight (p <0.001), lower biopsy Gleason sum (p = 0.01) and more organ confined (pT2) disease (p = 0.017). The Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated no association between number of biopsy sessions as a continuous or categorical variable and biochemical recurrence. Kaplan-Meier estimates of freedom from biochemical recurrence were similar across biopsy groups (log rank p = 0.211). Conclusions Multiple biopsy sessions are not associated with an increased risk of biochemical recurrence in men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Multiple biopsy sessions appear to select for a low risk cohort. PMID:22498218

  4. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China's largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65?×?10(4)?mg·kg(-1) with an average value of 4.67?×?10(3)?mg·kg(-1), which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181?mg·kg(-1)). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (La(N)/Yb(N), La(N)/Sm(N) and Gd(N)/Yb(N)). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind. PMID:26198417

  5. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-07-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China’s largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65?×?104?mg·kg-1 with an average value of 4.67?×?103?mg·kg-1, which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181?mg·kg-1). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, LaN/SmN and GdN/YbN). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind.

  6. Male-specific use of the purr in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Bolt, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, purring has been described in mostly affiliative contexts. In the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), both males and females purr, but only males were observed purring in agonistic contexts. In order to determine whether male ring-tailed lemurs purr as aggressive displays during intrasexual agonistic encounters, 480 h of focal data were collected on 25 adult males from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, from March to July 2010. The male purring rate increased during periods of male-male agonism when compared to times without intrasexual agonism, and the purring rate was positively correlated with male dominance rank. However, the purring rate was not significantly higher during winning agonistic interactions when compared with losing encounters. My results indicate that the male ring-tailed lemur purr is used most frequently as an agonistic vocalization in male-male encounters, in addition to being used less frequently in other social contexts, including during tail-waving at females, resting, scent-marking, feeding and copulation. Dominant males have higher purring rates across social situations, suggesting that the purring rate may be driven by intrinsic male qualities rather than functioning as a meaningful signal in each disparate social context. Male purring in intrasexual agonistic encounters can be added to previously described social contexts for ring-tailed lemur purring. PMID:25139722

  7. Geochemical fractions of rare earth elements in soil around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth mine tailing dumps are environmental hazards because tailing easily leaches and erodes by water and wind. To assess the influence of mine tailing on the geochemical behavior of rare earth elements (REEs) in soil, sixty-seven surface soil samples and three soil profile samples were collected from different locations near China’s largest rare earth mine tailing. The total concentration of REEs in surface soils ranged from 156 to 5.65?×?104?mg·kg?1 with an average value of 4.67?×?103?mg·kg?1, which was significantly higher than the average value in China (181?mg·kg?1). We found obvious fractionation of both light and heavy REEs, which was supported by the North American Shale Composite (NASC) and the Post-Archean Average Australian Shale (PAAS) normalized concentration ratios calculated for selected elements (LaN/YbN, LaN/SmN and GdN/YbN). A slightly positive Ce anomaly and a negative Eu anomaly were also found. For all 14 REEs in soils, enrichment was intensified by the mine tailing sources and influenced by the prevailing wind. PMID:26198417

  8. The tidal tails of NGC 2298

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balbinot, Eduardo; Santiago, Basílio X.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Makler, Martin; Maia, Marcio A. G.

    2011-09-01

    We present an implementation of the matched-filter technique to detect tidal tails of globular clusters. The method was tested using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) data for the globular cluster Palomar 5 revealing its well-known tidal tails. We also ran a simulation of a globular cluster with a tidal tail where we successfully recover the tails for a cluster at the same position and with the same characteristics of NGC 2298. Based on the simulation we estimate that the matched-filter increases the contrast of the tail relative to the background of stars by a factor of 2.5 for the case of NGC 2298. We also present the photometry of the globular cluster NGC 2298 using the MOSAIC2 camera installed on the Cerro Tololo International Observatory (CTIO) 4-m telescope. The photometry covers ˜3 deg2 reaching V˜ 23. A fit of a King profile to the radial density profile of NGC 2298 shows that this cluster has a tidal radius of ? which is twice as in the literature. The application of the matched-filter to NGC 2298 reveals several extra-tidal structures, including a leading and trailing tail. We also find that NGC 2298 has extra-tidal structures stretching towards and against the Galactic disc, suggesting strong tidal interaction. Finally, we assess how the matched-filter performs when applied to a globular cluster with and without mass segregation taken into account. We find that disregarding the effects of mass segregation may significantly reduce the detection limit of the matched-filter.

  9. Radial tail resolution in the SELEX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Morelos, A.; Mata, J.; Cooper, P.S.; Engelfried, J.; Aguilera-Servin, J.L.; /San Luis Potosi U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The authors use a 7 Million event data sample of 600 GeV/c single track pion events, where the pion track is reconstructed upstream and downstream of the SELEX RICH. They build the RICH ring radius histogram distribution and count the tail events that fall outside 5{sigma}, giving a fraction of 4 x 10{sup -5} events outside the Gaussian tails. This control of events establishes the ability of using the RICH as velocity spectrometer for high precision searches of the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay like it is planned in the CKM experiment.

  10. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  11. Intermittency for branching walks with heavy tails

    E-print Network

    A. Getan; S. Molchanov; B. Vainberg

    2015-09-25

    Branching random walks on multidimensional lattice with heavy tails and a constant branching rate are considered. It is shown that under these conditions (heavy tails and constant rate), the front propagates exponentially fast, but the particles inside of the front are distributed very non-uniformly. The particles exhibit intermittent behavior in a large part of the region behind the front (i.e., the particles are concentrated only in very sparse spots there). The zone of non-intermittency (were particles are distributed relatively uniformly) extends with a power rate. This rate is found.

  12. Role of sentinel lymph node biopsy in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, L; Bruschini, R; Ansarin, M; Giugliano, G; De Cicco, C; Ionna, F; Paganelli, G; Maffini, F; Werner, JA; Soutar, D

    2006-01-01

    Summary Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity represents about 2% of all malignant neoplasms and 47% of those developing in the head and neck area. The tongue is the most common site involved, and this incidence is increasing mainly in young people, possibly related to human papilloma virus infections. Prognosis depends on the stage: the 5-year survival rate of tongue squamous cell carcinoma, whatever the T stage, is 73% in pN0 cases, 40% in patients with positive nodes without extracapsular spread (pN1 ECS-), and 29% when nodes are metastatic with extracapsular spread (pN1 ECS+: p ? 0.0001). Nodal micrometastases (cN0 pN1) are found in up to 50% of cN0 tongue squamous cell carcinoma patients operated on the neck. At present, no clinical, imaging staging modalities or biological markers are available to diagnose nodal micrometastases. The sentinel node biopsy has been tested since 1996 in order to find a solution to this problem. The sentinel node is the first node reached by the lymphatic stream, assuming an orderly and sequential drainage from the tumour site, and should be predictive of the nodal stage. According to the literature, sentinel node biopsy is a reliable technique in selected cN0 cases, but the procedure is still experimental and should not be performed outside validation trials. Successful application of sentinel node biopsy in the head and neck region requires surgical experience and specific technical devices, including pre-operative lymphoscintigraphy and intra-operative gamma-probe. Moreover, dynamic lymphoscintigraphy seems to be able to show the lymphatic stream from the primary tumour and could allow a selective neck dissection to be tailored thus reducing the related morbidity. PMID:17633153

  13. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  14. Is resection necessary in biopsy-proven asymptomatic pulmonary hamartomas?

    PubMed

    Elsayed, Hany; Abdel Hady, Sarah M; Elbastawisy, Salma E

    2015-12-01

    A best evidence topic was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: in surgically fit patients with biopsy-proven asymptomatic pulmonary hamartoma, is surgical resection superior to conservative watchful waiting in terms of outcome. A total of 460 papers were identified using the reported search, of which 9 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, date, journal, country, study type, population, outcomes and key results are tabulated. Three studies were observational following up biopsy-proven asymptomatic pulmonary hamartoma with no resection for a mean period up to 5 years (where mentioned). No patients developed new symptoms or malignant transformation. One of the three studies considered tumour growth in patients with pulmonary hamartoma to be slow with a mean expansion in transverse diameter of 3.2 ± 2.6 mm per year. There were five sizable retrospective studies and one observational study for resection of pulmonary hamartoma. Three of the six studies showed no postoperative mortality but there was an association with major resection (lobectomy/pneumonectomy) ranging from 10 to 14%. There was no tumour recurrence during a long follow-up period in the three studies. One other study had a 4% postoperative mortality rate and a 1.8% postoperative lung cancer developing rate during a follow-up period of 61 months with a consequent recommendation against surgery in asymptomatic patients. In another study, there was a 2.6% recurrence rate after surgical resection during a follow-up period of 7.3 years whereas in the final observational study, 3 patients developed a malignant lung lesion during a follow-up period of 2-10 years after resection and in the same area from where the hamartoma was excised. In conclusion, we would recommend surveillance, rather than resection, of patients with biopsy-proven asymptomatic pulmonary hamartomas, since there is no evidence of malignant transformation during follow-up in any study. Resection is usually safe but a significant number of patients need a major resection (lobectomy or pneumonectomy, 10-14%) for clearance. Diagnosis can be achieved by a combination of radiological evidence and fine needle biopsy (sensitivity 85-90%). Therefore, resection should be reserved for symptomatic patients, or where the diagnosis remains in doubt. PMID:26409563

  15. Advanced characterization of microscopic kidney biopsies utilizing image analysis techniques.

    PubMed

    Goudas, Theodosios; Doukas, Charalampos; Chatziioannou, Aristotle; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2012-01-01

    Correct annotation and identification of salient regions in Kidney biopsy images can provide an estimation of pathogenesis in obstructive nephropathy. This paper presents a tool for the automatic or manual segmentation of such regions along with methodology for their characterization in terms of the exhibited pathology. The proposed implementation is based on custom code written in Java and the utilization of open source tools (i.e. RapidMiner, ImageJ). The corresponding implementation details along with the initial evaluation of the proposed integrated system are also presented in the paper. PMID:23366906

  16. Multiple cores of high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and any core of atypia on first biopsy are significant predictor for cancer detection at a repeat biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Sun; Ko, Kwang Jin; Shin, Seung Jea; Ryoo, Hyun Soo; Song, Wan; Sung, Hyun Hwan; Han, Deok Hyun; Jeong, Byong Chang; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Kyu Sung; Lee, Sung Won; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the differences in the cancer detection rate and pathological findings on a second prostate biopsy according to benign diagnosis, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) on first biopsy. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,323 patients who underwent a second prostate biopsy between March 1995 and November 2012. We divided the patients into three groups according to the pathologic findings on the first biopsy (benign diagnosis, HGPIN, and ASAP). We compared the cancer detection rate and Gleason scores on second biopsy and the unfavorable disease rate after radical prostatectomy among the three groups. Results A total of 214 patients (16.2%) were diagnosed with prostate cancer on a second biopsy. The rate of cancer detection was 14.6% in the benign diagnosis group, 22.1% in the HGPIN group, and 32.1% in the ASAP group, respectively (p<0.001). When patients were divided into subgroups according to the number of positive cores, the rate of cancer detection was 16.7%, 30.5%, 31.0%, and 36.4% in patients with a single core of HGPIN, more than one core of HGPIN, a single core of ASAP, and more than one core of ASAP, respectively. There were no significant differences in Gleason scores on second biopsy (p=0.324) or in the unfavorable disease rate after radical prostatectomy among the three groups (benign diagnosis vs. HGPIN, p=0.857, and benign diagnosis vs. ASAP, p=0.957, respectively). Conclusions Patients with multiple cores of HGPIN or any core number of ASAP on a first biopsy had a significantly higher cancer detection rate on a second biopsy. Repeat biopsy should be considered and not be delayed in those patients. PMID:26682019

  17. Flight costs of long, sexually selected tails in hummingbirds

    PubMed Central

    James Clark, Christopher; Dudley, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The elongated tails adorning many male birds have traditionally been thought to degrade flight performance by increasing body drag. However, aerodynamic interactions between the body and tail can be substantial in some contexts, and a short tail may actually reduce rather than increase overall drag. To test how tail length affects flight performance, we manipulated the tails of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) by increasing their length with the greatly elongated tail streamers of the red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) and reducing their length by removing first the rectrices and then the entire tail (i.e. all rectrices and tail covert feathers). Flight performance was measured in a wind tunnel by measuring (i) the maximum forward speed at which the birds could fly and (ii) the metabolic cost of flight while flying at airspeeds from 0 to 14?m?s?1. We found a significant interaction effect between tail treatment and airspeed: an elongated tail increased the metabolic cost of flight by up to 11 per cent, and this effect was strongest at higher flight speeds. Maximum flight speed was concomitantly reduced by 3.4 per cent. Also, removing the entire tail decreased maximum flight speed by 2 per cent, suggesting beneficial aerodynamic effects for tails of normal length. The effects of elongation are thus subtle and airspeed-specific, suggesting that diversity in avian tail morphology is associated with only modest flight costs. PMID:19324747

  18. The Value of Routine Biopsy during Percutaneous Kyphoplasty for Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chu; Cai, Siyi; Zhang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Percutaneous kyphoplasty (PKP) is now widely performed to treat VCF, which is usually caused by osteoporosis. Previous researches have reported unsuspected malignancies found by biopsy. However, the safety and cost-effective profiles of routine biopsy during PKP are unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of routine biopsy during PKP in treatment of VCF. Methods Ninety-three patients (September 2007–November 2010) undergoing PKP without biopsy were reviewed as the control group. One hundred and three consecutive patients (November 2010–September 2013) undergoing PKP with biopsy of every operated vertebral level were prospectively enrolled as the biopsy group. The rate of unsuspected lesions was reported, and the severe adverse events, surgical duration, cement leakage rate and pain control were compared between the two groups. Results No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups, regarding the severe adverse events, surgical duration, cement leakage rate and pain control. Four unsuspected lesions were found in the biopsy group, three of which were malignancies with a 2.9% (3/103) unsuspected malignancy rate. The economic analysis showed that routine biopsy was cost-effective in finding new malignancies comparing with a routine cancer screening campaign. Conclusions Routine biopsy during PKP was safe and cost-effective in finding unsuspected malignancies. We advocate routine biopsy in every operated vertebral level during PKP for VCF patients. PMID:25526360

  19. Molasses Tail in Dense Hard Core Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Masaharu; Alder, Berni

    2010-03-01

    The long slow decaying potential part of the shear-stress autocorrelation function has been called the ``molasses tail'' to differentiate it from the hydrodynamic origin of the long time tail in the velocity autocorrelation function and to emphasize its relation to the highly viscous glassy state [1]. Some twenty years ago, the molasses tail in dense liquids near the solid-fluid transition point was speculated to be due to transient crystal nuclei formation [2].This slow decaying process of the OACF and its decomposition (pair, triplet, and quadruplet) is a key factor in understanding the onset of the glass transition. With additional computer power, we are now investigating the origin of the molasses tail using a modern fast algorithm based on event-driven Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation.We confirm the non-algebraic decay (stretched exponential) at intermediate times corresponding to the existence of various cluster sizes a solid cluster at high densities. The decay in dense systems thus consists of a three stage relaxation process, which are the kinetic regime, the molasses regime and the diffusional power regime[3]. [1] B. J. Alder, in Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Statistical-mechanical Systems, G. Ciccotti and W. G. Hoover, eds.(North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1986) 66. [2] A. J. C. Ladd, and B. J. Alder, J. Stat. Phys. 57, 473 (1989). [3] M. Isobe and B. J. Alder, Mol. Phys., 107, 609 (2009).

  20. Experiments on a Tail-wheel Shimmy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harling, R; Dietz, O

    1954-01-01

    Model tests on the "running belt" and tests with a full-scale tail wheel were made on a rotating drum as well as on a runway in order to investigate the causes of the undesirable shimmy phenomena frequently occurring on airplane tail wheels, and the means of avoiding them. The small model (scale 1:10) permitted simulation of the mass, moments of inertia, and fuselage stiffness of the airplane and determination of their influence on the shimmy, whereas by means of the larger model with pneumatic tires (scale 1:2) more accurate investigations were made on the tail wheel itself. The results of drum and road tests show good agreement with one another and with model values. Detailed investigations were made regarding the dependence of the shimmy tendency on trail, rolling speed, load, size of tires, ground friction,and inclination of the swivel axis; furthermore, regarding the influence of devices with restoring effect on the tail wheel, and the friction damping required for prevention of shimmy. Finally observations from slow-motion pictures are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the influence of tire deformation.

  1. Dispersal in female white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Seven of 35 yearling female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a migratory herd in northeastern Minnesota dispersed 18-168 km from natal ranges during late May through June. Dispersal as a proximate event appears voluntary and independent of deer density.

  2. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-print Network

    storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadiumURANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill

  3. Mine Waste Technology Program Electrochemical Tailings Cover

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 40, Electrochemical Tailings Cover, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). MSE Technology A...

  4. Functional morphology of the aardvark tail.

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Mori, K; Koyabu, D; Kawada, S; Komiya, T; Itou, T; Koie, H; Kitagawa, M; Sakai, T

    2013-04-01

    The musculoskeletal system of the aardvark (Orycteropus afer) tail was morphologically examined in two adult specimens. The tail musculature comprised three muscular groups, viz. a dorsal sacrocaudal system that consisted of the irregularly oriented Musculus sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis and M. sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis, a lateral inter-vertebral connecting system, and a ventral sacrocaudal system characterized by the thick M. sacrocaudalis ventralis lateralis and M. sacrocaudalis ventralis medialis. Both the dorsal and ventral systems possessed large tendon groups that strengthened the tail structure. Computed tomography (CT) examination showed the presence of large but homogeneous cartilaginous inter-vertebral discs, whereas V-shaped bones were situated at the ventral aspect of the caudal vertebrae at the level of the inter-vertebral discs. CT visualization of the tendons and V-shaped bones in various tail positions suggested that these structures contribute to the tunnel digging action by bearing the trunk weight and lending force when the aardvark are displacing the soil by means of the forelimbs. PMID:22713114

  5. The Tailocin Tale: Peeling off Phage Tails.

    PubMed

    Ghequire, Maarten G K; De Mot, René

    2015-10-01

    Bacteria produce a variety of particles resembling phage tails that are functional without an associated phage head. Acquired from diverse bacteriophage sources, these stand-alone units were sculpted to serve different ecological roles. Such tailocins mediate antagonism between related bacteria as well as interactions with eukaryotic cells. PMID:26433692

  6. Lifshits tails in the hierarchical Anderson model

    E-print Network

    Simon Kuttruf; Peter Müller

    2011-08-21

    We prove that the homogeneous hierarchical Anderson model exhibits a Lifshits tail at the upper edge of its spectrum. The Lifshits exponent is given in terms of the spectral dimension of the homogeneous hierarchical structure. Our approach is based on Dirichlet-Neumann bracketing for the hierarchical Laplacian and a large-deviation argument.

  7. On the structure of tidal tails

    E-print Network

    Andreas H. W. Küpper; Andrew Macleod; Douglas C. Heggie

    2008-04-15

    We examine the longitudinal distribution of the stars escaping from a cluster along tidal tails. Using both theory and simulations, we show that, even in the case of a star cluster in a circular galactic orbit, when the tide is steady, the distribution exhibits maxima at a distance of many tidal radii from the cluster.

  8. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B.; Hricak, Hedvig

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot’s accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  9. Is Visual Registration Equivalent to Semiautomated Registration in Prostate Biopsy?

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jin Tae; Hong, Cheng William; Pinto, Peter A.; Williams, Molly; Xu, Sheng; Kruecker, Jochen; Yan, Pingkun; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2015-01-01

    In magnetic resonance iimaging- (MRI-) ultrasound (US) guided biopsy, suspicious lesions are identified on MRI, registered on US, and targeted during biopsy. The registration can be performed either by a human operator (visual registration) or by fusion software. Previous studies showed that software registration is fairly accurate in locating suspicious lesions and helps to improve the cancer detection rate. Here, the performance of visual registration was examined for ability to locate suspicious lesions defined on MRI. This study consists of 45 patients. Two operators with differing levels of experience (<1 and 18 years) performed visual registration. The overall spatial difference by the two operators in 72 measurements was 10.6?±?6.0?mm. Each operator showed a spatial difference of 9.4?±?5.1?mm (experienced; 39 lesions) and 12.1?±?6.6?mm (inexperienced; 33 lesions), respectively. In a head-to-head comparison of the same 16 lesions from 12 patients, the spatial differences were 9.7?mm?±?4.9?mm (experienced) and 13.4?mm?±?7.4?mm (inexperienced). There were significant differences between the two operators (unpaired, P value?=?0.042; paired, P value?=?0.044). The substantial differences by the two operators suggest that visual registration could improperly and inaccurately target many tumors, thereby potentially leading to missed diagnosis or false characterization on pathology. PMID:25821799

  10. Liver biopsy histopathology for diagnosis of Johne's disease in sheep.

    PubMed

    Smith, S L; Wilson, P R; Collett, M G; Heuer, C; West, D M; Stevenson, M; Chambers, J P

    2014-09-01

    Sheep with Johne's disease develop epithelioid macrophage microgranulomas, specific to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection, in the terminal ileum, mesenteric lymph nodes, and organs distant to the alimentary tract such as the liver. The objectives of this study were to determine whether liver pathology was present in ewes affected by Map and whether liver cores provide adequate tissue for this potential diagnostic marker. One hundred and twenty-six adult, low body condition ewes were euthanized, necropsied, and underwent simulated liver biopsy. Ileal lesions typical of Map were found in 60 ewes. Hepatic epithelioid microgranulomas were observed in all ewes with Type 3b (n = 40) and 82% (n = 11) with Type 3c ileal lesions. None were found in ewes unaffected by Map or with Type 1, 2, or 3a ileal lesions. Liver biopsy core samples provided adequate tissue for histopathology with a sensitivity and specificity of 96% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-0.99) and 100% (95% CI, 0.95-1), respectively for detection of types 3b and 3c ileal lesions. PMID:24676594

  11. Postobstructive pulmonary edema after biopsy of a nasopharyngeal mass

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Keyur Kamlesh; Ahmad, Sabina Qureshi; Shah, Vikas; Lee, Haesoon

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of 17 year-old male with a nasopharyngeal rhabdomyosarcoma who developed postobstructive pulmonary edema (POPE) after removing the endotracheal tube following biopsy. He developed muffled voice, rhinorrhea, dysphagia, odynophagia, and difficulty breathing through nose and weight loss of 20 pounds in the preceding 2 months. A nasopharyngoscopy revealed a fleshy nasopharyngeal mass compressing the soft and hard palate. Head and neck MRI revealed a large mass in the nasopharynx extending into the bilateral choana and oropharynx. Biopsy of the mass was taken under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Immediately after extubation he developed oxygen desaturation, which did not improve with bag mask ventilation with 100% of oxygen, but improved after a dose of succinylcholine. He was re-intubated and pink, frothy fluid was suctioned from the endotracheal tube. Chest radiograph (CXR) was suggestive of an acute pulmonary edema. He improved with mechanical ventilation and intravenous furosemide. His pulmonary edema resolved over the next 24 h. POPE is a rare but serious complication associated with upper airway obstruction. The pathophysiology of POPE involves hemodynamic changes occurring in the lung and the heart during forceful inspiration against a closed airway due to an acute or chronic airway obstruction. This case illustrates the importance of considering the development of POPE with general anesthesia, laryngospasm and removal of endotracheal tube to make prompt diagnosis and to initiate appropriate management.

  12. MRI-Safe Robot for Endorectal Prostate Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Srimathveeravalli, Govindarajan; Sebrecht, Peter; Petrisor, Doru; Coleman, Jonathan; Solomon, Stephen B; Hricak, Hedvig

    2013-09-16

    This paper reports the development of an MRI-Safe robot for direct (interventional) MRI-guided endorectal prostate biopsy. The robot is constructed of nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive materials, and is electricity free, using pneumatic actuation and optical sensors. Targeting biopsy lesions of MRI abnormality presents substantial clinical potential for the management of prostate cancer. The paper describes MRI-Safe requirements, presents the kinematic architecture, design and construction of the robot, and a comprehensive set of preclinical tests for MRI compatibility and needle targeting accuracy. The robot has a compact and simple 3 degree-of-freedom (DoF) structure, two for orienting a needle-guide and one to preset the depth of needle insertion. The actual insertion is performed manually through the guide and up to the preset depth. To reduce the complexity and size of the robot next to the patient, the depth setting DoF is remote. Experimental results show that the robot is safe to use in any MRI environment (MRI-Safe). Comprehensive MRI tests show that the presence and motion of the robot in the MRI scanner cause virtually no image deterioration or signal to noise ratio (SNR) change. Robot's accuracy in bench test, CT-guided in-vitro, MRI-guided in-vitro and animal tests are 0.37mm, 1.10mm, 2.09mm, and 2.58mm respectively. These values are acceptable for clinical use. PMID:25378897

  13. Microscale mineralogical characterization of As, Fe, and Ni in uranium mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essilfie-Dughan, Joseph; Hendry, M. Jim; Warner, Jeff; Kotzer, Tom

    2012-11-01

    Uranium (U) ores can contain high concentrations of elements of concern (EOCs), such as arsenic (As) and nickel (Ni) present in sulfide and arsenide minerals. The U in these ores is often solubilized by adding H2SO4 to attain a pH ?1 under oxic conditions. This process releases some EOCs from the primary minerals into solution. The barren raffinate (solution remaining after U extraction) is subsequently neutralized with Ca(OH)2 to a terminal pH of ?10.5, resulting in a reduction in the aqueous concentrations of the EOCs. These neutralized raffinates are mixed with the non-reacted primary minerals and discharged as tailing into tailings management facilities (TMFs). To aid in the accurate characterization and quantification of the mineralogical controls on the concentrations of EOCs in the tailings porewater, their spatial distribution and speciation were studied at the micron scale in tailings samples collected from the Deilmann U Tailings Management Facility (DTMF), northern Saskatchewan, Canada. Backscattered electron images of the tailings samples generated using an electron microprobe show the presence of nodules (10-200 ?m size) surrounded by bright rims. Wavelength dispersive spectrometric (WDS) and synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (?-XRF) elemental mapping show that the nodules are dominated by Ca and S (as gypsum) and the bright rims are dominated by Fe, As, and Ni. Micro-X-ray absorption near-edge structure (?-XANES) spectra collected within and near the rims indicate that the Fe and Ni are present mainly in the +3 and +2 oxidation states, respectively; for As, the +5 oxidation state dominates but significant amounts of the +3 oxidation state are present in some areas. Linear combination fit analyses of the K-edges for the Fe, As, and Ni ?-XANES spectra to reference compounds suggest the Fe in the rims is present as ferrihydrite with As and Ni are adsorbed to it. Energy dispersive spectrometric (EDS) data indicate that isolated, highly reflective particles distributed throughout the tailings matrix are primary As-, Cu-, Fe-, and Ni-bearing minerals. Geochemical modeling of the neutralization process shows that the nodules (gypsum) formed at pH ?1 and acted as a substrate for the precipitation of ferrihydrite at pH ?3.4. The As and Ni subsequently adsorb to the ferrihydrite. Overall, the microscale data suggest that the As and Ni adsorbed onto the ferrihydrite should remain stable for many years and continue to the control the Fe, As, and Ni concentrations in the tailings porewater.

  14. Comparison of measured and estimated maximum skin doses during CT fluoroscopy lung biopsies

    SciTech Connect

    Zanca, F.; Jacobs, A.; Crijns, W.; De Wever, W.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To measure patient-specific maximum skin dose (MSD) associated with CT fluoroscopy (CTF) lung biopsies and to compare measured MSD with the MSD estimated from phantom measurements, as well as with the CTDIvol of patient examinations. Methods: Data from 50 patients with lung lesions who underwent a CT fluoroscopy-guided biopsy were collected. The CT protocol consisted of a low-kilovoltage (80 kV) protocol used in combination with an algorithm for dose reduction to the radiology staff during the interventional procedure, HandCare (HC). MSD was assessed during each intervention using EBT2 gafchromic films positioned on patient skin. Lesion size, position, total fluoroscopy time, and patient-effective diameter were registered for each patient. Dose rates were also estimated at the surface of a normal-size anthropomorphic thorax phantom using a 10 cm pencil ionization chamber placed at every 30°, for a full rotation, with and without HC. Measured MSD was compared with MSD values estimated from the phantom measurements and with the cumulative CTDIvol of the procedure. Results: The median measured MSD was 141 mGy (range 38–410 mGy) while the median cumulative CTDIvol was 72 mGy (range 24–262 mGy). The ratio between the MSD estimated from phantom measurements and the measured MSD was 0.87 (range 0.12–4.1) on average. In 72% of cases the estimated MSD underestimated the measured MSD, while in 28% of the cases it overestimated it. The same trend was observed for the ratio of cumulative CTDIvol and measured MSD. No trend was observed as a function of patient size. Conclusions: On average, estimated MSD from dose rate measurements on phantom as well as from CTDIvol of patient examinations underestimates the measured value of MSD. This can be attributed to deviations of the patient's body habitus from the standard phantom size and to patient positioning in the gantry during the procedure.

  15. Unique Structural Features Facilitate Lizard Tail Kristian W. Sanggaard1

    E-print Network

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its

  16. 14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race and trestle used to carry excavated rock and construction materials across tail race. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  17. UNDERSTANDING HEAVY TAILS IN A BOUNDED WORLD OR, IS A TRUNCATED HEAVY TAIL HEAVY OR

    E-print Network

    Samorodnitsky, Gennady

    areas as human travel (Brockmann et al. (2006)), earthquake analysis (Corral (2006)), ani- mal science the characteristic fea- tures of power tails? Answering this question is not straightforward. We start by pointing

  18. Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Libby, Thomas; Moore, Talia Y; Chang-Siu, Evan; Li, Deborah; Cohen, Daniel J; Jusufi, Ardian; Full, Robert J

    2012-01-12

    In 1969, a palaeontologist proposed that theropod dinosaurs used their tails as dynamic stabilizers during rapid or irregular movements, contributing to their depiction as active and agile predators. Since then the inertia of swinging appendages has been implicated in stabilizing human walking, aiding acrobatic manoeuvres by primates and rodents, and enabling cats to balance on branches. Recent studies on geckos suggest that active tail stabilization occurs during climbing, righting and gliding. By contrast, studies on the effect of lizard tail loss show evidence of a decrease, an increase or no change in performance. Application of a control-theoretic framework could advance our general understanding of inertial appendage use in locomotion. Here we report that lizards control the swing of their tails in a measured manner to redirect angular momentum from their bodies to their tails, stabilizing body attitude in the sagittal plane. We video-recorded Red-Headed Agama lizards (Agama agama) leaping towards a vertical surface by first vaulting onto an obstacle with variable traction to induce a range of perturbations in body angular momentum. To examine a known controlled tail response, we built a lizard-sized robot with an active tail that used sensory feedback to stabilize pitch as it drove off a ramp. Our dynamics model revealed that a body swinging its tail experienced less rotation than a body with a rigid tail, a passively compliant tail or no tail. To compare a range of tails, we calculated tail effectiveness as the amount of tailless body rotation a tail could stabilize. A model Velociraptor mongoliensis supported the initial tail stabilization hypothesis, showing as it did a greater tail effectiveness than the Agama lizards. Leaping lizards show that inertial control of body attitude can advance our understanding of appendage evolution and provide biological inspiration for the next generation of manoeuvrable search-and-rescue robots. PMID:22217942

  19. [When only the pathologist may help. Limitation and possibilities of biopsies in Internal Medicine].

    PubMed

    Knüchel-Clarke, R; Lutz, H H; Floege, J; Marx, N; Brümmendorf, T H; Trautwein, C

    2010-04-01

    Histological evaluation after biopsy remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of numerous diseases in Internal Medicine. The gastrointestinal tract (e. g. esophagus, liver and large intestine), the kidneys or bone marrow are organs, where biopsy-driven diagnosis and evaluation of therapeutic regimens are of major relevance. Improvement in blood analysis, endoscopic techniques and radiology could significantly reduce the number of biopsies. Hence under certain circumstances, the risk of biopsy can be avoided and non-invasive markers can sufficiently substitute the histological evaluation. However, histological evaluation derived from biopsies remains the standard of diagnosis in many cases in Internal Medicine. In the present review the current standards and future developments of pathologic diagnosis through biopsy are illustrated. PMID:20195562

  20. MR-guided biopsy: a review of current techniques and applications.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Clifford R; Nour, Sherif Gamal; Lewin, Jonathan S

    2008-02-01

    Biopsy has become a cornerstone of modern medicine and most modern biopsies are performed percutaneously using image guidance, typically computed tomography or ultrasound. MR-guided biopsy offers many advantages over these more traditional modalities, and the recent development of interventional MR imaging techniques has made MR-guided percutaneous biopsies and aspirations a clinical reality. As the field of MR-guided procedures continues to expand and to attract more attention from radiologists, it is important to understand the concepts, techniques, applications, advantages, and limitations of MR-guided biopsy/percutaneous procedures. Radiologists should also recognize the need for their significant involvement in the technical aspects of MR-guided procedures, since several user-defined parameters can alter device visualization in the MR imaging environment and affect procedure safety. This article reviews the prerequisites, systems, and applications of MR-guided biopsy. PMID:18219685

  1. Surgical biopsy is still necessary for BI-RADS 4 calcifications found on digital mammography that are technically too faint for stereotactic core biopsy.

    PubMed

    Jeffries, Deborah O; Neal, Colleen H; Noroozian, Mitra; Joe, Annette I; Pinsky, Renee W; Goodsitt, Mitchell M; Helvie, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of faint BI-RADS 4 calcifications detected with digital mammography that were not amenable to stereotactic core biopsy due to suboptimal visualization. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a HIPAA compliant retrospective search identified 665 wire-localized surgical excisions of calcifications in 606 patients between 2007 and 2010. We included all patients that had surgical excision for initial diagnostic biopsy due to poor calcification visualization, whose current imaging was entirely digital and performed at our institution and who did not have a diagnosis of breast cancer within the prior 2 years. The final study population consisted of 20 wire-localized surgical biopsies in 19 patients performed instead of stereotactic core biopsy due to poor visibility of faint calcifications. Of the 20 biopsies, 4 (20 % confidence intervals 2, 38 %) were malignant, 5 (25 %) showed atypia and 11 (55 %) were benign. Of the malignant cases, two were invasive ductal carcinoma (2 and 1.5 mm), one was intermediate grade DCIS and one was low-grade DCIS. Malignant calcifications ranged from 3 to 12 mm. The breast density was scattered in 6/19 (32 %), heterogeneously dense in 11/19 (58 %) and extremely dense in 2/19 (10 %). Digital mammography-detected faint calcifications that were not amenable to stereotactic biopsy due to suboptimal visualization had a risk of malignancy of 20 %. While infrequent, these calcifications should continue to be considered suspicious and surgical biopsy recommended. PMID:26589316

  2. Tissue fluid shift, forelimb loading, and tail tension in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Johansson, C.; Tipton, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The tail suspension model (head-down tilt) simulates hypogravity in terms of musculoskeletal loss in the rat. However, little is known of tissue fluid shifts and body weight distribution in this model. Tissue fluid pressures were measured by wick catheters in 12 Munich-Wistar rats before, during, and after 48 hrs of tail suspension (about 30 deg head-down tilt). Subcutaneous tissue fluid pressure in the neck increased from -2.2 + or - 0.4 (normal horizontal position) to +4.0 + or - 1.5 cm H2O during tail suspension, indicating a cephalic fluid shift and significant edema during head-down tilt. In a separate study, six rats were suspended at 30-70 deg, and forelimb load and tail tension were measured by a balance and force transducer, respectively. Approximately 50 percent of body weight (BW) was loaded on forelimbs at a head-down tilt angle of 30 deg and forelimb load declined linearly to 10 percent BW at 70 deg. Furthermore, tail tension increased from 50 percent BW at 30 deg to 85 percent BW at 70 deg. These results indicate that less than normal loads are applied to forelimbs of rats suspended at angles of less than 30 deg and that the tail bears an increasing proportion of the rat's body weight at head-down tilt angles of less than 30 deg.

  3. Eimeria spp. (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) from black- and white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus and Cynomys leucurus) in central and southeast Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Seville, R S

    1997-02-01

    Feces collected from live-trapped black- (Cynomys ludovicianus) and white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus) from central and southeastern Wyoming were examined to determine the presence and prevalence of eimerian species. Six species (Eimeria adaensis [black-tailed prairie dog prevalence = 33%, white-tailed prairie dog prevalence = 51%], Eimeria beecheyi [8%, 28%], Eimeria callosper-mophili [64%, 71%], Eimeria lateralis [3%, 7%], Eimeria morainensis [19%, 8%], and Eimeria spermophili [2%, 1%]) were identified from both host species. Eimeria pseudospermophili was found infecting only black-tailed (prevalence = 1%) and Eimeria bilamellata only in white-tailed prairie dogs (2%). Reinfections in individual hosts were observed with E. callospermophili and E. adaensis. Comparison of these results with the published literature suggests that the host genera Cynomys and Spermophilus share a common guild of eimerians and that members of this guild have a long evolutionary association with these hosts, or host switching, or both, is common between these groups. PMID:9057719

  4. 14 CFR 23.481 - Tail down landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail down landing conditions. 23.481 Section 23.481 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Ground Loads § 23.481 Tail down landing conditions. (a) For a tail down landing, the airplane is...

  5. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Nose/tail wheel steering. 23.745 Section 23... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  6. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Nose/tail wheel steering. 23.745 Section 23... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  7. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Nose/tail wheel steering. 23.745 Section 23... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  8. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nose/tail wheel steering. 23.745 Section 23... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  9. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Landing Gear § 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Nose/tail wheel steering. 23.745 Section 23... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  10. Submitted to Operations Research Is tail-optimal scheduling possible?

    E-print Network

    Low, Steven H.

    possible to obtain information about the tail of the distribution of the sojourn time of a job in a random Department of Computer Science, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125. adamw there are policies that are known to optimize the sojourn time tail under a large class of heavy-tailed job sizes (e

  11. 14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP TOP HOUSE. ID-31-C-12 WOODEN STRUCTURE IS VISIBLE IN TOP LEFT. CABLES VISIBLE LEFT AND CENTER OF TAILINGS. HOUSE IS JUST OVER APEX OF TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  12. 14 CFR 25.481 - Tail-down landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...3) The combination of vertical and drag components considered to be acting at the main wheel axle centerline. (b) For the tail-down...landing condition for airplanes with tail wheels, the main and tail wheels are assumed to contact the...

  13. One-Tailed F-Tests in Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Banas, John

    2002-01-01

    Documents the recent use of one-tailed F-tests in communication journals, and examines the arguments both for and against their use. Examines the use of these tests within the broader unresolved controversy surrounding the use of one-tailed tests. Recommends that future researchers should most often avoid one-tailed Fs, and generally exercise…

  14. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  15. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  16. G-tail telomere HPA: simple measurement of

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    G-tail telomere HPA: simple measurement of human single-stranded telomeric overhangs Hidetoshi of telomeric 3¢-overhang (G-tail) lengths is essential for investigation of the biological effects of telomere dysfunction. G-tail telomere hybridization protection assay (Gt-telomere HPA) has the advantages of being

  17. SPACE USE BY ROUND-TAILED MUSKRATS IN ISOLATED WETLANDS

    E-print Network

    Branch, Lyn C.

    SPACE USE BY ROUND-TAILED MUSKRATS IN ISOLATED WETLANDS ROBERT L. SCHOOLEY* AND LYN C. BRANCH at Urbana-Champaign, 1102 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, USA The round-tailed muskrat (Neofiber alleni radiotracked 23 round-tailed muskrats in isolated freshwater wetlands in central Florida. Muskrats used lodges

  18. Research Article Survival of White-Tailed Deer Neonates

    E-print Network

    Research Article Survival of White-Tailed Deer Neonates in Minnesota and South Dakota TROY W, and sex) and habitat factors on survival of neonate white-tailed deer improves understanding of population. Understanding white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) population dynamics requires knowledge of survival

  19. Mark-Recapture of White-Tailed Deer Using DNA

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    Marker Behavior Introduction Population Estimates Why White-Tailed Deer? Keystone Species Competition11/10/2010 1 Mark-Recapture of White-Tailed Deer Using DNA Sampling from Scat Matthew J. Goode M;11/10/2010 3 Justification Economic and Environmental Importance of White-Tailed Deer Population Estimates

  20. Asymptotic Tail Probabilities of Sums of Dependent Subexponential Random Variables

    E-print Network

    Tang, Qihe

    Asymptotic Tail Probabilities of Sums of Dependent Subexponential Random Variables Jaap Geluk1 In this paper we study the asymptotic behavior of the tail probabilities of sums of dependent and real variation. We propose two general de- pendence assumptions under which the asymptotic behavior of the tail

  1. Multiple tail domain interactions stabilize nonmuscle myosin II bipolar filaments

    E-print Network

    Prehoda, Ken

    Multiple tail domain interactions stabilize nonmuscle myosin II bipolar filaments Derek Ricketson derives from its assembly into bipolar filaments. The coiled-coil tail domain of the myosin II heavy chain mediates filament assembly, although the mechanism is poorly understood. Tail domains contain

  2. BUCSTR2000017 1 TCP Congestion Control and Heavy Tails

    E-print Network

    BUCS­TR­2000­017 1 TCP Congestion Control and Heavy Tails LIANG GUO MARK CROVELLA IBRAHIM MATTA­ ies have shown that there is a close relationship between heavy­tailed distribution of various traffic traffic with heavy­tailed OFF, or idle, periods, and therefore introduces long­range de­ pendence

  3. Higher Order Tail Densities of Copulas and Hidden Regular Variation

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    Higher Order Tail Densities of Copulas and Hidden Regular Variation Haijun Li Lei Hua December 2014 (2nd Revision) Abstract A notion of higher order tail densities for copulas is introduced using can then be studied in a unified fashion. We show that the tail of a multivariate density can

  4. TOP: Tail Optimization Protocol For Cellular Radio Resource Allocation

    E-print Network

    Mao, Zhuoqing Morley

    TOP: Tail Optimization Protocol For Cellular Radio Resource Allocation Feng Qian1 Zhaoguang Wang1 timers. However, the timeout value itself, also known as the tail time, can last up to 15 seconds due, we propose Tail Optimization Pro- tocol (TOP), which enables cooperation between the phone

  5. Exponential tail bounds for max-recursive sequences

    E-print Network

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    Exponential tail bounds for max-recursive sequences Ludger R¨uschendorf and Eva-Maria Schopp University of Freiburg Abstract Exponential tail bounds are derived for solutions of max-recursive equa a characterization of exponential tail bounds due to Kasahara (1978). 1 Introduction Stochastic recursive equations

  6. Sums of Dependent Nonnegative Random Variables with Subexponential Tails

    E-print Network

    Tang, Qihe

    Sums of Dependent Nonnegative Random Variables with Subexponential Tails Bangwon Ko, Qihe Tang, U.S.A. December 6, 2007 Abstract In this paper we study the asymptotic tail probabilities of sums with tail independence. The results show that the subexponentiality of the summands eliminates the impact

  7. Distribution of bovine viral diarrhoea virus antigen in persistently infected white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Passler, T; Walz, H L; Ditchkoff, S S; van Santen, E; Brock, K V; Walz, P H

    2012-11-01

    Infection with bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV), analogous to that occurring in cattle, is reported rarely in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). This study evaluated the distribution of BVDV antigen in persistently infected (PI) white-tailed deer and compared the findings with those from PI cattle. Six PI fawns (four live-born and two stillborn) from does exposed experimentally to either BVDV-1 or BVDV-2 were evaluated. Distribution and intensity of antigen expression in tissues was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Data were analyzed in binary fashion with a proportional odds model. Viral antigen was distributed widely and was present in all 11 organ systems. Hepatobiliary, integumentary and reproductive systems were respectively 11.8, 15.4 and 21.6 times more likely to have higher antigen scores than the musculoskeletal system. Pronounced labelling occurred in epithelial tissues, which were 1.9-3.0 times likelier than other tissues to contain BVDV antigen. Antigen was present in >90% of samples of liver and skin, suggesting that skin biopsy samples are appropriate for BVDV diagnosis. Moderate to severe lymphoid depletion was detected and may hamper reliable detection of BVDV in lymphoid organs. Muscle tissue contained little antigen, except for in the cardiovascular system. Antigen was present infrequently in connective tissues. In nervous tissues, antigen expression frequency was 0.3-0.67. In the central nervous system (CNS), antigen was present in neurons and non-neuronal cells, including microglia, emphasizing that the CNS is a primary target for fetal BVDV infection. BVDV antigen distribution in PI white-tailed deer is similar to that in PI cattle. PMID:22520818

  8. Pulmonary Masses: Initial Results of Cone-beam CT Guidance with Needle Planning Software for Percutaneous Lung Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Braak, Sicco J.; Herder, Gerarda J. M.; Heesewijk, Johannes P. M. van Strijen, Marco J. L. van

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of percutaneous lung biopsy (PLB) findings using cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) guidance (CBCT guidance) and compared to conventional biopsy guidance techniques. Methods: CBCT guidance is a stereotactic technique for needle interventions, combining 3D soft-tissue cone-beam CT, needle planning software, and real-time fluoroscopy. Between March 2007 and August 2010, we performed 84 Tru-Cut PLBs, where bronchoscopy did not provide histopathologic diagnosis. Mean patient age was 64.6 (range 24-85) years; 57 patients were men, and 25 were women. Records were prospectively collected for calculating sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy. We also registered fluoroscopy time, room time, interventional time, dose-area product (DAP), and complications. Procedures were divided into subgroups (e.g., location, size, operator). Results: Mean lesion diameter was 32.5 (range 3.0-93.0) mm, and the mean number of samples per biopsy procedure was 3.2 (range 1-7). Mean fluoroscopy time was 161 (range 104-551) s, room time was 34 (range 15-79) min, mean DAP value was 25.9 (range 3.9-80.5) Gy{center_dot}cm{sup -2}, and interventional time was 18 (range 5-65) min. Of 84 lesions, 70 were malignant (83.3%) and 14 were benign (16.7%). Seven (8.3%) of the biopsy samples were nondiagnostic. All nondiagnostic biopsied lesions proved to be malignant during surgical resection. The outcome for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI] 86-96), 100% (95% CI 82-100), 100% (95% CI 96-100), 66.7% (95% CI 55-83), and 91.7% (95% CI 86-96), respectively. Sixteen patients (19%) had minor and 2 (2.4%) had major complications. Conclusion: CBCT guidance is an effective method for PLB, with results comparable to CT/CT fluoroscopy guidance.

  9. Emergent Embolization of Arterial Bleeding after Vacuum-Assisted Breast Biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, Aaron M.; Epelboym, Yan; Siegelbaum, Robert H. Weintraub, Joshua L. Kim, Edward Nowakowski, Francis S. Lookstein, Robert A.

    2012-02-15

    Vacuum-assisted core breast biopsy has become important in evaluating patients with suspicious breast lesions. It has proven to be a relatively safe procedure that in rare cases can result in vascular complications. These are the first reported cases of transcatheter embolization of uncontrolled breast hemorrhage after vacuum-assisted breast biopsy. With increased use of biopsy and larger-gauge devices, breast imaging groups may consider embolotherapy as a safe alternative for treatment of hemorrhage in a select group of patients.

  10. Stereotaxic needle localization and biopsy of occult breast lesions: first year's experience.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R L; Haynes, A E; Bolin, J A; Boagni, E M; Head, J F

    1992-02-01

    During a 12-month period 115 patients with abnormal mammograms had stereotaxic needle localization and biopsy of nonpalpable breast lesions. The procedure was performed on a Fischer Mammotest II machine (Fischer Imaging; Denver, CO) and the biopsies were taken with a #18 gauge Bard biopsy needle using a Bard biopty gun (distributed by Bard Urological; Covington, GA; manufactured by Radiplast; Uppsala, Sweden). Mammographic lesions were suspicious matrix densities (85), clustered microcalcifications (22), or a combination of both (8). The pathologist recommended open biopsy in 16 per cent (18/115) of the patients. Pathology on the 18 open biopsies revealed that 11 (9 matrix densities and 2 calcifications) were carcinomas and true positives, whereas the other 7 (all matrix densities) were benign mastopathies and false positives. Further analysis of the pathologic data showed that there were three possible diagnoses from the needle biopsies on the patients that later went to open biopsy: cancer (6), very suspicious lesion (9), and slightly suspicious lesion without atypical hyperplasia (3). All 6 cancers were confirmed by open biopsy; about half (5/9) of the very suspicious lesions were cancer and none (0/3) of the slightly suspicious lesions were cancer. More cases, followed by open biopsy, are needed to refine the selection procedure for open biopsy and careful follow-up of the patients who did not have open biopsy will also be needed to determine the false negative rate. Excellent patient acceptance was found and the test was easy to perform in the office without serious complications. Furthermore, the test was cost effective because it avoided open biopsy in 97 patients. PMID:1550304

  11. Needle Track Seeding of Primary and Secondary Liver Carcinoma After Percutaneous Liver Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Garden, O. James

    1993-01-01

    Seeding of tumour in the needle track following percutaneous needle biopsy of liver neoplasms is rarely reported. We describe two such cases following the needle biopsy of an hepatocellular carcinoma and secondary colorectal carcinoma respectively. The risk of needle track recurrence of liver tumours should not be regarded as insignificant. The diagnosis of liver neoplasms may be achieved by non-invasive modalities, and their needle biopsy should be reserved for cases not amenable to surgical resection. PMID:8387809

  12. A review of specialties performing temporal artery biopsies in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Temporal artery biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of giant cell arteritis, but the numbers and types of surgical specialists performing temporal artery biopsies are unknown. The goal of this study was to determine which surgical specialists performed temporal artery biopsies and how geographic location influenced this trend over a period of 10 years. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all physicians practising in Ontario from 2002 to 2013. Using comprehensive physician services data from the IntelliHEALTH Medical Services database, physicians performing temporal artery biopsies were identified by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan billing code submitted for remuneration. Physicians were categorized by specialty and geographic Local Health Integration Unit. Results A total of 9958 patients underwent a temporal artery biopsy during the study period: the biopsies were performed by 11 different subspecialties. The number of patients undergoing a temporal artery biopsy declined over the 10-year study period. Most procedures were performed by general surgeons (38.1%), followed by ophthalmologists (31.0%) and plastic surgeons (23.6%). Ophthalmologists performed more temporal artery biopsies per person compared with general surgeons, but significantly more general surgeons performed at least 1 biopsy. There was significant variation based on geographic location: plastic surgeons performed the most biopsies in regions with a population of more than 1 million people, and general surgeons performed most of the biopsies in rural areas. Interpretation Geographic location heavily influenced which specialty was most likely to perform temporal artery biopsies. General surgery, ophthalmology and plastic surgery emerged as leaders in this area, and their residency programs should include formal training in this procedure in their curricula. PMID:26442226

  13. [Transcutaneous pulmonary fine-needle aspiration biopsy under fluoroscopic guidance. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Esposito, S; Lemmi, A; Barzi, F; Lupattelli, L

    1990-05-01

    The authors report the radiological method and the cytohistologic and bacteriologic technique of percutaneous fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the lung under fluoroscopic guidance. The results are reported of 620 biopsies of benign and malignant lung lesions; the biopsies were performed from January 1981 to September 1989. Surgery, follow-up, and autopsy confirmed the high diagnostic accuracy of this method. The advantages of fluoroscopic guidance are discussed and compared with those of CT guidance. PMID:2359859

  14. Internal Mammary Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy With Modified Injection Technique

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Peng-Fei; Cong, Bin-Bin; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Yang, Guo-Ren; Liu, Yan-Bing; Chen, Peng; Wang, Yong-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the 2009 American Joint Committee on Cancer incorporated the internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy (IM-SLNB) concept, there has been little change in surgical practice patterns because of the low visualization rate of internal mammary sentinel lymph nodes (IMSLN) with the traditional radiotracer injection technique. In this study, various injection techniques were evaluated in term of the IMSLN visualization rate, and the impact of IM-SLNB on the diagnostic and prognostic value were analyzed. Clinically, axillary lymph nodes (ALN) negative patients (n?=?407) were divided into group A (traditional peritumoral intraparenchymal injection) and group B (modified periareolar intraparenchymal injection). Group B was then separated into group B1 (low volume) and group B2 (high volume) according to the injection volume. Clinically, ALN-positive patients (n?=?63) were managed as group B2. Internal mammary sentinel lymph node biopsy was performed for patients with IMSLN visualized. The IMSLN visualization rate was significantly higher in group B than that in group A (71.1% versus 15.5%, P?biopsy could provide individual minimally invasive staging, prognosis, and decision making of the internal mammary radiotherapy, especially for clinically ALN-positive patients. PMID:26469922

  15. Direct molecular versus culture-based assessment of Gram-positive cocci in biopsies of patients with major abscesses and diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Stappers, M H T; Hagen, F; Reimnitz, P; Mouton, J W; Meis, J F; Gyssens, I C

    2015-09-01

    Major abscesses and diabetic foot infections (DFIs) are predominant subtypes of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs), and are mainly caused by Staphylococcus aureus and ?-hemolytic streptococci. This study evaluates the potential benefit of direct pathogen-specific real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays in the identification of causative organisms of cSSSIs. One-hundred and fifty major abscess and 128 DFI biopsy samples were collected and microbial DNA was extracted by using the Universal Microbe Detection kit for tissue samples. Pathogen-specific PCRs were developed for S. aureus and its virulence factor Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), Streptococcus pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. dysgalactiae, and the S. anginosus group. Identification by pathogen-specific PCRs was compared to routine culture and both methods were considered as the gold standard for determination of the sensitivity and specificity of each assay. Direct real-time PCR assays of biopsy samples resulted in a 34 % higher detection of S. aureus, 37 % higher detection of S. pyogenes, 18 % higher detection of S. agalactiae, 4 % higher detection of S. dysgalactiae subspecies equisimilis, and 7 % higher detection of the S. anginosus group, compared to routine bacterial culture. The presence of PVL was mainly confined to S. aureus isolated from major abscess but not DFI biopsy samples. In conclusion, our pathogen-specific real-time PCR assays had a higher yield than culture methods and could be an additional method for the detection of relevant causative pathogens in biopsies. PMID:26143347

  16. Chart biopsy: an emerging medical practice enabled by electronic health records and its impacts on emergency department–inpatient admission handoffs

    PubMed Central

    Hilligoss, Brian; Zheng, Kai

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine how clinicians on the receiving end of admission handoffs use electronic health records (EHRs) in preparation for those handoffs and to identify the kinds of impacts such usage may have. Materials and methods This analysis is part of a two-year ethnographic study of emergency department (ED) to internal medicine admission handoffs at a tertiary teaching and referral hospital. Qualitative data were gathered and analyzed iteratively, following a grounded theory methodology. Data collection methods included semi-structured interviews (N = 48), observations (349 hours), and recording of handoff conversations (N = 48). Data analyses involved coding, memo writing, and member checking. Results The use of EHRs has enabled an emerging practice that we refer to as pre-handoff “chart biopsy”: the activity of selectively examining portions of a patient's health record to gather specific data or information about that patient or to get a broader sense of the patient and the care that patient has received. Three functions of chart biopsy are identified: getting an overview of the patient; preparing for handoff and subsequent care; and defending against potential biases. Chart biopsies appear to impact important clinical and organizational processes. Among these are the nature and quality of handoff interactions, and the quality of care, including the appropriateness of dispositioning of patients. Conclusions Chart biopsy has the potential to enrich collaboration and to enable the hospital to act safely, efficiently, and effectively. Implications for handoff research and for the design and evaluation of EHRs are also discussed. PMID:22962194

  17. Experimental verification of a simplified vee-tail theory and analysis of available data on complete models with vee tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purser, Paul E; Campbell, John P

    1945-01-01

    An analysis has been made of available data on vee tail surfaces. Previously published theoretical studies of vee tails have been extended to include the control effectiveness and control forces in addition to the stability. Tests of two isolated tail surfaces with various amounts of dihedral provided a check of the theory. Methods for designing vee tails were also developed and are given in the present paper.

  18. Normal adrenal glands in small cell lung carcinoma: CT-guided biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.

    1983-05-01

    Twenty-four small cell lung carcinoma patients with morphologically normal adrenal glands by computed tomographic (CT) criteria underwent percutaneous thin-needle biopsy of their adrenal glands. Of 43 glands biopsied, 29 had adequate cellular material for interpretation. Five (17%) of the 29 glands were positive for metastases; the rest had negative biopsies. This series indicates an approximate 17% false-negative diagnosis rate by CT when staging the adrenal glands in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. It also demonstrates the utility of percutaneous needle biopsy as an investigational tool to further evaluate normal-sized adrenal glands in the oncologic patient.

  19. Leydig cell tumor with lung metastasis diagnosed by lung biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Ning; Zeng, Xin; Li, Meichan; Shu, Jiaze

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cell tumors are very rare and account for only 3% of testicular tumors and are generally benign. Only less than 0.2% of all testicular cancers were evidenced by metastatic spread. We report a 34-year-old man visited hospital because of coughing sputum mixed with blood. His chest CT showed bilateral patch clouding opacity. He was suspected with allergic alveolitis and treated with methylprednisolone. However, his symptoms and general condition deteriorated, and he visited our hospital. He had no abnormal findings on physical examination. A chest radiograph showed pneumonia in whole lung and CT showed multiple nodules and diffused ground glass opacities in both lung fields. Lung biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumor with lung metastasis. The diagnosis is based on the histopathology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:26722493

  20. Development of the optical biopsy system for small experimental animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hidetoshi; Hattori, Yusuke; Oshima, Yusuke; Komachi, Yuichi; Katagiri, Takashi; Asakura, Toru; Shimosegawa, Toru; Matsuura, Yuji; Miyagi, Mitsunobu; Kanai, Gen'ichi; Ura, Nobuo; Masutani, Koji; Tashiro, Hideo

    2006-02-01

    Development of the optical biopsy system for experimental small animals is in progress. A prototype of the system which consists of a miniaturized gastro endoscope unit and Raman probes has been completed by now. The system is developed to study a gastric cancer rat model. The endoscope is 2.5 mm in diameter and is equipped an imaging bundle fiber, illumination fibers, a channel and a mechanism to angle the probe head. The head of the Raman probe comes out through the channel and it is possible to aim the probe to the target watching on the monitor. The endoscope was inserted into the anaesthetized healthy rat under the breathing support. It was successfully observed inside of the stomach of the living rat and measured Raman spectra. The spectrum of blood vessels contains the strong contribution from lipids. The present results demonstrate high potential of the system in the in vivo Raman study using the rat model.

  1. Novel Uses of Skin Biopsy Punches in Dermatosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Hurkudli, Deepak S; Sarvajnamurthy, Sacchidanand; Suryanarayan, Shwetha; Chugh, Vishal S

    2015-01-01

    The skin punch or surgical punch is an instrument which is used almost exclusively by dermatologists. It is a circular hollow blade attached to a pencil-like handle ranging in size from 0.5 to 10 mm. It is available as a disposable, reusable, and automated instrument. The punch can be used as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and cosmetic tool in dermatology. We have used punch as a diagnostic, therapeutic, and cosmetic tool in our dermatosurgery practice in our hospital. Various original research articles, text book publications, and review articles were studied and compiled. Techniques used by various authors and our own experiences with punch have been described. This article aims at providing the novel usefulness of skin biopsy punch in dermatology as the basic punch surgery is quick and easy to learn. Complications such as bleeding and infection are minimal. PMID:25814706

  2. Quand la biopsie cutanée peut étiqueter une épilepsie

    PubMed Central

    Harmouch, Taoufiq; Gallouj, Salim; Znati, Kaoutar; Sennou, Aicha Slassi; Belahcen, Faouzi; Amarti, Afaf

    2011-01-01

    La maladie de Lafora (ML) représente une forme rare et grave d’épilepsie myoclonique progressive. C'est une affection à transmission autosomique récessive, hétérogène sur le plan génétique. Nous rapportons le cas d'une adolescente de 16 ans, issue de parents consanguins de premier degré, qui présente depuis l’âge de 14 ans des crises d’épilepsie et des myoclonies. L'examen neurologique a montré un syndrome cérébelleux et une détérioration intellectuelle. La biopsie cutanée était indispensable pour orienter le diagnostic. La ML a un pronostic constamment fatal. L’étude histologique confirme le diagnostic et l’étude moléculaire peut aider à établir un conseil génétique. PMID:22187608

  3. Effect of music on anxiety of women awaiting breast biopsy.

    PubMed

    Haun, M; Mainous, R O; Looney, S W

    2001-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of music on the state anxiety of a sample of 20 patients awaiting breast biopsy at a suburban medical facility. The patients were assigned alternately to either the control or experimental group. The individuals in the experimental group were given a 20-minute music-based intervention in a preoperative holding area, whereas the patients in the control group received the customary preoperative care. Clinicians measured blood pressure, heart rate, and respiration in both groups of patients, and the participants completed the State portion of the self-administered State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). After the patients completed the 20 minutes of music or of preoperative care without music, clinicians again measured the participants' vital signs and the patients completed the STAI. The authors' findings indicated that the posttest state anxiety and respiratory rates of the patients in the experimental group were significantly lower than those of the patients in the control group. PMID:11985186

  4. Diagnostic Concordance Among Pathologists Interpreting Breast Biopsy Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Joann G.; Longton, Gary M.; Carney, Patricia A.; Geller, Berta M.; Onega, Tracy; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Nelson, Heidi D.; Pepe, Margaret S.; Allison, Kimberly H.; Schnitt, Stuart J.; O’Malley, Frances P.; Weaver, Donald L.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE A breast pathology diagnosis provides the basis for clinical treatment and management decisions; however, its accuracy is inadequately understood. OBJECTIVES To quantify the magnitude of diagnostic disagreement among pathologists compared with a consensus panel reference diagnosis and to evaluate associated patient and pathologist characteristics. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Study of pathologists who interpret breast biopsies in clinical practices in 8 US states. EXPOSURES Participants independently interpreted slides between November 2011 and May 2014 from test sets of 60 breast biopsies (240 total cases, 1 slide per case), including 23 cases of invasive breast cancer, 73 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), 72 with atypical hyperplasia (atypia), and 72 benign cases without atypia. Participants were blinded to the interpretations of other study pathologists and consensus panel members. Among the 3 consensus panel members, unanimous agreement of their independent diagnoses was 75%, and concordance with the consensus-derived reference diagnoses was 90.3%. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The proportions of diagnoses overinterpreted and underinterpreted relative to the consensus-derived reference diagnoses were assessed. RESULTS Sixty-five percent of invited, responding pathologists were eligible and consented to participate. Of these, 91% (N = 115) completed the study, providing 6900 individual case diagnoses. Compared with the consensus-derived reference diagnosis, the overall concordance rate of diagnostic interpretations of participating pathologists was 75.3% (95% CI, 73.4%–77.0%; 5194 of 6900 interpretations). Consensus ReferenceDiagnosis Pathologist Interpretation vs Consensus-Derived Reference Diagnosis, % (95% CI) No. ofInterpretations Overall ConcordanceRate OverinterpretationRate UnderinterpretationRate Benign without atypia 2070 87 (85–89) 13 (11–15) Atypia 2070 48 (44–52) 17 (15–21) 35 (31–39) DCIS 2097 84 (82–86) 3 (2–4) 13 (12–15) Invasive carcinoma 663 96 (94–97) 4 (3–6) Disagreement with the reference diagnosis was statistically significantly higher among biopsies from women with higher (n = 122) vs lower (n = 118) breast density on prior mammograms (overall concordance rate, 73% [95% CI, 71%–75%] for higher vs 77% [95% CI, 75%–80%] for lower, P < .001), and among pathologists who interpreted lower weekly case volumes (P < .001) or worked in smaller practices (P = .034) or nonacademic settings (P = .007). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE In this study of pathologists, in which diagnostic interpretation was based on a single breast biopsy slide, overall agreement between the individual pathologists’ interpretations and the expert consensus–derived reference diagnoses was 75.3%, with the highest level of concordance for invasive carcinoma and lower levels of concordance for DCIS and atypia. Further research is needed to understand the relationship of these findings with patient management. PMID:25781441

  5. Environmental assessment of ground-water compliance activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    This report assesses the environmental impacts of the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Spook, Wyoming on ground water. DOE previously characterized the site and monitoring data were collected during the surface remediation. The ground water compliance strategy is to perform no further remediation at the site since the ground water in the aquifer is neither a current nor potential source of drinking water. Under the no-action alternative, certain regulatory requirements would not be met.

  6. Predicting Malignancy from Mammography Findings and Surgical Biopsies.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Pedro; Fonseca, Nuno A; Dutra, Inês; Woods, Ryan; Burnside, Elizabeth

    2011-11-01

    Breast screening is the regular examination of a woman's breasts to find breast cancer earlier. The sole exam approved for this purpose is mammography. Usually, findings are annotated through the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) created by the American College of Radiology. The BIRADS system determines a standard lexicon to be used by radiologists when studying each finding. Although the lexicon is standard, the annotation accuracy of the findings depends on the experience of the radiologist. Moreover, the accuracy of the classification of a mammography is also highly dependent on the expertise of the radiologist. A correct classification is paramount due to economical and humanitarian reasons. The main goal of this work is to produce machine learning models that predict the outcome of a mammography from a reduced set of annotated mammography findings. In the study we used a data set consisting of 348 consecutive breast masses that underwent image guided or surgical biopsy performed between October 2005 and December 2007 on 328 female subjects. The main conclusions are threefold: (1) automatic classification of a mammography, independent on information about mass density, can reach equal or better results than the classification performed by a physician; (2) mass density seems to be a good indicator of malignancy, as previous studies suggested; (3) a machine learning model can predict mass density with a quality as good as the specialist blind to biopsy, which is one of our main contributions. Our model can predict malignancy in the absence of the mass density attribute, since we can fill up this attribute using our mass density predictor. PMID:24363962

  7. Clinical Value of Core Length in Contemporary Multicore Prostate Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangchul; Jeong, Seong Jin; Hwang, Sung Il; Hong, Sung Kyu; Lee, Hak Jong; Byun, Seok Soo; Choe, Gheeyoung; Lee, Sang Eun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There is little data about the clinical value of core length for prostate biopsy (PBx). We investigated the clinical values of various clinicopathological biopsy-related parameters, including core length, in the contemporary multi-core PBx. Patients and Methods Medical records of 5,243 consecutive patients who received PBx at our institution were reviewed. Among them, 3,479 patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ?10ng/ml level who received transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided multi (?12)-core PBx at our institution were analyzed for prostate cancer (PCa). Gleason score upgrading (GSU) was analyzed in 339 patients who were diagnosed with low-risk PCa and received radical prostatectomy. Multivariate logistic regression analyses for PCa detection and prediction of GSU were performed. Results The mean age and PSA of the entire cohort were 63.5 years and 5.4ng/ml, respectively. The overall cancer detection rate was 28.5%. There was no statistical difference in core length between patients diagnosed with PCa and those without PCa (16.1 ± 1.8 vs 16.1 ± 1.9mm, P = 0.945). The core length was also not significantly different (16.4 ± 1.7 vs 16.4 ± 1.6mm, P = 0.889) between the GSU group and non-GSU group. Multivariate logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the core length of PBx did not affect PCa detection in TRUS-guided multi-core PBx (P = 0.923) and was not prognostic for GSU in patients with low-risk PCa (P = 0.356). Conclusions In patients undergoing contemporary multi-core PBx, core length may not have significant impact on PCa detection and also GSU following radical prostatectomy among low-risk PCa group. PMID:25875823

  8. Optical biopsy - a new armamentarium to detect disease using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been considered a promising method for cancer detection for past thirty years because of its advantages over the conventional diagnostic methods of no tissue removal, minimal invasiveness, rapid diagnoses, less time consumption and reproducibility since the first use in 1984. It offers a new armamentarium. Human tissue is mainly composed of extracellular matrix of collagen fiber, proteins, fat, water, and epithelial cells with key molecules in different structures. Tissues contain a number of key fingerprint native endogenous fluorophore molecules, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. It is well known that abnormalities in metabolic activity precede the onset of a lot of main diseases: carcinoma, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease, etc. Optical spectroscopy may help in detecting various disorders. Conceivably the biochemical or morphologic changes that cause the spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological aberration. Therefore, "optical biopsy" holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases by combining with available photonic technology (e.g. optical fibers, photon detectors, spectrographs spectroscopic ratiometer, fiber-optic endomicroscope and nasopharyngoscope) for in vivo use. This paper focuses on various methods available to detect spectroscopic changes in tissues, for example to distinguish cancerous prostate tissues and/or cells from normal prostate tissues and/or cells. The methods to be described are fluorescence, stokes shift, scattering, Raman, and time-resolved spectroscopy will be reviewed. The underlying physical and biological basis for these optical approaches will be discussed with examples. The idea is to present some of the salient works to show the usefulness and methods of Optical Biopsy for cancer detection and show new directions.

  9. Immunocytochemical characterization of pulmonary histiocytosis X cells in lung biopsies.

    PubMed Central

    Soler, P.; Chollet, S.; Jacque, C.; Fukuda, Y.; Ferrans, V. J.; Basset, F.

    1985-01-01

    Morphologic and immunohistochemical studies were made of open lung biopsies from 9 patients with pulmonary histiocytosis X (HX) and 12 patients with other conditions, and of skin biopsies from patients with cutaneous sarcoidosis, Chester-Erdheim disease, and eruptive histiocytoma. The monoclonal antibody OKT6 was detected with the use of goat anti-mouse IgG labeled with fluorescein (FITC) for light microscopy, and sheep antimouse Fab'2 fragment of IgG labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) for immunoelectron microscopy. The presence of S-100 protein was revealed by an antibody prepared against bovine S-100 protein, using sheep anti-rabbit IgG labeled with FITC for light microscopy and with HRP for immunoelectron microscopy. OKT6 antibody and S-100 protein were detected simultaneously by double labeling with FITC and rhodamine. In all patients with pulmonary HX, the major cellular components (HX cells) of the granulomas showed labeling of the plasma membranes by OKT6 and of the cytoplasm by the anti S-100 protein antibody. The double-labeling technique demonstrated that the same cells carried both reactivities. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that the reactive cells had all the structural characteristics of Langerhans cells, including Langerhans cell granules. Cells reacting with OKT6 showed discrete internal labeling in some of the Langerhans granules, especially those in continuity with the plasma membranes. However, internal labeling of Langerhans granules was not demonstrated in preparations for the localization of S-100 protein. Control samples of sarcoid lesions and other pulmonary lesions unrelated to HX did not show any reactivity except in Langerhans cells; a skin lesion from a patient with eruptive histiocytoma contained OKT6-positive cells which did not have Langerhans granules. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 15 Figure 16 Figure 17 PMID:3872076

  10. The Modelling of Cometary Dust Tail Striae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.; Birkett, K.; Ramanjooloo, Y.; Battams, K.; Morrill, J.

    2013-09-01

    Several high-production rate comets have displayed dust tails containing numerous striae-near-linear regions of enhanced brightness. We present a study of the striae in the tail of C/2006 P1 (McNaught) during its perihelion passage in January-February 2007, and those in C/2002 V1 (NEAT) in January 2002. Both comets were observed by the LASCO coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft; McNaught was also observed using the SECCHI instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft. Our simulations of striae successfully reproduce many aspects of their morphology and dynamics. The results are compared to those of other striae models. Initial fits to the complex striae of C/2011 L4 (PANSTARRS), observed by the STEREO-B spacecraft, are also presented. The inferences that can be made regarding the comets' dust populations are discussed.

  11. The Modelling of Cometary Dust Tail Striae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, G. H.; Birkett, K.; Ramanjooloo, Y.; Morrill, J. S.; Battams, K.

    2013-05-01

    Several high-production rate comets have displayed dust tails containing numerous striae - near-linear regions of enhanced brightness. We present a study of the striae in the tail of C/2006 P1 (McNaught) during its perihelion passage in January-February 2007, and those in C/2002 V1 (NEAT) in January 2002. Both comets were observed by the LASCO coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft; McNaught was also observed using the SECCHI instrument on the two STEREO spacecraft. Our simulations of striae successfully reproduce many aspects of their morphology and dynamics. The results are compared to those of other striae models. The inferences that can be made regarding the comets' dust populations are discussed.

  12. Exposures from mining and mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Cassaday, Valerie J.; Lowe, Leo M.

    The mining, milling and tailings management of uranium ores results in environmental radiation exposures. This paper describes the sources of radioactive emissions to the environment associated with these activities, reviews the basic approach used to estimate the resultant radiation exposures and presents examples of typical uranium mind and mill facilities. Similar concepts apply to radiation exposures associated with the mining of non-radioactive ores although the magnitudes of the exposures would normally be smaller than those associated with uranium mining.

  13. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  14. Ecological aspects of microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.L.; Landa, E.R.; Updegraff, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numbers and types of microorganisms in uranium mill tailings were determined using culturing techniques. Arthrobacter were found to be the predominant microorganism inhabiting the sandy tailings, whereas Bacillus and fungi predominated in the slime tailings. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, capable of leaching radium, were isolated in low numbers from tailings samples but were isolated in significantly high numbers from topsoil in contact with the tailings. The results are placed in the context of the magnitude of uranium mill tailings in the United States, the hazards posed by the tailings, and how such hazards could be enhanced or diminished by microbial activities. Patterns in the composition of the microbial population are evaluated with respect to the ecological variables that influence microbial growth. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  15. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt.

  16. A comparison of two techniques: Open and percutaneous biopsies of thoracolumbar vertebral body lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yapici, Furkan; Atici, Yunus; Balioglu, Mehmet Bülent; Albayrak, Akif; Kargin, Deniz; Akman, Yunus Emre; Erdogan, Sinan; Kaygusuz, Mehmet Akif

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this article is to compare the similarity of initial radiological diagnosis and pathological diagnosis between thoracal and lumbar vertebral bodies and the adequacy and the reliability of open and percutaneous biopsies performed via transpedicular approach in the lesions located in vertebral bodies. Materials and Methods: Thirty-three patients who had undergone transpedicular biopsy for vertebral body lesions were retrospectively evaluated. Seventeen patients were diagnosed by percutaneous transpedicular biopsy (11 in the lumbar vertebrae, 6 in the thoracal vertebrae). Sixteen patients were diagnosed by open transpedicular biopsy (9 in the lumbar vertebrae, 7 in the thoracal vertebrae). Results: The similarity ratio between the initial radiological diagnosis and the final pathological diagnosis was 71.4% in the open biopsy and was 69.2% in the percutaneous biopsy (P > 0.05). The similarity ratio between the initial radiological diagnosis and the final pathological diagnosis was 66.7% in the lumbar region and was 77.8% in the thoracal region (P > 0.05). For percutaneous biopsy group, the similarity ratio was 72.7% in the lumbar region and was 66.7% in the thoracal region (P > 0.05). For open biopsy group, the similarity ratio was 62.5% in the lumbar region and 83.3% in the thoracal region (P > 0.05). No complication was observed. Conclusion: Specimen adequacy of open biopsy was higher than percutaneous biopsy. Particularly, the open thoracal biopsy has provided the highest similarity ratio between the initial radiological diagnosis and the final pathological diagnosis. PMID:25788819

  17. Factors Influencing the Acceptance of Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ji Won; Bang, Woo Jin; Oh, Cheol Young; Yoo, Changhee

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to improve prostate biopsy compliance by analyzing the factors that influence the acceptance of prostate biopsy by patients to whom transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy is recommended for suspected prostate cancer. Materials and Methods The subjects of this study were 268 patients to whom TRUS-guided prostate biopsy was recommended from January to June 2011 and who completed a questionnaire. Patients who showed a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increase to more than 4.0 ng/mL or abnormal findings on a digital rectal examination and TRUS were recommended to undergo prostate biopsy. The questionnaire consisted of 9 questions about the subjects' demographic characteristics and 15 questions that assessed their knowledge of prostate disease. Fisher exact probability test was conducted to assess the influence of the demographic characteristics and levels of knowledge of prostate disease on acceptance of prostate biopsy. Results The mean age of the subjects was 66.2 years (range, 43-83 years). Of the cohort, 188 patients (70.7%) agreed to the prostate biopsy and 78 patients (29.3%) refused. In terms of demographic characteristics, the patients' acceptance of prostate biopsy was associated only with education level. Patients with relatively lower education levels had a higher acceptance rate for prostate biopsy (80.0% vs. 65.9%, p=0.018). Other demographic factors, as well as the degree of knowledge of prostate disease, had no significant effect on the acceptance rate. Conclusions The patients' acceptance of prostate biopsy can be influenced by demographic characteristics, especially education level. Therefore, when prostate biopsy is recommended to patients, their demographic characteristics should be taken into consideration. PMID:25045444

  18. Complications of Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy: Impact of Prebiopsy Enema

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Sung Chul; Choi, See Min; Yoon, Sol; Choi, Jae Hui; Lee, Seong Hyun; Hwa, Jeong Seok; Chung, Ky Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided biopsy of the prostate is usually safe. However, some patients are hospitalized owing to complications from TRUS biopsy. We identified the risk factors for complications and effective preventive measures for treating complications after TRUS biopsy. Materials and Methods Medical records and radiological images of 1,083 patients who underwent TRUS biopsy of the prostate over 10 years in Gyeongsang National University Hospital were examined retrospectively to investigate the correlation between complications after TRUS biopsy and preventive antibiotics, prebiopsy enema, number of biopsy cores, and pathological findings. Results Complications occurred in 69 patients (6.4%). The complication rates of the 1,008 patients who received antibiotics and the 75 patients who did not were 6.3% and 8.0%, respectively (p=0.469). Complication rates of the pre-biopsy enema group (n=658) and the group without prebiopsy enema (n=425) were 4.7% and 8.9%, respectively (p=0.007). Complication rates of the 6-core biopsy group (n=41) and the 12-core biopsy group (n=955) were 7.3% and 6.3%, respectively (p=0.891). Complication rates of the prostate cancer group (n=306) and the no prostate cancer group (n=713) were 6.2% and 6.6%, respectively (p=0.740). Conclusions A prebiopsy enema was associated with a reduced risk of complications after TRUS biopsy. Preventive antibiotics, number of biopsy cores, and pathological findings did not significantly influence the complication rate. PMID:25405015

  19. Current practice of prostate biopsy in Australia and New Zealand: A survey

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Paul; Paul, Eldho; Grummet, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate biopsy remains the gold standard for prostate cancer diagnosis. The field of prostate biopsy is undergoing a rapid change. This study aims to provide a snapshot of the current practice of prostate biopsy in the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ). Materials and Methods: A 31-question multiple-choice survey was constructed using a web-based provider and was distributed to 644 members of USANZ. The questionnaire addressed various aspects of prostate biopsy. Questionnaire results were collated and the data were analyzed statistically. Results: 150 completed surveys were returned, with a response rate of 23.3%: 84.5% of those completing the survey were consultant urologists and 68% were working in a metropolitan setting. 98.6% of clinicians used prophylactic antibiotics before prostate biopsy, most commonly a quinolone. 30.6% had used intravenous (IV) carbapenems at least once. Peri-prostatic local anesthetic (LA) infiltration was used by 39.9% of clinicians with 73% using IV sedation or general anesthetic (GA). 38.4% of clinicians reported performing TPT biopsy of the prostate and 19.6% of clinicians had ordered a MRI of the prostate prior to an initial biopsy with 10.2% routinely ordering a MRI of the prostate before repeat biopsy. Conclusion: Frequent prophylactic use of carbapenems suggests concern amongst clinicians about sepsis with quinolone-resistant bacteria. Almost 75% of TRUS biopsies were performed under IV sedation or GA indicating a heavy demand of health resources. TPT biopsy was used commonly and there was significant use of multiparametric MRI prior to prostate biopsy. PMID:26229317

  20. Biopsy Findings After Breast Conservation Therapy for Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vapiwala, Neha Starzyk, Jill; Harris, Eleanor E.; Tchou, Julia C.; Boraas, Marcia C.; Czerniecki, Brian J.; Rosato, Ernest F.; Orel, Susan G.; Solin, Lawrence J.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns and factors predictive of positive ipsilateral breast biopsy after conservation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of Stage I-II breast cancer patients initially treated with lumpectomy and radiotherapy between 1977 and 1996, who later underwent post-treatment ipsilateral breast biopsies. Results: A total of 223 biopsies were performed in 193 treated breasts: 171 single and 22 multiple biopsies. Of the 223 biopsies, 56% were positive and 44% were negative for recurrence. The positive biopsy rate (PBR) was 59% for the first and 32% for subsequent biopsies. The median time to the first post-treatment biopsy was 49 months. Of the patients with negative initial biopsy findings, 11% later developed local recurrence. The PBR was 40% among patients with physical examination findings only, 65% with mammographic abnormalities only, and 79% with both findings (p = 0.001). Analysis of the procedure type revealed a PBR of 86% for core and 58% for excisional biopsies compared with 28% for aspiration cytology alone (p = 0.025). The PBR varied inversely with age at the original diagnosis: 49% if {>=}51 years, 57% if 36-50 years, and 83% if {<=}35 years (p = 0.05). The PBR correlated directly with the interval after radiotherapy: 49% if {<=}60 months, 59% if 60.1-120 months, 77% if 120.1-180 months, and 100% if >180 months after completing postlumpectomy radiotherapy (p = 0.01). The PBR was not linked with recurrence location, initial pathologic T or N stage, estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor status, or final pathologic margins (all p {>=} 0.15). Conclusion: After definitive radiotherapy for early-stage breast cancer, a greater PBR was associated with the presence of both mammographic and clinical abnormalities, excisional or core biopsies, younger age at the initial diagnosis, and longer intervals after radiotherapy completion.

  1. More on the structure of tidal tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Küpper, Andreas H. W.; Lane, Richard R.; Heggie, Douglas C.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the epicyclic motion of stars escaping from star clusters. Using streaklines, we visualize the path of escaping stars and show how epicyclic motion leads to over- and underdensities in tidal tails of star clusters moving on circular and eccentric orbits about a galaxy. Additionally, we investigate the effect of the cluster mass on the tidal tails, by showing that their structure is better matched when the perturbing effect of the cluster mass is included. By adjusting streaklines to results of N-body computations we can accurately and quickly reproduce all observed substructure, especially the streaky features often found in simulations which may be interpreted in observations as multiple tidal tails. Hence, we can rule out tidal shocks as the origin of such substructures. Finally, from the adjusted streakline parameters we can verify that for the star clusters we studied escape mainly happens from the tidal radius of the cluster, given by xL= (GM/(?2-?2?/?R2))1/3. We find, however, that there is another limiting radius, the 'edge' radius, which gives the smallest radius from which a star can escape during one cluster orbit about the galaxy. For eccentric cluster orbits the edge radius shrinks with increasing orbital eccentricity (for fixed apocentric distance) but is always significantly larger than the respective perigalactic tidal radius. In fact, the edge radii of the clusters we investigated, which are extended and tidally filling, agree well with their (fitted) King radii, which may indicate a fundamental connection between these two quantities.

  2. Development of a biologically inspired hydrobot tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Danielle; Janneh, Alhaji; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, has a large ocean underneath a thick layer of ice. In order to determine whether life exists, it has been proposed that an underwater glider (hydrobot) capable of propulsion could be sent to explore the vast ocean. In this research, we considered various smart materials to create a propulsion device inspired by dolphin tails. Dolphins are highly efficient and excellent gliders, which makes them the ideal candidate for ocean exploration. In order to select the best dolphin species, we began by reviewing literature and then utilized the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to compare the different species. Lagenorhynchus obliquidens (Pacific White-Sided Dolphin) was found to be the best choice for creating a bioinspired hydrobot. We then conducted literature review of various smart materials and using this knowledge constructed a hydrobot tail prototype. This prototype demonstrates that smart materials can be fashioned into suitable actuators to control a tail fashioned after a dolphin.

  3. Single-engine tail interference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.

    1994-01-01

    The data presented in this contribution were obtained in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Multiple test entries were completed and the results have been completely reported in five NASA reports. The objective of the initial investigation was to determine the effect of empennage (tail) interference on the drag characteristics of an axisymmetric model with a single engine fighter aft-end with convergent divergent nozzles. Two nozzle power settings, dry and maximum afterburning, were investigated. Several empennage arrangements and afterbody modifications were investigated during the initial investigation. Subsequent investigations were used to determine the effects of other model variables including tail incidence, tail span, and nozzle shape. For the final investigation, extensive surface pressure instrumentation was added to the model in order to develop and understanding of the flow interactions associated with afterbody/empennage integration and also to provide data for code validation. Extensive computational analysis has been conducted on the staggered empennage configuration at a Mach number of 0.6 utilizing a three-dimensional Navier Stokes code. Most of the investigations were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 and at ratios of jet total pressure to free stream static pressure (nozzle pressure ratio) from 0.1 (jet off) to 8.0. Some angle of attack variation was obtained at jet off conditions.

  4. Proposed ground water protection strategy for the Uranium Mill Tailings Site at Green River, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This document presents the US DOE water resources protection strategy for the Green River, Utah mill tailings disposal site. The modifications in the original plan are based on new information, including ground water quality data collected after remedial action was completed, and on a revised assessment of disposal cell design features, surface conditions, and site hydrogeology. All aspects are discussed in this report.

  5. Active Vertical Tail Buffeting Alleviation on a Twin-Tail Fighter Configuration in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    A 1/6-scale F-18 wind-tunnel model was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Actively Controlled Response Of Buffet-Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program to assess the use of active controls in reducing vertical tail buffeting. The starboard vertical tail was equipped with an active rudder and other aerodynamic devices, and the port vertical tail was equipped with piezoelectric actuators. The tunnel conditions were atmospheric air at a dynamic pressure of 14 psf. By using single-input-single-output control laws at gains well below the physical limits of the control effectors, the power spectral density of the root strains at the frequency of the first bending mode of the vertical tail was reduced by as much as 60 percent up to angles of attack of 37 degrees. Root mean square (RMS) values of root strain were reduced by as much as 19 percent. Stability margins indicate that a constant gain setting in the control law may be used throughout the range of angle of attack tested.

  6. Contaminant tailing in highly heterogeneous porous formations: Sensitivity on model selection and material properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maghrebi, Mahdi; Jankovic, Igor; Weissmann, Gary S.; Matott, L. Shawn; Allen-King, Richelle M.; Rabideau, Alan J.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled impacts of slow advection, diffusion and sorption were investigated using two heterogeneity models that differ in structure and in the mathematical framework that was used to simulate flow and transport and to quantify contaminant tailing. Both models were built using data from a highly heterogeneous exposure of the Borden Aquifer at a site located 2 km north-west of the Stanford-Waterloo experimental site at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, Canada. The inclusions-based model used a simplified representation of the different materials found at the site, while the second model was based on transitional probability geostatistics of the formation. These two models were used to investigate sensitivity of contaminant tailing on model selection and on geometric and material properties. While simulations were based on data collected at Borden, models were exercised beyond the geometric and material properties that characterize the site. Various realizations have identified very low conductive silty clay, found at volume fraction of 23.4%, as the material with dominant influence on tailing, and vertical diffusion in and out of low conductive units, affected by sorption, as the dominant transport mechanism causing tailing. The two models yielded almost identical transport results when vertical correlation lengths of silty clay were matched. Several practical implications relevant for characterization of low conductive units were identified and briefly discussed.

  7. Evaluation of microbial biofilm communities from an Alberta oil sands tailings pond.

    PubMed

    Golby, Susanne; Ceri, Howard; Gieg, Lisa M; Chatterjee, Indranil; Marques, Lyriam L R; Turner, Raymond J

    2012-01-01

    Bitumen extraction from the oil sands of Alberta has resulted in millions of cubic meters of waste stored on-site in tailings ponds. Unique microbial ecology is expected in these ponds, which may be key to their bioremediation potential. We considered that direct culturing of microbes from a tailings sample as biofilms could lead to the recovery of microbial communities that provide good representation of the ecology of the tailings. Culturing of mixed species biofilms in vitro using the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) under aerobic, microaerobic, and anaerobic growth conditions was successful both with and without the addition of various growth nutrients. Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene pyrotag sequencing revealed that unique mixed biofilm communities were recovered under each incubation condition, with the dominant species belonging to Pseudomonas, Thauera, Hydrogenophaga, Rhodoferax, and Acidovorax. This work used an approach that allowed organisms to grow as a biofilm directly from a sample collected of their environment, and the biofilms cultivated in vitro were representative of the endogenous environmental community. For the first time, representative environmental mixed species biofilms have been isolated and grown under laboratory conditions from an oil sands tailings pond environment and a description of their composition is provided. PMID:22029695

  8. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  9. Comparison of the biopsy and cytobrush techniques for diagnosis of subclinical endometritis in mares

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Endometritis is a major cause of infertility in the mare. Therefore, the diagnosis of this disease is very important in veterinary practice. The objective of this study was to compare bacteriological and cytological results obtained from the mare uterus using biopsy (EB) and cytobrush (CB) techniques and relating these findings to the presence of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) in endometrial tissue as the gold standard for detection of endometritis. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that endometrial cytology and microbiology data obtained from material collected using the EB and CB techniques are similar, so that the CB technique could preferentially be used to detect subclinical endometritis in clinical practice. Methods A total of 69 mares suspected of subclinical endometritis because of previous reproductive history and 15 maiden mares were enrolled in this study. Material collected from both EB and CB was smeared on sterile glass slides for cytological examinations and on culture media for microbiological examinations. Bacteriological cultures and cytological samples were classified as negative (no growth or mixed cultures of more than three microorganisms; <2% PMNs) or positive (pure growth of microorganisms; >2% PMNs) for endometritis. Results Positive growth was observed in 43% of CB samples and in 54% of EB samples (difference not significant). The growth of ?-hemolytic streptococci was always connected with positive cytology. This relationship was not observed for growth of E. coli or for non-pathogenic flora. The sensitivity of bacterial growth and cytology from EB was 0.63 and 0.73 respectively. The sensitivities of bacterial growth and cytology from CB were 0.50 and 0.71 respectively. Conclusion Microbiological and cytological results obtained from CB are similar to those obtained from EB and based on these findings the CB technique may be recommended for collection of materials from the mare’s uterus in clinical practice. PMID:24708825

  10. Optical diagnostics based on elastic scattering: An update of clinical demonstrations with the Optical Biopsy System

    SciTech Connect

    Bigio, I.J.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Mourant, J.R.; Conn, R.; Bohorfoush, A.

    1994-10-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. Our clinical studies have expanded since the last Biomedical Optics Europe conference (Budapest, September 1993), and we report here on the latest results of clinical tests in gastrointestinal tract. The OBS invokes a unique approach to optical diagnosis of tissue pathologies based on the elastic scattering properties, over a wide range of wavelengths, of the tissue. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, manifest significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes in an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. The OBS employs a small fiberoptic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination. The probe is designed to be used in optical contact with the tissue under examination and has separate illuminating and collecting fibers. Thus, the light that is collected and transmitted to the analyzing spectrometer must first scatter through a small volume of the tissue before entering the collection fiber(s). Consequently, the system is also sensitive to the optical absorption spectrum of the tissue, over an effective operating range of <300 to 950 nm, and such absorption adds valuable complexity to the scattering spectral signature.

  11. Toward 3D-guided prostate biopsy target optimization: an estimation of tumor sampling probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Peter R.; Cool, Derek W.; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron; Ward, Aaron D.

    2014-03-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-targeted, 3D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided "fusion" prostate biopsy aims to reduce the ~23% false negative rate of clinical 2D TRUS-guided sextant biopsy. Although it has been reported to double the positive yield, MRI-targeted biopsy still yields false negatives. Therefore, we propose optimization of biopsy targeting to meet the clinician's desired tumor sampling probability, optimizing needle targets within each tumor and accounting for uncertainties due to guidance system errors, image registration errors, and irregular tumor shapes. We obtained multiparametric MRI and 3D TRUS images from 49 patients. A radiologist and radiology resident contoured 81 suspicious regions, yielding 3D surfaces that were registered to 3D TRUS. We estimated the probability, P, of obtaining a tumor sample with a single biopsy. Given an RMS needle delivery error of 3.5 mm for a contemporary fusion biopsy system, P >= 95% for 21 out of 81 tumors when the point of optimal sampling probability was targeted. Therefore, more than one biopsy core must be taken from 74% of the tumors to achieve P >= 95% for a biopsy system with an error of 3.5 mm. Our experiments indicated that the effect of error along the needle axis on the percentage of core involvement (and thus the measured tumor burden) was mitigated by the 18 mm core length.

  12. Assisting diagnosis of melanoma through the "noninvasive biopsy" of skin lesions

    E-print Network

    Claridge, Ela

    Assisting diagnosis of melanoma through the "noninvasive biopsy" of skin lesions Symon D-180. #12;Assisting diagnosis of melanoma through the "noninvasive biopsy" of skin lesions Symon Cotton1 to ensure a good prognosis, malignant melanoma needs to be diagnosed whilst the level of invasion

  13. Percutaneous CT-Guided Biopsy of C3 Vertebral Body: Modified Approach for an Old Procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Pua, Uei; Chan, Stephen Yung-Wei

    2013-06-15

    Percutaneous biopsy of upper cervical vertebrae is challenging due to the various critical structures in the location and often requires difficult trajectory such as transoral or paramaxillary approaches. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the utility of head rotation in creating a potential space for direct percutaneous access to C3 vertebral body for safe biopsy.

  14. Gynecologic Biopsy for Molecular Profiling: A Review for the Interventional Radiologist

    PubMed Central

    Corr, Bradley R.; Behbakht, Kian; Spillman, Monique A.

    2013-01-01

    The interventional radiologist is often asked to obtain multiple biopsies of gynecological malignancies for genetic profiling. This article reviews the current indications for gynecological biopsy as well as how the information gained contributes to a personalized medicine plan for the individual patient. The specific focus of this review is the current knowledge and practice of molecular profiling for gynecological malignancies. PMID:24436571

  15. CO2 laser biopsies of oral mucosa: an immunocytological and histological comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitale, Marina C.; Botticelli, Annibale R.; Zaffe, Davide; Martignone, Alessandra; Cisternino, Aurelia; Vezzoni, Franco; Scarpelli, Francesco

    2001-04-01

    The relationship between bioptic technique and tissue preservation has been studied in 18 oral biopsies of young patients obtained by electro surgery or CO2 laser surgery. Biopsies were formalin fixed, paraffin embedded and histologically, histochemically and immunocytochemically treated. All the biopsies show inflammatory cell infiltration, epithelial spongiosis, trichocariosis, supra basal small blisters, and epithelial clefts with lamina detaching from the corium. Histochemistry shows both the presence of edema and acid mucopolysaccharides inside the corium, and variable glycogen content in epithelial cells. Trichocariotic cells show a positive MiB1/Ki67 expression, when they are present. Nevertheless, laser biopsies show a lower amount of basophilic fibrous tissue and of bc12 bodies detection, connected with a higher amount of glycogen, Cytokeratin and MiB1/Ki67 expression in epithelial cells, compared to bovie biopsies. The result show a higher degree of damages in particular at the epithelial level, in electro surgery biopsies rather than laser biopsies. The best epithelial and corium preservation showed by laser biopsies suggest a chance of reversible condition, which can lead to a complete recovery due to its higher capability of restoring tissues.

  16. SIMBiopsies: An Augmented Reality Training SIMulator for Needle Biopsies M S Narayanan1

    E-print Network

    Krovi, Venkat

    SIMBiopsies: An Augmented Reality Training SIMulator for Needle Biopsies M S Narayanan1 , X Zhou1 and validate an Augmented Reality Training SIMulator for Needle Biopsies (AR- SIMBiopsies) that reasons, including: (i) inadequate conventional training due to various economic and logistical issues

  17. 20 CFR 410.428 - X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of pneumoconiosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of...Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.428 X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of...if: (1) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) establishes the existence of...

  18. 20 CFR 410.428 - X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of pneumoconiosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of...Due to Pneumoconiosis § 410.428 X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of...if: (1) A chest roentgenogram (X-ray) establishes the existence of...

  19. Diagnostic value of maspin in distinguishing adenocarcinoma from benign biliary epithelium on endoscopic bile duct biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lihong; Huang, Kevin; Himmelfarb, Eric A; Zhai, Jing; Lai, Jin-Ping; Lin, Fan; Wang, Hanlin L

    2015-11-01

    Histopathologic distinction between benign and malignant epithelia on endoscopic bile duct biopsy can be extremely challenging due to small sample size, crush artifact, and a propensity for marked inflammatory and reactive changes after stent placement. Our previous studies have shown that the insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3, S100P, and the von Hippel-Lindau gene product (pVHL) can help the distinction. This study analyzed 134 endoscopic bile duct biopsy specimens (adenocarcinoma 45, atypical 31, and benign 58) by immunohistochemistry for the expression of maspin, a serine protease inhibitor. The results demonstrated that (1) maspin expression was more frequently detected in malignant than in benign biopsies; (2) malignant biopsies frequently showed diffuse, strong/intermediate, and combined nuclear/cytoplasmic staining patterns for maspin, which were much less commonly seen in benign biopsies; (3) the malignant staining patterns for maspin observed in atypical biopsies were consistent with follow-up data showing that 67% of these patients were subsequently diagnosed with adenocarcinoma; (4) a maspin+/S100P+/pVHL- staining profile was seen in 75% of malignant biopsies but in none of the benign cases. These observations demonstrate that maspin is a useful addition to the diagnostic immunohistochemical panel (S100P, pVHL, and insulin-like growth factor II mRNA-binding protein 3) to help distinguish malignant from benign epithelia on challenging bile duct biopsies. PMID:26362203

  20. 20 CFR 410.428 - X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of pneumoconiosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of... Pneumoconiosis § 410.428 X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of pneumoconiosis. (a) A finding of the existence of... roentgenogram (X-ray) establishes the existence of pneumoconiosis classified as Category 1, 2, 3, A, B, or...

  1. 20 CFR 410.428 - X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of pneumoconiosis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of... Pneumoconiosis § 410.428 X-ray, biopsy, and autopsy evidence of pneumoconiosis. (a) A finding of the existence of... roentgenogram (X-ray) establishes the existence of pneumoconiosis classified as Category 1, 2, 3, A, B, or...

  2. Predicting the Risk for Additional Axillary Metastases in Patients With Breast Carcinoma and Positive Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Giuseppe; Maiorano, Eugenio; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Mastropasqua, Mauro G.; Valentini, Stefano; Galimberti, Viviana; Zurrida, Stefano; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Paganelli, Giovanni; Mazzarol, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To assess whether the risk for nonsentinel node metastases may be predicted, thus sparing a subgroup of patients with breast carcinoma and a positive sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy completion axillary lymph node dissection (ALND). Summary Background Data: The SLN is the only involved axillary lymph node in the majority of the patients undergoing ALND for a positive SLN biopsy. A model to predict the status of nonsentinel axillary lymph nodes could help tailor surgical therapy to those patients most likely to benefit from completion ALND. Methods: All the axillary sentinel and nonsentinel lymph nodes of 1228 patients were reviewed histologically and reclassified according to the current TNM classification of malignant tumors as bearing isolated tumor cells only, micrometastases, or (macro)metastases. The prevalence of metastases in nonsentinel lymph nodes was correlated to the type of SLN involvement and the size of the metastasis, the number of affected SLNs, and the prospectively collected clinicopathologic variables of the primary tumors. Results: In multivariate analysis, further axillary involvement was significantly associated with the type and size of SLN metastases, the number of affected SLNs, and the occurrence of peritumoral vascular invasion in the primary tumor. A predictive model based on the characteristics most strongly associated with nonsentinel node metastases was able to identify subgroups of patients at significantly different risk for further axillary involvement. Conclusions: Patients with the most favorable combination of predictive factors still have no less than 13% risk for nonsentinel lymph node metastases and should be offered completion ALND outside of clinical trials of SLN biopsy without back-up axillary clearing. PMID:15650643

  3. Nerve biopsy findings contribute to diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy: 78% of findings support clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying-shuang; Sun, A-ping; Chen, Lu; Dong, Rong-fang; Zhong, Yan-feng; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple mononeuropathy is an unusual form of peripheral neuropathy involving two or more nerve trunks. It is a syndrome with many different causes. We reviewed the clinical, electrophysiological and nerve biopsy findings of 14 patients who suffered from multiple mononeuropathy in our clinic between January 2009 and June 2013. Patients were diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy (n = 6), perineuritis (n = 2), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (n = 2) or Lewis-Sumner syndrome (n = 1) on the basis of clinical features, laboratory data, electrophysiological investigations and nerve biopsies. Two patients who were clinically diagnosed with vasculitic neuropathy and one patient who was clinically diagnosed with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy were not confirmed by nerve biopsy. Nerve biopsies confirmed clinical diagnosis in 78.6% of the patients (11/14). Nerve biopsy pathological diagnosis is crucial to the etiological diagnosis of multiple mononeuropathy. PMID:25788930

  4. Morbidity and psychological impact of prostate biopsy: the future calls for a change

    PubMed Central

    Minervini, Andrea; Vittori, Gianni; Siena, Giampaolo; Carini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Currently transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-Bx) is one of the most common urological procedures, with more than 1 million performed per year in Europe and the United States.1 Among patients undergoing TRUS-Bx, approximately one-third will receive a diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa), while two-thirds receive a negative result on initial biopsy. Negative biopsy patients maintain an estimated risk of repeated biopsy of 12% at 1 year and 38% at 5 years.2 Standard TRUS-Bx is likely to systematically miss significant tumors, particularly in the anterior and apical parts of the gland.3 A crucial aim of urologists in the next decade is to increase the accuracy of the procedure and avoid the use of inappropriate biopsies. PMID:24713833

  5. Mapping of transrectal ultrasonographic prostate biopsies: quality control and learning curve assessment by image processing

    E-print Network

    Mozer, Pierre; Chevreau, Gregoire; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Bart, Stephane; Renard-Penna, Raphaele; Comperat, Eva; Conort, Pierre; Bitker, Marc-Olivier; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Richard, Francois; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Mapping of transrectal ultrasonographic (TRUS) prostate biopsies is of fundamental importance for either diagnostic purposes or the management and treatment of prostate cancer, but the localization of the cores seems inaccurate. Our objective was to evaluate the capacities of an operator to plan transrectal prostate biopsies under 2-dimensional TRUS guidance using a registration algorithm to represent the localization of biopsies in a reference 3-dimensional ultrasonographic volume. Methods: Thirty-two patients underwent a series of 12 prostate biopsies under local anesthesia performed by 1 operator using a TRUS probe combined with specific third-party software to verify that the biopsies were indeed conducted within the planned targets. RESULTS: The operator reached 71% of the planned targets with substantial variability that depended on their localization (100% success rate for targets in the middle and right parasagittal parts versus 53% for targets in the left lateral base). Feedback from this ...

  6. [The development of a guide device for stereotactic core-needle biopsy of the breast].

    PubMed

    Kong, Longyang; Wu, Jian; Gao, Peng; Wu, Guohui; Li, Xiuwang

    2013-11-01

    To meet the need of accurate positioning for biopsy gun in the breast biopsy operation, a new stereotactic biopsy guide device have been developed to adapt to the domestic mammary machine, which can help physician to carry out biopsy operation more accurately and effectively. The guide device has the motion model, measurement model and display model and can realize linear motion and display real-time displacement values in X, Y and Z direction. The experimental results showed that the guide device could be well fixed in the domestic mammary machine, and achieved good accuracy and repeatability in each direction. Depending on the displacement values, physician can change the space of biopsy gun accurately. PMID:24617213

  7. Prostate Biopsy Assistance System with Gland Deformation Estimation for Enhanced Precision

    E-print Network

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2009-01-01

    Computer-assisted prostate biopsies became a very active research area during the last years. Prostate tracking makes it possi- ble to overcome several drawbacks of the current standard transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) biopsy procedure, namely the insufficient targeting accuracy which may lead to a biopsy distribution of poor quality, the very approximate knowledge about the actual location of the sampled tissues which makes it difficult to implement focal therapy strategies based on biopsy results, and finally the difficulty to precisely reach non-ultrasound (US) targets stemming from different modalities, statistical atlases or previous biopsy series. The prostate tracking systems presented so far are limited to rigid transformation tracking. However, the gland can get considerably deformed during the intervention because of US probe pres- sure and patient movements. We propose to use 3D US combined with image-based elastic registration to estimate these deformations. A fast elastic registration algorithm that...

  8. Monooxygenase activity of human liver in microsomal fractions of needle biopsy specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Boobis, A R; Brodie, M J; Kahn, G C; Fletcher, D R; Saunders, J H; Davies, D S

    1980-01-01

    1 Methods are described for the determination of mixed function oxidase activity in microsomal fractions from percutaneous needle biopsies of human liver. 2 Activities of needle biopsy samples were comparable with those of wedge biopsy sample obtained at laparotomy from different subjects. 3 Although cytochrome P-450 content of liver from rat and man was similar, human AHH activity was only 10% of that in the rat. 4 In biopsies with preserved hepatic architecture, AHH activity and cytochrome P-450 content showed a significant positive correlation. 5 Cigarette smoking significantly increased both AHH activity and turnover number, but not cytochrome P-450 content, of biopsies with normal architecture. 6 The presence of liver disease caused a significant decrease in AHH activity and cytochrome P-450 content. PMID:6766729

  9. Metal mobilization under alkaline conditions in ash-covered tailings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinmei; Alakangas, Lena; Wanhainen, Christina

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine element mobilization and accumulation in mill tailings under alkaline conditions. The tailings were covered with 50 cm of fly ash, and above a sludge layer. The tailings were geochemically and mineralogically investigated. Sulfides, such as pyrrhotite, sphalerite and galena along with gangue minerals such as dolomite, calcite, micas, chlorite, epidote, Mn-pyroxene and rhodonite were identified in the unoxidized tailings. The dissolution of the fly ash layer resulted in a high pH (close to 12) in the underlying tailings. This, together with the presence of organic matter, increased the weathering of the tailings and mobilization of elements in the uppermost 47 cm of the tailings. All primary minerals were depleted, except quartz and feldspar which were covered by blurry secondary carbonates. Sulfide-associated elements such as Cd, Fe, Pb, S and Zn and silicate-associated elements such as Fe, Mg and Mn were released from the depletion zone and accumulated deeper down in the tailings where the pH decreased to circum-neutral. Sequential extraction suggests that Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, S and Zn were retained deeper down in the tailings and were mainly associated with the sulfide phase. Calcium, Cr, K and Ni released from the ash layer were accumulated in the uppermost depletion zone of the tailings. PMID:24681363

  10. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  11. Genetically-Adjusted PSA Values May Prevent Delayed Biopsies in African-American Men

    PubMed Central

    Donin, Nicholas; Loeb, Stacy; Cooper, Phillip R.; Roehl, Kimberly A.; Baumann, Nikola A.; J.Catalona, William; Helfand, Brian T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Genetic variants called PSA-single nucleotide polymorphisms (PSA-SNPs) have been associated with serum PSA levels. We previously demonstrated that genetic correction of serum PSA in Caucasian men could reduce both potentially unnecessary biopsies by 15% to 20% and potentially delayed biopsies by 3%. Our objective was to evaluate whether genetic correction with the PSA-SNPs could reduce potentially unnecessary and/or delayed biopsies in African-American (AA) men. Materials and Methods We compared the genotypes of 4 PSA-SNPs between 964 Caucasian and 363 AA men without known PC. We adjusted PSA values based upon an individual's PSA-SNP carrier status, and calculated the percentage of men that would meet commonly used PSA thresholds for biopsy (?2.5 or ?4.0ng/mL) before and after genetic correction. Potentially unnecessary and delayed biopsies were defined as those men who went below and above the biopsy threshold after genetic correction, respectively. Results Overall, 349 (96.1%) and 354 (97.5%) AA men had measured PSA levels <2.5 and <4.0 ng/mL. Genetic correction in AA men did not avoid any potentially unnecessary biopsies, but resulted in a significant (p<0.001) reduction in potentially delayed biopsies by 2.5% and 3.9% based upon the biopsy threshold cutoff. Conclusions There are significant differences in the influence of the PSA-SNPs between AA and Caucasian men without known PC, as genetic correction resulted in an increased proportion of AA men crossing the threshold for biopsy. These results raise the question whether genetic differences in PSA might contribute to delayed PC diagnosis in AA patients. PMID:24712975

  12. Tether-free endoscopic biopsy with self-assembled micro-surgical tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gultepe, Evin; Shin, Eun Ji; Selaru, Florin; Kalloo, Anthony; Gracias, David

    2013-03-01

    Feynman's futuristic vision of ``swallowing the surgeon'' or a truly non-invasive surgery relies on the invention and utilization of tetherless, stimuli-responsive and miniaturized surgical tools. We propose a step in this direction by the use of sub-millimeter scale, untethered, self-assembled endoscopic tools by designing and deploying microgrippers (?-grippers) for effective mucosal sampling from large surface-area organs and for tissue retrieval from hard to reach places in the body. Due to their small size, tether-free actuation, parallel fabrication and deployment, ?-grippers can be dispersed in large numbers (hundreds or thousands) to collect tissue samples and allow statistical sampling of large mucosal areas. Monte Carlo simulations showed that using large number of biopsy tools increases the sampling coverage for screening procedures and hence the chance of detecting the malignant lesions. To establish the feasibility of using ?-grippers for sampling large organs we used with ex-vivo colon and in-vivo esophagus models. Our results showed that it is possible to retrieve high quality tissue samples which are suitable for either conventional cytologic or genetic analyses by using ?-grippers. This work was funded in part by the NSF grant NSF CBET-1066898 and the NIH Director's New Innovator Award Program through grant DP2-OD004346-01; in part by FAMRI grant 072119 YCSA and by a K08 Award (DK09015) from the NIH.

  13. Fluid phase biopsy for detection and characterization of circulating endothelial cells in myocardial infarction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bethel, Kelly; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Damani, Samir; Kolatkar, Anand; Lamy, Rachelle; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Topol, Sarah; Topol, Eric J.; Kuhn, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Elevated levels of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) occur in response to various pathological conditions including myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we adapted a fluid phase biopsy technology platform that successfully detects circulating tumor cells in the blood of cancer patients (HD-CTC assay), to create a high-definition circulating endothelial cell (HD-CEC) assay for the detection and characterization of CECs. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 79 MI patients, 25 healthy controls and six patients undergoing vascular surgery (VS). CECs were defined by positive staining for DAPI, CD146 and von Willebrand Factor and negative staining for CD45. In addition, CECs exhibited distinct morphological features that enable differentiation from surrounding white blood cells. CECs were found both as individual cells and as aggregates. CEC numbers were higher in MI patients compared with healthy controls. VS patients had lower CEC counts when compared with MI patients but were not different from healthy controls. Both HD-CEC and CellSearch® assays could discriminate MI patients from healthy controls with comparable accuracy but the HD-CEC assay exhibited higher specificity while maintaining high sensitivity. Our HD-CEC assay may be used as a robust diagnostic biomarker in MI patients.

  14. Characterization of Gastric Mucosa Biopsies Reveals Alterations in Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCourt, Andrew C; O'Donovan, Kirsty L; Ekblad, Eva; Sand, Elin; Craufurd, David; Rosser, Anne; Sanders, David; Stoy, Nicholas; Rickards, Hugh; Wierup, Nils; Bates, Gillian P.; Björkqvist, Maria; Quarrell, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss is an important complication of Huntington’s disease (HD), however the mechanism for weight loss in HD is not entirely understood. Mutant huntingtin is expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and, in HD mice, mutant huntingtin inclusions are found within the enteric nervous system along the GI tract. A reduction of neuropeptides, decreased mucosal thickness and villus length, as well as gut motility impairment, have also been shown in HD mice. We therefore set out to study gastric mucosa of patients with HD, looking for abnormalities of mucosal cells using immunohistochemistry. In order to investigate possible histological differences related to gastric acid production, we evaluated the cell density of acid producing parietal cells, as well as gastrin producing cells (the endocrine cell controlling parietal cell function). In addition, we looked at chief cells and somatostatin-containing cells. In gastric mucosa from HD subjects, compared to control subject biopsies, a reduced expression of gastrin (a marker of G cells) was found. This is in line with previous HD mouse studies showing reduction of GI tract neuropeptides. PMID:26581667

  15. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Thorsten

    2011-01-01

    Summary The role of axillary surgery for the treatment of primary breast cancer is in a process of constant change. During the last decade, axillary dissection with removal of at least 10 lymph nodes (ALD) was replaced by sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) as a staging procedure. Since then, the indication for SLNB rapidly expanded. Today's surgical strategies aim to minimize the rate of patients with a negative axillary status who undergo ALD. For some subgroups of patients, the indication for SLNB (e.g. multicentric disease, large tumors) or its implication for treatment planning (micrometastatic involvement, neoadjuvant chemotherapy) is being discussed. Although the indication for ALD is almost entirely restricted to patients with positive axillary lymph nodes today, the therapeutic effect of completion ALD is more and more questioned. On the other hand, the diagnostic value of ALD in node-positive patients is discussed. This article reflects today's standards in axillary surgery and discusses open issues on the diagnostic and therapeutic role of SLNB and ALD in the treatment of early breast cancer. PMID:21779223

  16. Metabolic fingerprints in testicular biopsies from type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Alves, Marco G; Martins, Ana D; Moreira, Paula I; Carvalho, Rui A; Sousa, Mário; Barros, Alberto; Silva, Joaquina; Pinto, Soraia; Simões, Teresinha; Oliveira, Pedro Fontes

    2015-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a metabolic disease that has grown to pandemic proportions. Recent reports have highlighted the effect of DM on male reproductive function. Here, we hypothesize that testicular metabolism is altered in type 1 diabetic (T1D) men seeking fertility treatment. We propose to determine some metabolic fingerprints in testicular biopsies of diabetic patients. For that, testicular tissue from five normal and five type 1 diabetic men was analyzed by high-resolution magic-angle spinning (HR-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. mRNA and protein expression of glucose transporters and glycolysis-related enzymes were also evaluated. Our results show that testes from diabetic men presented decreased levels of lactate, alanine, citrate and creatine. The mRNA levels of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) and phosphofructokinase 1 (PFK1) were decreased in testes from diabetic men but only GLUT3 presented decreased mRNA and protein levels. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT) protein levels were also found to be decreased in testes from diabetic men. Overall, our results show that T1D alters glycolysis-related transporters and enzymes, compromising lactate content in the testes. Moreover, testicular creatine content was severely depressed in T1D men. Since lactate and creatine are essential for germ cells development and support, the data discussed here open new insights into the molecular mechanism by which DM promotes subfertility/infertility in human males. PMID:26051285

  17. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Shannon P; Zahid, Maliha J; Durkin, John R; Francis, Richard J; Lo, Cecilia W; Chennubhotla, S Chakra

    2015-08-01

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a "black box" toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. PMID:26246169

  18. Neck schwannoma diagnosed by core needle biopsy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasrollah, N; Trimboli, P; Bianchi, D; Taccogna, S

    2015-12-01

    Here we present a case of a 58 year old man referred to our hospital to undergo neck and thyroid ultrasonography (US) following palpable neck mass. US revealed a solid hypoechoic nodule in right thyroid lobe, and a solid lesion on the right laterocervical neck region with ultrasound suspicious features of neoplastic lymph node. In order to achieve a diagnosis of the neck mass and to get a proper evaluation of the thyroid nodule, we decided to perform a fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of both lesions. At cytopathologic examination the thyroid nodule appeared as benign, while cytologic sampling of the neck lesion was inadequate for a proper evaluation. Thus, we performed core needle biopsy (CNB) of the neck lesion like recently proposed for thyroid lesions; also, to definitively exclude malignancy of thyroid nodule, this also underwent CNB. Histologic report of CNB confirmed benign thyroid nodule, while the neck lesion revealed a proliferation of neuronal type consistent with schwannoma. The patient has been addressed to clinical and ultrasonographic follow-up. CNB appears as a safe and minimally-invasive approach to diagnose indeterminate neck masses and avoid unnecessary diagnostic surgery. PMID:26550065

  19. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground.

    Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born.

    The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light.

    This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  20. TAIL-seq: genome-wide determination of poly(A) tail length and 3' end modifications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyeshik; Lim, Jaechul; Ha, Minju; Kim, V Narry

    2014-03-20

    Global investigation of the 3' extremity of mRNA (3'-terminome), despite its importance in gene regulation, has not been feasible due to technical challenges associated with homopolymeric sequences and relative paucity of mRNA. We here develop a method, TAIL-seq, to sequence the very end of mRNA molecules. TAIL-seq allows us to measure poly(A) tail length at the genomic scale. Median poly(A) length is 50-100 nt in HeLa and NIH 3T3 cells. Poly(A) length correlates with mRNA half-life, but not with translational efficiency. Surprisingly, we discover widespread uridylation and guanylation at the downstream of poly(A) tail. The U tails are generally attached to short poly(A) tails (<25 nt), while the G tails are found mainly on longer poly(A) tails (>40 nt), implicating their generic roles in mRNA stability control. TAIL-seq is a potent tool to dissect dynamic control of mRNA turnover and translational control, and to discover unforeseen features of RNA cleavage and tailing. PMID:24582499

  1. HERA Beam Tail Shaping by Tune Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, Christoph

    2003-12-01

    To study CP violation, the HERA-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  2. A Farey tail for attractor black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Cheng, Miranda C. N.; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Manschot, Jan; Verlinde, Erik

    2006-11-01

    The microstates of 4d BPS black holes in IIA string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau manifold are counted by a (generalized) elliptic genus of a (0,4) conformal field theory. By exploiting a spectral flow that relates states with different charges, and using the Rademacher formula, we find that the elliptic genus has an exact asymptotic expansion in terms of semi-classical saddle-points of the dual supergravity theory. This generalizes the known "Black Hole Farey Tail" of [1] to the case of attractor black holes.

  3. A Farey Tail for Attractor Black Holes

    E-print Network

    Jan de Boer; Miranda C. N. Cheng; Robbert Dijkgraaf; Jan Manschot; Erik Verlinde

    2008-04-22

    The microstates of 4d BPS black holes in IIA string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau manifold are counted by a (generalized) elliptic genus of a (0,4) conformal field theory. By exploiting a spectral flow that relates states with different charges, and using the Rademacher formula, we find that the elliptic genus has an exact asymptotic expansion in terms of semi-classical saddle-points of the dual supergravity theory. This generalizes the known "Black Hole Farey Tail" of [1] to the case of attractor black holes.

  4. (de)Tails of Toda CFT

    E-print Network

    Nadav Drukker; Filippo Passerini

    2011-04-11

    The relation between the partition function of N=2 gauge theories in 4d and conformal Toda field theory in 2d is explained for the case where the 4d theory is a linear quiver with "quiver tails". That is when the 4d theory has gauge groups of different rank. We propose an identification of a subset of the states of Toda CFT which represent the Coulomb-branch parameters of the different rank gauge multiplets and study their three-point functions and descendants.

  5. Gene mutation profiling of primary glioblastoma through multiple tumor biopsy guided by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chao; Guo, Jun; Chen, Hong; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yin; Tang, Wei-Jun; Ren, Guang; Yao, Yu; Wu, Jin-Song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutation has served as the biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intra-tumor heterogeneity may interfere with personalized treatment strategies based on mutation analysis. This study aimed to characterize somatic mutation profiling of GBM. We collected 33 samples from 7 patients with the primary GBM associated with different Choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) through the frameless proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) guided biopsies and investigated multiple somatic mutations profi ling using the AmpliSeq cancer hotspot panel V2. We identifi ed 53 missense or nonsense mutations in 27 genes including some novel mutations such as APC and IDH2. The mutations in EGFR, TP53, PTEN, PIK3CA genes were presented with different frequency and the majority of the mutated gene was only shared by 1-2 samples from one patient. Moreover, we found the association of CNI with histological grade, but there was no signifi cant change of CNI in the presence of TP53, EGFR and PTEN mutations. These data suggest that gene mutations constitute a heterogeneous marker for primary GBM which may be independent of intra-tumor morphological phenotypes of GBM; therefore, gene mutation markers could not be determined from a small number of needle biopsies or only confi ned to the high-grade region. PMID:26191234

  6. Gene mutation profiling of primary glioblastoma through multiple tumor biopsy guided by 1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chao; Guo, Jun; Chen, Hong; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Wang, Yin; Tang, Wei-Jun; Ren, Guang; Yao, Yu; Wu, Jin-Song; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2015-01-01

    Genetic mutation has served as the biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, intra-tumor heterogeneity may interfere with personalized treatment strategies based on mutation analysis. This study aimed to characterize somatic mutation profiling of GBM. We collected 33 samples from 7 patients with the primary GBM associated with different Choline (Cho) to N-acetylaspartate (NAA) index (CNI) through the frameless proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) guided biopsies and investigated multiple somatic mutations profiling using the AmpliSeq cancer hotspot panel V2. We identified 53 missense or nonsense mutations in 27 genes including some novel mutations such as APC and IDH2. The mutations in EGFR, TP53, PTEN, PIK3CA genes were presented with different frequency and the majority of the mutated gene was only shared by 1-2 samples from one patient. Moreover, we found the association of CNI with histological grade, but there was no significant change of CNI in the presence of TP53, EGFR and PTEN mutations. These data suggest that gene mutations constitute a heterogeneous marker for primary GBM which may be independent of intra-tumor morphological phenotypes of GBM; therefore, gene mutation markers could not be determined from a small number of needle biopsies or only confined to the high-grade region. PMID:26191234

  7. Hydrogeology and effects of tailings basins on the hydrology of Sands Plain, Marquette County, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grannemann, N.G.

    1984-01-01

    A hydrogeological study of Sands Plain, a sandy outwash area in the north-central part of Michigan 's Upper Peninsula, was conducted during 1979-82. Parts of the area are being considered as possible sites for construction and operation of iron mining tailings basins. Gribben Basin, an existing tailings basin in the western part of Sands Plains, covers 2.5 square miles; hypothetical tailings basins may cover as much as 11 square miles. Glacial deposits are the area 's principal aquifer. The general direction of ground-water flow is from the outwash area toward Lake Superior. Before reaching Lake Superior, however, most ground water is discharged in a series of nearly parallel streams. Ground water accounts for 95 percent of the discharge of these streams. Precipitation collected at two sites had average pH values of 4.0. Dissolved solids concentrations in water from wells ranged from 41 to 246 milligrams per liter; in water from streams, they ranged from 82 to 143 milligrams per liter. Calcium and bicarbonate were the principal dissolved ions. A two-dimensional digital model of ground-water flow was used to simulate ground-water levels and runoff. The predictive computer simulations indicate that construction and operation of Gribben tailings basin, located in the western part of the study area, decreased ground-water flow to Goose Lake Outlet by 0.9 to 1.6 cubic feet per second. Construction and operation of four hypothetical tailings basins covering a total of 11 square miles is estimated to reduce ground-water flow to the area 's streams by 7 to 18 cubic feet per second depending on the hydraulic properties of material comprising the basin boundaries. Leakage from all of the basins is estimated to range from 0.7 to 7 cubic feet per second. (USGS)

  8. Plague in a complex of white-tailed prairie dogs and associated small mammals in Wyoming.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S H; Williams, E S

    1997-10-01

    Fleas were collected from white-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys leucurus) and other small mammals trapped on six grids during a field study near Meeteetse (Wyoming, USA) in 1989 and 1990 to investigate the dynamics of plague in this rodent population. Fleas were identified and tested for Yersinia pestis by mouse inoculation. Yersinia pestis-positive fleas were found on prairie dogs and in their burrows. Flea species on prairie dogs changed from spring to late summer. White-tailed prairie dog numbers were significantly lower in the presence of Y. pestis-positive fleas; however, affected populations generally recovered 1 to 2 yr following absence of detectable plague. Grids where recovery occurred had a high proportion of juvenile male prairie dogs. Eighteen flea species were identified on small mammals, six of which were infected with Y. pestis. Some flea species were associated with a particular small mammal species, while others were found on a broad range of host species. Flea species most important in the potential interchange of Y. pestis between associated small mammals and white-tailed prairie dogs were Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris, Oropsylla idahoensis, and Oropsylla labis. Plague cycled through the white-tailed prairie dog complex in an unpredictable manner. Each summer the complex was a mixture of colonies variously impacted by plague: some were declining, some were unaffected by plague, and others were recovering from plague population declines. These data provide insight into the dynamics of plague in white-tailed prairie dog complexes, but predicting movement of plague is not yet possible and the role of associated mammals in maintenance of plague is not understood. PMID:9391955

  9. Radioecological investigations of uranium mill tailings systems. Progress report, September 1, 1979-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F W

    1980-10-10

    The initial 13 months of this program have been devoted to staffing, development of a radiochemistry capability, development of a mill tailings reclamation study, studies on hydraulic properties of soils, initiation of plant uptake studies, preparation for metabolic studies with deer and antelope, and sample collections. Through the addition of new personnel and equipment, we are rapidly developing analytical capabilities for /sup 238/U, /sup 230/Th, /sup 226/Ra, /sup 210/Pb and /sup 210/Po in matrices such as soil, water, plant material, and animal tissues. A 4 acre study site was developed in cooperation with the Pathfinder Mines Corp. at the Shirley Basin Uranium Mine in Wyoming. The study site is designed for investigations on the influence of various kinds and thicknesses of mill tailings soil covers on the integrity of reclaimed tailings and inherent radionuclides. Studies on the hydraulic properties of various soil materials were conducted and data analysis is in progress. Plots and procedures for conducting plant uptake studies on uranium and progeny were established and long-term investigations have been initiated. A colony of tame mule deer and pronghorn antelope has been developed for studies on the uptake and retention of /sup 210/Pb and /sup 210/Po. Numerous collections of soil, vegetation and water from the Shirley Basin Uranium Mine environs were conducted and radiochemical assay is in progress.

  10. Use of research biopsies in clinical trials: Are risks and benefits adequately discussed? | accrualnet.cancer.gov

    Cancer.gov

    ICs were evaluated and specific information related to the rationale for the research biopsy, the description of the biopsy, mandatory versus optional classification, and the described risks were recorded.

  11. Prevalence and risk factors of contralateral extraprostatic extension in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for unilateral disease at biopsy: A global multi-institutional experience

    PubMed Central

    Bienz, Marc; Hueber, Pierre-Alain; Trudeau, Vincent; Alenizi, Abdullah M.; Valdivieso, Roger; Alom, Modar; Balbay, Mevlana Derya; Canda, Abdullah Erdem; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Albala, David M.; El-Hakim, Assaad; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Latour, Mathieu; Saad, Fred; Zorn, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We assessed the incidence of contralateral prostate cancer (cPCa), contralateral EPE (cEPE) and contralateral positive surgical margins (cPSM) in patients diagnosed preoperatively with unilateral prostate cancer and evaluated risk factors predictive of contralateral disease extension. Methods: The occurrence of cPCa, cEPE and cPSM and the side-specific nerve-sparing technique performed were collected postoperatively from 327 men diagnosed with unilateral prostate cancer at biopsy. Parameters, such as the localization, proportion, and percentage of cancer in positive cores, were prospectively collected. Results: Overall, 50.5% of patients had bilateral disease, and were at higher risk when associated with a positive biopsy core at the apex (p = 0.016). The overall incidence of ipsilateral EPE and cEPE were 21.4% and 3.4%, respectively (p < 0.001). Compared to cPCa, ipsilateral disease was at an almost 4-fold higher risk of extending out of the prostate (p < 0.001). None of the criteria tested were identified as useful predictors for cEPE. The low incidence of cEPE in our cohort could limit our ability to detect significance. The overall incidence of ipsilateral PSM and cPSM were 15.3% and 5.8%, respectively (p < 0.001). More aggressive nerve-sparing was not associated with a higher incidence of PSM. Prostate sides selected for more aggressive nerve-sparing were associated with younger patients (p < 0.001), a smaller prostate (p = 0.006), and a lower percentage of cancer in biopsy material (p = 0.008). Conclusion: Although the risk of cPCa is high in patients diagnosed with unilateral prostate cancer at biopsy, the risk of cEPE and cPSM is low, yet not insignificant. Contralateral aggressive nerve-sparing should be used with caution and should not compromise oncological outcome. PMID:26279712

  12. 54. Photocopied August 1978. INTERIOR OF A TAIL PIT OR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photocopied August 1978. INTERIOR OF A TAIL PIT OR TAIL RACE AT THE EAST END OF THE POWER HOUSE, SEPTEMBER 17, 1900. THE PRE-MOULDED BLOCKS WHICH FORMED THE SIDE WALLS AND THE ARCHED FOREBAY WALL ARE CLEARLY VISIBLE. THE MONOLITHIC FLOOR OF THE TAIL PIT, HOWEVER, HAS NOT YET BEEN POURED: NEITHER HAS THE MONOLITHIC ARCHED ROOF. (75) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  13. Utilization of gold tailings as an additive in Portland cement.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ozlem; Elbeyli, Iffet Yakar; Piskin, Sabriye

    2006-06-01

    Mine tailings are formed as an industrial waste during coal and ore mining and processing. In the investigated process, following the extraction of gold from the ore, the remaining tailings are subjected to a two-stage chemical treatment in order to destroy the free cyanide and to stabilize and coagulate heavy metals prior to discharge into the tailings pond. The aim of this study was the investigation of the feasibility of utilization of the tailings as an additive material in Portland cement production. For this purpose, the effects of the tailings on the compressive strength properties of the ordinary Portland cement were investigated. Chemical and physical properties, mineralogical composition, particle size distribution and microstructure of the tailings were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), particle size analyzer (Mastersizer) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Following the characterization of the tailings, cement mortars were prepared by intergrinding Portland cement with dried tailings. Composition of the cement clinkers were adjusted to contain 5, 15, 25% (wt/wt) dried tailings and also silica fume and fly ash samples (C and F type) were added to clinker in different ratios. The mortars produced with different amounts of tailings, silica fume, fly ashes and also mixtures of them were tested for compressive strength values after 2, 7, 28 and 56 days according to the European Standard (EN 196-1). The results indicated that gold tailings up to 25% in clinker could be beneficially used as an additive in Portland cement production. It is suggested that the gold tailings used in the cement are blended with silica fume and C-type fly ash to obtain higher compressive strength values. PMID:16784164

  14. FDG-PET in the selection of brain lesions for biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, M.W.; Glantz, M.J.; Hoffman, J.M.; Friedman, A.H.; Burger, P.C.; Schold, S.C.; Coleman, R.E. )

    1991-09-01

    The CT-guided stereotaxic needle biopsy has become a widely used procedure in the diagnostic evaluation of intracranial lesions including tumors. Conventional CT or MR frequently defines the anatomic regions of abnormality, which may be multiple lesions or a single lesion that is heterogeneous in cellular composition owing to the topographic variation of cellular constituency or the combination of active disease, nonspecific inflammation, necrosis, and/or edema. In these cases, selection of the most appropriate site for a successful diagnostic needle biopsy can be difficult. In three patients, we have used (18F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to determine the site most likely to provide a diagnostic biopsy result. In the first patient, who presented with confusion, multiple biopsies from the temporal lobe, based on MR abnormalities, revealed only reactive gliosis and edema. Repeat biopsy directed by PET revealed an anaplastic astrocytoma. In a second patient, PET allowed us to differentiate radiation effect from active metastatic breast cancer. In the third patient, who presented with a grand mal seizure, biopsy of a CT-defined hypodense region demonstrated lymphocytosis. Metabolism of FDG was normal or increased in areas of Aspergillus encephalitis at autopsy. These preliminary studies suggest a complementary role for FDG-PET and CT or MR in selected patients for defining the intracranial site most likely to yield a positive biopsy result.

  15. Mechanically assisted 3D prostate ultrasound imaging and biopsy needle-guidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bax, Jeffrey; Williams, Jackie; Cool, Derek; Gardi, Lori; Montreuil, Jacques; Karnik, Vaishali; Sherebrin, Shi; Romagnoli, Cesare; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-02-01

    Prostate biopsy procedures are currently limited to using 2D transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging to guide the biopsy needle. Being limited to 2D causes ambiguity in needle guidance and provides an insufficient record to allow guidance to the same suspicious locations or avoid regions that are negative during previous biopsy sessions. We have developed a mechanically assisted 3D ultrasound imaging and needle tracking system, which supports a commercially available TRUS probe and integrated needle guide for prostate biopsy. The mechanical device is fixed to a cart and the mechanical tracking linkage allows its joints to be manually manipulated while fully supporting the weight of the ultrasound probe. The computer interface is provided in order to track the needle trajectory and display its path on a corresponding 3D TRUS image, allowing the physician to aim the needle-guide at predefined targets within the prostate. The system has been designed for use with several end-fired transducers that can be rotated about the longitudinal axis of the probe in order to generate 3D image for 3D navigation. Using the system, 3D TRUS prostate images can be generated in approximately 10 seconds. The system reduces most of the user variability from conventional hand-held probes, which make them unsuitable for precision biopsy, while preserving some of the user familiarity and procedural workflow. In this paper, we describe the 3D TRUS guided biopsy system and report on the initial clinical use of this system for prostate biopsy.

  16. Multicenter Evaluation of the Prostate Health Index to Detect Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Biopsy Naïve Men

    PubMed Central

    de la Calle, Claire; Patil, Dattatraya; Wei, John T.; Scherr, Douglas S.; Sokoll, Lori; Chan, Daniel W.; Siddiqui, Javed; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; Rubin, Mark A.; Sanda, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We evaluated the ability of PHI to discriminate aggressive prostate cancer from indolent or no cancer in a biopsy naïve population. Materials and Methods Two independent prospective cohorts of 561 and 395 subjects, respectively, with no prior prostate biopsy who were enrolled at different clinical sites were used to validate the results. We compared the diagnostic specificity of PHI to prebiopsy total and percent free prostate specific antigen using prostate biopsy results. We also determined the optimal PHI threshold to discriminate aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score 7 or greater) from indolent or no prostate cancer (Gleason score 6 or less). Results In the primary cohort higher PHI values were significantly associated with Gleason score 7 or greater. The AUC to detect aggressive prostate cancer was 0.815. At 95% sensitivity PHI specificity was 36.0% vs 17.2% and 19.4% for total and percent free prostate specific antigen, respectively. At 95% sensitivity for detecting aggressive prostate cancer the optimal PHI cutoff was 24, which would help avoid 41% of unnecessary biopsies. A cutoff of 24 led to 36% biopsies avoided with few aggressive cancers missed. These results were confirmed in the validation cohort. Conclusions The PHI detected aggressive prostate cancer with better specificity than total and percent free prostate specific antigen in a biopsy naïve population. It could be a useful tool to decrease unnecessary prostate biopsies. PMID:25636659

  17. Target detection: Magnetic resonance imaging-ultrasound fusion–guided prostate biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Margolis, Daniel J.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have enabled image-guided detection of prostate cancer. Fusion of MRI with real-time ultrasound (US) allows the information from MRI to be used to direct biopsy needles under US guidance in an office-based procedure. Fusion can be performed either cognitively or electronically, using a fusion device. Fusion devices allow superimposition (coregistration) of stored MRI images on real-time US images; areas of suspicion found on MRI can then serve as targets during US-guided biopsy. Currently available fusion devices use a variety of technologies to perform coregistration: robotic tracking via a mechanical arm with built-in encoders (Artemis/Eigen, BioJet/Geoscan); electromagnetic tracking (UroNav/Philips-Invivo, Hi-RVS/Hitachi); or tracking with a 3D US probe (Urostation/Koelis). Targeted fusion biopsy has been shown to identify more clinically significant cancers and fewer insignificant cancers than conventional biopsy. Fusion biopsy appears to be a major advancement over conventional biopsy because it allows (1) direct targeting of suspicious areas not seen on US and (2) follow-up biopsy of specific cancerous sites in men undergoing active surveillance. PMID:24239473

  18. Feasibility of CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsy in Early Diagnosis of BOOP

    SciTech Connect

    Poulou, Loukia S. Tsangaridou, Iris; Filippoussis, Petros; Sidiropoulou, Nektaria; Apostolopoulou, Sofia; Thanos, Loukas

    2008-09-15

    Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) is a nonneoplastic, noninfectious lung disease with a diverse spectrum of imaging abnormalities and nonspecific symptoms diagnosed by open lung biopsy, transbroncial biopsy, and/or video-assisted thoracoscopy. The objective of this study was to retrospectively assess the role of percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy in early diagnosis of the disorder. Fourteen BOOP cases diagnosed by CT-guided biopsy were analyzed in terms of imaging abnormalities and complication rate. All had previously undergone a nondiagnostic procedure (bronchoscopy, transbronchial biopsy, bronchoalveolar lavage) to exclude infection or lung cancer. The most common imaging abnormalities in descending order were bilateral consolidations (5/14), unilateral tumor-like lesions (5/14), unilateral consolidations (3/14), and diffuse reticular pattern (1/14). Coexistent abnormalities (pleural effusions, nodules, ground-glass opacities) were observed in five patients. The complication rate was 4 of 14 (28.6%), including 2 cases of subclinical pneumothorax and 1 case of minor hemoptysis and local lung injury. None required intervention. We conclude that transthoracic CT-guided biopsy may be used in the diagnosis of BOOP in selected patients with mild complications. For the focal consolidation nodule/mass imaging pattern, CT-guided biopsy may prove to be a reasonable alternative to more invasive procedures.

  19. Development of virtual histology and virtual biopsy using laser-scanning confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Cho, J Y; Satodate, H; Sakashita, M; Hidaka, E; Fukami, S; Kazawa, T; Yoshida, T; Shiokawa, A; Kudo, S

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this project is to acquire a direct image of histology from in vivo gastrointestinal mucosa. In other words, the task of 'endo-microscope' is to observe the cellular architecture of tissue in vivo during routine endoscopic examination. As the first step to completing this study, resected fresh specimens from the oesophagus. stomach and colon were examined by laser-scanning confocal microscopy (LCM) (Fluoview, Olympus, Tokyo). Fresh untreated mucosal specimens obtained by endoscopic pinch biopsy, polypectomy or endoscopic mucosal resection were collected and placed in normal saline and examined by LCM, collecting the reflective light of a 488-nm wavelength argon laser beam. As the second step, a probe-type LCM 'endo-microscope' was designed and applied to observe the human oral-cavity mucosa. The probe has 4.5-mm outer diameter and 20-cm length, which enables easy access to oral cavity mucosa. The estimated special resolution of the probe is 1-5 microm. A real-time microscopic image directly from ex vivo fresh specimens was acquired. The acquired LCM images corresponded well with the conventional H-E light microscopic images. Cell wall, nucleus and cytoplasm were simultaneously visualized by LCM scanning. This novel method enables serial imaginary microscopic sections on fresh specimens. In addition, a probe-type LCM 'endo-microscope' was designed and was applied to observe human oral cavity mucosa. Virtual histological images from the living oral squamous cell were successfully obtained. LCM images from ex vivo fresh specimens demonstrated the features of the H-E staining histological image. In the next step to accomplish our project, we developed a LCM probe with 4.5-mm outer diameter to obtain a virtual image of human oral cavity mucosa. PMID:12797680

  20. A potential role for bat tail membranes in flight control.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, James D; Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Codd, Jonathan R; Nudds, Robert L

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests conducted on a model based on the long-eared bat Plecotus auritus indicated that the positioning of the tail membrane (uropatagium) can significantly influence flight control. Adjusting tail position by increasing the angle of the legs ventrally relative to the body has a two-fold effect; increasing leg-induced wing camber (i.e., locally increased camber of the inner wing surface) and increasing the angle of attack of the tail membrane. We also used our model to examine the effects of flying with and without a tail membrane. For the bat model with a tail membrane increasing leg angle increased the lift, drag and pitching moment (nose-down) produced. However, removing the tail membrane significantly reduced the change in pitching moment with increasing leg angle, but it had no significant effect on the level of lift produced. The drag on the model also significantly increased with the removal of the tail membrane. The tail membrane, therefore, is potentially important for controlling the level of pitching moment produced by bats and an aid to flight control, specifically improving agility and manoeuvrability. Although the tail of bats is different from that of birds, in that it is only divided from the wings by the legs, it nonetheless, may, in addition to its prey capturing function, fulfil a similar role in aiding flight control. PMID:21479137

  1. A Potential Role for Bat Tail Membranes in Flight Control

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, James D.; Dimitriadis, Grigorios; Codd, Jonathan R.; Nudds, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests conducted on a model based on the long-eared bat Plecotus auritus indicated that the positioning of the tail membrane (uropatagium) can significantly influence flight control. Adjusting tail position by increasing the angle of the legs ventrally relative to the body has a two-fold effect; increasing leg-induced wing camber (i.e., locally increased camber of the inner wing surface) and increasing the angle of attack of the tail membrane. We also used our model to examine the effects of flying with and without a tail membrane. For the bat model with a tail membrane increasing leg angle increased the lift, drag and pitching moment (nose-down) produced. However, removing the tail membrane significantly reduced the change in pitching moment with increasing leg angle, but it had no significant effect on the level of lift produced. The drag on the model also significantly increased with the removal of the tail membrane. The tail membrane, therefore, is potentially important for controlling the level of pitching moment produced by bats and an aid to flight control, specifically improving agility and manoeuvrability. Although the tail of bats is different from that of birds, in that it is only divided from the wings by the legs, it nonetheless, may, in addition to its prey capturing function, fulfil a similar role in aiding flight control. PMID:21479137

  2. Estimating Impact Forces of Tail Club Strikes by Ankylosaurid Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Victoria Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been assumed that the unusual tail club of ankylosaurid dinosaurs was used actively as a weapon, but the biological feasibility of this behaviour has not been examined in detail. Ankylosaurid tail clubs are composed of interlocking vertebrae, which form the handle, and large terminal osteoderms, which form the knob. Methodology/Principal Findings Computed tomographic (CT) scans of several ankylosaurid tail clubs referred to Dyoplosaurus and Euoplocephalus, combined with measurements of free caudal vertebrae, provide information used to estimate the impact force of tail clubs of various sizes. Ankylosaurid tails are modeled as a series of segments for which mass, muscle cross-sectional area, torque, and angular acceleration are calculated. Free caudal vertebrae segments had limited vertical flexibility, but the tail could have swung through approximately 100° laterally. Muscle scars on the pelvis record the presence of a large M. longissimus caudae, and ossified tendons alongside the handle represent M. spinalis. CT scans showed that knob osteoderms were predominantly cancellous, which would have lowered the rotational inertia of the tail club and made it easier to wield as a weapon. Conclusions/Significance Large knobs could generate sufficient force to break bone during impacts, but average and small knobs could not. Tail swinging behaviour is feasible in ankylosaurids, but it remains unknown whether the tail was used for interspecific defense, intraspecific combat, or both. PMID:19707581

  3. Sorption of copper by vegetated copper-mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Coninck, A.; Karam, A.; Jaouich, A.

    2009-04-01

    The lixiviation of copper (Cu) from vegetated mine tailings may present an environmental risk because of the potential adverse effects it may pose to ground and surface water around mines. However, bonding of Cu to mine tailings can limit transfer to surrounding water. The main objective of the present study is to assess Cu sorption by cultivated Cu-mine tailings containing calcite (pH 7.7) as influenced by commercial peat moss-shrimp waste compost (PSC) and chelating solution. Fresh tailing and tailing that had been used in pot experiments were tested and compared. Samples (0.50 g) of tailings were equilibrated with 20 cm3 of 0.01 M CaCl2 solution containing 100 mg Cu dm-3, as CuCl2, for 72 h at room temperature. After equilibration period, the samples were centrifuged and filtered. Concentration of Cu in the equilibrium solution was measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The sorption coefficient (Ks) was used to interpret the sorption data. The sorption experiment was replicated two times. Compost was the most effective organic amendment in enhancing Cu sorption. The Ks values were positively and significantly correlated with organic matter content and Cu associated with the organic fraction of tailing samples. The mineralogy and organic matter content can influence the sorption capacity of Cu-mine tailings. Calcite-containing mine tailings amended with PSC can be used to sorb Cu from chloride solutions.

  4. Review of fugitive dust control for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.T.; Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    An immediate concern associated with the disposal of uranium mill tailings is that wind erosion of the tailings from an impoundment area will subsequently deposit tailings on surrounding areas. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating the current technology for fugitive dust control. Different methods of fugitive dust control, including chemical, physical, and vegetative, have been used or tested on mill tailings piles. This report presents the results of a literature review and discussions with manufacturers and users of available stabilization materials and techniques.

  5. Evaluating Target Cold Spots By the use of Tail EUDs

    SciTech Connect

    Bortfeld, Thomas Craft, David; Dempsey, James F.; Halabi, Tarek; Romeijn, H. Edwin

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To propose a new measure of target underdose that can be used in the evaluation and optimization of radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods and Materials: We compare various formulations of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and introduce a modification of existing EUD definitions, which we call tail EUD. Tail EUD is a measure of 'cold spots' below the prescription dose in the target dose distribution, using units of gray (Gy). We investigate the mathematical properties of various target EUD concepts, including tail EUD. We apply the tail EUD measure retrospectively to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans from our plan database. We also use tail EUD as an optimization objective in the optimization of prostate, pancreas, and head-and-neck plans. Results: Tail EUD has desirable mathematical properties. In particular, it is convex and it leads to convex level sets (i.e., no local minima) if the EUD from which it is derived is concave. The tail EUD value is correlated with the subjective degree of target coverage. Constraining tail EUDs to a certain level in plan optimization leads to comparable target coverage in different plans and treatment sites. Conclusions: The newly introduced concept of tail EUD appears to be useful for both plan evaluation and optimization. In addition it can potentially be applied in the design of new clinical protocols.

  6. Exploring Stellar Populations in the Tidal Tails of NGC3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy interactions can inject material into the intergalactic medium via violent gravitational dynamics, often visualized in tidal tails. The composition of these tails has remained a mystery, as previous studies have focused on detecting tidal features, rather than the composite material itself. With this in mind, we have developed an observing program using deep, multiband imaging to probe the chaotic regions of tidal tails in search for an underlying stellar population. NGC3256's Western and Eastern tidal tails serve as a case study for this new technique. Our results show median color values of u - g = 1.12 and r - i = 0.09 for the Western tail, and u - g = 1.29 and r - i = 0.21 for the Eastern tail, corresponding to ages of approximately 450 Myr and 900 Myr for the tails, respectively. A u - g color gradient is seen in the Western tail as well, running from 1.32 to 1.08 (~2000 Myr to 400 Myr), suggesting ages inside tidal tails can have significant variations.

  7. Phytobarriers: Plants capture particles containing potentially toxic elements originating from mine tailings in semiarid regions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-López, Ariadna S; Carrillo-González, Rogelio; González-Chávez, Ma Del Carmen Angeles; Rosas-Saito, Greta Hanako; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-10-01

    Retention of particles containing potentially toxic elements (PTEs) on plants that spontaneously colonize mine tailings was studied through comparison of washed and unwashed shoot samples. Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Co and Mn concentrations were determined in plant samples. Particles retained on leaves were examined by Scanning Electronic Microscopy and energy dispersive X-Ray analysis. Particles containing PTEs were detected on both washed and unwashed leaves. This indicates that the thorough washing procedure did not remove all the particles containing PTEs from the leaf surface, leading to an overestimation of the concentrations of PTEs in plant tissues. Particularly trichomes and fungal mycelium were retaining particles. The quantity and composition of particles varied among plant species and place of collection. It is obvious that plants growing on toxic mine tailings form a physical barrier against particle dispersion and hence limit the spread of PTEs by wind. PMID:26002581

  8. Core Needle Biopsy of Breast Cancer Tumors Increases Distant Metastases in a Mouse Model12

    PubMed Central

    Mathenge, Edward Gitau; Dean, Cheryl Ann; Clements, Derek; Vaghar-Kashani, Ahmad; Photopoulos, Steffany; Coyle, Krysta Mila; Giacomantonio, Michael; Malueth, Benjamin; Nunokawa, Anna; Jordan, Julie; Lewis, John D.; Gujar, Shashi Ashok; Marcato, Paola; Lee, Patrick W.K.; Giacomantonio, Carman Anthony

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Incisional biopsies, including the diagnostic core needle biopsy (CNB), routinely performed before surgical excision of breast cancer tumors are hypothesized to increase the risk of metastatic disease. In this study, we experimentally determined whether CNB of breast cancer tumors results in increased distant metastases and examine important resultant changes in the primary tumor and tumor microenvironment associated with this outcome. METHOD: To evaluate the effect of CNB on metastasis development, we implanted murine mammary 4T1 tumor cells in BALB/c mice and performed CNB on palpable tumors in half the mice. Subsequently, emulating the human scenario, all mice underwent complete tumor excision and were allowed to recover, with attendant metastasis development. Tumor growth, lung metastasis, circulating tumor cell (CTC) levels, variation in gene expression, composition of the tumor microenvironment, and changes in immunologic markers were compared in biopsied and non-biopsied mice. RESULTS: Mice with biopsied tumors developed significantly more lung metastases compared to non-biopsied mice. Tumors from biopsied mice contained a higher frequency of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accompanied by reduced CD4 + T cells, CD8 + T cells, and macrophages, suggesting biopsy-mediated development of an increasingly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. We also observed a CNB-dependent up-regulation in the expression of SOX4, Ezh2, and other key epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genes, as well as increased CTC levels among the biopsy group. CONCLUSION: CNB creates an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, increases EMT, and facilitates release of CTCs, all of which likely contribute to the observed increase in development of distant metastases. PMID:25425969

  9. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Prostate Cancer in Chinese Men with PSA 4–10?ng/mL Who Underwent TRUS-Guided Prostate Biopsy: The Utilization of PAMD Score

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dong; Ren, Da; Zhao, Chenglin; Li, Xuesong; Yu, Wei; Wang, Rui; Wang, Huihui; Xi, Chenguang; He, Qun; Wang, Xiaoying; Xin, Zhongcheng; Zhou, Liqun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To elucidate the characteristics and risk factors for positive biopsy outcomes in Chinese patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA) 4–10?ng/mL and develop a risk-stratification score model. Methods. The data of 345 patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy between 2011 and 2013 was retrospectively analyzed. Digital rectal examination (DRE), prostate volume (PV), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and smoking status were also collected. Positive biopsy outcomes were defined as prostate cancer (PCa) and high grade PCa (HGPCa, Gleason Score ? 7). Results. The median PSA was 7.15 (IQR 5.91–8.45)?ng/mL. Overall 138 patients (40.0%) were shown to have PCa, including 100 patients (29.0%) with HGPCa. Smaller PV, elder age, MRI results, and positive DRE were proved to be predictive factors for positive biopsy outcomes in both univariate and multivariate analysis. We developed a “PAMD” score which combined the four factors to categorize patients into three risk groups, and the model performed good predictive sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion. The prevalence of prostate cancer in Chinese patients with PSA 4–10?ng/mL was 40%, including 29% patients with high grade disease. DRE, age, MRI, and PV were predictive factors for positive biopsy outcomes, and the PAMD score model could be utilized for risk-stratification and decision-making. PMID:26557679

  10. Assessment of the contamination problems resulting from the use of stainless steel needles in liver biopsies by total reflection X-ray fluorescence and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Imre

    2006-11-01

    Percutaneous human liver biopsies taken from living patients could not be repeated; therefore considerable contamination was indirectly disproved. In the present study, the possible contamination of biopsy samples during sample collection was determined using a porcine liver model. Portions of porcine liver were cut by a quartz blade and treated the same as the steel needle biopsy samples. Concentrations determined in samples taken by a quartz device represented the non-contaminated values and were used to determine reproducibility of measurement and intra-individual variations. Additionally, multiple samples taken from a human liver of a patient suffering steatosis during autopsy were used to determine intra-individual variation of element concentrations. Concentration data of non-contaminated samples were compared to data of steel needle biopsy samples. To investigate the possible release of elements from the steel needles the samples were allowed to contact with the needle for different time in a refrigerator at 4 °C. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were applied for simultaneous determination of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Mo and Pb because of the very low sample demand of the two selected techniques. Although the steel needles in the present study could not be substituted by polypropylene or Teflon utensils, it was demonstrated that the application of needle biopsy sampling in the reported analysis does not involve measurable contamination if contact time is kept to several minutes as usual in the clinical practice.

  11. Leverage Causes Fat Tails and Clustered Volatility

    E-print Network

    Thurner, Stefan; Geanakoplos, John

    2009-01-01

    We build a very simple model of leveraged asset purchases with margin calls. Investment funds use what is perhaps the most basic financial strategy, called 'value investing', i.e. systematically attempting to buy underpriced assets. When funds do not borrow, the price fluctuations of the asset are normally distributed and uncorrelated across time. All this changes when the funds are allowed to leverage, i.e. borrow from a bank, to purchase more assets than their wealth would otherwise permit. When funds use leverage, price fluctuations become heavy tailed and display clustered volatility, similar to what is observed in real markets. Previous explanations of fat tails and clustered volatility depended on 'irrational behavior', such as trend following. We show that the immediate cause of the increase in extreme risks in our model is the risk control policy of the banks: A prudent bank makes itself locally safer by putting a limit to leverage, so when a fund exceeds its leverage limit, it must partially repay it...

  12. A red-tailed hawk at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At KSC, a red-tailed hawk waits on top of a utility pole for the slightest movement in the grass below. It feeds mostly on small rodents. Ranging in height from 18 inches to 25 inches, the species has a stocky build with a whitish breast and rust-colored tail. It has a high-pitched descending scream with a hoarse quality. The hawk inhabits mainly deciduous forest and adjacent open country from Alaska and Nova Scotia south to Panama. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  13. A red-tailed hawk at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    From the top of a utility pole, a red-tailed hawk launches into flight, perhaps after spotting prey, typically a small rodent. Ranging in height from 18 inches to 25 inches, the species has a stocky build with a whitish breast and rust-colored tail. It has a high-pitched descending scream with a hoarse quality. The hawk inhabits mainly deciduous forest and adjacent open country from Alaska and Nova Scotia south to Panama. KSC shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  14. Collection Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Libraries in Canada, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Includes 21 articles that discuss collection development in Canadian school libraries. Topics include digital collections in school library media centers; print and electronic library resources; library collections; collaborative projects; print-disabled students; informing administrators of the importance of collection development; censorship;…

  15. CT-guided percutaneous skull biopsy using a drill-assisted system: Technical report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Adam N; Tomasian, Anderanik; Hsi, Andy C; Chang, Randy O; Jennings, Jack W

    2015-12-01

    The OnControl coaxial biopsy system (Vidacare Corporation, Shavano Park, TX) includes an inner diamond-tipped access needle and hollow biopsy needle that engage with a battery-powered hand drill. Herein, we report the use of this novel device to perform two CT-guided percutaneous skull biopsies. Both procedures were performed without complication and facilitated a pathologic diagnosis. PMID:26508092

  16. Rapid diagnostic imaging and pathologic evaluation of whole core biopsies at the point-of-care using structured illumination microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Sholl, Andrew B.; Kimbrell, Hillary; Tulman, David B.; Elfer, Katherine N.; Brown, J. Quincy

    2015-07-01

    Video-rate structured illumination microscopy (VR-SIM) of fluorescently stained prostate biopsies is demonstrated as a potential tool for rapid diagnosis of prostate biopsies at the point of care. Images of entire biopsies at 1.3 micron lateral resolution are rendered in seconds, and pathologist review of the resulting images achieves 90% accuracy as compared to gold standard histopathology.

  17. 78 FR 66932 - Scientific Information Request on Core Needle and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast Lesions AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... core needle and open surgical biopsy for diagnosis of breast lesions. Scientific information is being solicited to inform our review of Core Needle and Open Surgical Biopsy for Diagnosis of Breast...

  18. Percutaneous renal allograft biopsy. A comparison of two needle types and analysis of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kolb, L G; Velosa, J A; Bergstralh, E J; Offord, K P

    1994-06-27

    We retrospectively reviewed all (n = 369) percutaneous renal allograft biopsies performed at our institution between 1987 and 1992, comparing 14-gauge Franklin-Silverman (internal diameter = 2.0 mm, n = 169) and 18-gauge automated (internal diameter = 1.2 mm, n = 200) core biopsy needles. Visualization method, specimen adequacy, and complications were grouped by needle type. Five or more glomeruli were present in 88.9% of specimens obtained with Franklin-Silverman needles and in 82.7% with automated needles. A histologic diagnosis was obtained in 94.1% and 95.5% of Franklin-Silverman and automated biopsies, respectively. A complication was detected in 27 Franklin-Silverman biopsies (16.0%) and in 21 automated biopsies (10.5%) (not significant [NS], P > 0.05). Some procedures had more than one complication. Excluding asymptomatic gross hematuria, incidental hematomas, and incidental arteriovenous fistulas detected by routine ultrasonography, clinically significant complication rates were 6.5% for Franklin-Silverman biopsies and 2.5% for automated biopsies (NS). No allograft losses or patient deaths occurred as a result of allograft biopsy. Subgroup analysis of all biopsies performed with ultrasound marking alone (Franklin-Silverman, n = 119; automated, n = 148) revealed no significant (NS) difference in complication rates (15.1% vs. 10.8%). Additional subgroup analyses of palpation, ultrasound marking, and real-time ultrasonographic visualization techniques within each needle type also revealed no significant difference in the complication rate. Biopsy within 30 days of transplantation and no antihypertensive therapy were the only factors univariately associated (P < 0.05) with an increased complication rate. Multivariate analysis found biopsy within 30 days of transplantation (P = 0.007) was associated with the overall presence of one or more complications of any type. Type of needle (Franklin-Silverman vs. automated) achieved borderline significance (P = 0.047) when time to biopsy was statistically adjusted for; the Franklin-Silverman needle had a higher complication rate. PMID:8016879

  19. [The role of biopsy as diagnostic measure in rare nonspecific lung diseases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Chomenko, A G; Oserova, L W

    1980-01-01

    In this paper the diagnostic value of biopsy as diagnostic measure in rare nonspecific lung diseases is analysed. The rare nonspecific are diseases are heterogen in the view of etiology, pathogenesis and clinical, röntgenological nd morphological symptoms. Most of these diseases out of the material of our institute showed disseminated changes in the lungs. The role of the biopsy in the diagnostic of these group of diseases is demonstrated. In an another group of rare unspecific lung diseases the value of biopsy is only small and diagnosis can be secured by clinical-röntgenological examinations. PMID:7210743

  20. [Renal biopsy in the lateral position in high risk patients: an opportunity to take advantage of].

    PubMed

    Dugo, Mauro; Brisotto, Elisa; Vitturi, Nicola; Pasi, Alessandra; Mastrosimone, Stefania; Farneti, Fabrizio; Mangino, Margherita; Virgilio, Bice; Brunello, Anna; Pastori, Giordano; Mazzoli, Matteo; Laurino, Licia; Cova, Giandavide; Beniamin, Francesco; Maresca, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous ultrasound-guided renal biopsy (RB) is the gold standard for diagnosis of renal diseases. The standard procedure involves biopsy in the prone position (PP) for the native kidneys. In high risk patients, transjugular and laparoscopic RB have been proposed. In patients suffering from obesity or respiratory diseases, the RB of the native kidney in the supine anterolateral position (SALP) represents an alternative to these invasive and expensive methods. We illustrate the technique of execution of RB in the lateral position (LP) on native kidneys. The procedure is safe, effective and has reduced the path travelled by the needle biopsy compared with PP and SALP. PMID:25774589