Science.gov

Sample records for tail determinants involved

  1. Variation in salamander tail regeneration is associated with genetic factors that determine tail morphology.

    PubMed

    Voss, Gareth J; Kump, D Kevin; Walker, John A; Voss, S Randal

    2013-01-01

    Very little is known about the factors that cause variation in regenerative potential within and between species. Here, we used a genetic approach to identify heritable genetic factors that explain variation in tail regenerative outgrowth. A hybrid ambystomatid salamander (Ambystoma mexicanum x A. andersoni) was crossed to an A. mexicanum and 217 offspring were induced to undergo metamorphosis and attain terrestrial adult morphology using thyroid hormone. Following metamorphosis, each salamander's tail tip was amputated and allowed to regenerate, and then amputated a second time and allowed to regenerate. Also, DNA was isolated from all individuals and genotypes were determined for 187 molecular markers distributed throughout the genome. The area of tissue that regenerated after the first and second amputations was highly positively correlated across males and females. Males presented wider tails and regenerated more tail tissue during both episodes of regeneration. Approximately 66-68% of the variation in regenerative outgrowth was explained by tail width, while tail length and genetic sex did not explain a significant amount of variation. A small effect QTL was identified as having a sex-independent effect on tail regeneration, but this QTL was only identified for the first episode of regeneration. Several molecular markers significantly affected regenerative outgrowth during both episodes of regeneration, but the effect sizes were small (<4%) and correlated with tail width. The results show that ambysex and minor effect QTL explain variation in adult tail morphology and importantly, tail width. In turn, tail width at the amputation plane largely determines the rate of regenerative outgrowth. Because amputations in this study were made at approximately the same position of the tail, our results resolve an outstanding question in regenerative biology: regenerative outgrowth positively co-varies as a function of tail width at the amputation site. PMID:23843997

  2. Experimental determination of the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon: A transient photocurrent analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.P.; Chan, F.Y.M.; Zou, X.C.; Chan, Y.C.; Lam, Y.W.; Lin, S.H.; O'Leary, S.K.; Lim, P.K.

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental developments have cast doubt on the validity of the common assumption that the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon exhibits a single exponential functional form. The authors employ transient photocurrent decay measurements to determine this distribution of tail states. In their approach, however, they determine the distribution of tail states directly from the experimental data, without assuming, a priori, a specific functional form. It is found that these experimental results are consistent with other more recent experimental determinations of the distribution of tail states, suggesting the possibility of deviations from a single exponential distribution of tail states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  3. Mapping Loci Associated With Tail Color and Sex Determination in the Short-Lived Fish Nothobranchius furzeri

    PubMed Central

    Valenzano, Dario Riccardo; Kirschner, Jeanette; Kamber, Roarke A.; Zhang, Elisa; Weber, David; Cellerino, Alessandro; Englert, Christoph; Platzer, Matthias; Reichwald, Kathrin; Brunet, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The African fish Nothobranchius furzeri is the shortest-lived vertebrate species that can reproduce in captivity, with a median life span of 911 weeks for the shortest-lived strain. Natural populations of N. furzeri display differences in life span, aging biomarkers, behavior, and color, which make N. furzeri a unique vertebrate system for studying the genetic basis of these traits. We mapped regions of the genome involved in sex determination and tail color by genotyping microsatellite markers in the F2 progeny of a cross between a short-lived, yellow-tailed strain and a long-lived, red-tailed strain of N. furzeri. We identified one region linked with the yellow/red tail color that maps close to melanocortin 1 receptor (mc1r), a gene involved in pigmentation in several vertebrate species. Analysis of the segregation of sex-linked markers revealed that N. furzeri has a genetic sex determination system with males as the heterogametic sex and markedly reduced recombination in the male sex-determining region. Our results demonstrate that both naturally-evolved pigmentation differences and sex determination in N. furzeri are controlled by simple genetic mechanisms and set the stage for the molecular genetic dissection of factors underlying such traits. The microsatellite-based linkage map we developed for N. furzeri will also facilitate analysis of the genetic architecture of traits that characterize this group of vertebrates, including short life span and adaptation to extreme environmental conditions. PMID:19786620

  4. Experimental Determination of the Effect of Horizontal-Tail Size, Tail Length, and Vertical Location on Low-Speed Static Longitudinal Stability and Damping Pitch of a Model Having 45 Degree Sweptback Wing and Tail Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, Jacob H

    1952-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the effects of horizontal tails of various sizes and at various tail lengths (when loaded on the fuselage center line) and also the effects of vertical location of the horizontal tail relative to the wing on the low-speed static longitudinal stability and on the steady-state rotary damping in pitch for a complete-model configuration. The wing and tail surfaces had the quarter-chord lines swept back 45 degrees and had aspect ratios of 4. The results of the investigation showed that, in agreement with analytical considerations, the contribution of the horizontal tail to static longitudinal stability was related directly to the tail size and length; whereas, its contribution to damping in pitch was related directly to tail size and the square of tail length.

  5. Determination of the reaction rate coefficient of sulphide mine tailings deposited under water.

    PubMed

    Awoh, Akué Sylvette; Mbonimpa, Mamert; Bussière, Bruno

    2013-10-15

    The efficiency of a water cover to limit dissolved oxygen (DO) availability to underlying acid-generating mine tailings can be assessed by calculating the DO flux at the tailings-water interface. Fick's equations, which are generally used to calculate this flux, require knowing the effective DO diffusion coefficient (Dw) and the reaction (consumption) rate coefficient (Kr) of the tailings, or the DO concentration profile. Whereas Dw can be accurately estimated, few studies have measured the parameter Kr for submerged sulphide tailings. The objective of this study was to determine Kr for underwater sulphide tailings in a laboratory experiment. Samples of sulphide mine tailings (an approximately 6 cm layer) were placed in a cell under a water cover (approximately 2 cm) maintained at constant DO concentration. Two tailings were studied: TA1 with high sulphide content (83% pyrite) and TA2 with low sulphide content (2.8% pyrite). DO concentration was measured with a microelectrode at various depths above and below the tailings-water interface at 1 mm intervals. Results indicate that steady-state condition was rapidly attained. As expected, a diffusive boundary layer (DBL) was observed in all cases. An iterative back-calculation process using the numerical code POLLUTEv6 and taking the DBL into account provided the Kr values used to match calculated and experimental concentration profiles. Kr obtained for tailings TA1 and TA2 was about 80 d(-1) and 6.5 d(-1), respectively. For comparison purposes, Kr obtained from cell tests on tailings TA1 was lower than Kr calculated from the sulphate production rate obtained from shake-flask tests. Steady-state DO flux at the water-tailings interface was then calculated with POLLUTEv6 using tailings characteristics Dw and Kr. For the tested conditions, DO flux ranged from 608 to 758 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA1 and from 177 to 221 mg O2/m(2)/d for tailings TA2. The impact of placing a protective layer of inert material over the tailings was also investigated for tailings TA1 (with high sulphide content). A protective layer of only 5 cm reduced the DO flux into the tailings at about 5 mg/m(2)/d, compared to 608 mg O2/m(2)/d without a protective layer, or an approximately 99% reduction in flux. PMID:23906653

  6. Age and sex determination of juvenile band-tailed pigeons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, J.A.; Braun, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Captive band-tailed pigeons (Columbafasciata) were studied to document progression of molts and plumages from juvenal to adult age. Immature pigeons began the post-juvenal molt at 35 days which continued up to 340 days. The only 3 plumage characters useful for identification and estimation of age were presence of juvenal lesser, middle, and greater secondary coverts, juvenal secondaries, and juvenal primaries. While juvenal primaries were still present, hatching dates could be estimated up to 252 days (N = 84). Secondary feather presence and molt stage could be used to identify juvenile pigeons for more than 340 days (N = 24). Using coloration of the crown and breast feathers, 96 percent of the immature pigeons examined (106 of 110) at 80 days of age were classified accurately as to sex.

  7. Newt tail regeneration: a model for gravity-dependent morphogenesis and clues to the molecular mechanisms involved.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Almeida, Eduardo; Grigoryan, Eleonora

    Gravity alterations are widely recognized to influence living systems. They may cause temporary or permanent effects on physiology and development at different levels, from gene expression to morphogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are often unclear, and adequate model systems to study them are required. To address this problem we developed a new experimental model of how gravity affects morphogenesis during tail regeneration in the newt Pleurodeles waltl. The effects of increased gravity on newt tail morphogenesis were first documented in two joint Russian-US NASA spaceflight experiments in the Russian Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) missions. In these experiments the shape of newt tail regenerate was found to depend on the gravity level, being dorso-ventrally symmetrical in microgravity and in neutrally-buoyant aquarium controls, versus hook-like and bent downward in 1g controls. These 1g controls were conducted in spaceflight habitats using a water-saturated PVA sponge mat. These results were reproducible in multiple spaceflight, and ground laboratory studies, both in the US at NASA ARC and in Russia at IDB RAS, and were characterized in detail using morphometry and histology approaches. The role of hypergravity in shaping morphogenesis was confirmed at NASA ARC with an experiment in the ISS Testbed 8-foot diameter centrifuge operating at 2g. Animals that experienced two-week centrifugation (the period of time used in the Foton flights) developed the same hook-like regenerates as 1g controls, and morphometric analysis revealed no significant difference between 1g and 2g groups, however both were significantly different from aquarium controls. We hypothesize that exposure to 1g or 2g during tail morphogenesis constitutes excessive loading for newts that are adapted to microgravity-like conditions in their aquatic habitat. Because Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) are stress-induced molecules that respond to a broad variety of factors and are expressed during development, we hypothesized they may play a role newt tail regenerative morphogenesis under altered g-levels. Specifically there is increasing evidence for HSPs expression changes as a result of hyper-and microgravity. HSPs are also expressed throughout regeneration, rather than just after surgery. To test this hypothesis we performed heat shock on intact and regenerating newts and collected tail tissues. In these experiments we observed that some tails had uplifted tips while others mimicked hook-like regenerates at 1g or 2g. These findings suggest that heat shock, and HSPs induction, may be involved in the mechanism responsible for gravity effects on morphogenesis, or at least interact with them. Current work underway is focused on analyzing the expression of mRNA and localization of proteins for two members of the group, Hsp70 and Hsp90. In summary, we developed and characterized a new practical animal model in which gravity mechanostimulation at 1g, versus unloading in aquaria, causes prominent effects on newt tail regenerative morphogenesis. This model can be achieved without the use of a centrifuge, significantly simplifying its research applications. Initial results using this model suggest that induction of HSPs may be involved in gravity regulation of newt tail regenerative morphogenesis. Further research based on this simple model may help to unravel mechanisms of gravity influence relevant not only to newt tail regeneration, but also to a broad range of other biological processes in amphibian models.

  8. Determination of pressure loss and optimum concentration in tailings slurry pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lin

    1998-04-01

    Pressure loss and concentration of tailings slurry pipeline are important parameters which influence the economic benefits of tailings slurry transportation. High slurry concentration leads to a large transportation amount of tailings, but also leads to a high energy consumption due to high pressure loss. Therefore, there is a optimum concentration value for tailings slurry transportation. This paper based on Durand`s equation and experiment data inferred a new practical additional pressure loss equation by using regression method. Substituting the additional pressure loss into energy consumption equation and taking minimum, a optimum concentration equation which responds to the minimum energy consumption can also be inferred.

  9. Determination of pressure loss and optimum concentration in tailings slurry pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lin

    1998-07-01

    Pressure loss and concentration of tailings slurry pipeline are important parameters which influence the economic benefits of tailings slurry transportation. High slurry concentration leads to a large transportation amount of tailings, but also leads to a high energy consumption due to high pressure loss. Therefore, there is an optimum concentration value for tailings slurry transportation. This paper based on Durand's equation and experiment data inferred a new practical additional pressure loss equation by using regression method. Substituting the additional pressure loss into energy consumption equation and taking minimum, an optimum concentration equation which responds to the minimum energy consumption can also be inferred.

  10. Determinants of Pair-Living in Red-Tailed Sportive Lemurs (Lepilemur ruficaudatus)

    PubMed Central

    Hilgartner, Roland; Fichtel, Claudia; Kappeler, Peter M; Zinner, Dietmar

    2012-01-01

    Pair-living and a monogamous mating strategy are rare and theoretically unexpected among mammals. Nevertheless, about 10% of primate species exhibit such a social system, which is difficult to explain in the absence of paternal care. In this study, we investigated the two major hypotheses proposed to explain the evolution of monogamy in mammals, the female defence hypothesis (FDH) and the resource defence hypothesis (RDH), in red-tailed sportive lemurs (Lepilemur ruficaudatus), a nocturnal primate from Madagascar. We analysed behavioural data from eight male–female pairs collected during a 24-mo field study to illuminate the determinants of pair-living in this species. Male and female L. ruficaudatus were found to live in dispersed pairs, which are characterised by low cohesion and low encounter rates within a common home range. Social interactions between pair partners were mainly agonistic and characterised by a complete absence of affiliative interactions – body contact was only observed during mating. During the short annual mating season, males exhibited elevated levels of aggression towards mates, as well as extensive mate guarding and increased locomotor activity. In addition, males were exclusively responsible for the maintenance of proximity between pair partners during this period, and they defended their territories against neighbouring males but not against females. Together, these results point towards the importance of female defence in explaining pair-living in L. ruficaudatus. We discuss the spatial and temporal distribution of receptive females in relation to the female defence strategies of males and suggest possible costs that prevent male red-tailed sportive lemurs from defending more than one female. PMID:23144523

  11. DETERMINATION OF GENETIC DIVERSITY AND PATERNITY IN THE GRAY-TAILED VOLE (MICROTUS CANICAUDUS) BY RAPD-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Genetic relatedness of gray-tailed voles (Microtus canicaudus) was determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD). This work is the first reported use of the RAPD method for pedigree analysis of M. canicaudus and demonstrates the feasibility of RAPD for assessing paternity...

  12. Distribution of black-tailed jackrabbit habitat determined by GIS in southwestern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knick, Steven T.; Dyer, D.L.

    1997-01-01

    We developed a multivariate description of black-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus) habitat associations from Geographical Information Systems (GIS) signatures surrounding known jackrabbit locations in the Snake River Birds of Prey National Conservation Area (NCA), in southwestern Idaho. Habitat associations were determined for characteristics within a 1-km radius (approx home range size) of jackrabbits sighted on night spotlight surveys conducted from 1987 through 1995. Predictive habitat variables were number of shrub, agriculture, and hydrography cells, mean and standard deviation of shrub patch size, habitat richness, and a measure of spatial heterogeneity. In winter, jackrabbits used smaller and less variable sizes of shrub patches and areas of higher spatial heterogeneity when compared to summer observations (P 0.05), differed significantly between high and low population phase. We used the Mahalanobis distance statistic to rank all 50-m cells in a 440,000-ha region relative to the multivariate mean habitat vector. On verification surveys to test predicted models, we sighted jackrabbits in areas ranked close to the mean habitat vector. Areas burned by large-scale fires between 1980 and 1992 or in an area repeatedly burned by military training activities had greater Mahalanobis distances from the mean habitat vector than unburned areas and were less likely to contain habitats used by jackrabbits.

  13. Hydrophobic Tail Length, Degree of Fluorination and Headgroup Stereochemistry are Determinants of the Biocompatibility of (Fluorinated) Carbohydrate Surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueshu; Turnek, Jaroslav; Kntigov, Pavlna; Kudl?kov, Hana; Maek, Josef; Parkin, Sean; Rankin, Stephen E; Knutson, Barbara L; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    A series of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon carbohydrate surfactants with different headgroups (i.e., gluco-, galacto- and maltopyranoside) and (fluorinated) alkyl tails (i.e., C7 and C14 to C19) was synthesized to investigate trends in their cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity, and how surfactant-lipid interactions of selected surfactants contribute to these two measures of biocompatibility. All surfactants displayed low cytotoxicity (EC50 = 25 to > 250 ?M) and low haemolytic activity (EC50 = 0.2 to > 3.3 mM), with headgroup structure, tail length and degree of fluorination being important structural determinants for both endpoints. The EC50 values of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon glucopyranoside surfactants displayed a cut-off effect (i.e., a maximum with respect to the chain length). According to steady-state fluorescence anisotropy studies, short chain (C7) surfactants partitioned less readily into model membranes, which explains their low cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity. Interestingly, galactopyranosides were less toxic compared to glucopyranosides with the same hydrophobic tail. Although both surfactant types only differ in the stereochemistry of the 4-OH group, hexadecyl gluco- and galactopyranoside surfactants had similar apparent membrane partition coefficients, but differed in their overall effect on the phase behaviour of DPPC model membranes, as assessed using steady-state fluorescence anisotropy studies. These observations suggest that highly selective surfactant-lipid interactions may be responsible for the differential cytotoxicity and, possible, haemolytic activity of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon carbohydrate surfactants intended for a variety of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:19481909

  14. A "Tail" Of Two Mines: Determining The Sources Of Lead In Mine Waters Using Pb Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousens, B. L.; Allen, D. M.; Lepitre, M. E.; Mortensen, J. K.; Gabites, J. E.; Nugent, M.; Fortin, D.

    2004-12-01

    Acid mine drainage can be a significant environmental problem in regions where mine tailings are exposed to surface water and shallow groundwater flow. Whereas high metal concentrations in surface waters and groundwaters indicate that metals are being mobilized, these data do not uniquely identify the source of the contamination. The isotopic composition of Pb in mine waters is a superb tracer of Pb sources, because the isotopic composition of ore Pb is usually significantly different from that of host rocks, other surficial deposits, and aerosols. We have investigated metal mobility at two abandoned Pb-Zn mines in different geological settings: the sediment-hosted Sullivan Mine in southeastern British Columbia, and the New Calumet Mine of western Quebec that is hosted in metamorphic rocks of the Grenville Province. Ores from both mines have homogeneous Pb isotopic compositions that are much less radiogenic than surrounding host rocks. At Sullivan, the Pb isotopic compositions of water samples define a mixing line between Sullivan ore and at least one other more radiogenic end-member. Water samples with high Pb concentrations (0.002 to 0.3 mg/L) generally are acidic and have Pb isotope ratios equal to Sullivan ore, whereas waters with low Pb contents have near-neutral pH and have variably more radiogenic Pb isotope ratios. Thus not all the waters collected in the study area originate from Sullivan ore or mining operations, as previously thought. The dominant source of ore Pb in mine waters are the waste rock dumps. Based on their isotopic compositions, host shales or aerosols from the local Pb smelter are potential sources of non-Sullivan ore Pb; local glacial tills are an unlikely source due to their heterogeneous Pb isotopic composition. Similarly, at the New Calumet mine, water samples collected in direct contact with either ore at the surface or tailings have high Pb concentrations (up to 0.02 mg/L) and Pb isotope ratios equal to New Calumet Pb-Zn ore. However, all water samples collected downstream from the mine site have low Pb concentrations and variably more radiogenic Pb isotope ratios. Water samples from a well on the mine site and a pipe discharging water from below the tailings dam also have non-ore Pb isotope ratios. The isotopic compositions of low-Pb samples do not lie on a mixing line between ore and local host rocks, but rather lie on a mixing line between agricultural ditch and stream waters upstream of the mine and New Calumet ore. These waters may form a groundwater system flowing under the mine site that is virtually uncontaminated by the overlying ores and tailings. Compared to the Sullivan case, metals from the New Calumet ore and tailings are only weakly mobilized into local waters, probably due to buffering of waters by carbonate-bearing host rocks. We are impressed with the fingerprinting ability of Pb isotopes to track the sources of heavy metals in water systems, and suggest that other radiogenic isotopes (Sr, Nd) may also be useful in environmental studies.

  15. Identification of two regions in the N-terminal domain of ActA involved in the actin comet tail formation by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, I; Gouin, E; Goethals, M; Vancompernolle, K; David, V; Vandekerckhove, J; Cossart, P

    1997-01-01

    The ActA protein of Listeria monocytogenes induces actin nucleation on the bacterial surface. The continuous process of actin filament elongation provides the driving force for bacterial propulsion in infected cells or cytoplasmic extracts. Here, by fusing the N-terminus of ActA (residues 1-234) to the omega fragment of beta-galactosidase, we present the first evidence that this domain contains all the necessary elements for actin tail formation. A detailed analysis of ActA variants, in which small fragments of the N-terminal region were deleted, allowed the identification of two critical regions. Both are required to initiate the actin polymerization process, but each has in addition a specific role to maintain the dynamics of the process. The first region (region T, amino acids 117-121) is critical for filament elongation, as shown by the absence of actin tail in a 117-121 deletion mutant or when motility assays are performed in the presence of anti-region T antibodies. The second region (region C, amino acids 21-97), is more specifically involved in maintenance of the continuity of the process, probably by F-actin binding or prevention of barbed end capping, as strongly suggested by both a deletion (21-97) leading to 'discontinuous' actin tail formation and in vitro experiments showing that a synthetic peptide covering residues 33-74 can interact with F-actin. Our results provide the first insights in the molecular dissection of the actin polymerization process induced by the N-terminal domain of ActA. PMID:9130698

  16. Hydrophobic tail length, degree of fluorination and headgroup stereochemistry are determinants of the biocompatibility of (fluorinated) carbohydrate surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueshu; Turnek, Jaroslav; Kntigov, Pavlna; Kudlckov, Hana; Masek, Josef; Parkin, Sean; Rankin, Stephen E; Knutson, Barbara L; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2009-10-01

    A series of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon carbohydrate surfactants with different headgroups (i.e., gluco-, galacto- and maltopyranoside) and (fluorinated) alkyl tails (i.e., C7 and C14 to C19) was synthesized to investigate trends in their cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity, and how surfactant-lipid interactions of selected surfactants contribute to these two measures of biocompatibility. All surfactants displayed low cytotoxicity (EC50 = 25 to >250 microM) and low haemolytic activity (EC50 = 0.2 to >3.3 mM), with headgroup structure, tail length and degree of fluorination being important structural determinants for both endpoints. The EC50 values of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon glucopyranoside surfactants displayed a "cut-off" effect (i.e., a maximum with respect to the chain length). According to steady-state fluorescence anisotropy studies, short chain (C7) surfactants partitioned less readily into model membranes, which explains their low cytotoxicity and haemolytic activity. Interestingly, galactopyranosides were less toxic compared to glucopyranosides with the same hydrophobic tail. Although both surfactant types only differ in the stereochemistry of the 4-OH group, hexadecyl gluco- and galactopyranoside surfactants had similar apparent membrane partition coefficients, but differed in their overall effect on the phase behaviour of DPPC model membranes, as assessed using steady-state fluorescence anisotropy studies. These observations suggest that highly selective surfactant-lipid interactions may be responsible for the differential cytotoxicity and, possible, haemolytic activity of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon carbohydrate surfactants intended for a variety of pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. PMID:19481909

  17. Determining the radon exhalation rate from a gold mine tailings dump by measuring the gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ongori, Joash N; Lindsay, Robert; Newman, Richard T; Maleka, Peane P

    2015-02-01

    The mining activities taking place in Gauteng province, South Africa have caused millions of tons of rocks to be taken from underground to be milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are placed in an estimated 250 dumps covering a total area of about 7000 ha. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon. The size of these dumps make traditional radon exhalation measurements time consuming and it is difficult to get representative measurements for the whole dump. In this work radon exhalation measurements from the non-operational Kloof mine dump have been performed by measuring the gamma radiation from the dump fairly accurately over an area of more than 1 km(2). Radon exhalation from the mine dump have been inferred from this by laboratory-based and in-situ gamma measurements. Thirty four soil samples were collected at depths of 30 cm and 50 cm. The weighted average activity concentrations in the soil samples were 308 ± 7 Bq kg(-1), 255 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 18 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, (40)K and (232)Th, respectively. The MEDUSA (Multi-Element Detector for Underwater Sediment Activity) γ-ray detection system was used for field measurements. The radium concentrations were then used with soil parameters to obtain the radon flux using different approaches such as the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) formula. Another technique the MEDUSA Laboratory Technique (MELT) was developed to map radon exhalation based on (1) recognising that radon exhalation does not affect (40)K and (232)Th activity concentrations and (2) that the ratio of the activity concentration of the field (MEDUSA) to the laboratory (HPGe) for (238)U and (40)K or (238)U and (232)Th will give a measure of the radon exhalation at a particular location in the dump. The average, normalised radon flux was found to be 0.12 ± 0.02 Bq m(-2) s(-1) for the mine dump. PMID:25461511

  18. Determining exposure history of northern pike and walleye to tailings effluence using trace metal uptake in otoliths.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Lisa A; Halden, Norman M

    2010-03-01

    Determining the effects of mining activity on fish populations is complicated by the uncertainty of fish residency in an affected area. Otoliths are considered to be metabolically inert and can contain complete chemical records of environments in which individuals have lived. When coupled with the annular structure, otoliths provide temporal information to the history of exposure to pollutants. In this preliminary study, northern pike and walleye otoliths collected from two lakes adjacent to base metal mine tailings at Lynn Lake, Manitoba, Canada, were analyzed using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine background levels of trace metals. The presence of overlapping Zn, Cu, and Pb peaks above background levels in some otoliths is interpreted as a record of elevated levels in the environment. These otoliths provided a record of the history of fish movement into and out of the affected area. PMID:20136074

  19. Characterization of structural variability sheds light on the specificity determinants of the interaction between effector domains and histone tails.

    PubMed

    Lois, Sergi; Akizu, Naiara; de Xaxars, Gemma Mas; Vzquez, Iago; Martnez-Balbs, Marian; de la Cruz, Xavier

    2010-02-16

    Structural characterization of the interaction between histone tails and effector modules (bromodomains, chromodomains, PHD fingers, etc.) is fundamental to understand the mechanistic aspects of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In recent years many researchers have applied this approach to specific systems, thus providing a valuable but fragmentary view of the histone-effector interaction. In our work we use this information to characterize the structural features of the two main components of this interaction, histone peptides and the binding site of effector domains (focusing on those which target modified lysines), and increase our knowledge on its specificity determinants. Our results show that the binding sites of effectors are structurally variable, but some clear trends allow their classification in three main groups: flat-groove, narrow-groove and cavity-insertion. In addition, we found that even within these classes binding site variability is substantial. These results in context with the work from other researchers indicate that the there are at least two determinants of binding specificity in the binding site of effector modules. Finally, our analysis of the histone peptides sheds light on the structural transition experienced by histone tails upon effector binding, showing that it may vary depending on the local properties of the sequence stretch considered, thus allowing us to identify an additional specificity determinant for this interaction. Overall, the results of our analysis contribute to clarify the origins of specificity: different regions of the binding site and, in particular, differences in the disorder-order transitions experienced by different histone sequence stretches upon binding. PMID:20160474

  20. Tail wags the dog: activity of krait natriuretic peptide is determined by its C-terminal tail in a natriuretic peptide receptor-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Sindhuja; Kini, R Manjunatha

    2015-07-15

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are potent vasoactive hormones, which maintain pressure-volume homoeostasis. Snake venom NPs exhibit distinct biological activity compared with mammalian NPs due to subtle changes in their sequences. We recently identified a new NP from krait venom (KNP), with an unusual 38-residue long C-terminal tail, which has a propensity to form an ?-helix. KNP mediates vasodilation via NP receptor (NPR) independent mechanisms on pre-contracted aortic strips in contrast with classical NPs. The infusion of KNP in anaesthetized rats resulted in a prolonged and sustained drop in blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) with no renal effects in contrast with mammalian counterparts. Deletion mutant studies have revealed the presence of two functional segments in KNP, namely Ring and Helix. Although the Ring interacts with NPR, its contribution to the activity of KNP is shown to be negligible as both KNP and Helix elicit equipotent endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. Further, KNP and Helix signalled through endothelial nitric oxide (NO) to mediate NPR-independent vasodilation. Thus, KNP exhibits non-canonical characteristics through its C-terminal tail, despite a functional NP ring. The present study has altered the paradigm of NP biology through the understanding of structure-function relationships and may serve as a lead for the design of novel hypotensive agents. PMID:25981819

  1. Social Capital and Determinants of Immigrant Family Educational Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Family educational involvement has been identified as a particularly beneficial practice for the achievement and behavioral outcomes of all students, including ethnic-minority students from families who have low levels of income, education, and English language proficiency. However, despite the associated benefits not all families are involved in their child's education and the explanation for differing involvement patterns has not been fully explored. This study examines precursors to parent educational involvement with an emphasis on immigrant families who may face more involvement barriers using the immigrant sample from the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 189). Results provide limited support for the Hoover-Dempsey and Sandler theoretical model for family involvement; self-efficacy and perceived opportunities for involvement predicted immigrant families home-based involvement. No antecedents, however, predicted school-based involvement. In addition, results suggest expanding this model to include social capital, which significantly predicted immigrant families home-based involvement activities. PMID:26392635

  2. Evidence for the Involvement of Potassium Channel Inhibition in the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Hesperidin in the Tail Suspension Test in Mice.

    PubMed

    Donato, Franciele; Borges Filho, Carlos; Giacomeli, Renata; Alvater, Elza Eliza Tenório; Del Fabbro, Lucian; Antunes, Michele da Silva; de Gomes, Marcelo Gomes; Goes, André Tiago Rossito; Souza, Leandro Cattelan; Boeira, Silvana Peterini; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The administration of hesperidin elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice by a mechanism dependent on an interaction with the L-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, whose stimulation is associated with the activation of potassium (K(+)) channels. Thus, this study investigated the involvement of different types of K(+) channels in the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the mice tail suspension test (TST). The intracerebroventricular administration of tetraethylammonium (TEA, a nonspecific blocker of K(+) channels), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker), charybdotoxin (a large- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel blocker) or apamin (a small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel blocker) combined with a subeffective dose of hesperidin (0.01 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) was able to produce a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the mice TST. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effect elicited by an effective dose of hesperidin (0.3 mg/kg, i.p.) in TST was abolished by the treatment of mice with pharmacological compounds K(+) channel openers (cromakalim and minoxidil). Results showed that the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in TST may involve, at least in part, the modulation of neuronal excitability through inhibition of K(+) channels and may act through a mechanism dependent on the inhibition of L-arginine-NO pathway. PMID:25647144

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase 1 of Arabidopsis (AtCEP1) is involved in pathogen defense.

    PubMed

    Hwing, Timo; Huesmann, Christina; Hoefle, Caroline; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika; Hckelhoven, Ralph; Gietl, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically determined process in all multicellular organisms. Plant PCD is effected by a unique group of papain-type cysteine endopeptidases (CysEP) with a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL CysEP). KDEL CysEPs can be stored as pro-enzymes in ER-derived endomembrane compartments and are released as mature CysEPs in the final stages of organelle disintegration. KDEL CysEPs accept a wide variety of amino acids at the active site, including the glycosylated hydroxyprolines of the extensins that form the basic scaffold of the cell wall. In Arabidopsis, three KDEL CysEPs (AtCEP1, AtCEP2, and AtCEP3) are expressed. Cell- and tissue-specific activities of these three genes suggest that KDEL CysEPs participate in the abscission of flower organs and in the collapse of tissues in the final stage of PCD as well as in developmental tissue remodeling. We observed that AtCEP1 is expressed in response to biotic stress stimuli in the leaf. atcep1 knockout mutants showed enhanced susceptibility to powdery mildew caused by the biotrophic ascomycete Erysiphe cruciferarum. A translational fusion protein of AtCEP1 with a three-fold hemaglutinin-tag and the green fluorescent protein under control of the endogenous AtCEP1 promoter (PCEP1::pre-pro-3xHA-EGFP-AtCEP1-KDEL) rescued the pathogenesis phenotype demonstrating the function of AtCEP1 in restriction of powdery mildew. The spatiotemporal AtCEP1-reporter expression during fungal infection together with microscopic inspection of the interaction phenotype suggested a function of AtCEP1 in controlling late stages of compatible interaction including late epidermal cell death. Additionally, expression of stress response genes appeared to be deregulated in the interaction of atcep1 mutants and E. cruciferarum. Possible functions of AtCEP1 in restricting parasitic success of the obligate biotrophic powdery mildew fungus are discussed. PMID:24605116

  4. Social Capital and Determinants of Immigrant Family Educational Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Family educational involvement has been identified as a particularly beneficial practice for the achievement and behavioral outcomes of all students, including ethnic-minority students from families who have low levels of income, education, and English language proficiency. Despite the associated benefits, however, not all families are involved in

  5. Role of the long-range oscillatory tail of the effective pair potential in determining the structure of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Naoshi; Hoshino, Kozo; Watabe, Mitsuo

    1990-11-01

    To investigate the role of the long-range oscillatory part of the effective pair potential in determining structural features of liquid metals, the structure factor S(q) and the pair correlation function g(r) calculated for the full pair potential are compared with those obtained for various cutoff forms of the pair potential. The calculations are performed by employing the modified hypernetted-chain approximation, which is one of the best approximations in the integral equation theory of liquid. The results for liquid cesium are presented in detail. It is shown that the peak positions of g(r) and S(q) are affected rather significantly by the long-range oscillatory tail of the pair potential, the contribution from the short-range attractive part being especially important. These features are quite different from the results for the Lennard-Jones liquid, whose structure is known to be dominantly determined by the short-range repulsive part of the pair potential.

  6. Determinants of Parental Involvement in Early Schooling: Evidence from Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Susan D.; Yamamoto, Yoko; Suzuki, Sawako; Mindnich, Jessica D.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how demographic and psychological factors shape the involvement of Japanese mothers in their children's education. The five demographic variables studied were family income, maternal education, family size, mothers' employment status, and sex of the child. Three forms of parental cognition were also studied: mothers'

  7. Lift generation by the avian tail.

    PubMed

    Maybury, W J; Rayner, J M; Couldrick, L B

    2001-07-22

    Variation with tail spread of the lift generated by a bird tail was measured on mounted, frozen European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in a wind tunnel at a typical air speed and body and tail angle of attack in order to test predictions of existing aerodynamic theories modelling tail lift. Measured lift at all but the lowest tail spread angles was significantly lower than the predictions of slender wing, leading edge vortex and lifting line models of lift production. Instead, the tail lift coefficient based on tail area was independent of tail spread, tail aspect ratio and maximum tail span. Theoretical models do not predict bird tail lift reliably and, when applied to tail morphology, may underestimate the aerodynamic optimum tail feather length. Flow visualization experiments reveal that an isolated tail generates leading edge vortices as expected for a low-aspect ratio delta wing, but that in the intact bird body-tail interactions are critical in determining tail aerodynamics: lifting vortices shed from the body interact with the tail and degrade tail lift compared with that of an isolated tail. PMID:11454286

  8. Structures and interaction analyses of integrin αMβ2 cytoplasmic tails.

    PubMed

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Amalraj, Monalisa; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-12-23

    Integrins are heterodimeric (α and β subunits) signal transducer proteins involved in cell adhesions and migrations. The cytosolic tails of integrins are essential for transmitting bidirectional signaling and also implicated in maintaining the resting states of the receptors. In addition, cytosolic tails of integrins often undergo post-translation modifications like phosphorylation. However, the consequences of phosphorylation on the structures and interactions are not clear. The leukocyte-specific integrin αMβ2 is essential for myeloid cell adhesion, phagocytosis, and degranulation. In this work, we determined solution structures of the myristoylated cytosolic tail of αM and a Ser phosphorylated variant in dodecylphosphocholine micelles by NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the interactions between non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated αM tails with β2 tail were investigated by NMR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The three-dimensional structures of the 24-residue cytosolic tail of αM or phosphorylated αM are characterized by an N-terminal amphipathic helix and a loop at the C terminus. The residues at the loop are involved in packing interactions with the hydrophobic face of the helix. 15N-1H heteronuclear single quantum coherence experiments identified residues of αM and β2 tails that may be involved in the formation of a tail-tail heterocomplex. We further examined interactions between myristoylated β2 tail in dodecylphosphocholine micelles with dansylated αM tail peptides by FRET. These studies revealed enhanced interactions between αM or phosphorylated αM tails with β2 tail with Kd values ∼5.2±0.6 and ∼4.4±0.7 μm, respectively. Docked structures of tail-tail complexes delineated that the αM/β2 interface at the cytosolic region could be sustained by a network of polar interactions, ionic interactions, and/or hydrogen bonds. PMID:22052909

  9. Tail Buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdrashitov, G.

    1943-01-01

    An approximate theory of buffeting is here presented, based on the assumption of harmonic disturbing forces. Two cases of buffeting are considered: namely, for a tail angle of attack greater and less than the stalling angle, respectively. On the basis of the tests conducted and the results of foreign investigators, a general analysis is given of the nature of the forced vibrations the possible load limits on the tail, and the methods of elimination of buffeting.

  10. Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Complementary Signaling Pathways Involved in Listeria Infection and Reveals Different Actin Nucleation Mechanisms during Listeria Cell Invasion and Actin Comet Tail Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämo, Pauli; Kafai, Natasha; Dehio, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes enters nonphagocytic cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is dependent on a clathrin-based molecular machinery and actin rearrangements. Bacterial intra- and intercellular movements are also actin dependent and rely on the actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex, which is activated by host-derived nucleation-promoting factors downstream of the cell receptor Met during entry and by the bacterial nucleation-promoting factor ActA during comet tail formation. By genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening for host factors involved in bacterial infection, we identified diverse cellular signaling networks and protein complexes that support or limit these processes. In addition, we could precise previously described molecular pathways involved in Listeria invasion. In particular our results show that the requirements for actin nucleators during Listeria entry and actin comet tail formation are different. Knockdown of several actin nucleators, including SPIRE2, reduced bacterial invasion while not affecting the generation of comet tails. Most interestingly, we observed that in contrast to our expectations, not all of the seven subunits of the Arp2/3 complex are required for Listeria entry into cells or actin tail formation and that the subunit requirements for each of these processes differ, highlighting a previously unsuspected versatility in Arp2/3 complex composition and function. PMID:25991686

  11. A polar-localized iron-binding protein determines the polar targeting of Burkholderia BimA autotransporter and actin tail formation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhe; Xu, Yue; Yao, Qing; Niu, Miao; Shao, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens including Shigella, Listeria, Mycobacteria, Rickettsia and Burkholderia spp. deploy a specialized surface protein onto one pole of the bacteria to induce filamentous actin tail formation for directional movement within host cytosol. The mechanism underlying polar targeting of the actin tail proteins is unknown. Here we perform a transposon screen in Burkholderia thailandensis and identify a conserved bimC that is required for actin tail formation mediated by BimA from B. thailandensis and its closely related pathogenic species B. pseudomallei and B. mallei. bimC is located upstream of bimA in the same operon. Loss of bimC results in even distribution of BimA on the outer membrane surface, where actin polymerization still occurs. BimC is targeted to the same bacterial pole independently of BimA. BimC confers polar targeting of BimA prior to BimA translocation across bacterial inner membrane. BimC is an iron-binding protein, requiring a four-cysteine cluster at the carboxyl terminus. Mutation of the cysteine cluster disrupts BimC polar localization. Truncation analyses identify the transmembrane domain in BimA being responsible for its polar targeting. Consistently, BimC can interact with BimA transmembrane domain in an iron binding-dependent manner. Our study uncovers a new mechanism that determines the polar distribution of bacteria-induced actin tail in infected host cells. PMID:25293534

  12. Tank tests to determine the effect on planing-tail hulls of varying length, width, and plan-form taper of afterbody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R; Walter, Robert C; Hay, Elizabeth S

    1946-01-01

    Tests were conducted in Langley Tank no. 2 on models of an unconventional flying-boat hull called a planing-tail hull to determine the effects on resistance of varying a number of afterbody parameters. The effects of varying length, width, and plan-form taper of the afterbody are presented. Tests were made with afterbodies of two widths, two lengths, and two tapers. In the tests the depth of step and the angle of afterbody keel were held constant.(author)

  13. Determination of thermodynamic and transport parameters of naphthenic acids and organic process chemicals in oil sand tailings pond water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Robinson, Lisa; Wen, Qing; Kasperski, Kim L

    2013-07-01

    Oil sand tailings pond water contains naphthenic acids and process chemicals (e.g., alkyl sulphates, quaternary ammonium compounds, and alkylphenol ethoxylates). These chemicals are toxic and can seep through the foundation of the tailings pond to the subsurface, potentially affecting the quality of groundwater. As a result, it is important to measure the thermodynamic and transport parameters of these chemicals in order to study the transport behavior of contaminants through the foundation as well as underground. In this study, batch adsorption studies and column experiments were performed. It was found that the transport parameters of these chemicals are related to their molecular structures and other properties. The computer program (CXTFIT) was used to further evaluate the transport process in the column experiments. The results from this study show that the transport of naphthenic acids in a glass column is an equilibrium process while the transport of process chemicals seems to be a non-equilibrium process. At the end of this paper we present a real-world case study in which the transport of the contaminants through the foundation of an external tailings pond is calculated using the lab-measured data. The results show that long-term groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport at the oil sand mining site may be necessary to avoid chemicals from reaching any nearby receptors. PMID:23736740

  14. XAFS determination of the chemical form of lead in smelter-contaminated soils and mine tailings: Importance of adsorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Ildefonse, P.; Calas, G.; Ostergren, J.D.; Brown, G.E. Jr. |

    1999-03-01

    The authors investigated smelter-contaminated soils from Evin-Malmaison, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France, and mine tailings from Leadville, Colorado, U.S.A. Bulk Pb concentrations range from 460 to 1900 ppm in the topsoils at Evin-Malmaison site and from 6000 to 10,000 ppm in the tailings samples from the Leadville site. These concentrations necessarily raise human health and environmental concerns, but bioavailability and chemical lability of Pb in these materials vary dramatically and show little correlation with bulk concentrations. This study provides detailed information on the speciation of Pb in these materials. Emphasis is on the identification and characterization of poorly crystalline and/or fine-grained species, such as sorption complexes and poorly crystalline (co)precipitates, which are likely to control Pb bioavailability and mobility in these natural systems. In the Evin-Malmaison samples, direct spectroscopic evidence for Pb sorbed to humic acids was found, as well as to both manganese and iron (oxyhydr)oxides. In the Leadville samples, variations in Pb speciation with pH are consistent with predictions based on simplified model system studies of adsorption processes; specifically, the carbonate-buffered tailings with near-neutral pH contain up to 50% of total Pb as adsorption complexes on iron (oxyhydr)oxides, whereas Pb speciation in sulfide-rich low pH samples is dominated by Pb-bearing jarosites with no evidence for adsorbed Pb in these latter samples.

  15. Structural and Functional Characterization of Ybr137wp Implicates Its Involvement in the Targeting of Tail-Anchored Proteins to Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Hung; Lin, Tai-Wen; Li, Yi-Chuan; Tung, Jung-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 5% of membrane proteins are guided to nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondrial, Golgi, or peroxisome membranes by their C-terminal transmembrane domain and are classified as tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the guided entry of TA protein (GET) pathway has been shown to function in the delivery of TA proteins to the ER. The sorting complex for this pathway is comprised of Sgt2, Get4, and Get5 and facilitates the loading of nascent tail-anchored proteins onto the Get3 ATPase. Multiple pulldown assays also indicated that Ybr137wp associates with this complex in vivo. Here, we report a 2.8-Å-resolution crystal structure for Ybr137wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The protein is a decamer in the crystal and also in solution, as observed by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that the C-terminal acidic motif of Ybr137wp interacts with the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of Sgt2. Moreover, an in vivo study demonstrated that Ybr137wp is induced in yeast exiting the log phase and ameliorates the defect of TA protein delivery and cell viability derived by the impaired GET system under starvation conditions. Therefore, this study suggests a possible role for Ybr137wp related to targeting of tail-anchored proteins. PMID:25288638

  16. COMET C/2011 W3 (LOVEJOY): ORBIT DETERMINATION, OUTBURSTS, DISINTEGRATION OF NUCLEUS, DUST-TAIL MORPHOLOGY, AND RELATIONSHIP TO NEW CLUSTER OF BRIGHT SUNGRAZERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W. E-mail: Paul.W.Chodas@jpl.nasa.gov

    2012-10-01

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for {approx}3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at {approx}10{sup 12} g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail-the product of the terminal fragmentation-was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s{sup -1}. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The resulting orbit gives 698 {+-} 2 yr for the osculating orbital period, showing that C/2011 W3 is the first member of the expected new, 21st-century cluster of bright Kreutz-system sungrazers, whose existence was predicted by these authors in 2007. From the spine tail's evolution, we determine that its measured tip, populated by dust particles 1-2 mm in diameter, receded antisunward from the computed position of the missing nucleus. The bizarre appearance of the comet's dust tail in images taken only hours after perihelion with the coronagraphs on board the SOHO and STEREO spacecraft is readily understood. The disconnection of the comet's head from the tail released before perihelion and an apparent activity attenuation near perihelion have a common cause-sublimation of all dust at heliocentric distances smaller than about 1.8 solar radii. The tail's brightness is strongly affected by forward scattering of sunlight by dust. From an initially broad range of particle sizes, the grains that were imaged the longest had a radiation-pressure parameter {beta} {approx_equal} 0.6, diagnostic of submicron-sized silicate grains and consistent with the existence of the dust-free zone around the Sun. The role and place of C/2011 W3 in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system and its genealogy via a 14th-century parent suggest that it is indirectly related to the celebrated sungrazer X/1106 C1, which, just as the first-generation parent of C/2011 W3, split from a common predecessor during the previous return to perihelion.

  17. Comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy): Orbit Determination, Outbursts, Disintegration of Nucleus, Dust-tail Morphology, and Relationship to New Cluster of Bright Sungrazers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for ~3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at ~1012 g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail—the product of the terminal fragmentation—was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s-1. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The resulting orbit gives 698 ± 2 yr for the osculating orbital period, showing that C/2011 W3 is the first member of the expected new, 21st-century cluster of bright Kreutz-system sungrazers, whose existence was predicted by these authors in 2007. From the spine tail's evolution, we determine that its measured tip, populated by dust particles 1-2 mm in diameter, receded antisunward from the computed position of the missing nucleus. The bizarre appearance of the comet's dust tail in images taken only hours after perihelion with the coronagraphs on board the SOHO and STEREO spacecraft is readily understood. The disconnection of the comet's head from the tail released before perihelion and an apparent activity attenuation near perihelion have a common cause—sublimation of all dust at heliocentric distances smaller than about 1.8 solar radii. The tail's brightness is strongly affected by forward scattering of sunlight by dust. From an initially broad range of particle sizes, the grains that were imaged the longest had a radiation-pressure parameter β ~= 0.6, diagnostic of submicron-sized silicate grains and consistent with the existence of the dust-free zone around the Sun. The role and place of C/2011 W3 in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system and its genealogy via a 14th-century parent suggest that it is indirectly related to the celebrated sungrazer X/1106 C1, which, just as the first-generation parent of C/2011 W3, split from a common predecessor during the previous return to perihelion.

  18. Immunolocalization of FGF7 (KGF) in the regenerating tail of lizard suggests it is involved in the differentiation of the epidermis.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies showed that Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGF) 1 and 2 are localized in the tissues of the regenerating tail in lizards. In the present immunofluorescence and immunoblotting study we have specifically analyzed the presence and distribution of FGF7 (keratinocyte growth factor) in the regenerating tissues of the tail. FGF7 immunoreactivity is mainly detected in the regenerating epidermis and in sparse fibroblasts of the underlying dermis of the regenerating scales while it is weaker in the other tissues such as the apical ependymal cells and early regenerating muscles. Immunolabeled mesenchymal fibroblasts are frequently present under the epidermis of the forming outer scale surface, a localization that might be connected to beta-cell differentiation in this region of the scale. FGF7 immunolabeling is also seen in differentiating beta-keratinocytes of the beta-layer in the regenerating scales. The present immunofluorescent observations suggest that FGF7 is specifically utilized as a paracrine factor during the process of differentiation of the epidermal layers in the regenerating scales and in particular for beta-cells differentiation. PMID:26508592

  19. Environmentally safe design of tailing dams for the management of iron ore tailings in Indian context.

    PubMed

    Ghose, Mrinal K; Sen, P K

    2005-10-01

    The need for the disposal of iron ore tailings in an enviornmentally firiendly manner is of great concern. This paper investigates the soil engineering properties for the construction of iron ore tailing dam, its foundation, construction materials and design data used for the construction analysis of the tailing dam. Geophysical investigations were carried out to establish the bedrock below the spillway. A computer programme taking into account the Swedish Slip Circle Method of analysis was used in the stability analysis of dam. It also focuses on the charactierstics of the tailings reponsible for the determination of optimum size of tailing pond for the containment of the tailings. The studies on the settling characteristics of tailings indicate much less area in comparison to the area provided in the existing tailing ponds in India. In the proposed scheme, it is suggested to provide an additional unit of sedimentation tank before the disposal of tailings to the tailing pond. PMID:17051916

  20. Wind-tunnel Investigation of End-plate Effects of Horizontal Tails on a Vertical Tail Compared with Available Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Harry E

    1946-01-01

    A vertical-tail model with stub fuselage was tested in combination with various simulated horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and location on the aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical tail. Available theoretical data on end-plate effects were collected and presented in the form most suitable for design purposes. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the measured and theoretical end-plate effects of horizontal tails on vertical tails, and the data indicated that the end-plate effect was determined more by the location of the horizontal tail than by the span of the horizontal tail. The horizontal tail gave most end-plate effect when located near either tip of the vertical tail and, when located near the base of the vertical tail, the end-plate effect was increased by moving the horizontal tail rearward.

  1. Paraprofessional Involvement in Self-Determination Instruction for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Carter, Erik W.; Sisco, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Although enhancing students' self-determination is advocated as a central element of high-quality special education and transition services, little is known about the ways in which paraprofessionals are involved in promoting self-determination or the extent to which they share teachers' views regarding its importance. The authors surveyed 223…

  2. Involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 antagonists in mouse forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Kordjazy, Nastaran; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 (5-HT3) antagonists such as ondansetron and tropisetron exert positive behavioral effects in animal models of depression. Due to the ionotropic nature of 5-HT3 and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, plus their contribution to the pathophysiology of depression, we investigated the possible role of NMDA receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists in male mice. In order to evaluate the animals' behavior in response to different treatments, we performed open-field test (OFT), forced swimming test (FST), and tail-suspension test (TST), which are considered as valid tasks for measuring locomotor activity and depressive-like behaviors in mice. Our data revealed that intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of tropisetron (5, 10, and 30mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.01, and 0.1μg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in FST and TST. Also, co-administration of subeffective doses of tropisetron (1mg/kg, i.p.) or ondansetron (0.001μg/kg, i.p.) with subeffective doses of NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine (1mg/kg, i.p.), MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.) and magnesium sulfate (10mg/kg, i.p.) resulted in a reduced immobility time both in FST and TST. The subeffective dose of NMDA (NMDA receptor agonist, 75mg/kg, i.p.) abolished the effects of 5-HT3 antagonists in FST and TST, further supporting the presumed interaction between 5-HT3 and NMDA receptors. These treatments did not affect the locomotor behavior of animals in OFT. Finally, the results of our study suggest that the positive effects of 5-HT3 antagonists on the coping behavior of mice in FST and TST are at least partly mediated through NMDA receptors participation. PMID:26604075

  3. Molecular players involved in temperature-dependent sex determination and sex differentiation in Teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that underlie sex determination and differentiation are conserved and diversified. In fish species, temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation seem to be ubiquitous and molecular players involved in these mechanisms may be conserved. Although how the ambient temperature transduces signals to the undifferentiated gonads remains to be elucidated, the genes downstream in the sex differentiation pathway are shared between sex-determining mechanisms. In this paper, we review recent advances on the molecular players that participate in the sex determination and differentiation in fish species, by putting emphasis on temperature-dependent sex determination and differentiation, which include temperature-dependent sex determination and genetic sex determination plus temperature effects. Application of temperature-dependent sex differentiation in farmed fish and the consequences of temperature-induced sex reversal are discussed. PMID:24735220

  4. Selective interactions of mu-opioid receptors with pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins: involvement of the third intracellular loop and the c-terminal tail in coupling.

    PubMed

    Georgoussi, Z; Merkouris, M; Mullaney, I; Megaritis, G; Carr, C; Zioudrou, C; Milligan, G

    1997-12-12

    A cDNA encoding the rat mu-opioid receptor was expressed stably in a Rat-1 fibroblast cell line. Expression of this receptor was demonstrated with specific binding of the mu-opioid selective ligand [3H][D-Ala2,N-MePhe4,Gly5-ol]-enkephalin ([3H]DAMGO). In membranes of clone mu11 cells DAMGO produced a robust, concentration-dependent stimulation of basal high affinity GTPase activity. Cholera toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP-ribosylation in membranes of this clone labelled a 40 kDa Gi family polypeptide(s) that was markedly enhanced by the addition of DAMGO. Antisera against Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha were both able to immunoprecipitate a [32P]-radiolabelled 40 kDa polypeptide(s) from DAMGO and cholera-toxin treated membranes of clone mu11, indicating that the mu-opioid receptor was able to interact effectively with both Gi2 and Gi3 in Rat-1 fibroblasts. A series of peptides derived from the delta-opioid receptor sequence were assessed for their ability to modify agonist-stimulated G protein activation and [3H] agonist binding to the receptor. In membranes from the clone mu11, specific binding of [3H]DAMGO was reduced by peptides corresponding to the NH2-terminal region of the third intracellular loop (i3.1) and the carboxyl-terminal tail (i4) of this receptor. Agonist stimulated GTPase activity and DAMGO dependent cholera toxin-catalyzed [32P]ADP-ribosylation were inhibited by peptides derived from the proximal (i3.1) and the distal portion (i3.3) of the third intracellular loop. Peptide i3.1 also inhibited DAMGO-stimulated [35S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTP-gammaS) binding in the same membranes. In contrast, peptides derived from the second intracellular loop were without any effect. PMID:9434132

  5. High-Poverty Youth: Self-Determination and Involvement in Educational Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Barbara H.; Hughes, Carolyn; Cosgriff, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    The authors compared involvement in educational planning and use of self-determination strategies reported by two groups of students attending a high-poverty, predominately Black high school: 19 students with severe intellectual disabilities and 20 general education seniors who were identified as successful. Findings revealed that special

  6. High-Poverty Youth: Self-Determination and Involvement in Educational Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Barbara H.; Hughes, Carolyn; Cosgriff, Joseph C.

    2012-01-01

    The authors compared involvement in educational planning and use of self-determination strategies reported by two groups of students attending a high-poverty, predominately Black high school: 19 students with severe intellectual disabilities and 20 general education seniors who were identified as successful. Findings revealed that special…

  7. Tail gut cyst.

    PubMed

    Rao, G Mallikarjuna; Haricharan, P; Ramanujacharyulu, S; Reddy, K Lakshmi

    2002-01-01

    The tail gut is a blind extension of the hindgut into the tail fold just distal to the cloacal membrane. Remnants of this structure may form tail gut cyst. We report a 14-year-old girl with tail gut cyst that presented as acute abdomen. The patient recovered after cyst excision. PMID:12546176

  8. A tail of two phages: genomic and functional analysis of Listeria monocytogenes phages vB_LmoS_188 and vB_LmoS_293 reveal the receptor-binding proteins involved in host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Aidan; Jordan, Kieran; Neve, Horst; Coffey, Aidan; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    The physical characteristics of bacteriophages establish them as viable candidates for downstream development of pathogen detection assays and biocontrol measures. To utilize phages for such purposes, a detailed knowledge of their host interaction mechanisms is a prerequisite. There is currently a wealth of knowledge available concerning Gram-negative phage-host interaction, but little by comparison for Gram-positive phages and Listeria phages in particular. In this research, the lytic spectrum of two recently isolated Listeria monocytogenes phages (vB_LmoS_188 and vB_LmoS_293) was determined, and the genomic basis for their observed serotype 4b/4e host-specificity was investigated using comparative genomics. The late tail genes of these phages were identified to be highly conserved when compared to other serovar 4-specific Listeria phages. Spontaneous mutants of each of these phages with broadened host specificities were generated. Their late tail gene sequences were compared with their wild-type counterparts resulting in the putative identification of the products of ORF 19 of vB_LmoS_188 and ORF 20 of vB_LmoS_293 as the receptor binding proteins of these phages. The research findings also indicate that conserved baseplate architectures and host interaction mechanisms exist for Listeria siphoviruses with differing host-specificities, and further contribute to the current knowledge of phage-host interactions with regard to Listeria phages. PMID:26500641

  9. Modelling Cometary Sodium Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    Neutral sodium is readily observed in cometary spectra and can be seen to form its own distinct tail at high activity comets. Solar radiation pressure accelerates the sodium atoms antisunward and, as strong sodium absorption lines are present in the solar spectrum, the magnitude of this force is dependent upon the Doppler shift of the incident solar radiation. Therefore the heliocentric velocity of the sodium atom directly determines its acceleration. This can produce unique effects, such as a stagnation region. Sodium is relatively easy to detect and so can potentially be used to trace mechanisms in the coma that are otherwise difficult to observe. The source of neutral sodium in the tail currently remains unknown. We have therefore developed a new, three dimensional Monte-Carlo model of neutral cometary sodium in order to facilitate testing of different source production functions. It includes weightings due to neutral sodium lifetime, variation of cometary sodium emission due to Fraunhofer absorption lines and solar flux variation with heliocentric distance. The Swings and Greenstein effects, which can have particularly dramatic effects in near-Sun comets, are also considered comprehensively. Preliminary results from this model are presented, focusing on a comparison of predictions of the neutral sodium tail of Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) with initial observations.

  10. Heads for learning, tails for memory: reward, reinforcement and a role of dopamine in determining behavioral relevance across multiple timescales

    PubMed Central

    Baudonnat, Mathieu; Huber, Anna; David, Vincent; Walton, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine has long been tightly associated with aspects of reinforcement learning and motivation in simple situations where there are a limited number of stimuli to guide behavior and constrained range of outcomes. In naturalistic situations, however, there are many potential cues and foraging strategies that could be adopted, and it is critical that animals determine what might be behaviorally relevant in such complex environments. This requires not only detecting discrepancies with what they have recently experienced, but also identifying similarities with past experiences stored in memory. Here, we review what role dopamine might play in determining how and when to learn about the world, and how to develop choice policies appropriate to the situation faced. We discuss evidence that dopamine is shaped by motivation and memory and in turn shapes reward-based memory formation. In particular, we suggest that hippocampal-striatal-dopamine networks may interact to determine how surprising the world is and to either inhibit or promote actions at time of behavioral uncertainty. PMID:24130514

  11. Involvement of Androgen Receptor in Sex Determination in an Amphibian Species

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Akira; Matsuo, Yasuki; Min, Mi-Sook; Hasebe, Takashi; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko; Kawakami, Koichi; Nakamura, Masahisa

    2014-01-01

    In mice and humans, the androgen receptor (AR) gene, located on the X chromosome, is not known to be involved in sex determination. In the Japanese frog Rana rugosa the AR is located on the sex chromosomes (X, Y, Z and W). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AR on the X chromosome (X-AR) of the Korean R. rugosa is basal and segregates into two clusters: one containing W-AR of Japanese R. rugosa, the other containing Y-AR. AR expression is twice as high in ZZ (male) compared to ZW (female) embryos in which the W-AR is barely expressed. Higher AR-expression may be associated with male sex determination in this species. To examine whether the Z-AR is involved in sex determination in R. rugosa, we produced transgenic (Tg) frogs carrying an exogenous Z-AR. Analysis of ZW Tg frogs revealed development of masculinized gonads or ovotestes. Expression of CYP17 and Dmrt1, genes known to be activated during normal male gonadal development, were up-regulated in the ZW ovotestis. Testosterone, supplied to the rearing water, completed the female-to-male sex-reversal in the AR-Tg ZW frogs. Here we report that Z-AR is involved in male sex-determination in an amphibian species. PMID:24826887

  12. Modulations of DNA Contacts by Linker Histones and Post-translational Modifications Determine the Mobility and Modifiability of Nucleosomal H3 Tails.

    PubMed

    Sttzer, Alexandra; Liokatis, Stamatios; Kiesel, Anja; Schwarzer, Dirk; Sprangers, Remco; Sding, Johannes; Selenko, Philipp; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Post-translational histone modifications and linker histone incorporation regulate chromatin structure and genome activity. How these systems interface on a molecular level is unclear. Using biochemistry and NMR spectroscopy, we deduced mechanistic insights into the modification behavior of N-terminal histone H3 tails in different nucleosomal contexts. We find that linker histones generally inhibit modifications of different H3 sites and reduce H3 tail dynamics in nucleosomes. These effects are caused by modulations of electrostatic interactions of H3 tailswith linker DNA and largely depend on the C-terminal domains of linker histones. In agreement,linker histone occupancy and H3 tail modifications segregate on a genome-wide level. Charge-modulating modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation weaken transient H3 tail-linker DNAinteractions, increase H3 tail dynamics, and, concomitantly, enhance general modifiability. We propose that alterations of H3 tail-linker DNA interactions by linker histones and charge-modulating modifications execute basal control mechanisms of chromatin function. PMID:26778125

  13. Soil acidity determines the effectiveness of an organic amendment and a native bacterium for increasing soil stabilisation in semiarid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcn, R; Roldn, A

    2009-01-01

    Unstable mine tailings are vulnerable to water and air erosion, so it is important to promote their surface stabilisation in order to avoid the spread of heavy metals. In a greenhouse experiment, we assessed the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste and inoculation with a native bacterium, Bacillus cereus, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two acidic, semiarid mine tailings, with different acidity degree, during watering and drying periods. Organic amendment raised the pH of both the moderately and highly acidic tailings, whereas the bacterial inoculation increased this parameter in the former. Only the amendment addition increased soil water-soluble carbon in both tailings compared with their controls, under either watering or drying conditions. Both the amendment and B. cereus enhanced water-soluble carbohydrates. Both treatments increased dehydrogenase activity and aggregate stability, particularly in the moderately acidic tailing under drying conditions. After soil drying, aggregate stability was increased by the amendment (about 66% higher than the control soil) and by the bacterium (about 45% higher than the control soil) in the moderately acidic tailing. The effectiveness of these treatments as structure-stabilisation methods for degraded, semiarid mine ecosystems appears to be restricted to tailings of moderate acidity. PMID:18954889

  14. Determination of Sites Involved, HIV CoInfection & Utility of Diagnostic Modalities in EPTB

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Aruna; R, Srinivasan; G, Thilagavathy; D, Satishkumar; C, Sidduraj; James, Bonny

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis remains a major global public health problem and an on-going epidemic. Though the chief objectives of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) in detecting and curing the infectious pulmonary cases is well taken, there has been a steady rise in the number of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) cases as documented in several studies. EPTB which usually constitutes around 15%-20% of the total TB cases is now being increasingly reported due to a combination of better diagnostic facilities, and the HIV pandemic. Though several studies have shown increasing prevalence of EPTB, only few studies are available, especially in the Indian scenario, that study the pattern and risk factors. Hence, this retrospective observational study was undertaken to determine the sites of the involvement, HIV co-infection and usefulness of various diagnostic modalities in EPTB affecting patients attending a medical college DOTS clinic. Material and Methods: One hundred ten EPTB patients referred to the DOTS clinics of the TB & Chest department from the period Dec 2010 Mar 2012 were included in the study. The diagnosis of EPTB was established by combined clinical, microbiological, histopathological &/or imaging modalities. Their medical records were assessed to determine the age distribution, gender and anatomical sites of involvement. The presence of co-morbid conditions like smoking history, alcoholism, diabetic and HIV status were noted. BCG status and Mantoux test readings were recorded. The different diagnostic tests used in confirming EPTB at different sites were recorded. Chest x-ray was analysed for all patients to assess coexisting pulmonary involvement. All patients were followed to assess the outcome of treatment. Results: The mean age of patients was 34.4. The male to female ratio was 58:52 showing a slight male predominance. The most common site of involvement was lymph node followed by pleural effusion and abdominal TB. The prevalence of lymph node TB was noted to be higher in female patients as compared to other sites of EPTB. Mantoux test was positive in 57 (51.8%) patients. HIV co-infection was noted in only 3 (2.7%) patients. Concomitant pulmonary involvement was seen in 19 (17.3%) patients. Conclusions: Lymph node was the most common site involvement showing a significant female preponderance followed by pleural effusion and abdominal TB. The rates of HIV co-infection and diabetes mellitus were 2.7% and 20% respectively. The most useful diagnostic modality was tissue sampling followed by imaging. Mantoux test is not unequivocal for the diagnosis of EPTB. PMID:24086863

  15. Determination of catalase activity using chromogenic probe involving iso-nicotinicacidhydrazide and pyrocatechol.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, Anantharaman; Nagaraja, Padmarajaiah; Chamaraja, Nelligere Arkeshwaraiah; Krishna, Honnur; Avinash, Krishnegowda

    2011-10-10

    A biocatalatic pathway involving chromogenic probe has been proposed for the determination of catalase activity by means of iso-nicotinicacidhydrazide (INH) and pyrocatechol (PC). The assay is based on the enzymatic consumption of hydrogen peroxide using INH-PC system. The response of the catalase activity was ascertained by the rate of the reaction involving 14.10mM H(2)O(2). On addition of H(2)O(2), INH-PC indicator system formed a chromogenic product with absorbance maxima at 490 nm. Hence the activity of catalase was directly measured by the chromogenic response in the formation of the coupled product. The catalase assay was elaborated by the kinetic response of the INH-PC system. The linearity of the catalase activity and H(2)O(2) was in the range 0.2-7.0 units and 1.76-7.0mM, respectively in 3 ml solution. The catalytic efficiency and catalytic power were calculated. The Michaelis-Menten constant of INH, PC and H(2)O(2) were found to be 0.344, 0.176 and 8.82 mM, respectively. The indicator reaction was applied in the determination of catalase activity in mycelia mats and culture media. PMID:21839122

  16. A Method for Estimating the Rolling Moments Caused by Wing-tail Interference for Missiles at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Sherman; Hikido, Katsumi

    1953-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the rolling moments caused by wing-tail interference for missiles composed of wing-tail-body combination. The considerations involved in determining the structure of the downwash field behind lifting cruciform wing-body combinations and the rolling moment on cruciform wings of various plan forms induced by an infinite line vortex are discussed in detail. Computations of induced rolling moments for several missile designs are compared with experimental results.

  17. Molecular mapping of the determinants involved in human Staufen-ribosome association.

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Duchane, Thomas F; DesGroseillers, Luc

    2002-01-01

    The human double-stranded (ds) RNA-binding protein Staufen (hStau) is considered to have a role in RNA transport and its localization. By using sedimentation analysis on sucrose gradients, we showed that the Staufen isoform with an apparent molecular mass of 55 kDa (Stau(55)) co-fractionated with ribosomes and associated with both the 40 and 60 S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that the Staufen isoform hStau(55) plays some role in translation. To map the determinant(s) involved in this association, we generated a series of deletion mutants and analysed their subcellular distribution by cell fractionation and fluorescent immunomicroscopy. Our results demonstrated that multiple determinants promote hStau(55)-ribosome association via both an RNA-binding-dependent mechanism and protein-protein interaction. The RNA-binding activity of the ds RNA-binding protein domain 3 (dsRBD3) but not that of dsRBD4 is the first determinant. Although necessary for stable association with ribosomes, dsRBD3 alone is not sufficient and needs other determinants as co-factors. Consistently, when expressed together, dsRBD4 and the tubulin-binding domain constitute the minimal Stau(55)/ribosome protein-protein association domain. This region of Stau(55) is sufficient to associate with ribosomes independently, but requires the RNA-binding activity of dsRBD3 for complete association. Thus the results are consistent with a putative role for Stau(55) in the regulation of translation. PMID:12133005

  18. Determination of reaction mechanisms and rates involving SO and NO radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijesingha, Manoj; Nanayakkara, Asiri

    2015-12-01

    Reaction rates and mechanisms involving radicals SO and NO are studied using ab initio electronic structure methods and transition-state theory calculations for the temperature range 200K-2000K. The molecules involved in these reactions are optimized at CCSD levels with basis set cc-PVTZ. The potential energy surface is determined computationally by MP2/6-31G(d,p) method. Moreover CCSD/cc-PVTZ levels of theory are employed to locate stationary points, which are then characterized by calculation of vibrational frequencies to locate the transition states. In this investigation, we find that the possible products in the ground state consist of cis-SONO, SNO2, trans-SONO, cis-NOSO, t-NOSO, NSO2, cis-OSNO, trans-OSNO, S+NO2 and N+SO2. All intermediate states of the reaction SO+NO are positive energy of formation relative to the reactants. According to the reaction profiles of SO+NO, the molecular structures of the reactants are shifted to S+NO2 (49.02kcal/mol) and N+SO2 (25.22kcal/mol) through four transition structures and shifted to trans-OSNO (13.39kcal/mol) via three transition structures. The rates calculated with variational transition state theory show that for the temperature range 200K-2000K, three parameter Arrhenius equation produces the most accurate reaction rates.

  19. Selective tryptophan determination using tryptophan oxidases involved in bis-indole antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kameya, Masafumi; Onaka, Hiroyasu; Asano, Yasuhisa

    2013-07-15

    A novel tryptophan assay was developed using tryptophan oxidases. Although many l-amino acid oxidases (LAAOs) have been reported to catalyze tryptophan oxidation, most of them have broad substrate specificity and oxidize multiple amino acids besides tryptophan. To obtain a tryptophan-specific LAAO, we focused on bis-indole antibiotic biosynthesis, a bacterial secondary metabolic pathway. A putative LAAO from Streptomyces sp. TP-A0274, StaO involved in staurosporine biosynthesis, was heterologously expressed, biochemically characterized, and shown to serve as a selective tryptophan oxidase for the first time. In addition, another LAAO, VioA involved in violacein biosynthesis in Chromobacterium violaceum, was characterized for comparison with StaO. Interestingly, StaO and VioA share similar properties, namely narrow substrate specificity and high affinity for l-tryptophan, despite the phylogenetic distance between these enzymes. Owing to these features, uncommon among known LAAOs, StaO and VioA assays can be used for selective and accurate quantification of l-tryptophan via a coupled colorimetric reaction. Indeed, StaO and VioA assays provided tryptophan concentrations in human plasma as accurately as those obtained by high-performance liquid chromatography. Therefore, these enzymes were clearly shown to offer an effective method for determining tryptophan in biological samples rapidly, inexpensively, and accurately. The results shown here also suggest the possibility of metabolism-oriented screening as a strategy to obtain enzymes highly selective for individual biomolecules. PMID:23545192

  20. Tank tests to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls II : effect of varying depth of step, angle of after- body keel, length of afterbody chine, and gross load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R; Mckann, Robert; Hay, Elizabeth S

    1946-01-01

    The second part of a series of tests made in Langley tank no. 2 to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls is presented. Results are given to show the effects on resistance characteristics of varying angle of afterbody keel, depth of step, and length of afterbody chine. The effect of varying the gross load is shown for one configuration. The resistance characteristics of planing-tail hulls are compared with those of a conventional flying-boat hull. The forces on the forebody and afterbody of one configuration are compared with the forces on a conventional hull. Increasing the angle of afterbody keel had small effect on hump resistance and no effect on high-speed resistance but increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Increasing the depth of step increased hump resistance, had little effect on high-speed resistance, and increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Omitting the chines on the forward 25 percent of the afterbody had no appreciable effect on resistance. Omitting 70 percent of the chine length had almost no effect on maximum resistance but broadened the hump and increased spray around the afterbody. Load-resistance ratio at the hump decreased more rapidly with increasing load coefficient for the planing-tail hull than for the representative conventional hull, although the load-resistance ratio at the hump was greater for the planing-tail hull than for the conventional hull throughout the range of loads tested. At speeds higher than hump speed, load-resistance ratio for the planing-tail hull was a maximum at a particular gross load and was slightly less at heavier and lighter gross loads. The planing-tail hull was found to have lower resistance than the conventional hull at both the hump and at high speeds, but at intermediate speeds there was little difference. The lower hump resistance of the planing-tail hull was attributed to the ability of the afterbody to carry a greater percentage of the total load while maintaining a higher value of load-resistance ratio.

  1. Amino acid composition of alpha1/alpha2 domains and cytoplasmic tail of MHC class I molecules determine their susceptibility to human cytomegalovirus US11-mediated down-regulation.

    PubMed

    Barel, Martine T; Pizzato, Nathalie; van Leeuwen, Daphne; Bouteiller, Philippe Le; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Lenfant, Francoise

    2003-06-01

    During co-evolution with its host, human cytomegalovirus has acquired multiple defense mechanisms to escape from immune recognition. In this study, we focused on US11, which binds to MHC class I heavy chains and mediates their dislocation to the cytosol and subsequent degradation by proteasomes. To examine which domains of class I heavy chains are involved in this process, we constructed chimeric HLA molecules of US11-sensitive and -insensitive class I molecules (HLA-A2 and HLA-G, respectively). Pulse-chase experiments were performed to evaluate protein stability and interactions between class I heavy chains and US11. Flow cytometry was employed to assess the effect of US11 on surface expression of the different chimeras. Our results indicate that the alpha1 and alpha2 domains of HLA molecules are important for the affinity of US11 association. However, the degradation efficiency seems to rely mostly on cytosolic tail residues. We found that the nonclassical HLA-G molecule is insensitive to US11-mediated degradation solely because it lacks essential tail residues. A deletion of the last two tail residues in full-length MHC class I molecules already caused a severe reduction in degradation efficiency. Altogether, our data provide new insights into the mechanism by which US11 down-regulates MHC class I molecules. PMID:12778489

  2. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Luisa F.; Carbonetto, Peter; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Parker, Clarissa C.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Palmer, Abraham A.; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW). We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi), where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population. PMID:26523602

  3. Free-carrier dynamics and band tails in C u2ZnSn (SxSe1-x) 4 : Evaluation of factors determining solar cell efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong, Le Quang; Okano, Makoto; Yamashita, Genki; Nagai, Masaya; Ashida, Masaaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Yoshino, Kenji; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiko

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the composition-dependent photocarrier dynamics in C u2ZnSn (SxSe1-x) 4 (CZTSSe) single crystals using various types of steady-state and time-resolved optical spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectroscopy shows that the band-tail states formed below the band edge decrease monotonically with increasing Se content. THz time-resolved spectroscopy clarifies that an increase in the Se content leads to a shorter lifetime of the free photocarriers. A trade-off between the composition-dependent band-tail density and the free-carrier lifetime occurs in CZTSSe single crystals. Our experimental results provide insights into the physics behind the low and composition-dependent conversion efficiency of CZTSSe-based solar cells.

  4. Organization and nucleotide sequence determination of a gene cluster involved in 3-chlorocatechol degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Frantz, B; Chakrabarty, A M

    1987-01-01

    Three critical enzymes catechol oxygenase II (chlorocatechol dioxygenase), muconate cycloisomerase II, and dienelactone hydrolase, are involved in the degradation of chlorocatechols, which are obligatory intermediates in the catabolism of chlorinated aromatic compounds. The organization and complete nucleotide sequence of the genes for these enzymes have been determined on a 4.2-kilobase-pair (kbp) Bgl II fragment cloned from the plasmid pAC27, based on the agreement of open reading frame lengths with apparent mobilities of polypeptides expressed in Escherichia coli maxicells, predicted N-terminal amino acid sequences with those of the purified proteins, and predicted total amino acid compositions with those of the purified proteins. The 4.2-kbp fragment contains the three genes and ribosome binding sites for those genes but no promoter. When placed downstream of the tac promoter in the broad-host-range plasmid pMMB22, this fragment directs the synthesis of all three enzymes in both E. coli and Pseudomonas putida only on induction with isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside, suggesting that the gene cluster is regulated as a single unit under the control of a single promoter. Endogenous transcription initiation of the gene cluster on pAC27, however, occurs from a site present within a 386-bp Bgl II fragment upstream of the 4.2-kbp fragment, and sequences 5' to that site are similar to the sequences of other positively controlled Pseudomonas promoters occurring on the TOL and NAH plasmids. Images PMID:3299368

  5. Simultaneous determination of the total number of aquatic bacteria and the number thereof involved in respiration.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, R; Iturriaga, R; Becker-Birck, J

    1978-01-01

    The electron transport system of respiring organisms reduces 2-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(p-nitrophenyl)-5-phenyl tetrazolium chloride (INT) to INT-formazan. Respiring bacteria deposit accumulated INT-formazan intracellularly as dark red spots. Corresponding to electron transport system activity, these deposits attain a size and a degree of optical density which allows them to be examined by light microscopy. If polycarbonate filters and epifluorescence microscopy are applied to analyze an INT-treated water sample, it is possible to differentiate between respiring and apparently nonrespiring bacteria. This differentiation, which permits determinations of the total number of bacteria and the proportion thereof involved in respiration, is realized directly within one and the same microscopic image. Initial applications of the present method for hydrobiological purposes showed that the proportion of respiring aquatic bacteria ranged between 6 to 12% (samples taken from coastal areas of the Baltic Sea) and 5 to 36% (samples taken from freshwater lakes and ponds). Cells of 1.6 to 2.4 micrometer (freshwater) and 0.4 micrometer (Baltic Sea) account for the highest proportion of respiring bacteria. Images PMID:367268

  6. Horizontal tail loads in maneuvering flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A; Mcgowan, William A; Donegan, James J

    1951-01-01

    A method is given for determining the horizontal tail loads in maneuvering flight. The method is based upon the assignment of a load-factor variation with time and the determination of a minimum time to reach peak load factor. The tail load is separated into various components. Examination of these components indicated that one of the components was so small that it could be neglected for most conventional airplanes; therefore, the number of aerodynamic parameters needed in this computation of tail loads was reduced to a minimum. In order to illustrate the method, as well as to show the effect of the main variables, a number of examples are given. Some discussion is given regarding the determination of maximum tail loads, maximum pitching accelerations, and maximum pitching velocities obtainable.

  7. Mineralogic variations in fluvial sediments contaminated by mine tailings as determined from AVIRIS data, Coeur D'Alene River Valley, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Harsanyi, Joseph C.

    1995-01-01

    The success of imaging spectrometry in mineralogic mapping of natural terrains indicates that the technology can also be used to assess the environmental impact of human activities in certain instances. Specifically, this paper describes an investigation into the use of data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) for mapping the spread of, and assessing changes in, the mineralogic character of tailings from a major silver and base metal mining district. The area under investigation is the Coeur d'Alene River Valley in northern Idaho. Mining has been going on in and around the towns of Kellogg and Wallace, Idaho since the 1880's. In the Kellogg-Smelterville Flats area, west of Kellogg, mine tailings were piled alongside the South Fork of the Coeur d'Alene River. Until the construction of tailings ponds in 1968 much of these waste materials were washed directly into the South Fork. The Kellogg-Smelterville area was declared an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund site in 1983 and remediation efforts are currently underway. Recent studies have demonstrated that sediments in the Coeur d'Alene River and in the northern part of Lake Coeur d'Alene, into which the river flows, are highly enriched in Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Hg, As, and Sb. These trace metals have become aggregated in iron oxide and oxyhydroxide minerals and/or mineraloids. Reflectance spectra of iron-rich tailing materials are shown. Also shown are spectra of hematite and goethite. The broad bandwidth and long band center (near 1 micron) of the Fe(3+) crystal-field band of the iron-rich sediment samples combined with the lack of features on the Fe(3+) -O(2-) charge transfer absorption edge indicates that the ferric oxide and/or oxyhydroxide in these sediments is poorly crystalline to amorphous in character. Similar features are seen in poorly crystalline basaltic weathering products (e.g., palagonites). The problem of mapping and analyzing the downriver occurrences of iron rich tailings in the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) River Valley using remotely sensed data is complicated by the full vegetation cover present in the area. Because exposures of rock and soil were sparse, the data processing techniques used in this study were sensitive to detecting materials at subpixel scales. The methods used included spectral mixture analysis and a constrained energy minimization technique.

  8. Immunological determinants of nerve growth factor involved in p140trk (Trk) receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, J; Vroegop, S M; Buxser, S E; Neet, K E

    1994-03-01

    Monoclonal anti-NGF antibodies that specifically inhibit the biological activity of mouse beta-NGF were used to study the structural determinants involved in the interaction of NGF with its receptors gp75LNGFR and Trk. None of the three antibodies--N60, M15, and 27/21--showed any reactivity toward denatured NGF. Three experimental methods--radioimmunoassay (RIA), enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA), and slot blots--detected no significant cross reactivity between the antibodies and BDNF or NT-3. RIA showed that M15 and N60 recognize the same or an overlapping antigenic site, but 27/21 recognizes a different epitope. Only 27/21, and not N60 or M15, immunoprecipitated beta-NGF crosslinked to LNGFR receptor. Thus, the epitope recognized by 27/21 does not overlap the LNGFR receptor binding site. N60, M15, and 27/21 all block binding of NGF to Trk in a manner consistent with competitive inhibition. Purified Fab fragments of N60 and M15 gave similar results to the intact antibodies. The other subunits present in the 7S complex of NGF, i.e. the alpha and gamma subunits, competitively inhibited binding of antibodies to beta-NGF. Only the gamma subunit inhibited phosphorylation of Trk and biological activity of beta-NGF. These findings suggest that the M15, N60, and 27/21 antibodies bind to a specific site on the surface of NGF where they competitively inhibit binding to the Trk NGF receptor. The region encompassing the N-terminus, the C-terminus, and the loop on the surface of beta-NGF containing residues 60-80 is proposed as important for binding to the Trk receptor. PMID:7517456

  9. 8 CFR 208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., pursuant to 8 CFR 208.16 or 208.17. (4) In determining whether the alien has a credible fear of persecution... findings as provided in 8 CFR 1208.30(g)(2). (ii) The record of the negative credible fear determination...'s claim pursuant to 8 CFR 208.2(c)(3). (6) Prior to any determination concerning whether an...

  10. 8 CFR 208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., pursuant to 8 CFR 208.16 or 208.17. (4) In determining whether the alien has a credible fear of persecution... findings as provided in 8 CFR 1208.30(g)(2). (ii) The record of the negative credible fear determination...'s claim pursuant to 8 CFR 208.2(c)(3). (6) Prior to any determination concerning whether an...

  11. The Tail of BPM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruba, Steve; Meyer, Jim

    Business process management suites (BPMS's) represent one of the fastest growing segments in the software industry as organizations automate their key business processes. As this market matures, it is interesting to compare it to Chris Anderson's 'Long Tail.' Although the 2004 "Long Tail" article in Wired magazine was primarily about the media and entertainment industries, it has since been applied (and perhaps misapplied) to other markets. Analysts describe a "Tail of BPM" market that is, perhaps, several times larger than the traditional BPMS product market. This paper will draw comparisons between the concepts in Anderson's article (and subsequent book) and the BPM solutions market.

  12. Estimating tail probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.; Tolley, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper investigates procedures for univariate nonparametric estimation of tail probabilities. Extrapolated values for tail probabilities beyond the data are also obtained based on the shape of the density in the tail. Several estimators which use exponential weighting are described. These are compared in a Monte Carlo study to nonweighted estimators, to the empirical cdf, to an integrated kernel, to a Fourier series estimate, to a penalized likelihood estimate and a maximum likelihood estimate. Selected weighted estimators are shown to compare favorably to many of these standard estimators for the sampling distributions investigated.

  13. Modelling Cometary Sodium Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2013-09-01

    Neutral sodium is readily observed in cometary spectra and can be seen to form its own distinct tail around high activity comets. We present a brief overview of neutral sodium tail observations to date and discuss the importance of theoretical modelling in understanding these data. We have developed a new, 3D Monte-Carlo model of cometary sodium that incorporates several advancements over previous models. It includes weightings due to solar flux variation with heliocentric distance, and comprehensive handling of the Swings and Greenstein effects on the neutral sodium tail, which can have particularly dramatic effects in near-Sun comets. Some preliminary results from this model are presented, including predictions of the structure of the eagerly anticipated neutral sodium tail at Comet C/2012 S1 (ISON).

  14. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second multi-phase research program for tailplane icing (TIP II) to develop test methodologies and tailplane performance and handling qualities evaluation tools. The main objectives of this new NASA/Industry/Academia collaborative research programs were: (1) define and evaluate a sub-scale wind tunnel test methodology for determining tailplane performance degradation due to icing. (2) develop an experimental database of tailplane aerodynamic performance with and without ice contamination for a range of tailplane configurations. Wind tunnel tests were planned with representative general aviation aircraft, i.e., the Learjet 45, and a twin engine low speed aircraft. This report summarizes the research performed during the first year of the study, and outlines the work tasks for the second year.

  15. Self-Determination and Student Involvement in Standards-Based Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Field, Sharon; Doren, Bonnie; Jones, Bonnie; Mason, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Promoting self-determination has become "best practice" in the education of students with disabilities. We synthesize the decade's work in this area as a foundation for considering issues pertaining to promoting self-determination in light of the current educational context. We particularly examine the role of promoting self-determination in light…

  16. 8 CFR 1208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... determinations, see 8 CFR 208.30. The immigration judges will review such determinations as provided in paragraph (g)(2) of this section and 8 CFR 1003.42. (f) (g) Procedures for a negative credible fear finding. (1... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Credible fear determinations...

  17. 8 CFR 1208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... determinations, see 8 CFR 208.30. The immigration judges will review such determinations as provided in paragraph (g)(2) of this section and 8 CFR 1003.42. (f) (g) Procedures for a negative credible fear finding. (1... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Credible fear determinations...

  18. 8 CFR 1208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... determinations, see 8 CFR 208.30. The immigration judges will review such determinations as provided in paragraph (g)(2) of this section and 8 CFR 1003.42. (f) (g) Procedures for a negative credible fear finding. (1... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Credible fear determinations...

  19. 8 CFR 1208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... determinations, see 8 CFR 208.30. The immigration judges will review such determinations as provided in paragraph (g)(2) of this section and 8 CFR 1003.42. (f) (g) Procedures for a negative credible fear finding. (1... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Credible fear determinations...

  20. 8 CFR 1208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... determinations, see 8 CFR 208.30. The immigration judges will review such determinations as provided in paragraph (g)(2) of this section and 8 CFR 1003.42. (f) (g) Procedures for a negative credible fear finding. (1... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credible fear determinations...

  1. Heavy-tailed log hydraulic conductivity distributions imply heavy-tailed log velocity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohlbecker, Matthew V.; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2006-04-01

    Equations of contaminant transport describing non-Gaussian dispersion of solute in heterogeneous porous media have been developed by several authors (e.g., Berkowitz and Scher (1995, 1998), Benson (1998, 2001), Berkowitz et al. (2000), and Baeumer et al. (2005)). The equations assume that solute particle movement in time and/or space can be described by heavy-tailed probability distributions (e.g., Levy ? stable distributions). This assumption requires a mechanism for solute particles to move through heterogeneous porous media in a manner that can be approximated with heavy-tailed probability distributions. This work investigates whether a heavy-tailed Levy ? stable distribution of increments in log hydraulic conductivity results in a heavy-tailed distribution of increments in log velocity; a heavy-tailed distribution of increments in log velocity would be a mechanism for solute particle movement in time or space that can be described by a heavy-tailed probability distribution. A computer algorithm was written to generate realistic hydraulic conductivity fields. The algorithm modifies the spectral synthesis method for generating fractional Brownian motion (i.e., Saupe (1988) and Brewer and Wheatcraft (1994)) and produces self-similar hydraulic conductivity fields with a heavy-tailed Levy ? stable distribution of increments in log hydraulic conductivity. A Monte Carlo approach was adopted in which 100 hydraulic conductivity fields were generated for each of the following values of ?: 0.8, 1.1, 1.4, and 1.7. The USGS finite difference groundwater code MODFLOW was used to calculate the velocity fields, and the increments in longitudinal log hydraulic conductivity and log velocity from the fields were analyzed to determine whether they were consistent with a heavy-tailed Levy ? stable probability density function (PDF). After determining that the distributions of increments in log hydraulic conductivity and log velocity were consistent with a Levy ? stable PDF, the tail parameters describing each pair of hydraulic conductivity and velocity fields were estimated with the Nolan (1997) maximum likelihood estimator. The relationship between the two tail parameters was then determined. There are three conclusions of this research. First, Mandelbrot and PP plots confirm that Levy ? stable distributions of increments in log hydraulic conductivity give rise to Levy ? stable distributions of increments in log velocity. Second, the tail parameter ? for the increments in log velocity is typically smaller, indicating a heavier probability tail, than the corresponding tail parameter for the increments in log hydraulic conductivity. Third, there is a positive statistical relation between the two tail parameters.

  2. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  3. Ecological aspects of microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, C.L.; Landa, E.R.; Updegraff, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Numbers and types of microorganisms in uranium mill tailings were determined using culturing techniques. Arthrobacter were found to be the predominant microorganism inhabiting the sandy tailings, whereas Bacillus and fungi predominated in the slime tailings. Sulfate-reducing bacteria, capable of leaching radium, were isolated in low numbers from tailings samples but were isolated in significantly high numbers from topsoil in contact with the tailings. The results are placed in the context of the magnitude of uranium mill tailings in the United States, the hazards posed by the tailings, and how such hazards could be enhanced or diminished by microbial activities. Patterns in the composition of the microbial population are evaluated with respect to the ecological variables that influence microbial growth. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  4. Comet Tails of Type 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probstein, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    A summary is presented of a theory for the head and tail regions of Type 2 (dust) comets, wherein dust particles having a wide distribution of sizes are assumed to be released from the comet nucleus in an essentially continuous manner in time during the period of distinctive cometary phenomena. The dust particles are assumed to be accelerated radially outward from the nucleus as a result of a drag interaction with the expanding gas in the comet head. In the tail region the only significant forces assumed to act on the dust particles are solar gravity and the force of solar radiation pressure. It is shown how results describing the surface density in the tail are obtained and how by matching calculated distributions with measured ones it is possible to determine the dust and head-gas emission rates as a function of time, the distribution of dust particle sizes, and the emission velocity from the inner head region as a function of particle size and time. The results of matching calculated density distributions with light intensity measurements from Comet Arend-Roland 1956h are summarized.

  5. 8 CFR 208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... negative credible fear findings as provided in 8 CFR 1208.30(g)(2). (ii) The record of the negative... Against Torture, pursuant to 8 CFR 208.16 or 208.17. (4) In determining whether the alien has a credible... the alien's claim pursuant to 8 CFR 208.2(c)(3). (6) Prior to any determination concerning whether...

  6. 8 CFR 208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... negative credible fear findings as provided in 8 CFR 1208.30(g)(2). (ii) The record of the negative... Against Torture, pursuant to 8 CFR 208.16 or 208.17. (4) In determining whether the alien has a credible... the alien's claim pursuant to 8 CFR 208.2(c)(3). (6) Prior to any determination concerning whether...

  7. 8 CFR 208.30 - Credible fear determinations involving stowaways and applicants for admission found inadmissible...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... negative credible fear findings as provided in 8 CFR 1208.30(g)(2). (ii) The record of the negative... Against Torture, pursuant to 8 CFR 208.16 or 208.17. (4) In determining whether the alien has a credible... the alien's claim pursuant to 8 CFR 208.2(c)(3). (6) Prior to any determination concerning whether...

  8. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  9. Student Perceptions of School Efforts to Facilitate Student Involvement, School Commitment, Self-Determination, and High School Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student perceptions of school efforts to facilitate student involvement, school commitment, self-determination skills, and on track indicators for graduation in 10th grade and actual graduation outcomes two years later. The participants were 154 primarily minority students in a large, urban school…

  10. 8 CFR 208.31 - Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered removed under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reasonable fear of persecution or torture... HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR ASYLUM AND WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL Credible Fear of Persecution § 208.31 Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered...

  11. 8 CFR 208.31 - Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered removed under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reasonable fear of persecution or torture... HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR ASYLUM AND WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL Credible Fear of Persecution § 208.31 Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered...

  12. 8 CFR 208.31 - Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered removed under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reasonable fear of persecution or torture... HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR ASYLUM AND WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL Credible Fear of Persecution § 208.31 Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered...

  13. 8 CFR 208.31 - Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered removed under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Reasonable fear of persecution or torture... HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR ASYLUM AND WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL Credible Fear of Persecution § 208.31 Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered...

  14. 8 CFR 208.31 - Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered removed under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reasonable fear of persecution or torture... HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS PROCEDURES FOR ASYLUM AND WITHHOLDING OF REMOVAL Credible Fear of Persecution § 208.31 Reasonable fear of persecution or torture determinations involving aliens ordered...

  15. Myosin5a tail associates directly with Rab3A-containing compartments in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wllert, Torsten; Patel, Anamika; Lee, Ying-Lung; Provance, D William; Vought, Valarie E; Cosgrove, Michael S; Mercer, John A; Langford, George M

    2011-04-22

    Myosin-Va (Myo5a) is a motor protein associated with synaptic vesicles (SVs) but the mechanism by which it interacts has not yet been identified. A potential class of binding partners are Rab GTPases and Rab3A is known to associate with SVs and is involved in SV trafficking. We performed experiments to determine whether Rab3A interacts with Myo5a and whether it is required for transport of neuronal vesicles. In vitro motility assays performed with axoplasm from the squid giant axon showed a requirement for a Rab GTPase in Myo5a-dependent vesicle transport. Furthermore, mouse recombinant Myo5a tail revealed that it associated with Rab3A in rat brain synaptosomal preparations in vitro and the association was confirmed by immunofluorescence imaging of primary neurons isolated from the frontal cortex of mouse brains. Synaptosomal Rab3A was retained on recombinant GST-tagged Myo5a tail affinity columns in a GTP-dependent manner. Finally, the direct interaction of Myo5a and Rab3A was determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation using recombinant mouse Myo5a tail and human Rab3A. When both proteins were incubated in the presence of 1 mm GTP?S, Myo5a tail and Rab3A formed a complex and a direct interaction was observed. Further analysis revealed that GTP-bound Rab3A interacts with both the monomeric and dimeric species of the Myo5a tail. However, the interaction between Myo5a tail and nucleotide-free Rab3A did not occur. Thus, our results show that Myo5a and Rab3A are direct binding partners and interact on SVs and that the Myo5a/Rab3A complex is involved in transport of neuronal vesicles. PMID:21349835

  16. Vocational Determination Process through School, Industry and Community Involvement. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, John; Staber, Richard A.

    Through a school-industry-community council strategies and procedures were developed and tested to identify the most cost effective method to provide selected students with opportunities for nontraditional counseling training and to determine the effect it had on career goal choices. The American College Testing (ACT) Career Planning Program test

  17. Tissue-Specific Expression of Head-to-Tail Cyclized Miniproteins in Violaceae and Structure Determination of the Root Cyclotide Viola hederacea root cyclotide1W⃞

    PubMed Central

    Trabi, Manuela; Craik, David J.

    2004-01-01

    The plant cyclotides are a family of 28 to 37 amino acid miniproteins characterized by their head-to-tail cyclized peptide backbone and six absolutely conserved Cys residues arranged in a cystine knot motif: two disulfide bonds and the connecting backbone segments form a loop that is penetrated by the third disulfide bond. This knotted disulfide arrangement, together with the cyclic peptide backbone, renders the cyclotides extremely stable against enzymatic digest as well as thermal degradation, making them interesting targets for both pharmaceutical and agrochemical applications. We have examined the expression patterns of these fascinating peptides in various Viola species (Violaceae). All tissue types examined contained complex mixtures of cyclotides, with individual profiles differing significantly. We provide evidence for at least 57 novel cyclotides present in a single Viola species (Viola hederacea). Furthermore, we have isolated one cyclotide expressed only in underground parts of V. hederacea and characterized its primary and three-dimensional structure. We propose that cyclotides constitute a new family of plant defense peptides, which might constitute an even larger and, in their biological function, more diverse family than the well-known plant defensins. PMID:15295104

  18. Genetic, molecular and clinical determinants for the involvement of aldosterone and its receptors in major depression.

    PubMed

    Murck, Harald; Bttner, Matthias; Kircher, Tilo; Konrad, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Major depression (MDE) has metabolic and neuroendocrine correlates, which point to a biological overlap between MDE and cardiovascular diseases. Whereas the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis has long been recognized for its involvement in depression, the focus was mostly on cortisol/corticosterone, whereas aldosterone appears to be the 'forgotten' stress hormone. Part of the reason for this is that the receptors for aldosterone, the mineralocorticoid receptors (MR), were thought to be occupied by glucocorticoids in most parts of the brain. However, recently it turned out that aldosterone acts selectively in relevant mood-regulating brain areas, without competing with cortisol/corticosterone. These areas include the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the amygdala and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. These regions are intimately involved in the close relationship between emotional and vegetative symptoms. Genetic analysis supports the role of aldosterone and of MR-related pathways in the pathophysiology of depression. Functional markers for these pathways in animal models as well as in humans are available and allow an indirect assessment of NTS function. They include heart rate variability, baroreceptor reflex sensitivity, blood pressure, salt taste sensitivity and slow-wave sleep. MR activation in the periphery is related to electrolyte regulation. MR overactivity is a risk factor for diabetes mellitus and a trigger of inflammatory processes. These markers can be used not only to assist the development of new treatment compounds, but also for a personalized approach to treat patients with depression and related disorders by individual dose titration with an active medication, which targets this system. PMID:25376974

  19. Ratios of bottom meson branching fractions involving J/? mesons and determination of b quark fragmentation fractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M. G.; Amendolia, S. R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Anway-Wiese, C.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M. W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J. P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bevensee, B.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolla, G.; Bolognesi, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chang, P. S.; Chang, P. T.; Chao, H. Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.-T.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C. N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A. G.; Cobal, M.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Cunningham, J. D.; Daniels, T.; Dejongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; dell'agnello, S.; dell'orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Denby, B.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J. E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Fuess, T. A.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guillian, G.; Guo, R. S.; Haber, C.; Hafen, E.; Hahn, S. R.; Hamilton, R.; Handler, R.; Hans, R. M.; Hara, K.; Hardman, A. D.; Harral, B.; Harris, R. M.; Hauger, S. A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Hayashi, E.; Heinrich, J.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hohlmann, M.; Holck, C.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hlscher, A.; Hong, S.; Houk, G.; Hu, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hylen, J.; Ikeda, H.; Incagli, M.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iwai, J.; Iwata, Y.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R. W.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambara, H.; Kamon, T.; Kaneko, T.; Karr, K.; Kasha, H.; Kato, Y.; Keaffaber, T. A.; Keeble, L.; Kelley, K.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kephart, R.; Kesten, P.; Kestenbaum, D.; Keup, R. M.; Keutelian, H.; Keyvan, F.; Kharadia, B.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirsch, L.; Koehn, P.; Kondo, K.; Konigsberg, J.; Kopp, S.; Kordas, K.; Korytov, A.; Koska, W.; Kovacs, E.; Kowald, W.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuns, E.; Laasanen, A. T.; Labanca, N.; Lammel, S.; Lamoureux, J. I.; Lecompte, T.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limon, P.; Lindgren, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lockyer, N.; Long, O.; Loomis, C.; Loreti, M.; Lu, J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lukens, P.; Lusin, S.; Lys, J.; Maeshima, K.; Maghakian, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Mangano, M.; Mansour, J.; Mariotti, M.; Marriner, J. P.; Martin, A.; Matthews, J. A.; Mattingly, R.; McIntyre, P.; Melese, P.; Menzione, A.; Meschi, E.; Metzler, S.; Miao, C.; Miao, T.; Michail, G.; Miller, R.; Minato, H.; Miscetti, S.; Mishina, M.; Mitsushio, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Miyashita, S.; Moggi, N.; Morita, Y.; Mueller, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, T.; Murat, P.; Nakada, H.; Nakano, I.; Nelson, C.; Neuberger, D.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Ninomiya, M.; Nodulman, L.; Oh, S. H.; Ohl, K. E.; Ohmoto, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Oishi, R.; Okabe, M.; Okusawa, T.; Oliveira, R.; Olsen, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Pappas, S. P.; Park, S.; Parri, A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pescara, L.; Peters, M. D.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pillai, M.; Pitts, K. T.; Plunkett, R.; Pondrom, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ragan, K.; Ribon, A.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rolli, S.; Romano, J.; Rosenson, L.; Roser, R.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltzberg, D.; Sansoni, A.; Santi, L.; Sato, H.; Scarpine, V.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Scribano, A.; Segler, S.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sganos, G.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shaw, N. M.; Shen, Q.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Singh, P.; Skarha, J.; Sliwa, K.; Snider, F. D.; Song, T.; Spalding, J.; Speer, T.; Sphicas, P.; Spinella, F.; Spiropulu, M.; Spiegel, L.; Stanco, L.; Steele, J.; Stefanini, A.; Strahl, K.

    1996-12-01

    We report a measurement of the ratios of the decay rates of the B+, B0, and B0s mesons into exclusive final states containing a J/? meson. The final states were selected from 19.6 pb-1 of pp collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. These data are interpreted to determine the b quark fragmentation fractions fu, fd, and fs. We also determine the branching fractions for the decay modes B+-->J/?K+, B+-->J/?K*(892)+, B0-->J/?K0, B0-->J/?K*(892)0, and B0s-->J/??(1020). We discuss the implications of these measurements to B meson decay models.

  20. Cytokines pre-determined by genetic factors are involved in pathogenesis of Rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Veena

    2015-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with the presence of autoreactive CD4 T cells that produce pro-inflammatory cytokines. The role of genetic factors in the predilection to develop RA is strongly supported by the increased presence of certain HLA class II molecules in patients. The HLA class II genes are highly polymorphic and are critical for generating an immune response to clear infections. Production of Th1 and Th17 response by the CD4 T cells helps to clear infections. HLA-DQ8 is a promiscuous binder and presents many peptides generating immune response and producing a Th17 response. DRB1?0401 is associated with the production of both IL-17 and IFN-?. Thus both DR4 and DQ8 can clear infections by producing TH1/Th17 cytokines, but their presence increases the risk of developing RA. Using transgenic mice expressing human HLA genes, we have shown that HLA polymorphism determines the cytokine profile. DRB1?04 molecules modulate the DQ8-restricted response and determine the outcome of arthritis in mice carrying DR4/DQ8 haplotype. Thus, interaction between DQ and DR molecules determines the cytokine milieu and propensity of the HLA haplotype to predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:25541434

  1. Morphogenetic changes occurring in the regenerating newt tail under changed gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Almeida, Eduardo

    2012-07-01

    It is widely accepted that gravity greatly affects animal physiology, development, and alters gene expression. Recently it became apparent that it can also affect tissue morphogenesis. In our work, we developed special laboratory conditions that allow us to produce the gravity-dependent alterations in tail regenerates of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. We examined the dynamic morphogenetic changes during 50-day tail regeneration using computer morphometric analysis. Changes that we observed under these conditions were comparable with those found earlier in our spaceflight experiments. The newts kept in aquarium deep water (low g) after 1/3 tail amputation developed normal lanceolate regenerates. In contrast, the animals that stayed on the moist mat (1g) developed tail regenerates curved ventrally, with tips almost touching the mat. The similar results were obtained with a 12-day centrifugation at 2g. The study of the regenerate morphology in low g, 1g, and 2g animal groups allowed us to determine the stage at which the morphological changes in regenerates become apparent, and to detect the main morphological events associated with the development of tail curve, such as bending of ependymal tube and reorientation of the forming cartilage. We describe cellular processes foregoing observed tissue morphogenetic changes, such as cell migration, condensation in cell population, and unequal proliferation in different areas of epidermis and blastema. Cell proliferation in epidermis and blastema of tails regenerated under the conditions of different gravitational load was evaluated by BrdU assay. In 1g newts, cell proliferation increased within the dorso-apical region of the regenerates compared with that in low g group. These results provide us with a valuable insight into the regenerative tissue homostasis that involves cell division, cell death, and migration in the newt regenerating tail. In addition, these findings could provide us with better understanding of the mechanisms mediating morphogenetic response of regenerating tissues to the modified gravity vector.

  2. Managing 'tail liability'.

    PubMed

    Frese, Richard C; Weber, Ryan J

    2013-11-01

    To reduce and control their level of tail liability, hospitals should: Utilize a self-insurance vehicle; Consider combined limits between the hospital and physicians; Communicate any program changes to the actuary, underwriter, and auditor; Continue risk management and safety practices; Ensure credit is given to the organization's own medical malpractice program. PMID:24340649

  3. A locus determining pathogenicity of Xanthomonas campestris is involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dow, J M; Osbourn, A E; Wilson, T J; Daniels, M J

    1995-01-01

    A pathogenicity locus in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris has been shown to comprise two genes which mediate biosynthesis of the bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not extracellular polysaccharide. Mutants with Tn5 insertions in either gene showed alterations in the electrophoretic patterns of both water-soluble and phenol-soluble LPS forms, which suggested defects in the biosynthesis of the core oligosaccharide component. On gel chromatography, core oligosaccharides of the mutants were of apparently lower molecular weight than those from the wild type. Furthermore, the content of mannose and glucose, sugars characteristic of the core oligosaccharide, were significantly lower in the water-soluble LPS of the mutants. Because of their role in LPS core biosynthesis, the two genes were called rfaX and rfaY. rfaX mutants show altered behavior in a range of host and non-host plants such that the number of recoverable bacteria drop within the first 24 h after inoculation. In contrast, the behavior of rfaY mutants only differed from the wild type in Datura, a non-host plant in which the growth of the wild type is severely attenuated. The predicted protein RfaY showed significant sequence homology to a sub-family of RNA polymerase sigma factors which are involved in extracytoplasmic functions. PMID:7579621

  4. Determination of the functional domains involved in nucleolar targeting of nucleolin.

    PubMed Central

    Crancier, L; Prats, H; Zanibellato, C; Amalric, F; Bugler, B

    1993-01-01

    Nucleolin (713 aa), a major nucleolar protein, presents two structural domains: a N-terminus implicated in interaction with chromatin and a C-terminus containing four RNA-binding domains (RRMs) and a glycine/arginine-rich domain mainly involved in pre-rRNA packaging. Furthermore, nucleolin was shown to shuttle between cytoplasm and nucleolus. To get an insight on the nature of nuclear and nucleolar localization signals, a set of nucleolin deletion mutants in fusion with the prokaryotic chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were constructed, and the resulting chimeric proteins were recognized by anti-CAT antibodies. First, a nuclear location signal bipartite and composed of two short basic stretches separated by eleven residues was characterized. Deletion of either motifs renders the protein cytoplasmic. Second, by deleting one or more domains implicated in nucleolin association either with DNA, RNA, or proteins, we demonstrated that nucleolar accumulation requires, in addition to the nuclear localization sequence, at least two of the five RRMs in presence or absence of N-terminus. However, in presence of only one RRM the N-terminus allowed a partial targeting of the chimeric protein to the nucleolus. Images PMID:8167407

  5. Interspecies determinants of Friend leukemia virus antigens involved in cytolysis of virus-pfoducing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Collins, J J; Bolio, L D; Denny, T P; Bolognesi, D P

    1977-01-01

    The cytolytic reactivity of a complex goat anti-feline leukemia virus (FeLV) antiserum for mouse cells (Eveline) releasing large quantities of Friend leukemia virus (FLV) was analyzed by the sensitive [14C]nicotinamide release microcytotoxicity assay. Whereas this interspecies killing reactivity could be blocked by absorption of the goat anti-FeLV serum with a preparation of disrupted FLV, absorption with purified FLV gp71, the major envelope glycoprotein, had no effect. Subsequent serum absorptions with the individual FLV structural polypeptides revealed that the lysis of the Eveline cells by the goat anti-FeLV serum is mediated by antibodies recognizing the interspecies determinant of p30, the major internal capsid protein. The expression of this internal viral component at the surface of virus-producing cells is discussed further. The results also demonstrated that removal of approximately 70% of the carbohydrate portion of gp71 with a preparation of glycosidases did not affect the integrity of its interspecies determinant; these results are in agreement with an earlier study (Bolgnesi et al., 1975) that examined primarily the group- and type-specific sites. PMID:64623

  6. REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND, SHOWING AIRCRAFT NUMBER (319), HORIZONTAL STABILIZER, TAIL CONE AND COOLING CTS FOR THE AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), MECHANIC PAUL RIDEOUT IS LOWERING THE BALANCE PANELS ON THE STABILIZERS FOR LUBRICATION AND INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  7. Metal mobilization under alkaline conditions in ash-covered tailings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinmei; Alakangas, Lena; Wanhainen, Christina

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine element mobilization and accumulation in mill tailings under alkaline conditions. The tailings were covered with 50cm of fly ash, and above a sludge layer. The tailings were geochemically and mineralogically investigated. Sulfides, such as pyrrhotite, sphalerite and galena along with gangue minerals such as dolomite, calcite, micas, chlorite, epidote, Mn-pyroxene and rhodonite were identified in the unoxidized tailings. The dissolution of the fly ash layer resulted in a high pH (close to 12) in the underlying tailings. This, together with the presence of organic matter, increased the weathering of the tailings and mobilization of elements in the uppermost 47cm of the tailings. All primary minerals were depleted, except quartz and feldspar which were covered by blurry secondary carbonates. Sulfide-associated elements such as Cd, Fe, Pb, S and Zn and silicate-associated elements such as Fe, Mg and Mn were released from the depletion zone and accumulated deeper down in the tailings where the pH decreased to circum-neutral. Sequential extraction suggests that Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, S and Zn were retained deeper down in the tailings and were mainly associated with the sulfide phase. Calcium, Cr, K and Ni released from the ash layer were accumulated in the uppermost depletion zone of the tailings. PMID:24681363

  8. Genetic Evidence That the Sans Fille Locus Is Involved in Drosophila Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, B.; Perrimon, N.; Mahowald, A. P.

    1988-01-01

    Females homozygous for sans fille(1621) (= fs(1)1621) have an abnormal germ line. Instead of producing eggs, the germ-line cells proliferate forming ovarian tumors or excessive numbers of nurse cells. The Sex-lethal gene product(s) regulate the branch point of the dosage compensation and sex determination pathways in the soma. The role of Sex-lethal in the germ line is not clear but the germ line of females homozygous for female sterile Sex-lethal alleles or germ-line clones of loss-of-function alleles are characterized by ovarian tumors. Females heterozygous for sans fille(1621) or Sex-lethal are phenotypically wild type with respect to viability and fertility but females trans-heterozygous for sans fille(1621) and Sex-lethal show ovarian tumors, somatic sexual transformations, and greatly reduced viability. PMID:3220249

  9. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  10. circTAIL-seq, a targeted method for deep analysis of RNA 3' tails, reveals transcript-specific differences by multiple metrics.

    PubMed

    Gazestani, Vahid H; Hampton, Marshall; Abrahante, Juan E; Salavati, Reza; Zimmer, Sara L

    2016-03-01

    Post-transcriptionally added RNA 3' nucleotide extensions, or tails, impose numerous regulatory effects on RNAs, including effects on RNA turnover and translation. However, efficient methods for in-depth tail profiling of a transcript of interest are still lacking, hindering available knowledge particularly of tail populations that are highly heterogeneous. Here, we developed a targeted approach, termed circTAIL-seq, to quantify both major and subtle differences of heterogeneous tail populations. As proof-of-principle, we show that circTAIL-seq quantifies the differences in tail qualities between two selected Trypanosoma brucei mitochondrial transcripts. The results demonstrate the power of the developed method in identification, discrimination, and quantification of different tail states that the population of one transcript can possess. We further show that circTAIL-seq can detect the tail characteristics for variants of transcripts that are not easily detectable by conventional approaches, such as degradation intermediates. Our findings are not only well supported by previous knowledge, but they also expand this knowledge and provide experimental evidence for previous hypotheses. In the future, this approach can be used to determine changes in tail qualities in response to environmental or internal stimuli, or upon silencing of genes of interest in mRNA-processing pathways. In summary, circTAIL-seq is an effective tool for comparing nonencoded RNA tails, especially when the tails are extremely variable or transcript of interest is low abundance. PMID:26759453

  11. Geochemistry of Metals from mine tailing in Taxco Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton-Bermea, O.; ARMIENTA, A.; BARRERA, M.; TALAVERA, O.; HERNANDEZ, E.

    2001-12-01

    The mining district of Taxco in Central Mexico has been exploited since prehispanic times. The processing of metals produced tailings with high heavy metal concentrations. Those tailings constitute a potential risk to the environment. To assess the effects of the mine tailing on water quality, tailing samples and water samples from rivers, wells and tailing effluents were collected and analyzed for Cu, Zn, As and Pb. Metals were analyzed with by ICP-MS. Tailing samples were leached with water to determine pH and sulfate concentration. The highest metal contents were found in the samples with a pH acid. As, Pb and Zn are over the drinking water standards in some of the water samples.

  12. Efficient utilization of washery tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Lyadov, V.V.; Litmanovich, I.M.

    1982-01-01

    The quality and quantity of coal recoverable from jigging machine tailings from the washeries at the Makeevha and Yasinovka Coke Works was investigated. Recleaning of tailings from these washeries can provide over 5 X 10/sup 5/ ton/year of coal suitable for use as an energy fuel. Tailings were processed using a dense medium separator.

  13. A spectroscopic method to determine the activity of the restriction endonuclease EcoRV that involves a single reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qing; Quiñones, Edwin

    2016-03-15

    A one-step protocol is presented to determine the activity of EcoRV as a model of restriction enzymes. The protocol involved a molecular beacon as DNA substrate, with the target sequence recognized by EcoRV in the stem. EcoRV cleaved the stem forming two fragments, one of which contained the fluorophore and quencher, initially bound by 3bp. This shorter fragment rapidly dissociated at 37°C, causing an increase of fluorescence intensity that was used to gauge the reaction kinetics. The reaction can be described using the Michaelis-Menten mechanism, and the kinetic parameters obtained were compared with literature values involving other protocols. PMID:18489897

  14. Structural insight into recognition of methylated histone tails by retinoblastoma-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Zhou, Tao; Mo, Jinjin; Perrett, Sarah; Wang, Jinfeng; Feng, Yingang

    2012-03-01

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1), also named AT-rich interaction domain containing 4A (ARID4A), is a tumor and leukemia suppressor involved in epigenetic regulation in leukemia and Prader-Willi/Angelman syndromes. Although the involvement in epigenetic regulation is proposed to involve its chromobarrel and/or Tudor domains because of their potential binding to methylated histone tails, the structures of these domains and their interactions with methylated histone tails are still uncharacterized. In this work, we first found that RBBP1 contains five domains by bioinformatics analysis. Three of the five domains, i.e. chromobarrel, Tudor, and PWWP domains, are Royal Family domains, which potentially bind to methylated histone tails. We further purified these domains and characterized their interaction with methylated histone tails by NMR titration experiments. Among the three Royal Family domains, only the chromobarrel domain could recognize trimethylated H4K20 (with an affinity of ?3 mm), as well as recognizing trimethylated H3K9, H3K27, and H3K36 (with lower affinities). The affinity could be further enhanced up to 15-fold by the presence of DNA. The structure of the chromobarrel domain of RBBP1 determined by NMR spectroscopy has an aromatic cage. Mutagenesis analysis identified four aromatic residues of the cage as the key residues for methylated lysine recognition. Our studies indicate that the chromobarrel domain of RBBP1 is responsible for recognizing methylated histone tails in chromatin remodeling and epigenetic regulation, which presents a significant advance in our understanding of the mechanism and relationship between RBBP1-related gene suppression and epigenetic regulation. PMID:22247551

  15. Thrust reversing effects on horizontal tail effectiveness of twin-engine fighter aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capone, F. J.; Mason, M. L.; Carson, G. T., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The Langley Research Center has conducted an experimental program to determine the interference effects of thrust reversing on horizontal tail effectiveness of a twin engine, general research fighter model at approach (Mach number 0.15) and in-flight (Mach number 0.60 and 0.90) speeds. Twin vertical tails were tested at three longitudinal locations. Two nonaxisymmetric nozzle reverser concepts were studied. The effects of thrust reversing on horizontal tail effectiveness were found to be very dependent upon vertical tail locations. At approach speeds thrust reverser operation usually resulted in large variations in horizontal tail effectiveness as either nozzle pressure ratio or model angle of attack was varied. Either increases or decreases in tail effectiveness ocurred due to reverse operation depending upon tail location. At in-flight conditions there were always decreases in tail effectiveness due to reverser operation regardless of vertical tail location.

  16. Interpretation of tails of X-ray bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Paradijs, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Four reasons for ruling out the Alcock and Hatchett (1978) proposal concerning the tails of X-ray bursts are advanced. This proposal suggests that the tails of X-ray bursts observed during burst decay are due to the small-angle scattering of the original pulse of X-rays on interstellar dust grains; grains with a typical size of approximately 3 microns are assumed. The arguments against this theory involve differences in burst tail sizes sometimes observed for bursts from the same source; the different kinds of bursts emitted by MXB 1730-335 (rapid burster); an indication that MXB 1730-335 bursts have tails less than 2 s long; and the lack of correlation between relative strength of burst tails and the interstellar absorption.

  17. Remote control canard missile with a free-rolling tail brake torque system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An experimental wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted at supersonic Mach numbers to determine the static aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform canard-controlled missile with fixed and free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies. Mechanical coupling effects of the free-rolling tail afterbody were investigated using an electronic/electromagnetic brake system that provides arbitrary tail-fin brake torques with continuous measurements of tail-to-mainframe torque and tail-roll rate. Results are summarized to show the effects of fixed and free-rolling tail-fin afterbodies that include simulated measured bearing friction torques on the longitudinal and lateral-directional aerodynamic characteristics.

  18. Sex determination. foxl3 is a germ cell-intrinsic factor involved in sperm-egg fate decision in medaka.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Toshiya; Sato, Tetsuya; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Watakabe, Ikuko; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Suyama, Mikita; Kobayashi, Satoru; Tanaka, Minoru

    2015-07-17

    Sex determination is an essential step in the commitment of a germ cell to a sperm or egg. However, the intrinsic factors that determine the sexual fate of vertebrate germ cells are unknown. Here, we show that foxl3, which is expressed in germ cells but not somatic cells in the gonad, is involved in sperm-egg fate decision in medaka fish. Adult XX medaka with disrupted foxl3 developed functional sperm in the expanded germinal epithelium of a histologically functional ovary. In chimeric medaka, mutant germ cells initiated spermatogenesis in female wild-type gonad. These results indicate that a germ cell-intrinsic cue for the sperm-egg fate decision is present in medaka and that spermatogenesis can proceed in a female gonadal environment. PMID:26067255

  19. Simulations of Instabilities in Tidal Tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comparetta, Justin N.; Quillen, A. C.

    2010-05-01

    We use graphics cards to run a hybrid test particle/N-body simulation to integrate 4 million massless particle trajectories within fully self-consistent N-body simulations of 128,000 - 256,000 particles. The number of massless particles allows us to resolve fine structure in the spatial distribution and phase space of a dwarf galaxy that is disrupted in the tidal field of a Milky Way type galaxy. The tidal tails exhibit clumping or a smoke-like appearance. By running simulations with different satellite particle mass, number of massive vs massless particles and with and without a galaxy disk, we have determined that the instabilities are not due to numerical noise or shocking as the satellite passes through the disk of the Galaxy. The instability is possibly a result of self-gravity which indicates it may be due to Jeans instabilities. Simulations involving different halo particle mass may suggest limitations on dark matter halo substructure. We find that the instabilities are visible in velocity space as well as real space and thus could be identified from velocity surveys as well as number counts.

  20. Floods from tailings dam failures.

    PubMed

    Rico, M; Benito, G; Dez-Herrero, A

    2008-06-15

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released, and this outflow volume is difficult to estimate prior the incident. In this study, tailings' volume stored at the time of failure was shown to have a good correlation (r2=0.86) with the tailings outflow volume, and the volume of spilled tailings was correlated with its run-out distance (r2=0.57). An envelope curve was drawn encompassing the majority of data points indicating the potential maximum downstream distance affected by a tailings' spill. The application of the described regression equations for prediction purposes needs to be treated with caution and with support of on-site measurement and observations. However, they may provide a universal baseline approximation on tailing outflow characteristics (even if detailed dam information is unavailable), which is of a great importance for risk analysis purposes. PMID:18096316

  1. Wind Tails Near Chimp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of the rock 'Chimp' was taken by the Sojourner rover's right front camera on Sol 72 (September 15). Fine-scale texture on Chimp and other rocks is clearly visible. Wind tails, oriented from lower right to upper left, are seen next to small pebbles in the foreground. These were most likely produced by wind action.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. The geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J. )

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the plasma sheet and lobe regions of the magnetotail, focusing principally on large-scale processes or microprocesses with some large-scale effects. Consideration is given to quiet and average structures, not necessarily related to activity phases, with quasi-steady convection aspects, and with the characteristics of dynamic phases including acceleration mechanisms and single particle aspects. Attention is given to various activity models, average and quiet time properties, properties and effects of magnetospheric convection, dynamics of the magnetotail, and the near tail, substorm current wedge.

  3. Structural Conservation of the Myoviridae Phage Tail Sheath Protein Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Fokine, Andrei; Forouhar, Farhad; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Tong, Liang; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2012-02-21

    Bacteriophage phiKZ is a giant phage that infects Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human pathogen. The phiKZ virion consists of a 1450 {angstrom} diameter icosahedral head and a 2000 {angstrom}-long contractile tail. The structure of the whole virus was previously reported, showing that its tail organization in the extended state is similar to the well-studied Myovirus bacteriophage T4 tail. The crystal structure of a tail sheath protein fragment of phiKZ was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Furthermore, crystal structures of two prophage tail sheath proteins were determined to 1.9 and 3.3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite low sequence identity between these proteins, all of these structures have a similar fold. The crystal structure of the phiKZ tail sheath protein has been fitted into cryo-electron-microscopy reconstructions of the extended tail sheath and of a polysheath. The structural rearrangement of the phiKZ tail sheath contraction was found to be similar to that of phage T4.

  4. PssP2 is a polysaccharide co-polymerase involved in exopolysaccharide chain-length determination in Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ma?gorzata; Matysiak, Paulina; Kutkowska, Jolanta; Skorupska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Production of extracellular polysaccharides is a complex process engaging proteins localized in different subcellular compartments, yet communicating with each other or even directly interacting in multicomponent complexes. Proteins involved in polymerization and transport of exopolysaccharide (EPS) in Rhizobium leguminosarum are encoded within the chromosomal Pss-I cluster. However, genes implicated in polysaccharide synthesis are common in rhizobia, with several homologues of pss genes identified in other regions of the R. leguminosarum genome. One such region is chromosomally located Pss-II encoding proteins homologous to known components of the Wzx/Wzy-dependent polysaccharide synthesis and transport systems. The pssP2 gene encodes a protein similar to polysaccharide co-polymerases involved in determination of the length of polysaccharide chains in capsule and O-antigen biosynthesis. In this work, a mutant with a disrupted pssP2 gene was constructed and its capabilities to produce EPS and enter into a symbiotic relationship with clover were studied. The pssP2 mutant, while not altered in lipopolysaccharide (LPS), displayed changes in molecular mass distribution profile of EPS. Lack of the full-length PssP2 protein resulted in a reduction of high molecular weight EPS, yet polymerized to a longer length than in the RtTA1 wild type. The mutant strain was also more efficient in symbiotic performance. The functional interrelation between PssP2 and proteins encoded within the Pss-I region was further supported by data from bacterial two-hybrid assays providing evidence for PssP2 interactions with PssT polymerase, as well as glycosyltransferase PssC. A possible role for PssP2 in a complex involved in EPS chain-length determination is discussed. PMID:25268738

  5. Inframesocolic Superior Mesenteric Artery First Approach as an Introductory Procedure of Radical Antegrade Modular Pancreatosplenectomy for Carcinoma of the Pancreatic Body and Tail.

    PubMed

    Aosasa, Suefumi; Nishikawa, Makoto; Hoshikawa, Mayumi; Noro, Takuji; Yamamoto, Junji

    2016-02-01

    Superior mesenteric artery (SMA)-first approaches are operative tactics used to determine tumor resectability early during pancreatoduodenectomy. With locally advanced carcinoma of the pancreatic body and tail, early determination of SMA involvement also helps establish whether curative resection is feasible. During either radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy (RAMPS) or classic left-to-right distal pancreatectomy, dissection of the SMA is performed after transection of the pancreas or wide detachment of the distal pancreas and spleen. Herein, we describe an inframesocolic SMA-first approach as an introductory procedure when treating carcinoma of the pancreatic body and tail. This first approach procedure provides a reliable and safe introduction to RAMPS. PMID:26601979

  6. Uranium mill tailings and radon

    SciTech Connect

    Hanchey, L A

    1981-04-01

    The major health hazard from uranium mill tailings is presumed to be respiratory cancer resulting from the inhalation of radon daughter products. A review of studies on inhalation of radon and its daughters indicates that the hazard from the tailings is extremely small. If the assumptions used in the studies are correct, one or two people per year in the United States may develop cancer as a result of radon exhaled from all the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action program sites. The remedial action should reduce the hazard from the tailings by a factor of about 100.

  7. Modeling the neutral sodium tails of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K.; Jones, G.; Coates, A.

    2014-07-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and, at some comets, a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) data taken using CoCam [1], but, since this initial detection, similar features have been observed at near-Sun comets using the LASCO coronagraph on SOHO. A full picture of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be established using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout the orbit. The high efficiency of the sodium D transition has allowed it to be detected in systems, even if the column density of sodium is extremely low. In these instances it is sometimes possible to determine some of the system's characteristics from the sodium emission detection, such as in Io's plasma torus [2] and Enceladus's plume [3,4]. It is hoped that a similar approach may be applied to the active cometary environment, but, at present, the production of neutral sodium is unknown. Various authors [5--9, thorough review presented in 10] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail, and ion tail. The morphology and evolution of the neutral cometary sodium tail are difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three-dimensional, heliocentric-distance-dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model, which incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. Our model was initially based on that of Brown et al [7]. We present preliminary results from this model. We have found initial agreement with the overall morphology and brightness of the neutral sodium tail observed at C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp, for which this phenomenon was studied most extensively) and our model, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present our initial analysis of the likely presence of neutral sodium in the SOHO LASCO images of C/2012 S1 (ISON) and a comparison of this dataset with our model. The versatility of the model allows it to be easily adapted to any other cometary sodium tail.

  8. Western Red-tailed Skink Distribution in Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D. B. and Gergor, P. D.

    2011-11-01

    This slide show reports a study to: determine Western Red-tailed Skink (WRTS) distribution on Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); identify habitat where WRTS occur; learn more about WRTS natural history; and document distribution of other species.

  9. Accelerated aging tests of liners for uranium mill tailings disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, S.M.; Buelt, J.L.; Hale, V.Q.

    1981-11-01

    This document describes the results of accelerated aging tests to determine the long-term effectiveness of selected impoundment liner materials in a uranium mill tailings environment. The study was sponsored by the US Department of Energy under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The study was designed to evaluate the need for, and the performance of, several candidate liners for isolating mill tailings leachate in conformance with proposed Environmental Protection Agency and Nuclear Regulatory Commission requirements. The liners were subjected to conditions known to accelerate the degradation mechanisms of the various liners. Also, a test environment was maintained that modeled the expected conditions at a mill tailings impoundment, including ground subsidence and the weight loading of tailings on the liners. A comparison of installation costs was also performed for the candidate liners. The laboratory testing and cost information prompted the selection of a catalytic airblown asphalt membrane and a sodium bentonite-amended soil for fiscal year 1981 field testing.

  10. 3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WEST TAILING DAM, LARGE TANK, AND TAILING, LOOKING NORTHEAST. A SIX-FOOT SCALE IS LOCATED AGAINST WALL ON LEFT. PURPOSE OF TANK IS UNKNOWN, BUT APPEARS TO HAVE FALLEN FROM ITS ORIGINAL LOCATION AT THE MILL SITE, UP AND TO THE RIGHT OF THIS VIEW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  11. Determinants of father involvement with young children: Evidence from the early childhood longitudinal study-birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Planalp, Elizabeth M; Braungart-Rieker, Julia M

    2016-02-01

    The current study used data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B; Snow et al., 2007) to explore determinants of resident father involvement. Families (N = 2,900) were measured at 3 time points (9 months, 2 years, and 4 years of age). Father, mother, and child factors were examined in relation to father caregiving and play. Latent change score models indicated that fathers engaged in more caregiving and play behaviors and increased at a faster rate when they more strongly identified with their role as a father. Fathers engaged in more caregiving when mothers reported higher depressive symptoms and increased in play more slowly when marital conflict was higher. In addition, a Mother Depressive Symptoms × Marital Conflict interaction emerged indicating that fathers differed in their levels of caregiving depending on mothers' report of depressive symptoms, but only when marital conflict was low. Fathers also increased in caregiving at a faster rate with girls than boys. A comprehensive framework for examining resident father involvement is presented. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26437143

  12. Experiments on a Tail-wheel Shimmy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harling, R; Dietz, O

    1954-01-01

    Model tests on the "running belt" and tests with a full-scale tail wheel were made on a rotating drum as well as on a runway in order to investigate the causes of the undesirable shimmy phenomena frequently occurring on airplane tail wheels, and the means of avoiding them. The small model (scale 1:10) permitted simulation of the mass, moments of inertia, and fuselage stiffness of the airplane and determination of their influence on the shimmy, whereas by means of the larger model with pneumatic tires (scale 1:2) more accurate investigations were made on the tail wheel itself. The results of drum and road tests show good agreement with one another and with model values. Detailed investigations were made regarding the dependence of the shimmy tendency on trail, rolling speed, load, size of tires, ground friction,and inclination of the swivel axis; furthermore, regarding the influence of devices with restoring effect on the tail wheel, and the friction damping required for prevention of shimmy. Finally observations from slow-motion pictures are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the influence of tire deformation.

  13. Economic evaluation of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, J H

    1982-12-01

    Mountain States Research and Development was contracted on March 1, 1981 to make an economic evaluation study at each of 12 abandoned uranium mill tailings sites in the western states. The objective of this work was to obtain the data necessary at each site to determine the possible revenue that could be derived from reprocessing the tailings. To accomplish this objective a drilling and sampling program was established for each site to determine the total amount of tailings and subbase material available for treatment and the amount of recoverable uranium, vanadium and molybdenum. These three metals were selected due to their common occurrence in uranium ores and common extractability in the leaching process. Laboratory leaching was then conducted on the samples obtained to determine the extractability of each of these metals and the optimum plant process to be applied. As the metal contents were generally low and represented mineral that had not been leached during previous processing, the economic evaluation is limited to consideration of the direct capital and operating costs required in connection with processing of each respective site material. Excavating, transportation and disposal of the material from each site in an environmentally acceptable location and manner was not within the scope of this project. It will be necessary to complete a separate study of these areas in order to determine the total costs involved. This report contains the results of the investigations of the Old Rifle Site.

  14. Migration of arsenic from old tailings ponds-A case study on the King Edward Mine, Cornwall, UK

    SciTech Connect

    Beeston, Michael Philip Tuen van Elteren, Johannes; Slejkovec, Zdenka; Glass, Hylke Jan

    2008-09-15

    A methodology is presented to study the physico-chemical processes in old tailings ponds using an array of analytical-physical chemistry approaches. A case study was conducted on the sorption/desorption behaviour of arsenic in tailings pond 2406, at the King Edward Mine (KEM) in Cornwall, UK. The tailings pond was in operation from approximately 1907 to 1921. The methodology involves two principal stages: (1) sequential extraction followed by subsequent arsenic species determination to characterise the material with regards to the association of arsenic with soil phases and identification of As (III/V) in the easily accessible soil phase; (2) batch contacting/equilibrating the tailings pond material with As(III/V), followed by a similar procedure as in stage 1 to establish the material's As(III/V) phase distribution kinetics/thermodynamics. By extrapolating the data from present day samples we infer past and future elemental mobility. From this study it is concluded that adsorption and desorption from tailings material is a rapid process for the most unstable soil phases (non-specific and specific) and a slow process for the more stable phases (poorly crystalline and well crystalline). The hypothetical application of this conclusion to the tailings from dam 2406 is that, during the initial phases of the dam's creation (ca. 100 years ago), when arsenic was both in solution and bound to mineralogical components, arsenic must have dispersed into the environment as a result of slow As(V) adsorption/phase distribution processes. Aging of the tailings material sees the movement of the arsenic to the more stable soil phases, producing a situation that is seen at present day.

  15. Protection of uranium tailings impoundments against overland erosion

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    This study investigates the problems involved in designing protection methods to prevent erosion of a uranium tailings impoundment cover from rainfall and runoff (overland flow) processes. The study addresses the side slopes and top surface as separate elements. The side slopes are more subject to gully erosion and require absolute protection such as that provided by rock riprap. The flatter top surface needs much less protection (vegetation/rock combinations) but some estimate of erosion rates are needed to compare alternatives. A literature review indicated that, currently, procedures are not available for the design of rock riprap to prevent gully erosion. Therefore, rock protection on the side slope will have to be based upon engineering judgment determined by the particular site conditions. The Manning-kinetic equations (velocity and depth of runoff) were investigated as a possible aid to the design of gully erosion protection. Guidelines are suggested for the use of rock riprap to prevent gully erosion. Three mathematical models were used to compute erosion rates for the top surface of a hypothetical tailings impoundment. The results recommend that one or possibly both of the regression models could be used to evaluate preliminary protection designs for the top surface. A physical process simulation model should be used for the final design. 30 refs., 13 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Runaway tails in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway tail driven by a dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is analyzed. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, there are three different regimes in the evolution of the tail. The tail can be (1) stable with electrons accelerated to large parallel velocities, (2) unstable to Cerenkov resonance because of the depletion of the bulk and the formation of a positive slope, (3) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution. The role of a convection type loss term is also discussed.

  17. Tail contribution to the directional aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/6-scale model of the rotor systems research aircraft with a tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mineck, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results are presented of a wind tunnel investigation to determine the tail contribution to the directional aerodynamic characteristics of a 1/6-scale model of the rotor systems research aircraft (RSRA) with a tail rotor. No main rotor was used during the investigation. Data were obtained with and without the tail rotor over a range of sideslip angle and over a range of rotor collective pitch angle. The model with the tail rotor was tested at several advance ratios with and without thrust from the auxiliary thrust engines on the RSRA fuselage. Increasing the space between the tail-rotor hub and the vertical tail reduced the tail-rotor torque required at moderate to high rotor thrust. Increasing the exit dynamic pressure of the auxiliary thrust engines decreases the tail contribution to the static directional stability. The tail-rotor thrust and its interference provide a positive increment to the static directional stability. The tail contribution increases with forward speed. The adverse yawing moment of the airframe would strongly affect the thrust required of the tail rotor when the helicopter is hovering in a crosswind.

  18. Oxygen availability is a major factor in determining the composition of microbial communities involved in methane oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria E.; Beck, David A.C.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed that methane supplied to lake sediment microbial communities as a substrate not only causes a response by bona fide methanotrophic bacteria, but also by non-methane-oxidizing bacteria, especially by members of the family Methylophilaceae. This result suggested that methane oxidation in this environment likely involves communities composed of different functional guilds, rather than a single type of microbe. To obtain further support for this concept and to obtain further insights into the factors that may define such partnerships, we carried out microcosm incubations with sediment samples from Lake Washington at five different oxygen tensions, while methane was supplied at the same concentration in each. Community composition was determined through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing after 10 and 16 weeks of incubation. We demonstrate that, in support of our prior observations, the methane-consuming communities were represented by two major types: the methanotrophs of the family Methylococcaceae and by non-methanotrophic methylotrophs of the family Methylophilaceae. However, different species persisted under different oxygen tensions. At high initial oxygen tensions (150 to 225 M) the major players were, respectively, species of the genera Methylosarcina and Methylophilus, while at low initial oxygen tensions (15 to 75 M) the major players were Methylobacter and Methylotenera. These data suggest that oxygen availability is at least one major factor determining specific partnerships in methane oxidation. The data also suggest that speciation within Methylococcaceae and Methylophilaceae may be driven by niche adaptation tailored toward specific placements within the oxygen gradient. PMID:25755930

  19. Helicopter tail rotor noise analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, A. R.; Chou, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to interactions with the main rotor tip vortices, and with the fuselage separation mean wake. The tail rotor blade-main rotor tip vortex interaction is modelled as an airfoil of infinite span cutting through a moving vortex. The vortex and the geometry information required by the analyses are obtained through a free wake geometry analysis of the main rotor. The acoustic pressure-time histories for the tail rotor blade-vortex interactions are then calculated. These acoustic results are compared to tail rotor loading and thickness noise, and are found to be significant to the overall tail rotor noise generation. Under most helicopter operating conditions, large acoustic pressure fluctuations can be generated due to a series of skewed main rotor tip vortices passing through the tail rotor disk. The noise generation depends strongly upon the helicopter operating conditions and the location of the tail rotor relative to the main rotor.

  20. Elucidating Internucleosome Interactions and the Roles of Histone Tails

    PubMed Central

    Howell, StevenC.; Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    The nucleosome is the first level of genome organization and regulation in eukaryotes where negatively charged DNA is wrapped around largely positively charged histone proteins. Interaction between nucleosomes is dominated by electrostatics at long range and guided by specific contacts at short range, particularly involving their flexible histone tails. We have thus quantified how internucleosome interactions are modulated by salts (KCl, MgCl2) and histone tail deletions (H3, H4 N-terminal), using small-angle x-ray scattering and theoretical modeling. We found that measured effective charges at low salts are ?1/5th of the theoretically predicted renormalized charges and that H4 tail deletion suppresses the attraction at high salts to a larger extent than H3 tail deletion. PMID:23823239

  1. From dinosaurs to birds: a tail of evolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A particularly critical event in avian evolution was the transition from long- to short-tailed birds. Primitive bird tails underwent significant alteration, most notably reduction of the number of caudal vertebrae and fusion of the distal caudal vertebrae into an ossified pygostyle. These changes, among others, occurred over a very short evolutionary interval, which brings into focus the underlying mechanisms behind those changes. Despite the wealth of studies delving into avian evolution, virtually nothing is understood about the genetic and developmental events responsible for the emergence of short, fused tails. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the signaling pathways and morphological events that contribute to tail extension and termination and examine how mutations affecting the genes that control these pathways might influence the evolution of the avian tail. To generate a list of candidate genes that may have been modulated in the transition to short-tailed birds, we analyzed a comprehensive set of mouse mutants. Interestingly, a prevalent pleiotropic effect of mutations that cause fused caudal vertebral bodies (as in the pygostyles of birds) is tail truncation. We identified 23 mutations in this class, and these were primarily restricted to genes involved in axial extension. At least half of the mutations that cause short, fused tails lie in the Notch/Wnt pathway of somite boundary formation or differentiation, leading to changes in somite number or size. Several of the mutations also cause additional bone fusions in the trunk skeleton, reminiscent of those observed in primitive and modern birds. All of our findings were correlated to the fossil record. An open question is whether the relatively sudden appearance of short-tailed birds in the fossil record could be accounted for, at least in part, by the pleiotropic effects generated by a relatively small number of mutational events. PMID:25621146

  2. On the Path of Election and Martyrdom: Some Psychic Mechanisms Involved in the Anders Behring Breivik's Determination as a Terrorist.

    PubMed

    Cotti, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    On 22 July 2011, the Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik carried out two attacks in Oslo that cost the lives of 77 people, injured many others, and plunged the entire Norwegian nation into mourning. When he was arrested, Breivik presented himself as a member of the Knights Templar, whose mission is to defend the Christian Western world. He considers that he has sacrificed himself by his actions for his people and says that he has prepared himself for martyrdom. In analysing Breivik's words and writings, this article attempts to identify the thought mechanisms involved in Breivik's idea of election (megalomania) and martyrology. It highlights the importance of a mechanism of "return to the sender," whereby Breivik returns the reproaches directed at him by an agency of judgment (ego ideal or superegoic object). It emphasizes the existence of a "burning desire" and yearning (Sehnsucht) for this same persecuting superegoic object, an object that Breivik constantly wants to find again, even if in death. Taking into consideration Searles's hypothesis that the sense of being persecuted is a defence against the impossibility of mourning, and also H. Blum's hypothesis that persecutory feelings are indicative of fears of a "regressive loss of object constancy," the different psychic mechanisms and modes of functioning underlying Breivik's terrorist determination are related here to what we know about his affective development and infantile relationships. PMID:26290947

  3. Analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, William H , Jr

    1952-01-01

    An analysis of the effects of wing interference on the tail contributions to the rolling stability derivatives of complete airplane configurations is made by calculating the angularity of the air stream at the vertical tail due to rolling and determining the resulting forces and moments. Some of the important factors which affect the resultant angularity on the vertical tail are wing aspect ratio and sweepback, vertical-tail span, and considerations associated with angle of attack and airplane geometry. Some calculated sidewash results for a limited range of plan forms and vertical-tail sizes are presented. Equations taking into account the sidewash results are given for determining the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives. Comparisons of estimated and experimental results indicate that a consideration of wing interference effects improves the estimated values of the tail contributions to the rolling derivatives and that fair agreement with available experimental data is obtained.

  4. Mercury's Dynamic Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.

    2010-01-01

    The Mariner 10 and MESSENGER flybys of Mercury have revealed a magnetosphere that is likely the most responsive to upstream interplanetary conditions of any in the solar system. The source of the great dynamic variability observed during these brief passages is due to Mercury's proximity to the Sun and the inverse proportionality between reconnection rate and solar wind Alfven Mach number. However, this planet's lack of an ionosphere and its small physical dimensions also contribute to Mercury's very brief Dungey cycle, approx. 2 min, which governs the time scale for internal plasma circulation. Current observations and understanding of the structure and dynamics of Mercury's magnetotail are summarized and discussed. Special emphasis will be placed upon such questions as: 1) How much access does the solar wind have to this small magnetosphere as a function of upstream conditions? 2) What roles do heavy planetary ions play? 3) Do Earth-like substorms take place at Mercury? 4) How does Mercury's tail respond to extreme solar wind events such coronal mass ejections? Prospects for progress due to advances in the global magnetohydrodynamic and hybrid simulation modeling and the measurements to be taken by MESSENGER after it enters Mercury orbit on March 18, 2011 will be discussed.

  5. Wing-Fuselage Interference, Tail Buffeting, and Air Flow About the Tail of a Low-Wing Monoplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James A; Hood, Manley J

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on a Mcdonnell Douglas airplane to determine the wing-fuselage interference of a low-wing monoplane. The tests included a study of tail buffeting and the air flow in the region of the tail. The airplane was tested with and without the propeller slipstream, both in the original condition and with several devices designed to reduce or eliminate tail buffeting. The devices used were wing-fuselage fillets, a NACA cowling, reflexed trailing edge of the wing, and stub auxiliary airfoils.

  6. Interactions of tailings leachate with local liner materials found at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, M.E.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    The mill tailings site at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania is the first mill site to receive remedial action under the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Part of this remedial action will require excavating the 53,500 m/sup 3/ (70,000 yd/sup 3/) of tailings on the site having a specific activity exceeding 100 pCi/g, and encapsulating these contaminated tailings in a clay-lined cell. As part of the remedial action effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been studying the interactions of tailings and tailings leachate with locally occurring clays proposed for liner materials. These studies include physical and chemical characterization of amended and unamended local clays, chemical characterization of the tailings, column studies of tailings leached with deionized water, and column studies of clays contacted with tailings solutions to determine the attenuation properties of the proposed liner materials. Column studies of tailings leached with deionized water indicated that the Canonsburg tailings could represent a source of soluble radium-226 and uranium-238, several trace metals, cations, and the anions SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/, and Cl. Of these soluble contaminants, uranium-238, radium-226, the trace metals As and Mo, and the anions F and SO/sub 4/ were present at levels exceeding maximum concentration levels in the tailings leaching column effluents. However, local clays, both in amended and unamended form were effective in attenuating contaminant migration. The soil amendments tested failed to increase radium attenuation. The tailings leaching studies indicated that the tailings will produce leachates of neutral pH and relatively low contaminant levels for at least 200 years. We believe that compacting the tailings within the encapsulation cell will help to reduce leaching of contaminants from the liner system, since very low permeabilities (<10/sup -8/ cm/s) were observed for even slightly compacted tailings materials.

  7. Behavioural and Brain Gene Expression Profiling in Pigs during Tail Biting Outbreaks – Evidence of a Tail Biting Resistant Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Brunberg, Emma; Jensen, Per; Isaksson, Anders; Keeling, Linda J.

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tail biting behaviour is a major welfare problem for pigs receiving the behaviour, as well as an indication of decreased welfare in the pigs performing it. However, not all pigs in a pen perform or receive tail biting behaviour and it has recently been shown that these ‘neutral’ pigs not only differ in their behaviour, but also in their gene expression compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen. To investigate whether this difference was linked to the cause or a consequence of them not being involved in the outbreak of tail biting, behaviour and brain gene expression was compared with ‘control’ pigs housed in pens with no tail biting. It was shown that the pigs housed in control pens performed a wider variety of pig-directed abnormal behaviour (belly nosing 0.95±1.59, tail in mouth 0.31±0.60 and ‘other‘ abnormal 1.53±4.26; mean±S.D) compared to the neutral pigs (belly nosing 0.30±0.62, tail in mouth 0.13±0.50 and “other“ abnormal 0.42±1.06). With Affymetrix gene expression arrays, 107 transcripts were identified as differently expressed (p<0.05) between these two categories of pigs. Several of these transcripts had already been shown to be differently expressed in the neutral pigs when they were compared to performers and receivers of tail biting in the same pen in an earlier study. Hence, the different expression of these genes cannot be a consequence of the neutral pigs not being involved in tail biting behaviour, but rather linked to the cause contributing to why they were not involved in tail biting interactions. These neutral pigs seem to have a genetic and behavioural profile that somehow contributes to them being resistant to performing or receiving pig-directed abnormal behaviour, such as tail biting, even when housed in an environment that elicits that behaviour in other pigs. PMID:23824700

  8. Tail Lobe Revisited: Magnetic Field Modeling Based on Plasma Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, S. B. P.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma data from the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft during 1977-1980 have been used to determine the distribution of data points in the magnetotail in the range of distances -20 < XGSM < --15, i.e. which of the records that were located in the current sheet, in the tail lobe, in the magnetosheath and in the boundary layers respectively. The ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field data for the records in the tail lobe were then used to model the tail lobe magnetic field dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure, on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and on the Dst index. The tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be dependent on the square root of the dynamic pressure based on the balance between the total magnetic pressure in the tail lobes and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. The IMF dependent terms, added to the pressure term, were sought in many different forms while the Dst dependence of the tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be linear. The field shows a strong dependence on the square root of the dynamic pressure and the different IMF dependent terms all constitute a significant contribution to the total field. However, the dependence on the Dst index turned out to be very weak at those down-tail distances. The results of this study are intended to be used for parameterizing future versions of the data-based models of the global magnetospheric magnetic field.

  9. Single-engine tail interference model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.

    1994-01-01

    The data presented in this contribution were obtained in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. Multiple test entries were completed and the results have been completely reported in five NASA reports. The objective of the initial investigation was to determine the effect of empennage (tail) interference on the drag characteristics of an axisymmetric model with a single engine fighter aft-end with convergent divergent nozzles. Two nozzle power settings, dry and maximum afterburning, were investigated. Several empennage arrangements and afterbody modifications were investigated during the initial investigation. Subsequent investigations were used to determine the effects of other model variables including tail incidence, tail span, and nozzle shape. For the final investigation, extensive surface pressure instrumentation was added to the model in order to develop and understanding of the flow interactions associated with afterbody/empennage integration and also to provide data for code validation. Extensive computational analysis has been conducted on the staggered empennage configuration at a Mach number of 0.6 utilizing a three-dimensional Navier Stokes code. Most of the investigations were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 and at ratios of jet total pressure to free stream static pressure (nozzle pressure ratio) from 0.1 (jet off) to 8.0. Some angle of attack variation was obtained at jet off conditions.

  10. Efficient utilization of washery tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Lyadov, V.V.; Litmanovich, I.M.

    1982-05-01

    The possibility of building a plant in Makeevka for the utilization of jigging machine tailings from the Yasinovka and Makeevka Coke Works washeries for production of lightweight concrete fillers and wall materials is being investigated.

  11. Bearing capacity of desiccated tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Rassam, D.W.; Williams, D.J.

    1999-07-01

    The development of matric suctions in soils contributes to their shear strength, resulting in an enhanced factor of safety against bearing-capacity failure. In this paper, matric suction profiles of desiccated mine tailings are predicted from a steady-state solution for evaporative conditions, and from an isothermal mathematical model that simulates liquid and vapor water flow through soils. The shear-strength envelope with respect to matric suction is established by testing reconstituted tailings samples in a modified triaxial cell, in which matric suction can be controlled. The contribution of matric suction to the shear strength is interpreted as an additional apparent cohesion for use in bearing-capacity calculations. Because of the nonlinearity of the shear-strength profile, a numerical method of analysis is adopted to predict the ultimate bearing capacity of the desiccated tailings. A subsequent decrease in bearing capacity following 2D water infiltration into a partially capped tailings deposit and accompanying suction loss is investigated.

  12. Theseus Tail Being Unloaded

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The tail of the Theseus prototype research aircraft is seen here being unloaded at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in May of 1996. The Theseus aircraft, built and operated by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation, Manassas, Virginia, was a unique aircraft flown at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, under a cooperative agreement between NASA and Aurora. Dryden hosted the Theseus program, providing hangar space and range safety for flight testing. Aurora Flight Sciences was responsible for the actual flight testing, vehicle flight safety, and operation of the aircraft. The Theseus remotely piloted aircraft flew its maiden flight on May 24, 1996, at Dryden. During its sixth flight on November 12, 1996, Theseus experienced an in-flight structural failure that resulted in the loss of the aircraft. As of the beginning of the year 2000, Aurora had not rebuilt the aircraft. Theseus was built for NASA under an innovative, $4.9 million fixed-price contract by Aurora Flight Sciences Corporation and its partners, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia, and Fairmont State College, Fairmont, West Virginia. The twin-engine, unpiloted vehicle had a 140-foot wingspan, and was constructed largely of composite materials. Powered by two 80-horsepower, turbocharged piston engines that drove twin 9-foot-diameter propellers, Theseus was designed to fly autonomously at high altitudes, with takeoff and landing under the active control of a ground-based pilot in a ground control station 'cockpit.' With the potential ability to carry 700 pounds of science instruments to altitudes above 60,000 feet for durations of greater than 24 hours, Theseus was intended to support research in areas such as stratospheric ozone depletion and the atmospheric effects of future high-speed civil transport aircraft engines. Instruments carried aboard Theseus also would be able to validate satellite-based global environmental change measurements. Dryden's Project Manager was John Del Frate.

  13. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    The Grand Junction site has been reevaluated in order to revise the october 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Grand Junction, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.9 million tons of tailings at the Grand Junction site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation are also factors. The eight alternative actions presented herein range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $10,200,000 for stabilization in-place to about $39,500,000 for disposal in the DeBeque area, at a distance of about 35 mi, using transportation by rail. If transportation to DeBeque were by truck, the cost is estimated to be about $41,900,000. Three prinicpal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Grand Junction tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $200/lb by heap leach and $150/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery appears not to be economically attractive.

  14. Improved Tail-Current Representation in the Rice Field Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naehr, S.; Toffoletto, F. R.

    2001-05-01

    The Rice Field Model (RFM) represents the magnetic field of the steady-state open magnetosphere. In order to improve the mapping of field lines in the near Earth region, the simple Harris-sheet field representing the cross-tail current is replaced near the Earth by a more flexible tail current model developed by Hilmer and Voigt In the far-tail region the tail current and expansion fan fields are modified to allow for variations in the IMF and the interconnection field down the tail. The new tail-current is completely shielded by the magnetopause current system. The effects of time-dependent IMF on the polar cap potential pattern are explored by propagating a Northward turning down the tail. To evaluate the new tail-current in the near Earth region, magnetometer data from the GOES-8 satellite (in geosynchronous orbit) for the period of March 9-17, 1998 is compared to model predictions. The combination of RFM shielding with the Hilmer-Voigt tail-current proves significantly more accurate in determining the magnetic field at GEO than either of the two models alone. Ding, C., T. W. Hill, and F. R. Toffoletto. Improvement of the Toffoletto-Hill Open Magnetospheric Model, in Physics of Space Plasmas (1995): Proceedings of the 1995 Cambridge Syposium/Workshop in Geoplasma Physics on "Multiscale Phenomena in Space Plasmas", edited by T. Chang, and J.R. Jasperse, pp. 639-644, MIT Center for Theoretical Geo/Cosmo Plasma Physics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1996.

  15. Cryogenic Spectroscopy and Quantum Molecular Dynamics Determine the Structure of Cyclic Intermediates Involved in Peptide Sequence Scrambling.

    PubMed

    Aseev, Oleg; Perez, Marta A S; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Rizzo, Thomas R

    2015-07-01

    Collision-induced dissociation (CID) is a key technique used in mass spectrometry-based peptide sequencing. Collisionally activated peptides undergo statistical dissociation, forming a series of backbone fragment ions that reflect their amino acid (AA) sequence. Some of these fragments may experience a "head-to-tail" cyclization, which after proton migration, can lead to the cyclic structure opening in a different place than the initially formed bond. This process leads to AA sequence scrambling that may hinder sequencing of the initial peptide. Here we combine cryogenic ion spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to isolate and characterize the precise structures of key intermediates in the scrambling process. The most stable peptide fragments show intriguing symmetric cyclic structures in which the proton is situated on a C2 symmetry axis and forms exceptionally short H-bonds (1.20 ) with two backbone oxygens. Other nonsymmetric cyclic structures also exist, one of which is protonated on the amide nitrogen, where ring opening is likely to occur. PMID:26266729

  16. Cooling Characteristics of an Experimental Tail-pipe Burner with an Annular Cooling-air Passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Harold R; Koffel, William K

    1952-01-01

    The effects of tail-pipe fuel-air ratio (exhaust-gas temperatures from approximately 3060 degrees to 3825 degrees R), radial distributiion of tail-pipe fuel flow, and mass flow of combustion gas and the inside wall were determined for an experimental tail-pipe burner cooled by air flowing through and insulated cooling-air to combustion gas mass flow from 0.066 to 0.192 were also determined.

  17. The Pressure Distribution Over the Horizontal Tail Surfaces of an Airplane I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1923-01-01

    This work was undertaken to determine as completely as possible the distribution of pressure over the horizontal tail surfaces of an airplane, and to analyze the relation of this pressure to the structural loads and the longitudinal stability. The investigation is divided into three parts, of which this the first. The first part of the investigation is for the purpose of determining the pressure distribution over two horizontal tail surfaces in uniform free flight; the second part to conduct tests of similar tail planes in the wind tunnel; and the third part to determine the pressure distribution on the horizontal tail surfaces during accelerated flight on the full-size airplane.

  18. Measurements of pressures on the tail and aft fuselage of an airplane model during rotary motions at spin attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, Randy S.; Bowman, James S., Jr.; Martin, Colin A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA-Langley Spin Tunnel was used to determine the empennage and aft fuselage surfaces of an aircraft model while it was rotated at spinning-event attitudes, in order to ascertain stern flow conditions and the effects of horizontal tail, as well as the wings, on the vertical tail. A substantial horizontal tail influence is noted on both sides of the vertical tail; the removal of the horizontal tail was found to change the propelling or damping moment characteristics of the vertical tail. The wing was also found to have a large influence on the magnitude of the pressures measured on both the empennage and the aft-fuselage areas.

  19. Active Alu Element A-Tails: Size Does Matter

    PubMed Central

    Roy-Engel, Astrid M.; Salem, Abdel-Halim; Oyeniran, Oluwatosin O.; Deininger, Lisa; Hedges, Dale J.; Kilroy, Gail E.; Batzer, Mark A.; Deininger, Prescott L.

    2002-01-01

    Long and short interspersed elements (LINEs and SINEs) are retroelements that make up almost half of the human genome. L1 and Alu represent the most prolific human LINE and SINE families, respectively. Only a few Alu elements are able to retropose, and the factors determining their retroposition capacity are poorly understood. The data presented in this paper indicate that the length of Alu A-tails is one of the principal factors in determining the retropositional capability of an Alu element. The A stretches of the Alu subfamilies analyzed, both old (Alu S and J) and young (Ya5), had a Poisson distribution of A-tail lengths with a mean size of 21 and 26, respectively. In contrast, the A-tails of very recent Alu insertions (disease causing) were all between 40 and 97 bp in length. The L1 elements analyzed displayed a similar tendency, in which the disease-associated elements have much longer A-tails (mean of 77) than do the elements even from the young Ta subfamily (mean of 41). Analysis of the draft sequence of the human genome showed that only about 1000 of the over one million Alu elements have tails of 40 or more adenosine residues in length. The presence of these long A stretches shows a strong bias toward the actively amplifying subfamilies, consistent with their playing a major role in the amplification process. Evaluation of the 19 Alu elements retrieved from the draft sequence of the human genome that are identical to the Alu Ya5a2 insert in the NF1 gene showed that only five have tails with 40 or more adenosine residues. Sequence analysis of the loci with the Alu elements containing the longest A-tails (7 of the 19) from the genomes of the NF1 patient and the father revealed that there are at least two loci with A-tails long enough to serve as source elements within our model. Analysis of the A-tail lengths of 12 Ya5a2 elements in diverse human population groups showed substantial variability in both the Alu A-tail length and sequence homogeneity. On the basis of these observations, a model is presented for the role of A-tail length in determining which Alu elements are active. [The sequence data from this study have been submitted to GenBank under accession nos. AF504933AF505511.] PMID:12213770

  20. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be attributed to iron-bearing sulfide (and oxide) minerals present in the mill tailings. However, the concentration of available Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions can be reduced by the precipitation of insoluble ferric hydroxides (Fe(OH ){sub 3}) by seawater due to its near neutral pH. In such case, the oxidation of a sulfide mineral is inhibited due to the absence of an oxidizing agent (viz. oxygen and/or Fe{sup 3+} ions). The experiments carried out in this study provided a better understanding of behavior of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in subaqueous conditions and may be useful for further investigation of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in other environments.

  1. Development of a biologically inspired hydrobot tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Danielle; Janneh, Alhaji; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, has a large ocean underneath a thick layer of ice. In order to determine whether life exists, it has been proposed that an underwater glider (hydrobot) capable of propulsion could be sent to explore the vast ocean. In this research, we considered various smart materials to create a propulsion device inspired by dolphin tails. Dolphins are highly efficient and excellent gliders, which makes them the ideal candidate for ocean exploration. In order to select the best dolphin species, we began by reviewing literature and then utilized the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to compare the different species. Lagenorhynchus obliquidens (Pacific White-Sided Dolphin) was found to be the best choice for creating a bioinspired hydrobot. We then conducted literature review of various smart materials and using this knowledge constructed a hydrobot tail prototype. This prototype demonstrates that smart materials can be fashioned into suitable actuators to control a tail fashioned after a dolphin.

  2. Detailed determination of the nuclear fusion radius by a simultaneous optical model calculation of elastic scattering and fusion cross sections in reactions involving weakly bound projectiles

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, A. Gomez; Aguilera, E. F.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.

    2007-10-15

    Within the optical model for direct reactions, simultaneous calculations of elastic scattering, complete fusion, and total reaction cross sections for energies around the Coulomb barrier are presented for reactions involving the weakly bound projectile {sup 9}Be on {sup 64}Zn. Volume (W{sub F}) and surface (W{sub DR}) Woods-Saxon optical potentials are used such that the former is responsible only for complete fusion reactions while the latter for all direct reactions plus incomplete fusion. Simultaneous fits can be obtained with several sets of potential parameters, but if we impose the condition that the strength of W{sub F} is smaller than the strength of W{sub DR} at the tail region of the potential (this condition is discussed in detail), then values are required for r{sub F} and r{sub DR} of around 1.6 and 1.7-1.9 fm, respectively. These values are much larger than those frequently used in barrier penetration model calculations. Through the energy dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the polarization potentials, we show that the usual threshold anomaly does not show up for this system, but instead there is evidence of the presence of a breakup threshold anomaly.

  3. Study of Cu and Pb partitioning in mine tailings using the Tessier sequential extraction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrei, Mariana Lucia; Senila, Marin; Hoaghia, Maria Alexandra; Borodi, Gheorghe; Levei, Erika-Andrea

    2015-12-01

    The Cu and Pb partitioning in nonferrous mine tailings was investigated using the Tessier sequential extraction scheme. The contents of Cu and Pb found in the five operationally defined fractions were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The results showed different partitioning patterns for Cu and Pb in the studied tailings. The total Cu and Pb contents were higher in tailings from Brazesti than in those from Saliste, while the Cu contents in the first two fractions considered as mobile were comparable and the content of mobile Pb was the highest in Brazesti tailings. In the tailings from Saliste about 30% of Cu and 3% of Pb were found in exchangeable fraction, while in those from Brazesti no metals were found in the exchangeable fraction, but the percent of Cu and Pb found in the bound to carbonate fraction were high (20% and 26%, respectively). The highest Pb content was found in the residual fraction in Saliste tailings and in bound to Fe and Mn oxides fraction in Brazesti tailings, while the highest Cu content was found in the fraction bound to organic matter in Saliste tailings and in the residual fraction in Brazesti tailings. In case of tailings of Brazesti medium environmental risk was found both for Pb and Cu, while in case of Saliste tailings low risk for Pb and high risk for Cu were found.

  4. The Pressure Distribution over the Wings and Tail Surfaces of a PW-9 Pursuit Airplane in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Richard

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine (1) the magnitude and distribution of aerodynamic loads over the wings and tail surfaces of a pursuit-type airplane in the maneuvers likely to impose critical loads on the various subassemblies of the airplane structure. (2) To study the phenomenon of center of pressure movement and normal force coefficient variation in accelerated flight, and (3) to measure the normal accelerations at the center of gravity, wing-tip, and tail, in order to determine the nature of the inertia forces acting simultaneously with the critical aerodynamic loads. The results obtained throw light on a number of important questions involving structural design. Some of the more interesting results are discussed in some detail, but in general the report is for the purpose of making this collection of airplane-load data obtained in flight available to those interested in airplane structures.

  5. Mira's Tail There All Along

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered an exceptionally long comet-like tail of material trailing behind Mira -- a star that has been studied thoroughly for about 400 years. So, why had this tail gone unnoticed for so long? The answer is that nobody had scanned the extended region around Mira in ultraviolet light until now.

    As this composite demonstrates, the tail is only visible in ultraviolet light (top), and does not show up in visible light (bottom). Incidentally, Mira is much brighter in visible than ultraviolet light due to its low surface temperature of about 3,000 kelvin (about 5,000 degrees Fahrenheit).

    The Galaxy Evolution Explorer, one of NASA's Small Explorer class missions, is the first all-sky survey in ultraviolet light. It found Mira's tail by chance during a routine scan. Since the mission's launch more than four years ago, it has surveyed millions of galaxies and stars. Such vast collections of data often bring welcome surprises, such as Mira's unusual tail.

    The visible-light image is from the United Kingdom Schmidt Telescope in Australia, via the Digitized Sky Survey, a program affiliated with the Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Md.

  6. Mine tailings composition in a historic site: implications for ecological restoration.

    PubMed

    Courtney, R

    2013-02-01

    Ecological restoration, using tolerant plant species and nutrient additions, is a low-cost option to decrease environmental risks associated with mine tailings. An attempt was previously made to establish such a vegetation cover on an abandoned tailings facility in Southern Ireland. Historically, the tailings site has been prone to dusting and is a potential source of contamination to the surrounding environment. The site was examined to determine the success of the previous restoration plan used to revegetate the site and to determine its suitability for further restoration. Three distinct floristic areas were identified (grassland, poor grassland and bare area) based on herbage compositions and elemental analysis. Surface and subsurface samples were taken to characterise tailings from within these areas of the tailings site. The pH of bare surface tailings (pH, 2.7) was significantly more acidic (p < 0.5) than in other areas. Additionally, negligible net neutralising potential resulted in the tailings being hostile to plant growth. Total metal concentrations in tailings were high (c. 10,000 mg kg(-1) for Pb and up to 20,000 mg kg(-1) for Zn). DTPA-extractable Zn and Pb were 16 and 11 % of the total amount, respectively. Metal content in grasses growing on some areas of the tailings were elevated and demonstrated the inability of the tailings to support sustainable plant growth. Due to the inherently hostile characteristics of these areas, future restoration work will employ capping with a barrier layer. PMID:22699431

  7. Long-term stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Voorhees, L.D.; Sale, M.J.; Webb, J.W.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The primary hazard associated with uranium mill tailings is exposure to a radioactive gas, radon-222, the concentration of which has been correlated with the occurrence of lung cancer. Previous studies on radon attenuation conclude that the placement of earthen cover materials over the tailings is the most effective technique for reducing radioactive emissions and dispersal of tailings. The success of such a plan, however, is dependent on ensuring the long-term integrity of these cover materials. Soil erosion from water and wind is the major natural cause of destabilizing earthen cover materials. Field data related to the control of soil loss are limited and only indirectly apply to the problem of isolation of uranium mill tailings over very long time periods (up to 80,000 a). However, sufficient information is available to determine benefits that will result from the changes in specific design variables and to evaluate the need for different design strategies among potential disposal sites. The three major options available for stabilization of uranium mill tailings are: rock cover, soil and revegetation, or a combination of both on different portions of the tailings cover. The optimal choice among these alternatives depends on site-specific characteristics such as climate and local geomorphology and soils, and on design variables such as embankment, heights and slopes, modification of upstream drainage, and revegetation practices. Generally, geomorphic evidence suggests that use of soil and vegetation alone will not be adequate to reduce erosion on slopes greater than about 5 to 9%.

  8. Tail venting for enhanced yaw damping at spinning conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stough, H. P., III; Whipple, Raymond D.; Fremaux, C. M.

    1991-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-ft Vertical Spin Tunnel to determine the spin and spin-recovery characteristics of a 1/11-scale model of a low-wing general aviation airplane with a horizontal tail modified with variable-size gaps to allow ventilation of the vertical stabilizer and rudder. Erect spins at symmetric loadings were tested with varying gap sizes on either or both sides of the horizontal tail. The model results indicate that the basic airplane (with no gaps) exhibits a fast, flat spin from which no recoveries can be obtained. The airplane with the modified tail has either a fast, flat spin from which no recoveries or poor recoveries may be made, or a slower, steeper spin from which fair to excellent recoveries may be obtained, depending on the size and orientation of the tail gaps. The major contribution to spin recovery was from the gap on the leeward side of the tail. Gap widths of 15-25 percent of the tail semispan were needed to produce satisfactory recovery from the flat spin.

  9. Molycorp Guadalupe Mountain tailings disposal facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    Molycorp proposes to construct and operate a molybdenum tailings disposal facility on 1,230 acres of public land near Questa, New Mexico and has located mill site claims for this purpose. The project would consist of a 568-acre tailings pond in the saddle of Guadalupe Mountain. The pond would be formed by the construction of two rock-filled dams at either end of the saddle. Other facilities would include a tailings pump station, an extension of the tailings pipeline, tailings distribution lines, access roads and a patrol road, a powerline, a seepage collection pond, surface water diversion channels, and a decant water channel. The project would provide additional storage for approximately 200 million tons of tailings from Molycorp's molybdenum mine located approximately 12 miles east of Guadalupe Mountain. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) completed an Environmental Assessment (EA) for this project in February 1985. As a result of that EA, the BLM determined that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) would be required. The EIS analyzes and documents the environmental impacts of the proposed project through construction, operation, and closure.

  10. Flip, flop and fly: modulated motor control and highly variable movement patterns of autotomized gecko tails

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Timothy E.; Russell, Anthony P.

    2010-01-01

    Many animals lose and regenerate appendages, and tail autotomy in lizards is an extremely well-studied example of this. Whereas the energetic, ecological and functional ramifications of tail loss for many lizards have been extensively documented, little is known about the behaviour and neuromuscular control of the autotomized tail. We used electromyography and high-speed video to quantify the motor control and movement patterns of autotomized tails of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius). In addition to rhythmic swinging, we show that they exhibit extremely complex movement patterns for up to 30 min following autotomy, including acrobatic flips up to 3 cm in height. Unlike the output of most central pattern generators (CPGs), muscular control of the tail is variable and can be arrhythmic. We suggest that the gecko tail is well suited for studies involving CPGs, given that this spinal preparation is naturally occurring, requires no surgery and exhibits complex modulation. PMID:19740891

  11. Determinants of Substance Abuse in a Population of Children and Adolescents Involved with the Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Veeran-Anne S.; Thornton, Tiffany; Tonmyr, Lil

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse is an important health issue facing children involved with child welfare, but little is known about the associated factors. The purpose of this study was to build on findings from the "Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2003" and use a national sample of 10-15 year old children to examine the factors

  12. Determinants of Substance Abuse in a Population of Children and Adolescents Involved with the Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Veeran-Anne S.; Thornton, Tiffany; Tonmyr, Lil

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse is an important health issue facing children involved with child welfare, but little is known about the associated factors. The purpose of this study was to build on findings from the "Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2003" and use a national sample of 10-15 year old children to examine the factors…

  13. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culturebased proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  14. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 2: Run log and tabulated data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model Rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The existence of mutual interference between hovering main rotor and a tail rotor was acknowledged in the test. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. This volume contains the test run log and tabulated data.

  15. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 1. Text and figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. The test showed that overall the tail rotor effects on the advanced tip configurations tested are not substantially different from the effects on conventional tips.

  16. Is rhizosphere remediation sufficient for sustainable revegetation of mine tailings?

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Longbin; Baumgartl, Thomas; Mulligan, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Revegetation of mine tailings (fine-grained waste material) starts with the reconstruction of root zones, consisting of a rhizosphere horizon (mostly topsoil and/or amended tailings) and the support horizon beneath (i.e. equivalent to subsoil – mostly tailings), which must be physically and hydro-geochemically stable. This review aims to discuss key processes involved in the development of functional root zones within the context of direct revegetation of tailings and introduces a conceptual process of rehabilitating structure and function in the root zones based on a state transition model. Scope Field studies on the revegetation of tailings (from processing base metal ore and bauxite residues) are reviewed. Particular focus is given to tailings' properties that limit remediation effectiveness. Aspects of root zone reconstruction and vegetation responses are also discussed. Conclusions When reconstructing a root zone system, it is critical to restore physical structure and hydraulic functions across the whole root zone system. Only effective and holistically restored systems can control hydro-geochemical mobility of acutely and chronically toxic factors from the underlying horizon and maintain hydro-geochemical stability in the rhizosphere. Thereafter, soil biological capacity and ecological linkages (i.e. carbon and nutrient cycling) may be rehabilitated to integrate the root zones with revegetated plant communities into sustainable plant ecosystems. A conceptual framework of system transitions between the critical states of root zone development has been proposed. This will illustrate the rehabilitation process in root zone reconstruction and development for direct revegetation with sustainable plant communities. Sustainable phytostabilization of tailings requires the systematic consideration of hydro-geochemical interactions between the rhizosphere and the underlying supporting horizon. It further requires effective remediation strategies to develop hydro-geochemically stable and biologically functional root zones, which can facilitate the recovery of the microbial community and ecological linkages with revegetated plant communities. PMID:22648878

  17. Acceleration of cometary plasma tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundt, Wolfgang; Krishan, V.

    1988-04-01

    Cometary plasma tails are accelerated by the solar wind to ? half its velocity, corresponding to some 102 times the solar-wind momentum density. The authors corroborate Alfvn's (1957) "wind-sock" mechanism according to which the momentum transfer is brought about by magnetic rigidity.

  18. Black-Tailed Prairie Dog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Black-tailed prairie dogs are quite susceptible to sylvatic plague, but a new plague vaccine put in their food shows significant promise in the laboratory. The prairie dogs transmit the disease to endangered black-footed ferrets, who eat the prairie dogs and are also quite susceptible to the disease...

  19. NPS6, Encoding a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase Involved in Siderophore-Mediated Iron Metabolism, is a Conserved Virulence Determinant of Plant Pathogenic Ascomycetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NPS6, encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, is a virulence determinant in the corn pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus and is also involved in resistance to oxidative stress, generated by hydrogen peroxide. Deletion of NPS6 orthologs in the rice pathogen, Cochliobolus miyabeanus, the cereal...

  20. An Analysis of a Typical Instructional Unit in Junior High School Science to Determine the Explicit and Implicit Concept Loading Involved. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Herbert A.

    This study involved examining an instructional unit with regard to its concept content and appropriateness for its target audience. The study attempted to determine (1) what concepts are treated explicitly or implicitly, (2) whether there is a hierarchical conceptual structure within the unit, (3) what level of sophistication is required to

  1. Immunocalization of telomerase in cells of lizard tail after amputation suggests cell activation for tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, L

    2016-02-01

    Tail amputation (autotomy) in most lizards elicits a remarkable regenerative response leading to a new although simplified tail. No information on the trigger mechanism following wounding is known but cells from the stump initiate to proliferate and form a regenerative blastema. The present study shows that telomerases are mainly activated in the nuclei of various connective and muscle satellite cells of the stump, and in other tissues, probably responding to the wound signals. Western blotting detection also indicates that telomerase positive bands increases in the regenerating blastema in comparison to the normal tail. Light and ultrastructural immunocytochemistry localization of telomerase shows that 4-14 days post-amputation in lizards immunopositive nuclei of sparse cells located among the wounded tissues are accumulating into the forming blastema. These cells mainly include fibroblasts and fat cells of the connective tissue and satellite cells of muscles. Also some immature basophilic and polychromatophilic erytroblasts, lymphoblasts and myelocytes present within the Bone Marrow of the vertebrae show telomerase localization in their nuclei, but their contribution to the formation of the regenerative blastema remains undetermined. The study proposes that one of the initial mechanisms triggering cell proliferation for the formation of the blastema in lizards involve gene activation for the production of telomerase that stimulates the following signaling pathways for cell division and migration. PMID:26697743

  2. Tail tip necrosis in Ontario beef feedlot cattle

    PubMed Central

    Drolia, Helen; Luescher, U. Andrew; Meek, Alan H.; Wilcock, Brian P.

    1991-01-01

    Studies were performed to establish the prevalence and importance of tail tip necrosis in the southern Ontario beef feedlot industry and to characterize the gross appearance and histopathology of the condition. In a mail survey, 96% of 71 feedlots with slatted floors, but only 5% of 184 feedlots with solid floors, reported a problem with tail tip necrosis from 1982-1986. Treatments reported included antibiotics, amputation of the tail (therapeutic or preventive), and slaughter. Lameness was associated with tail tip necrosis. A scoring system for severity of necrosis was developed. Repeated inspections revealed that mild lesions were unlikely to progress to more severe stages. Histological alterations such as perivascular edema and hemorrhage, dermal scarring, follicular atrophy, and paucity of leukocytes were compatible with cutaneous ischemia. Of 441 tails inspected at slaughter plants, 34.5% were affected, with 3.4% involving skin lacerations and infection, and 4.3% amputated before slaughter. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6.Figure 7.Figure 8. PMID:17423716

  3. Physiochemical factors of iron photoproduction from mine tailings wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimski, L.J.; St. Clair, M.A.; Fan, K.K.; Schnoor, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    This study investigated the feasibility of using iron rich mine tailings in a metals removal process for leachate based on the natural iron cycle. The natural iron cycle involves the photoreductive dissolution of iron(III) (hydr)oxides resulting in soluble iron(II) during the day, and subsequent oxidation and reprecipitation to iron(III) during the night. Photolysis experiments conducted in the laboratory using mine tailings produced significant concentrations of soluble iron(II) in aqueous solution at low pH. Oxidation of soluble iron(II) to iron(III) removed soluble arsenic and cadmium from solution to concentrations less toxic, with the solid phase precipitate more concentrated for a possible metals recovery system. Factors influencing the photoproduction of iron(II) from the mine tailings included the concentration of organic matter, the presence of amorphous iron oxides, and the chemical forms of iron in the mine tailings. Solution pH and the addition of ligands also affected iron(II) photoproduction. Factors influencing the removal of arsenic and cadmium from aqueous solution included the pH of the solution, as well as the presence of organic matter and amorphous iron oxides in the mine tailings.

  4. Characterization of Emergent Data Networks Among Long-Tail Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, Mostafa; Kumar, Praveen; Hedstrom, Margaret; Myers, James; Plale, Beth; Marini, Luigi; McDonald, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Data curation underpins data-driven scientific advancements. It manages the information flux across multiple users throughout data life cycle as well as increases data sustainability and reusability. The exponential growth in data production spanning across the Earth Science involving individual and small research groups, which is termed as log-tail data, increases the data-knowledge latency among related domains. It has become clear that an advanced framework-agnostic metadata and ontologies for long-tail data is required to increase their visibility to each other, and provide concise and meaningful descriptions that reveal their connectivity. Despite the advancement that has been achieved by various sophisticated data management models in different Earth Science disciplines, it is not always straightforward to derive relationships among long-tail data. Semantic data clustering algorithms and pre-defined logic rules that are oriented toward prediction of possible data relationships, is one method to address these challenges. Our work advances the connectivity of related long-tail data by introducing the design for an ontology-based knowledge management system. In this work, we present the system architecture, its components, and illustrate how it can be used to scrutinize the connectivity among datasets. To demonstrate the capabilities of this "data network" prototype, we implemented this approach within the Sustainable Environment Actionable Data (SEAD) environment, an open-source semantic content repository that provides a RDF database for long-tail data, and show how emergent relationships among datasets can be identified.

  5. Distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection for pancreatic body and tail cancer invading celiac axis

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyemin; Kim, Sang Geol; Ha, Heontak; Choi, Young Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Pancreatic body/tail cancer often involves the celiac axis (CA) and it is regarded as an unresectable disease. To treat the disease, we employed distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) and reviewed our experiences. Methods We performed DP-CAR for seven patients with pancreatic body/tail cancer involving the CA. The indications of DP-CAR initially included tumors with definite invasion of CA and were later expanded to include borderline resectable disease. To determine the efficacy of DP-CAR, the clinico-pathological data of patients who underwent DP-CAR were compared to both distal pancreatectomy (DP) group and no resection (NR) group. Results The R0 resection rate was 71.4% and was not statistically different compared to DP group. The operative time (P = 0.018) and length of hospital stay (P = 0.022) were significantly longer in DP-CAR group but no significant difference was found in incidence of the postoperative pancreatic fistula compared to DP group. In DP-CAR group, focal hepatic infarction and transient hepatopathy occurred in 1 patient and 3 patients, respectively. No mortality occurred in DP-CAR group. The median survival time (MST) was not statistically different compared to DP group. However, the MST of DP-CAR group was significantly longer than that of NR group (P < 0.001). Conclusion In our experience, DP-CAR was safe and offered high R0 resection rate for patients with pancreatic body/tail cancer with involvement of CA. The effect on survival of DP-CAR is comparable to DP and better than that of NR. However, the benefits need to be verified by further studies in the future. PMID:26446424

  6. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Determine the Effectiveness of an Early Psychological Intervention with Children Involved in Road Traffic Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Richard; Salter, Emma; Howse, Imogen; Yule, William; Taylor, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether an early intervention using a psychological debriefing format is effective in preventing psychological distress in child road traffic accident survivors. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Accident and Emergency Department, Royal United Hospital, Bath. Subjects: 158 children aged 7-18. Follow-up

  7. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Determine the Effectiveness of an Early Psychological Intervention with Children Involved in Road Traffic Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Richard; Salter, Emma; Howse, Imogen; Yule, William; Taylor, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether an early intervention using a psychological debriefing format is effective in preventing psychological distress in child road traffic accident survivors. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Accident and Emergency Department, Royal United Hospital, Bath. Subjects: 158 children aged 7-18. Follow-up…

  8. Lobster Tail Ice Formation on Aerosurface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Glace Ice formation commonly refered to as 'Lobster Tail' by scientists and engineers, is caused to form on the leading edge of a aircraft tail section in the icing research tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio.

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Naturita, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (phase I), and the Ground Water Project (phase II). For the UMTRA Project site located near Naturita, Colorado (the Naturita site), phase I involves the removal of radioactively contaminated soils and materials and their transportation to a disposal site at Union Carbide Corporation`s Upper Burbank Repository at Uravan, Colorado, about 13 road miles (mi) (21 kilometers [km]) to the northwest. No uranium mill tailings are involved because the tailings were removed from the Naturita site and placed at Coke Oven, Colorado, during 1977 to 1979. Phase II of the project will evaluate the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing and its effect on human health or the environment; and will determine site-specific ground water compliance strategies in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. Human health risks could occur from drinking water pumped from a hypothetical well drilled in the contaminated ground water area. Environmental risks may result if plants or animals are exposed to contaminated ground water, or surface water that has received contaminated ground water. Therefore, a risk assessment is conducted for the Naturita site. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the Ground Water Project at the Naturita site. What follows is an evaluation of current and possible future impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results of this evaluation and further site characterization will be used to determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  10. The tail sheath structure of bacteriophage T4: a molecular machine for infecting bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Aksyuk, Anastasia A.; Leiman, Petr G.; Kurochkina, Lidia P.; Shneider, Mikhail M.; Kostyuchenko, Victor A.; Mesyanzhinov, Vadim V.; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2009-07-22

    The contractile tail of bacteriophage T4 is a molecular machine that facilitates very high viral infection efficiency. Its major component is a tail sheath, which contracts during infection to less than half of its initial length. The sheath consists of 138 copies of the tail sheath protein, gene product (gp) 18, which surrounds the central non-contractile tail tube. The contraction of the sheath drives the tail tube through the outer membrane, creating a channel for the viral genome delivery. A crystal structure of about three quarters of gp18 has been determined and was fitted into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the tail sheath before and after contraction. It was shown that during contraction, gp18 subunits slide over each other with no apparent change in their structure.

  11. Determination of genes and microRNAs involved in the resistance to fludarabine in vivo in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are often affected by genomic aberrations targeting key regulatory genes. Although fludarabine is the standard first line therapy to treat CLL, only few data are available about the resistance of B cells to this purine nucleoside analog in vivo. Here we sought to increase our understanding of fludarabine action and describe the mechanisms leading to resistance in vivo. We performed an analysis of genomic aberrations, gene expression profiles, and microRNAs expression in CLL blood B lymphocytes isolated during the course of patients' treatment with fludarabine. Results In sensitive patients, the differentially expressed genes we identified were mainly involved in p53 signaling, DNA damage response, cell cycle and cell death. In resistant patients, uncommon genomic abnormalities were observed and the resistance toward fludarabine could be characterized based on the expression profiles of genes implicated in lymphocyte proliferation, DNA repair, and cell growth and survival. Of particular interest in some patients was the amplification of MYC (8q) observed both at the gene and transcript levels, together with alterations of myc-transcriptional targets, including genes and miRNAs involved in the regulation of cell cycle and proliferation. Differential expression of the sulfatase SULF2 and of miR-29a, -181a, and -221 was also observed between resistant and sensitive patients before treatment. These observations were further confirmed on a validation cohort of CLL patients treated with fludarabine in vitro. Conclusion In the present study we identified genes and miRNAs that may predict clinical resistance of CLL to fludarabine, and describe an interesting oncogenic mechanism in CLL patients resistant to fludarabine by which the complete MYC-specific regulatory network was altered (DNA and RNA levels, and transcriptional targets). These results should prove useful for understanding and overcoming refractoriness to fludarabine and also for predicting the clinical outcome of CLL patients before or early during their treatment. PMID:20487546

  12. Transportation of the MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings to White Mesa Mill by Slurry Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Hochstein, R. F.; Warner, R.; Wetz, T. V.

    2003-02-26

    The Moab uranium mill tailings pile, located at the former Atlas Minerals Corporation site approximately three miles north of Moab, Utah, is now under the control of the US Department of Energy (''DOE''). The location of the tailings pile adjacent to the Colorado River, and the ongoing contamination of groundwater and seepage of pollutants into the river, have lead to the investigation, as part of the final site remediation program, of alternatives to relocate the tailings to a qualified permanent disposal site. This paper will describe the approach being taken by the team formed between International Uranium (USA) Corporation (''IUC'') and Washington Group International (''WGINT'') to develop an innovative technical proposal to relocate the Moab tailings to IUC's White Mesa Mill south of Blanding, Utah. The proposed approach for relocating the tailings involves using a slurry pipeline to transport the tailings to the White Mesa Mill. The White Mesa Mill is a fully licensed, active uranium mill site that is uniquely suited for permanent disposal of the Moab tailings. The tailings slurry would be dewatered at the White Mesa Mill, the slurry water would be recycled to the Moab site for reuse in slurry makeup, and the ''dry'' tailings would be permanently disposed of in an approved below grade cell at the mill site.

  13. Abaxial tail attachment of bovine spermatozoa and its effect on fertility

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Albert D.

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of abaxial sperm tails, accessory tails and double tails, was determined from semen evaluation records of 600 western Canadian range bulls and 449 bulls in Canadian artificial insemination centers. Spermatozoa with abaxial tails were produced by 10.5% of bulls, however, only 0.48% produced sperm with greater than 50% abaxial tails, and 0.86% of the 1049 bulls produced sperm with accessory and double tails. Three experiments were done to determine the importance of abaxial sperm tails to fertility. In experiments 1 and 2, frozen semen with 88%, 50% and 0% abaxial tails was used to inseminate synchronized heifers, which were allowed to develop pregnancy, and superovulated heifers, which were slaughtered prior to embryo recovery seven days after breeding. In experiment 3, a bull which produced 100% abaxial sperm was used in a competitive mating situation with three control bulls in a herd of 118 cows. The combined results of these experiments indicate that spermatozoa with abaxial tail attachment fertilize ova at a normal rate and are not associated with any increase in embryonic death. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:17423394

  14. Catalytic Analysis of APOBEC3G Involving Real-Time NMR Spectroscopy Reveals Nucleic Acid Determinants for Deamination

    PubMed Central

    Kamba, Keisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a single-stranded DNA-specific cytidine deaminase that preferentially converts cytidine to uridine at the third position of triplet cytosine (CCC) hotspots. A3G restricts the infectivity of viruses, such as HIV-1, by targeting CCC hotspots scattered through minus DNA strands, reverse-transcribed from genomic RNA. Previously, we developed a real-time NMR method and elucidated the origin of the 3'?5' polarity of deamination of DNA by the C-terminal domain of A3G (CD2), which is a phenomenon by which a hotspot located closer to the 5'-end is deaminated more effectively than one less close to the 5'-end, through quantitative analysis involving nonspecific binding to and sliding along DNA. In the present study we applied the real-time NMR method to analyze the catalytic activity of CD2 toward DNA oligonucleotides containing a nucleotide analog at a single or multiple positions. Analyses revealed the importance of the sugar and base moieties throughout the consecutive 5 nucleotides, the CCC hotspot being positioned at the center. It was also shown that the sugar or base moieties of the nucleotides outside this 5 nucleotide recognition sequence are also relevant as to CD2's activity. Analyses involving DNA oligonucleotides having two CCC hotspots linked by a long sequence of either deoxyribonucleotides, ribonucleotides or abasic deoxyribonucleotides suggested that the phosphate backbone is required for CD2 to slide along the DNA strand and to exert the 3'?5' polarity. Examination of the effects of different salt concentrations on the 3'?5' polarity indicated that the higher the salt concentration, the less prominent the 3'?5' polarity. This is most likely the result of alleviation of sliding due to a decrease in the affinity of CD2 with the phosphate backbone at high salt concentrations. We also investigated the reactivity of substrates containing 5-methylcytidine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytidine, and found that A3G exhibited low activity toward 5mC. PMID:25875164

  15. A feedback regulatory loop involving microRNA-9 and nuclear receptor TLX in neural stem cell fate determination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunnian; Sun, GuoQiang; Li, Shengxiu; Shi, Yanhong

    2009-04-01

    MicroRNAs have been implicated as having important roles in stem cell biology. MicroRNA-9 (miR-9) is expressed specifically in neurogenic areas of the brain and may be involved in neural stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. We showed previously that the nuclear receptor TLX is an essential regulator of neural stem cell self-renewal. Here we show that miR-9 suppresses TLX expression to negatively regulate neural stem cell proliferation and accelerate neural differentiation. Introducing a TLX expression vector that is not prone to miR-9 regulation rescued miR-9-induced proliferation deficiency and inhibited precocious differentiation. In utero electroporation of miR-9 in embryonic brains led to premature differentiation and outward migration of the transfected neural stem cells. Moreover, TLX represses expression of the miR-9 pri-miRNA. By forming a negative regulatory loop with TLX, miR-9 provides a model for controlling the balance between neural stem cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:19330006

  16. Liquid Chromatographic Detection of Permethrin from Filter Paper Wipes of White-tailed Deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, small-scale method for the determination of the presence or absence of permethrin on the hair coat of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), by high performance liquid chromatography was developed. White-tailed deer in South Texas and the northeastern U.S. are routinely tr...

  17. Uranium mill tailings quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Latkovich, J.M.

    1982-05-01

    Progress is reported on: radon barrier systems for uranium mill tailings; liner evaluation for uranium mill tailings; revegetation/rock cover for stabilization of inactive U-tailings sites; and application of long-term chemical biobarriers for uranium tailings.

  18. Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Giardia and Cryptosporidium infecting white-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Despite a white-tailed deer (WTD) population in the United States of approximately 32 million animals extremely little is known of the prevalence and species of the protists that infect these animals. The present study was undertaken to determine the presence of potential human protist pathogens in ...

  19. Analysis of Imp-C data from the magnetospheric tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Speiser, T. W.

    1973-01-01

    Satellite magnetic field measurements in the geomagnetic tail current sheet are analyzed to determine the normal field component, and other CS parameters such as thickness, motion, vector current density, etc., and to make correlations with auroral activity as measured by the A sub e index. The satellite data used in the initial part of this study were from Explorer 28 and Explorer 34 satellites.

  20. Ectoderm to mesoderm lineage switching during axolotl tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Karen; Tanaka, Elly M

    2002-12-01

    Foreign environments may induce adult stem cells to switch lineages and populate multiple tissue types, but whether this mechanism is used for tissue repair remains uncertain. Urodele amphibians can regenerate fully functional, multitissue structures including the limb and tail. To determine whether lineage switching is an integral feature of this regeneration, we followed individual spinal cord cells live during tail regeneration in the axolotl. Spinal cord cells frequently migrate into surrounding tissue to form regenerating muscle and cartilage. Thus, in axolotls, cells switch lineage during a real example of regeneration. PMID:12471259

  1. SASP, a Senescence-Associated Subtilisin Protease, is involved in reproductive development and determination of silique number in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Dana E; Borniego, Maria L; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari; Tyystjrvi, Esa; Guiamt, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Senescence involves increased expression of proteases, which may participate in nitrogen recycling or cellular signalling. 2D zymograms detected two protein species with increased proteolytic activity in senescing leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. A proteomic analysis revealed that both protein species correspond to a subtilisin protease encoded by At3g14067, termed Senescence-Associated Subtilisin Protease (SASP). SASP mRNA levels and enzyme activity increase during leaf senescence in leaves senescing during both the vegetative or the reproductive phase of the plant life cycle, but this increase is more pronounced in reproductive plants. SASP is expressed in all above-ground organs, but not in roots. Putative AtSASP orthologues were identified in dicot and monocot crop species. A phylogenetic analysis shows AtSASP and its putative orthologues clustering in one discrete group of subtilisin proteases in which no other Arabidospsis subtilisin protease is present. Phenotypic analysis of two knockout lines for SASP showed that mutant plants develop more inflorescence branches during reproductive development. Both AtSASP and its putative rice orthologue (OsSASP) were constitutively expressed in sasp-1 to complement the mutant phenotype. At maturity, sasp-1 plants produced 25% more inflorescence branches and siliques than either the wild-type or the rescued lines. These differences were mostly due to an increased number of second and third order branches. The increased number of siliques was compensated for by a small decrease (5.0%) in seed size. SASP downregulates branching and silique production during monocarpic senescence, and its function is at least partially conserved between Arabidopsis and rice. PMID:25371504

  2. Xtal-xplore-R: a graphical tool for exploring the residual function involved in crystal structure determination

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Jan Marten; Roth, Georg

    2015-01-01

    This work presents Xtal-xplore-R, a tool dedicated to the visualization of two-dimensional cuts through the multidimensional crystallographic residual function. It imports arbitrary crystal structures, generates artificial diffraction data, and calculates and investigates the residual function in parameter space. The program serves two major purposes. Firstly, it is part of a more general project dealing with structure determination via global optimization techniques. In this context, the tool is being used to systematically analyse characteristic universal features of the target function (residual function) which can be used to develop appropriate problem-specific heuristic optimization algorithms. Secondly, Xtal-xplore-R is intended as a didactic tool to visualize how changes in atom parameters affect the residual function and can be used to demonstrate manual structure optimization for simple crystal structures. PMID:26306094

  3. Instanton calculus of Lifshitz tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaida, Sho

    2016-02-01

    Some degree of quenched disorder is present in nearly all solids, and can have a marked impact on their macroscopic properties. A manifestation of this effect is the Lifshitz tail of localized states that then gets attached to the energy spectrum, resulting in the nonzero density of states in the band gap. We present here a systematic approach for deriving the asymptotic behavior of the density of states and of the typical shape of the disorder potentials in the Lifshitz tail. The analysis is carried out first for the well-controlled case of noninteracting particles moving in a Gaussian random potential and then for a broad class of disordered scale-invariant models—pertinent to a variety of systems ranging from semiconductors to semimetals to quantum critical systems. For relevant Gaussian disorder, we obtain the general expression for the density of states deep in the tail, with the rate of exponential suppression governed by the dynamical exponent and spatial dimensions. For marginally relevant disorder, however, we would expect a power-law scaling. We discuss the implications of these results for understanding conduction in disordered materials.

  4. Tidal Tails of Globular Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yim, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Hyung Mok

    2002-06-01

    We present N-body simulations of globular clusters including gravitational field of the Galaxy, in order to study effects of tidal field systematically on the shape of outer parts of globular clusters using NBODY6. The Galaxy is assumed to be composed of central bulge and outer halo. We investigate the cluster of multi-mass models with a power-law initial mass function (IMF) starting with different initial masses, initial number of particles, different slopes of the IMF and different orbits of the cluster. We have examined the general evolution of the clusters, the shape of outer parts of the clusters, density profiles and the direction of tidal tails. The density profiles appear to become somewhat shallower just outside the tidal boundary consistent with some observed data. The position angle of the tidal tail depends on the location in the Galaxy as well as the direction of the motion of clusters. We found that the clusters become more elongated at the apogalacticon than at the perigalacticon. The tidal tails may be used to trace the orbital paths of globular clusters.

  5. Determining the Involvement and Therapeutic Implications of Host Cellular Factors in Hepatitis C Virus Cell-to-Cell Spread

    PubMed Central

    Barretto, Naina; Sainz, Bruno; Hussain, Snawar

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 180 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of liver diseases such as fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. It has been shown that HCV can spread to naive cells using two distinct entry mechanisms, cell-free entry of infectious extracellular virions that have been released by infected cells and direct cell-to-cell transmission. Here, we examined host cell requirements for HCV spread and found that the cholesterol uptake receptor NPC1L1, which we recently identified as being an antiviral target involved in HCV cell-free entry/spread, is also required for the cell-to-cell spread. In contrast, the very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) pathway, which is required for the secretion of cell-free infectious virus and thus has been identified as an antiviral target for blocking cell-free virus secretion/spread, is not required for cell-to-cell spread. Noting that HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell spread share some common factors but not others, we tested the therapeutic implications of these observations and demonstrate that inhibitors that target cell factors required for both forms of HCV spread exhibit synergy when used in combination with interferon (a representative inhibitor of intracellular HCV production), while inhibitors that block only cell-free spread do not. This provides insight into the mechanistic basis of synergy between interferon and HCV entry inhibitors and highlights the broader, previously unappreciated impact blocking HCV cell-to-cell spread can have on the efficacy of HCV combination therapies. IMPORTANCE HCV can spread to naive cells using distinct mechanisms: cell-free entry of extracellular virus and direct cell-to-cell transmission. Herein, we identify the host cell HCV entry factor NPC1L1 as also being required for HCV cell-to-cell spread, while showing that the VLDL pathway, which is required for the secretion of cell-free infectious virus, is not required for cell-to-cell spread. While both these host factors are considered viable antiviral targets, we demonstrate that only inhibitors that block factors required for both forms of HCV entry/spread (i.e., NPC1L1) exhibit synergy when used in combination with interferon, while inhibitors that block factors required only for cell-free spread (i.e., VLDL pathway components) do not. Thus, this study advances our understanding of HCV cell-to-cell spread, provides mechanistic insight into the basis of drug synergy, and highlights inhibition of HCV spread as a previously unappreciated consideration in HCV therapy design. PMID:24554660

  6. Bioinformatics analysis of thousands of TCGA tumors to determine the involvement of epigenetic regulators in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Many cancer cells show distorted epigenetic landscapes. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project profiles thousands of tumors, allowing the discovery of somatic alterations in the epigenetic machinery and the identification of potential cancer drivers among members of epigenetic protein families. Methods We integrated mutation, expression, and copy number data from 5943 tumors from 13 cancer types to train a classification model that predicts the likelihood of being an oncogene (OG), tumor suppressor (TSG) or neutral gene (NG). We applied this predictor to epigenetic regulator genes (ERGs), and used differential expression and correlation network analysis to identify dysregulated ERGs along with co-expressed cancer genes. Furthermore, we quantified global proteomic changes by mass spectrometry after EZH2 inhibition. Results Mutation-based classifiers uncovered the OG-like profile of DNMT3A and TSG-like profiles for several ERGs. Differential gene expression and correlation network analyses revealed that EZH2 is the most significantly over-expressed ERG in cancer and is co-regulated with a cell cycle network. Proteomic analysis showed that EZH2 inhibition induced down-regulation of cell cycle regulators in lymphoma cells. Conclusions Using classical driver genes to train an OG/TSG predictor, we determined the most predictive features at the gene level. Our predictor uncovered one OG and several TSGs among ERGs. Expression analyses elucidated multiple dysregulated ERGs including EZH2 as member of a co-expressed cell cycle network. PMID:26110843

  7. Volatile Compounds in Honey: A Review on Their Involvement in Aroma, Botanical Origin Determination and Potential Biomedical Activities

    PubMed Central

    Manyi-Loh, Christy E.; Ndip, Roland N.; Clarke, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in honey are obtained from diverse biosynthetic pathways and extracted by using various methods associated with varying degrees of selectivity and effectiveness. These compounds are grouped into chemical categories such as aldehyde, ketone, acid, alcohol, hydrocarbon, norisoprenoids, terpenes and benzene compounds and their derivatives, furan and pyran derivatives. They represent a fingerprint of a specific honey and therefore could be used to differentiate between monofloral honeys from different floral sources, thus providing valuable information concerning the honey’s botanical and geographical origin. However, only plant derived compounds and their metabolites (terpenes, norisoprenoids and benzene compounds and their derivatives) must be employed to discriminate among floral origins of honey. Notwithstanding, many authors have reported different floral markers for honey of the same floral origin, consequently sensory analysis, in conjunction with analysis of VOCs could help to clear this ambiguity. Furthermore, VOCs influence honey’s aroma described as sweet, citrus, floral, almond, rancid, etc. Clearly, the contribution of a volatile compound to honey aroma is determined by its odor activity value. Elucidation of the aroma compounds along with floral origins of a particular honey can help to standardize its quality and avoid fraudulent labeling of the product. Although only present in low concentrations, VOCS could contribute to biomedical activities of honey, especially the antioxidant effect due to their natural radical scavenging potential. PMID:22272147

  8. Determination of Ghrelin Structure in the Barfin Flounder (Verasper moseri) and Involvement of Ingested Fatty Acids in Ghrelin Acylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Andoh, Tadashi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Amiya, Noriko; Matsuda, Kouhei; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that is acylated with a fatty acid, usually n-octanoic acid, at the third amino acid (aa) residue (usually a serine or threonine), and this acylation is known to be essential for ghrelin activity not only in mammals but also in non-mammals, such as fish. However, the modification mechanisms of ghrelin modification in fish are not known. In this study, we elucidated the structure of ghrelin in a teleost, the barfin flounder (Verasper moseri), and determined whether ingested free fatty acids of various chain lengths participated in ghrelin acylation. Complementary DNA cloning revealed the barfin flounder prepro-ghrelin to be a 106-aa peptide and the mature ghrelin to be a 20-aa peptide (GSSFLSPSHKPPNKGKPPRA). However, purification of ghrelin peptides from stomach extracts demonstrated that the major form of the hormone was a 19-aa decanoylated peptide [GSS(C10:0)FLSPSHKPPNKGKPPR] missing the last alanine of the 20-aa peptide. Ingestion of feed enriched with n-heptanoic acid (C7), n-octanoic acid (C8), or n-non-anoic acid (C9) changed the modification status of the peptide: ingestion of C8 or C9 increased the amount of C8:0 or C9:0 19-aa ghrelin, respectively, but no C7:0 ghrelin was isolated after ingestion of C7. These results indicate that ingested free fatty acids are substrates for ghrelin acylation in the barfin flounder, but the types of free fatty acids utilized as substrates may be limited. PMID:24027560

  9. Development and application of a hybrid method involving interpolation and ab initio calculations for the determination of transition states.

    PubMed

    Goodrow, Anthony; Bell, Alexis T; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Transition state search algorithms, such as the nudged elastic band can fail, if a good initial guess of the transition state structure cannot be provided. The growing string method (GSM) [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7877 (2004)] eliminates the need for an initial guess of the transition state. While this method only requires knowledge of the reactant and product geometries, it is computationally intensive. To alleviate the bottlenecks in the GSM, several modifications were implemented: Cartesian coordinates were replaced by internal coordinates, the steepest descent method for minimization of orthogonal forces to locate the reaction path was replaced by the conjugate gradient method, and an interpolation scheme was used to estimate the energy and gradient, thereby reducing the calls to the quantum mechanical (QM) code. These modifications were tested to measure the reduction in computational time for four cases of increasing complexity: the Muller-Brown potential energy surface, alanine dipeptide isomerization, H abstraction in methanol oxidation, and C-H bond activation in oxidative carbonylation of toluene to p-toluic acid. These examples show that the modified GSM can achieve two- to threefold speedups (measured in terms of the reduction in actual QM gradients computed) over the original version of the method without compromising accuracy of the geometry and energy of the final transition state. Additional savings in computational effort can be achieved by carrying out the initial search for the minimum energy pathway (MEP) using a lower level of theory (e.g., HF/STO-3G) and then refining the MEP using density functional theory at the B3LYP level with larger basis sets (e.g., 6-31G( *), LANL2DZ). Thus, a general strategy for determining transition state structures is to initiate the modified GSM using a low level of theory with minimal basis sets and then refining the calculation at a higher level of theory with larger basis sets. PMID:19045335

  10. Long-Term Performance of Uranium Tailings Disposal Cells - 13340

    SciTech Connect

    Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary; Pill, Ken; Tachiev, Georgio; Noosai, Nantaporn; Villamizar, Viviana

    2013-07-01

    Recently, there has been interest in the performance and evolution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell covers because some sites are not compliant with groundwater standards. Field observations of UMTRA disposal cells indicate that rock covers tend to become vegetated and that saturated conductivities in the upper portion of radon barriers may increase due to freeze/thaw cycles and biointrusion. This paper describes the results of modeling that addresses whether these potential changes and transient drainage of moisture in the tailings affect overall performance of the disposal cells. A numerical unsaturated/saturated 3-dimensional flow model was used to simulate whether increases in saturated conductivities in radon barriers with rock covers affect the overall performance of the disposal cells using field data from the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site. A unique modeling approach allowed simulation with daily climatic conditions to determine changes in moisture and moisture flux from the disposal cell. Modeling results indicated that increases in the saturated conductivity at the top of radon barrier do not influence flux from the tailings with time because the tailings behave similar hydraulically to the radon barrier. The presence of a thin layer of low conductivity material anywhere in the cover or tailings restricts flux in the worst case to the saturated conductivity of that material. Where materials are unsaturated at depth within the radon barrier of tailings slimes, conductivities are typically less than 10{sup -8} centimeters per second. If the low conductivity layer is deep within the disposal cell, its saturated properties are less likely to change with time. The significance of this modeling is that operation and maintenance of the disposal cells can be minimized if they are allowed to progress to a natural condition with some vegetation and soil genesis. Because the covers and underlying tailings have a very low saturated hydraulic conductivity after transient drainage, eventually the amount of moisture leaving the tailings has a negligible effect on groundwater quality. Although some of the UMTRA sites are not in compliance with the groundwater standards, the explanation may be legacy contamination from mining, or earlier higher fluxes from the tailings or unlined processing ponds. Investigation of other legacy sources at the UMTRA sites may help explain persistent groundwater contamination. (authors)

  11. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  12. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2010-08-17

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 {angstrom} crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  13. Evidence for involvement of 3'-untranslated region in determining angiotensin II receptor coupling specificity to G-protein.

    PubMed Central

    Thekkumkara, Thomas J; Linas, Stuart L

    2003-01-01

    The mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of many genes has been identified as an important regulator of the mRNA transcript itself as well as the translated product. Previously, we demonstrated that Chinese-hamster ovary-K1 cells stably expressing angiotensin receptor subtypes (AT(1A)) with and without 3'-UTR differed in AT(1A) mRNA content and its coupling with intracellular signalling pathways. Moreover, RNA mobility-shift assay and UV cross-linking studies using the AT(1A) 3'-UTR probe identified a major mRNA-binding protein complex of 55 kDa in Chinese-hamster ovary-K1 cells. In the present study, we have determined the functional significance of the native AT(1A) receptor 3'-UTR in rat liver epithelial (WB) cell lines by co-expressing the AT(1A) 3'-UTR sequence 'decoy' to compete with the native receptor 3'-UTR for its mRNA-binding proteins. PCR analysis using specific primers for the AT(1A) receptor and [(125)I]angiotensin II (AngII)-binding studies demonstrated the expression of the native AT(1A) receptors in WB (B(max)=2.7 pmol/mg of protein, K(d)=0.56 nM). Northern-blot analysis showed a significant increase in native receptor mRNA expression in 3'-UTR decoy-expressing cells, confirming the role of 3'-UTR in mRNA destabilization. Compared with vehicle control, AngII induced DNA and protein synthesis in wild-type WB as measured by [(3)H]thymidine and [(3)H]leucine incorporation respectively. Activation of [(3)H]thymidine and [(3)H]leucine correlated with a significant increase in cell number (cellular hyperplasia). In these cells, AngII stimulated GTPase activity by AT(1) receptor coupling with G-protein alpha i. We also delineated that functional coupling of AT(1A) receptor with G-protein alpha i is an essential mechanism for AngII-mediated cellular hyperplasia in WB by specifically blocking G-protein alpha i activation. In contrast with wild-type cells, stable expression of the 3'-UTR 'decoy' produced AngII-stimulated protein synthesis and cellular hypertrophy as demonstrated by a significant increase in [(3)H]leucine incorporation and no increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation and cell number. Furthermore, [(125)I]AngII cross-linking and immunoprecipitation studies using specific G-protein alpha antibodies showed that in wild-type cells, the AT(1A) receptor coupled with G-protein alpha i, whereas in cells expressing the 3'-UTR 'decoy', the AT(1A) receptor coupled with G-protein alpha q. These findings indicate that the 3'-UTR-mediated changes in receptor function may be mediated in part by a switch from G-protein alpha i to G-protein alpha q coupling of the receptor. Our results suggest that the 3'-UTR-mediated post-transcriptional modification of the AT(1A) receptor is critical for regulating tissue-specific receptor functions. PMID:12431186

  14. Effects of tail span and empennage arrangement on drag of a typical single-engine fighter aft end

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, J. R., II; Berrier, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 16 foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the effects of tail span and empennage arrangement on drag of a single engine nozzle/afterbody model. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.50 to 1.20, nozzle pressures frm 1.0 (jet off) to 8.0, and angles of attack from -3 to 9 deg, depending upon Mach numbers. Three empennage arrangements (aft, staggered, and forward) were investigated with several different tail spans. The results of the investigation indicate that tail span and position have a significant effect on the drag at transonic speeds. Unfavorable tail interference was largely due to the outer portion of the tail surfaces. The inner portion near the nozzle and afterbody did little to increase drag other than surface skin friction. Tail positions forward of the nozzle generally had lower tail interference.

  15. Uranium mill tailings neutralization: contaminant complexation and tailings leaching studies

    SciTech Connect

    Opitz, B.E.; Dodson, M.E.; Serne, R.J.

    1985-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed to compare the effectiveness of limestone (CaCO/sub 3/) and hydrated lime (Ca(OH)/sub 2/) for improving waste water quality through the neutralization of acidic uranium mill tailings liquor. The experiments were designed to also assess the effects of three proposed mechanisms - carbonate complexation, elevated pH, and colloidal particle adsorption - on the solubility of toxic contaminants found in a typical uranium mill waste solution. Of special interest were the effects each of these possible mechanisms had on the solution concentrations of trace metals such as Cd, Co, Mo, Zn, and U after neutralization. Results indicated that the neutralization of acidic tailings to a pH of 7.3 using hydrated lime provided the highest overall waste water quality. Both the presence of a carbonate source or elevating solution pH beyond pH = 7.3 resulted in a lowering of previously achieved water quality, while adsorption of contaminants onto colloidal particles was not found to affect the solution concentration of any constituent investigated. 24 refs., 8 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. A Phenotypic Screen in Zebrafish Identifies a Novel Small-Molecule Inducer of Ectopic Tail Formation Suggestive of Alterations in Non-Canonical Wnt/PCP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gebruers, Evelien; Cordero-Maldonado, Mara Lorena; Gray, Alexander I.; Clements, Carol; Harvey, Alan L.; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; de Witte, Peter A. M.; Crawford, Alexander D.; Esguerra, Camila V.

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a zebrafish-based phenotypic screen of over 3000 plant-derived secondary metabolite extracts with the goal of identifying novel small-molecule modulators of the BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. One of the bioactive plant extracts identified in this screen Jasminum gilgianum, an Oleaceae species native to Papua New Guinea induced ectopic tails during zebrafish embryonic development. As ectopic tail formation occurs when BMP or non-canonical Wnt signaling is inhibited during the tail protrusion process, we suspected a constituent of this extract to act as a modulator of these pathways. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out on the basis of this zebrafish phenotype, identifying para-coumaric acid methyl ester (pCAME) as the active compound. We then performed an in-depth phenotypic analysis of pCAME-treated zebrafish embryos, including a tissue-specific marker analysis of the secondary tails. We found pCAME to synergize with the BMP-inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in inducing ectopic tails, and causing convergence-extension defects in compound-treated embryos. These results indicate that pCAME may interfere with non-canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Jnk, a downstream target of Wnt/PCP signaling (via morpholino antisense knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with the kinase inhibitor SP600125) phenocopied pCAME-treated embryos. However, immunoblotting experiments revealed pCAME to not directly inhibit Jnk-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun, suggesting additional targets of SP600125, and/or other pathways, as possibly being involved in the ectopic tail formation activity of pCAME. Further investigation of pCAMEs mechanism of action will help determine this compounds pharmacological utility. PMID:24349481

  17. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  18. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers. PMID:25528133

  19. Heavy metal leaching from mine tailings as affected by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, D.; Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-12-01

    A column experiment was conducted to determine the impact of soil cover and plants on heavy metal leaching from mine tailings and heavy metal contaminated soil. Columns made of PVC were constructed with 30 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm of clean topsoil. Two grasses, tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), were grown in the columns. The columns were leached at a slow rate for 1 yr with a 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution under unsaturated conditions. The presence of both tall fescue and big bluestem increased Zn and Cd concentrations in the leachate. Lead concentrations in leachates were not affected by the presence of plants. Although plants generally reduced the total amount of water leached, total mass of Zn and Cd leached generally was not impacted by plants. Total mass of Pb leached was positively correlated with total leachate collected from each column. Covering the mine tailings with 60 cm of topsoil increased the mass of Zn and Cd leached relative to no topsoil. When the subsoil was absent, Zn and Cd leaching increased by as much as 20-fold, verifying the ability of soil to act as a sink for metals. Mine tailing remediation by establishing vegetation can reduce Pb movement but may enhance short-term Cd and Zn leaching. However, the changes were relatively small and do not outweigh the benefits of using vegetation in mine tailings reclamation.

  20. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000 Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers.

  1. Ion populations in the tail of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaisberg, O.; Fedorov, A.; Dunjushkin, F.; Kozhukhovsky, A.; Smirnov, V.; Avanov, L.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma measurements in the tails of Venus showed the existence of several ion populations. Measurements performed on Venera and Pioneer Venus spacecraft at different planetocentric distances showed the evolution of the plasma parameters along the tail. Low-energy ion fluxes measured in the tail at close downstream distances, are also observed farther downstream, and show low acceleration from 0.5 R(sub V) to 12 R(sub V). High energy ions (energetic O(+) ions) reported from Pioneer Venus Orbiter (PVO) observations in the tail at 10-12 R(sub V) seem to be the same ion component that was observed as energetic ions at the tail boundary close to the planet on Venera spacecraft. We give evidence that these ions are accelerated in the narrow shear layer near the tail boundary.

  2. Students' Perceptions of a Highly Controversial yet Keystone Species, the Black-Tailed Prairie Dog: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox-Parrish, Lynne; Jurin, Richard R.

    2008-01-01

    The authors used a case-study methodology to explore the perceptions of 30 9th-grade biology students relative to black-tailed prairie dogs. The case study, which involved classroom- and field-based experiences that focused on black-tailed prairie dogs, revealed 3 major themes: apathy, egocentrism, and naive conceptions. The authors had hoped that

  3. Students' Perceptions of a Highly Controversial yet Keystone Species, the Black-Tailed Prairie Dog: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox-Parrish, Lynne; Jurin, Richard R.

    2008-01-01

    The authors used a case-study methodology to explore the perceptions of 30 9th-grade biology students relative to black-tailed prairie dogs. The case study, which involved classroom- and field-based experiences that focused on black-tailed prairie dogs, revealed 3 major themes: apathy, egocentrism, and naive conceptions. The authors had hoped that…

  4. Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos

    PubMed Central

    Jusufi, Ardian; Goldman, Daniel I.; Revzen, Shai; Full, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Geckos are nature's elite climbers. Their remarkable climbing feats have been attributed to specialized feet with hairy toes that uncurl and peel in milliseconds. Here, we report that the secret to the gecko's arboreal acrobatics includes an active tail. We examine the tail's role during rapid climbing, aerial descent, and gliding. We show that a gecko's tail functions as an emergency fifth leg to prevent falling during rapid climbing. A response initiated by slipping causes the tail tip to push against the vertical surface, thereby preventing pitch-back of the head and upper body. When pitch-back cannot be prevented, geckos avoid falling by placing their tail in a posture similar to a bicycle's kickstand. Should a gecko fall with its back to the ground, a swing of its tail induces the most rapid, zero-angular momentum air-righting response yet measured. Once righted to a sprawled gliding posture, circular tail movements control yaw and pitch as the gecko descends. Our results suggest that large, active tails can function as effective control appendages. These results have provided biological inspiration for the design of an active tail on a climbing robot, and we anticipate their use in small, unmanned gliding vehicles and multisegment spacecraft. PMID:18347344

  5. Time course for tail regression during metamorphosis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis.

    PubMed

    Matsunobu, Shohei; Sasakura, Yasunori

    2015-09-01

    In most ascidians, the tadpole-like swimming larvae dramatically change their body-plans during metamorphosis and develop into sessile adults. The mechanisms of ascidian metamorphosis have been researched and debated for many years. Until now information on the detailed time course of the initiation and completion of each metamorphic event has not been described. One dramatic and important event in ascidian metamorphosis is tail regression, in which ascidian larvae lose their tails to adjust themselves to sessile life. In the present study, we measured the time associated with tail regression in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Larvae are thought to acquire competency for each metamorphic event in certain developmental periods. We show that the timing with which the competence for tail regression is acquired is determined by the time since hatching, and this timing is not affected by the timing of post-hatching events such as adhesion. Because larvae need to adhere to substrates with their papillae to induce tail regression, we measured the duration for which larvae need to remain adhered in order to initiate tail regression and the time needed for the tail to regress. Larvae acquire the ability to adhere to substrates before they acquire tail regression competence. We found that when larvae adhered before they acquired tail regression competence, they were able to remember the experience of adhesion until they acquired the ability to undergo tail regression. The time course of the events associated with tail regression provides a valuable reference, upon which the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ascidian metamorphosis can be elucidated. PMID:26102482

  6. Tail Biting in Pigs: Blood Serotonin and Fearfulness as Pieces of the Puzzle?

    PubMed Central

    Ursinus, Winanda W.; Van Reenen, Cornelis G.; Reimert, Inonge; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread problem in intensive pig farming. The tendency to develop this damaging behaviour has been suggested to relate to serotonergic functioning and personality characteristics of pigs. We investigated whether tail biting in pigs can be associated with blood serotonin and with their behavioural and physiological responses to novelty. Pigs (n = 480) were born in conventional farrowing pens and after weaning at four weeks of age they were either housed barren (B) or in straw-enriched (E) pens. Individual pigs were exposed to a back test and novel environment test before weaning, and after weaning to a novel object (i.e. bucket) test in an unfamiliar arena. A Principal Component Analysis on behaviours during the tests and salivary cortisol (novel object test only) revealed five factors for both housing systems, labeled ‘Early life exploration’, ‘Near bucket’, ‘Cortisol’, ‘Vocalizations & standing alert’, and ‘Back test activity’. Blood samples were taken at 8, 9 and 22 weeks of age to determine blood platelet serotonin. In different phases of life, pigs were classified as tail biter/non-tail biter based on tail biting behaviour, and as victim/non-victim based on tail wounds. A combination of both classifications resulted in four pig types: biters, victims, biter/victims, and neutrals. Generally, only in phases of life during which pigs were classified as tail biters, they seemed to have lower blood platelet serotonin storage and higher blood platelet uptake velocities. Victims also seemed to have lower blood serotonin storage. Additionally, in B housing, tail biters seemed to consistently have lower scores of the factor ‘Near bucket’, possibly indicating a higher fearfulness in tail biters. Further research is needed to elucidate the nature of the relationship between peripheral 5-HT, fearfulness and tail biting, and to develop successful strategies and interventions to prevent and reduce tail biting. PMID:25188502

  7. Arsenic Fractionation in Tailing Piles in Zimapn, Hidalgo, Mxico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceniceros, N.

    2001-12-01

    Zimapn, Hidalgo, is located in a semiarid region in the central part of Mxico and has been one of the main mining district of this country. As a result of the mining activities, residual material has been deposited in the surroundings of town. Arsenic ground water pollution has been reported produced by natural and antropogenic sources . X-ray diffraction showed presence of sulfide minerals in tailing piles, such as arsenopyrite. To determine the arsenic mobility, samples from tailings were analyzed by sequential extraction procedure. Arsenic was determined on extraction solutions at each step by HG-AAS. The extraction was done with different chemicals to determine As exchangeable, As bound to carbonates or specifically adsorbed, As bound to Fe-Al oxides, As bound to organic matter and sulfides, and As residual. Most of the arsenic was contained in the Fe-Al oxides an residual fractions. Nevertheless The As content in the exchangeable fraction was found to be of environmental risk.

  8. Quantitative Trait Loci Involved in Sex Determination and Body Growth in the Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata L.) through Targeted Genome Scan

    PubMed Central

    Loukovitis, Dimitrios; Sarropoulou, Elena; Tsigenopoulos, Costas S.; Batargias, Costas; Magoulas, Antonios; Apostolidis, Apostolos P.; Chatziplis, Dimitrios; Kotoulas, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    Among vertebrates, teleost fish exhibit a considerably wide range of sex determination patterns that may be influenced by extrinsic parameters. However even for model fish species like the zebrafish Danio rerio the precise mechanisms involved in primary sex determination have not been studied extensively. The zebrafish, a gonochoristic species, is lacking discernible sex chromosomes and the sex of juvenile fish is difficult to determine. Sequential protandrous hermaphrodite species provide distinct determination of the gender and allow studying the sex determination process by looking at the mechanism of sex reversal. This is the first attempt to understand the genetic basis of phenotypic variation for sex determination and body weight in a sequential protandrous hermaphrodite species, the gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata). This work demonstrates a fast and efficient strategy for Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) detection in the gilthead sea bream, a non-model but target hermaphrodite fish species. Therefore a comparative mapping approach was performed to query syntenies against two other Perciformes, the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax), a gonochoristic species and the Asian sea bass (Lates calcarifer) a protandrous hermaphrodite. In this manner two significant QTLs, one QTL affecting both body weight and sex and one QTL affecting sex, were detected on the same linkage group. The co-segregation of the two QTLs provides a genomic base to the observed genetic correlation between these two traits in sea bream as well as in other teleosts. The identification of QTLs linked to sex reversal and growth, will contribute significantly to a better understanding of the complex nature of sex determination in S. aurata where most individuals reverse to the female sex at the age of two years through development and maturation of the ovarian portion of the gonad and regression of the testicular area. [Genomic sequences reported in this manuscript have been submitted to GenBank under accession numbers HQ021443HQ021749.] PMID:21304996

  9. MESSENGER observations of extreme loading and unloading of Mercury's magnetic tail.

    PubMed

    Slavin, James A; Anderson, Brian J; Baker, Daniel N; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E; Ho, George C; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M; McNutt, Ralph L; Nittler, Larry R; Raines, Jim M; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C; Starr, Richard D; Trávnícek, Pavel M; Zurbuchen, Thomas H

    2010-08-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetic tail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 minutes. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is lower by a factor of approximately 10 and typical durations are approximately 1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of substorms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere, suggests that such circulation determines the substorm time scale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby. PMID:20647422

  10. Groundwater leaching of neutralized and untreated acid-leached uranium-mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Begej, C.W.; Campbell, A.C.; Sauter, N.N.; Opitz, B.E.; Sherwood, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    Tailings neutralization was examined to determine the effect of neutralization on contaminant release. Column leaching of acid extracted uranium mill tailings from Exxon Highland Mill, Wyoming, Pathfinder Gas Hills Mill, Wyoming, and the Dawn Midnite Mill, Washington, resulted in the flushing of high concentrations of salts in the first four pore volumes of leachate, followed by a steady decrease to the original groundwater salt concentrations. Neutralization decreased the concentration of salts and radionuclides leaching from the tailings and decreased the volume of solution required to return the solution to the groundwater pH and EC. Radium-226 and uranium-238 leached quickly from the tailings in the initial pore volumes of both neutralized and unneutralized tailings, and then decreased significantly. 6 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Detection of massive tidal tails around the globular cluster Pal 5 with SDSS commissioning data

    SciTech Connect

    Odenkirchen, Michael; Grebel, Eva K.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Dehnen, Walter; Ibata, Rodrigo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Stolte, Andrea; Wolf, Christian; Anderson, John E.; Bahcall, Neta A.; Brinkmann, Jon; Csabai, Istvan; Hennessy, G.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Lupton, Robert H.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stoughton, Chris; York, Donald G.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron. /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr. /Fermilab /Princeton U. Observ. /Apache Point Observ. /Johns Hopkins U. /Naval Observ., Wash., D.C. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Naval Observ., Flagstaff

    2000-12-01

    We report the discovery of two well-defined tidal tails emerging from the sparse remote globular cluster Palomar 5. These tails stretch out symmetrically to both sides of the cluster in the direction of constant Galactic latitude and subtend an angle of 2.6{sup o} on the sky. The tails have been detected in commissioning data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), providing deep five-color photometry in a 2.5{sup o}-wide band along the equator. The stars in the tails make up a substantial part ({approx} 1/3) of the current total population of cluster stars in the magnitude interval 19.5 {le} i* {le} 22.0. This reveals that the cluster is subject to heavy mass loss. The orientation of the tails provides an important key for the determination of the cluster's Galactic orbit.

  12. A Tale of Two Tails: Exploring Stellar Populations in the Tidal Tails of NGC 3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy interactions can inject material into the intergalactic medium via violent gravitational dynamics, often visualized in tidal tails. The composition of these tails has remained a mystery, as previous studies have focused on detecting tidal features, rather than the composite material itself. We have developed an observing program using deep, multiband imaging to probe the chaotic regions of tidal tails in search for an underlying stellar population. NGC 3256's twin tidal tails serve as a case study for this new technique. Our results show color values of u - g = 1.15 and r - i = 0.08 for the Western tail, and u - g = 1.33 and r - i = 0.22 for the Eastern tail, corresponding to discrepant ages between the tails of approximately 320 Myr and 785 Myr, respectively. With the interaction age of the system measured at 400 Myr, we find the stellar light in Western tail to be dominated by disrupted star clusters formed during and after the interaction, whereas the light from the Eastern tail is dominated by a 10 Gyr population originating from the host galaxies. We fit the Eastern tail color to a Mixed Stellar Population (MSP) model comprised 94% by mass of a 10 Gyr stellar population, and 6% of a 309 Myr population. We find 52% of the bolometric flux originating from this 10 Gyr population. We also detect a blue to red color gradient in each tail, running from galactic center to tail tip. In addition to tidal tail light, we detect 29 star cluster candidates (SCCs) in the Western tail and 19 in the Eastern, with mean ages of 282 Myr and 98 Myr respectively. Interestingly, we find an excess of very blue SCCs in the Eastern tail as compared to the Western tail, marking a recent, small episode of star formation.

  13. Determinants of Plant Growth-promoting Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 Involved in Induction of Systemic Resistance against Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum in Tobacco Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Sumayo, Marilyn; Hahm, Mi-Seon; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2013-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Ochrobactrum lupini KUDC1013 elicited induced systemic resistance (ISR) in tobacco against soft rot disease caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. We investigated of its factors involved in ISR elicitation. To characterize the ISR determinants, KUDC1013 cell suspension, heat-treated cells, supernatant from a culture medium, crude bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and flagella were tested for their ISR activities. Both LPS and flagella from KUDC1013 were effective in ISR elicitation. Crude cell free supernatant elicited ISR and factors with the highest ISR activity were retained in the n-butanol fraction. Analysis of the ISR-active fraction revealed the metabolites, phenylacetic acid (PAA), 1-hexadecene and linoleic acid (LA), as elicitors of ISR. Treatment of tobacco with these compounds significantly decreased the soft rot disease symptoms. This is the first report on the ISR determinants by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) KUDC1013 and identifying PAA, 1-hexadecene and LA as ISR-related compounds. This study shows that KUDC1013 has a great potential as biological control agent because of its multiple factors involved in induction of systemic resistance against phytopathogens. PMID:25288944

  14. Identification of regions interacting with ovo{sup D} mutations: Potential new genes involved in germline sex determination or differentiation in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, D.; Oliver, B.; Mahowald, A.P.

    1995-02-01

    Only a few Drosophila melanogaster germline sex determination genes are known, and there have been no systematic screens to identify new genes involved in this important biological process. The ovarian phenotypes produced by females mutant for dominant alleles of the ovo gene are modified in flies with altered doses of other loci involved in germline sex determination in Drosophila (Sex-lethal{sup +}, snas fille{sup +} and ovarian tumor{sup +}). This observation constitutes the basis for a screen to identify additional genes required for proper establishment of germline sexual identity. We tested 300 deletions, which together cover {approximately}58% of the euchromatic portion of the genome, for genetic interactions with ovo{sup D}. Hemizygosity for more than a dozen small regions show interactions that either partially suppress or enhance the ovarian phenotypes of females mutant for one or more of the three dominant ovo mutations. These regions probably contain genes whose products act in developmental heirarchies that include ovo{sup +} protein. 40 refs, 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Hydrodynamic Characteristics of a Low-drag, Planing-tail Flying-boat Hull

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suydam, Henry B

    1948-01-01

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of a flying-boat incorporating a low-drag, planing-tail hull were determined from model tests made in Langley tank number 2 and compared with tests of the same flying boat incorporating a conventional-type hull. The planing-tail model, with which stable take-offs were possible for a large range of elevator positions at all center-of-gravity locations tested, had more take-off stability than the conventional model. No upper-limit porpoising was encountered by the planing-tail model. The maximum changes in rise during landings were lower for the planing-tail model than for the conventional model at most contact trims, an indication of improved landing stability for the planing-tail model. The hydrodynamic resistance of the planing-tail hull was lower than the conventional hull at all speeds, and the load-resistance ratio was higher for the planing-tail hull, being especially high at the hump. The static trim of the planing-tail hull was much higher than the conventional hull, but the variation of trim with speed during take-off was smaller.

  16. An experimental study of concurrent methods for adaptively controlling vertical tail buffet in high performance aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Patrick J.

    High performance twin-tail aircraft, like the F-15 and F/A-18, encounter a condition known as tail buffet. At high angles of attack, vortices are generated at the wing fuselage interface (shoulder) or other leading edge extensions. These vortices are directed toward the twin vertical tails. When the flow interacts with the vertical tail it creates pressure variations that can oscillate the vertical tail assembly. This results in fatigue cracks in the vertical tail assembly that can decrease the fatigue life and increase maintenance costs. Recently, an offset piezoceramic stack actuator was used on an F-15 wind tunnel model to control buffet induced vibrations at high angles of attack. The controller was based on the acceleration feedback control methods, In this thesis a procedure for designing the offset piezoceramic stack actuators is developed. This design procedure includes determining the quantity and type of piezoceramic stacks used in these actuators. The changes of stresses, in the vertical tail caused by these actuators during an active control, are investigated. In many cases, linear controllers are very effective in reducing vibrations. However, during flight, the natural frequencies of the vertical tail structural system changes as the airspeed increases. This in turn, reduces the effectiveness of a linear controller. Other causes such as the unmodeled dynamics and nonlinear effects due to debonds also reduce the effectiveness of linear controllers. In this thesis, an adaptive neural network is used to augment the linear controller to correct these effects.

  17. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  18. Identification of tail genes in the temperate phage 16-3 of Sinorhizobium meliloti 41.

    PubMed

    Dek, Veronika; Lukcs, Rita; Buzs, Zsuzsanna; Plvlgyi, Adrienn; Papp, Pter P; Orosz, Lszl; Putnoky, Pter

    2010-03-01

    Genes encoding the tail proteins of the temperate phage 16-3 of the symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti 41 have been identified. First, a new host range gene, designated hII, was localized by using missense mutations. The corresponding protein was shown to be identical to the 85-kDa tail protein by determining its N-terminal sequence. Electron microscopic analysis showed that phage 16-3 possesses an icosahedral head and a long, noncontractile tail characteristic of the Siphoviridae. By using a lysogenic S. meliloti 41 strain, mutants with insertions in the putative tail region of the genome were constructed and virion morphology was examined after induction of the lytic cycle. Insertions in ORF017, ORF018a, ORF020, ORF021, the previously described h gene, and hII resulted in uninfectious head particles lacking tail structures, suggesting that the majority of the genes in this region are essential for tail formation. By using different bacterial mutants, it was also shown that not only the RkpM and RkpY proteins but also the RkpZ protein of the host takes part in the formation of the phage receptor. Results for the host range phage mutants and the receptor mutant bacteria suggest that the HII tail protein interacts with the capsular polysaccharide of the host and that the tail protein encoded by the original h gene recognizes a proteinaceous receptor. PMID:20081029

  19. Rapid plant-cover establishment on gold mine tailings in southern New Zealand: glasshouse screening trials.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, K; Rufaut, C G; Smith, C; Mains, D; Craw, D

    2005-01-01

    The use of a short-term vegetation cover to temporarily control the negative environmental effects of inactive tailings ponds is notfrequently practiced during operational mining, but could have some merit This article reports on a glasshouse trial designed to examine some of the issues associated with short-term vegetation: fast germination of a high proportion of seed, the ability of seedlings to survive in unamended substrates, and potentially toxic substrate. Five nonindigenous plant species were tested--barley (Hordeum vulgare), rye corn (Secale cereale), Italian ryegrass (Lolium multifiorum), red clover (Trifolium pratense), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)--in five different types of substrate: unamended tailings, tailings and fertilizer, tailings and greenwaste, biosolid-blend compost, and local topsoil. The nutrient and heavy metal status (As, Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb) of each substrate type was determined Plant species performance was monitored over 14 wk Substrate metal concentrations were low except for As, which was elevated in all substrate types. Plants in unamended tailings grew less vigorously than plants in tailings and compost or in topsoil. Plant performance in tailings and fertiliser was greatly suppressed following a high fertilization rate. Metal uptake in plants was highest for As (0.4-77 mg kg(-1) DW) and Cu (5.3-50.3 mg kg(-1) DW). Future field trials are necessary to authenticate findings, but barley and rye corn are promising species for a short-term tailings cover. PMID:16463543

  20. Flight Investigation of Effect of Various Vertical-Tail Modifications on the Directional Stability and Control Characteristics of the P-63A-1 Airplane (AAF No. 42-68889)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Harold I.

    1946-01-01

    Because the results of preliminary flight tests had indicated. the P-63A-1 airplane possessed insufficient directional stability, the NACA and the manufacturer (Bell Aircraft Corporation) suggested three vertical-tail modifications to remedy the deficiencies in the directional characteristics. These modifications included an enlarged vertical tail formed by adding a tip extension to the original vertical tail, a large sharp-edge ventral fin, and a small dorsal fin. The enlarged vertical tail involved only a slight increase in total vertical-tail area from 23.73 to 26.58 square feet but a relatively much larger increase in geometric aspect ratio from 1.24 to 1.73 based on height and area above the horizontal tail. At the request of the Air Material Command, Army Air Forces, flight tests were made to determine the effect of these modifications and of some combinations of these modifications on the directional stability and control characteristics of the airplane, In all, six different vertical-tail. configurations were investigated to determine the lateral and directional oscillation characteristics of the airplane, the sideslip characteristics, the yaw due to ailerons in rudder-fixed rolls from turns and pull-outs, the trim changes due to speed changes; and the trim changes due to power changes. Results of the tests showed that the enlarged vertical tail approximately doubled the directional stability of the airplane and that the pilots considered the directional stability provided by the enlarged vertical tail to be satisfactory. Calculations based on sideslip data obtained at an indicated airspeed of 300 miles per hour showed that the directional stability of the airplane with the original vertical tail corresponded to a value of 0(sub n beta) of -0.00056 whereas for the enlarged vertical tail the estimated va1ue of C(sub n beta) was -0.00130, The ventral fin was found to increase by a moderate amount the directional stability of the airplane with the original vertical tail for smal1 sides1ip angles at low speeds but little consistent change in directional stability was effected by the ventral fin at higher speeds, The effectiveness of the ventral fin was generally much less when used with the enlarged vertical tail than when used with the original vertical tail. The ventral and dorsal fins were found to be very effective in eliminating rudder-force reversals which occurred in low-speed, high-engine-power, sideslipped conditions of flight . Sideslip tests at two altitudes for approximately the sane engine power and indicated airspeed showed that a small decrease in static directional stability occurred with increasing altitude and this decrease in stability was attributed to the increased propeller blade angles required at high altitudes. The variations of rudder pedal force with indicated airspeed using normal rated power and a constant rudder tab setting through the speed range were desirably small for all the configurations tested. The rudder pedal force changed by about 50 pounds for a power change from engine idling power, to normal rated power and this pedal force change was largely independent of airspeed or of vertical-tail configuration for the various configurations tested.

  1. Investigation of contamination of earthen covers on inactive uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    The upward migration of contaminants into earthen covers on uranium mill tailings was evaluated from chemical and isotopic analysis of samples from 5--10 cm intervals through the cover and into the tailings at three locations on the Riverton pile. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project elected to determine the significance of migration of salts and contaminants into earthen covers emplaced on tailings by funding this investigation of the migration which has occurred through an earthen cover since the time of emplacement on an inactive uranium mill tailings pile. The Riverton tailings pile, covered with 20 to 40 cm of local sandy soil, was chosen for the study. The objectives of the study were to: determine vertical distributions of concentrations of salts, trace metals, and radionuclides through the cover and into the tailings; determine the concentrations of salts and contaminants in the cover from chemical migration; relate the migration of salts to the contaminants; model the mechanisms responsible for promoting and retarding migration; and evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the cover influencing migration. 20 refs., 35 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. CD59 mediates cartilage patterning during spontaneous tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhang, Qing; Sun, Cheng; Hu, Wen; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration-competent adult animals have ability to regenerate their lost complex appendages with a near-perfect replica, owing to the positional identity acquired by the progenitor cells in the blastema, i.e. the blastemal cells. CD59, a CD59/Ly6 family member, has been identified as a regulator of positional identity in the tail blastemal cells of Gekko japonicus. To determine whether this function of CD59 is unique to the regenerative amniote(s) and how CD59 mediates PD axis patterning during tail regeneration, we examined its protective role on the complement-mediated cell lysis and intervened CD59 expression in the tail blastemal cells using an in vivo model of adenovirus transfection. Our data revealed that gecko CD59 was able to inhibit complement-mediated cell lysis. Meanwhile, CD59 functioned on positional identity through expression in cartilage precursor cells. Intervening positional identity by overexpression or siRNA knockdown of CD59 resulted in abnormal cartilaginous cone patterning due to the decreased differentiation of blastemal cells to cartilage precursor cells. The cartilage formation-related genes were found to be under the regulation of CD59. These results indicate that CD59, an evolutionarily transitional molecule linking immune and regenerative regulation, affects tail regeneration by mediating cartilage patterning. PMID:26238652

  3. Cross-tail current evolution during substorm dipolarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, A. T. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We examine evolution of the cross-tail current during substorm current disruption/dipolarization using observations from two satellites in the near-Earth magnetotail at the downtail distances of 8-9 RE. By choosing times when these two satellites are separated, mainly in the north-south distance in the tail current sheet, precise determination of current density in the layer embedded between these satellites can be obtained with Ampre's law. Two such events are examined and several common features are found. The current densities in the layer embedded by the two satellites were reduced by ~ 40-70% during substorm dipolarization. The changes in current densities have the fast kinetic timescale, i.e., in seconds, implying a kinetic process for current disruption/dipolarization. The estimated power within the current layer was mainly dissipative in the dawn-dusk direction and mainly dynamo in the Sun-tail direction that is needed to drive the north-south substorm current system in the ionosphere. Remote sensing of the energization site with the ion sounding technique shows that the energization site was initially earthward of the satellite and moved down the tail at later times. Breakdown of the frozen-in condition occurred intermittently during the disturbance interval. These features provide important clues to the substorm onset process.

  4. Moisture content analysis of covered uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    The use of vegetation and rock covers to stabilize uranium mill tailings cover systems is being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A modeling study of moisture movement through the tailings and cover layers was initiated to determine the effect of the stabilizing techniques. The cover system was simulated under climatic conditions occurring at Grand Junction, Colorado. The cover consisted of a layer of wet clay/gravel mix followed by a capillary barrier of washed rock and a surface layer of fill soil. Vegetation and rock were used to stabilize the surface layer. The simulation yielded moisture content and moisture storage values for the tailings and cover system along with information about moisture losses due to evaporation, transpiration, and drainage. The study demonstrates that different surface stabilization treatments lead to different degrees of moisture retention in the covered tailings pile. The evapotranspiration from vegetation can result in a relatively stable moisture content. Rock covers, however, may cause drainage to occur because they reduce evaporation and lead to a subsequent increase in moisture content. It is important to consider these effects when designing a surface stabilization treatment. Drainage may contribute to a groundwater pollution problem. A surface treatment that allows the cover system to dry out can increase the risk of atmospheric contamination through elevated radon emission rates.

  5. Using comet plasma tails to study the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, B. V.; Buffington, A.; Clover, J. M.; Hick, P. P.; Yu, H.-S.; Bisi, M. M.

    2013-06-01

    The plasma tails of comets have been used as probes of the solar wind for many years, and well before direct solar wind measurements. Now, analyses utilizing the much greater regularity and extent of comet tails imaged from space detail outward solar wind flow much better than was previously possible. These analyses mark the location of the solar wind flow in three-dimensions over time much as do in-situ measurements. Data from comet plasma tails using coronagraphs and heliospheric white-light imagers provide a view closer to the Sun than where spacecraft have ventured to date. These views show that this flow is chaotic and highly variable, and not the benign regular outward motion of a quiescent plasma. While this is no surprise to those who study and characterize the solar wind in situ or use remotely-sensed interplanetary scintillation (IPS) techniques, these spacecraft images provide a visualization of this as never-before possible. Here we summarize the results of an analysis that determines solar wind velocity from multiple comet tails that were observed by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) and also by the inner Heliospheric Imager (HI) on board the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Ahead (STEREOA) spacecraft. Finally, we present results using a similar analysis that measures this same behavior using coronagraph observations in the low corona.

  6. CD59 mediates cartilage patterning during spontaneous tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xue; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhang, Qing; Sun, Cheng; Hu, Wen; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    The regeneration-competent adult animals have ability to regenerate their lost complex appendages with a near-perfect replica, owing to the positional identity acquired by the progenitor cells in the blastema, i.e. the blastemal cells. CD59, a CD59/Ly6 family member, has been identified as a regulator of positional identity in the tail blastemal cells of Gekko japonicus. To determine whether this function of CD59 is unique to the regenerative amniote(s) and how CD59 mediates PD axis patterning during tail regeneration, we examined its protective role on the complement-mediated cell lysis and intervened CD59 expression in the tail blastemal cells using an in vivo model of adenovirus transfection. Our data revealed that gecko CD59 was able to inhibit complement-mediated cell lysis. Meanwhile, CD59 functioned on positional identity through expression in cartilage precursor cells. Intervening positional identity by overexpression or siRNA knockdown of CD59 resulted in abnormal cartilaginous cone patterning due to the decreased differentiation of blastemal cells to cartilage precursor cells. The cartilage formation-related genes were found to be under the regulation of CD59. These results indicate that CD59, an evolutionarily transitional molecule linking immune and regenerative regulation, affects tail regeneration by mediating cartilage patterning. PMID:26238652

  7. Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; McFadden, James P; Larson, Davin; Carlson, Charles W; Mende, Stephen B; Frey, Harald; Phan, Tai; Sibeck, David G; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Auster, Uli; Donovan, Eric; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Russell, Christopher T; Runov, Andrei; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Kepko, Larry

    2008-08-15

    Magnetospheric substorms explosively release solar wind energy previously stored in Earth's magnetotail, encompassing the entire magnetosphere and producing spectacular auroral displays. It has been unclear whether a substorm is triggered by a disruption of the electrical current flowing across the near-Earth magnetotail, at approximately 10 R(E) (R(E): Earth radius, or 6374 kilometers), or by the process of magnetic reconnection typically seen farther out in the magnetotail, at approximately 20 to 30 R(E). We report on simultaneous measurements in the magnetotail at multiple distances, at the time of substorm onset. Reconnection was observed at 20 R(E), at least 1.5 minutes before auroral intensification, at least 2 minutes before substorm expansion, and about 3 minutes before near-Earth current disruption. These results demonstrate that substorms are likely initiated by tail reconnection. PMID:18653845

  8. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Dust Wind Tails Around Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 32. The Pathfinder lander is at right and is about 9 meters away. Wind tails of dust are clearly seen extending from the left side of many of the small rocks in the foreground. The large rocks on the horizon at left center are the next goal of Sojourner as it continues our exploration of Mars.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  10. Flight Investigation to Determine the Aerodynamic Characteristics of Rocket-Powered Models Representative of a Fighter-Type Airplane Configuration Incorporating an Inverse-Taper Wing and a Vee Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Sidney R.

    1948-01-01

    Two rocket-powered models representative of a fighter-type airplane were investigated in flight at Mach numbers up to 1.01 and 1.07 by the Langley Pilotless Aircraft Research Division at its testing station at Wallops Island, Va. These models incorporated an inverse-taper wing and a vee tail and were flown with controls undeflected and wing and stabilizer set at 0 deg incidence. Values of lateral acceleration, normal acceleration velocity, and drag were obtained by use of telemeters and a Doppler velocimeter radar unit. The results of this investigation indicated no unusual variation in the lateral acceleration characteristics. After the cessation of powered flight, the lateral oscillation quickly damped to zero. The data indicated that the airplane, at low lift coefficients, should not experience any abrupt trim changes until it attains a Mach number of 0.97. The change in normal-force coefficient associated with this trim change will amount to about 0.03 with the center of gravity located at 4.48% of the mean aerodynamic chord. At higher lift coefficients, on the basis of other data, the Mach number at which this trim change occurs would be expected to be decreased. The neutral point of the model at Mach numbers near 1.05 was estimated to fall at 45% of the mean aerodynamic chord, assuming a lift-curve slope of 0.05. A value of the static-directional-stability parameter dCn/d(psi) of approximately -0.002 was estimated for a Mach number of 0.93. The values of drag coefficient obtained from both model flights were in a good comparative agreement. The highest drag coefficient occurred at a Mach number of 1.01 and was equal to 0.044.

  11. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Public Participation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    1981-05-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to explain the Department of Energy`s plan for involving the public in the decision-making process related to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This project was authorized by Congress in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. The Act provides for a cooperative effort with affected states and Indian tribes for the eventual cleanup of abandoned or inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which are located in nine western states and in Pennsylvania. Section 111 of the Act states, ``in carrying out the provisions of this title, including the designation of processing sites, establishing priorities for such sites, the selection of remedial actions and the execution of cooperative agreements, the Secretary (of Energy), the Administrator (of the Environmental Protection Agency), and the (Nuclear Regulatory) Commission shall encourage public participation and, where appropriate, the Secretary shall hold public hearings relative to such matters in the States where processing sites and disposal sites are located.`` The objective of this document is to show when, where, and how the public will be involved in this project.

  12. Injurious tail biting in pigs: how can it be controlled in existing systems without tail docking?

    PubMed

    D'Eath, R B; Arnott, G; Turner, S P; Jensen, T; Lahrmann, H P; Busch, M E; Niemi, J K; Lawrence, A B; Sandøe, P

    2014-09-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some 'alternative' forms of pig production and certain countries do not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable substrates and feeder space affect damaging tail biting. Only epidemiological evidence was available for effects of temperature and season, and the effect of stocking density was unclear. Studies suggest that group size has little effect, and the effects of nutrition, disease and breed require further investigation. The review identifies a number of knowledge gaps and promising avenues for future research into prevention and mitigation. We illustrate the diversity of hypotheses concerning how different proposed risk factors might increase tail biting through their effect on each other or on the proposed underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible, manipulable natural materials can be of considerable benefit. Further comparative research is needed into materials, such as ropes, which are compatible with slatted floors. Also, materials which double as fuel for anaerobic digesters could be utilised. As well as optimising housing and management to reduce risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked under, could in future be automatically detected using precision livestock farming methods enabling earlier reaction and prevention of tail damage. However, there is a lack of scientific studies on how best to respond to outbreaks: the effectiveness of, for example, removing biters and/or bitten pigs, increasing enrichment, or applying substances to tails should be investigated. Finally, some breeding companies are exploring options for reducing the genetic propensity to tail bite. If these various approaches to reduce tail biting are implemented we propose that the need for tail docking will be reduced. PMID:25130712

  13. Phytostabilization potential of Jatropha curcas L. in polymetallic acid mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihang; Wang, Shizhong; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Li, Qingfei; Zheng, Han; Bai, Jun; Qiu, Rongliang

    2011-09-01

    Greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to determine the growth response, metal tolerance, and phytostabilization potential of Jatropha curcas L The plants were grown on different degrees of multi-metal contaminated acid mine soils (T0, control; T1, moderately and T2, highly contaminated soils) with or without limestone amendments. The order of metal accumulation in J. curcas was roots>stems>leaves. The higher tolerance index (>90%) with no phytotoxic symptoms and growth reduction in T1 showed that this plant has the ability to tolerate polymetallic acid mine tailings. Further, various enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants also actively involved in metal defense mechanism in J. curcas. On the other hand, to alleviate the predominant phytoavailable toxic metals such as Al, Cu, and Pb, different rates (0.1, 0.25, 0.50, and 1%) of limestone amendments were added in both T1 and T2 soils. The growth performance of J. curcas was improved due to the increase in soil pH and decrease in phytoavailable soil A1 (95%), Zn (approximately 75%), and Cu (approximately 65%) contents at 0.50% of lime addition. Based on the inherent tolerance ability of J. curcas in existing adverse environmental conditions without liming, it could be used as a suitable candidate for phytostabilization in acid mine tailings. PMID:21972519

  14. The genetics of colour in fat-tailed sheep: a review.

    PubMed

    Lundie, Roger S

    2011-10-01

    Fat-tailed sheep come in various colours-most are either brown (tan) or black. In some, most of the body is white with the tan or black colour restricted to the front portion of the body or to just around the eyes, muzzle and parts of the legs. The Karakul breed is important for the production of lamb skins of various colours for the fashion industry. As well as the black and tan colours there are Karakuls bred for grey or roan shades, a white colour or one of the numerous Sur shades. In the Sur shades, the base of the birthcoat fibre is one of a number of dark shades and the tip a lighter or white shade. All these colours and many others are the result of the interaction of various genes that determine the specifics of the coat colour of the sheep. A number of sets of nomenclature and symbols have been used to represent the various loci and their alleles that are involved. In the 1980s and 1990s, a standardised set, based closely on those of the mouse and other species was developed. Using this as the framework, the alleles of the Extension, Agouti, Brown, Spotting, Pigmented Head and Roan loci are described using fat-tailed sheep (mainly Damara, Karakul and Persian) as examples. Further discussion includes other types of "white markings," the Ticking locus and the Sur loci. PMID:21544704

  15. The Urbach tail in silica glass from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Sadigh, B; Erhart, P; Aberg, D; Trave, A; Schwegler, E; Bude, J

    2010-06-15

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the optical absorption spectra of silica glass for temperatures up to 2400K. The calculated spectra exhibit exponential tails near the fundamental absorption edge that follow the Urbach rule, in quantitative agreement with experiments. We discuss the accuracy of our results by comparing to hybrid exchange correlation functionals. We derive a simple relationship between the exponential tails of the absorption coefficient and the electronic density-of-states, and thereby establish a direct link between the photoemission and the absorption spectra near the absorption edge. We use this relationship to determine the lower bound to the Urbach frequency regime. We show that in this frequency interval, the optical absorption is Poisson distributed with very large statistical fluctuations. We determine the upper bound to the Urbach frequency regime by identifying the frequency at which transition to Poisson distribution takes place.

  16. Isolation and characterization of lost copper and molybdenum particles in the flotation tailings of Kennecott copper porphyry ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tserendavga, Tsend-Ayush

    The importance of flotation separation has long been, and continues to be, an important technology for the mining industry, especially to metallurgical engineers. However, the flotation process is quite complex and expensive, in addition to being influenced by many variables. Understanding the variables affecting flotation efficiency and how valuable minerals are lost to the tailings gives metallurgists an advantage in their attempts to increase efficiency by designing operations to target the areas of greatest potential value. A successful, accurate evaluation of lost minerals in the tailings and appropriate solutions to improve flotation efficiency can save millions of dollars in the effective utilization of our mineral resources. In this dissertation research, an attempt has been made to understand the reasons for the loss of valuable mineral particles in the tailings from Kennecott Utah Copper ores. Possibilities include liberation, particle aggregation (slime coating) and surface chemistry issues associated with the flotation separation. This research generally consisted of three main aspects. The first part involved laboratory flotation experiments and factors, which affect the flotation efficiency. Results of flotation testing are reported that several factors such as mineral exposure/liberation and slime coating and surface oxidation strongly affect the flotation efficiency. The second part of this dissertation research was to develop a rapid scan dual energy (DE) methodology using 2D radiography to identify, isolate, and prepare lost sulfide mineral particles with the advantages of simple sample preparation, short analysis time, statistically reliable accuracy and confident identification. The third part of this dissertation research was concerned with detailed characterization of lost particles including such factors as liberation, slime coating, and surface chemistry characteristics using advanced analytical techniques and instruments. Based on the results from characterization, the extent to which these factors contribute to the loss of sulfide mineral particles in the tailings were determined.

  17. Human Sperm Tail Proteome Suggests New Endogenous Metabolic Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballesc, Jos Lus; Ramalho-Santos, Joo; Oliva, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic studies are contributing greatly to our understanding of the sperm cell, and more detailed descriptions are expected to clarify additional cellular and molecular sperm attributes. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular proteome of the human sperm tail and, hopefully, identify less concentrated proteins (not found in whole cell proteome studies). Specifically, we were interested in characterizing the sperm metabolic proteome and gaining new insights into the sperm metabolism issue. Sperm were isolated from normozoospermic semen samples and depleted of any contaminating leukocytes. Tail fractions were obtained by means of sonication followed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was confirmed via various techniques. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry of isolated sperm tail peptides resulted in the identification of 1049 proteins, more than half of which had not been previously described in human sperm. The categorization of proteins according to their function revealed two main groups: proteins related to metabolism and energy production (26%), and proteins related to sperm tail structure and motility (11%). Interestingly, a great proportion of the metabolic proteome (24%) comprised enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, including enzymes for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. Unexpectedly, we also identified various peroxisomal proteins, some of which are known to be involved in the oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. Analysis of our data using Reactome suggests that both mitochondrial and peroxisomal pathways might indeed be active in sperm, and that the use of fatty acids as fuel might be more preponderant than previously thought. In addition, incubation of sperm with the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir resulted in a significant decrease in sperm motility. Contradicting a common concept in the literature, we suggest that the male gamete might have the capacity to obtain energy from endogenous pools, and thus to adapt to putative exogenous fluctuations. PMID:23161514

  18. Weathering in coal mine rejects and tailings - variation with respect to depth

    SciTech Connect

    Devasahayam, S.

    2007-02-15

    Acid production or acid drainage is a major environmental issue that also has negative implications on the aquifer system surrounding the mine tailings area. The approach to controlling acid mine drainage involves physical and geochemical characterization that affect acid production. The material permeability determines the availability of oxygen, which is paramount in acid production in coal rejects, and varies with depth. In this paper the author presents the variation in oxidized pyrite/acid production with depth in black coal mine washery wastes. Chemical kinetic parameters and the diffusive parameters have been used to obtain the variation in oxygen content and the oxidized pyrite content with respect to the depth and time. Its dependence on porosity and moisture content is illustrated.

  19. AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are Involved in Determining the Poly(A) Length of Granule-bound starch synthase 1 Transcript and Modulating Sucrose and Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuya; Arae, Toshihiro; Green, Pamela J; Yamaguchi, Junji; Chiba, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Removing the poly(A) tail is the first and rate-limiting step of mRNA degradation and apparently an effective step not only for modulating mRNA stability but also for translation of many eukaryotic transcripts. Carbon catabolite repressor 4 (CCR4) has been identified as a major cytoplasmic deadenylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the yeast CCR4, AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b, were identified by sequence-based analysis; however, their role and physiological significance in plants remain to be elucidated. In this study, we revealed that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are localized to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies, which are specific granules consisting of many enzymes involved in mRNA turnover. Double mutants of AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b exhibited tolerance to sucrose application but not to glucose. The levels of sucrose in the seedlings of the atccr4a/4b double mutants were reduced, whereas no difference was observed in glucose levels. Further, amylose levels were slightly but significantly increased in the atccr4a/4b double mutants. Consistent with this observation, we found that the transcript encoding granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, is accumulated to a higher level in the atccr4a/4b double mutant plants than in the control plants. Moreover, we revealed that GBSS1 has a longer poly(A) tail in the double mutant than in the control plant, suggesting that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b can influence the poly(A) length of transcripts related to starch metabolism. Our results collectively suggested that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are involved in sucrose and starch metabolism in A. thaliana. PMID:25630334

  20. Bump-on-tail instability in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Susmita; Paul, Samit; Denra, Raicharan

    2015-10-01

    Bump-on-tail instability of Langmuir waves propagating in unmagnetized Lorentzian plasma modeled by a Kappa velocity distribution with spectral index ? has been investigated in this paper. Growth rate of this microinstability has been determined analytically from the Langmuir wave dispersion relation. Change in the maximum growth rate with increasing ? has been numerically estimated for different number density and temperature ratios using solar wind data.

  1. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Falls City site, Falls City, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Falls City site in order to update the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranum mill tailings at Falls City, Texas. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrolgy and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.5 million tons of tailings at the Falls City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,700,000 for stabilization in place, to about $35,100,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Falls City tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The tailings piles are presently being rewashed for uranium recovery by Solution Engineering, Inc. The cost for further reprocessing would be about $250/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive for the foreseeable future.

  2. Integrated Tail Buffet Loads on the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; James, Kevin D.

    1994-01-01

    The unsteady pressures acting on the vertical tails of a full-scale F/A-18 fighter aircraft were studied to gain a better understanding of tail-buffet loads that frequently occur on fighter aircraft operating at high angles-of-attack. Data for the study were acquired during two test entries in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel wherein the aircraft was tested at wind speeds up to 100 knots and at angles-of-attack from 20deg to 40deg. For the purposes of this paper, the primary difference between the two tests is that, during the first wind-tunnel entry, the pressure transducers were more sparsely spaced and covered less of the fin than during the second entry. In addition to a brief description of the spectral analysis methods used for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures and loads, an analysis of the effects of sensor density on estimating integrated loads is presented. It was found that the integrated loads determined from sparse sensor arrays are significantly higher than actual loads. However, a modest increase in the number of sensors can greatly reduce the error and a method for correcting load estimates from sparse sensor arrays is also suggested. The results for the time-averaged, power-spectral analysis are then presented for the tail-fin bending moments. Power spectra are presented for the aircraft at zero sideslip over an angle-of-attack range from 20deg to 40deg and for the aircraft at an angle-of-attack of 30deg over a sideslip range from -16deg to 16deg. Since the aircraft was equipped with a removable leading-edge extension (LEX) fence to reduce tail-buffet loads, the tail-fin bending moment loads are also presented for that configuration. The LEX fence is shown to significantly reduce bending moment loads over a broad range frequencies, for all the aircraft attitudes presented.

  3. Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in Purkinje cell dendrites: Evidence that factors other than binding to microtubules are involved in determining its cytoplasmic distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Matus, A.; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N.; Mariani, J. )

    1990-07-15

    We have studied the distribution of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) in the Purkinje cell dendrites of rats whose cerebella were exposed to X-irradiation during the second postnatal week. The Purkinje cells of such animals have abnormally elongated apical primary processes that branch in the other molecular layer rather than close to the cell body as in normal tissue. The results show that in these distorted dendrites the MAP2 distribution is shifted distally relative to the normal pattern, in which MAP2 is distributed evenly throughout the dendritic tree. Tubulin and other microtubule-associated proteins, such as MAP1, are not affected and remain evenly distributed throughout the dendritic tree despite the anatomical distortion. We conclude that the distribution of MAP2 in Purkinje cells is not determined solely by its binding to tubulin. Other factors must be involved and these appear to be related to dendritic morphology and possibly to branching.

  4. Simultaneous determination of formaldehyde and methylglyoxal in urine: involvement of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase-mediated deamination in diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Deng, Y; Yu, P H

    1999-09-01

    The deamination of methylamine and aminoacetone by semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) produces formaldehyde and methylglyoxal, respectively, which have been presumed to be involved in diabetic complications. A high-performance liquid chromatography procedure using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) as a derivatizing agent is developed to determine endogenous formaldehyde, methylglyoxal, malondialdehyde, and acetaldehyde. The devised DNPH method is sensitive enough to analyze aldehyde levels in urine. An increase in the excretion of formaldehyde, methylglyoxal, and malondialdehyde is confirmed in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Following the chronic administration of methylamine, the urinary levels of both formaldehyde and malondialdehyde (a product from lipid peroxidation) are found to be substantially increased. A potent selective SSAO inhibitor, (E)-2-(4-fluorophenethyl)-3-fluoroallylamine hydrochloride (MDL-72974A), reduced the formation of formaldehyde, methylglyoxal, and malondialdehyde. The increase of the cytotoxic aldehyde levels as a result of increased SSAO-mediated deamination may occur in some pathological conditions. PMID:10497785

  5. Plant and soil reactions to nickel ore processed tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, P.J.; Volk, V.V.; Gardner, E.H.

    1982-07-01

    Greenhouse and laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect that tailings, produced during the processing of nickeliferous laterite ores by a proposed U.S. Bureau of Mines Process, would have on plant growth and soil properties. The tailings contained soluble salts (7.6 mmhos/cm), NH/sub 4/-N (877 ..mu..g/g), Ni (0.28%), Mn (82 ..mu..g/g DTPA-extractable), Cr (0.44%), P (2 and 6 ..mu..g/g acid F- and NaHCO/sub 3/-extractable, respectively), and Ca and Mg (1.0 and 20.7 meq/100 g NH/sub 4/Ac-extractable, respectively). Water leaching decreased the NH/sub 4/-N concentration to 53 ..mu..g/g and the EC to 0.4 mmhos/cm by removal of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MgSO/sub 4/ salts. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was grown on Eightlar clay soil (skeletal, serpentinitic, mesic Typic Xerochrept) amended with 0, 223, 446, and 669 g tailings/kg soil and pure, unleached tailings for 32 weeks in the greenhouse. Seedling establishment of plants grown on soil amended at the highest tailings rate and the pure tailings was initially slow, but plants grown on soil amended at lower rates established readily and grew well. Plant P was <0.24%, while plant Ca concentrations were <0.45% throughout the growth period even though Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 2/)/sub 2/ and gypsum had been added. Ammonium acetate-extractable Ca at the end of the growth period was <5.0 meq/100 g on all amended soils.The Mn, Ni, and Cr concentrations of plants grown on treated soils were within normal ranges, although soil-analysis values were higher than commonly found. It is recommended that the tailings be washed to reduce NH/sub 4/-N and soluble salts prior to revegetation, and that native soil be added to the surface to reduce crusting.

  6. Assessment of computational prediction of tail buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Assessments of the viability of computational methods and the computer resource requirements for the prediction of tail buffeting are made. Issues involved in the use of Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in modeling vortex-dominated and buffet flows are discussed and the requirement for sufficient grid density to allow accurate, converged calculations is stressed. Areas in need of basic fluid dynamics research are highlighted: vorticity convection, vortex breakdown, dynamic turbulence modeling for free shear layers, unsteady flow separation for moderately swept, rounded leading-edge wings, vortex flows about wings at high subsonic speeds. An estimate of the computer run time for a buffeting response calculation for a full span F-15 aircraft indicates that an improvement in computer and/or algorithm efficiency of three orders of magnitude is needed to enable routine use of such methods. Attention is also drawn to significant uncertainties in the estimates, in particular with regard to nonlinearities contained within the modeling and the question of the repeatability or randomness of buffeting response.

  7. Improved visualization of the pancreatic tail after maximum distension of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Stuck, K.J.; Kuhns, L.R.

    1981-08-01

    Fifty-two computed tomography examinations through the region of the pancreas were retrospectively analyzed to determine if marked stomach distension influenced the visualization of the pancreatic tail. Of the 29 patients who had marked stomach distension, 25 (86%) had displacement of small bowel loops away from the ventral surface of the pancreatic tail. With moderate or minimal stomach distension, there was bowel loop displacement in 37% and 0% of cases, respectively. Marked stomach distension appears to be an effective means of improving visualization of the pancreatic tail.

  8. Experimental study of tail-span effects on a generic canard-controlled missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.; Dillon, James L.; Watson, Carolyn B.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted on a cruciform canard controlled missile configuration to determine the effects of tail span/canard span ratio on controllability. The investigation was conducted over the Mach number range of 1.75 to 3.50. Reductions of tail span/canard span ratio produced lower static margins and higher trim angle of attack. The results show that canard controls can provide pitch- and yaw-control as well as roll-control by proper selection of the tail span/canard span ratio.

  9. Key programmatic steps and activities for implementing the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA) was enacted based upon findings by Congress that uranium mill tailings located at active and inactive hazard to the public, and that protection of the public health, safety and welfare, and the regulations of interstate commerce, require that every reasonable effort be made to provide for the stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize radon diffusion into the environment and to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings.'' A general understanding of the steps leading to elimination of the hazards associated with designated uranium mill tailings sites, and the parties involved in that effort, are presented in this document. A representative schedule is also presented in this document to show both program sequence and activity interdependence. Those activities that have the most potential to influence program duration, because of the significant amount of additional time that may be required, include identification and selection of a suitable site, field data collection delays due to weather, actual acquisition of the designated or alternate disposal site, construction delays due to weather, and site licensing. This document provides an understanding of the steps, the sequence, the parties involved, and a representative duration of activities leading to remedial action and cleanup at the designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. ); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. , Inc., Washington, DC ); Rice, G. )

    1984-12-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  11. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  12. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40phox and p47phox) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in the lizard Anolis carolinensis reveals activation of conserved vertebrate developmental and repair mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D; Markov, Glenn J; Eckalbar, Walter L; George, Rajani M; King, Jesse M; Tokuyama, Minami A; Geiger, Lauren A; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J; Allen, April N; Siniard, Ashley L; Corneveaux, Jason J; Fisher, Rebecca E; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F; Rawls, J Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  14. Transcriptomic Analysis of Tail Regeneration in the Lizard Anolis carolinensis Reveals Activation of Conserved Vertebrate Developmental and Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D.; Markov, Glenn J.; Eckalbar, Walter L.; George, Rajani M.; King, Jesse M.; Tokuyama, Minami A.; Geiger, Lauren A.; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J.; Allen, April N.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F.; Rawls, J. Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  15. Nucleation and crystallization of tailing-based glass-ceramics by microwave heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao-wei; Li, Hong-xia; Zhang, Xue-feng; Jia, Xiao-lin; Sun, Zhi-chao

    2015-12-01

    The effect of microwave radiation on the nucleation and crystallization of tailing-based glass-ceramics was investigated using a 2.45 GHz multimode microwave cavity. Tailing-based glass samples were prepared from Shandong gold tailings and Guyang iron tailings utilizing a conventional glass melting technique. For comparison, the tailing-based glass samples were crystallized using two different heat-treatment methods: conventional heating and hybrid microwave heating. The nucleation and crystallization temperatures were determined by performing a differential thermal analysis of the quenched tailing-based glass. The prepared glass-ceramic samples were further characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, thermal expansion coefficient measurements, and scanning electron microscopy. The results demonstrated that hybrid microwave heating could be successfully used to crystallize the tailing-based glass, reduce the processing time, and decrease the crystallization temperature. Furthermore, the results indicated that the nucleation and crystallization mechanism of the hybrid microwave heating process slightly differs from that of the conventional heating process.

  16. Flight investigation of the effect of tail boom strakes on helicopter directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Henry L.; Crowell, Cynthia A.; Yenni, Kenneth R.; Lance, Michael B.

    1993-01-01

    A joint U.S. Army/NASA flight investigation was conducted utilizing a single-rotor helicopter to determine the effectiveness of horizontally mounted tail boom strakes on directional controllability and tail rotor power during low-speed, crosswind operating conditions. Three configurations were investigated: (1) baseline (strakes off), (2) single strake (strake at upper shoulder on port side of boom), and (3) double strake (upper strake plus a lower strake on same side of boom). The strakes were employed as a means to separate airflow over the tail boom and change fuselage yawing moments in a direction to improve the yaw control margin and reduce tail rotor power. Crosswind data were obtained in 5-knot increments of airspeed from 0 to 35 knots and in 30 deg increments of wind azimuth from 0 deg to 330 deg. At the most critical wind azimuth and airspeed in terms of tail rotor power, the strakes improved the pedal margin by 6 percent of total travel and reduced tail rotor power required by 17 percent. The increase in yaw control and reduction in tail rotor power offered by the strakes can expand the helicopter operating envelope in terms of gross weight and altitude capability. The strakes did not affect the flying qualities of the vehicle at airspeeds between 35 and 100 knots.

  17. Radon attenuation handbook for uranium mill tailings cover design

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    This handbook has been prepared to facilitate the design of earthen covers to control radon emission from uranium mill tailings. Radon emissions from bare and covered uranium mill tailings can be estimated from equations based on diffusion theory. Basic equations are presented for calculating surface radon fluxes from covered tailings, or alternately, the cover thicknesses required to satisfy a given radon flux criterion. Also described is a computer code, RAECOM, for calculating cover thicknesses and surface fluxes. Methods are also described for measuring diffusion coefficients for radon, or for estimating them from empirical correlations. Since long-term soil moisture content is a critical parameter in determining the value of the diffusion coefficient, methods are given for estimating the long-term moisture contents of soils. The effects of cover defects or advection are also discussed and guidelines are given for determining if they are significant. For most practical cases, advection and cover defect effects on radon flux can be neglected. Several examples are given to demonstrate cover design calculations, and an extensive list of references is included. 63 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Analysis of stability contributions of high dihedral V-tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, C. E.; Yeager, W. T., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An investigation was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of four analytical methods (empirical, modified empirical, vortex-lattice, and an inviscid, three dimensional, potential flow, wing body program) to estimate the lateral and longitudinal static stability characteristics of an isolated V-tail wind tunnel model. The experimental tests were conducted in the V/STOL tunnel at a Mach number of 0.18. Angle-of-attack data were obtained from -12 deg to 8 deg at 0 deg sideslip. Sideslip sweeps from -5 deg to 10 deg were made at angles of attack of 4 deg, 0 deg and -4 deg. The V-tail dihedral angles were 45 deg, 50 deg, 55 deg, and 60 deg.

  19. Relationship between tail-current sheet activation and dayside magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, R.; Keika, K.; Baumjohann, W.; Runov, A.; Magnes, W.; Eichelberger, H.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J.; Carlson, C. W.; Larson, D.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Auster, U.; Fornacon, K. H.; Lucek, E. A.; Carr, C. M.; Amm, O.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Reme, H.; Dandouras, I.; Klecker, B.; Daly, P.

    2007-12-01

    We report on multi-point observations of an isolated BZ disturbance detected at a wide local time sector including dayside magnetosphere in association with a tail current activation using THEMIS, Cluster, and Double Star observations around 01 UT on August 17, 2007. The unique constellation of the spacecraft allows us to examine simultaneously the propagation of the disturbance locally as well as globally. THEMIS at the late morning sector, observed an enhanced BZ disturbance that propagated tailward (and radial inward). TC1 at the dawnside detected relevant disturbance in BZ. Cluster, located post midnight sector, observed BZ enhancement accompanied with signature of field-aligned currents, in association with an enhancement of the westward electrojet observed by MIRACLE at a close local time sector. By comparing the timing of the disturbance and determining the propagation properties we discuss the possible casual relationship between the dayside disturbance and the tail current sheet activation.

  20. Large-scale phosphotyrosine proteomic profiling of rat renal collecting duct epithelium reveals predominance of proteins involved in cell polarity determination

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boyang; Chou, Chung-Lin; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Although extensive phosphoproteomic information is available for renal epithelial cells, previous emphasis has been on phosphorylation of serines and threonines with little focus on tyrosine phosphorylation. Here we have carried out large-scale identification of phosphotyrosine sites in pervanadate-treated native inner medullary collecting ducts of rat, with a view towards identification of physiological processes in epithelial cells that are potentially regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. The method combined antibody-based affinity purification of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides coupled with immobilized metal ion chromatography to enrich tyrosine phosphopeptides, which were identified by LC-MS/MS. A total of 418 unique tyrosine phosphorylation sites in 273 proteins were identified. A large fraction of these sites have not been previously reported on standard phosphoproteomic databases. All results are accessible via an online database: http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/iPY/. Analysis of surrounding sequences revealed four overrepresented motifs: [D/E]xxY*, Y*xxP, DY*, and Y*E, where the asterisk symbol indicates the site of phosphorylation. These motifs plus contextual information, integrated using the NetworKIN tool, suggest that the protein tyrosine kinases involved include members of the insulin- and ephrin-receptor kinase families. Analysis of the gene ontology (GO) terms and KEGG pathways whose protein elements are overrepresented in our data set point to structures involved in epithelial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions (adherens junction, tight junction, and focal adhesion) and to components of the actin cytoskeleton as major sites of tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. In general, these findings mesh well with evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a key role in epithelial polarity determination. PMID:21940666

  1. Large-scale phosphotyrosine proteomic profiling of rat renal collecting duct epithelium reveals predominance of proteins involved in cell polarity determination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boyang; Knepper, Mark A; Chou, Chung-Lin; Pisitkun, Trairak

    2012-01-01

    Although extensive phosphoproteomic information is available for renal epithelial cells, previous emphasis has been on phosphorylation of serines and threonines with little focus on tyrosine phosphorylation. Here we have carried out large-scale identification of phosphotyrosine sites in pervanadate-treated native inner medullary collecting ducts of rat, with a view towards identification of physiological processes in epithelial cells that are potentially regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. The method combined antibody-based affinity purification of tyrosine phosphorylated peptides coupled with immobilized metal ion chromatography to enrich tyrosine phosphopeptides, which were identified by LC-MS/MS. A total of 418 unique tyrosine phosphorylation sites in 273 proteins were identified. A large fraction of these sites have not been previously reported on standard phosphoproteomic databases. All results are accessible via an online database: http://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/iPY/. Analysis of surrounding sequences revealed four overrepresented motifs: [D/E]xxY*, Y*xxP, DY*, and Y*E, where the asterisk symbol indicates the site of phosphorylation. These motifs plus contextual information, integrated using the NetworKIN tool, suggest that the protein tyrosine kinases involved include members of the insulin- and ephrin-receptor kinase families. Analysis of the gene ontology (GO) terms and KEGG pathways whose protein elements are overrepresented in our data set point to structures involved in epithelial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions ("adherens junction," "tight junction," and "focal adhesion") and to components of the actin cytoskeleton as major sites of tyrosine phosphorylation in these cells. In general, these findings mesh well with evidence that tyrosine phosphorylation plays a key role in epithelial polarity determination. PMID:21940666

  2. Application of STR markers in wildlife forensic casework involving Australian black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.).

    PubMed

    White, Nicole E; Dawson, Rick; Coghlan, Megan L; Tridico, Silvana R; Mawson, Peter R; Haile, James; Bunce, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Parrots and cockatoos are highly prized aviary birds and the demands for such species has fuelled their illegal trade and harvest from the wild. Here we report on three forensic case studies involving black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.) endemic to Australia. These cases involve suspected poaching and illegal killing of endangered red- and white-tailed black-cockatoos. Through the prior development of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci and population databases for white- and red-tailed black-cockatoos, the tools are available to conduct high-resolution paternity and individual identity testing. In one case, we matched a red-tailed black-cockatoo nestling to a tree hollow from which it was poached through the use of DNA from eggshell recovered from the nest. For the second case, we utilized our provenance population database (nest sites), and identified the kinship and geographic origin of a white-tailed black-cockatoo, which was illegally harvested from the wild. The third case determined the number individual white-tailed black-cockatoos allegedly shot at a fruit grower's orchard from body part remains. These genetic investigations highlight the significance and statistical confidence of DNA profiling and associated databases for endangered taxa, such as exotic birds. Our cockatoo population databases are the first of their kind in Australia, and demonstrate the efficacy of such approaches to identify such illegal activity. With a robust set of genetic markers and methodologies in place, we aim to broaden our population databases to include other cockatoo species of conservation concern. PMID:22101117

  3. The Distant Sodium Tail of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.; Morgan, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    Models of the sodium atmosphere of Mercury predict the possible existence of a cornet-like sodium tail. Detection and mapping of the predicted sodium tail would provide quantitative data on the energy of the process that produces sodium atoms from the planetary surface. Previous efforts to detect the sodium tail by means of observations done during daylight hours have been only partially successful because scattered sunlight obscured the weak sodium emissions in the tail. However, at greatest eastern elongation around the March equinox in the northern hemisphere, Mercury can be seen as an evening star in astronomical twilight. At this time, the intensity of scattered sunlight is low enough that sodium emissions as low as 500 Rayleighs can be detected. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Characterization and monitoring of transverse beam tails

    SciTech Connect

    Seeman, J.T.; Decker, F.J.; Hsu, I.; Young, C.

    1991-05-01

    Low emittance electron beams accelerated to high energy in a linac experience transverse effects (wakefield, filamentation, optics) which produce non-Gaussian projected transverse beam distributions. Characterizations of the beam shapes are difficult because the shapes are asymmetric and change with betatron phase. In this note several methods to describe beam distributions are discussed including an accelerator physics model of these tails. The uses of these characterizations in monitoring the beam emittances in the SLC are described in this paper. First, two dimensional distributions from profile monitor screens are reviewed showing correlated tails. Second, a fitting technique for non-Gaussian one dimensional distributions is used to extract the core from the tail areas. Finally, a model for tail propagation in the linac is given. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  5. BIOMECHANICS. Why the seahorse tail is square.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Adriaens, Dominique; Hatton, Ross L; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Whereas the predominant shapes of most animal tails are cylindrical, seahorse tails are square prisms. Seahorses use their tails as flexible grasping appendages, in spite of a rigid bony armor that fully encases their bodies. We explore the mechanics of two three-dimensional-printed models that mimic either the natural (square prism) or hypothetical (cylindrical) architecture of a seahorse tail to uncover whether or not the square geometry provides any functional advantages. Our results show that the square prism is more resilient when crushed and provides a mechanism for preserving articulatory organization upon extensive bending and twisting, as compared with its cylindrical counterpart. Thus, the square architecture is better than the circular one in the context of two integrated functions: grasping ability and crushing resistance. PMID:26138983

  6. Unique Structural Features Facilitate Lizard Tail Autotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sanggaard, Kristian W.; Danielsen, Carl Chr.; Wogensen, Lise; Vinding, Mads S.; Rydtoft, Louise M.; Mortensen, Martin B.; Karring, Henrik; Nielsen, Niels Chr.; Wang, Tobias; Thgersen, Ida B.; Enghild, Jan J.

    2012-01-01

    Autotomy refers to the voluntary shedding of a body part; a renowned example is tail loss among lizards as a response to attempted predation. Although many aspects of lizard tail autotomy have been studied, the detailed morphology and mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko) and the associated extracellular matrix (ECM) rupture were independent of proteolysis. Instead, lizard caudal autotomy relied on biological adhesion facilitated by surface microstructures. Results based on bio-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its structural integrity depended on the adhesion between these segments. PMID:23284771

  7. Effects of Tail on Spinning Aircraft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takafumi; Horichi, Takao; Nakamura, Yoshiaki

    The experiment on aircraft spin phenomena was conducted at the low speed wind tunnel of Nagoya University with its exit test section inclined vertically. The model used in this experiment consists of three parts: a main wing, a fuselage, and a tail. Due to the stability effect of the tail, rotation of the model is decreased at low angles of attack, while it is increased at high angles of attack. As a result of pressure measurements, the horizontal tail wing was found to be the cause of this phenomenon. More specifically, a vortex is created from the leading edge of the windward horizontal tail wing, so that negative pressure regions appear on the windward horizontal wing and the vertical wing.

  8. Shake a Tail Feather: The Evolution of the Theropod Tail into a Stiff Aerodynamic Surface

    PubMed Central

    Pittman, Michael; Gatesy, Stephen M.; Upchurch, Paul; Goswami, Anjali; Hutchinson, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Theropod dinosaurs show striking morphological and functional tail variation; e.g., a long, robust, basal theropod tail used for counterbalance, or a short, modern avian tail used as an aerodynamic surface. We used a quantitative morphological and functional analysis to reconstruct intervertebral joint stiffness in the tail along the theropod lineage to extant birds. This provides new details of the tail’s morphological transformation, and for the first time quantitatively evaluates its biomechanical consequences. We observe that both dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased along the non-avian theropod lineage (between nodes Theropoda and Paraves). Our results show how the tail structure of non-avian theropods was mechanically appropriate for holding itself up against gravity and maintaining passive balance. However, as dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness decreased, the tail may have become more effective for dynamically maintaining balance. This supports our hypothesis of a reduction of dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness in shorter tails. Along the avian theropod lineage (Avialae to crown group birds), dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness increased overall, which appears to contradict our null expectation. We infer that this departure in joint stiffness is specific to the tail’s aerodynamic role and the functional constraints imposed by it. Increased dorsoventral and lateral joint stiffness may have facilitated a gradually improved capacity to lift, depress, and swing the tail. The associated morphological changes should have resulted in a tail capable of producing larger muscular forces to utilise larger lift forces in flight. Improved joint mobility in neornithine birds potentially permitted an increase in the range of lift force vector orientations, which might have improved flight proficiency and manoeuvrability. The tail morphology of modern birds with tail fanning capabilities originated in early ornithuromorph birds. Hence, these capabilities should have been present in the early Cretaceous, with incipient tail-fanning capacity in the earliest pygostylian birds. PMID:23690987

  9. Charge compensation of head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls in barium titanate and its influence on conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Yinan; Genenko, Yuri A.; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2014-07-28

    The effect of the polarization charge compensation by ionic and electronic space charges on domain properties in ferroelectrics with semiconducting features is considered, in particular, the conductivity of head-to-head and tail-to-tail domain walls is studied. It is shown that the domain wall conductivity that is enhanced by electrons or holes depends on the configuration and the types of domains as well as on the energy levels and concentrations of the defects involved. Phase field simulation results are used to explain recent equivocal experimental results on conductivity of charged domain walls in different ferroelectrics.

  10. The sodium tail of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  11. Field investigation of evaporation from freshwater tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiyasu, Yoshimasa; Fahey, M.; Newson, T.

    2000-06-01

    Safe and economical storage of tailings is now a major consideration in the operation of many mining operations. Tailings in slurried form, particularly if they have a significant clay content, can take a very long time to consolidate under the action of self-weight consolidation alone. However, if the operation is located in an area of high potential evaporation, this can be used to accelerate the rate of tailings densification. This paper presents a study of the evaporation behavior of a clayey tailings slurry deposited into an evaporation pond in the southwest of Western Australia. Over a six-month period, the rate of evaporation from the tailings surface was monitored using the Bowen Ratio method and the microlysimeter method. This was compared with the evaporation from a Class A pan located nearby. The tailings underwent very significant cracking as drying proceeded, and it was found that these cracks had a significant influence on the overall rate of evaporation once the top surface of the deposit started to desaturate. A large strain consolidation model was used to model the behavior, and the algorithm used in this model to include the effects of evaporation is shown to provide a reasonable prediction of the observed evaporation behavior.

  12. Snapshot of haloarchaeal tailed virus genomes

    PubMed Central

    Senčilo, Ana; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Russell, Daniel A.; Ko, Ching-Chung; Bowman, Charles A.; Atanasova, Nina S.; Österlund, Eija; Oksanen, Hanna M.; Bamford, Dennis H.; Hatfull, Graham F.; Roine, Elina; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequences of archaeal tailed viruses are currently highly underrepresented in sequence databases. Here, we report the genomic sequences of 10 new tailed viruses infecting different haloarchaeal hosts. Among these, only two viral genomes are closely related to each other and to previously described haloviruses HF1 and HF2. The approximately 760 kb of new genomic sequences in total shows no matches to CRISPR/Cas spacer sequences in haloarchaeal host genomes. Despite their high divergence, we were able to identify virion structural and assembly genes as well as genes coding for DNA and RNA metabolic functions. Interestingly, we identified many genes and genomic features that are shared with tailed bacteriophages, consistent with the hypothesis that haloarchaeal and bacterial tailed viruses share common ancestry, and that a viral lineage containing archaeal viruses, bacteriophages and eukaryotic viruses predates the division of the three major domains of non-viral life. However, as in tailed viruses in general and in haloarchaeal tailed viruses in particular, there are still a considerable number of predicted genes of unknown function. PMID:23470522

  13. Electrodialytic remediation of copper mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Henrik K; Rojo, Adrin; Ottosen, Lisbeth M

    2005-01-31

    Mining activities in Chile have generated large amounts of solid waste, which have been deposited in mine tailing impoundments. These impoundments cause concern to the communities due to dam failures or natural leaching to groundwater and rivers. This work shows the laboratory results of nine electrodialytic remediation experiments on copper mine tailings. The results show that electric current could remove copper from watery tailing if the potential gradient was higher than 2 V/cm during 21 days. With addition of sulphuric acid, the process was enhanced because the pH decreased to around 4, and the copper by this reason was released in the solution. Furthermore, with acidic tailing the potential gradient was less than 2 V/cm. The maximum copper removal reached in the anode side was 53% with addition of sulphuric acid in 21 days experiment at 20 V using approximately 1.8 kg mine tailing on dry basis. In addition, experiments with acidic tailing show that the copper removal is proportional with time. PMID:15629576

  14. The Sodium Tail of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-01-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  15. Headspace single-drop microextraction and cuvetteless microspectrophotometry for the selective determination of free and total cyanide involving reaction with ninhydrin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Archana; Pillai, Aradhana K K V; Sharma, Nisha; Verma, Krishna K

    2010-07-15

    Headspace single-drop microextraction has been used for the determination of cyanide with ninhydrin in combination with fibre-optic-based cuvetteless microspectrophotometry which accommodates sample volume of 1 microL placed between the two ends of optical fibres, and has been found to avoid salient drawbacks of batch methods. This method involved hydrocyanic acid formation in a closed vial, and simultaneous extraction and reaction with 2 microL drop of ninhydrin in carbonate medium suspended at the tip of a microsyringe needle held in the headspace of the acidified sample solution. The method was linear in range 0.025-0.5 mg L(-1) of cyanide. The headspace reaction was free from the interference of substances, e.g., thiocyanate, hydrazine sulphate, hydroxylammonium chloride and ascorbic acid. Sulphide was masked by cadmium sulphate, nitrite by sulphamic acid, sulphite by N-ethylmaleimide, and halogens by ascorbic acid. The limit of detection was found to be 4.3 microg L(-1) of cyanide which was comparable to existing most sensitive methods for cyanide. However, the present method is far more simple. The method was applied to acid-labile and metal cyanides complexes by treatment with sulphide when metal sulphides were precipitated setting cyanide ion free, and to iron(II) and (III) cyanide complexes by their decomposition with mercury(II), the mercury(II) cyanide formed was then determined. These pre-treatment methods avoided cumbersome pre-separation of cyanide by methods such as distillation or gas diffusion. The overall recovery of cyanide in diverse samples was 97% with RSD of 3.9%. PMID:20602966

  16. The new idea of transporting tailings-logs in tailings slurry pipeline and the innovation of technology of mining waste-fill method

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Yu; Wang Fuji; Tao Yan

    2000-07-01

    This paper introduced a new idea of transporting mine tailings-logs in mine tailings-slurry pipeline and a new technology of mine cemented filing of tailings-logs with tailings-slurry. The hydraulic principles, the compaction of tailings-logs and the mechanic function of fillbody of tailings-logs cemented by tailings-slurry have been discussed.

  17. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching, treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be more than $500/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  18. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  19. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  20. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Phillips/United Nuclear site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Phillips/United Nuclear site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Phillips/United Nuclear site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $21,500,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $45,200,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing.The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $87/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by either heap leach or conventional plant process. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Phillips/United Nuclear tailings for uranium recovery does not appear to be economically attractive under present or foreseeable market conditions.

  1. A non-uniform three-dimensional perfusion model of rat tail heat transfer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Jiji, L M; Lemons, D E; Weinbaum, S

    1995-05-01

    Previous models of rat tail heat transfer have assumed that the tail is uniformly perfused along its length and have introduced questionable assumptions about the heat transfer role of the major axial arteries and the venous blood shunting between the superficial and deep veins. The recent experiments of Lemons and Wu have shown that (i) perfusion of the tail tip is more than tenfold higher than that in the tail base and (ii) the perfusion of the middle region of the tail increases eightfold during heat stress compared to threefold to fourfold in the base and tip. Our anatomical studies have shown that the lateral arteries are a series of radially arcading connections from the ventral artery and probably do not serve as major axial conduit vessels. These observations indicate that current views and models for the blood flow distribution and heat transfer in the major axial arteries and veins and in the rat tail cutaneous circulation need substantial revision. Based on these new experimental findings a new three-dimensional model is developed to determine the heat transfer function of the rat tail at different local and central temperatures. The predictions of the model show good agreement with the axial surface temperature distribution in the rat tail reported by Lemons and Wu. These results, when combined with our anatomical studies, indicate that there is very little shunting of blood between the superficial lateral veins and the deep ventral vein as proposed by Raman et al. Although this model is based on the rat tail anatomy, it can be modified to treat the human limb and digit. PMID:7652008

  2. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock site, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Shiprock site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.5 million dry tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The eight alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $13,400,000 for stabilization in place to about $37,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 miles. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Shiprock tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $230/lb by heap leach and $250/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive.

  3. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Shiprock Site, Shiprock, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    1981-07-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Shiprock site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Shiprock, New Mexico. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.5 million dry tons of tailings at the Shiprock site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The eight alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of the stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through VIII). Cost estimates for the eight options range from about $13,400,000 for stabilization in place to about $37,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 miles. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Shiprock tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and(c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $230/lb by heap leach and $250/lb by conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive.

  4. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  5. Enhancement of Mineral Carbonation of Various Ultramafic Mine Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, J.; Duchesne, J.; Beaudoin, G.; Constantin, M.; Hébert, R.; Larachi, F.; Lemieux, J.; Molson, J. W.

    2011-12-01

    Capture of atmospheric CO2 in minerals to form magnesium and/or calcium carbonates is a process for permanent sequestration of CO2. Mineral carbonation occurs naturally in some ultramafic mining waste forming cemented crusts at surface, whereas reaction within the waste piles vents CO2-depleted air at the top of the piles. The purpose of this research is to kinetically enhance the mineral carbonation of different ultramafic mine tailings by addition of neutral organic salts and pH adjustments in order to reach a compromise between solubility of magnesium ions and carbonate precipitation. Real time monitoring of CO2 uptake at atmospheric conditions was performed using the Laval eudiometers, which allows calculation of the rate of the mineral carbonation reaction. Tests were conducted by varying the concentration of CO2 in the gas phase, the tailing water content and the material porosity to determine the optimal carbonation conditions. Subsequently, carbonation tests with different pH and various concentrations of organic salts (or chelate) such as sodium EDTA, sodium oxalate and sodium citrate were evaluated. Preliminary results indicate that CO2 reacts with the total mass of the sample and not only with the layer in contact with the gas phase. The water content for optimal carbonation reaction ranged from 20% and 60% according to the type of tailing investigated. Interstitial water is necessary as solvent for dissolution of Mg ions, but saturated pores reduce diffusion of CO2. A linear relationship was obtained between the CO2 concentration in the gas mixture and the CO2 absorption rate of the mine tailings. Increase of tailings porosity by addition of inert aluminum oxide enhances the carbonation reaction probably by facilitating CO2 diffusion in increased pore space. CO2 uptake was increased by 60% over distilled water, using a saturated solution of sodium citrate (1.5 M) and NaHCO3, by 14 to 19% using a saturated solution of sodium EDTA (0.2 M) and NaHCO3 and by 3 to 4% for a saturated solution of sodium oxalate (0.2 M) and NaHCO3. These data show that it is possible to significantly enhance the natural mineral carbonation reaction of various ultramafic mine tailings by adequate porosity, water content, increased CO2 concentration in air, and by adding chelating agents playing a role in Mg solubility at the surface of the Mg-rich minerals.

  6. Mercury's Tail Current Sheet from MESSENGER Magnetic Field Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Asad, M.; Johnson, C. L.; Philpott, L. C.; Anderson, B. J.; Korth, H.; Slavin, J. A.; Solomon, S. C.

    2014-12-01

    We have estimated the spatial variations in the position and average thickness of Mercury's magnetospheric tail current sheet from orbital magnetic field data collected by the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft. We have investigated the changes in these average properties with varying solar wind conditions and magnetospheric activity. The time-averaged thickness of the current sheet was obtained from superposed epoch analysis (SEA) of the 1-s-averaged vector magnetic field data within ± 10 min of the identified magnetic equator position at different down-tail distances. The average thickness was then estimated from a given SEA by identifying the time interval during which the field completed a rotation from the sunward to the anti-sunward direction, or vice versa, accompanied by a depression in the field magnitude. We have found that the current sheet has a thickness of ~0.8 RM (where RM is Mercury's radius, or 2440 km) close to the planet (~ 1.1 RM) and thins to ~0.2 RM in the far tail region (~2.8 RM). We examined individual orbits to catalogue the existence and number of current sheet crossings encountered on each orbit. These data allow us to (1) determine whether the thickness obtained from the SEA is an actual thickness or an apparent thickness controlled by rapid motions of the current sheet, and (2) estimate the statistical likelihood of observing the current sheet as a function of down-tail distance. For example, some magnetically quiet orbits that cross the magnetic equator at down-tail distances greater than 2 RM do not record a current sheet crossing and appear to cross closed field lines in the vicinity of the magnetic equator, even though they lie in a region in which the tail current sheet is usually observed. This result suggests that the inner (near-planet) edge of the current sheet is not stationary but may move anti-sunward (or sunward) under quiet (or active) magnetospheric conditions.

  7. Determination of the Active Principle in a Syrup by Spectrophotometry and Principal Component Regression Analysis. An Advanced Undergraduate Experiment Involving Chemometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribone, María É.; Pagani, Ariana P.; Olivieri, Alejandro C.; Goicoechea, Héctor C.

    2000-10-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry laboratory experiment concerning the determination of the mucolitic bromhexine in a commercial syrup is described. It involves the following steps: (i) preparing nine calibration mixtures and recording their absorption spectra in the region 285-348 nm, (ii) recording spectrophotometric data for four synthetic unknowns and two commercial samples, and (iii) processing them with the multivariate calibration technique of principal component regression (PCR). The theory of PCR is discussed, and a Visual Basic 5.0 for Windows 95/98 program is made available to students for data processing. The program allows students to perform cross-validation and to obtain and save relevant statistical information (root mean square deviation, correlation coefficient, and relative error of prediction), as well as calibration spectral factors and spectral residuals for each test sample, all of which illustrate the PCR technique in detail. The reagents used are low-cost and nontoxic; the experiment is simple and gives students an insight into a real practice that integrates chemistry, instrumentation, and computer techniques.

  8. `Cranach Inc.' A case study determining the nature and extent of Lucas Cranach the Elder's involvement in his industrious workshop using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubashevsky, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    Lucas Cranach the Elder (LCE) (1472-1553) maintained an organized and highly efficient workshop, served as councilor in Wittenberg from 1519-1544, established a publishing house in 1520, held a pharmacy from 1520, and served as mayor of Wittenberg from 1537 to 1543. He was known as the 'swiftest of painters,' resulting in 1,000 surviving panel paintings, canvas paintings, drawings, and etchings in a career that spanned 53 years (1500-1553). Facing this astoundingly enormous oeuvre, the question that this paper seeks to answer is unavoidable: what was LCE's involvement in this oeuvre, which most is still attributed to him, in light of his many other time-consuming engagements? To answer this question, this paper becomes a study of stylistic comparisons of LCE's oeuvre, in order to assess, analyze and identify his style to determine whether all of the works attributed to him were indeed his own handiwork. Classifying LCE's style, together with the fact that he ran his workshop in factory-like conditions, supplying his apprentices with pigments, designs they could trace, copies, modelling versions, and patterns, making him an artist turned businessman, LCE becomes an artist who turned art into an industrial operation, earning the title 'Cranach Inc.' The conclusion of this paper will be based inter-alia on comparisons between Infra-red images and the visible paintings, in order to undermine the established attributions made to LCE.

  9. NPS6, Encoding a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Involved in Siderophore-Mediated Iron Metabolism, Is a Conserved Virulence Determinant of Plant Pathogenic Ascomycetes[W

    PubMed Central

    Oide, Shinichi; Moeder, Wolfgang; Krasnoff, Stuart; Gibson, Donna; Haas, Hubertus; Yoshioka, Keiko; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2006-01-01

    NPS6, encoding a nonribosomal peptide synthetase, is a virulence determinant in the maize (Zea mays) pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus and is involved in tolerance to H2O2. Deletion of NPS6 orthologs in the rice (Oryza sativa) pathogen, Cochliobolus miyabeanus, the wheat (Triticum aestivum) pathogen, Fusarium graminearum, and the Arabidopsis thaliana pathogen, Alternaria brassicicola, resulted in reduced virulence and hypersensitivity to H2O2. Introduction of the NPS6 ortholog from the saprobe Neurospora crassa to the Δnps6 strain of C. heterostrophus restored wild-type virulence to maize and tolerance to H2O2, demonstrating functional conservation in filamentous ascomycete phytopathogens and saprobes. Increased sensitivity to iron depletion was identified as a conserved phenotype of Δnps6 strains. Exogenous application of iron enhanced the virulence of Δnps6 strains of C. heterostrophus, C. miyabeanus, F. graminearum, and A. brassicicola to each host. NPS6 is responsible for the biosynthesis of extracellular siderophores by C. heterostrophus, F. graminearum, and A. brassicicola. Application of the extracellular siderophore of A. brassicicola restored wild-type virulence of the ΔAbnps6 strain to Arabidopsis. It is proposed that the role of extracellular siderophores in fungal virulence to plants is to supply an essential nutrient, iron, to their producers in planta and not to act as phytotoxins, depriving their hosts of iron. PMID:17056706

  10. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles involved in 2-aminoethanethiol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for sensitive determination of cefexime in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju; Atar, Necip

    2014-10-15

    The molecular imprinting technique depends on the molecular recognition. It is a polymerization method around the target molecule. Hence, this technique creates specific cavities in the cross-linked polymeric matrices. In present study, a sensitive imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles (Fe@AuNPs) involved in 2-aminoethanethiol (2-AET) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was developed for determination of cefexime (CEF). The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) confirmed the formation of the developed surfaces. CEF imprinted film was constructed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for 9 cycles in the presence of 80 mM pyrrole in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20mM CEF. The developed electrochemical biosensor was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guideline and found to be linear, sensitive, selective, precise and accurate. The linearity range and the detection limit were obtained as 1.0 × 10(-10)-1.0 × 10(-8)M and 2.2 × 10(-11)M, respectively. The developed CEF imprinted sensor was successfully applied to real samples such as human plasma. In addition, the stability and reproducibility of the prepared molecular imprinted electrode were investigated. The excellent long-term stability and reproducibility of the prepared CEF imprinted electrodes make them attractive in electrochemical sensors. PMID:24832202

  11. EXPOSURE OF WHITE TAILED DEER TO BOVINE DIARRHEA VIRUS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The importance of white tail deer as a reservoir of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has been a point of controversy. The objective of this project was to observe the infectivity of BVDV white tail deer isolates in white tailed deer. Eight white tailed deer fawn 2-4 weeks in age were divided int...

  12. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Tuba City site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Tuba City, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 0.8 million tons of tailings at the Tuba City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  13. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Tuba City site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Tuba City, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 0.8 million tons of tailings at the Tuba City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Green River Site, Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    1981-08-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Green River site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. This evaluation has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the 123,000 tons of tailings at the Green River site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  15. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L., Jr.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail increased by factors of 2 to 3.5 over intervals of 2 to 3 min. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approx.10 times less and typical durations are approx.1 hour. The extreme tail loading observed at Mercury implies that the relative intensity of sub storms must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail field enhancements and the characteristic time for the Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere. suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles, but no acceleration signatures were seen during the MESSENGER flyby.

  16. The Pressure Distribution over the Horizontal Tail Surfaces of an Airplane II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine whether the results obtained upon model tail surfaces can be used to accurately predict loads upon the full-sized tail; and also to find the distribution of load when large elevator angles are used, as the loads from such angles can not be obtained readily in free flight. The method consisted in using a metal horizontal tail surface inside of which small air passages, connecting with a series of holes in the surface, led the pressure off from the tail in rubber tubes. In this way the pressure at each of these holes was measured by a manometer at several angles of attack and several to the loading under similar conditions in the full-sized airplane and the manner of distribution is quite similar in the two cases when there is no slip stream.

  17. Double chromodomains cooperate to recognize the methylated histone H3 tail

    SciTech Connect

    Flanagan, John F.; Mi, Li-Zhi; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Cymborowski, Marcin; Clines, Katrina L.; Kim, Youngchang; Minor, Wladek; Rastinejad, Fraydoon; Khorasanizadeh, Sepideh

    2010-07-19

    Chromodomains are modules implicated in the recognition of lysine-methylated histone tails and nucleic acids. CHD (for chromo-ATPase/helicase-DNA-binding) proteins regulate ATP-dependent nucleosome assembly and mobilization through their conserved double chromodomains and SWI2/SNF2 helicase/ATPase domain. The Drosophila CHD1 localizes to the interbands and puffs of the polytene chromosomes, which are classic sites of transcriptional activity. Other CHD isoforms (CHD3/4 or Mi-2) are important for nucleosome remodelling in histone deacetylase complexes. Deletion of chromodomains impairs nucleosome binding and remodelling by CHD proteins. Here we describe the structure of the tandem arrangement of the human CHD1 chromodomains, and its interactions with histone tails. Unlike HP1 and Polycomb proteins that use single chromodomains to bind to their respective methylated histone H3 tails, the two chromodomains of CHD1 cooperate to interact with one methylated H3 tail. We show that the human CHD1 double chromodomains target the lysine 4-methylated histone H3 tail (H3K4me), a hallmark of active chromatin. Methylammonium recognition involves two aromatic residues, not the three-residue aromatic cage used by chromodomains of HP1 and Polycomb proteins. Furthermore, unique inserts within chromodomain 1 of CHD1 block the expected site of H3 tail binding seen in HP1 and Polycomb, instead directing H3 binding to a groove at the inter-chromodomain junction.

  18. An Alternative Phosphorylation Switch in Integrin??2 (CD18) Tail for Dok1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sebanti; Chit, Joel Chia-Yeong; Feng, Chen; Bhunia, Anirban; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are involved in cell migration and adhesion. A large number of proteins interact with the cytoplasmic tails of integrins. Dok1 is a negative regulator of integrin activation and it binds to the phosphorylated membrane proximal NxxY motif in a number of integrin ? tails. The ? tail of the ?2 integrins contains a non-phosphorylatable NxxF motif. Hence it is unclear how Dok1 associates with the ?2 integrins. We showed in this study using NMR and cell based analyses that residues Ser745 and Ser756 in the integrin ?2 tail, which are adjacent to the NxxF motif, are required for Dok1 interaction. NMR analyses detected significant chemical shift changes and higher affinity interactions between Dok1 phospho-tyrosine binding (PTB) domain and integrin ?2 tail peptide containing pSer756 compared to pSer745. The phosphorylated ?2 peptide occupies the canonical ligand binding pocket of Dok1 based on the docked structure of the ?2 tail-Dok1 PTB complex. Taken together, our data suggest an alternate phosphorylation switch in ?2 integrins that regulates Dok1 binding. This could be important for cells of the immune system and their functions. PMID:26108885

  19. An Alternative Phosphorylation Switch in Integrin β2 (CD18) Tail for Dok1 Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sebanti; Chit, Joel Chia-Yeong; Feng, Chen; Bhunia, Anirban; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2015-06-01

    Integrins are involved in cell migration and adhesion. A large number of proteins interact with the cytoplasmic tails of integrins. Dok1 is a negative regulator of integrin activation and it binds to the phosphorylated membrane proximal NxxY motif in a number of integrin β tails. The β tail of the β2 integrins contains a non-phosphorylatable NxxF motif. Hence it is unclear how Dok1 associates with the β2 integrins. We showed in this study using NMR and cell based analyses that residues Ser745 and Ser756 in the integrin β2 tail, which are adjacent to the NxxF motif, are required for Dok1 interaction. NMR analyses detected significant chemical shift changes and higher affinity interactions between Dok1 phospho-tyrosine binding (PTB) domain and integrin β2 tail peptide containing pSer756 compared to pSer745. The phosphorylated β2 peptide occupies the canonical ligand binding pocket of Dok1 based on the docked structure of the β2 tail-Dok1 PTB complex. Taken together, our data suggest an alternate phosphorylation switch in β2 integrins that regulates Dok1 binding. This could be important for cells of the immune system and their functions.

  20. A Field and Modeling Study of Windblown Particles from a Uranium Mill Tailings Pile

    SciTech Connect

    Schwendiman, L. C.; Sehmel, G. A.; Horst, T. W.; Thomas, C. W.; Perkins, R. W.

    1980-06-01

    An extensive field study whose primary objective was to obtain knowledge and understanding of the nature and quantity of windblown particles from uranium mill tailings piles was conducted in the Ambrosia Lake District of New Mexico. The following major field tasks were undertaken: determination of physical, chemical, and radioactivity characteristics of mill tailings particles; an investigation of the nature and quantity of tailings particles in soil in the vicinity of tailings piles; and the determination of the nature and flux of particles being transported by wind as a function of wind speed and height. Results of the field study are presented. Particle size distributions and associated radioactivity were measured. Radioactivity relationships showed uranium daughters in mill tailings to be in essential radioactive equilibrium for the carbonate leach process but thorium-230 tends to be leached into the slurry water for the acid process mill tailings. One objective of the study was to relate windblown particle concentrations, fluxes, and particle sizes to wind speed. Hundreds of samples were taken and analyses were performed, but relationships between wind speed, airborne particle sizes and concentrations were found to be vague and inconclusive. A resuspension, deposition, and transport model was developed and applied using site meteorology. Ground deposition patterns predicted were similar to those found.

  1. Acoustic characteristics of tail rotors and the effects of empennage interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Eric W.; Fitzgerald, James M.; Shenoy, Rajarama K.

    Acoustic and aerodynamic measurements were performed on a four-bladed 0.597-m-diameter scale model tail rotor in the Acoustic Research Tunnel. Initial tests were performed with isolated pusher and tractor tail rotor configurations to determine the operational parameters significantly affecting tail rotor acoustic levels. Subsequent tests incorporated a pylon and stabilizer to investigate tail rotor-empennage interaction effects. The primary determinant of near field tail rotor OASPL and dBD levels was found to be the advancing blade tip Mach number (M sub 1,90). Multiple linear regression analyses of the isolated tail rotor acoustic data indicated that in-plane noise was dominated by thickness noise and scaled approximately as M super 12.5 sub 1,90 and that the out-of-plane (45 deg) noise was significantly affected by higher harmonic and/or broadband 'vortex' noise scaling approximately as M super 8.2 sub 1,90, with rotational blade passage harmonic noise scaling approximately as M super 6.7 sub 1,90.

  2. Escape of O+ Through the Distant Tail Plasma Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Popecki, M.; Simunac, K. D.; Farrugia, C. J.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Blush, L. M.; Bochsler, P. A.; Wurz, P.; Klecker, B.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Opitz, A.; Sauvaud, J.; Russell, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    During the early orbit phase of the STEREO mission, in February, 2007, the STEREO-B spacecraft went down the deep magnetotail, and encountered the magnetosheath, plasma sheet and plasma sheet boundary layer from about 200 Re to 300 Re downtail, before finally exiting to the solar wind. This time period was during solar minimum, and there was no storm activity during this month. We have used the ion composition data from the PLASTIC instrument to determine how much ionospheric O+ is in the deep tail plasma sheet, and to calculate the loss rate through this path. Surprisingly, we find that during this solar and geomagnetically quiet time, O+ is a constant feature of the deep magnetotail. We find that the O+ density is about 15% of the density in the near-earth plasma sheet for similar conditions. The tailward flux of the O+ is similar to the flux of O+ beams that have been observed in the lobe/mantle region of the deep tail. The observations provide a consistent picture that some O+ is transported into the distant tail in the lobe/mantle region, and then enters the plasma sheet tailward of the distant neutral line. The total outflow of the O+ down the plasma sheet is a rate of 1.1x1024 ions/s, which is 10% of the total outflow rate of 1x 1025 ions/s, and of the same order as the estimated loss from dayside transport.

  3. Lizard tail regeneration: regulation of two distinct cartilage regions by Indian hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Lozito, Thomas P; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-03-15

    Lizards capable of caudal autotomy exhibit the remarkable ability to "drop" and then regenerate their tails. However, the regenerated lizard tail (RLT) is known as an "imperfect replicate" due to several key anatomical differences compared to the original tail. Most striking of these "imperfections" concerns the skeleton; instead of the vertebrae of the original tail, the skeleton of the RLT takes the form of an unsegmented cartilage tube (CT). Here we have performed the first detailed staging of skeletal development of the RLT CT, identifying two distinct mineralization events. CTs isolated from RLTs of various ages were analyzed by micro-computed tomography to characterize mineralization, and to correlate skeletal development with expression of endochondral ossification markers evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. During early tail regeneration, shortly after CT formation, the extreme proximal CT in direct contact with the most terminal vertebra of the original tail develops a growth plate-like region that undergoes endochondral ossification. Proximal CT chondrocytes enlarge, express hypertrophic markers, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), apoptose, and are replaced by bone. During later stages of tail regeneration, the distal CT mineralizes without endochondral ossification. The sub-perichondrium of the distal CT expresses Ihh, and the perichondrium directly calcifies without cartilage growth plate formation. The calcified CT perichondrium also contains a population of stem/progenitor cells that forms new cartilage in response to TGF-β stimulation. Treatment with the Ihh inhibitor cyclopamine inhibited both proximal CT ossification and distal CT calcification. Thus, while the two mineralization events are spatially, temporally, and mechanistically very different, they both involve Ihh. Taken together, these results suggest that Ihh regulates CT mineralization during two distinct stages of lizard tail regeneration. PMID:25596336

  4. Orexigenic response to tail pinch: role of brain NPY1 and corticotropin releasing factor receptors

    PubMed Central

    Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Stengel, Andreas; Wang, Lixin

    2013-01-01

    Tail pinch stimulates food intake in rats. We investigated brain mechanisms of this response and the influence of repeated exposure. Sprague-Dawley rats received acute (5 min) or repeated (5 min/day for 14 days) tail pinch using a padded clip. Acute tail pinch increased 5-min food intake compared with control (0.92 ± 0.2 vs. 0.03 ± 0.01 g, P < 0.01). This response was inhibited by 76% by intracerebroventricular injection of BIBP-3226, a neuropeptide Y1 (NPY1) receptor antagonist, increased by 48% by astressin-B, a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor antagonist, and not modified by S-406-028, a somatostatin subtype 2 antagonist. After the 5-min tail pinch without food, blood glucose rose by 21% (P < 0.01) while changes in plasma acyl ghrelin (+41%) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (+37%) were not significant. Two tail pinches (45 min apart) activate pontine and hindbrain catecholaminergic and hypothalamic paraventricular CRF neurons. After 14 days of repeated tail pinch, the 5-min orexigenic response was not significantly different from days 2 to 11 but reduced by 50% thereafter (P < 0.001). Simultaneously, the 5-min fecal pellet output increased during the last 5 days compared with the first 5 days (+58%, P < 0.05). At day 14, the body weight gain was reduced by 22%, with a 99% inhibition of fat gain and a 25% reduction in lean mass (P < 0.05). The orexigenic response to acute 5-min tail pinch is likely to involve the activation of brain NPY1 signaling, whereas that of CRF tends to dampen the acute response and may contribute to increased defecation and decreased body weight gain induced by repeated tail pinch. PMID:24338440

  5. Modelling the Neutral Sodium Tails of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and at some comets a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) data taken using CoCam [Cremonese et al, 1997], but since this initial detection similar features have been observed at a number of near-Sun comets using the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph. An understanding of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be developed using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout a comet's orbit. At present the source of neutral sodium in comets is unknown, primarily because the evolution of neutral cometary sodium is difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. Several authors [review presented in Cremonese et al, 1999] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail and ion tail. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three dimensional, heliocentric distance dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model (initially based on a model developed by [Brown et al, 1998]). Our model is known as COMPASS (Cometary Orbital Motion at Perihelion: an Adaptable Sodium Simulation), and incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. We present the initial results of a comparison between COMPASS and observational data. We have found good agreement between the overall morphology of the neutral sodium tail imaged at comet Hale-Bopp and COMPASS, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present a comparison between simulated COMPASS spectra and observations. The versatility of COMPASS allows it to be easily adapted to any other neutral cometary sodium tail observations available.

  6. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liontos, Lynn Balster

    1992-01-01

    Family involvement in schools will work only when perceived as an enlarged concept focusing on all children, including those from at-risk families. Each publication reviewed here is specifically concerned with family involvement strategies concerned with all children or targeted at primarily high risk students. Susan McAllister Swap looks at three

  7. Community Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Hayden R., Ed.

    1979-01-01

    This publication features thirteen articles on community involvement. Several programs and individuals concerned with the role of the community in educational development and improvement are discussed. The main points made in all of the articles are: 1) research on community involvement appears limited, and 2) research "experts" are grass roots

  8. Histochemical, Biochemical and Cell Biological aspects of tail regeneration in lizard, an amniote model for studies on tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The present review summarizes biochemical, histochemical and immunocytochemical aspects of the process of tissue regeneration in lizards, non-mammalian amniotes with high regenerative power. The amputated tail initially mobilizes the glycogen and lipid reserves during wound healing. In the following stage of formation of the regenerative blastema tissue remodeling produces a typical embryonic tissue, initially increasing the amount of water and glycosaminoglycans such as jaluronate, which are later replaced by sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen during tail elongation. In blastematic and early differentiating stages the initial anaerobic metabolism utilizes glycolysis and hexose monophosphate pathways to sustain high RNA production and lipid catabolism for energy production. This stage, after formation of blood vessels, is replaced by the energy-efficient aerobic metabolism based on the Krebs' cycle that is needed for the differentiation and growth of the new tissues of the regenerating tail. Specific proteins of the cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, cell junctions, transcriptional and growth factors are actively produced in the embryonic environment of early stages of regeneration and allow for cell movement, signaling and differentiation. During wound healing, the production of anti-microbial peptides in granulocytes is likely involved in limiting inflammation and stimulates tissue regeneration in the tail while the lasting inflammatory reaction of the limb and spinal cord limits their potential of regeneration. Activated hemopoiesis, circulating blood, endocrine glands, liver, kidney and spleen supply the regenerating tissues with metabolites and hormones but also with phagocytes and immuno-competent cells that can inhibit tissue regeneration after repetitive amputations that elicit chronic inflammation. The latter aspect shows how successful tissue regeneration in an amniote can be turned into scarring by the alteration of the initial microenvironment and inflammatory course, an inspiring model for understanding failure of tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates and humans. The participation of 5-Bromo-deoxyuridine (5BrdU) long retention cells, indicated as putative stem cells, for the following regeneration is analyzed and it shows that different tissue sites of the original tail contain putative stem cells that are likely activated from the wounding signal. In particular, the permanence of stem cells in the central canal of the spinal cord can explain the limited but important neurogenesis present in the caudal but also in the lumbar-thoracic spinal cord. In the latter, the limited number of glial and neurons regenerated is however sufficient to recover some limited hind limb movement after injury or spinal transection. Finally, the presence of stem cells in the spinal cord, in the regenerative blastema and skin allow to use these organs as a source of cells for studies on gene activation during cell differentiation in the new spinal cord, tail and in the epidermis. The above information form the basic knowledge for the future molecular studies on the specific gene activation capable to determine tail regeneration in lizards, and more in general genes involved in the reactivation of regeneration process in amniotes and humans. PMID:24387878

  9. 75 FR 62445 - Otter Tail Valley Railroad Company, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Otter Tail County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Surface Transportation Board Otter Tail Valley Railroad Company, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-- in Otter Tail County, MN Otter Tail Valley Railroad Company, Inc. (OTVR) filed a verified notice of exemption... milepost 48.422 near Fergus Falls, and milepost 47.60 near Hoot Lake, in Otter Tail County, Minn.\\1\\...

  10. Hydrology and geochemistry of the uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming. Part II. History matching. [Mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; White, A.F.; Tokunaga, T.

    1985-02-01

    In Part I of this series of two reports the observed fluid potential and geochemical characteristics in and around the inactive uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming were presented. The prupose of the present work is to attempt to simulate field observations using mathematical models. The results of the studies have not only helped identify the physicochemical mechanisms govering contaminant migration around the inactive mill tailings pile in Riverton, but also have indicated the feasibility of quantifying these mechanisms with the help of newly developed mathematical models. Much work needs to be done to validate and benchmark these models. The history-matching effort on hand involves the mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the inactive uranium mill tailings. The simulation problem involves consideration of transient fluid flow and transient, reactive chemical transport in a variably saturated ground water system with time-dependent boundary conditions. 15 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Genomic analyses of metal resistance genes in three plant growth promoting bacteria of legume plants in Northwest mine tailings, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin; Hao, Xiuli; Herzberg, Martin; Luo, Yantao; Nies, Dietrich H; Wei, Gehong

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the diversity of metal resistance genetic determinant from microbes that survived at metal tailings in northwest of China, a highly elevated level of heavy metal containing region, genomic analyses was conducted using genome sequence of three native metal-resistant plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB). It shows that: Mesorhizobium amorphae CCNWGS0123 contains metal transporters from P-type ATPase, CDF (Cation Diffusion Facilitator), HupE/UreJ and CHR (chromate ion transporter) family involved in copper, zinc, nickel as well as chromate resistance and homeostasis. Meanwhile, the putative CopA/CueO system is expected to mediate copper resistance in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 while ZntA transporter, assisted with putative CzcD, determines zinc tolerance in Agrobacterium tumefaciens CCNWGS0286. The greenhouse experiment provides the consistent evidence of the plant growth promoting effects of these microbes on their hosts by nitrogen fixation and/or indoleacetic acid (IAA) secretion, indicating a potential in-site phytoremediation usage in the mining tailing regions of China. PMID:25597676

  12. Single-Tailed Lipidoids Enhance the Transfection Activity of Their Double-Tailed Counterparts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yihang; Li, Linxian; Chen, Qing; Su, Yi; Levkin, Pavel A; Davidson, Gary

    2016-01-11

    Cationic lipid-like molecules (lipidoids) are widely used for in vitro and in vivo gene delivery. Nearly all lipidoids developed to date employ double-tail or multiple-tail structures for transfection. Single-tail lipidoids are seldom considered for transfection as they have low efficiency in gene delivery. So far, there is no detailed study on the contribution to transfection efficiency of single-tail lipidoids when combined with standard double-tail lipidoids. Here, we use combinatorial chemistry to synthesize 17 double-tail and 17 single-tail lipidoids using thiol-yne and thiol-ene click chemistry, respectively. HEK 293T cells were used to analyze transfection efficiency by fluorescence microscopy and calculated based on the percentage of cells transfected. The size and zeta potential of liposomes and lipoplexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS). Intracellular DNA delivery and trafficking was further examined using confocal microscopy. Our study shows that combining single with double-tail lipidoids increases uptake of lipoplexes, as well as cellular transfection efficiency. PMID:26651853

  13. Translational regulation of the mRNA encoding the ubiquitin peptidase USP1 involved in the DNA damage response as a determinant of Cisplatin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sourisseau, Tony; Helissey, Carole; Lefebvre, Cline; Ponsonnailles, Florence; Malka-Mahieu, Hlne; Olaussen, Ken A; Andr, Fabrice; Vagner, Stephan; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2016-01-17

    Cisplatin (cis-diaminedichloroplatin (II), CDDP) is part of the standard therapy for a number of solid tumors including Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). The initial response observed is in most cases only transient and tumors quickly become refractory to the drug. Tumor cell resistance to CDDP relies on multiple mechanisms, some of which still remain unknown. In search for such mechanisms, we examined the impact of CDDP on mRNA translation in a sensitive and in a matched resistant NSCLC cell line. We identified a set of genes whose mRNAs are differentially translated in CDDP resistant vs. sensitive cells. The translation of the mRNA encoding the Ubiquitin-Specific Peptidase 1 (USP1), a Ubiquitin peptidase with important function in multiple DNA repair pathways, is inhibited by CDDP exposure in the sensitive cells, but not in the resistant cells. This lack of down-regulation of USP1 expression at the translational level plays a primary role in CDDP resistance since inhibition of USP1 expression or activity by siRNA or the small molecule inhibitor ML323, respectively is sufficient to re-sensitize resistant cells to CDDP. We involved the USP1 mRNA translation as a major mechanism of CDDP resistance in NSCLC cells and suggest that USP1 could be evaluated as a candidate predictive marker and as a therapeutic target to overcome CDDP resistance. More generally, our results indicate that analysis of gene expression at the level of mRNA translation is a useful approach to identify new determinants of CDDP resistance. PMID:26825230

  14. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Aaron W; Lee, Kyubin; Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  15. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  16. Cross-tail current, field-aligned current, and By

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Richard L.; Lu, Chen; Larson, Douglas J.

    1994-06-01

    Orbits of individual charged particles were traced in a one-dimensional magnetic field model that included a uniform cross-tail component Byo. The effects of Byo on the cross-tail current distribution jy(z), the average cross-tail drift velocity , and the average pitch angle change experienced during current sheet encounters were calculated. The addition of a Byo that exceeded several tenths of one nanotesla completely eliminated all resonance effects for odd-N orbits. An odd-N resonance involves ions that enter and exit the current sheet on the same side. Pitch angles of nearly all such ions changed substantially during a typical current sheet interaction, and there was no region of large cross-tail drift velocity in the presence of a modest Byo. The addition of a very large Byo guide field in the direction that enhances the natural drift produces a large jy and small for ions with all energies. The addition of a modest Byo had less effect near even-N resonances. In this case, ions in a small energy range were found to undergo so little change in pitch angle that particles which originated in the ionosphere would pass through the current sheet and return to the conjugate ionosphere. Finally, the cross-tail drift of ions from regions dominated by stochastic orbits to regions dominated by either resonant or guiding center orbits was considered. The ion drift speed changed substantially during such transitions. The accompanying electrons obey the guiding center equations, so electron drift is more uniform. Any difference between gradients in the fluxes associated with electron and ion drifts requires the presence of a Birkeland current in order to maintain charge neutrality. This plasma sheet region therefore serves as a current generator. The analysis predicts that the resulting Birkeland current connects to the lowest altitude equatorial regions in which ions drift to or from a point at which stochastic orbits predominate. The proposed mechanism appears only in analyses that include non-guiding-center effects.

  17. Stability and Function of the Sec61 Translocation Complex Depends on the Sss1p Tail-Anchor Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Domina; Henderson, Matthew P.; Nieuwland, Hendrik; Coughlan, Christine M.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Andrews, David W.

    2011-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Sss1p, an essential component of the heterotrimeric Sec61 complex in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) #, is a tail-anchored protein whose precise mechanism of action is largely unknown. Tail-anchored proteins are involved in many cellular processes and are characterized by a single transmembrane sequence (TMS) at or near the carboxyl-terminus. The Sec61 complex is the molecular machine through which secretory and membrane proteins translocate into and across the ER membrane. To understand the function of the tail-anchor of Sss1p, we introduced mutations into the tail-anchor sequence and analyzed the resulting yeast phenotypes. Point mutations in the C-terminal hydrophobic core of the tail-anchor of Sss1p were identified that allowed Sss1p assembly into Sec61 complexes but resulted in diminished growth, defects in co- and post-translational translocation, diminished ribosome binding to Sec61 complexes, reduced stability of both heterotrimeric Sec61 and heptameric Sec complexes, and a complete breakdown of ER structure. The underlying defect caused by the mutations involves loss of a stabilizing function of the Sss1p tail-anchor sequence for both the heterotrimeric Sec61 and the heptameric Sec complexes. These data indicate that by stabilizing multiprotein membrane complexes, the hydrophobic core of a tail-anchor sequence can be more than a simple membrane anchor. PMID:21355855

  18. Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site located near Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The designated site covers 196 acres and contains 111 acres of tailings and some of the original mill structures. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for th remedial action (40 CFR Part 192). Remedial action must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated materials into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion protection measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. Another alternative which would involve moving the tailings to a new location is also assessed in this document. This alternative would generally involve greater short-term impacts and costs but would result in stabilization of the tailings at an undeveloped location. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document.

  19. THE DUST TAIL OF ASTEROID (3200) PHAETHON

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Li Jing; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears {approx}>350'' (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius {approx}1 {mu}m and a combined mass {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures ({approx}1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

  20. Beyond the Standard Employment Relationship: The Character and Determinants of Risk-Involved Teams, Altered-Time Arrangements, and the Contracting-In of Retirees. EQW Working Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherer, Peter D.; Lee, Kyungmook

    A study examined three human resource arrangements that varied from the standard form of the employment relationship. One arrangement included risk-involved teams (RITs) in which greater reliance was placed on risk sharing and employee involvement. The second represented the "contracting-in" of retired employees (CIR) to act as independent

  1. THE IMPACT OF ROUTINE PIGLET PROCESSING PROCEDURES ON WELL-BEING. I. TEETH RESECTION, TAIL-DOCKING, AND CASTRATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several potentially painful procedures are performed on piglets soon after birth. These procedures include teeth resection, tail docking, and castration. Several experiments were conducted to determine if less painful alternatives could be identified. Three experiments were conducted to compare: 1)...

  2. Design of tailing dam using red mud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rout, Subrat; Sahoo, Tapaswini; Das, Sarat

    2013-06-01

    Red mud, waste industrial product from aluminum industries produced approximately 75 million tonnes every year with less than half of this is used. Storage of this unutilized red mud takes vast tracts of usable land and pollutes, land, air and water. Construction of high embankments, under passes, flyovers, tailing dams uses vast tract of natural resources (top soil) is also matter of concern as its takes thousands of years to form the natural soil. This paper discusses use of red mud for construction of tailing dam based on laboratory findings and finite element analysis. The geotechnical properties such as plasticity, compaction, permeability, shear strength characteristics and dispersion of red mud are presented. Stability and seepage analysis of tailing dams as per finite element analysis using the above geotechnical parameters is presented.

  3. Assessment of leaching from lead mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Raised bed test plots containing 15-20 cm of mine tailings from the Old Lead Belt in southeastern Missouri were used in studying the effects of cover materials on leaching of Pb, Cd, Zn, and other chemical constituents from the tailings. The following cover materials, chosen to simulate the effects of vegetative stabilization of tailings piles, were studied: anaerobically digested sewage sludge (''S''), silver maple leaves (''L''), sod (''G''), fertilizer/seed mixture (''F''), and untreated (''U''). The plots were situated outdoors, and the rainfall leachates collected in vinyl receiving pools. Comparison of filtrable metal concentrations in leachates utilized the Bonferroni multiple comparison method (p < 0.05) applied to ranked data. The following effects were observed during the first study season: Pb-L > U > F; Cd-S-L > U; Zn-S > U > F. During the second season, leaching of Pb and Zn from the leaf covered plot was greater than from the control plot.

  4. Reclamation of Exxon Ray Point Tailings Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.L.; Strachan, C.L. ); Estey, H.P. )

    1989-12-01

    This paper outlines key items for reclamation of uranium tailings impoundments, using the reclamation of Exxon Coal and Minerals Company's (ECMC'S) Ray Point (or Felder) uranium mill site and tailings impoundment as a case history. ECMC'S Ray Point is the first Title II site for which a final reclamation plan has been approved and constructed. Initial reclamation work of the Ray Point Site consists of mill decommissioning, mill site cleanup, and initial tailings impoundment cover placement. The licensing process in Texas consists of submitting the reclamation plan documents to Texas Department of Health (TDH), with subsequent discussion of the plans and submittal of additional data, analyses, with subsequent discussion of the plans and submittal of additional data, analysis, and clarification. Following approval of the Ray Point reclamation plan, final reclamation work is carried out, and consists of random fill placement, compacted soil cover construction, topsoiling, and revegetation.

  5. A generalized dynamic balancing procedure for the AH-64 tail rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Donald L.; Newkirk, Mark C.

    2009-09-01

    The tail rotors on the AH-64A Apache and AH-64D Longbow Apache incorporate a unique design, which includes two, two-bladed teetering rotors that have an azimuth spacing of 55°, instead of the more usual 90°. Maintainers have observed that some Apache tail rotors can be extraordinarily difficult to balance dynamically. This investigation uses RCAS (Rotorcraft Comprehensive Analysis System) numerical simulations of tail rotor response when mass is added to the tips of single and adjacent blades to investigate possible causes for this balancing difficulty. The simulations show that the 1/rev, vertical, vibratory force response due to added tip mass varies as a function of the mass distribution between two adjacent blades, and the azimuth spacing between the two blades. As a result, the tail rotor balance sensitivity coefficients, if used as for a single blade, will be inaccurate; and may be a prime contributor to the problems observed while balancing tail rotors. An analytical model of the AH-64D tail rotor, with characteristics similar to the RCAS model, and which incorporates the influence of structural impedance through the balance sensitivity coefficients and phase angles, is used to develop a method for accurately determining the amount of tip mass required to reduce the 1/rev vibrations to acceptable levels.

  6. Flight investigation of the effect of tail boom strakes on helicopter directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L.; Crowell, Cynthia A.; Yenni, Kenneth R.; Lance, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A joint U.S. Army/NASA flight investigation was conducted utilizing an instrumented Bell 240B single-rotor helicopter to determine the effectiveness of horizontally-mounted tail boom strakes on directional controllability and tail rotor power required during low-speed, crosswind operating conditions. The purpose of the strakes was to separate airflow over the tail boom and change fuselage yawing moments in a direction to improve the yaw control margin and reduce tail rotor power required. Low-speed crosswind data were obtained in 5-knot increments at airspeeds of 0 knots to 35 knots and for 30 deg increments in wind azimuth from 0 to 330 deg. In right sideward flight at the most critical wind azimuth and airspeed (60 deg azimuth measured from the nose of the aircraft and 20 knots airspeed), the strakes improved the pedal margin by about 6 percent of total travel and reduced the tail rotor power required by 17 percent. The increase in yaw control and reduction in tail rotor power offered by the strakes can expand the operating envelope in terms of gross weight and altitude capability. No effects in forward flight were noted.

  7. Spatial Characteristics of the Unsteady Differential Pressures on 16 percent F/A-18 Vertical Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.; Ashley, Holt

    1998-01-01

    Buffeting is an aeroelastic phenomenon which plagues high performance aircraft at high angles of attack. For the F/A-18 at high angles of attack, vortices emanating from wing/fuselage leading edge extensions burst, immersing the vertical tails in their turbulent wake. The resulting buffeting of the vertical tails is a concern from fatigue and inspection points of view. Previous flight and wind-tunnel investigations to determine the buffet loads on the tail did not provide a complete description of the spatial characteristics of the unsteady differential pressures. Consequently, the unsteady differential pressures were considered to be fully correlated in the analyses of buffet and buffeting. The use of fully correlated pressures in estimating the generalized aerodynamic forces for the analysis of buffeting yielded responses that exceeded those measured in flight and in the wind tunnel. To learn more about the spatial characteristics of the unsteady differential pressures, an available 16%, sting-mounted, F-18 wind-tunnel model was modified and tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the ACROBAT (Actively Controlled Response Of Buffet-Affected Tails) program. Surface pressures were measured at high angles of attack on flexible and rigid tails. Cross-correlation and cross-spectral analyses of the pressure time histories indicate that the unsteady differential pressures are not fully correlated. In fact, the unsteady differential pressure resemble a wave that travels along the tail. At constant angle of attack, the pressure correlation varies with flight speed.

  8. Gecko CD59 Is Implicated in Proximodistal Identity during Tail Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shengjuan; Zhou, Weijuan; Liu, Yan; Wang, Yingjie; Gu, Qing; Gu, Yun; Dong, Yingying; Liu, Mei; Gu, Xingxing; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2011-01-01

    Several adult reptiles, such as Gekko japonicus, have the ability to precisely re-create a missing tail after amputation. To ascertain the associated acquisition of positional information from blastemal cells and the underlying molecular mechanism of tail regeneration, a candidate molecule CD59 was isolated from gecko. CD59 transcripts displayed a graded expression in the adult gecko spinal cord with the highest level in the anterior segment, with a stable expression along the normal tail. After tail amputation, CD59 transcripts in the spinal cord proximal to the injury sites increased markedly at 1 day and 2 weeks; whereas in the regenerating blastema, strong CD59 positive signals were detected in the blastemal cells anterior to the blastema, with a gradual decrease along the proximodistal (PD) axis. When treated with RA following amputation, CD59 transcripts in the blastema were up-regulated. PD confrontation assays revealed that the proximal blastema engulfed the distal one after in vitro culture, and rabbit-anti human CD59 antibody was able to block this PD engulfment. Overexpression of the CD59 during tail regeneration causes distal blastemal cells to translocate to a more proximal location. Our results suggest that position identity is not restricted to amphibian limb regeneration, but has already been established in tail blastema of reptiles. The CD59, a cell surface molecule, acted as a determinant of proximaldistal cell identity. PMID:21464923

  9. Research investigation of helicopter main rotor/tail rotor interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Kohlhepp, F.

    1988-05-01

    Acoustic measurements were obtained in a Langley 14 x 22 foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel to study the aeroacoustic interaction of 1/5th scale main rotor, tail rotor, and fuselage models. An extensive aeroacoustic data base was acquired for main rotor, tail rotor, fuselage aerodynamic interaction for moderate forward speed flight conditions. The details of the rotor models, experimental design and procedure, aerodynamic and acoustic data acquisition and reduction are presented. The model was initially operated in trim for selected fuselage angle of attack, main rotor tip-path-plane angle, and main rotor thrust combinations. The effects of repositioning the tail rotor in the main rotor wake and the corresponding tail rotor countertorque requirements were determined. Each rotor was subsequently tested in isolation at the thrust and angle of attack combinations for trim. The acoustic data indicated that the noise was primarily dominated by the main rotor, especially for moderate speed main rotor blade-vortex interaction conditions. The tail rotor noise increased when the main rotor was removed indicating that tail rotor inflow was improved with the main rotor present.

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Gunnison Site, Gunnison, Colorado: summary

    SciTech Connect

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Gunnison site in order to revise the November 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Gunnison, Colorado. This evaluation has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the ivnvestigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the combined 540,000 dry tons of tailings and the 435,400 tons of contaminated waste at the Gunnison site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The 10 alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from stabilization of the site in its present location with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to disposal sites along with decontamination of the Gunnison site (Options II through X). Cost estimates for the 10 options range from about $8,900,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $14,000,000 for disposal in the North Alkali Creek area at a distance of about 18 mi. Truck haulage would be used to transport the tailings and contaminated materials from the Gunnison site to the selected disposal site. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Gunnison tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocesssing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $250 and $230/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981.

  11. Subsonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Airplane Configuration with a 63 deg Sweptback Wing and Twin-Boom Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Howard F.; Edwards, George G.

    1959-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of an unconventional tail arrangement on the subsonic static longitudinal and lateral stability characteristics of a model having a 63 deg sweptback wing of aspect ratio 3.5 and a fuselage. Tail booms, extending rearward from approximately the midsemispan of each wing panel, supported independent tail assemblies well outboard of the usual position at the rear of the fuselage. The horizontal-tail surfaces had the leading edge swept back 45 deg and an aspect ratio of 2.4. The vertical tail surfaces were geometrically similar to one panel of the horizontal tail. For comparative purposes, the wing-body combination was also tested with conventional fuselage-mounted tail surfaces. The wind-tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.95 with a Reynolds number of 2,000,000, at a Mach number of 0.46 with a Reynolds number of 3,500,000, and at a Mach number of 0.20 with a Reynolds number of 7,000,000. The results of the investigation indicate that longitudinal stability existed to considerably higher lift coefficients for the outboard tail configuration than for the configuration with conventional tail. Wing fences were necessary with both configurations for the elimination of sudden changes in longitudinal stability at lift coefficients between 0.3 and 0.5. Sideslip angles up to 15 deg had only small effects upon the pitching-moment characteristics of the outboard tail configuration. There was an increase in the directional stability for the outboard tail configuration at the higher angles of attack as opposed to a decrease for the conventional tail configuration at most of the Mach numbers and Reynolds numbers of this investigation. The dihedral effect increased rapidly with increasing angle of attack for both the outboard and the conventional tail configurations but the increase was greater for the outboard tail configuration. The data indicate that the outboard tail is an effective roll control.

  12. Bacteriophage P22 tail protein gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, M B; Brown, H R; Casjens, S

    1985-01-01

    We have found that mutations which block bacteriophage P22 head assembly at or before the DNA packaging stage (1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, and 8-) cause up to a 20-fold increase in the amount of tail (gene 9) protein made during infection. This correlation seems strong enough to warrant consideration of a control mechanism in which the failure to package DNA per se causes a large increase in the synthesis of tail protein. Our results indicate that one of the repressors required for maintenance of lysogeny, the mnt gene product, may be partially responsible for this phenomenon. Images PMID:3155554

  13. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  14. Radial tail resolution in the SELEX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Morelos, A.; Mata, J.; Cooper, P.S.; Engelfried, J.; Aguilera-Servin, J.L.; /San Luis Potosi U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The authors use a 7 Million event data sample of 600 GeV/c single track pion events, where the pion track is reconstructed upstream and downstream of the SELEX RICH. They build the RICH ring radius histogram distribution and count the tail events that fall outside 5{sigma}, giving a fraction of 4 x 10{sup -5} events outside the Gaussian tails. This control of events establishes the ability of using the RICH as velocity spectrometer for high precision searches of the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay like it is planned in the CKM experiment.

  15. Band-tail parameter modeling in semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iribarren, A.; Castro-Rodrguez, R.; Sosa, V.; Pea, J. L.

    1998-07-01

    An analytical formulation and modeling for determining the band-tail parameter E0 taking into account the carrier-impurity and phonon-carrier interactions and the structural disorder is presented. An analysis of the different contributions to E0 at low and room temperature in n- and p-type GaAs is also done. The theoretical results agree very well with experiment for noncompensated GaAs samples. The agreement was achieved in a wide range of carrier concentrations at 5 K and room temperature by adding a constant value to E0, lower than 4.1 meV, related to the structural disorder.

  16. Mixing of propagules from discrete sources at long distance: comparing a dispersal tail to an exponential

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Etienne K; Lavigne, Claire; Gouyon, Pierre-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Background Rare long distance dispersal events impact the demography and the genetic structure of populations. When dispersal is modelled via a dispersal kernel, one possible characterisation of long-distance dispersal is given by the shape of the tail of the kernel, i.e. its type of decay. This characteristic is known to directly act on the speed and pattern of colonization, and on the spatial structure of genetic diversity during colonization. In particular, colonization waves behave differently depending on whether the kernel decreases faster or slower than an exponential (i.e. is thin-tailed vs. fat-tailed). To interpret and extend published results on the impact of long-distance dispersal on the genetic structure of populations, we examine a classification of dispersal kernels based on the shape of their tails and formally demonstrate qualitative differences among them that can influence the predicted diversity of a propagule pool sampled far from two distinct sources. Results We show that a fat-tailed kernel leads asymptotically to a diverse propagule pool containing a balanced mixing of the propagules from the two sources, whereas a thin-tailed kernel results in all propagules originating from the closest source. We further show that these results hold for biologically relevant distances under certain circumstances, and in particular if the number of propagules is large enough, as would be the case for pollen or seeds. Conclusion To understand the impact of long-distance dispersal on the structure and dynamics of a metapopulation, it might be less important to precisely estimate an average dispersal distance than to determine if the tail of the dispersal kernel is fatter or thinner than that of an exponential function. Depending solely on this characteristic, a metapopulation will behave similarly to an island model with a diverse immigrant pool or to a stepping-stone model with migrants from closest populations. Our results further help to understand why thin-tailed dispersal kernels lead to a colonization wave of constant speed, whereas fat-tailed dispersal kernels lead to a wave of increasing speed. Our results also suggest that the diversity of the pollen cloud of a mother plant should increase with increasing isolation for fat-tailed kernels, whereas it should decrease for thin-tailed kernels. PMID:16504013

  17. Breeding biology and nest-site selection of red-tailed hawks in an altered desert grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hobbs, R.J.; DeStefano, S.; Halvorson, W.L.

    2006-01-01

    Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) have expanded their range as trees have invaded formerly-open grasslands. Desert grasslands of southern Arizona have been invaded by mesquite trees (Prosopis velutina) since Anglo-American settlement and now support a large population of Red-tailed Hawks. We studied a population of Red-tailed Hawks in an altered desert grassland in southern Arizona. Our objectives were to determine what environmental characteristics influence Red-tailed Hawk habitat selection in mesquite-invaded desert grasslands and to evaluate the habitat quality of these grasslands for Red-tailed Hawks based on nesting density, nest success, and productivity. Red-tailed Hawks had 86% (95% C.I. = 73-99) nest success and 1.82 young per breeding pair (95% C.I. = 1.41-2.23). Nesting density was 0.15 (95% CI = 0.08-0.21) breeding pairs/km2 and the mean nearest-neighbor distance was 1.95 km (95% C.I. = 1.74-2.16). Red-tailed Hawks selected nest-sites with taller nest-trees and greater tree height and cover than were available at random. Mesquite trees in desert grasslands provide abundant potential nesting structures for Red-tailed Hawks. ?? 2006 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  18. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS: STAR FORMATION EFFICIENCY IN THE WESTERN TAIL OF NGC 2782

    SciTech Connect

    Knierman, Karen; Scowen, Paul; Jansen, Rolf A.; Knezek, Patricia M.; Wehner, Elizabeth E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu

    2012-04-10

    While major mergers and their tidal debris are well studied, they are less common than minor mergers (mass ratios {approx}< 0.3). The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a merger between two disk galaxies with a mass ratio of {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun to occur in that tidal tail. However, deep H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail. Across the entire western tail, we find the global star formation rate per unit area ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) to be several orders of magnitude less than expected from the total gas density. Together with extended FUV+NUV emission from Galaxy Evolution Explorer along the tail, this indicates a low global star formation efficiency in the tidal tail producing lower mass star clusters. The H II region that we observed has a local (few-kiloparsec scale) {Sigma}{sub SFR} from H{alpha} that is less than that expected from the total gas density, which is consistent with other observations of tidal debris. The star formation efficiency of this H II region inferred from the total gas density is low, but normal when inferred from the molecular gas density. These results suggest the presence of a very small, locally dense region in the western tail of NGC 2782 or of a low-metallicity and/or low-pressure star-forming region.

  19. Anaerobic BTEX degradation in oil sands tailings ponds: Impact of labile organic carbon and sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stasik, Sebastian; Wick, Lukas Y; Wendt-Potthoff, Katrin

    2015-11-01

    The extraction of bitumen from oil sands in Alberta (Canada) produces volumes of tailings that are pumped into large anaerobic settling-basins. Beside bitumen, tailings comprise fractions of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes (BTEX) that derive from the application of industrial solvents. Due to their toxicity and volatility, BTEX pose a strong concern for gas- and water-phase environments in the vicinity of the ponds. The examination of two pond profiles showed that concentrations of indigenous BTEX decreased with depth, pointing at BTEX transformation in situ. With depth, the relative contribution of ethylbenzene and xylenes to total BTEX significantly decreased, while benzene increased relatively from 44% to 69%, indicating preferential hydrocarbon degradation. To predict BTEX turnover and residence time, we determined BTEX degradation rates in tailings of different depths in a 180-days microcosm study. In addition, we evaluated the impact of labile organic substrates (e.g. acetate) generally considered to stimulate hydrocarbon degradation and the contribution of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) to BTEX turnover. In all depths, BTEX concentrations significantly decreased due to microbial activity, with degradation rates ranging between 4 and 9 ?g kg(-1) d(-1). BTEX biodegradation decreased linearly in correlation with initial concentrations, suggesting a concentration-dependent BTEX transformation. SRB were not significantly involved in BTEX consumption, indicating the importance of methanogenic degradation. BTEX removal decreased to 70-90% in presence of organic substrates presumptively due to an accumulation of acetate that lowered BTEX turnover due to product inhibition. In those assays SRB slightly stimulated BTEX transformation by reducing inhibitory acetate levels. PMID:26066083

  20. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  1. Analysis and simulation of entirely saturated unilateral laser spot tails in BCCD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Menglian; Cheng, Deyan; Zhang, Jianmin

    2015-07-27

    A new phenomenon involving the entire saturation of unilateral tails of buried channel charge-coupled devices (BCCDs) under laser radiation is observed in this study. A physical model related to this phenomenon is constructed based on the assumption that the charge transfer inefficiency of BCCD is a jump function of signal charge quantity. The profile of a spot tail under laser radiation is simulated using this self-developed model. The simulation results are compared with experimental findings to validate this model. PMID:26367588

  2. Oxygen diffusion through soil covers on sulphidic mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Yanful, E.K. . Mineral Science Lab.)

    1993-08-01

    Engineered soil covers are being evaluated under Canada's Mine Environment Neutral Drainage (MEND) program for their effectiveness in preventing and controlling acid generation in sulfidic mill tailings. A critical parameter for predicting the performance of these covers is the diffusion coefficient of gaseous oxygen in the cover materials. Laboratory experiments conducted to determine the effective diffusion coefficient of a candidate cover material, a glacial till from an active mine site, are described. The diffusion coefficient is determined by fitting a semianalytic solution of the one-dimensional, transient diffusion equation to experimental gaseous oxygen concentration versus time graphs. Effective diffusion coefficients determined at high water saturations (85%--95%) were of the order of 8 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] m[sup 2]/s. The diffusion coefficients decreased with increase in water saturation as a result of the low diffusivity of gaseous oxygen in water relative to that in air and the low solubility of oxygen in water. Placement of soil covers in high saturation conditions would ensure that the flux of oxygen into tailings underneath such covers is low, resulting in low acid flux. This is confirmed by combined laboratory, field, and modeling studies.

  3. Short-tailed shrews: Toxicity and residue relationships of DDT, dieldrin, and endrin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments involving dietary toxicity and residue relationships of DDT, dieldrin, and endrin were conducted with short-tailed shrews. Dietary concentrations of DDT dissolved in vegetable oils were usually more toxic than diets containing comparable amounts of powdered DDT. Younger shrews, particularly females, were more tolerant of powdered DDT than older animals; yet, there were no conspicuous age differences in toxicity of DDT dissolved in oils. In comparison to other mammals, short-tailed shrews are not unusually sensitive to DDT, dieldrin, or endrin on the basis of two-week feeding tests. The influence of age and sex on toxicity of DDT, endrin, and dieldrin was sometimes more important than body weight. Of those shrews of the same age and sex that were fed the same dietary dosage, heavier shrews were more tolerant than lighter individuals; and, heavier shrews tended to lose a greater percentage of body weight before death. There was a range of 15 to 105 DDT equivalents in brains of shrews dying on dietary dosages of DDT. Six shrews fed a high level of DDT seemed to have unusual metabolite capabilities and died with apparent lethal levels of DDD in their brains. Levels of dieldrin in brains of shrews that died on a dietary dosage of dieldrin ranged from 3.7 to 12.6 ppm. In the rates of gain and loss experiments where shrews were given diets containing 400 ppm DDT or 50 ppm dieldrin up to 17 days, high residues were noted in tissues of shrews after two weeks on a contaminated diet and a few died at that time. After shrews were placed on clean food, it was determined that >50% of the dieldrin residues in carcass and brain were lost in 50% of residues of DDT and metabolites in brains after 2 weeks on clean food; males lost nearly 50% of residues in carcasses after two weeks on clean food compared with a loss of only 11% in females.

  4. Parental Involvment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Jeanne; And Others

    This document presents one module in a set of training resources for trainers to use with parents and/or professionals serving children with disabilities; focus is on parental involvement. The modules stress content and activities that build skills and offer resources to promote parent-professional collaboration. Each module takes about 2 hours to

  5. Family Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This periodical issue focuses on the theme of involvement of families in the education of their children with disabilities. It includes papers with the following titles and authors: "A Message from the Assistant Secretary: Developing Successful Partnerships between Parents and Service Providers" (Robert R. Davila); "Parent Advocacy and Children

  6. Parent Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, Ed

    The paper discusses the rationale and guidelines for parent involvement in HCEEP (Handicapped Children's Early Education Program) projects. Ways of assessing parents' needs are reviewed, as are four types of services to meet the identified needs: parent education, direct participation, parent counseling, and parent provided programs. Materials and

  7. Feasible conversion of solid waste bauxite tailings into highly crystalline 4A zeolite with valuable application

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Dongyang; Wang, Zhendong; Guo, Min; Zhang, Mei; Liu, Jingbo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Concept to convert waste to valuable product is carried out in this study. • An industrially feasible and cost-effective approach was developed and optimized. • Highly crystalline and well-defined zeolite was produced under moderate conditions. • The zeolite derived from the bauxite tailings displayed high ion exchange capacity. • Bauxite tailings have potential application in heavy metal ions adsorbent. - Abstract: Bauxite tailings are a major type of solid wastes generated in the flotation process. The waste by-products caused significant environmental impact. To lessen this hazardous effect from poisonous mine tailings, a feasible and cost-effective solution was conceived and implemented. Our approach focused on reutilization of the bauxite tailings by converting it to 4A zeolite for reuse in diverse applications. Three steps were involved in the bauxite conversion: wet-chemistry, alkali fusion, and crystallization to remove impurities and to prepare porous 4A zeolite. It was found that the cubic 4A zeolite was single phase, in high purity, with high crystallinity and well-defined structure. Importantly, the 4A zeolite displayed maximum calcium ion exchange capacity averaged at 296 mg CaCO{sub 3}/g, comparable to commercially-available zeolite (310 mg CaCO{sub 3}/g) exchange capacity. Base on the optimal synthesis condition, the reaction yield of zeolite 4A from bauxite tailings achieved to about 38.43%, hence, this study will provide a new paradigm for remediation of bauxite tailings, further mitigating the environmental and health care concerns, particularly in the mainland of PR China.

  8. Significance of Microbial Communities and Interactions in Safeguarding Reactive Mine Tailings by Ecological Engineering?

    PubMed Central

    N?ancucheo, Ivan; Johnson, D. Barrie

    2011-01-01

    Pyritic mine tailings (mineral waste generated by metal mining) pose significant risk to the environment as point sources of acidic, metal-rich effluents (acid mine drainage [AMD]). While the accelerated oxidative dissolution of pyrite and other sulfide minerals in tailings by acidophilic chemolithotrophic prokaryotes has been widely reported, other acidophiles (heterotrophic bacteria that catalyze the dissimilatory reduction of iron and sulfur) can reverse the reactions involved in AMD genesis, and these have been implicated in the natural attenuation of mine waters. We have investigated whether by manipulating microbial communities in tailings (inoculating with iron- and sulfur-reducing acidophilic bacteria and phototrophic acidophilic microalgae) it is possible to mitigate the impact of the acid-generating and metal-mobilizing chemolithotrophic prokaryotes that are indigenous to tailing deposits. Sixty tailings mesocosms were set up, using five different microbial inoculation variants, and analyzed at regular intervals for changes in physicochemical and microbiological parameters for up to 1 year. Differences between treatment protocols were most apparent between tailings that had been inoculated with acidophilic algae in addition to aerobic and anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria and those that had been inoculated with only pyrite-oxidizing chemolithotrophs; these differences included higher pH values, lower redox potentials, and smaller concentrations of soluble copper and zinc. The results suggest that empirical ecological engineering of tailing lagoons to promote the growth and activities of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria could minimize their risk of AMD production and that the heterotrophic populations could be sustained by facilitating the growth of microalgae to provide continuous inputs of organic carbon. PMID:21965397

  9. Ra-226 radioassay of soil and tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, C.S.; Rayno, D.R.; Kretz, N.D.; Zelle, P.W.

    1983-01-01

    Studies of inactive uranium tailings piles have shown that tailings sands containing Ra-226 and other radionuclides may be dispersed by wind and water erosion, causing contamination of adjacent areas. To conduct an effective cleanup operation, it is necessary that boundaries of contamination be well defined. To accomplish this, data from surface gamma-ray surveys made under the Measurement Monitoring Program of the US DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) are first used to delineate a general outline of the contaminated area. Then, data from portable scintillometer surveys and from sealed-can gamma-ray analyses of soil samples are used to more precisely define the perimeter of Ra-226 contamination. These field measurements are supported by radiochemical analyses of randomly selected samples. Because of its adaptability to the widely varying chemical composition of the material in these samples, the complexing agent EDTA is used in a complexometric leaching procedure to analyze Ra-226. By this procedure, natural concentrations of Ra-226 in soil (approx. 1 pCi/g) can be measured routinely. The potential limit of detection is in the 0.1 to 0.5 pCi/g range. Details of the method, which includes leaching of radium followed by radon de-emanation, are described. Comparative data for various soil and tailings samples are presented.

  10. Mine Waste Technology Program Electrochemical Tailings Cover

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 40, Electrochemical Tailings Cover, funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). MSE Technology A...

  11. Nonlinear shear viscosity and long time tails

    PubMed Central

    Zwanzig, R.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical connection between nonlinear shear viscosity and the long time tail of the equilibrium stress-stress correlation function is pointed out. The connection is a consequence of the Goddard-Miller rheological equation of state which takes into account the angular rotation of a fluid in steady uniform shear. PMID:16593025

  12. Magnetic field controls carbon arc tail flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Polarity of two electromagnets placed near the exhaust flue cancels out a high carbon-arc field. The arc tail flame is correctly drawn to the exhaust flue and contamination is diverted. This device should reduce maintenance cycles on any arc-powered illuminator.

  13. Structural Equation Modeling with Heavy Tailed Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Bentler, Peter M.; Chan, Wai

    2004-01-01

    Data in social and behavioral sciences typically possess heavy tails. Structural equation modeling is commonly used in analyzing interrelations among variables of such data. Classical methods for structural equation modeling fit a proposed model to the sample covariance matrix, which can lead to very inefficient parameter estimates. By fitting a…

  14. Kinesin Tail Domains Are Intrinsically Disordered

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Mark A.; Zhang, Yongbo; Rice, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Kinesin motor proteins transport a wide variety of molecular cargoes in a spatially and temporally regulated manner. Kinesin motor domains, which hydrolyze ATP to produce a directed mechanical force along a microtubule, are well conserved throughout the entire superfamily. Outside of the motor domains, kinesin sequences diverge along with their transport functions. The non-motor regions, particularly the tails, respond to a wide variety of structural and molecular cues that enable kinesins to carry specific cargoes in response to particular cellular signals. Here, we demonstrate that intrinsic disorder is a common structural feature of kinesins. A bioinformatics survey of the full-length sequences of all 43 human kinesins predicts that significant regions of intrinsically disordered residues are present in all kinesins. These regions are concentrated in the non-motor domains, particularly in the tails and near sites for ligand binding or post-translational modifications. In order to experimentally verify these predictions, we expressed and purified the tail domains of kinesins representing three different families (Kif5B, Kif10, and KifC3). Circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy experiments demonstrate that the isolated tails are disordered in vitro, yet they retain their functional microtubule-binding activity. Based on these results, we propose that intrinsic disorder is a common structural feature that confers functional specificity to kinesins. PMID:22674872

  15. Dispersal in female white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, M.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Seven of 35 yearling female white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in a migratory herd in northeastern Minnesota dispersed 18-168 km from natal ranges during late May through June. Dispersal as a proximate event appears voluntary and independent of deer density.

  16. Geomorphic criteria for selecting stable uranium tailings disposal sites in New Mexico. Volume 1. Technical report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, S.G.; Gardner, T.W.

    1985-03-01

    Essential to the disposal of uranium mill tailings in northwestern New Mexico is the geomorphic stability of the disposal site. Geomorphic stability assessment involves 3 steps: (1) evaluating the site's past geomorphic stability by determining the age of the landscape and its associated deposits; (2) quantifying short- and long-term geomorphic processes operating in the site area; and (3) evaluating the impact of mining activity and reclamation on the geomorphic stability of the site area. A heirarchy of geomorphic hazards which might impact a site area include: (1) drainage network extension/channel headcutting, (2) piping and gullying, (3) bank erosion and meander growth, (4) drainage network and channel incision, (5) channel aggradation, and (6) valley floor deposition and wind erosion. All of these processes operate on a scale of meters of change per year over historic time periods. Landscapes which have undergone significant changes in historic and Holocene time periods are valley floors. Valley floors are considered one of the most unstable landscapes for siting of uranium mill tailings.

  17. Analysis of three-dimensional kinematics of carp tail fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Shu; He, Xiaoyuan

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, a test based on the wavelet transform for instantaneous three dimensional (3D) Carp tail fin profile measurements and analysis the kinematics of Carp tail fin method was proposed to understand the function of the tail fin. This experiment method is used in cruising carp. Projecting a moiré fringes onto a tail fin, the deformed fringe pattern containing 3D information was produced and varied with the movement of tail fin. The time-sequence deformed fringe pattern images were captured by a high speed camera. By wavelet transform profilometry, the tail fin movements were really reconstructed. On this basis, the kinematics parameter of tail fin was analyses. Experimental results indicate that the 3D profile of tail fin was varied during the tail-beat cycle. Analysis of tail kinematics suggests that, at a swimming speed 0.5Ls-1, the tail beat frequency is 1.42Hz and the dorsal lobe of the tail undergoes a 15.6% greater lateral excursion than does the ventral lobe. The timing of maximal lateral excursion was different at different location of tail fin.

  18. Analysis of three-dimensional kinematics of carp tail fin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ming; Zhang, Shu; He, Xiaoyuan

    2010-03-01

    In this paper, a test based on the wavelet transform for instantaneous three dimensional (3D) Carp tail fin profile measurements and analysis the kinematics of Carp tail fin method was proposed to understand the function of the tail fin. This experiment method is used in cruising carp. Projecting a moiré fringes onto a tail fin, the deformed fringe pattern containing 3D information was produced and varied with the movement of tail fin. The time-sequence deformed fringe pattern images were captured by a high speed camera. By wavelet transform profilometry, the tail fin movements were really reconstructed. On this basis, the kinematics parameter of tail fin was analyses. Experimental results indicate that the 3D profile of tail fin was varied during the tail-beat cycle. Analysis of tail kinematics suggests that, at a swimming speed 0.5Ls-1, the tail beat frequency is 1.42Hz and the dorsal lobe of the tail undergoes a 15.6% greater lateral excursion than does the ventral lobe. The timing of maximal lateral excursion was different at different location of tail fin.

  19. Flight costs of long, sexually selected tails in hummingbirds

    PubMed Central

    James Clark, Christopher; Dudley, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The elongated tails adorning many male birds have traditionally been thought to degrade flight performance by increasing body drag. However, aerodynamic interactions between the body and tail can be substantial in some contexts, and a short tail may actually reduce rather than increase overall drag. To test how tail length affects flight performance, we manipulated the tails of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) by increasing their length with the greatly elongated tail streamers of the red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) and reducing their length by removing first the rectrices and then the entire tail (i.e. all rectrices and tail covert feathers). Flight performance was measured in a wind tunnel by measuring (i) the maximum forward speed at which the birds could fly and (ii) the metabolic cost of flight while flying at airspeeds from 0 to 14?m?s?1. We found a significant interaction effect between tail treatment and airspeed: an elongated tail increased the metabolic cost of flight by up to 11 per cent, and this effect was strongest at higher flight speeds. Maximum flight speed was concomitantly reduced by 3.4 per cent. Also, removing the entire tail decreased maximum flight speed by 2 per cent, suggesting beneficial aerodynamic effects for tails of normal length. The effects of elongation are thus subtle and airspeed-specific, suggesting that diversity in avian tail morphology is associated with only modest flight costs. PMID:19324747

  20. Mechanism by which a LINE protein recognizes its 3? tail RNA

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Kajikawa, Masaki; Matsumoto, Takuma; Okada, Norihiro

    2014-01-01

    LINEs mobilize their own copies via retrotransposition. LINEs can be divided into two types. One is a stringent type, which constitutes a majority of LINEs. The other is a relaxed type. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of retrotransposition, we used here two different zebrafish LINEs belonging to the stringent type. By using retrotransposition assays, we demonstrated that proteins (ORF2) encoded by an individual LINE recognize the cognate 3? tail sequence of the LINE RNA strictly. By conducting in vitro binding assays with a variety of ORF2 proteins, we demonstrated that the region between the endonuclease and reverse transcriptase domains in ORF2 is the site at which the proteins bind the stem-loop structure of the 3? tail RNA, showing that the strict recognition of the stem-loop structure by the cognate ORF2 protein is an important step in retrotransposition. This recognition can be bipartite, involving the general recognition of the stem by cTBR (conserved tail-binding region) of ORF2 and the specific recognition of the loop by vTBR (variable tail-binding region). This is the first report that clearly characterized the RNA-binding region in ORF2, providing the generality for the recognition mechanism of the RNA tail by the ORF2 protein encoded by LINEs. PMID:25143533

  1. Feasible conversion of solid waste bauxite tailings into highly crystalline 4A zeolite with valuable application.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongyang; Wang, Zhendong; Guo, Min; Zhang, Mei; Liu, Jingbo

    2014-11-01

    Bauxite tailings are a major type of solid wastes generated in the flotation process. The waste by-products caused significant environmental impact. To lessen this hazardous effect from poisonous mine tailings, a feasible and cost-effective solution was conceived and implemented. Our approach focused on reutilization of the bauxite tailings by converting it to 4A zeolite for reuse in diverse applications. Three steps were involved in the bauxite conversion: wet-chemistry, alkali fusion, and crystallization to remove impurities and to prepare porous 4A zeolite. It was found that the cubic 4A zeolite was single phase, in high purity, with high crystallinity and well-defined structure. Importantly, the 4A zeolite displayed maximum calcium ion exchange capacity averaged at 296 mg CaCO3/g, comparable to commercially-available zeolite (310 mg CaCO3/g) exchange capacity. Base on the optimal synthesis condition, the reaction yield of zeolite 4A from bauxite tailings achieved to about 38.43%, hence, this study will provide a new paradigm for remediation of bauxite tailings, further mitigating the environmental and health care concerns, particularly in the mainland of PR China. PMID:25153822

  2. Comparison of tar sands and phosphatic clay tailings properties, disposal, and reclamation options

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, W.A.; Carrier, W.D. III; Burns, R.

    1995-12-31

    The tar sands industry of northern Alberta, much like the phosphate mining industry of Florida, is having to deal with the long term management of a fine-grained tailings waste. The production of synthetic crude from surface deposits of tar sands results in a combined tailings mixture of sand, bitumen, and clay. The phosphate industry bonification process separates the clay and sand waste streams at the plant and these materials are generally deposited in separate disposal areas. Both the tar sands fine tailings and the waste phosphatic clays exhibit engineering characteristics associated with highly plastic clays. This behavior is typically characterized by large changes in void ratio and permeability with changes in effective stress. Recent technology exchanges between the phosphate and tar sands industries reveal some encouraging opportunities for waste disposal and reclamation planning in the tar sands industry. Studies involving the mixing of mature fine oil sands tailings and sand (with and without chemical additives) have provided some improvements in the tar sands tailings material consolidation and permeability properties.

  3. Survival, growth, and bioaccumulation of heavy metals by juvenile tanner crabs (Chionoecetes bairdi) held on weathered mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.P.; Johnson, S.W.

    1997-05-01

    Between 1891 and 1944, over 80 million metric tons of tailings from three gold mines (Alaska-Gastineau, Alaska-Juneau, and Treadwell) were deposited in Gastineau Channel near Juneau, Alaska. Tailings are rock materials that have been subjected to some form of milling and mineral separation process. After at least 50 years of weathering (e.g., rain, tidal flushing) or continuous submergence in seawater, elevated levels of some metals have been found in these tailings, but their present availability to biota are unknown. With renewed interest to reopen one of these mines and marine disposal of tailings a possible option, examination of the impact historic tailings have on the environment may reflect future environmental conditions. Thus, further study is needed to document and identify metal concentrations in these weathered tailings and to determine availability and possible impacts to marine life. The objectives of this study were to determine the bioavailability of heavy metals to juvenile Tanner crabs held for 500+ days on weathered mine tailings and to examine possible effects on survival, growth, and health of the animals. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Contributions of a compost-biochar mixture to the metal sorption capacity of a mine tailing.

    PubMed

    Forján, R; Asensio, V; Vila, A Rodríguez-; Covelo, E F

    2016-02-01

    One technique applied to restore degraded or contaminated soils is to use amendments made of different types of waste materials, which in turn may contain metals such as Cu, Pb and Zn. For this reason, it is important to determine the capacity of the soil to retain these materials, and to compare the sorption capacity between an amended soil and another unamended soil. The aim of this study was to determine the mobility and availability of these metals in the soil after applying the amendment, and how it affected the soil's sorption capacity. Sorption isotherms were compared with the empirical models of Langmuir and Freundlich to estimate the sorption capacity. The overall capacity of the soils to sorb Cu, Pb or Zn was evaluated as the slope Kr. The amendments used in this study were a mixture made of compost and biochar in different proportions (20, 40, 60, 100 %), which were applied to the mine tailing from a settling pond from a copper mine. The mine tailing that were amended with the mixture of compost and biochar had a higher sorption capacity than the mine tailing from the unamended pond, and their sorption isotherms had a greater affinity towards Cu, Pb and Zn than the mine tailing that was studied. Therefore, the results obtained show that adding a mixture of compost and biochar favours the retention of Cu, Pb and Zn in mine tailing. PMID:26432263

  5. Tail and Ionospheric Signatures of Tail Fast Flows Associated with PBIs and with Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Zesta, E.; Lyons, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E.; McFadden, J.; Carlson, C.; Glassmeier, K.; Mende, S.

    2009-05-01

    Earthward convection of the tail plasma sheet is often organized in bursts of fast ion flows restricted in azimuthally narrow channels. It has been shown that Auroral Poleward Boundary Intensifications (PBIs) are often the ionospheric signature of such fast flow channels in the midtail. Equatorward flow bursts have been observed in the ionosphere, and have been shown to be the ionospheric mapping of the tail fast flow channels in few case studies. We focus on identifying such ionospheric signatures and understanding the physics of this magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction via conjunctions of the THEMIS probes with the Sondrestrom radar. We find fundamental differences between the tail fast flows that are associated with substorm onsets and those associated with PBIs, as well as between their respective ionospheric flow signatures. The tail fast flows that produce PBIs are observed in the midtail. They do not typically penetrate to the inner magnetosphere and they are accompanied by plasma sheet expansion signatures in the mid tail. No dipolarization signatures are observed in the inner magnetosphere. The ionospheric signatures associated with such tail flows are PBI- type aurora and substantially enhanced equatorward flows. Tail fast flows that are associated with substorm onsets are typically observed only by the inner magnetosphere probes, only occasionally being seen also in the midtail. Clear dipolarizations are seen with such flows in the inner magnetosphere but not in the midtail. The ionospheric flow associated with such tail fast flows is far distinct, enhanced westward flows being occasionally seen at the higher latitude part of the Sondrestrom field of view with enhanced eastward flows observed at the lower latitudes. Enhanced equatorward flows are not seen.

  6. Tail and ionospheric signatures of tail fast flows associated with PBIs and with substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yong; Zesta, Eftyhia; Lyons, Larry; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Donovan, Eric; McFadden, James; Carlson, Charles; Glassmeier, K.-H.; Mende, Stephen

    Earthward convection of the tail plasma sheet is often organized in bursts of fast ion flows restricted in azimuthally narrow channels. It has been shown that Auroral Poleward Boundary Intensifications (PBIs) are often the ionospheric signature of such fast flow channels in the midtail. Equatorward flow bursts have been observed in the ionosphere, and have been shown to be the ionospheric mapping of the tail fast flow channels in 2 case studies. We focus on identifying such ionospheric signatures and understanding the physics of this magnetosphere-ionosphere interaction via conjunctions of the THEMIS probes with the Sondrestrom radar. We find fundamental differences between the tail fast flows that are associated with substorm onsets and those associated with PBIs, as well as between their respective ionospheric flow signatures. The tail fast flows that produce PBIs are observed in the midtail. They do not typically penetrate to the inner magnetosphere and they are accompanied by dipolarizations in the mid tail. No dipolarization signatures are observed in the inner magnetosphere. The ionospheric signatures associated with such tail flows are PBI-type aurora and substantially enhanced equatorward flows around midnight. Tail fast flows that are associated with substorm onsets are typically observed only by the inner magnetosphere probes, only occasionally being seen in the midtail. Clear dipolarizations are seen with such flows in the inner magnetosphere but not in the midtail. The ionospheric flow associated with such tail fast flows shows a clear change after the substorm onset. We find that before onset there is generally enhanced eastward flow. Just after onset, the flow suddenly changes to westward with either similar magnitude as the preceded eastward flow or much weaker magnitude. Enhanced equatorward flows are not seen.

  7. The Relationship between Self-Determination and Quality of Life among Individuals with Disabilities Involved with a Center for Independent Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekemeier, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities have historically been compromised in their ability to assert independence with respect to concepts of independent living and self-determination. In turn this may potentially impact an individual's overall quality of life. Community integration and availability of a full quality of life and to be self-determined has

  8. 14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race and trestle used to carry excavated rock and construction materials across tail race. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  9. 14 CFR 23.497 - Supplementary conditions for tail wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... tail wheel, bumper, or an energy absorption device is provided to show compliance with § 23.925(b), the... absorption device; and (2) The supporting structure of the tail wheel, bumper, or energy absorption...

  10. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  11. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  12. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  13. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  14. 14 CFR 23.745 - Nose/tail wheel steering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Landing Gear 23.745 Nose/tail wheel steering. (a) If nose/tail wheel steering is installed, it must be... gear. Floats and Hulls...

  15. 14 CFR 23.497 - Supplementary conditions for tail wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... tail wheel, bumper, or an energy absorption device is provided to show compliance with § 23.925(b), the... absorption device; and (2) The supporting structure of the tail wheel, bumper, or energy absorption...

  16. 14 CFR 23.497 - Supplementary conditions for tail wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... tail wheel, bumper, or an energy absorption device is provided to show compliance with § 23.925(b), the... absorption device; and (2) The supporting structure of the tail wheel, bumper, or energy absorption...

  17. 14 CFR 23.497 - Supplementary conditions for tail wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... tail wheel, bumper, or an energy absorption device is provided to show compliance with § 23.925(b), the... absorption device; and (2) The supporting structure of the tail wheel, bumper, or energy absorption...

  18. 14 CFR 23.497 - Supplementary conditions for tail wheels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... tail wheel, bumper, or an energy absorption device is provided to show compliance with § 23.925(b), the... absorption device; and (2) The supporting structure of the tail wheel, bumper, or energy absorption...

  19. Buckling of Amphiphilic Monolayers Induced by Head-Tail Asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, J.-G.; Granek, R.

    1996-07-01

    Packing asymmetry between head-group and tail-chain of amphiphiles may induce buckling modulations in monolayers at air-water or oil-water interfaces. We consider three different cases associated with the head-tail asymmetry: (i) spontaneous curvature, (ii) molecular tilt divergence, and (iii) local composition variation in mixed monolayers. For a pure monolayer with non-zero spontaneous curvature, we find that, below some critical surface tension, an hexagonal array of long-fingers" becomes more stable than the flat surface. This long-finger" structure is not expected to remain stable against multilayer formation in the case of a Langmuir monolayer, but is relevant for monolayers at the oil-water interface. When the molecular tilt is non-zero, as often is the case in the liquid condensed phase of Langmuir monolayers, the coupling between curvature and tilt can also give rise to a first-order buckling transition. Considering a binary mixture monolayer, we find that it can easily buckle to periodic structures following composition modulations. For the latter case we find two kinds of buckling structures. One involves a very large amplitude, a counterpart of the long-finger" structure, and is dominated by the average spontaneous curvature. The other structure is of much smaller amplitude, and results from the curvature-composition coupling. Implications for the process of spontaneous emulsification are also briefly discussed.

  20. Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Wielinga, Bruce; Lucy, Juliette K.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Seastone, October F.; Gannon, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated. PMID:10103249

  1. Impact of ozonation on particle aggregation in mature fine tailings.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jiaming; Tumpa, Fahmida; Prez Estrada, Leonidas; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed; Liu, Yang

    2014-12-15

    The extraction of bitumen from the oil sands in Canada generates tonnes of mature fine tailings (MFT), consisting of a mineral matrix of sand, clay, and water, which without treatment requires thousands of years to fully consolidate. We assessed the performance of a novel ozonation method designed to enhance the settling of MFT and explored the mechanisms involved. The solid content of MFT obtained from oil sands tailings was adjusted to 1, 3, 5 wt % with water before applying 15, 30, and 60 min of ozonation. MFT settled after a short (15 min) ozonation treatment, resulting in a sample with clear released water on the top and condensed sludge at the bottom. The water chemistry characteristics, particles' surface charge and chemical bonding were measured. Ozonation led to the increased organic acids concentrations in MFT suspension through converting of organic matter from high to low molecular weight, and detaching organic coating on MFT particles. The pH and the concentrations of ions in the MFT suspension were changed significantly, an association of metal ions with MFT particles was promoted, and the surface charges of MFT particles were neutralized. Consequently, the MFT suspension was destabilized and MFT particle precipitation was observed. PMID:25214072

  2. Microbiological and geochemical characterization of fluvially deposited sulfidic mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Wielinga, B.; Lucy, J.K.; Moore, J.N.; Seastone, O.F.; Gannon, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated.

  3. Implicit sequence learning in ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Drucker, Caroline B; Baghdoyan, Talia; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Implicit learning involves picking up information from the environment without explicit instruction or conscious awareness of the learning process. In nonhuman animals, conscious awareness is impossible to assess, so we define implicit learning as occurring when animals acquire information beyond what is required for successful task performance. While implicit learning has been documented in some nonhuman species, it has not been explored in prosimian primates. Here we ask whether ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) learn sequential information implicitly. We tested lemurs in a modified version of the serial reaction time task on a touch screen computer. Lemurs were required to respond to any picture within a 2 2 grid of pictures immediately after its surrounding border flickered. Over 20 training sessions, both the locations and the identities of the images remained constant and response times gradually decreased. Subsequently, the locations and/or the identities of the images were disrupted. Response times indicated that the lemurs had learned the physical location sequence required in original training but did not learn the identity of the images. Our results reveal that ring-tailed lemurs can implicitly learn spatial sequences, and raise questions about which scenarios and evolutionary pressures give rise to perceptual versus motor-implicit sequence learning. PMID:26615500

  4. Insights into Head-Tailed Viruses Infecting Extremely Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Pietilä, Maija K.; Laurinmäki, Pasi; Russell, Daniel A.; Ko, Ching-Chung; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Butcher, Sarah J.

    2013-01-01

    Extremophilic archaea, both hyperthermophiles and halophiles, dominate in habitats where rather harsh conditions are encountered. Like all other organisms, archaeal cells are susceptible to viral infections, and to date, about 100 archaeal viruses have been described. Among them, there are extraordinary virion morphologies as well as the common head-tailed viruses. Although approximately half of the isolated archaeal viruses belong to the latter group, no three-dimensional virion structures of these head-tailed viruses are available. Thus, rigorous comparisons with bacteriophages are not yet warranted. In the present study, we determined the genome sequences of two of such viruses of halophiles and solved their capsid structures by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. We show that these viruses are inactivated, yet remain intact, at low salinity and that their infectivity is regained when high salinity is restored. This enabled us to determine their three-dimensional capsid structures at low salinity to a ∼10-Å resolution. The genetic and structural data showed that both viruses belong to the same T-number class, but one of them has enlarged its capsid to accommodate a larger genome than typically associated with a T=7 capsid by inserting an additional protein into the capsid lattice. PMID:23283946

  5. Insights into head-tailed viruses infecting extremely halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Pietil, Maija K; Laurinmki, Pasi; Russell, Daniel A; Ko, Ching-Chung; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Butcher, Sarah J; Bamford, Dennis H; Hendrix, Roger W

    2013-03-01

    Extremophilic archaea, both hyperthermophiles and halophiles, dominate in habitats where rather harsh conditions are encountered. Like all other organisms, archaeal cells are susceptible to viral infections, and to date, about 100 archaeal viruses have been described. Among them, there are extraordinary virion morphologies as well as the common head-tailed viruses. Although approximately half of the isolated archaeal viruses belong to the latter group, no three-dimensional virion structures of these head-tailed viruses are available. Thus, rigorous comparisons with bacteriophages are not yet warranted. In the present study, we determined the genome sequences of two of such viruses of halophiles and solved their capsid structures by cryo-electron microscopy and three-dimensional image reconstruction. We show that these viruses are inactivated, yet remain intact, at low salinity and that their infectivity is regained when high salinity is restored. This enabled us to determine their three-dimensional capsid structures at low salinity to a ?10- resolution. The genetic and structural data showed that both viruses belong to the same T-number class, but one of them has enlarged its capsid to accommodate a larger genome than typically associated with a T=7 capsid by inserting an additional protein into the capsid lattice. PMID:23283946

  6. Tissue fluid shift, forelimb loading, and tail tension in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Johansson, C.; Tipton, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The tail suspension model (head-down tilt) simulates hypogravity in terms of musculoskeletal loss in the rat. However, little is known of tissue fluid shifts and body weight distribution in this model. Tissue fluid pressures were measured by wick catheters in 12 Munich-Wistar rats before, during, and after 48 hrs of tail suspension (about 30 deg head-down tilt). Subcutaneous tissue fluid pressure in the neck increased from -2.2 + or - 0.4 (normal horizontal position) to +4.0 + or - 1.5 cm H2O during tail suspension, indicating a cephalic fluid shift and significant edema during head-down tilt. In a separate study, six rats were suspended at 30-70 deg, and forelimb load and tail tension were measured by a balance and force transducer, respectively. Approximately 50 percent of body weight (BW) was loaded on forelimbs at a head-down tilt angle of 30 deg and forelimb load declined linearly to 10 percent BW at 70 deg. Furthermore, tail tension increased from 50 percent BW at 30 deg to 85 percent BW at 70 deg. These results indicate that less than normal loads are applied to forelimbs of rats suspended at angles of less than 30 deg and that the tail bears an increasing proportion of the rat's body weight at head-down tilt angles of less than 30 deg.

  7. Tail-assisted pitch control in lizards, robots and dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Libby, Thomas; Moore, Talia Y; Chang-Siu, Evan; Li, Deborah; Cohen, Daniel J; Jusufi, Ardian; Full, Robert J

    2012-01-12

    In 1969, a palaeontologist proposed that theropod dinosaurs used their tails as dynamic stabilizers during rapid or irregular movements, contributing to their depiction as active and agile predators. Since then the inertia of swinging appendages has been implicated in stabilizing human walking, aiding acrobatic manoeuvres by primates and rodents, and enabling cats to balance on branches. Recent studies on geckos suggest that active tail stabilization occurs during climbing, righting and gliding. By contrast, studies on the effect of lizard tail loss show evidence of a decrease, an increase or no change in performance. Application of a control-theoretic framework could advance our general understanding of inertial appendage use in locomotion. Here we report that lizards control the swing of their tails in a measured manner to redirect angular momentum from their bodies to their tails, stabilizing body attitude in the sagittal plane. We video-recorded Red-Headed Agama lizards (Agama agama) leaping towards a vertical surface by first vaulting onto an obstacle with variable traction to induce a range of perturbations in body angular momentum. To examine a known controlled tail response, we built a lizard-sized robot with an active tail that used sensory feedback to stabilize pitch as it drove off a ramp. Our dynamics model revealed that a body swinging its tail experienced less rotation than a body with a rigid tail, a passively compliant tail or no tail. To compare a range of tails, we calculated tail effectiveness as the amount of tailless body rotation a tail could stabilize. A model Velociraptor mongoliensis supported the initial tail stabilization hypothesis, showing as it did a greater tail effectiveness than the Agama lizards. Leaping lizards show that inertial control of body attitude can advance our understanding of appendage evolution and provide biological inspiration for the next generation of manoeuvrable search-and-rescue robots. PMID:22217942

  8. Role of the Cytoplasmic Tail Amino Acid Sequences of Newcastle Disease Virus Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Protein in Virion Incorporation, Cell Fusion, and Pathogenicity ?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Hee; Yan, Yongqi; Samal, Siba K.

    2009-01-01

    To determine the role of amino acid sequences of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) cytoplasmic tail in Newcastle disease virus (NDV) replication and pathogenicity, we generated recombinant NDVs with a deletion or point mutation in the N-terminal cytoplasmic tail. The first 2-amino-acid deletion in the cytoplasmic tail did not affect the biological characteristics of NDV. However, a 4-amino-acid deletion and the substitution of alanine for serine at position 6 affected cell fusion, pathogenicity, and colocalization of the HN and M proteins of NDV, indicating that these residues of the HN cytoplasmic tail are critical for its specific incorporation into virions. PMID:19640990

  9. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of the Spinning Characteristics of Typical Single-Engine General Aviation Airplane Designs. 1. Low-Wing Model A: Effects of Tail Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, S. M., Jr.; Bowman, J. S., Jr.; White, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of tail design on spin and recovery were investigated in a spin tunnel. A 1/11-scale model of a research airplane which represents a typical low-wing, single engine, light general aviation airplane was used. A tail design criterion for satisfactory spin recovery for light airplanes was evaluated. The effects of other geometric design features on the spin and recovery characteristics were also determined. Results indicate that the existing tail design criterion for light airplanes, which uses the tail damping power factor as a parameter, cannot be used to predict spin-recovery characteristics.

  10. The long-term environmental impacts of the Mount Polley mine tailings spill, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Macklin, Mark; Brewer, Paul; Bird, Graham; Williams, Richard

    2015-04-01

    On the 4th August 2014 a tailings impoundment failure at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in British Columbia, Canada, released approximately 25 million m3 of solid and liquid waste into Hazeltine Creek, Quesnel Lake and Polley Lake. The sheer volume of the tailings released caused Haseltine Creek channel to expand from 2m to over 25m in width and Polley Lake water level to rise by 1.7m. The spill also removed trees in a 900 km2 corridor either side of Hazeltine Creek. Local residents and government officials have expressed serious concerns regarding the potential long-term effects on regional biodiversity, water security and to the livelihoods of First Nation communities. Among impoundment failures, the Mount Polley disaster is unique in that the solid tailings contain an unusual mixture of metal contaminants (arsenic, copper, gold, manganese, nickel, lead, vanadium). As particulate matter is the principal carrier of metal contaminants, the spilled tailings may reside in the regional soils and sediments for 1000s of years serving as a secondary source of pollution. The environmental risk posed by the spilled tailings is compounded by the location of the spill in a mountainous forested catchment, affected by severe winters with prominent spring snow melts that have the potential to remobilise very large quantities of spilled tailings. No data currently exist on the short- to long-term behaviour of these tailings in soils and sediments and the effects of the clean-up operations on their behaviour in this type of river environment. In this study, we adopt a multidisciplinary approach to determine the environmental and geomorphological impacts of the tailings spill. We have two specific objectives. (1) The physicochemical speciation and geochemical stability of spilled tailings will be characterised in surface and hyporheic sediments using bulk chemistry, mineralogical (XRD and SEM) and speciation methods (sequential extractions, electron microprobe analysis, XAS). (2) Pre- and post-remediation geomorphological assessments will use unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photographic surveys and ground-based topographic surveys to (i) establish the efficacy of remediation efforts in stabilising Hazeltine Creek channel and (ii) quantify the physical remobilisation of tailings during the spring snowmelt.

  11. The potential for metal release by reductive dissolution of weathered mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeta, I.; Ptacek, C. J.; Blowes, D. W.; Jambor, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Remediation programs proposed for decommissioned sulphide tailings may include the addition of a cover layer rich in organic-carbon material such as sewage sludge or composted municipal waste. These covers are designed to consume oxygen and prevent the oxidation of underlying sulphide minerals. The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of such organic-carbon-rich waste can release soluble organic compounds to infiltrating precipitation water. In laboratory experiments, and in natural settings, biotic and abiotic interactions between similar dissolved organic compounds and ferric-bearing secondary minerals have been observed to result in the reductive dissolution of ferric (oxy)hydroxides and the release of ferrous iron to pore waters. In weathered tailings, oxidation of sulphide minerals typically results in the formation of abundant ferric-bearing secondary precipitates near the tailings surface. These secondary precipitates may contain high concentrations of potentially toxic metals, either coprecipitated with or adsorbed onto ferric (oxy)hydroxides. Reductive dissolution reactions, resulting from the addition of the organic-carbon covers, may remobilize metals previously attenuated near the tailings surface. To assess the potential for metal release to tailings pore water by reductive dissolution reactions, a laboratory study was conducted on weathered tailings collected from the Nickel Rim mine tailings impoundment near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. This site was selected for study because it is representative of many tailings sites. Mineralogical study indicates that sulphide minerals originally present in the vadose zone at the time of tailings deposition have been replaced by a series of secondary precipitates. The most abundant secondary minerals are goethite, gypsum and jarosite. Scanning electron microscopy, coupled with elemental analyses by X-ray energy dispersion analysis, and electron microprobe analysis indicate that trace metals including Ni, Cr and Cu are associated with these secondary minerals. To assess the masses of trace metals associated with each of the dominant secondary mineral phases, a series of extraction procedures was used. The masses of metals determined in three fractions (water soluble, reducible and residual) suggest that the greatest accumulation of metals is in the reducible fraction. These measurements indicate that high concentrations of metals are potentially available for release by reductive dissolution of the ferric-bearing secondary minerals. The actual mass of metals that can be released by this mechanism will depend on a number of site-specific characteristics, particularly the intensity of the reducing conditions established near the tailings surface.

  12. Effect of Tail Dihedral on Lateral Control Effectiveness at High Subsonic Speeds of Differentially Deflected Horizontal-Tail Surfaces on a Configuration having a Thin Highly Tapered Wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, Paul G.

    1959-01-01

    Tests have been conducted in the Langley high-speed 7- by 10-foot tunnel to determine the effect of tail dihedral on lateral control effectiveness of a complete-model configuration having differentially deflected horizontal-tail surfaces. Limited tests were made to determine the lateral characteristics as well as the longitudinal characteristics in sideslip. The wing had an aspect ratio of 3, a taper ratio of 0.14, 28.80 deg sweep of the quarter-chord line with zero sweep at the 80-percent-chord line, and NACA 65A004 airfoil sections. The test Mach number range extended from 0.60 to 0.92. There are only small variations in the roll effectiveness parameter C(sub iota delta) with negative tail dihedral angle. The tail size used on the test model, however, is perhaps inadequate for providing the roll rates specified by current military requirements at subsonic speeds. The lateral aerodynamic characteristics were essentially constant throughout the range of sideslip angle from 12 deg to -12 deg. A general increase in yawing moment was noted with increased negative dihedral throughout the Mach number range.

  13. 14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. TIP TOP MINE. TAILINGS LOCATED DIRECTLY WEST FROM TIP TOP HOUSE. ID-31-C-12 WOODEN STRUCTURE IS VISIBLE IN TOP LEFT. CABLES VISIBLE LEFT AND CENTER OF TAILINGS. HOUSE IS JUST OVER APEX OF TAILINGS. CAMERA POINTED EAST. - Florida Mountain Mining Sites, Tip Top Mine, West face Florida Mountain, approximately 150 feet below summit, Silver City, Owyhee County, ID

  14. 14 CFR 25.481 - Tail-down landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tail-down landing conditions. 25.481 Section 25.481 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads 25.481 Tail-down landing conditions. (a) In the tail-down...

  15. 14 CFR 25.481 - Tail-down landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... landing conditions. (a) In the tail-down attitude, the airplane is assumed to contact the ground at... for airplanes with tail wheels, the main and tail wheels are assumed to contact the ground... an attitude corresponding to either the stalling angle or the maximum angle allowing clearance...

  16. 14 CFR 25.481 - Tail-down landing conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... landing conditions. (a) In the tail-down attitude, the airplane is assumed to contact the ground at... for airplanes with tail wheels, the main and tail wheels are assumed to contact the ground... an attitude corresponding to either the stalling angle or the maximum angle allowing clearance...

  17. One-Tailed F-Tests in Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Banas, John

    2002-01-01

    Documents the recent use of one-tailed F-tests in communication journals, and examines the arguments both for and against their use. Examines the use of these tests within the broader unresolved controversy surrounding the use of one-tailed tests. Recommends that future researchers should most often avoid one-tailed Fs, and generally exercise

  18. The Tail-less Cat in Free-Fall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrickson, J. E.

    1989-01-01

    Describes four kinds of movement by a cat with or without angular momentum and tail or tail-less during free falling. Presents many pictures illustrating the movement. Supports the position that the angular momentum of the tail plays an important role in free fall. (YP)

  19. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  20. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the static load on the tail wheel, in combination with a side component of...

  1. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project surface project management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Project Management Plan describes the planning, systems, and organization that shall be used to manage the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRA). US DOE is authorized to stabilize and control surface tailings and ground water contamination at 24 inactive uranium processing sites and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and related residual radioactive materials.

  2. The Tail Domain Is Essential but the Head Domain Dispensable for C. elegans Intermediate Filament IFA-2 Function

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kyle; Williams, Kristen; Baucher, Hallie M.; Plenefisch, John

    2015-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein IFA-2 is essential for the structural integrity of the Caenorhabditis elegans epidermis. It is one of the major components of the fibrous organelle, an epidermal structure comprised of apical and basal hemidesmosomes linked by cytoplasmic intermediate filaments that serve to transmit force from the muscle to the cuticle. Mutations of IFA-2 result in epidermal fragility and separation of the apical and basal epidermal surfaces during postembryonic growth. An IFA-2 lacking the head domain fully rescues the IFA-2 null mutant, whereas an IFA-2 lacking the tail domain cannot. Conversely, an isolated IFA-2 head was able to localize to fibrous organelles whereas the tail was not. Taken together these results suggest that the head domain contains redundant signals for IF localization, whereas non-redundant essential functions map to the IFA-2, tail, although the tail is unlikely to be directly involved in fibrous organelle localization. PMID:25742641

  3. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  4. Summary of the engineering assessment of inactive uranium-mill tailings: Canonsburg Site, Canonsburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has evaluated the Canonsburg site in order to assess the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive residues at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the approximately 300,000 tons of tailings and contaminated soil at the Canonsburg site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite and off-site decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings and contaminated materials to a remote disposal site and decontamination of the Canonsburg site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from $23,244,000 for stabilization in-place, to $27,052,000 for disposal at a distance of about 17 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Canonsburg tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. As required by Public Law 95-604, under whose auspices this project is conducted, the US Department of Energy has solicited expressions of interest in reprocessing the tailings and residues at the Canonsburg site for uranium recovery. Since no such interest was demonstrated, no effort has been made to estimate the value of the residual uranium resource at the Canonsburg site.

  5. The Trouble With Tailings: How Alteration Mineralogy can Hinder Quantitative Phase Analysis of Mineral Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, S. A.; Mills, S. J.; Dipple, G. M.; Raudsepp, M.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative phase analysis, using the Rietveld method and X-ray powder-diffraction data, has become a standard technique for analysis of mineral waste from mining operations. This method relies upon the availability of well defined crystal structures for all detectable mineral phases in a sample. An even more basic assumption, central to quantitative mineralogy, is that all significant mineral phases can be detected from X-ray diffraction data. This is not always the case, because X-ray amorphous and nanocrystalline mineral phases can develop within geological samples as a result of chemical weathering. The extent of mineral-water interaction to which mine tailings are exposed, during processing and storage, makes these materials particularly susceptible to weathering and alteration. We have used the Rietveld method and X-ray powder-diffraction data to quantify the uptake of atmospheric CO2 into secondary carbonate minerals at two operating mines: the Diavik Diamond Mine, Northwest Territories, Canada, and the Mount Keith Nickel Mine, Western Australia, Australia. At Diavik, nominally anhydrous minerals in kimberlitic mine tailings have been found to contain X-ray amorphous material and hydroxyl groups detectable by Raman spectroscopy. A series of weighed mixtures, prepared to simulate kimberlite mine tailings, has been used to assess the effects of X-ray amorphous material on quantitative phase analysis of Diavik tailings. At Mount Keith, hydrated sulphate minerals and halide minerals develop efflorescent crusts at the surface of the tailings storage facility. Hydrated sulphate minerals in these mine tailings commonly decompose to amorphous substances rather than dehydrating to produce minerals detectable from X-ray powder-diffraction patterns. Nanocrystalline and X-ray amorphous material in mine tailings can affect the accuracy of quantitative determinations of CO2 trapping and abundances of sulphur-bearing minerals associated with redox reactions. Here we assess the impact of amorphous material on quantitative X-ray diffraction results with particular reference to CO2 sequestration and suggest strategies for detection and analysis.

  6. Hedgehog signaling controls dorsoventral patterning, blastema cell proliferation and cartilage induction during axolotl tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Schnapp, Esther; Kragl, Martin; Rubin, Lee; Tanaka, Elly M

    2005-07-01

    Tail regeneration in urodeles requires the coordinated growth and patterning of the regenerating tissues types, including the spinal cord, cartilage and muscle. The dorsoventral (DV) orientation of the spinal cord at the amputation plane determines the DV patterning of the regenerating spinal cord as well as the patterning of surrounding tissues such as cartilage. We investigated this phenomenon on a molecular level. Both the mature and regenerating axolotl spinal cord express molecular markers of DV progenitor cell domains found during embryonic neural tube development, including Pax6, Pax7 and Msx1. Furthermore, the expression of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is localized to the ventral floor plate domain in both mature and regenerating spinal cord. Patched1 receptor expression indicated that hedgehog signaling occurs not only within the spinal cord but is also transmitted to the surrounding blastema. Cyclopamine treatment revealed that hedgehog signaling is not only required for DV patterning of the regenerating spinal cord but also had profound effects on the regeneration of surrounding, mesodermal tissues. Proliferation of tail blastema cells was severely impaired, resulting in an overall cessation of tail regeneration, and blastema cells no longer expressed the early cartilage marker Sox9. Spinal cord removal experiments revealed that hedgehog signaling, while required for blastema growth is not sufficient for tail regeneration in the absence of the spinal cord. By contrast to the cyclopamine effect on tail regeneration, cyclopamine-treated regenerating limbs achieve a normal length and contain cartilage. This study represents the first molecular localization of DV patterning information in mature tissue that controls regeneration. Interestingly, although tail regeneration does not occur through the formation of somites, the Shh-dependent pathways that control embryonic somite patterning and proliferation may be utilized within the blastema, albeit with a different topography to mediate growth and patterning of tail tissues during regeneration. PMID:15983402

  7. Diets of short-tailed shearwaters in the southeastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, George L.; Baduini, Cheryl; Jahncke, Jaime

    2002-12-01

    In the late 1990s, the southeastern Bering Sea exhibited a number of anomalous conditions, including a major die-off of short-tailed shearwaters ( Puffinus tenuirostris), a trans-equatorial migrant that constitutes a major portion of the marine bird biomass in the southeastern Bering Sea. As part of a larger study of the ecological role of the inner or structural front over the southeastern Bering Sea shelf, in 1997-1999, we collected short-tailed shearwaters to determine diet composition. In spring 1997, we found that short-tailed shearwaters were consuming predominately the euphausiid Thysanoessa raschii, a diet expected on the basis of past studies. However, in subsequent years, short-tailed shearwater diets in spring contained increasingly larger proportions of fish, in particular, sandlance ( Ammodytes hexapterus), as well as other species of euphausiids ( T. inermis in 1999). In summer and fall collections, short-tailed shearwater diets were more varied than in spring, and included both fish (age-0 gadids, 21-35% by weight) and a wider variety of euphausiid species (T. inermis and T. spinifera). In summer and fall, crab zoea (August 1998) and copepods (August 1999) were eaten by shearwaters collected while feeding within the inner front. Diets in 1997-1999 were broader than those found in previous studies of short-tailed shearwaters over the inner shelf and Bristol Bay, which had documented diets composed almost solely of T. raschii. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that euphausiids were less available to short-tailed shearwaters foraging over the middle and coastal domains of the southeastern Bering Sea in 1997-1999 than has previously been true. Our results are also consistent with hypothesis that the inner front can affect the availability of prey to shearwaters.

  8. Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Vertical-tail Size and Length and of Fuselage Shape and Length on the Static Lateral Stability Characteristics of a Model with 45 Degree Sweptback Wing and Tail Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queijo, M J; Wolhart, Walter D

    1951-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine the effects of vertical-tail size and length and of fuselage shape and length on the static lateral stability characteristics of a model with wing and vertical tails having the quarter-chord lines swept back 45 degrees. The results indicate that the directional instability of the various isolated fuselages was about two-thirds as large as that predicted by classical theory.

  9. Experimental verification of a simplified vee-tail theory and analysis of available data on complete models with vee tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purser, Paul E; Campbell, John P

    1945-01-01

    An analysis has been made of available data on vee tail surfaces. Previously published theoretical studies of vee tails have been extended to include the control effectiveness and control forces in addition to the stability. Tests of two isolated tail surfaces with various amounts of dihedral provided a check of the theory. Methods for designing vee tails were also developed and are given in the present paper.

  10. Discovery, identification and sequence analysis of RNAs selected for very short or long poly A tail in immature bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gohin, Maella; Fournier, Eric; Dufort, Isabelle; Sirard, Marc-Andr

    2014-02-01

    A major challenge in applying genomics to oocyte physiology is that many RNAs are present but will not be translated into proteins, making it difficult to draw conclusions from RNAseq and array data. Oocyte maturation and early embryo development rely on maternal storage of specific RNAs with a short poly(A) tail, which must be elongated for translation. To resolve the role of key genes during that period, we aimed to characterize both extremes of mRNA: deadenylated RNA and long polyA tails mRNA population in immature bovine oocytes. Using magnetic beads coupled to oligodT, we isolated deadenylated (A-, 20-50 adenosines) from polyadenylated (A+, up to 200 adenosines) RNAs. After transcriptomic analysis, we observed that A+ candidates are associated with short-term processes required for immediate cell survival (translation or protein transport) or meiotic resumption, while several A- candidates are involved in processes (chromatin modification, gene transcription and post-transcriptional modifications) that will be extremely important in the development of the early embryo. In addition to a list of candidates probably translated early or late, sequence analysis revealed that cytoplasmic polyadenylation element (CPE) and U(3)GU(3) were enriched in A- sequences. Moreover, a motif associated with polyadenylation signals (MAPS, U(5)CU(2)) appeared to be enriched in 3'untranslated regions (UTR) with CPE or U(3)GU(3) sequences in bovine but also in zebrafish and Xenopus tropicalis. To further validate our methodology, we measured specific tail length of known candidates (AURKA, PTTG1, H2A1) but also determined the poly(A) tail length of other candidate RNAs (H3F3A, H1FOO, DAZAP2, ATF1, ATF2, KAT5, DAZL, ELAVL2). In conclusion, we have reported a methodology to isolate deadenylated from polyadenylated RNAs in samples with small total RNA quantities such as mammals. Moreover, we identified deadenylated RNAs in bovine oocytes that may be stored for the long-term process of early embryo development and described a conserved motif enriched in the 3'UTR of deadenylated RNAs. PMID:24233545

  11. Theoretical lift due to wing incidence of slender wing-body-tail combinations at zero angle of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sacks, Alvin H

    1956-01-01

    The theoretical lift of a cylindrical afterbody at zero angle of attack due to incidence of the wing is calculated by means of slender-body theory. It is assumed that the vortex sheet becomes fully rolled up ahead of the tail, and the vortex paths in the presence of the body are determined analytically. The total lift of a variety of slender wing-body-tail combinations due to wing incidence is also calculated.

  12. Exposures from mining and mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Douglas B.; Cassaday, Valerie J.; Lowe, Leo M.

    The mining, milling and tailings management of uranium ores results in environmental radiation exposures. This paper describes the sources of radioactive emissions to the environment associated with these activities, reviews the basic approach used to estimate the resultant radiation exposures and presents examples of typical uranium mind and mill facilities. Similar concepts apply to radiation exposures associated with the mining of non-radioactive ores although the magnitudes of the exposures would normally be smaller than those associated with uranium mining.

  13. Tail Rotor Airfoils Stabilize Helicopters, Reduce Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Founded by former Ames Research Center engineer Jim Van Horn, Van Horn Aviation of Tempe, Arizona, built upon a Langley Research Center airfoil design to create a high performance aftermarket tail rotor for the popular Bell 206 helicopter. The highly durable rotor has a lifetime twice that of the original equipment manufacturer blade, reduces noise by 40 percent, and displays enhanced performance at high altitudes. These improvements benefit helicopter performance for law enforcement, military training, wildfire and pipeline patrols, and emergency medical services.

  14. DNA packaging and delivery machines in tailed bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Johnson, John E; Chiu, Wah

    2007-04-01

    Several symmetric and asymmetric reconstructions of bacteriophage particles have recently been determined using electron cryo-microscopy and image reconstruction, and X-ray crystal structures of phage particles and particle-associated gene products have also been solved. In the past two years, the asymmetric structures of four different phages, T7, epsilon15, P22 and phi29, were determined at resolutions sufficient to visualize details of the machinery for DNA packaging and delivery, as well as the organization of the double-stranded DNA within the particles. Invariably, the portals, through which DNA enters and leaves the particle, have 12-fold symmetry, occupy a pentavalent site in the capsid and, along with tail machine accessory proteins attached to it, are fixed in a specific orientation relative to the rest of the capsid. PMID:17395453

  15. DENSITY-DEPENDENT RESPONSES OF GRAY-TAILED VOLES TO MOWING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Voles (Microtus spp.) commonly inhabit forage crops and may cause excessive damage to these crops. owever, cover removal by mowing or haying may cause vole populations to decline. o determine if gray-tailed voles responded to mowing of alfalfa in a density-dependent manner, the a...

  16. 75 FR 34100 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ...In response to timely requests, the Department of Commerce (the Department) is conducting an administrative review and a new- shipper review of the antidumping duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China (PRC). The period of review (POR) is September 1, 2008, through August 31, 2009. With respect to the administrative review, we have preliminarily determined......

  17. White-tailed Deer are Susceptible to Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral Inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesi...

  18. The complete mitogenome of Asiatic Short-tailed Shrew Blarinella quadraticauda (Soricidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiong; Fu, Changkun; Chen, Shunde; Yong, Bin; Chen, Guiying; Zong, Hao

    2016-01-01

    The Asiatic Short-tailed Shrew, Blarinella quadraticauda, is an endemic shrew to China, and is only distributed in Sichuan. In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome sequence of B. quadraticauda was determined. The mitogenome is 17,014 base pairs in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes and 1 control region, with a base composition of 33.3 % A, 31.8% T, 22.3% C and 12.6% G. This study contributes to illuminating taxonomic status of the Asiatic Short-tailed Shrew, B. quadraticauda. PMID:24660918

  19. Altitude Performance Characteristics of Tail-pipe Burner with Variable-area Exhaust Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Emmert T; Thorman, H Carl

    1950-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NACA Lewis altitude wind tunnel to determine effect of altitude and flight Mach number on performance of tail-pipe burner equipped with variable-area exhaust nozzle and installed on full-scale turbojet engine. At a given flight Mach number, with constant exhaust-gas and turbine-outlet temperatures, increasing altitude lowered the tail-pipe combustion efficiency and raised the specific fuel consumption while the augmented thrust ratio remained approximately constant. At a given altitude, increasing flight Mach number raised the combustion efficiency and augmented thrust ratio and lowered the specific fuel consumption.

  20. The effect of organic acids on the leaching of heavy metals from mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Burckhard, S.R.; Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1994-12-31

    A laboratory study was conducted to determine whether the concentration of heavy metals, zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), and cadmium (Cd), in leachate from mine tailings could be affected by the presence of organic acids exuded by plant roots and microbes in the rhizosphere. Geochemical modeling predicted that some organic ligands found in the rhizosphere have the capability to complex and increase the solubility of Zn. The leachate was analyzed for Zn, Pb and Cd content and for organic acid concentration. These results were confirmed by batch and column studies in which mine tailings were exposed to 0 to 10,000 {micro}M organic acids.

  1. Self-remediation potential of groundwater systems impacted by acidic mine tailings effluents

    SciTech Connect

    Frind, E.O.; Wunderly, M.D.; Werner, F.

    1995-12-31

    Groundwater contamination from acidic mine tailings effluents is a serious problem in many countries. Under certain conditions, the natural buffering capacity of aquifer minerals can neutralize the acid and immobilize the metals, thus preventing harmful environmental effects. The groundwater system therefore may have the ability to remediate itself. Three computer models have been developed to represent the relevant processes. The MINTRAN, MINTOX, and MINFLOOD software are briefly described. They are used together for assessing the impact of acidic discharge from mine tailings or spoil sites, and for determining the self-remediation potential of the affected groundwater systems.

  2. H3 Histone Tail Conformation within the Nucleosome and the Impact of K14 Acetylation Studied Using Enhanced Sampling Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Jinzen; Sakuraba, Shun; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues in histone tails is associated with gene transcription. Because histone tails are structurally flexible and intrinsically disordered, it is difficult to experimentally determine the tail conformations and the impact of acetylation. In this work, we performed simulations to sample H3 tail conformations with and without acetylation. The results show that irrespective of the presence or absence of the acetylation, the H3 tail remains in contact with the DNA and assumes an α-helix structure in some regions. Acetylation slightly weakened the interaction between the tail and DNA and enhanced α-helix formation, resulting in a more compact tail conformation. We inferred that this compaction induces unwrapping and exposure of the linker DNA, enabling DNA-binding proteins (e.g., transcription factors) to bind to their target sequences. In addition, our simulation also showed that acetylated lysine was more often exposed to the solvent, which is consistent with the fact that acetylation functions as a post-translational modification recognition site marker. PMID:26967163

  3. Physical modeling of marginally stable tailings dams using centrifuge simulation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Rechard, R.P.; Heckes, A.A.

    1984-02-01

    The stability of a marginally stable tailings dam is investigated using centrifuge simulations and flow and stability analyses. The centrifuge simulations are conducted on Sandia's large radius machine using tailings from a coal mine. Pore pressure measurements and photographic coverage of the phreatic surface permit the determination of the flow field developed in the dam. The simulations investigate the effects of packing density and particle size distribution on the stability of a dam. The results illustrate that an increase in packing density can increase the stability of the embankment and that the addition of slurried fines to the embankment affects stability by changing the properties of the tailings used to construct the dam and by limiting the discharge of water from the reservoir through the dam. For the tailings studied here, the increase in packing density and fines increases the stability of the dam by changing the material properties of the tailings. However, these changes also restrict the flow through the embankment and thereby reduce the stability of the dam by raising the level of both the reservoir and the phreatic surface. The addition of fines into the reservoir dramatically lowers the position of the phreatic surface by restricting the flow of water into the dam. The effect of this decreased flow is to increase the stability of the embankment, if over-topping of the dam does not occur. 14 references, 15 figures, 2 tables.

  4. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Lakeview site, Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    1981-10-01

    This assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The three alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I) and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II and III). Cost estimates range from about $6,000,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $7,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 10 miles. Three alternatives for reprocessing the Lakeview tailings were examined: heap leaching, treatment at an existing mill, and reprocessing at a new conventional mill. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $450/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ and hence reprocessing is not economical.

  5. Aerodynamic characteristics of several current helicopter tail boom cross sections including the effect of spoilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Kelley, H. L.

    1986-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics were determined of three cylindrical shapes representative of tail boom cross sections of the U.S. Army AH-64, UH-60, and UH-1H helicopters. Forces and pressures were measured in a wind-tunnel investigation at the Langley Research Center. Data were obtained for a flow incidence range from -45 to 90 deg and a dynamic pressure range from 1.5 to 50 psf. These ranges provided data representative of full-scale Reynolds numbers and the full range of flow incidence to which these helicopter tail boom shapes would be subjected at low flight speeds. The effects of protuberances such as tail rotor drive-shaft covers and spoilers were evaluated. The data indicate that significant side loads on tail booms of helicopters can be generated and that the addition of spoilers can beneficially alter the side loads. Although an increase in vertical drag occurs, the net effect through reduction of tail rotor thrust required can be an improvement in helicopter performance.

  6. Application of biochar on mine tailings: effects and perspectives for land reclamation.

    PubMed

    Fellet, G; Marchiol, L; Delle Vedove, G; Peressotti, A

    2011-05-01

    Mine tailings represent a source of toxic pollutants, mainly heavy metals, which may spread to the surrounding areas. Phytostabilization, a long-term and cost-effective rehabilitation strategy, can be achieved by promoting the establishment of vegetation to reduce the risk of pollutant transfer. In this work, the application of pyrolyzed biomass (biochar) was studied to evaluate the amelioration of the mine tailings properties for potential use as a phytostabilization technology. Four substrates were obtained by mixing the mine tailings from a dumping site in Cave del Predil (NE, Italy) with biochar from orchard prune residues at four dosages (0%, 1%, 5% and 10% biochar in the mine tailings). The physical and chemical properties were determined and the bioavailability and leachability of the contaminants were estimated. The pH, the nutrient retention in terms of cation exchange capacity and the water-holding capacity increased as the biochar content increased in the substrates and the bioavailability of Cd, Pb, Tl and Zn of the mine tailings decreased. The changes promoted by the biochar seem to be in favor of its use on mine wastes to help the establishment of a green cover in a phytostabilization process. PMID:21501855

  7. Male-specific use of the purr in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Bolt, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, purring has been described in mostly affiliative contexts. In the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), both males and females purr, but only males were observed purring in agonistic contexts. In order to determine whether male ring-tailed lemurs purr as aggressive displays during intrasexual agonistic encounters, 480 h of focal data were collected on 25 adult males from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, from March to July 2010. The male purring rate increased during periods of male-male agonism when compared to times without intrasexual agonism, and the purring rate was positively correlated with male dominance rank. However, the purring rate was not significantly higher during winning agonistic interactions when compared with losing encounters. My results indicate that the male ring-tailed lemur purr is used most frequently as an agonistic vocalization in male-male encounters, in addition to being used less frequently in other social contexts, including during tail-waving at females, resting, scent-marking, feeding and copulation. Dominant males have higher purring rates across social situations, suggesting that the purring rate may be driven by intrinsic male qualities rather than functioning as a meaningful signal in each disparate social context. Male purring in intrasexual agonistic encounters can be added to previously described social contexts for ring-tailed lemur purring. PMID:25139722

  8. Analysis for the presence of determinants involved in the transport of mercury across bacterial membrane from polluted water bodies of India.

    PubMed

    Jan, Arif Tasleem; Azam, Mudsser; Choi, Inho; Ali, Arif; Haq, Qazi Mohd Rizwanul

    2016-01-01

    Mercury, which is ubiquitous and recalcitrant to biodegradation processes, threatens human health by escaping to the environment via various natural and anthropogenic activities. Non-biodegradability of mercury pollutants has necessitated the development and implementation of economic alternatives with promising potential to remove metals from the environment. Enhancement of microbial based remediation strategies through genetic engineering approaches provides one such alternative with a promising future. In this study, bacterial isolates inhabiting polluted sites were screened for tolerance to varying concentrations of mercuric chloride. Following identification, several Pseudomonas and Klebsiella species were found to exhibit the highest tolerance to both organic and inorganic mercury. Screened bacterial isolates were examined for their genetic make-up in terms of the presence of genes (merP and merT) involved in the transport of mercury across the membrane either alone or in combination to deal with the toxic mercury. Gene sequence analysis revealed that the merP gene showed 86-99% homology, while the merT gene showed >98% homology with previously reported sequences. By exploring the genes involved in imparting metal resistance to bacteria, this study will serve to highlight the credentials that are particularly advantageous for their practical application to remediation of mercury from the environment. PMID:26887227

  9. Signals of Ezh2, Src, and Akt Involve in Myostatin-Pax7 Pathways Regulating the Myogenic Fate Determination during the Sheep Myoblast Proliferation and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Liu, Ruizao; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Fuping; Lu, Jian; Zhang, Xiaoning; Du, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin and Pax7 have been well documented individually, however, the mechanism by which Myostatin regulates Pax7 is seldom reported. Here, based on muscle transcriptome analysis in Texel (Myostatin mutant) and Ujumqin (wild type) sheep across the five fetal stages, we constructed and examined the Myostatin-Pax7 pathways in muscle. Then we validated the signals by RNAi in the proliferating and differentiating sheep myoblasts in vitro at mRNA, protein, and cell morphological levels. We reveal that Myostatin signals to Pax7 at least through Ezh2, Src, and Akt during the sheep myoblast proliferation and differentiation. Other signals such as p38MAPK, mTOR, Erk1/2, Wnt, Bmp2, Smad, Tgfb1, and p21 are most probably involved in the Myostatin-affected myogenic events. Myostatin knockdown significantly reduces the counts of nucleus and myotube, but not the fusion index of myoblasts during cell differentiation. In addition, findings also indicate that Myostatin is required for normal myogenic differentiation of the sheep myoblasts, which is different from the C2C12 myoblasts. We expand the regulatory network of Myostatin-Pax7 pathways and first illustrate that Myostatin as a global regulator participates in the epigenetic events involved in myogenesis, which contributes to understand the molecular mechanism of Myostatin in regulation of myogenesis. PMID:25811841

  10. The use of post detonation analysis of stable isotope ratios to determine the type and production process of the explosive involved

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.R.; Velsko, C.A.; Lee, C.G.; Raber, E.

    1993-03-05

    The detonation of a series of explosives was performed in a controlled manner to collect the resulting, solid residue or {open_quotes}soot.{close_quotes} This residue was examined to determine the ratios of the stable carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopes. The goal of the experiment was to determine if these ratios could be used to indicate, from the post detonation residues, the type and origin of the detonated explosive. The ratios of the stated stable isotopes in the undetonated explosive were also determined. Despite some reservations in the quality of the data resulting from contamination by nonexplosive components, certain trends can be discerned. (1) Carbon isotopes allow aromatic explosives to be distinguished from nonaromatic explosives. This trend seems to carry through the detonation so that the distinction might be made after the fact. (2) The amination process for TATB can be detected through the hydrogen and, to some extent, the nitrogen isotope ratios. Unfortunately, the data are not sufficiently good to determine if this differential carries through the detonation. (3) The relative magnitude and sign of the nitrogen isotope ratio seems to carry through the detonation: some exchange with atmospheric nitrogen is probable. Even though this set of experiments must also be viewed as preliminary, there is a definite indication that certain qualitative characteristics of explosives can be detected after the detonation. This {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} could have application to both intelligence and counter terrorism.

  11. Culicoides (Diptera:Ceratopogonidae) collected during epizootics of hemorrhagic disease among captive white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Smith, K E; Stallknecht, D E

    1996-05-01

    To help determine specific vectors of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) and bluetongue (BT) viruses for white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus Zimmermann, in the southeastern United States, Culicoides sp. midges were collected during epizootics of hemorrhagic disease among captive white-tailed deer in Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina. Culicoides variipennis (Coquillett), a confirmed vector of EHD and BT viruses, was present in low numbers in light-trap collections made at all sites. Collections from deer made in Georgia and North Carolina yielded only a single specimen of C. variipennis. Other Culicoides species present in far greater numbers during the epizootics included C. lahillei Lutz, C. paraensis (Goeldi), and C. stellifer (Coquillett) C. lahillei warrants particular attention as a potential vector because its readily feeds on white-tailed deer and was by far the predominant species collected from deer during the epizootics. PMID:8667402

  12. Atrophy and growth failure of rat hindlimb muscles in tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is related to an evaluation of a modified tail-cast suspension model as a means of identifying metabolic factors which control or are associated with muscle atrophy and growth failure. Two different control conditions (normal and tail-casted weight bearing) were studied to determine the appropriate control for tail-cast suspension. A description is presented of a model which is most useful for studying atrophy of hindlimb muscles under certain conditions. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were employed in the experiments. Attention is given to growth rate and urinary excretion of urea and ammonia in different types of rats, the relationship between body weight and skeletal muscle weight, and the relationship between animal body weight and rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation.

  13. Experimental parametric studies of transonic T-tail flutter. [wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Sandford, M. C.

    1975-01-01

    Wind-tunnel tests of the T-tail of a wide-body jet airplane were made at Mach numbers up to 1.02. The model consisted of a 1/13-size scaled version of the T-tail, fuselage, and inboard wing of the airplane. Two interchangeable T-tails were tested, one with design stiffness for flutter-clearance studies and one with reduced stiffness for flutter-trend studies. Transonic antisymmetric-flutter boundaries were determined for the models with variations in: (1) fin-spar stiffness, (2) stabilizer dihedral angle (-5 deg and 0 deg), (3) wing and forward-fuselage shape, and (4) nose shape of the fin-stabilizer juncture. A transonic symmetric-flutter boundary and flutter trends were established for variations in stabilizer pitch stiffness. Photographs of the test configurations are shown.

  14. Cartesian-Grid Simulations of a Canard-Controlled Missile with a Free-Spinning Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murman, Scott M.; Aftosmis, Michael J.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The proposed paper presents a series of simulations of a geometrically complex, canard-controlled, supersonic missile with free-spinning tail fins. Time-dependent simulations were performed using an inviscid Cartesian-grid-based method with results compared to both experimental data and high-resolution Navier-Stokes computations. At fixed free stream conditions and canard deflections, the tail spin rate was iteratively determined such that the net rolling moment on the empennage is zero. This rate corresponds to the time-asymptotic rate of the free-to-spin fin system. After obtaining spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients for the missile, the investigation seeks a fixed-tail approximation to the spin-averaged aerodynamic coefficients, and examines the validity of this approximation over a variety of freestream conditions.

  15. Hydrodynamic analysis, performance assessment, and actuator design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philen, Michael; Neu, Wayne

    2011-09-01

    The overall objective of this research is to develop analysis tools for determining actuator requirements and assessing viable actuator technology for design of a flexible tail propulsor in an artificial alligator. A simple hydrodynamic model that includes both reactive and resistive forces along the tail is proposed and the calculated mean thrust agrees well with conventional estimates of drag. Using the hydrodynamic model forces as an input, studies are performed for an alligator ranging in size from 1 cm to 2 m at swimming speeds of 0.3-1.8 body lengths per second containing five antagonistic pairs of actuators distributed along the length of the tail. Several smart materials are considered for the actuation system, and preliminary analysis results indicate that the acrylic electroactive polymer and the flexible matrix composite actuators are potential artificial muscle technologies for the system.

  16. Prediction of Downwash and Dynamic Pressure at the Tail from Free-flight Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eujen, E

    1942-01-01

    The present measurements form a continuation of earlier flight tests published in a previous report for predicting the downwash at the tail of an airplane. The method makes use of the tail itself as integrating contact surface to the extent that, beginning from the measurement of the self-alignment of the elevator, the mean downwash angle and dynamic pressure at the tail are determined. The instrumental accuracy is considerably improved if the elevator is completely separate from the controls during the tests, because the effect of friction on the self-alignment of the elevator is then reduced to a minimum and a finer elevator weight balance is rendered possible. The structural design of the push-rod uncoupling mechanism is also described.

  17. Head-tail instability and Landau damping in bunches with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2010-11-01

    Head-tail modes in bunches with space charge are studied using particle tracking simulations. The eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of transverse coherent oscillations in a Gaussian bunch are determined and compared with theories. A model for an airbag distribution in a barrier potential gives good predictions for the head-tail spectrum and for eigenfunctions in bunches with space charge. Using numerical simulations, space-charge induced Landau damping in a bunch is demonstrated. The damping rates are quantified for different modes and space-charge tune shifts. Finally, the head-tail instability with space charge is studied for the resistive-wall impedance below the mode coupling threshold. Results demonstrate that space-charge induced damping can suppress the instability for moderately strong space charge; instability growth rates saturate at strong space charge, in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  18. Aquatic impact investigation from the Lynn Lake tailings: Status report, 1998. Report number 98-09

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    Mining activity in the vicinity of Lynn Lake in north-west Manitoba resulted in development of a number of tailings ponds that are potential sources of acid drainage. Observations such as the presence of dead trees in the vicinity of tailings pond dikes and a distinctive green coloration in one effluent pond raised concerns that confinement of acid drainage in the tailings area may be compromised and causing renewed detrimental impacts to the Lynn River and surrounding area. This report presents results of water quality and sediment surveys conducted in the Lynn Lake area. Parameters studied include pH, conductivity, calcium, sulfate, iron, nickel, zinc, copper, cyanide, and presence of benthos. Comparisons of the results are made with results from earlier surveys in order to determine temporal trends.

  19. MESSENGER Observations of Extreme Loading and Unloading of Mercury's Magnetic Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, James A.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Benna, Mehdi; Boardsen, Scott A.; Gloeckler, George; Gold, Robert E.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; Krimigis, Stamatios M.; McNutt, Ralph L.; Nittler, Larry R.; Raines, Jim M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Schriver, David; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    During MESSENGER's third flyby of Mercury, a series of 2-3 minute long enhancements of the magnetic field in the planet's magnetotail were observed. Magnetospheric substorms at Earth are powered by similar tail loading, but the amplitude is approximately 10 times less and the durations are 1 hr. These observations of extreme loading imply that the relative intensity of substorms at Mercury must be much larger than at Earth. The correspondence between the duration of tail enhancements and the calculated approximately 2 min Dungey cycle, which describes plasma circulation through Mercury's magnetosphere, suggests that such circulation determines substorm timescale. A key aspect of tail unloading during terrestrial substorms is the acceleration of energetic charged particles. Such signatures are puzzlingly absent from the MESSENGER flyby measurements.

  20. Ecological studies of the white-tailed deer in western Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, R.D.; Kennedy, M.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Activity patterns and microhabitat utilization of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are being studied at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in Carroll and Gibson counties, Tennessee. Ten white-tailed deer have been fitted with radio-collars, and locations are being monitored using standard techniques. Home ranges and daily activity patterns are being determined. Preliminary analyses have shown that white-tailed deer are readily located using radio-techniques. Microhabitat utilization is being assessed by pellet transects and radio locations. Pellet counts from transects located in pastures and old fields are significantly different from those in other habitat types. Use of honeysuckle (Lonicera sp.) is being examined by observing the degree of browse along transects. No significant difference in utilization has been seen between the honeysuckle transects.

  1. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  2. Active Vertical Tail Buffeting Alleviation on a Twin-Tail Fighter Configuration in a Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, Robert W.

    1997-01-01

    A 1/6-scale F-18 wind-tunnel model was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of the Actively Controlled Response Of Buffet-Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program to assess the use of active controls in reducing vertical tail buffeting. The starboard vertical tail was equipped with an active rudder and other aerodynamic devices, and the port vertical tail was equipped with piezoelectric actuators. The tunnel conditions were atmospheric air at a dynamic pressure of 14 psf. By using single-input-single-output control laws at gains well below the physical limits of the control effectors, the power spectral density of the root strains at the frequency of the first bending mode of the vertical tail was reduced by as much as 60 percent up to angles of attack of 37 degrees. Root mean square (RMS) values of root strain were reduced by as much as 19 percent. Stability margins indicate that a constant gain setting in the control law may be used throughout the range of angle of attack tested.

  3. Determination of the role of DDX3 a factor involved in mammalian RNAi pathway using an shRNA-expression library.

    PubMed

    Kasim, Vivi; Wu, Shourong; Taira, Kazunari; Miyagishi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is an endogenous RNA-destruction phenomenon induced by certain double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs). In RNAi, dsRNAs are processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which in turn trigger the cleavage of the target mRNA. Here, using a short hairpin RNA-expression library, we identified a DEAD-box helicase 3, DDX3, as an essential factor involved in RNAi pathway and revealed that DDX3 is colocalized with Ago2, an essential factor in RNAi pathway that cleaves target mRNA. Results of experiments with a dominant negative mutant of DDX3 further confirmed that this factor affects the RNAi activity. Together, DDX3 functions to assure mammalian RNAi pathway. Together, our results indicate that DDX3 is a new key molecule to understand the molecular mechanism underlying RNAi pathway in mammals. PMID:23527197

  4. Endothelin-1-induced contraction is impaired in the tail artery of renal hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Linder, Aurea Elizabeth; Bendhack, Lusiane Maria

    2002-07-01

    The contraction induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) was evaluated in tail arteries from normotensive two-kidney (2K) and hypertensive two-kidney-one-clip (2K-1C) rats. Since the maximal effect induced by ET-1 (0.1-30 or 100 nmol/l) was lower in 2K-1C (1.11 +/- 0.10 g) than in 2K (1.46 +/- 0.14 g) tail arteries, we evaluated the possible mechanisms involved in this blunted response. The sensitivity and efficacy of ET-1 were not affected by endothelium removal in either group. ET-1 failed to induce contraction of 2K and 2K-1C arteries in Ca(2+)-free medium. The contractile response induced by 10 nmol/l ET-1 was similarly inhibited by 0.1 microM nifedipine in arteries from 2K (81.6 +/- 3.3%) and 2K-1C (81.3 +/- 3.8%) rats. The effect of nifedipine was not potentiated by 10 mumol/l SK&F 96365. The cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) was similarly increased by 30 nmol/l ET-1 in smooth muscle cells isolated from tail arteries of 2K (30.80 +/- 11.94 nmol/l) and 2K-1C (54.06 +/- 10.98 nmol/l) rats. In conclusion, the blunted contraction induced by ET-1 in 2K-1C tail arteries was not dependent on the endothelium or on decreased Ca2+ influx through channels sensitive to nifedipine or SK&F 96365. Since the increase of [Ca2+]c upon stimulation with ET-1 was similar in 2K and 2K-1C tail artery cells, probably the sensitivity to Ca2+ is decreased in 2K-1C tail arteries. PMID:12616994

  5. Hydrochemistry at the Falls City Uranium Mine Tailings Remedial Action Project, Karnes County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, T.J.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1994-09-01

    Acidic tailings and tailings solutions, created by sulfuric acid processing of uranium ores, were disposed on the outcrop of the Whitsett Formation (Eocene). These solutions have recharged the sandstones of the Whitsett since the 1960s. Previous work found a large, complex, and unexplained pattern of contamination. The present study determined the extent and nature of contamination by (1) characterizing the geology and hydrology of the two shallow aquifers at the site, (2) determining the chemistry of the contaminant source (tailings solutions), and (3) identifying geochemical reactions that have altered the composition of contaminant plumes within each aquifer. The tailings solutions are composed of sodium chloride and neutral sulfate salts of aluminum and ammonium, with lesser amounts of iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium sulfate. Hydrolysis of aluminum sulfate produces an acid pH (3 to 4). Also, aluminum sulfate is a pH buffer and controls acidity of the tailings solutions. Cation exchange and neutralization by calcite modify the tailings solutions as they migrate through the aquifers. These reactions explain chemical patterns, which delineate five separate contaminant plumes in the aquifers. In the Deweesville Sandstone, cation exchange has removed ammonium from acidic contaminant plumes. However, neutralization is incomplete due to the paucity of calcite in the Deweesville. In contrast, in the calcite-rich Conquista fossiliferous sandstone, cation exchange and complete neutralization by calcite have removed most contaminant ions. Those contaminant plumes are delineated by elevated concentrations of calcium and carbon dioxide. The amount of contamination in both aquifers is much smaller than earlier estimated.

  6. Hydrochemistry of the Falls City uranium mine tailings remedial action project, Karnes County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, T.J.; Kreitler, C.W.

    1994-12-31

    Acidic tailings and tailings solutions, created by sulfuric acid processing of uranium ores, were disposed of on the outcrop of the Whitsett Formation (Eocene). These solutions have recharged the sandstones of the Whitsett since the 1960`s. Previous workers found a larger, complex, and unexplained pattern of contamination. Our study determined the extent and nature of contamination by (1) characterizing the geology and hydrology of the two shallow aquifers at the site, (2) determining the chemistry of the contaminant source (tailings solutions), and (3) identifying geochemical reactions that have altered the composition of contaminant plumes within each aquifer. The tailings solutions are composed of sodium chloride and neutral sulfate salts of aluminum and ammonium, with lesser amounts of iron, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium sulfate. Hydrolysis of aluminum sulfate produces an acid pH (3 to 4). Also, aluminum sulfate is a pH buffer, and it controls acidity of the tailings solutions. Cation exchange and neutralization by calcite modify the tailings solutions as they migrate through the aquifers. These reactions explain chemical patterns, which delineate five separate contaminant plumes in the aquifers. In the Deweesville sandstone, cation exchange has removed ammonium from acidic contaminant plumes. However, neutralization is incomplete because of the paucity of calcite in the Deweesville. In contrast, in the calcite-rich Conquista fossilferous sandstone, cation exchange and complete neutralization by calcite have removed most contaminant ions. Those contaminant plumes are delineated by elevated concentrations of calcium and carbon dioxide. The amount of contamination in both aquifers is much smaller than that estimated previously.

  7. Does this baby have a tail?: a case of congenital isolated perineal lipoma presenting as human pseudo-tail

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hong; Cho, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    A pseudo-tail is defined as a tail-like lesion in the lumbosacrococcygeal region that is not a true tail but one caused by disease. Perineal lipoma is one of the conditions that may present as a pseudo-tail. Congenital perineal lipoma is a rare disease and in particular, isolated congenital perineal lipoma without other anomalies is extremely rare. Here we report a case of congenital isolated perineal lipoma presenting as a pseudo-tail and also include a literature review of the condition. PMID:26793694

  8. Wind-Tunnel Tests of a 1/6-Scale Model of Republic XF-12 Vertical Tail with Stub Fuselage and Stub Horizontal Tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLachlan, Robert

    1945-01-01

    A 1/6-scale model of the Republic XF-12 vertical tail with stub fuselage and stub horizontal tail was tested in the Langley stability tunnel to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the model, The investigation included a study of the effects of boundarylayer thickness, rudder area, and cover-plate alinement on the aerodynamic characteristics. Tuft studies were made in the vicinity of the junction of the vertical and stub horizontal tails. The results of the investigation indicated that the flow in the vicinity of the junction of the vertical and stub horizontal tails was only slightly improved by the addition of a fillet. An increase in boundary-layer thickness produced a slight decrease in rudder effectiveness. The increase in lift of the combined rudders over that of the upper rudder alone was not proportional at low deflections and was approximately proportional at high deflections to the increase in rudder area. When the balance-chamber cover plates were bowed out, the change in rudder hinge moment with rudder angle was less negative. The variation of the lift coefficient with angle of attack and the variation, at small values of angle of attack, of rudder hinge-noment coefficient with angle of attack was approximately the same for all model configurations tested. The upper rudder used in conjunction with a tab was found to satisfy the Army specifications regarding asymmetric power on a multiengine airplane.

  9. Wind-tunnel investigation at supersonic speeds of a remote-controlled canard missile with a free-rolling-tail brake torque system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, A. B., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted at Mach numbers 1.70, 2.16, and 2.86 to determine the static aerodynamic characteristics of a cruciform canard-controlled missile with fixed or free rolling tailfin afterbodies. Mechanical coupling effects of the free-rolling-tail afterbody were investigated by using an electronic electromagnetic brake system providing arbitrary tail-fin brake torques with continuous measurements of tail-to-mainframe torque and tail roll rate. Remote-controlled canards were deflected to provide pitch, yaw, and roll control. Results indicate that the induced rolling moment coefficients due to canard yaw control are reduced and linearized for the free-rolling-tail (free-tail) configuration. The canards of the latter provide conventional roll control for the entire angle-of-attack test range. For the free-tail configuration, the induced rolling moment coefficient due to canard yaw control increased and the canard roll control decreased with increases in brake torque, which simulated bearing friction torque. It appears that a compromise in regard to bearing friction, for example, low-cost bearings with some friction, may allow satisfactory free-tail aerodynamic characteristics that include reductions in adverse rolling-moment coefficients and lower tail roll rates.

  10. Improving clay-based tailings disposal: Case study on coal tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Kretser, R. de; Scales, P.J.; Boger, D.V.

    1997-07-01

    The role of swelling clays in hindering the compressional dewatering characteristics of coal-mine tailings is examined. The effects of electrolyte concentration and ion exchange in improving the shear and compressional rheology are compared. Suspensions studied include actual mine tailings (thickener feed and thickener underflow) as well as synthetic clay dispersions made from clay collected from the coal seam. It was shown that the most important parameter in controlling the properties of the tailings suspension is controlled dispersion in the presence of a Ca{sup 2+} electrolyte concentration in excess of that required to (1) prevent initial swelling and (2) provide full cation exchange of the clay. Under these electrolyte conditions, complete delamination of the clay did not occur, and both the dewatering and handling characteristics of the resultant suspensions improved dramatically.

  11. Identification and functional analysis of the chain length determinant gene ste8 involved in the biosynthesis of ebosin by Streptomyces sp. 139.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhang; Li, Xiaohua; Qi, Xiaoqaing; Shan, Junjie; Jiang, Rong; Guo, Lianhong; Zhang, Ren; Li, Yuan

    2013-11-28

    Ebosin, a novel exopolysaccharide produced by Streptomyces sp. 139, has obvious antirheumatic arthritis activity in vivo, and its biosynthesis gene cluster (ste), consisting of 27 open reading frames, has been identified. This paper reports our study of the gene functionality of ste8, the predicted protein product of which is homologous to some bacterial chain length determinant Wzz proteins. For characterization of Ste8, ste8 was cloned and expressed in the mutant strain E. coli 086:H2 (?wzz). The functional complementation of wzz by ste8 was demonstrated by the restoration of wild-type lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and increased levels of serum resistance of E. coli 086:H2 (?wzz) (pET30a-ste8). To examine the function of ste8 in ebosin biosynthesis, the gene was knocked out with a double crossover via homologous recombination. The molecular weight of the ebosin derivative EPS-8m produced by the mutant Streptomyces sp. 139 (ste8(-)) was much lower than that of ebosin, and the binding activity of EPS-8m for IL-1R decreased significantly compared with ebosin. These results demonstrate that ste8 encodes a chain length determinant (Wzz) that functions in ebosin biosynthesis. PMID:23851269

  12. Effect of measured material properties on the finite element analysis of an OH-58 composite tail boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    A static and dynamic finite element analysis is conducted on a U.S. Army OH-58 composite tail boom and compared with test data. The tail boom is a filament-wound graphite/epoxy monocoque structure. The structural design of the composite tail boom skin is based on 50-percent graphite fiber volume. However, material tests on representative samples of the tail boom skin reveal that the graphite fiber-volume fraction varied from 44.6 to 49.3 percent. To determine the effect of using measured material properties, static and dynamic finite element analyses are conducted for three fiber-volume conditions of 45, 48, and 50 percent. The static and dynamic model with the 45-percent fiber-volume graphite skins gives the closest agreement with test data.

  13. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  14. An investigation of a high-strength proppant tail-in at McAllen Ranch Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lindley, B.W.; Lale, N.A.; McGhee, B.F.

    1983-10-01

    This paper discusses the evaluation of proppant placement in a massive hydraulic fracture treatment ''tail-in'' technique. The term ''tail-in'' is used to describe the final proppant stage of a multi-stage fracture treatment. A new evaluation method was developed to determine placement of this tail-in stage. For this new method the leading stages of proppant laden fluid were tagged with a long half-life isotope, 74 days. The tail-in of proppant laden fluid was tagged with a short half-life isotope, 8 days. Comparison of calibrated radiation logs recorded before and immediately after fracture treatment define the placement of proppant tagged with both isotopes. A third radiation log, recorded at the appropriate time measures decreases in radiation of both isotopes. Processing data from these three logs in a mathematical model enables calculation of proppant placement during treatment.

  15. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  16. Genetic linkage analysis using pooled DNA and infrared detection of tailed STRP primer patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oetting, William S.; Wildenberg, Scott C.; King, Richard A.

    1996-04-01

    The mapping of a disease locus to a specific chromosomal region is an important step in the eventual isolation and analysis of a disease causing gene. Conventional mapping methods analyze large multiplex families and/or smaller nuclear families to find linkage between the disease and a chromosome marker that maps to a known chromosomal region. This analysis is time consuming and tedious, typically requiring the determination of 30,000 genotypes or more. For appropriate populations, we have instead utilized pooled DNA samples for gene mapping which greatly reduces the amount of time necessary for an initial chromosomal screen. This technique assumes a common founder for the disease locus of interest and searches for a region of a chromosome shared between affected individuals. Our analysis involves the PCR amplification of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRP) to detect these shared regions. In order to reduce the cost of genotyping, we have designed unlabeled tailed PCR primers which, when combined with a labeled universal primer, provides for an alternative to synthesizing custom labeled primers. The STRP pattern is visualized with an infrared fluorescence based automated DNA sequencer and the patterns quantitated by densitometric analysis of the allele pattern. Differences in the distribution of alleles between pools of affected and unaffected individuals, including a reduction in the number of alleles in the affected pool, indicate the sharing of a region of a chromosome. We have found this method effective for markers 10 - 15 cM away from the disease locus for a recessive genetic disease.

  17. Nitrate signals determine the sensing of nitrogen through differential expression of genes involved in nitrogen uptake and assimilation in finger millet.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Alok Kumar; Gaur, Vikram Singh; Gupta, Sanjay; Kumar, Anil

    2013-06-01

    In order to understand the molecular basis of high nitrogen use efficiency of finger millet, five genes (EcHNRT2, EcLNRT1, EcNADH-NR, EcGS, and EcFd-GOGAT) involved in nitrate uptake and assimilation were isolated using conserved primer approaches. Expression profiles of these five genes along with the previously isolated EcDof1 was studied under increased KNO3 concentrations (0.15 to 1,500 ?M) for 2 h as well as at 1.5 ?M for 24 h in the roots and shoots of 25 days old nitrogen deprived two contrasting finger millet genotypes (GE-3885 and GE-1437) differing in grain protein content (13.76 and 6.15 %, respectively). Time kinetics experiment revealed that, all the five genes except EcHNRT2 in the leaves of GE-3885 were induced within 30 min of nitrate exposure indicating that there might be a greater nitrogen deficit in leaves and therefore quick transportation of nitrate signals to the leaves. Exposing the plants to increasing nitrate concentrations for 2 h showed that in roots of GE-3885, NR was strongly induced while GS was repressed; however, the pattern was found to be reversed in leaves of GE-1437 indicating that in GE-3885, most of the nitrate might be reduced in the roots but assimilated in leaves and vice-versa. Furthermore, compared with the low-protein genotype, expression of HNRT2 was strongly induced in both roots and shoots of high-protein genotype at the least nitrate concentration supplied. This further indicates that GE-3885 is a quick sensor of nitrogen compared with the low-protein genotype. Furthermore, expression of EcDof1 was also found to overlap the expression of NR, GS, and GOGAT indicating that Dof1 probably regulates the expression of these genes under different conditions by sensing the nitrogen fluctuations around the root zone. PMID:23435937

  18. Determination of expression and activity of genes involved in starch metabolism in Lactobacillus plantarum A6 during fermentation of a cereal-based gruel.

    PubMed

    Humblot, Christèle; Turpin, Williams; Chevalier, François; Picq, Christian; Rochette, Isabelle; Guyot, Jean-Pierre

    2014-08-18

    Traditional fermented gruels prepared from cereals are widely used for complementary feeding of young children in Africa and usually have a low energy density. The amylase activity of some lactic acid bacteria (LAB) helps increase the energy content of gruels through partial hydrolysis of starch, thus enabling the incorporation of more starchy material while conserving the desired semi-liquid consistency for young children. Even if this ability is mainly related to the production of alpha-amylase (E.C. 3.2.1.1), in a recent molecular screening, genes coding for enzymes involved in starch metabolism were detected in the efficient amylolytic LAB Lactobacillus plantarum A6: alpha-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.20), neopullulanase (E.C. 3.2.1.135), amylopectin phosphorylase (E.C. 2.4.1.1) and maltose phosphorylase (E.C. 2.4.1.8). The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of these genes in a model of starchy fermented food made from pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum). Transcriptional and enzymatic analyses were performed during the 18-h fermentation period. Liquefaction was mainly caused by an extracellular alpha amylase encoded by the amyA gene specific to the A6 strain among L. plantarum species and found in both Lactobacillus amylovorus and Lactobacillus manihotivorans. The second most active enzyme was neopullulanase. Other starch metabolizing enzymes were less often detected. The dynamic detection of transcripts of gene during starch fermentation in pearl millet porridge suggests that the set of genes we investigated was not expressed continuously but transiently. PMID:24950021

  19. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground.

    Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born.

    The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light.

    This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  20. Centrifuge modeling of coal tailing embankments

    SciTech Connect

    Rechard, R.P.; Sutherland, H.J.; Heckes, A.A.

    1986-03-01

    Centrifuge model studies were conducted on eight homogeneous dams with 1.75:1 slopes using coal tailings (waste coal, shale, fine sand, silt, and clay) to obtain experience on the behavior of this low-strength material in a laboratory setting and, further, to examine the accuracy of predictions of embankment failure by the simplified Bishop limit equilibrium method. The failure of four of the model embankments simulated typical features of slope failures observed in the field. Centrifuge modeling verified that the simplified Bishop method using standard measurements of soil strength properly indexed the dam safety but did not accurately locate the embankment failure surface. 20 refs.

  1. A Farey tail for attractor black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Jan; Cheng, Miranda C. N.; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Manschot, Jan; Verlinde, Erik

    2006-11-01

    The microstates of 4d BPS black holes in IIA string theory compactified on a Calabi-Yau manifold are counted by a (generalized) elliptic genus of a (0,4) conformal field theory. By exploiting a spectral flow that relates states with different charges, and using the Rademacher formula, we find that the elliptic genus has an exact asymptotic expansion in terms of semi-classical saddle-points of the dual supergravity theory. This generalizes the known "Black Hole Farey Tail" of [1] to the case of attractor black holes.

  2. Energy metabolism and hematology of white-tailed deer fawns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rawson, R.E.; DelGiudice, G.D.; Dziuk, H.E.; Mech, L.D.

    1992-01-01

    Resting metabolic rates, weight gains and hematologic profiles of six newborn, captive white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns (four females, two males) were determined during the first 3 mo of life. Estimated mean daily weight gain of fawns was 0.2 kg. The regression equation for metabolic rate was: Metabolic rate (kcal/kg0.75/day) = 56.1 +/- 1.3 (age in days), r = 0.65, P less than 0.001). Regression equations were also used to relate age to red blood cell count (RBC), hemoglobin concentration (Hb), packed cell volume, white blood cell count, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), and mean corpuscular hemoglobin. The age relationships of Hb, MCHC, and smaller RBC's were indicative of an increasing and more efficient oxygen-carrying and exchange capacity to fulfill the increasing metabolic demands for oxygen associated with increasing body size.

  3. Identification of shed or plucked origin of Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus) tail feathers: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Sahajpal, Vivek; Goyal, S P

    2008-06-01

    Indian Peafowl (Pavo cristatus) tail covert feathers were studied to investigate the difference between shed and plucked feathers in the context of wildlife offence cases involving the killing of the Indian national bird for the purpose of plucking feathers. Plucked feathers were distinguished from shed feathers by examining their roots under low magnification of a stereoscopic microscope. A chemical test to show the presence of blood on the roots of plucked feathers was used to corroborate the plucked origin of feathers. PMID:18700500

  4. Arterial morphology and blood volumes of rats following 10-14 weeks of tail suspension.

    PubMed

    Chew, H G; Segal, S S

    1997-10-01

    We hypothesized that the structure of systemic arteries would be altered following 10-14 wk of hindlimb unloading (tail suspension) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Tail suspension resulted in atrophy of the soleus muscle (P < or = 0.01) but no significant differences in the mass of the extensor digitorum muscle, heart, or adrenal glands. In anesthetized rats, there was no difference between groups in arterial pressure (approximately 60 mm Hg). The corresponding maximal (topical papaverine) external diameter (ED) of femoral arteries (N = 5 per group) was reduced (P < or = 0.05) in tail suspended (TS, 511 +/- 47 microm, mean +/- SD) compared with cage sedentary (CS, 615 +/- 89 microm) and food restricted weight-paired (FR, 643 +/- 61 microm) groups. Neither hematocrit, red cell, plasma, nor total blood volume differed among groups. Following systemic vasodilation with papaverine, progressive arterial inflation with liquid silicon rubber (Microfil) revealed a reduction in both ED and distensibility of the femoral artery (P < or = 0.05). To determine the effects of tail suspension on systemic arterial morphology, the vasculature of additional rats was perfusion fixed at 80 mm Hg during vasodilation. Cross sections (thickness, 8 microm) of the carotid, axillary, iliac, and femoral arteries were then evaluated. Whereas the internal diameter of femoral arteries was smaller in TS than in CS (P < 0.05), no differences were observed for other vessels among groups. Further, arterial wall thickness increased systemically (overall, P < 0.05; carotid, 24%, P < 0.01; femoral, 28%, P < 0.01) following tail suspension. These findings illustrate adaptation in the structure of conduit arteries to prolonged tail suspension, with diameter altered regionally and wall thickness increased systemically. We suggest that chronic changes in activity patterns can influence arterial structure. PMID:9346160

  5. Using soil island plantings as dispersal vectors in large area copper tailings reforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Everett, R.

    1998-12-31

    The Wenatchee National Forest undertook the reforestation of the 80 acre (35 ha) Holden copper mine tailings of Washington State in 1989 by using 20, one-fourth acre, triangular shaped soil islands as a source of plant propagules targeted for gravel-covered tailings surfaces. The islands were constructed of soil and surface litter transported from a nearby gravel pit, and planted with four species of conifer seedlings, the shrub Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) and eight species of grasses. Conifer and alder seedlings were also planted in graveled covered tailings with amendments. Since reproductive status of the conifers would not occur for several years, this propagule vector hypothesis was tested by measuring the distances traveled onto the tailings surface by grass seeds. The number of grass shoots established in four treatment blocks in target plots downwind from the soil island source plantings was also determined. After 36 months, grass seed had migrated to a distance of 32 feet (11 m) from the soil island source. Grass shoots were present within 10 feet (3 m) downwind of the soil island, the most frequent being Mountain brome (Bromus marginatus). Among the tree species, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Sitka alder grew an average of 6 inches (15--16 cm) after 40 months on the soil islands but somewhat less on the tailing surface. By the third growing season, the only tree species in reproductive condition on the tailings was alder. The soil-island technique is successful for grass dispersal and may have potential for conifer and alder migration.

  6. Reconciling PM10 analyses by different sampling methods for Iron King Mine tailings dust.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Félix, Omar I; Gonzales, Patricia; Sáez, Avelino Eduardo; Ela, Wendell P

    2016-03-01

    The overall project objective at the Iron King Mine Superfund site is to determine the level and potential risk associated with heavy metal exposure of the proximate population emanating from the site's tailings pile. To provide sufficient size-fractioned dust for multi-discipline research studies, a dust generator was built and is now being used to generate size-fractioned dust samples for toxicity investigations using in vitro cell culture and animal exposure experiments as well as studies on geochemical characterization and bioassay solubilization with simulated lung and gastric fluid extractants. The objective of this study is to provide a robust method for source identification by comparing the tailing sample produced by dust generator and that collected by MOUDI sampler. As and Pb concentrations of the PM10 fraction in the MOUDI sample were much lower than in tailing samples produced by the dust generator, indicating a dilution of Iron King tailing dust by dust from other sources. For source apportionment purposes, single element concentration method was used based on the assumption that the PM10 fraction comes from a background source plus the Iron King tailing source. The method's conclusion that nearly all arsenic and lead in the PM10 dust fraction originated from the tailings substantiates our previous Pb and Sr isotope study conclusion. As and Pb showed a similar mass fraction from Iron King for all sites suggesting that As and Pb have the same major emission source. Further validation of this simple source apportionment method is needed based on other elements and sites. PMID:26820180

  7. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  8. Changes in Zinc Speciation with Mine Tailings Acidification in a Semiarid Weathering Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Sarah M.; O’Day, Peggy A.; Webb, Sam M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2012-10-09

    High concentrations of residual metal contaminants in mine tailings can be transported easily by wind and water, particularly when tailings remain unvegetated for decades following mining cessation, as is the case in semiarid landscapes. Understanding the speciation and mobility of contaminant metal(loid)s, particularly in surficial tailings, is essential to controlling their phytotoxicities and to revegetating impacted sites. In prior work, we showed that surficial tailings samples from the Klondyke State Superfund Site (AZ, USA), ranging in pH from 5.4 to 2.6, represent a weathering series, with acidification resulting from sulfide mineral oxidation, long-term Fe hydrolysis, and a concurrent decrease in total (6000 to 450 mg kg{sup -1}) and plant-available (590 to 75 mg kg{sup -1}) Zn due to leaching losses and changes in Zn speciation. Here, we used bulk and microfocused Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data and a six-step sequential extraction procedure to determine tailings solid phase Zn speciation. Bulk sample spectra were fit by linear combination using three references: Zn-rich phyllosilicate (Zn{sub 0.8}talc), Zn sorbed to ferrihydrite (Zn{sub adsFeOx}), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O). Analyses indicate that Zn sorbed in tetrahedral coordination to poorly crystalline Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides decreases with acidification in the weathering sequence, whereas octahedral zinc in sulfate minerals and crystalline Fe oxides undergoes a relative accumulation. Microscale analyses identified hetaerolite (ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}), hemimorphite (Zn{sub 4}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O) and sphalerite (ZnS) as minor phases. Bulk and microfocused spectroscopy complement the chemical extraction results and highlight the importance of using a multimethod approach to interrogate complex tailings systems.

  9. Quantitative Microbial Community Analysis of Three Different Sulfidic Mine Tailing Dumps Generating Acid Mine Drainage?

    PubMed Central

    Kock, Dagmar; Schippers, Axel

    2008-01-01

    The microbial communities of three different sulfidic and acidic mine waste tailing dumps located in Botswana, Germany, and Sweden were quantitatively analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH), Sybr green II direct counting, and the most probable number (MPN) cultivation technique. Depth profiles of cell numbers showed that the compositions of the microbial communities are greatly different at the three sites and also strongly varied between zones of oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Maximum cell numbers of up to 109 cells g?1 dry weight were determined in the pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation zones, whereas cell numbers in unoxidized tailings were significantly lower. Bacteria dominated over Archaea and Eukarya at all tailing sites. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and/or sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus spp. dominated over the acidophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Leptospirillum spp. among the Bacteria at two sites. The two genera were equally abundant at the third site. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing Sulfobacillus spp. were generally less abundant. The acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing Acidiphilium spp. could be found at only one site. The neutrophilic Fe(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae as well as the dsrA gene of sulfate reducers were quantifiable at all three sites. FISH analysis provided reliable data only for tailing zones with high microbial activity, whereas CARD-FISH, Q-PCR, Sybr green II staining, and MPN were suitable methods for a quantitative microbial community analysis of tailings in general. PMID:18586975

  10. Arsenic and heavy metals in native plants at tailings impoundments in Queretaro, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos-Jallath, Jos; Castro-Rodrguez, Alejandrina; Huezo-Casillas, Jos; Torres-Bustillos, Luis

    Ten native plants species that grow in three tailings dams from Ag, Pb, Cu and Zn mine in Queretaro, Mexico were studied. Total concentrations in tailings were 183-14,660 mg/kg As, 45-308 mg/kg Cd, 327-1754 mg/kg Pb, 149-459 mg/kg Cu and 448-505 mg/kg Zn. In the three tailings dams, the solubility of these elements is low. Tailings in dam 1 are acid generating while tailings in dams 2 and 3 are not acid-generating potential. Plants species that accumulate arsenic and heavy metals was identified; Nicotina glauca generally presented the highest concentrations (92 mg/kg As, 106 mg/kg Cd, 189 mg/kg Pb, 95 mg/kg Cu and 1985 mg/kg Zn). Other species that accumulate these elements are Flaveria pubescens, Tecoma stans, Prosopis Sp, Casuarina Sp and Maurandia antirrhiniflora. Two species were found that accumulates a large amount of metals in the root, Cenchrus ciliaris and Opuntia lasiacantha. Concentrations in soils in which plants grow were 488-5990 mg/kg As, 5-129 mg/kg Cd, 169-3638 mg/kg Pb, 159-1254 mg/kg Cu and 1431-13,488 mg/kg Zn. The Accumulation Factor (AF) determined for plants was less than 1, with exception of N. glauca for Cd. The correlation between arsenic and heavy metals found in soils and plants was low. Knowledge of plant characteristics allows it use in planning the reforestation of tailings dams in controlled manner. This will reduce the risk of potentially toxic elements are integrated into the food chain of animal species.

  11. Quantitative microbial community analysis of three different sulfidic mine tailing dumps generating acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kock, Dagmar; Schippers, Axel

    2008-08-01

    The microbial communities of three different sulfidic and acidic mine waste tailing dumps located in Botswana, Germany, and Sweden were quantitatively analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH), Sybr green II direct counting, and the most probable number (MPN) cultivation technique. Depth profiles of cell numbers showed that the compositions of the microbial communities are greatly different at the three sites and also strongly varied between zones of oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Maximum cell numbers of up to 10(9) cells g(-1) dry weight were determined in the pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation zones, whereas cell numbers in unoxidized tailings were significantly lower. Bacteria dominated over Archaea and Eukarya at all tailing sites. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and/or sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus spp. dominated over the acidophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Leptospirillum spp. among the Bacteria at two sites. The two genera were equally abundant at the third site. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing Sulfobacillus spp. were generally less abundant. The acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing Acidiphilium spp. could be found at only one site. The neutrophilic Fe(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae as well as the dsrA gene of sulfate reducers were quantifiable at all three sites. FISH analysis provided reliable data only for tailing zones with high microbial activity, whereas CARD-FISH, Q-PCR, Sybr green II staining, and MPN were suitable methods for a quantitative microbial community analysis of tailings in general. PMID:18586975

  12. Changes in zinc speciation with mine tailings acidification in a semi-arid weathering environment

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah M.; ODay, Peggy A.; Webb, Sam M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2011-01-01

    High concentrations of residual metal contaminants in mine tailings can be transported easily by wind and water, particularly when tailings remain unvegetated for decades following mining cessation, as is the case in semi-arid landscapes. Understanding the speciation and mobility of contaminant metal(loid)s, particularly in surficial tailings, is essential to controlling their phytotoxicities and to revegetating impacted sites. In prior work, we showed that surficial tailings samples from the Klondyke State Superfund Site (AZ, USA), ranging in pH from 5.4 to 2.6, represent a weathering series, with acidification resulting from sulfide mineral oxidation, long-term Fe hydrolysis, and a concurrent decrease in total (6,000 to 450 mg kg?1) and plant-available (590 to 75 mg kg?1) Zn due to leaching losses and changes in Zn speciation. Here, we used bulk and micro-focused Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data and a six-step sequential extraction procedure to determine tailings solid phase Zn speciation. Bulk sample spectra were fit by linear combination using three references: Zn-rich phyllosilicate (Zn0.8talc), Zn sorbed to ferrihydrite (ZnadsFeOx), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO47H2O). Analyses indicate that Zn sorbed in tetrahedral coordination to poorly-crystalline Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides decreases with acidification in the weathering sequence, whereas octahedral zinc in sulfate minerals and crystalline Fe oxides undergoes a relative accumulation. Micro-scale analyses identified hetaerolite (ZnMn2O4), hemimorphite (Zn4Si2O7(OH)2H2O) and sphalerite (ZnS) as minor phases. Bulk and micro-focused spectroscopy complement the chemical extraction results and highlight the importance of using a multi-method approach to interrogate complex tailings systems. PMID:21761897

  13. Availability of radium isotopes and heavy metals from scales and tailings of Polish hard coal mining.

    PubMed

    Leopold, Karsten; Michalik, Boguslaw; Wiegand, Jens

    2007-01-01

    Radium and heavy metal contaminated tailings and scales resulting from Polish hard coal mining were investigated for their mobilisation potential by using leaching methods. The main focus is set on a three-step extraction procedure proposed by BCR (Bureau Communautaire de Rfrence, now Standards Measurements and Testing Programme) of the European Union, which was used for investigating the availability of radium isotopes. In addition, the results of a Polish extraction procedure for the heavy metals' water solubility are presented for rough comparison. After a special treatment, the BCR-reagents were measured by gamma-spectrometry to define their radium activity concentrations; the heavy metal content in the water soluble fractions was determined by ICP-AES. The samples were collected at two different sites influenced by the discharge of pit water from hard coal mining. The tailings were taken from a former tailing pond, which now is no longer in use, but the settled material is still present. At another abandoned and meanwhile flooded tailing pond, the scales were scraped from the inside of a discharge tube. The results obtained show that there is different leaching behaviour between the radium isotopes. The tailings being characterised by surface adsorbed radium provide up to 25% of the initial (226)Ra content, (228)Ra is altogether leached up to 15%. The scales comprise stable radiobaryte (Ba[Ra]SO(4)) and can be considered as being unable to provide radium isotopes, since no trace of radium dissolution was observed. The leaching behaviour of heavy metals is similar to that of radium. Mn, Ni and Zn are dissolved by water from the tailings; the scales do not provide any. PMID:17350147

  14. Multiple determinants in the coding region of Pea seed-borne mosaic virus P3 are involved in virulence against sbm-2 resistance.

    PubMed

    Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Olsen, Birgit Schlichter; Jensen, Ditte Marie Kjaer; Cordea, Mirela Irina; Krath, Britta N; Johansen, I Elisabeth; Lund, Ole Søgaard

    2006-11-10

    Viral determinants for overcoming Pisum sativum recessive resistance, sbm-2, against the potyvirus Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) were identified in the region encoding the N-terminal part of the P3 protein. Codons conserved between sbm-2 virulent isolates in this region: Q21, K30 and H122 were found to specifically impair sbm-2 virulence when mutated in selected genetic backgrounds. The corresponding amino acids, Gln21 and Lys30, are neighbored by P3 residues strongly conserved among potyviruses and His122 is conserved particularly in potyviral species infecting legumes. The strongest selective inhibition of sbm-2 virulence, however, was observed by elimination of isolate specific length polymorphisms also located in the N-terminal part of the P3 protein. Length variation in N-terminal P3 is common between potyviral species. However, intra-species length polymorphism in this region was found only among PSbMV isolates. Our findings comply with a model for PSbMV pathotypes having evolved by a diversification of the P3 protein likely to extend to the level of function. PMID:16908044

  15. Structural determinants within residues 180-199 of the rodent. alpha. 5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit involved in. alpha. -bungarotoxin binding

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, K.E.; Xiadong Wu; Conti-Tronconi, B.M. )

    1991-11-05

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequence segments of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits have been used to identify regions that contribute to formation of the binding sites for cholinergic ligands. The authors have previously defined {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) binding sequences between residues 180 and 199 of a putative rat neuronal nAChR {alpha} subunit, designated {alpha}5, and between residues 181 and 200 of the chick neuronal {alpha}7 and {alpha}8 subunits. These sequences are relatively divergent compared with the Torpedo and muscle nAChR {alpha}1 {alpha}-BTX binding sites, which indicates a serious limitation of predicting functional domains of proteins based on homology in general. Given the highly divergent nature of the {alpha}5 sequence, they were interested in determining the critical amino acid residues for {alpha}-BTX binding. In the present study, the effects of single amino acid substitutions of Gly or Ala for each residue of the rat {alpha}(180-199) sequence were tested, using a competition assay, in which peptides compete for {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX binding with native Torpedo nAChR. These results indicate that a disulfide bridge between the vicinal cysteines at positions 191 and 192 of the {alpha}5 sequence is not an absolute requirement for {alpha}-BTX binding activity.

  16. Luffa acutangula agglutinin: Primary structure determination and identification of a tryptophan residue involved in its carbohydrate-binding activity using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gnanesh; Mishra, Padmanabh; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-12-01

    A lectin from phloem exudates of Luffa acutangula (ridge gourd) was purified on chitin affinity chromatography and characterized for its amino acid sequence and to study the role of tryptophan in its activity. The purified lectin was subjected to various proteolytic digestions, and the resulting peptides were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled electrospray ionization ion trap mass spectrometer. The peptide precursor ions were fragmented by collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation experiments, and a manual interpretation of MS/MS was performed to deduce amino acid sequence. This gave rise to almost complete sequence coverage of the lectin which showed high-sequence similarity with deduced sequences of phloem lectins present in the database. Chemical modification of lysine, tyrosine, histidine, arginine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid residues did not inhibit the hemagglutinating activity. However, the modification of tryptophan residues using N-bromosuccinimide showed the loss of hemagglutinating activity. Additionally, the mapping of tryptophan residues was performed to determine the extent and number of residues modified, which revealed that six residues per molecule were oxidized suggesting their accessibility. The retention of the lectin activity was seen when the modifications were performed in the presence of chitooligosaccharides due to protection of a tryptophan residue (W102 ) in the protein. These studies taken together have led to the identification of a particular tryptophan residue (W102 ) in the activity of the lectin. 2015 IUBMB Life, 67(12):943-953, 2015. PMID:26597132

  17. Determination of the catalytic activity of LEOPARD syndrome-associated SHP2 mutants toward parafibromin, a bona fide SHP2 substrate involved in Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Noda, Saori; Takahashi, Atsushi; Hayashi, Takeru; Tanuma, Sei-Ichi; Hatakeyama, Masanori

    2016-01-22

    SHP2, encoded by the PTPN11 gene, is a protein tyrosine phosphatase that plays a key role in the proliferation of cells via RAS-ERK activation. SHP2 also promotes Wnt signaling by dephosphorylating parafibromin. Germline missense mutations of PTPN11 are found in more than half of patients with Noonan syndrome (NS) and LEOPARD syndrome (LS), both of which are congenital developmental disorders with multiple common symptoms. However, whereas NS-associated PTPN11 mutations give rise to gain-of-function SHP2 mutants, LS-associated SHP2 mutants are reportedly loss-of-function mutants. To determine the phosphatase activity of LS-associated SHP2 more appropriately, we performed an in vitro phosphatase assay using tyrosine-phosphorylated parafibromin, a biologically relevant substrate of SHP2 and the positive regulator of Wnt signaling that is activated through SHP2-mediated dephosphorylation. We found that LS-associated SHP2 mutants (Y279C, T468M, Q506P, and Q510E) exhibited a substantially reduced phosphatase activity toward parafibromin when compared with wild-type SHP2. Furthermore, each of the LS-associated mutants displayed a differential degree of decrease in phosphatase activity. Deviation of the SHP2 catalytic activity from a certain range, either too strong or too weak, may therefore lead to similar clinical outcomes in NS and LS, possibly through an imbalanced Wnt signal caused by inadequate dephosphorylation of parafibromin. PMID:26742426

  18. On the determination of intensities for electron photodetachment and photoionization spectra involving states coupled by conical intersections: Total integral cross sections for polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seungsuk; Yarkony, David R.

    2010-11-01

    The formal underpinning is derived for the computational determination of electron photodetachment and photoionization total integral cross sections for molecules in which the residual species, which can be a neutral or an ion, has states that are strongly coupled by conical intersections. The theory takes full account of the requisite antisymmetry of all the electrons and the potential nonorthogonality of the orbital for the scattering electron to the occupied molecular orbitals of the residual. The breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation requires significant modifications to the standard adiabatic state theory. The developed theory builds on ideas from theories of low-energy electron scattering, in which the scattered electron is described by an orbital taken as channel dependent, but independent of nuclear coordinates. The derived computational approach is based on the accurate description of the vibronic levels of the residual species using the nonadiabatic vibronic coupling theory of Kppel, Domcke, and Cederbaum. The electron scattering problem is solved using the complex rotation L2 method of Han and Reinhardt. This approach has the advantage that both Coulomb and free electron boundary conditions can be treated in the same approach.

  19. Lipid tail protrusions initiate spontaneous insertion of charged, amphiphilic nanoparticles into lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lehn, Reid; Ricci, Maria; Carney, Randy; Voitchovsky, Kislon; Stellacci, Francesco; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Vesicle fusion is a primary mechanism used to mediate the uptake and trafficking of materials both into and between cells. The pathway of vesicle fusion involves the formation of a lipid stalk in which the hydrophobic core regions of two closely associated bilayers merge. The transition state for stalk formation requires the transient protrusion of hydrophobic lipid tails into solvent; favorable contact between these hydrophobic tails then drives stalk creation. In this work, we use unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to show that lipid tail protrusions can also induce the insertion of charged, amphiphilic nanoparticles (NPs) into lipid bilayers. As in the case of vesicle fusion, the rate-limiting step for NP-bilayer fusion is the stochastic protrusion of aliphatic lipid tails into solvent and into contact with hydrophobic material in the amphiphilic NP monolayer. We confirm our predictions with experiments on supported lipid bilayers. The strong agreement between simulation and experiments indicates that the pre-stalk transition associated with vesicle fusion may be a general mechanism for the insertion of amphiphilic nano-objects that could be prominent in biological systems given the widespread use of NPs in applications ranging from drug delivery to biosensing.

  20. Citizen knowledge and perception of black-tailed prairie dog management; report to respondents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, N.R.; Brinson, Ayeisha; Ponds, P.D.; Cline, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    In the late summer of 2000, we canvassed a random sample of residents in the 11-state short grass prairie region of the United States. We asked about peoplea??s attitude toward and knowledge of black-tailed prairie dogs and their management. The survey received 1,933 useable responses with a response rate of 56.4% (margin of error +/- 2.2%). We developed a questionnaire (OMB Control Number: 1028-0073; see Appendix B) to answer the following questions: * What is the level of citizen knowledge regarding black-tailed prairie dogs? * What are citizensa?? attitudes and preferences regarding black-tailed prairie dogs and the environment in general? * What are the factors that explain difference in attitudes and knowledge about prairie dogs? * What are the factors that explain citizen participation in these types of issues? * What are the important differences between rural and urban citizens regarding their political participation and their knowledge and attitudes about prairie dogs? In general, we found that citizens do not have a high regard for black-tailed prairie dogs. Citizens generally have a positive orientation toward the environment and favor a balanced or somewhat environmental approach on questions--like prairie dog management--that involve environmental protection and economic considerations. People having direct experience with prairie dogs specifically, most citizens did not believe the question of what to do about these animals was a highly important environmental issue.