Sample records for tail determinants involved

  1. Tail bud determination in the vertebrate embryo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abigail S. Tucker; Jonathan M. W. Slack

    1995-01-01

    Background: Although as humans we lose our tails in the second month of embryonic development, a persistent tail is a prominent structural feature of most adult vertebrates. Indeed, the post-anal tail is part of the definition of a chordate. The internal organization of the developing tail — with neural tube, notochord and paired somites — is the same as that

  2. Experimental determination of the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon: A transient photocurrent analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.P.; Chan, F.Y.M.; Zou, X.C.; Chan, Y.C.; Lam, Y.W.; Lin, S.H.; O'Leary, S.K.; Lim, P.K.

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental developments have cast doubt on the validity of the common assumption that the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon exhibits a single exponential functional form. The authors employ transient photocurrent decay measurements to determine this distribution of tail states. In their approach, however, they determine the distribution of tail states directly from the experimental data, without assuming, a priori, a specific functional form. It is found that these experimental results are consistent with other more recent experimental determinations of the distribution of tail states, suggesting the possibility of deviations from a single exponential distribution of tail states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  3. Involvement of single-stranded tails in homologous recombination of DNA injected into Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Maryon, E; Carroll, D

    1991-01-01

    Homologous recombination of DNA molecules injected into Xenopus laevis oocyte nuclei is extremely efficient when those molecules are linear and have overlapping homologous ends. It was previously shown that a 5'----3' exonuclease activity in oocytes attacks injected linear DNAs and leaves them with single-stranded 3' tails. We tested the hypothesis that such tailed molecules are early intermediates on the pathway to recombination products. Substrates with 3' tails were made in vitro and injected into oocytes, where they recombined rapidly and efficiently. In experiments with mixed substrates, molecules with 3' tails entered recombination intermediates and products more rapidly than did molecules with flush ends. Molecules endowed in vitro with 5' tails also recombined efficiently in oocytes, but their rate was not faster than for flush-ended substrates. In most cases, the 5' tails served as templates for resynthesis of the 3' strands, regenerating duplex ends which then entered the normal recombination pathway. In oocytes from one animal, some of the 5' tails were removed, and this was exacerbated when resynthesis was partially blocked. Analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of recombination intermediates from 5'-tailed substrates confirmed that they had acquired 3' tails as a result of the action of the 5'----3' exonuclease. These results demonstrate that homologous recombination in oocytes proceeds via a pathway that involves single-stranded 3' tails. Molecular models incorporating this feature are discussed. Images PMID:2038330

  4. Derivation of charts for determining the horizontal tail load variation with any elevator motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Henry A

    1943-01-01

    The equations relating the wing and tail loads are derived for a unit elevator displacement. These equations are then converted into a nondimensional form and charts are given by which the wing- and tail-load-increment variation may be determined under dynamic conditions for any type of elevator motion and for various degrees of airplane stability. In order to illustrate the use of the charts, several examples are included in which the wing and tail loads are evaluated for a number of types of elevator motion. Methods are given for determining the necessary derivatives from results of wind-tunnel tests when such tests are available.

  5. Age and sex determination of juvenile band-tailed pigeons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, J.A.; Braun, C.E.

    1978-01-01

    Captive band-tailed pigeons (Columbafasciata) were studied to document progression of molts and plumages from juvenal to adult age. Immature pigeons began the post-juvenal molt at 35 days which continued up to 340 days. The only 3 plumage characters useful for identification and estimation of age were presence of juvenal lesser, middle, and greater secondary coverts, juvenal secondaries, and juvenal primaries. While juvenal primaries were still present, hatching dates could be estimated up to 252 days (N = 84). Secondary feather presence and molt stage could be used to identify juvenile pigeons for more than 340 days (N = 24). Using coloration of the crown and breast feathers, 96 percent of the immature pigeons examined (106 of 110) at 80 days of age were classified accurately as to sex.

  6. Newt tail regeneration: a model for gravity-dependent morphogenesis and clues to the molecular mechanisms involved.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Almeida, Eduardo; Grigoryan, Eleonora

    Gravity alterations are widely recognized to influence living systems. They may cause temporary or permanent effects on physiology and development at different levels, from gene expression to morphogenesis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects are often unclear, and adequate model systems to study them are required. To address this problem we developed a new experimental model of how gravity affects morphogenesis during tail regeneration in the newt Pleurodeles waltl. The effects of increased gravity on newt tail morphogenesis were first documented in two joint Russian-US NASA spaceflight experiments in the Russian Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) missions. In these experiments the shape of newt tail regenerate was found to depend on the gravity level, being dorso-ventrally symmetrical in microgravity and in neutrally-buoyant aquarium controls, versus hook-like and bent downward in 1g controls. These 1g controls were conducted in spaceflight habitats using a water-saturated PVA sponge mat. These results were reproducible in multiple spaceflight, and ground laboratory studies, both in the US at NASA ARC and in Russia at IDB RAS, and were characterized in detail using morphometry and histology approaches. The role of hypergravity in shaping morphogenesis was confirmed at NASA ARC with an experiment in the ISS Testbed 8-foot diameter centrifuge operating at 2g. Animals that experienced two-week centrifugation (the period of time used in the Foton flights) developed the same hook-like regenerates as 1g controls, and morphometric analysis revealed no significant difference between 1g and 2g groups, however both were significantly different from aquarium controls. We hypothesize that exposure to 1g or 2g during tail morphogenesis constitutes excessive loading for newts that are adapted to microgravity-like conditions in their aquatic habitat. Because Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) are stress-induced molecules that respond to a broad variety of factors and are expressed during development, we hypothesized they may play a role newt tail regenerative morphogenesis under altered g-levels. Specifically there is increasing evidence for HSPs expression changes as a result of hyper-and microgravity. HSPs are also expressed throughout regeneration, rather than just after surgery. To test this hypothesis we performed heat shock on intact and regenerating newts and collected tail tissues. In these experiments we observed that some tails had uplifted tips while others mimicked hook-like regenerates at 1g or 2g. These findings suggest that heat shock, and HSPs induction, may be involved in the mechanism responsible for gravity effects on morphogenesis, or at least interact with them. Current work underway is focused on analyzing the expression of mRNA and localization of proteins for two members of the group, Hsp70 and Hsp90. In summary, we developed and characterized a new practical animal model in which gravity mechanostimulation at 1g, versus unloading in aquaria, causes prominent effects on newt tail regenerative morphogenesis. This model can be achieved without the use of a centrifuge, significantly simplifying its research applications. Initial results using this model suggest that induction of HSPs may be involved in gravity regulation of newt tail regenerative morphogenesis. Further research based on this simple model may help to unravel mechanisms of gravity influence relevant not only to newt tail regeneration, but also to a broad range of other biological processes in amphibian models.

  7. Indirect systolic and mean blood pressure determination by a new tail cuff method in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Ikeda; Y. Nara; Y. YAMORII

    1991-01-01

    Summary A new tail cuff method for determining systolic and mean blood pressure in rats was developed based on photoelectric detection of tail arterial blood flow and pulsatile volume oscillation. Indirect systolic and mean blood pressure measured by this method correlated well with direct systolic and mean blood pressures recorded by a transducer and polygraph after carotid artery cannulation in

  8. A minimally invasive method for gender determination in the prehensile-tailed porcupine (Coendou prehensilis).

    PubMed

    Woc-Colburn, Ana Margarita; Murray, Suzan; Lock, Justin; Dragoo, Jerry W; Guglielmo, Dell; Maldonado, Jesús E

    2013-01-01

    Prehensile-tailed porcupines (Coendou prehensilis), like other rodents, lack external sexual traits, making it difficult to non-invasively determine their gender. By exploiting genetic differences between the X and the Y chromosome, we developed a simple genetic test to determine the gender of Coendous from shed quills. We Sanger sequenced a short portion (195?bp) of the zinc finger protein gene of known male (XY) Coendous to identify positions that are polymorphic between the X and Y chromosomes at this locus. By directly sequencing this fragment, we were able to correctly determine (confirmed via anatomical sexing) the gender of male and female Coendous by the presences or absence of polymorphisms in the resulting chromatograms. This assay is simple, quick and is applicable to other porcupine species. PMID:23447467

  9. CNS cell groups projecting to sympathetic outflow of tail artery: neural circuits involved in heat loss in the rat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julia E Smith; Arthur S. P Jansen; Michael P Gilbey; Arthur D Loewy

    1998-01-01

    In the rat, ?20% of total body heat-loss occurs by sympathetically mediated increases in blood flow through an elaborate system of arteriovenous anastomoses in the skin of its tail. In this study, the CNS cell groups that regulate this sympathetic outflow were identified by the viral transneuronal labeling method. Pseudorabies virus was injected into the wall of the ventral tail

  10. The receptor specificity of bacteriophages can be determined by a tail fiber modifying protein.

    PubMed Central

    Riede, I; Degen, M; Henning, U

    1985-01-01

    T-Even type bacteriophages recognize their cellular receptors with the distal ends of their long tail fibers. The distal part of these fibers consists of a dimer of gene product (gp) 37. The assembly of this gp to a functional dimer requires the action of two other proteins, gp57 and gp38. Genes (g) 38 have been cloned from five T-even type phages which use the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein OmpA as a receptor. The phages used differ in their ability to infect a series of ompA mutants producing altered OmpA proteins, i.e., each phage has a specific host range for these mutants. The cloned genes 38 complemented g38 amber mutants of phage T2, which uses the outer membrane protein OmpF as a receptor. The complemented phages had become phenotypically OmpA-dependent and, with one exception, OmpF-independent, but regained the host range of T2 upon growth in a host lacking the cloned g38. The host range of the complemented phages, as determined on the ompA mutants, was identical to, similar to, or different from that of the phage, from which the cloned g38 originated. The results presented show that gp38 from one phage can phenotypically 'imprint', in a finely-tuned manner, a host range onto gp37 of another phage with a different host specificity. In view of the extreme diversity of host ranges observed, it is suggested that gp38 of T2 and of the OmpA-specific phages may remain attached to gp37 in the phage particle and in cooperation with gp37 determine the host range. PMID:3000773

  11. Molecular mechanisms involved in mammalian primary sex determination.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2014-08-01

    Sex determination refers to the developmental decision that directs the bipotential genital ridge to develop as a testis or an ovary. Genetic studies on mice and humans have led to crucial advances in understanding the molecular fundamentals of sex determination and the mutually antagonistic signaling pathway. In this review, we summarize the current molecular mechanisms of sex determination by focusing on the known critical sex determining genes and their related signaling pathways in mammalian vertebrates from mice to humans. We also discuss the underlying delicate balance between testis and ovary sex determination pathways, concentrating on the antagonisms between major sex determining genes. PMID:24928207

  12. Determinants of Communication Network Involvement: Connectedness and Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monge, Peter R.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Developed structural equation models of involvement in communication networks in organizations for communication network connectedness and for network integration. A questionnaire was administered to members of a naval training facility (N=125). Models showed acceptable goodness-of-fit for the connectedness model and excellent goodness-of-fit for…

  13. A twist in the tail: SHAPE mapping of long-range interactions and structural rearrangements of RNA elements involved in HCV replication.

    PubMed

    Tuplin, Andrew; Struthers, Madeleine; Simmonds, Peter; Evans, David J

    2012-08-01

    The RNA structure and long-range interactions of the SL9266 cis-acting replication element located within the NS5B coding region of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were determined using selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension. Marked differences were found in the long-range interactions of SL9266 when the two widely used genotype 2a JFH-1 (HCVcc) and genotype 1b Con1b sub-genomic replicon systems were compared. In both genomes, there was evidence for interaction of the sub-terminal bulge loop of SL9266 and sequences around nucleotide 9110, though the replication phenotype of genomes bearing mutations that disrupted this interaction was fundamentally different. In contrast, a 'kissing loop' interaction between the terminal loop of SL9266 and sequences in the 3'-untranslated X-tail was only detectable in JFH-1-based genomes. In the latter, where both long-range interactions are present, they were independent, implying that SL9266 forms the core of an extended pseudoknot. The presence of the 'kissing loop' interaction inhibited the formation of SL9571 in the 3'-X-tail, an RNA structure implicated in genome replication. We propose that, SL9266 may contribute a switch function that modulates the mutually incompatible translation and replication events that must occur for replication of the positive-strand RNA genome of HCV. PMID:22561372

  14. Determining the radon exhalation rate from a gold mine tailings dump by measuring the gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Ongori, Joash N; Lindsay, Robert; Newman, Richard T; Maleka, Peane P

    2015-02-01

    The mining activities taking place in Gauteng province, South Africa have caused millions of tons of rocks to be taken from underground to be milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are placed in an estimated 250 dumps covering a total area of about 7000 ha. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon. The size of these dumps make traditional radon exhalation measurements time consuming and it is difficult to get representative measurements for the whole dump. In this work radon exhalation measurements from the non-operational Kloof mine dump have been performed by measuring the gamma radiation from the dump fairly accurately over an area of more than 1 km(2). Radon exhalation from the mine dump have been inferred from this by laboratory-based and in-situ gamma measurements. Thirty four soil samples were collected at depths of 30 cm and 50 cm. The weighted average activity concentrations in the soil samples were 308 ± 7 Bq kg(-1), 255 ± 5 Bq kg(-1) and 18 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) for (238)U, (40)K and (232)Th, respectively. The MEDUSA (Multi-Element Detector for Underwater Sediment Activity) ?-ray detection system was used for field measurements. The radium concentrations were then used with soil parameters to obtain the radon flux using different approaches such as the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) formula. Another technique the MEDUSA Laboratory Technique (MELT) was developed to map radon exhalation based on (1) recognising that radon exhalation does not affect (40)K and (232)Th activity concentrations and (2) that the ratio of the activity concentration of the field (MEDUSA) to the laboratory (HPGe) for (238)U and (40)K or (238)U and (232)Th will give a measure of the radon exhalation at a particular location in the dump. The average, normalised radon flux was found to be 0.12 ± 0.02 Bq m(-2) s(-1) for the mine dump. PMID:25461511

  15. Evidence for the Involvement of Potassium Channel Inhibition in the Antidepressant-Like Effects of Hesperidin in the Tail Suspension Test in Mice.

    PubMed

    Donato, Franciele; Filho, Carlos Borges; Giacomeli, Renata; Alvater, Elza Eliza Tenório; Fabbro, Lucian Del; Antunes, Michele da Silva; de Gomes, Marcelo Gomes; Goes, André Tiago Rossito; Souza, Leandro Cattelan; Boeira, Silvana Peterini; Jesse, Cristiano Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The administration of hesperidin elicits an antidepressant-like effect in mice by a mechanism dependent on an interaction with the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway, whose stimulation is associated with the activation of potassium (K(+)) channels. Thus, this study investigated the involvement of different types of K(+) channels in the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in the mice tail suspension test (TST). The intracerebroventricular administration of tetraethylammonium (TEA, a nonspecific blocker of K(+) channels), glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker), charybdotoxin (a large- and intermediate-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel blocker) or apamin (a small-conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel blocker) combined with a subeffective dose of hesperidin (0.01?mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) was able to produce a synergistic antidepressant-like effect in the mice TST. Moreover, the antidepressant-like effect elicited by an effective dose of hesperidin (0.3?mg/kg, i.p.) in TST was abolished by the treatment of mice with pharmacological compounds K(+) channel openers (cromakalim and minoxidil). Results showed that the antidepressant-like effect of hesperidin in TST may involve, at least in part, the modulation of neuronal excitability through inhibition of K(+) channels and may act through a mechanism dependent on the inhibition of l-arginine-NO pathway. PMID:25647144

  16. Molecular determinants involved in activation of caspase 7

    PubMed Central

    BOUCHER, Dave; BLAIS, Véronique; DRAG, Marcin; DENAULT, Jean-Bernard

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS During apoptosis, initiator caspases (8, 9, and 10) activate downstream executioner caspases (3, 6, and 7) by cleaving the interdomain connector (IDC) at two sites. Here, we demonstrate that both activation sites, site 1 and site 2, of caspase 7 are suboptimal for activation by initiator caspases 8 and 9 in cellulo, and in vitro using recombinant proteins and activation kinetics. Indeed, when both sites are replaced with the preferred motifs recognized by either caspases 8 and 9, we measured improvement in activation of up to 36 folds. Moreover, cleavage at site 1 is preferred over site 2 because of its location within the IDC since swapping sites does not lead to a more efficient activation. We also demonstrate the paramount role of Ile195 of site 1 involved in maintaining a network of contacts that preserves the proper conformation of the active enzyme. Finally, we show that the length of the IDC plays a crucial role in maintaining the need for proteolysis for activation. In fact, although we were unable to generate a caspase 7 that does not require proteolysis for activity, shortening the IDC of the initiator caspase 8 by four residues was sufficient to confer a requirement for proteolysis, a key feature of executioner caspases. Altogether, the results demonstrate the critical role of the primary structure of caspase 7’s IDC for its activation and proteolytic activity. PMID:20942802

  17. Density and distribution of cutaneous sensilla on tails of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in relation to caudal autotomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Anthony P; Lai, Erica K; Lawrence Powell, G; Higham, Timothy E

    2014-09-01

    The lizard tail is well known for its ability to autotomize and regenerate. Physical contact of the tail by a predator may induce autotomy at the location at which the tail is grasped, and upon detachment the tail may undergo violent, rapid, and unpredictable movements that appear to be, to some degree, regulated by contact with the physical environment. Neither the mechanism by which tail breakage at a particular location is determined, nor that by which environmental feedback to the tail is received, are known. It has been suggested that mechanoreceptors (sensilla) are the means of mediation of such activities, and reports indicate that the density of sensilla on the tail is high. To determine the feasibility that mechanoreceptors are involved in such phenomena, we mapped scale form and the size, density, distribution, and spacing of sensilla on the head, body, limbs, and tail of the leopard gecko. This species has a full complement of autotomy planes along the length of the tail, and the postautotomic behavior of its tail has been documented. We found that the density of sensilla is highest on the tail relative to all other body regions examined; a dorsoventral gradient of caudal sensilla density is evident on the tail; sensilla are more closely spaced on the dorsal and lateral regions of the tail than elsewhere and are carried on relatively small scales; and that the whorls of scales on the tail bear a one to one relationship with the autotomy planes. Our results are consistent with the hypotheses of sensilla being involved in determining the site at which autotomy will occur, and with them being involved in the mediation of tail behavior following autotomy. These findings open the way for experimental neurological investigations of how autotomy is induced and how the detached tail responds to external environmental input. PMID:24643900

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum KDEL-tailed cysteine endopeptidase 1 of Arabidopsis (AtCEP1) is involved in pathogen defense

    PubMed Central

    Höwing, Timo; Huesmann, Christina; Hoefle, Caroline; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika; Hückelhoven, Ralph; Gietl, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically determined process in all multicellular organisms. Plant PCD is effected by a unique group of papain-type cysteine endopeptidases (CysEP) with a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention signal (KDEL CysEP). KDEL CysEPs can be stored as pro-enzymes in ER-derived endomembrane compartments and are released as mature CysEPs in the final stages of organelle disintegration. KDEL CysEPs accept a wide variety of amino acids at the active site, including the glycosylated hydroxyprolines of the extensins that form the basic scaffold of the cell wall. In Arabidopsis, three KDEL CysEPs (AtCEP1, AtCEP2, and AtCEP3) are expressed. Cell- and tissue-specific activities of these three genes suggest that KDEL CysEPs participate in the abscission of flower organs and in the collapse of tissues in the final stage of PCD as well as in developmental tissue remodeling. We observed that AtCEP1 is expressed in response to biotic stress stimuli in the leaf. atcep1 knockout mutants showed enhanced susceptibility to powdery mildew caused by the biotrophic ascomycete Erysiphe cruciferarum. A translational fusion protein of AtCEP1 with a three-fold hemaglutinin-tag and the green fluorescent protein under control of the endogenous AtCEP1 promoter (PCEP1::pre-pro-3xHA-EGFP-AtCEP1-KDEL) rescued the pathogenesis phenotype demonstrating the function of AtCEP1 in restriction of powdery mildew. The spatiotemporal AtCEP1-reporter expression during fungal infection together with microscopic inspection of the interaction phenotype suggested a function of AtCEP1 in controlling late stages of compatible interaction including late epidermal cell death. Additionally, expression of stress response genes appeared to be deregulated in the interaction of atcep1 mutants and E. cruciferarum. Possible functions of AtCEP1 in restricting parasitic success of the obligate biotrophic powdery mildew fungus are discussed. PMID:24605116

  19. Effects of intragastric nutrients upon simultaneously determined plasma insulin, glucagon, insulin\\/glucagon ratios and glucose in red-tailed hawks, Buteo jamaicensis gmelin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Merlyn C. Minick; Gary E. Duke; Susan W. Fishman; Rodney B. Harvey

    1996-01-01

    1. Short-term effects (120 min) of an orally intubated amino-acid mixture upon simultaneously-determined plasma insulin, glucagon, I\\/G ratios and glucose levels were studied in five (nonsexed) 24-hr-fasted adults and two immature red-tailed hawks, Buteo jamaicensis Gmelin. For control and comparative purposes the effects of isosmotic saline, free fatty acids (FFA) or mouse pureé (MP) were also determined. 2. Mean preintubation

  20. Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Identifies Complementary Signaling Pathways Involved in Listeria Infection and Reveals Different Actin Nucleation Mechanisms during Listeria Cell Invasion and Actin Comet Tail Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kühbacher, Andreas; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämo, Pauli; Kafai, Natasha; Dehio, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Listeria monocytogenes enters nonphagocytic cells by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is dependent on a clathrin-based molecular machinery and actin rearrangements. Bacterial intra- and intercellular movements are also actin dependent and rely on the actin nucleating Arp2/3 complex, which is activated by host-derived nucleation-promoting factors downstream of the cell receptor Met during entry and by the bacterial nucleation-promoting factor ActA during comet tail formation. By genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening for host factors involved in bacterial infection, we identified diverse cellular signaling networks and protein complexes that support or limit these processes. In addition, we could precise previously described molecular pathways involved in Listeria invasion. In particular our results show that the requirements for actin nucleators during Listeria entry and actin comet tail formation are different. Knockdown of several actin nucleators, including SPIRE2, reduced bacterial invasion while not affecting the generation of comet tails. Most interestingly, we observed that in contrast to our expectations, not all of the seven subunits of the Arp2/3 complex are required for Listeria entry into cells or actin tail formation and that the subunit requirements for each of these processes differ, highlighting a previously unsuspected versatility in Arp2/3 complex composition and function. PMID:25991686

  1. Developing governmental decision strategies for determining involvement in highly uncertain, large-scale capital investment projects 

    E-print Network

    Golden, Robert J

    1978-01-01

    DEVELOPING GOVERNMENTAL DECISION STRATEGIES FOR DETERMINING INVOLVEMENT IN HIGHLY UNCERTAIN~ LARGE-SCALE CAPITAL INVESTMENT PROJECTS A Thesis ROBERT J. GOLDEN~ JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... by ROBERT J. GOLDEN, JR. Approved as to style and content by: C airman mmittee Head o Department I~iember ember August, 1978 -$03284 ABSTRACT Developing Governmental Decision Strategies for Determining Involvement in Highly Uncertain, Large...

  2. Innovativeness and involvement as determinants of website loyalty: II. Determinants of consumer loyalty in B2C e-commerce

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hui-Chih Wang; John G. Pallister; Gordon R. Foxall

    2006-01-01

    This paper is the second of the series of studies entitled “Innovativeness and Involvement as Determinants of Website Loyalty”, which was designed to test Foxall's [(1995). Cognitive styles of consumer initiators. Technovation 15(5), 269–288] style\\/involvement model in the context of Internet buyer behaviours. In this paper, a consumer Website loyalty model was proposed to describe how consumer transfer their existing

  3. Paraprofessional Involvement in Self-Determination Instruction for Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Carter, Erik W.; Sisco, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Although enhancing students' self-determination is advocated as a central element of high-quality special education and transition services, little is known about the ways in which paraprofessionals are involved in promoting self-determination or the extent to which they share teachers' views regarding its importance. The authors surveyed 223…

  4. Animal Tails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sohmer, Rachel.

    2003-01-01

    Call it tail envy. With only a vestigial nub to show for ourselves, perhaps it's no wonder that animal tails capture our attention. The following Web sites present some of the more interesting tails to be found in the animal kingdom. The first Web site contains a recent article from Discovery News describing new findings that at least one species of scorpion produces two distinct types of tail venom, which have completely different effects on their victims (1). The next site from Singapore Zoological Gardens introduces the cebids (our New World monkey cousins), some of which have amazing prehensile tails that are used like a fifth limb (2). The rattlesnake is another famously-tailed creature, highlighted in the following site from the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum (3). The site covers the main aspects of rattlesnake natural history, including a section on how the rattle forms. The Great Plains Nature Center in Wichita, Kansas, offers a Web page devoted to the beaver, including tail trivia and an audio clip of a resident beaver surprised in his den at the Kansas Wildlife Exhibit (4). Anyone who has witnessed the freakishly fascinating spectacle of a gecko leaving its tail behind to distract a would-be predator will appreciate this brief bio of the Tokay gecko, presented by ReptileCenter.com, the Herpetologist's Portal (5). Stacy's Wag'N'Train -- offering dog-training classes in San Jose, California -- provides this online guide to dog body language, which would have a very limited vocabulary without the tail (6). So, how did the peacock get its tail? It's a simple question that has driven zoologists crazy for over a century. The next Web site (7) contains an in-depth article on the subject from the Independent (London), offered through National Geographic News. And finally, the bizarre gulper eel -- able to tie its tail in several knots -- gets is own Web page on Pangea, the Web server for the Department of Educational Leadership and Technology at Southeastern Louisiana University (8). This deep-sea curiosity uses its bioluminescent tail tip to lure hapless prey into its impossibly gigantic mouth.

  5. Severe neural tube defects in the loop-tail mouse result from mutation of Lpp1, a novel gene involved in floor plate specification

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer N. Murdoch; Kit Doudney; Caroline Paternotte; Andrew J. Copp; Philip Stanier

    2001-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTD) are clinically important congenital malformations whose molecular mecha- nisms are poorly understood. The loop-tail ( Lp) mutant mouse provides a model for the most severe NTD, craniorachischisis, in which the brain and spinal cord remain open. During a positional cloning approach, we have identified a mutation in a novel gene, Lpp1, in the Lp mouse, providing

  6. Tail Buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdrashitov, G.

    1943-01-01

    An approximate theory of buffeting is here presented, based on the assumption of harmonic disturbing forces. Two cases of buffeting are considered: namely, for a tail angle of attack greater and less than the stalling angle, respectively. On the basis of the tests conducted and the results of foreign investigators, a general analysis is given of the nature of the forced vibrations the possible load limits on the tail, and the methods of elimination of buffeting.

  7. Structural and Functional Characterization of Ybr137wp Implicates Its Involvement in the Targeting of Tail-Anchored Proteins to Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Yi-Hung; Lin, Tai-Wen; Li, Yi-Chuan; Tung, Jung-Yu; Lin, Cheng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 5% of membrane proteins are guided to nuclear, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), mitochondrial, Golgi, or peroxisome membranes by their C-terminal transmembrane domain and are classified as tail-anchored (TA) membrane proteins. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the guided entry of TA protein (GET) pathway has been shown to function in the delivery of TA proteins to the ER. The sorting complex for this pathway is comprised of Sgt2, Get4, and Get5 and facilitates the loading of nascent tail-anchored proteins onto the Get3 ATPase. Multiple pulldown assays also indicated that Ybr137wp associates with this complex in vivo. Here, we report a 2.8-?-resolution crystal structure for Ybr137wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The protein is a decamer in the crystal and also in solution, as observed by size exclusion chromatography and analytical ultracentrifugation. In addition, isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that the C-terminal acidic motif of Ybr137wp interacts with the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of Sgt2. Moreover, an in vivo study demonstrated that Ybr137wp is induced in yeast exiting the log phase and ameliorates the defect of TA protein delivery and cell viability derived by the impaired GET system under starvation conditions. Therefore, this study suggests a possible role for Ybr137wp related to targeting of tail-anchored proteins. PMID:25288638

  8. Comet C/2011 W3 (Lovejoy): Orbit Determination, Outbursts, Disintegration of Nucleus, Dust-tail Morphology, and Relationship to New Cluster of Bright Sungrazers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W.

    2012-10-01

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for ~3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at ~1012 g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail—the product of the terminal fragmentation—was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s-1. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The resulting orbit gives 698 ± 2 yr for the osculating orbital period, showing that C/2011 W3 is the first member of the expected new, 21st-century cluster of bright Kreutz-system sungrazers, whose existence was predicted by these authors in 2007. From the spine tail's evolution, we determine that its measured tip, populated by dust particles 1-2 mm in diameter, receded antisunward from the computed position of the missing nucleus. The bizarre appearance of the comet's dust tail in images taken only hours after perihelion with the coronagraphs on board the SOHO and STEREO spacecraft is readily understood. The disconnection of the comet's head from the tail released before perihelion and an apparent activity attenuation near perihelion have a common cause—sublimation of all dust at heliocentric distances smaller than about 1.8 solar radii. The tail's brightness is strongly affected by forward scattering of sunlight by dust. From an initially broad range of particle sizes, the grains that were imaged the longest had a radiation-pressure parameter ? ~= 0.6, diagnostic of submicron-sized silicate grains and consistent with the existence of the dust-free zone around the Sun. The role and place of C/2011 W3 in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system and its genealogy via a 14th-century parent suggest that it is indirectly related to the celebrated sungrazer X/1106 C1, which, just as the first-generation parent of C/2011 W3, split from a common predecessor during the previous return to perihelion.

  9. COMET C/2011 W3 (LOVEJOY): ORBIT DETERMINATION, OUTBURSTS, DISINTEGRATION OF NUCLEUS, DUST-TAIL MORPHOLOGY, AND RELATIONSHIP TO NEW CLUSTER OF BRIGHT SUNGRAZERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sekanina, Zdenek; Chodas, Paul W., E-mail: Zdenek.Sekanina@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: Paul.W.Chodas@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    We describe the physical and orbital properties of C/2011 W3. After surviving perihelion passage, the comet was observed to undergo major physical changes. The permanent loss of the nuclear condensation and the formation of a narrow spine tail were observed first at Malargue, Argentina, on December 20 and then systematically at Siding Spring, Australia. The process of disintegration culminated with a terminal fragmentation event on December 17.6 UT. The postperihelion dust tail, observed for {approx}3 months, was the product of activity over <2 days. The nucleus' breakup and crumbling were probably caused by thermal stress due to the penetration of the intense heat pulse deep into the nucleus' interior after perihelion. The same mechanism may be responsible for cascading fragmentation of sungrazers at large heliocentric distances. The delayed response to the hostile environment in the solar corona is at odds with the rubble-pile model, since the residual mass of the nucleus, estimated at {approx}10{sup 12} g (equivalent to a sphere 150-200 m across) just before the terminal event, still possessed nontrivial cohesive strength. The high production rates of atomic oxygen, observed shortly after perihelion, are compatible with a subkilometer-sized nucleus. The spine tail-the product of the terminal fragmentation-was a synchronic feature, whose brightest part contained submillimeter-sized dust grains, released at velocities of up to 30 m s{sup -1}. The loss of the nuclear condensation prevented an accurate orbital-period determination by traditional techniques. Since the missing nucleus must have been located on the synchrone, whose orientation and sunward tip have been measured, we compute the astrometric positions of this missing nucleus as the coordinates of the points of intersection of the spine tail's axis with the lines of forced orbital-period variation, derived from the orbital solutions based on high-quality preperihelion astrometry from the ground. The resulting orbit gives 698 {+-} 2 yr for the osculating orbital period, showing that C/2011 W3 is the first member of the expected new, 21st-century cluster of bright Kreutz-system sungrazers, whose existence was predicted by these authors in 2007. From the spine tail's evolution, we determine that its measured tip, populated by dust particles 1-2 mm in diameter, receded antisunward from the computed position of the missing nucleus. The bizarre appearance of the comet's dust tail in images taken only hours after perihelion with the coronagraphs on board the SOHO and STEREO spacecraft is readily understood. The disconnection of the comet's head from the tail released before perihelion and an apparent activity attenuation near perihelion have a common cause-sublimation of all dust at heliocentric distances smaller than about 1.8 solar radii. The tail's brightness is strongly affected by forward scattering of sunlight by dust. From an initially broad range of particle sizes, the grains that were imaged the longest had a radiation-pressure parameter {beta} {approx_equal} 0.6, diagnostic of submicron-sized silicate grains and consistent with the existence of the dust-free zone around the Sun. The role and place of C/2011 W3 in the hierarchy of the Kreutz system and its genealogy via a 14th-century parent suggest that it is indirectly related to the celebrated sungrazer X/1106 C1, which, just as the first-generation parent of C/2011 W3, split from a common predecessor during the previous return to perihelion.

  10. Determination of thermodynamic and transport parameters of naphthenic acids and organic process chemicals in oil sand tailings pond water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaomeng; Robinson, Lisa; Wen, Qing; Kasperski, Kim L

    2013-07-01

    Oil sand tailings pond water contains naphthenic acids and process chemicals (e.g., alkyl sulphates, quaternary ammonium compounds, and alkylphenol ethoxylates). These chemicals are toxic and can seep through the foundation of the tailings pond to the subsurface, potentially affecting the quality of groundwater. As a result, it is important to measure the thermodynamic and transport parameters of these chemicals in order to study the transport behavior of contaminants through the foundation as well as underground. In this study, batch adsorption studies and column experiments were performed. It was found that the transport parameters of these chemicals are related to their molecular structures and other properties. The computer program (CXTFIT) was used to further evaluate the transport process in the column experiments. The results from this study show that the transport of naphthenic acids in a glass column is an equilibrium process while the transport of process chemicals seems to be a non-equilibrium process. At the end of this paper we present a real-world case study in which the transport of the contaminants through the foundation of an external tailings pond is calculated using the lab-measured data. The results show that long-term groundwater monitoring of contaminant transport at the oil sand mining site may be necessary to avoid chemicals from reaching any nearby receptors. PMID:23736740

  11. Involvement of Androgen Receptor in Sex Determination in an Amphibian Species

    PubMed Central

    Oike, Akira; Matsuo, Yasuki; Min, Mi-Sook; Hasebe, Takashi; Ishizuya-Oka, Atsuko; Kawakami, Koichi; Nakamura, Masahisa

    2014-01-01

    In mice and humans, the androgen receptor (AR) gene, located on the X chromosome, is not known to be involved in sex determination. In the Japanese frog Rana rugosa the AR is located on the sex chromosomes (X, Y, Z and W). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the AR on the X chromosome (X-AR) of the Korean R. rugosa is basal and segregates into two clusters: one containing W-AR of Japanese R. rugosa, the other containing Y-AR. AR expression is twice as high in ZZ (male) compared to ZW (female) embryos in which the W-AR is barely expressed. Higher AR-expression may be associated with male sex determination in this species. To examine whether the Z-AR is involved in sex determination in R. rugosa, we produced transgenic (Tg) frogs carrying an exogenous Z-AR. Analysis of ZW Tg frogs revealed development of masculinized gonads or ‘ovotestes’. Expression of CYP17 and Dmrt1, genes known to be activated during normal male gonadal development, were up-regulated in the ZW ovotestis. Testosterone, supplied to the rearing water, completed the female-to-male sex-reversal in the AR-Tg ZW frogs. Here we report that Z-AR is involved in male sex-determination in an amphibian species. PMID:24826887

  12. Safety of Tailings Dams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Contains information on different aspects of tailings dams; tailings dam properties, disasters, failure modes, slurry waves, stability analysis, and safe tailings disposal. Also includes a slope stability calculator and a tailings flow slide calculator.

  13. Wind-tunnel Investigation of End-plate Effects of Horizontal Tails on a Vertical Tail Compared with Available Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Harry E

    1946-01-01

    A vertical-tail model with stub fuselage was tested in combination with various simulated horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and location on the aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical tail. Available theoretical data on end-plate effects were collected and presented in the form most suitable for design purposes. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the measured and theoretical end-plate effects of horizontal tails on vertical tails, and the data indicated that the end-plate effect was determined more by the location of the horizontal tail than by the span of the horizontal tail. The horizontal tail gave most end-plate effect when located near either tip of the vertical tail and, when located near the base of the vertical tail, the end-plate effect was increased by moving the horizontal tail rearward.

  14. Determination of Sites Involved, HIV Co–Infection & Utility of Diagnostic Modalities in EPTB

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Aruna; R, Srinivasan; G, Thilagavathy; D, Satishkumar; C, Sidduraj; James, Bonny

    2013-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis remains a major global public health problem and an on-going epidemic. Though the chief objectives of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme (RNTCP) in detecting and curing the infectious pulmonary cases is well taken, there has been a steady rise in the number of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) cases as documented in several studies. EPTB which usually constitutes around 15%-20% of the total TB cases is now being increasingly reported due to a combination of better diagnostic facilities, and the HIV pandemic. Though several studies have shown increasing prevalence of EPTB, only few studies are available, especially in the Indian scenario, that study the pattern and risk factors. Hence, this retrospective observational study was undertaken to determine the sites of the involvement, HIV co-infection and usefulness of various diagnostic modalities in EPTB affecting patients attending a medical college DOTS clinic. Material and Methods: One hundred ten EPTB patients referred to the DOTS clinics of the TB & Chest department from the period Dec 2010– Mar 2012 were included in the study. The diagnosis of EPTB was established by combined clinical, microbiological, histopathological &/or imaging modalities. Their medical records were assessed to determine the age distribution, gender and anatomical sites of involvement. The presence of co-morbid conditions like smoking history, alcoholism, diabetic and HIV status were noted. BCG status and Mantoux test readings were recorded. The different diagnostic tests used in confirming EPTB at different sites were recorded. Chest x-ray was analysed for all patients to assess coexisting pulmonary involvement. All patients were followed to assess the outcome of treatment. Results: The mean age of patients was 34.4. The male to female ratio was 58:52 showing a slight male predominance. The most common site of involvement was lymph node followed by pleural effusion and abdominal TB. The prevalence of lymph node TB was noted to be higher in female patients as compared to other sites of EPTB. Mantoux test was positive in 57 (51.8%) patients. HIV co-infection was noted in only 3 (2.7%) patients. Concomitant pulmonary involvement was seen in 19 (17.3%) patients. Conclusions: Lymph node was the most common site involvement showing a significant female preponderance followed by pleural effusion and abdominal TB. The rates of HIV co-infection and diabetes mellitus were 2.7% and 20% respectively. The most useful diagnostic modality was tissue sampling followed by imaging. Mantoux test is not unequivocal for the diagnosis of EPTB. PMID:24086863

  15. Caste determination in a polyembryonic wasp involves inheritance of germ cells

    PubMed Central

    Donnell, David M.; Corley, Laura S.; Chen, Gang; Strand, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Social insects are characterized by the development of castes in which some colony members reproduce whereas others function as altruistic helpers. The conditional switch controlling caste formation usually involves environmental stimuli that act on processes that regulate development of individuals. Unlike other social species, embryos of polyembryonic wasps develop clonally to produce large numbers of genetically identical offspring and two morphologically distinct castes. All embryos in a clone exist in an identical environment, the host, yet develop into either reproductive larvae that mature into adult wasps or soldier larvae whose function is defense. Here, we report that caste determination in Copidosoma floridanum involves inheritance of germ cells. Expression of a C. floridanum homolog (Cf-vas) of the germ cell marker Vasa indicated that the B4 blastomere in four cell-stage embryos is specified as a primordial germ cell. Vas expression later in development further indicated that embryos developing into reproductive larvae possess primordial germ cells whereas embryos developing into soldier larvae do not. Ablation of the B4 blastomere resulted in most broods containing only soldiers whereas ablation of other blastomeres produced broods containing both castes. These results indicate that soldier larvae are obligately sterile and reveal a previously unknown role for germ cells in caste formation. PMID:15226498

  16. Roadmap to determine the point mutations involved in cardiomyopathy disorder: a Bayesian approach.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ambuj; Rajendran, Vidya; Sethumadhavan, Rao; Purohit, Rituraj

    2013-04-25

    Determining the deleterious non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs), that might be involved in inducing disease-associated phenomena, is now among the most important field of computational genomic research. The rapid evolution in sequencing technologies has now outranged the limit of available sequence databases and has out-fledged the amount of SNP data that are yet to be characterized. In this article we have performed a comprehensive analysis of deleterious nsSNPs in MyH7 gene associated with cardiomyopathy cases using a set of computational platforms. We implemented a set of computational SNP analysis platforms along with the Bayesian calculations in order to filter the most likely mutation that might be associated with cardiomyopathy associated disorders. The Bayesian calculation depicted 27 fold rises in the likelihood score for causing cardiomyopathy disorder when MyH7 gene mutations were compiled. Furthermore, we reported E466Q mutation in MyH7 motor domain that showed increase in the amyloid propensity of protein, as well as a significant level of pathogenicity was also observed. The prediction roadmap followed in this article has showed a notable range of accuracy and can be used for determining cardiomyopathy associated nsSNPs for other candidate genes. PMID:23403236

  17. Heads for learning, tails for memory: reward, reinforcement and a role of dopamine in determining behavioral relevance across multiple timescales

    PubMed Central

    Baudonnat, Mathieu; Huber, Anna; David, Vincent; Walton, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine has long been tightly associated with aspects of reinforcement learning and motivation in simple situations where there are a limited number of stimuli to guide behavior and constrained range of outcomes. In naturalistic situations, however, there are many potential cues and foraging strategies that could be adopted, and it is critical that animals determine what might be behaviorally relevant in such complex environments. This requires not only detecting discrepancies with what they have recently experienced, but also identifying similarities with past experiences stored in memory. Here, we review what role dopamine might play in determining how and when to learn about the world, and how to develop choice policies appropriate to the situation faced. We discuss evidence that dopamine is shaped by motivation and memory and in turn shapes reward-based memory formation. In particular, we suggest that hippocampal-striatal-dopamine networks may interact to determine how surprising the world is and to either inhibit or promote actions at time of behavioral uncertainty. PMID:24130514

  18. A Method for Estimating the Rolling Moments Caused by Wing-tail Interference for Missiles at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Sherman; Hikido, Katsumi

    1953-01-01

    A method is presented for estimating the rolling moments caused by wing-tail interference for missiles composed of wing-tail-body combination. The considerations involved in determining the structure of the downwash field behind lifting cruciform wing-body combinations and the rolling moment on cruciform wings of various plan forms induced by an infinite line vortex are discussed in detail. Computations of induced rolling moments for several missile designs are compared with experimental results.

  19. The Incidence and Determinants of Employee Involvement - Evidence from Finnish Manufacturing Sector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek C. Jones; Panu Kalmi; Takao Kato; Mikko Mäkinen

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present preliminary empirical findings on the incidence of employee involvement practices in the Finnish manufacturing sector. The novel survey on EI practices is based on a representative random sample from the population of the Finnish manufacturing firms who had 50 or more employees in 2005. Our main findings are that employee involvement practices are widespread in

  20. Abortion attitudes as determinants of perceptions regarding male involvement in abortion decisions.

    PubMed

    Coleman, P K; Nelson, E S

    1999-01-01

    Abortion decisions have a potentially meaningful effect on the lives of men. Previous research suggests that both men and women generally believe that men have the right to be involved in such decisions. However, very little research attention has been devoted to identifying individual difference correlates of discrepant levels of endorsement for male involvement in abortion decisions. The extent to which abortion attitudes (on a pro-choice to pro-life continuum), conceptualization of abortion as strictly a female issue, and interest in the issue operate as effective predictors of the appropriate level of male involvement in abortion decisions was examined in a sample of 1,387 college students. Results of a multiple regression analysis revealed that 44% of the variance in male involvement scores was explained by the predictor variables. PMID:9919847

  1. Self-determination and student involvement in standards-based reform

    E-print Network

    Wehmeyer, Michael L.; Field, Sharon; Doren, Bonnie; Jones, Bonnie; Mason, Christine

    2004-01-01

    Promoting self-determination has become ‘best practice’ in the education of students with disabilities. We synthesize the decade's work in this area as a foundation for considering issues pertaining to promoting self-determination in light...

  2. Zebrafish sex determination and differentiation: Involvement of FTZ-F1 genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonas von Hofsten; Per-Erik Olsson

    2005-01-01

    Sex determination is the process deciding the sex of a developing embryo. This is usually determined genetically; however it is a delicate process, which in many cases can be influenced by environmental factors. The mechanisms controlling zebrafish sex determination and differentiation are not known. To date no sex linked genes have been identified in zebrafish and no sex chromosomes have

  3. Tank tests to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls II : effect of varying depth of step, angle of after- body keel, length of afterbody chine, and gross load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R; Mckann, Robert; Hay, Elizabeth S

    1946-01-01

    The second part of a series of tests made in Langley tank no. 2 to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls is presented. Results are given to show the effects on resistance characteristics of varying angle of afterbody keel, depth of step, and length of afterbody chine. The effect of varying the gross load is shown for one configuration. The resistance characteristics of planing-tail hulls are compared with those of a conventional flying-boat hull. The forces on the forebody and afterbody of one configuration are compared with the forces on a conventional hull. Increasing the angle of afterbody keel had small effect on hump resistance and no effect on high-speed resistance but increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Increasing the depth of step increased hump resistance, had little effect on high-speed resistance, and increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Omitting the chines on the forward 25 percent of the afterbody had no appreciable effect on resistance. Omitting 70 percent of the chine length had almost no effect on maximum resistance but broadened the hump and increased spray around the afterbody. Load-resistance ratio at the hump decreased more rapidly with increasing load coefficient for the planing-tail hull than for the representative conventional hull, although the load-resistance ratio at the hump was greater for the planing-tail hull than for the conventional hull throughout the range of loads tested. At speeds higher than hump speed, load-resistance ratio for the planing-tail hull was a maximum at a particular gross load and was slightly less at heavier and lighter gross loads. The planing-tail hull was found to have lower resistance than the conventional hull at both the hump and at high speeds, but at intermediate speeds there was little difference. The lower hump resistance of the planing-tail hull was attributed to the ability of the afterbody to carry a greater percentage of the total load while maintaining a higher value of load-resistance ratio.

  4. Student Perceptions of School Efforts to Facilitate Student Involvement, School Commitment, Self-Determination, and High School Graduation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavendish, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between student perceptions of school efforts to facilitate student involvement, school commitment, self-determination skills, and on track indicators for graduation in 10th grade and actual graduation outcomes two years later. The participants were 154 primarily minority students in a large, urban school…

  5. A study to determine the effects of direct parental involvement on students' mathematic achievement in grades three through five

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Judith E Arnold Joy

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if direct parental training would effect third, fourth, and fifth grade students' academic performance in the area of mathematics. Mathematics is an important subject in elementary education. The major emphasis of the activities involved was on reinforcing computational skills.^ Those interested in the formal education of students, both in the K-12 arena

  6. Molecular determinants involved in the allosteric control of agonist affinity in GABAB receptor by the GABAB2 subunit

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ;3 Abstract -aminobutyric acid (GABA) type B receptor (GABAB) is an allosteric complex made of two subunits nervous system, activates GABAA ligand-gated Cl- channels, as well as the G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCRMolecular determinants involved in the allosteric control of agonist affinity in GABAB receptor

  7. Genes involved in the determination of the rate of inversions at short inverted repeats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malgorzata M. Slupska; Ju-Huei Chiang; Wendy M. Luther; Jean Lee Stewart; Lisa Amii; Alexis Conrad; Jeffrey H. Miller

    2000-01-01

    Background: Not all of the enzymatic pathways involved in genetic rearrangements have been elucidated. While some rearrangements occur by recombination at areas of high homology, others are mediated by short, often interrupted homologies. We have previously constructed an Escherichia coli strain that allows us to examine inversions at microhomologies, and have shown that inversions can occur at short inverted repeats

  8. INVOLVING WATERSHED STAKEHOLDERS: AN ISSUE ATTRIBUTE APPROACH TO DETERMINE WILLINGNESS AND NEED

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Steven Smutko; Suzanne H. Kimek; Christy A. Perrin; Leon E. Danielson

    2002-01-01

    The development of effective solutions for addressing nonpoint source pollution on a watershed basis often involves watershed stakeholders. However, success in engaging stakeholders in collaborative decision-making processes varies, as watershed managers are faced with the challenges inherent to finding the right process for the decisions needed and in successfully engaging stakeholders in that process. Two characteristics that may provide guidance

  9. Involving Watershed Stakeholders: An Issue Attribute Approach to Determine Willingness and Need

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Steven Smutko; Suzanne H. Klimek; Christy A. Perrin; Leon E. Danielson

    2002-01-01

    The development of effective solutions for addressing nonpoint source pollution on a watershed basis often involves watershed stakeholders. However, success in engaging stakeholders in collaborative decision making processes varies, as watershed managers are faced with the challenges inherent to finding the right process for the decisions needed and in successfully engaging stakeholders in that process. Two characteristics that may provide

  10. Effect of Horizontal-Tail Span and Vertical Location on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Unswept Tail Assembly in Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald R

    1954-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel on a vertical-tail model with a stub fuselage in combination with various horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and vertical location of the horizontal tail relative to the vertical tail on the aerodynamic characteristics of an unswept tail assembly in sideslip. The results of the investigation indicated that the induced loading carried by the horizontal tail produced a rolling moment about the point of attachment to the vertical tail which was strongly influenced by horizontal-tail span and vertical locations. The greatest effect of horizontal-tail span on the rolling-moment derivative of the complete tail assembly was obtained for horizontal-tail locations near the top of the vertical tail. Span loadings which were reduced to the static-stability derivatives were calculated for each configuration tested by applying the well-known finite-step method used for wings to the intersecting surfaces of the vertical and horizontal tails. The finite-step method provides a simple and effective means of investigating the span loadings of intersecting surfaces.

  11. Effect of Fuselage and Tail Surfaces on Low-speed Yawing Characteristics of a Swept-wing Model as Determined in Curved-flow Test Section of Langley Stability Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bird, John D; Jaquet, Byron M; Cowan, John W

    1951-01-01

    Results are presented of a wind-tunnel investigation made to determine the influence of the fuselage and tail surfaces on the rotary derivatives in yawing flight of a transonic-airplane configuration having 45 degrees sweptback wing and tail surfaces. The tests were run in the curved-flow test section of the Langley stability tunnel at a Reynolds number of 1.07 X 10 to the sixth power and consisted of balance measurements throughout the angle-of-attack range for several flight-path radii of curvature. The results are compared with data from forced-oscillation and free-oscillation tests, and a description of testing techniques used is included.

  12. Paraprofessional involvement in self-determination instruction for students with high-incidence disabilities

    E-print Network

    Lane, Kathleen Lynne; Carter, Erik W.; Sisco, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    accompanied each instruc- tional domain. For example, "teaching students to monitor and evaluate their own behavior, select and provide their own reinforcement, se: their own schedule, and to self-direct learning through strategies like self.... (2002). Preparing youth to exercise self-determination: Quality indicators of school environments that promote the acquisition of knowl- edge, skills, and beliefs related to self-determination. Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 13, 113-118. doi: 10...

  13. A rapid sensitive method for determining phospholipid phosphorus involving digestion with magnesium nitrate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Coral G. Duck-Chong

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the rapid determination of phospholipid phosphorus in samples containing less than 0.5 ?g phosphorus.\\u000a Phospholipid phosphorus is first converted to inorganic phosphate by heating a dried lipid extract briefly over a Bunsen flame\\u000a in the presence of magnesium nitrate, then dissolving the resulting residue in dilute hydrochloric acid at 95 C. The determination\\u000a of the

  14. Specialized Conservation of Surface Loops of Myosin: Evidence that Loops are Involved in Determining

    E-print Network

    Spudich, James A.

    of Biochemistry and Developmental Biology Stanford Medical School Stanford, CA 94305-5307, USA The molecular motor moves actin. Two regions that have been implicated in determining these parameters are the ``loop of the myosin motor domain sequence (Figure 1), leading to the suggestion that the sequences of these loops

  15. Genetic Determinants Involved in the Susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ?-Lactam Antibiotics?

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Ortega, Carolina; Wiegand, Irith; Olivares, Jorge; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Martínez, José Luis

    2010-01-01

    The resistome of P. aeruginosa for three ?-lactam antibiotics, namely, ceftazidime, imipenem, and meropenem, was deciphered by screening a comprehensive PA14 mutant library for mutants with increased or reduced susceptibility to these antimicrobials. Confirmation of the phenotypes of all selected mutants was performed by Etest. Of the total of 78 confirmed mutants, 41 demonstrated a reduced susceptibility phenotype and 37 a supersusceptibility (i.e., altered intrinsic resistance) phenotype, with 6 mutants demonstrating a mixed phenotype, depending on the antibiotic. Only three mutants demonstrated reduced (PA0908) or increased (glnK and ftsK) susceptibility to all three antibiotics. Overall, the mutant profiles of susceptibility suggested distinct mechanisms of action and resistance for the three antibiotics despite their similar structures. More detailed analysis indicated important roles for novel and known ?-lactamase regulatory genes, for genes with likely involvement in barrier function, and for a range of regulators of alginate biosynthesis. PMID:20679510

  16. Mineralogic variations in fluvial sediments contaminated by mine tailings as determined from AVIRIS data, Coeur D'Alene River Valley, Idaho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Harsanyi, Joseph C.

    1995-01-01

    The success of imaging spectrometry in mineralogic mapping of natural terrains indicates that the technology can also be used to assess the environmental impact of human activities in certain instances. Specifically, this paper describes an investigation into the use of data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) for mapping the spread of, and assessing changes in, the mineralogic character of tailings from a major silver and base metal mining district. The area under investigation is the Coeur d'Alene River Valley in northern Idaho. Mining has been going on in and around the towns of Kellogg and Wallace, Idaho since the 1880's. In the Kellogg-Smelterville Flats area, west of Kellogg, mine tailings were piled alongside the South Fork of the Coeur d'Alene River. Until the construction of tailings ponds in 1968 much of these waste materials were washed directly into the South Fork. The Kellogg-Smelterville area was declared an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund site in 1983 and remediation efforts are currently underway. Recent studies have demonstrated that sediments in the Coeur d'Alene River and in the northern part of Lake Coeur d'Alene, into which the river flows, are highly enriched in Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Hg, As, and Sb. These trace metals have become aggregated in iron oxide and oxyhydroxide minerals and/or mineraloids. Reflectance spectra of iron-rich tailing materials are shown. Also shown are spectra of hematite and goethite. The broad bandwidth and long band center (near 1 micron) of the Fe(3+) crystal-field band of the iron-rich sediment samples combined with the lack of features on the Fe(3+) -O(2-) charge transfer absorption edge indicates that the ferric oxide and/or oxyhydroxide in these sediments is poorly crystalline to amorphous in character. Similar features are seen in poorly crystalline basaltic weathering products (e.g., palagonites). The problem of mapping and analyzing the downriver occurrences of iron rich tailings in the Coeur d'Alene (CDA) River Valley using remotely sensed data is complicated by the full vegetation cover present in the area. Because exposures of rock and soil were sparse, the data processing techniques used in this study were sensitive to detecting materials at subpixel scales. The methods used included spectral mixture analysis and a constrained energy minimization technique.

  17. Floods from tailings dam failures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rico; G. Benito; A. Díez-Herrero

    2008-01-01

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released,

  18. Structural determinations, magnetic and EPR studies of complexes involving the Cr(OH) 2Cr unit

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victor Ciornea; Liudmila Mingalieva; Jean-Pierre Costes; Ghenadie Novitchi; Irina Filippova; Ravil T. Galeev; Sergiu Shova; Violeta K. Voronkova; Aurelian Gulea

    2008-01-01

    Five heterometallic compounds with formulae [Ba(H2O)4Cr2(?-OH)2(nta)2]·3H2O (I), [M(bpy)2(H2O)2] [Cr2(OH)2(nta)2]·7H2O, where M2+=Zn, (II); Ni, (III); Co, (IV) and [Mn(H2O)3(bpy)Cr2(OH)2(nta)2]·(bpy)·5H2O (V); bpy=2,2?-bipyridine, (nta=nitrilotriacetate ion) have been prepared by reaction of I with the corresponding MII-sulfates in the presence of 2,2?-bipyridine. Substances I–V have been characterized by magnetic susceptibility measurements, EPR and X-ray determinations. I represents a 2D coordination polymer formed by coordination

  19. Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles involved in malarial peptide bonds determine sterile protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Patarroyo, Manuel E., E-mail: mepatarr@gmail.com [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia); Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Moreno-Vranich, Armando; Bermudez, Adriana [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)] [Fundacion Instituto de Inmunologia de Colombia (FIDIC), Bogota (Colombia)

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles determine sterile protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified peptide's tendency to assume a regular conformation related to a PPII{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural modifications in mHABPs induce Ab and protective immunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mHABP backbone atom's interaction with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} is stabilised by H-bonds. -- Abstract: Modified HABP (mHABP) regions interacting with HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator} molecules have a more restricted conformation and/or sequence than other mHABPs which do not fit perfectly into their peptide binding regions (PBR) and do not induce an acceptable immune response due to the critical role of their {Phi} and {Psi} torsion angles. These angle's critical role was determined in such highly immunogenic, protection-inducing response against experimental malaria using the conformers (mHABPs) obtained by {sup 1}H-NMR and superimposed into HLA-DR{beta}1{sup Asterisk-Operator }-like Aotus monkey molecules; their phi ({Phi}) and psi ({Psi}) angles were measured and the H-bond formation between these molecules was evaluated. The aforementioned mHABP propensity to assume a regular conformation similar to a left-handed polyproline type II helix (PPII{sub L}) led to suggesting that favouring these conformations according to their amino acid sequence would lead to high antibody titre production and sterile protective immunity induction against malaria, thereby adding new principles or rules for vaccine development, malaria being one of them.

  20. The kangaroo's tail propels and powers pentapedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Shawn M; Dawson, Terence J; Kram, Rodger; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2014-07-01

    When moving slowly, kangaroos plant their tail on the ground in sequence with their front and hind legs. To determine the tail's role in this 'pentapedal' gait, we measured the forces the tail exerts on the ground and calculated the mechanical power it generates. We found that the tail is responsible for as much propulsive force as the front and hind legs combined. It also generates almost exclusively positive mechanical power, performing as much mass-specific mechanical work as does a human leg during walking at the same speed. Kangaroos use their muscular tail to support, propel and power their pentapedal gait just like a leg. PMID:24990111

  1. The kangaroo's tail propels and powers pentapedal locomotion

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Shawn M.; Dawson, Terence J.; Kram, Rodger; Donelan, J. Maxwell

    2014-01-01

    When moving slowly, kangaroos plant their tail on the ground in sequence with their front and hind legs. To determine the tail's role in this ‘pentapedal’ gait, we measured the forces the tail exerts on the ground and calculated the mechanical power it generates. We found that the tail is responsible for as much propulsive force as the front and hind legs combined. It also generates almost exclusively positive mechanical power, performing as much mass-specific mechanical work as does a human leg during walking at the same speed. Kangaroos use their muscular tail to support, propel and power their pentapedal gait just like a leg. PMID:24990111

  2. Involvement of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yan, An; Wu, Minjie; Zhao, Yongqin; Zhang, Aidong; Liu, Bohan; Schiefelbein, John; Gan, Yinbo

    2014-12-01

    Cell fate determination is a basic developmental process during the growth of multicellular organisms. Trichomes and root hairs of Arabidopsis are both readily accessible structures originating from the epidermal cells of the aerial tissues and roots respectively, and they serve as excellent models for understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling cell fate determination and cell morphogenesis. The regulation of trichome and root hair formation is a complex program that consists of the integration of hormonal signals with a large number of transcriptional factors, including MYB and bHLH transcriptional factors. Studies during recent years have uncovered an important role of C2H2 type zinc finger proteins in the regulation of epidermal cell fate determination. Here in this minireview we briefly summarize the involvement of C2H2 zinc finger proteins in the control of trichome and root hair formation in Arabidopsis. PMID:24862531

  3. Kinesin: the tail unfolds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Cross; Jonathan Scholey

    1999-01-01

    The cargo-binding tail of the motor protein kinesin acts as a regulator of kinesin-driven vesicle transport. In the absence of bound cargo, the kinesin tail interacts with the motor domains and inhibits their activity. Cargo binding blocks this interaction and relieves the inhibition.

  4. Reported tailings dam failures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rico; G. Benito; A. R. Salgueiro; A. D ´ õez-Herrero; H. G. Pereira

    2008-01-01

    A detailed search and re-evaluation of the known historical cases of tailings dam failure was carried out. A corpus of 147 cases of worldwide tailings dam disasters, from which 26 located in Europe, was compiled in a database. This contains six sections, including dam location, its physical and constructive characteristics, actual and putative failure cause, sludge hydrodynamics, socio-economical consequences and

  5. Asbestos tailings as aggregates for asphalt mixture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoming Liu; Linrong Xu

    2011-01-01

    To use many asbestos tailings collected in Ya-Lu highway, and to explore the feasibility of using asbestos tailings as aggregates\\u000a in common asphalt mixtures, and properties of some asphalt mixtures were evaluated as well. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray\\u000a fluorescent (XRF), and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) were employed to determine the solid waste content of copper,\\u000a zinc, lead, and cadmium. Volume

  6. Myosin5a tail associates directly with Rab3A-containing compartments in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wöllert, Torsten; Patel, Anamika; Lee, Ying-Lung; Provance, D William; Vought, Valarie E; Cosgrove, Michael S; Mercer, John A; Langford, George M

    2011-04-22

    Myosin-Va (Myo5a) is a motor protein associated with synaptic vesicles (SVs) but the mechanism by which it interacts has not yet been identified. A potential class of binding partners are Rab GTPases and Rab3A is known to associate with SVs and is involved in SV trafficking. We performed experiments to determine whether Rab3A interacts with Myo5a and whether it is required for transport of neuronal vesicles. In vitro motility assays performed with axoplasm from the squid giant axon showed a requirement for a Rab GTPase in Myo5a-dependent vesicle transport. Furthermore, mouse recombinant Myo5a tail revealed that it associated with Rab3A in rat brain synaptosomal preparations in vitro and the association was confirmed by immunofluorescence imaging of primary neurons isolated from the frontal cortex of mouse brains. Synaptosomal Rab3A was retained on recombinant GST-tagged Myo5a tail affinity columns in a GTP-dependent manner. Finally, the direct interaction of Myo5a and Rab3A was determined by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation using recombinant mouse Myo5a tail and human Rab3A. When both proteins were incubated in the presence of 1 mm GTP?S, Myo5a tail and Rab3A formed a complex and a direct interaction was observed. Further analysis revealed that GTP-bound Rab3A interacts with both the monomeric and dimeric species of the Myo5a tail. However, the interaction between Myo5a tail and nucleotide-free Rab3A did not occur. Thus, our results show that Myo5a and Rab3A are direct binding partners and interact on SVs and that the Myo5a/Rab3A complex is involved in transport of neuronal vesicles. PMID:21349835

  7. PssP2 is a polysaccharide co-polymerase involved in exopolysaccharide chain-length determination in Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Marczak, Ma?gorzata; Matysiak, Paulina; Kutkowska, Jolanta; Skorupska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Production of extracellular polysaccharides is a complex process engaging proteins localized in different subcellular compartments, yet communicating with each other or even directly interacting in multicomponent complexes. Proteins involved in polymerization and transport of exopolysaccharide (EPS) in Rhizobium leguminosarum are encoded within the chromosomal Pss-I cluster. However, genes implicated in polysaccharide synthesis are common in rhizobia, with several homologues of pss genes identified in other regions of the R. leguminosarum genome. One such region is chromosomally located Pss-II encoding proteins homologous to known components of the Wzx/Wzy-dependent polysaccharide synthesis and transport systems. The pssP2 gene encodes a protein similar to polysaccharide co-polymerases involved in determination of the length of polysaccharide chains in capsule and O-antigen biosynthesis. In this work, a mutant with a disrupted pssP2 gene was constructed and its capabilities to produce EPS and enter into a symbiotic relationship with clover were studied. The pssP2 mutant, while not altered in lipopolysaccharide (LPS), displayed changes in molecular mass distribution profile of EPS. Lack of the full-length PssP2 protein resulted in a reduction of high molecular weight EPS, yet polymerized to a longer length than in the RtTA1 wild type. The mutant strain was also more efficient in symbiotic performance. The functional interrelation between PssP2 and proteins encoded within the Pss-I region was further supported by data from bacterial two-hybrid assays providing evidence for PssP2 interactions with PssT polymerase, as well as glycosyltransferase PssC. A possible role for PssP2 in a complex involved in EPS chain-length determination is discussed. PMID:25268738

  8. Long distance seed dispersal by wind: measuring and modelling the tail of the curve

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James M. Bullock; Ralph T. Clarke

    2000-01-01

    The size and shape of the tail of the seed dispersal curve is important in determining the spatial dynamics of plants, but\\u000a is difficult to quantify. We devised an experimental protocol to measure long-distance dispersal which involved measuring\\u000a dispersal by wind from isolated individuals at a range of distances from the source, but maintaining a large and constant\\u000a sampling intensity

  9. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second multi-phase research program for tailplane icing (TIP II) to develop test methodologies and tailplane performance and handling qualities evaluation tools. The main objectives of this new NASA/Industry/Academia collaborative research programs were: (1) define and evaluate a sub-scale wind tunnel test methodology for determining tailplane performance degradation due to icing. (2) develop an experimental database of tailplane aerodynamic performance with and without ice contamination for a range of tailplane configurations. Wind tunnel tests were planned with representative general aviation aircraft, i.e., the Learjet 45, and a twin engine low speed aircraft. This report summarizes the research performed during the first year of the study, and outlines the work tasks for the second year.

  10. A chromatin binding site in the tail domain of nuclear lamins that interacts with core histones

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Interaction of chromatin with the nuclear envelope and lamina is thought to help determine higher order chromosome organization in the interphase nucleus. Previous studies have shown that nuclear lamins bind chromatin directly. Here we have localized a chromatin binding site to the carboxyl-terminal tail domains of both A- and B-type mammalian lamins, and have characterized the biochemical properties of this binding in detail. Recombinant glutathione-S-transferase fusion proteins containing the tail domains of mammalian lamins C, B1, and B2 were analyzed for their ability to associate with rat liver chromatin fragments immobilized on microtiter plate wells. We found that all three lamin tails specifically bind to chromatin with apparent KdS of 120-300 nM. By examining a series of deletion mutants, we have mapped the chromatin binding region of the lamin C tail to amino acids 396- 430, a segment immediately adjacent to the rod domain. Furthermore, by analysis of chromatin subfractions, we found that core histones constitute the principal chromatin binding component for the lamin C tail. Through cooperativity, this lamin-histone interaction could be involved in specifying the high avidity attachment of chromatin to the nuclear envelope in vivo. PMID:7559784

  11. Morphogenetic changes occurring in the regenerating newt tail under changed gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Almeida, Eduardo

    2012-07-01

    It is widely accepted that gravity greatly affects animal physiology, development, and alters gene expression. Recently it became apparent that it can also affect tissue morphogenesis. In our work, we developed special laboratory conditions that allow us to produce the gravity-dependent alterations in tail regenerates of the newt Pleurodeles waltl. We examined the dynamic morphogenetic changes during 50-day tail regeneration using computer morphometric analysis. Changes that we observed under these conditions were comparable with those found earlier in our spaceflight experiments. The newts kept in aquarium deep water (low g) after 1/3 tail amputation developed normal lanceolate regenerates. In contrast, the animals that stayed on the moist mat (1g) developed tail regenerates curved ventrally, with tips almost touching the mat. The similar results were obtained with a 12-day centrifugation at 2g. The study of the regenerate morphology in low g, 1g, and 2g animal groups allowed us to determine the stage at which the morphological changes in regenerates become apparent, and to detect the main morphological events associated with the development of tail curve, such as bending of ependymal tube and reorientation of the forming cartilage. We describe cellular processes foregoing observed tissue morphogenetic changes, such as cell migration, condensation in cell population, and unequal proliferation in different areas of epidermis and blastema. Cell proliferation in epidermis and blastema of tails regenerated under the conditions of different gravitational load was evaluated by BrdU assay. In 1g newts, cell proliferation increased within the dorso-apical region of the regenerates compared with that in low g group. These results provide us with a valuable insight into the regenerative tissue homostasis that involves cell division, cell death, and migration in the newt regenerating tail. In addition, these findings could provide us with better understanding of the mechanisms mediating morphogenetic response of regenerating tissues to the modified gravity vector.

  12. What Makes a Tidal Tail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Konstantopoulos, I.; Charlton, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are famous for creating some of the most visually stunning scenes in astronomy, particularly in the cases of tidal tails. These chaotic regions are known to house breeding grounds for young stellar clusters, as shown through past imaging and spectroscopic studies, but the underlying material remains a mystery. While we know that gas is easily stripped from the parent galaxies, what about the stars? The presence of an older stellar population is crucial to dynamical simulations of tidal tails, but has not yet been confirmed by observation. We use the twin tidal tails of NGC3256 as a case study for determining the presence of an old, underlying stellar population. Newly acquired ugriz Gemini data allows us to distinguish between young and old stars, while previous HST data pinpoints the locations of these objects. Deep imaging surveys have often been used to detect tidal features, including these ancient relics, but our survey will be the first to measure the colors of such objects. This will lead us to place constraints on the original composition of the material that was ejected from the interacting/merging galaxies, and the star formation history.

  13. Metal mobilization under alkaline conditions in ash-covered tailings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinmei; Alakangas, Lena; Wanhainen, Christina

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine element mobilization and accumulation in mill tailings under alkaline conditions. The tailings were covered with 50 cm of fly ash, and above a sludge layer. The tailings were geochemically and mineralogically investigated. Sulfides, such as pyrrhotite, sphalerite and galena along with gangue minerals such as dolomite, calcite, micas, chlorite, epidote, Mn-pyroxene and rhodonite were identified in the unoxidized tailings. The dissolution of the fly ash layer resulted in a high pH (close to 12) in the underlying tailings. This, together with the presence of organic matter, increased the weathering of the tailings and mobilization of elements in the uppermost 47 cm of the tailings. All primary minerals were depleted, except quartz and feldspar which were covered by blurry secondary carbonates. Sulfide-associated elements such as Cd, Fe, Pb, S and Zn and silicate-associated elements such as Fe, Mg and Mn were released from the depletion zone and accumulated deeper down in the tailings where the pH decreased to circum-neutral. Sequential extraction suggests that Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, S and Zn were retained deeper down in the tailings and were mainly associated with the sulfide phase. Calcium, Cr, K and Ni released from the ash layer were accumulated in the uppermost depletion zone of the tailings. PMID:24681363

  14. Ectoderm to Mesoderm Lineage Switching During Axolotl Tail Regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Echeverri; Elly M. Tanaka

    2002-01-01

    Foreign environments may induce adult stem cells to switch lineages and populate multiple tissue types, but whether this mechanism is used for tissue repair remains uncertain. Urodele amphibians can regenerate fully functional, multitissue structures including the limb and tail. To determine whether lineage switching is an integral feature of this regeneration, we followed individual spinal cord cells live during tail

  15. Happy Tailings to You

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students prepare a sample of "mine tailings", then separate out desirable materials using whatever method they choose, and quantify the results. They will discover that sometimes it's hard to separate desirable minerals from undesirable ones, especially if they look alike or the crystals are of similar sizes. Students learn that old, worked-out mines contain some desirable minerals (in small quantities) mixed in with unwanted minerals, but that doesn't stop some people from trying to squeeze out the last drop. Once considered tailings (or trash), the mix may now be profitable for mining. Desirable minerals can be separated physically and chemically.

  16. REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND, SHOWING AIRCRAFT NUMBER (319), HORIZONTAL STABILIZER, TAIL CONE AND COOLING CTS FOR THE AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), MECHANIC PAUL RIDEOUT IS LOWERING THE BALANCE PANELS ON THE STABILIZERS FOR LUBRICATION AND INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  17. An unbiased approach to identify genes involved in development in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). The initial cue in TSD is incubation temperature, unlike genotypic sex determination (GSD) where it is determined by the presence of specific alleles (or genetic loci). We used patterns of gene expression to identify candidates for genes with a role in TSD and other developmental processes without making a priori assumptions about the identity of these genes (ortholog-based approach). We identified genes with sexually dimorphic mRNA accumulation during the temperature sensitive period of development in the Red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta), a turtle with TSD. Genes with differential mRNA accumulation in response to estrogen (estradiol-17?; E2) exposure and developmental stages were also identified. Results Sequencing 767 clones from three suppression-subtractive hybridization libraries yielded a total of 581 unique sequences. Screening a macroarray with a subset of those sequences revealed a total of 26 genes that exhibited differential mRNA accumulation: 16 female biased and 10 male biased. Additional analyses revealed that C16ORF62 (an unknown gene) and MALAT1 (a long noncoding RNA) exhibited increased mRNA accumulation at the male producing temperature relative to the female producing temperature during embryonic sexual development. Finally, we identified four genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, and NFIB) that exhibited a stage effect and five genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, NFIB and NOTCH2) showed a response to E2 exposure. Conclusions Here we report a survey of genes identified using patterns of mRNA accumulation during embryonic development in a turtle with TSD. Many previous studies have focused on examining the turtle orthologs of genes involved in mammalian development. Although valuable, the limitations of this approach are exemplified by our identification of two genes (MALAT1 and C16ORF62) that are sexually dimorphic during embryonic development. MALAT1 is a noncoding RNA that has not been implicated in sexual differentiation in other vertebrates and C16ORF62 has an unknown function. Our results revealed genes that are candidates for having roles in turtle embryonic development, including TSD, and highlight the need to expand our search parameters beyond protein-coding genes. PMID:22793670

  18. Dolphin Skeleton - Tail

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton; Student, Biological Sciences)

    2007-07-14

    The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward.

  19. Evolution of "Rhabditidae" and the Male Tail

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, David H. A.

    2000-01-01

    Evolution of diverse male tail epidermal features of representative species in the family Rhabditidae (Nematoda:Rhabditida) was mapped by parsimony on a molecular phylogeny inferred with nearly complete DNA sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. Although the molecular phylogeny is consistent with some previously proposed relationships, there are also some major differences, suggesting a revision of rhabditid taxonomy is required. To reconstruct male tail evolution, character states and homologies were determined with the aid of developmental profiling at the level of single cells. Because the model genetic system Caenorhabditis elegans is a member of Rhabditidae and allows the genetic and developmental mechanisms of morphogenesis to be elucidated, candidate genes and pathways can be proposed for several of the reconstructed evolutionary changes in male tail morphology. PMID:19270972

  20. D. Aaron Haines Student Projects Fecal Testing, Baiting & White-tailed Deer

    E-print Network

    Boal, Jean

    D. Aaron Haines Student Projects Fecal Testing, Baiting & White-tailed Deer January 2013 ­ Present Due to the potential negative impacts of baiting on white­tailed deer, and the philosophy of fair as internationally. The objective of this study is to determine whether baiting activity on white-tailed deer can

  1. Western Red-tailed Skink Distribution in Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D. B. and Gergor, P. D.

    2011-11-01

    This slide show reports a study to: determine Western Red-tailed Skink (WRTS) distribution on Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); identify habitat where WRTS occur; learn more about WRTS natural history; and document distribution of other species.

  2. Molecular genetic dissection of mouse unconventional myosin-VA: tail region mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J D; Mermall, V; Strobel, M C; Russell, L B; Mooseker, M S; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1998-01-01

    We used an RT-PCR-based sequencing approach to identify the mutations responsible for 17 viable dilute alleles, a mouse-coat-color locus encoding unconventional myosin-VA. Ten of the mutations mapped to the MyoVA tail and are reported here. These mutations represent the first extensive collection of tail mutations reported for any unconventional mammalian myosin. They identify sequences important for tail function and identify domains potentially involved in cargo binding and/or proper folding of the MyoVA tail. Our results also provide support for the notion that different myosin tail isoforms produced by alternative splicing encode important cell-type-specific functions. PMID:9560409

  3. Determination of the Active Principle in a Syrup by Spectrophotometry and Principal Component Regression Analysis. An Advanced Undergraduate Experiment Involving Chemometrics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    María É. Ribone; Ariana P. Pagani; Alejandro C. Olivieri; Héctor C. Goicoechea

    2000-01-01

    An advanced analytical chemistry laboratory experiment concerning the determination of the mucolitic bromhexine in a commercial syrup is described. It involves the following steps: (i) preparing nine calibration mixtures and recording their absorption spectra in the region 285-348 nm, (ii) recording spectrophotometric data for four synthetic unknowns and two commercial samples, and (iii) processing them with the multivariate calibration technique

  4. NPS6, Encoding a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase Involved in Siderophore-Mediated Iron Metabolism, is a Conserved Virulence Determinant of Plant Pathogenic Ascomycetes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NPS6, encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, is a virulence determinant in the corn pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus and is also involved in resistance to oxidative stress, generated by hydrogen peroxide. Deletion of NPS6 orthologs in the rice pathogen, Cochliobolus miyabeanus, the cereal...

  5. The geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the plasma sheet and lobe regions of the magnetotail, focusing principally on large-scale processes or microprocesses with some large-scale effects. Consideration is given to quiet and average structures, not necessarily related to activity phases, with quasi-steady convection aspects, and with the characteristics of dynamic phases including acceleration mechanisms and single particle aspects. Attention is given to various activity models, average and quiet time properties, properties and effects of magnetospheric convection, dynamics of the magnetotail, and the near tail, substorm current wedge.

  6. Determinants of Substance Abuse in a Population of Children and Adolescents Involved with the Child Welfare System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Veeran-Anne S.; Thornton, Tiffany; Tonmyr, Lil

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse is an important health issue facing children involved with child welfare, but little is known about the associated factors. The purpose of this study was to build on findings from the "Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect-2003" and use a national sample of 10-15 year old children to examine the factors…

  7. Experiments on a Tail-wheel Shimmy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harling, R; Dietz, O

    1954-01-01

    Model tests on the "running belt" and tests with a full-scale tail wheel were made on a rotating drum as well as on a runway in order to investigate the causes of the undesirable shimmy phenomena frequently occurring on airplane tail wheels, and the means of avoiding them. The small model (scale 1:10) permitted simulation of the mass, moments of inertia, and fuselage stiffness of the airplane and determination of their influence on the shimmy, whereas by means of the larger model with pneumatic tires (scale 1:2) more accurate investigations were made on the tail wheel itself. The results of drum and road tests show good agreement with one another and with model values. Detailed investigations were made regarding the dependence of the shimmy tendency on trail, rolling speed, load, size of tires, ground friction,and inclination of the swivel axis; furthermore, regarding the influence of devices with restoring effect on the tail wheel, and the friction damping required for prevention of shimmy. Finally observations from slow-motion pictures are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the influence of tire deformation.

  8. Elucidating Internucleosome Interactions and the Roles of Histone Tails

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steven C.; Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    The nucleosome is the first level of genome organization and regulation in eukaryotes where negatively charged DNA is wrapped around largely positively charged histone proteins. Interaction between nucleosomes is dominated by electrostatics at long range and guided by specific contacts at short range, particularly involving their flexible histone tails. We have thus quantified how internucleosome interactions are modulated by salts (KCl, MgCl2) and histone tail deletions (H3, H4 N-terminal), using small-angle x-ray scattering and theoretical modeling. We found that measured effective charges at low salts are ?1/5th of the theoretically predicted renormalized charges and that H4 tail deletion suppresses the attraction at high salts to a larger extent than H3 tail deletion. PMID:23823239

  9. Wing-Fuselage Interference, Tail Buffeting, and Air Flow About the Tail of a Low-Wing Monoplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James A; Hood, Manley J

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on a Mcdonnell Douglas airplane to determine the wing-fuselage interference of a low-wing monoplane. The tests included a study of tail buffeting and the air flow in the region of the tail. The airplane was tested with and without the propeller slipstream, both in the original condition and with several devices designed to reduce or eliminate tail buffeting. The devices used were wing-fuselage fillets, a NACA cowling, reflexed trailing edge of the wing, and stub auxiliary airfoils.

  10. Interactions of tailings leachate with local liner materials found at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, M.E.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    The mill tailings site at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania is the first mill site to receive remedial action under the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Part of this remedial action will require excavating the 53,500 m/sup 3/ (70,000 yd/sup 3/) of tailings on the site having a specific activity exceeding 100 pCi/g, and encapsulating these contaminated tailings in a clay-lined cell. As part of the remedial action effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been studying the interactions of tailings and tailings leachate with locally occurring clays proposed for liner materials. These studies include physical and chemical characterization of amended and unamended local clays, chemical characterization of the tailings, column studies of tailings leached with deionized water, and column studies of clays contacted with tailings solutions to determine the attenuation properties of the proposed liner materials. Column studies of tailings leached with deionized water indicated that the Canonsburg tailings could represent a source of soluble radium-226 and uranium-238, several trace metals, cations, and the anions SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/, and Cl. Of these soluble contaminants, uranium-238, radium-226, the trace metals As and Mo, and the anions F and SO/sub 4/ were present at levels exceeding maximum concentration levels in the tailings leaching column effluents. However, local clays, both in amended and unamended form were effective in attenuating contaminant migration. The soil amendments tested failed to increase radium attenuation. The tailings leaching studies indicated that the tailings will produce leachates of neutral pH and relatively low contaminant levels for at least 200 years. We believe that compacting the tailings within the encapsulation cell will help to reduce leaching of contaminants from the liner system, since very low permeabilities (<10/sup -8/ cm/s) were observed for even slightly compacted tailings materials.

  11. From dinosaurs to birds: a tail of evolution.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Dana J; Chapman, Susan C; Larsson, Hans Ce; Organ, Chris L; Bebin, Anne-Gaelle; Merzdorf, Christa S; Bradley, Roger; Horner, John R

    2014-01-01

    A particularly critical event in avian evolution was the transition from long- to short-tailed birds. Primitive bird tails underwent significant alteration, most notably reduction of the number of caudal vertebrae and fusion of the distal caudal vertebrae into an ossified pygostyle. These changes, among others, occurred over a very short evolutionary interval, which brings into focus the underlying mechanisms behind those changes. Despite the wealth of studies delving into avian evolution, virtually nothing is understood about the genetic and developmental events responsible for the emergence of short, fused tails. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the signaling pathways and morphological events that contribute to tail extension and termination and examine how mutations affecting the genes that control these pathways might influence the evolution of the avian tail. To generate a list of candidate genes that may have been modulated in the transition to short-tailed birds, we analyzed a comprehensive set of mouse mutants. Interestingly, a prevalent pleiotropic effect of mutations that cause fused caudal vertebral bodies (as in the pygostyles of birds) is tail truncation. We identified 23 mutations in this class, and these were primarily restricted to genes involved in axial extension. At least half of the mutations that cause short, fused tails lie in the Notch/Wnt pathway of somite boundary formation or differentiation, leading to changes in somite number or size. Several of the mutations also cause additional bone fusions in the trunk skeleton, reminiscent of those observed in primitive and modern birds. All of our findings were correlated to the fossil record. An open question is whether the relatively sudden appearance of short-tailed birds in the fossil record could be accounted for, at least in part, by the pleiotropic effects generated by a relatively small number of mutational events. PMID:25621146

  12. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-01-01

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington

  13. Heavy Tails Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    that µ(B) = 0 (Resnick, 2007). Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal Dependence MMR2011 Densities of Copulas and Extremal Dependence Haijun Li (Joint work with Peiling Wu) Department of Mathematics Washington State University MMR2011, Beijing Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal

  14. The Pressure Distribution over the Wings and Tail Surfaces of a PW-9 Pursuit Airplane in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhode, Richard

    1931-01-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation to determine (1) the magnitude and distribution of aerodynamic loads over the wings and tail surfaces of a pursuit-type airplane in the maneuvers likely to impose critical loads on the various subassemblies of the airplane structure. (2) To study the phenomenon of center of pressure movement and normal force coefficient variation in accelerated flight, and (3) to measure the normal accelerations at the center of gravity, wing-tip, and tail, in order to determine the nature of the inertia forces acting simultaneously with the critical aerodynamic loads. The results obtained throw light on a number of important questions involving structural design. Some of the more interesting results are discussed in some detail, but in general the report is for the purpose of making this collection of airplane-load data obtained in flight available to those interested in airplane structures.

  15. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Determine the Effectiveness of an Early Psychological Intervention with Children Involved in Road Traffic Accidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Richard; Salter, Emma; Howse, Imogen; Yule, William; Taylor, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether an early intervention using a psychological debriefing format is effective in preventing psychological distress in child road traffic accident survivors. Design: Randomised controlled trial. Setting: Accident and Emergency Department, Royal United Hospital, Bath. Subjects: 158 children aged 7-18. Follow-up…

  16. The Pressure Distribution Over the Horizontal Tail Surfaces of an Airplane I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H

    1923-01-01

    This work was undertaken to determine as completely as possible the distribution of pressure over the horizontal tail surfaces of an airplane, and to analyze the relation of this pressure to the structural loads and the longitudinal stability. The investigation is divided into three parts, of which this the first. The first part of the investigation is for the purpose of determining the pressure distribution over two horizontal tail surfaces in uniform free flight; the second part to conduct tests of similar tail planes in the wind tunnel; and the third part to determine the pressure distribution on the horizontal tail surfaces during accelerated flight on the full-size airplane.

  17. Runaway tails in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway tail driven by a dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is analyzed. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, there are three different regimes in the evolution of the tail. The tail can be (1) stable with electrons accelerated to large parallel velocities, (2) unstable to Cerenkov resonance because of the depletion of the bulk and the formation of a positive slope, (3) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution. The role of a convection type loss term is also discussed.

  18. Measurements of pressures on the tail and aft fuselage of an airplane model during rotary motions at spin attitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultberg, Randy S.; Bowman, James S., Jr.; Martin, Colin A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA-Langley Spin Tunnel was used to determine the empennage and aft fuselage surfaces of an aircraft model while it was rotated at spinning-event attitudes, in order to ascertain stern flow conditions and the effects of horizontal tail, as well as the wings, on the vertical tail. A substantial horizontal tail influence is noted on both sides of the vertical tail; the removal of the horizontal tail was found to change the propelling or damping moment characteristics of the vertical tail. The wing was also found to have a large influence on the magnitude of the pressures measured on both the empennage and the aft-fuselage areas.

  19. Tail Lobe Revisited: Magnetic Field Modeling Based on Plasma Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, S. B. P.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma data from the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft during 1977-1980 have been used to determine the distribution of data points in the magnetotail in the range of distances -20 < XGSM < --15, i.e. which of the records that were located in the current sheet, in the tail lobe, in the magnetosheath and in the boundary layers respectively. The ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field data for the records in the tail lobe were then used to model the tail lobe magnetic field dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure, on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and on the Dst index. The tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be dependent on the square root of the dynamic pressure based on the balance between the total magnetic pressure in the tail lobes and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. The IMF dependent terms, added to the pressure term, were sought in many different forms while the Dst dependence of the tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be linear. The field shows a strong dependence on the square root of the dynamic pressure and the different IMF dependent terms all constitute a significant contribution to the total field. However, the dependence on the Dst index turned out to be very weak at those down-tail distances. The results of this study are intended to be used for parameterizing future versions of the data-based models of the global magnetospheric magnetic field.

  20. Identification of Regions Interacting with Ovo(d) Mutations: Potential New Genes Involved in Germline Sex Determination or Differentiation in Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, D.; Oliver, B.; Mahowald, A. P.

    1995-01-01

    Only a few Drosophila melanogaster germline sex determination genes are known, and there have been no systematic screens to identify new genes involved in this important biological process. The ovarian phenotypes produced by females mutant for dominant alleles of the ovo gene are modified in flies with altered doses of other loci involved in germline sex determination in Drosophila (Sex-lethal(+), sans fille(+) and ovarian tumor(+)). This observation constitutes the basis for a screen to identify additional genes required for proper establishment of germline sexual identity. We tested 300 deletions, which together cover ~58% of the euchromatic portion of the genome, for genetic interactions with ovo(D). Hemizygosity for more than a dozen small regions show interactions that either partially suppress or enhance the ovarian phenotypes of females mutant for one or more of the three dominant ovo mutations. These regions probably contain genes whose products act in developmental hierarchies that include ovo(+) protein. PMID:7713427

  1. Ratios of bottom meson branching fractions involving J\\/psi mesons and determination of b quark fragmentation fractions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Abe; H. Akimoto; A. Akopian; M. G. Albrow; S. R. Amendolia; D. Amidei; J. Antos; C. Anway-Wiese; S. Aota; G. Apollinari; T. Asakawa; W. Ashmanskas; M. Atac; F. Azfar; P. Azzi-Bacchetta; N. Bacchetta; W. Badgett; S. Bagdasarov; M. W. Bailey; J. Bao; P. de Barbaro; A. Barbaro-Galtieri; V. E. Barnes; B. A. Barnett; E. Barzi; G. Bauer; T. Baumann; F. Bedeschi; S. Behrends; S. Belforte; G. Bellettini; J. Bellinger; D. Benjamin; J. Benlloch; J. Bensinger; D. Benton; A. Beretvas; J. P. Berge; J. Berryhill; S. Bertolucci; B. Bevensee; A. Bhatti; K. Biery; M. Binkley; D. Bisello; R. E. Blair; C. Blocker; A. Bodek; W. Bokhari; G. Bolla; V. Bolognesi; D. Bortoletto; J. Boudreau; L. Breccia; C. Bromberg; N. Bruner; E. Buckley-Geer; H. S. Budd; K. Burkett; G. Busetto; A. Byon-Wagner; K. L. Byrum; J. Cammerata; C. Campagnari; M. Campbell; A. Caner; W. Carithers; D. Carlsmith; A. Castro; D. Cauz; Y. Cen; F. Cervelli; P. S. Chang; H. Y. Chao; J. Chapman; M.-T. Cheng; G. Chiarelli; T. Chikamatsu; C. N. Chiou; L. Christofek; S. Cihangir; A. G. Clark; M. Cobal; M. Contreras; J. Conway; J. Cooper; M. Cordelli; C. Couyoumtzelis; D. Crane; D. Cronin-Hennessy; R. Culbertson; J. D. Cunningham; T. Daniels; F. Dejongh; S. Delchamps; S. dell'agnello; M. dell'orso; R. Demina; L. Demortier; B. Denby; M. Deninno; P. F. Derwent; T. Devlin; J. R. Dittmann; S. Donati; J. Done; T. Dorigo; A. Dunn; N. Eddy; K. Einsweiler; J. E. Elias; R. Ely; E. Engels; D. Errede; S. Errede; Q. Fan; I. Fiori; B. Flaugher; G. W. Foster; M. Franklin; M. Frautschi; J. Freeman; J. Friedman; T. A. Fuess; Y. Fukui; S. Funaki; G. Gagliardi; S. Galeotti; M. Gallinaro; M. Garcia-Sciveres; A. F. Garfinkel; C. Gay; S. Geer; D. W. Gerdes; P. Giannetti; N. Giokaris; P. Giromini; L. Gladney; D. Glenzinski; M. Gold; J. Gonzalez; A. Gordon; A. T. Goshaw; K. Goulianos; H. Grassmann; L. Groer; C. Grosso-Pilcher; G. Guillian; R. S. Guo; C. Haber; E. Hafen; S. R. Hahn; R. Handler; R. M. Hans; K. Hara; A. D. Hardman; B. Harral; R. M. Harris; S. A. Hauger; J. Hauser; C. Hawk; E. Hayashi; J. Heinrich; K. D. Hoffman; M. Hohlmann; C. Holck; R. Hollebeek; L. Holloway; A. Hölscher; S. Hong; G. Houk; P. Hu; B. T. Huffman; R. Hughes; J. Huston; J. Huth; J. Hylen; H. Ikeda; M. Incagli; J. Incandela; G. Introzzi; J. Iwai; Y. Iwata; H. Jensen; U. Joshi; R. W. Kadel; E. Kajfasz; H. Kambara; T. Kamon; T. Kaneko; K. Karr; H. Kasha; Y. Kato; T. A. Keaffaber; L. Keeble; K. Kelley; R. D. Kennedy; R. Kephart; P. Kesten; D. Kestenbaum; R. M. Keup; H. Keutelian; F. Keyvan; B. Kharadia; B. J. Kim; D. H. Kim; H. S. Kim; S. B. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. K. Kim; L. Kirsch; P. Koehn; K. Kondo; J. Konigsberg; S. Kopp; K. Kordas; A. Korytov; W. Koska; E. Kovacs; W. Kowald; M. Krasberg; J. Kroll; M. Kruse; T. Kuwabara; S. E. Kuhlmann; E. Kuns; A. T. Laasanen; N. Labanca; S. Lammel; J. I. Lamoureux; T. Lecompte; S. Leone; J. D. Lewis; P. Limon; M. Lindgren; T. M. Liss; N. Lockyer; O. Long; C. Loomis; M. Loreti; J. Lu; D. Lucchesi; P. Lukens; S. Lusin; J. Lys; K. Maeshima; A. Maghakian; P. Maksimovic; M. Mangano; J. Mansour; M. Mariotti; J. P. Marriner; A. Martin; J. A. Matthews; R. Mattingly; P. McIntyre; P. Melese; A. Menzione; E. Meschi; S. Metzler; C. Miao; T. Miao; G. Michail; R. Miller; H. Minato; S. Miscetti; M. Mishina; H. Mitsushio; T. Miyamoto; S. Miyashita; N. Moggi; Y. Morita; J. Mueller; A. Mukherjee; T. Muller; P. Murat; H. Nakada; I. Nakano; C. Nelson; D. Neuberger; C. Newman-Holmes; M. Ninomiya; L. Nodulman; S. H. Oh; K. E. Ohl; T. Ohmoto; T. Ohsugi; R. Oishi; M. Okabe; T. Okusawa; R. Oliveira; J. Olsen; C. Pagliarone; R. Paoletti; V. Papadimitriou; S. P. Pappas; A. Parri; J. Patrick; G. Pauletta; M. Paulini; A. Perazzo; L. Pescara; M. D. Peters; T. J. Phillips; G. Piacentino; M. Pillai; K. T. Pitts; R. Plunkett; L. Pondrom; J. Proudfoot; F. Ptohos; G. Punzi; K. Ragan; A. Ribon; F. Rimondi; L. Ristori; W. J. Robertson; T. Rodrigo; S. Rolli; J. Romano; L. Rosenson; R. Roser; W. K. Sakumoto; D. Saltzberg; A. Sansoni; L. Santi; H. Sato; V. Scarpine; P. Schlabach; E. E. Schmidt; M. P. Schmidt; A. Scribano; S. Segler; S. Seidel; Y. Seiya; G. Sganos; M. D. Shapiro; N. M. Shaw; Q. Shen; P. F. Shepard; M. Shimojima; M. Shochet; J. Siegrist; A. Sill; P. Sinervo; P. Singh; J. Skarha; K. Sliwa; F. D. Snider; T. Song; J. Spalding; T. Speer; P. Sphicas; F. Spinella; M. Spiropulu; L. Spiegel; L. Stanco; J. Steele; A. Stefanini; K. Strahl; J. Strait; R. Ströhmer; D. Stuart; G. Sullivan; A. Soumarokov; K. Sumorok; J. Suzuki; T. Takada; T. Takahashi; T. Takano; K. Takikawa; N. Tamura; F. Tartarelli; W. Taylor; P. K. Teng; Y. Teramoto; S. Tether; D. Theriot; T. L. Thomas; R. Thun; M. Timko; P. Tipton; A. Titov; S. Tkaczyk; D. Toback; K. Tollefson; A. Tollestrup; J. Tonnison; J. F. de Troconiz; S. Truitt; J. Tseng; N. Turini; T. Uchida; N. Uemura; F. Ukegawa; G. Unal; J. Valls; S. C. van den Brink; S. Vejcik

    1996-01-01

    We report a measurement of the ratios of the decay rates of the B+, B0, and B0s mesons into exclusive final states containing a J\\/psi meson. The final states were selected from 19.6 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. These data are interpreted to determine the b quark fragmentation fractions fu, fd, and fs. We

  2. HIV-1 Nef Responsiveness is Determined by Env Variable Regions Involved in Trimer Association and Correlates with Neutralization Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Usami, Yoshiko; Göttlinger, Heinrich

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY HIV-1 Nef and the unrelated MLV glycoGag similarly enhance the infectivity of HIV-1 virions. We now show that the effects of Nef and glycoGag are similarly determined by variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 that control Env trimer association and neutralization sensitivity. Whereas neutralization-sensitive X4-tropic Env proteins conferred high responsiveness to Nef and glycoGag, particles bearing neutralization-resistant R5-tropic Envs were considerably less affected. The profoundly different Nef/glycoGag-responsiveness of a neutralization-resistant and a neutralization-sensitive R5-tropic Env could be switched by exchanging their gp120 V1/V2 regions, which also switches their neutralization sensitivity. Within V1/V2, the same determinants governed Nef/glycoGag-responsiveness and neutralization sensitivity, indicating that these phenotypes are mechanistically linked. The V1/V2 and V3 regions, which form an apical trimer-association domain, together determined the Nef- and glycoGag-responsiveness of an X4-tropic Env. Our results suggest that Nef and glycoGag counteract the inactivation of Env spikes with relatively unstable apical trimer-association domains. PMID:24209751

  3. Pharmacological characterization of senktide-induced tail whips.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Rebecca E; Ballard, Theresa M; Algeyer, Brigitte; Pauly-Evers, Meike; Ozmen, Laurence; Spooren, Will

    2010-01-01

    The tachykinin NK(3) receptor shows promise as a novel target for antipsychotics, but knowledge of downstream activity following tachykinin NK(3) receptor activation is lacking. To determine the practical utility of senktide-induced tail whips in mice as a tool for determining and characterizing downstream activity following tachykinin NK(3) receptor activation, mice were injected with 0.05 nmol of senktide i.c.v. and the number of tail whip bouts was counted for 20 min. Strain differences were observed, with NMRI mice showing a stronger tail whip response than C57Bl/6J mice. Tachykinin NK(3) receptor specificity was confirmed by the absence of the senktide-induced tail whip response in tachykinin NK(3) receptor knockout mice. Effects of tachykinin receptor pharmacological agents were tested by pretreatment with tachykinin NK(3) receptor antagonists (SB222200, talnetant and osanetant), which attenuated senktide-induced tail whips, and the tachykinin NK(1) receptor antagonist MK869, which had no effect on senktide-induced tail whips. Pharmacological interactions with other neurotransmitter systems were determined by pretreatment with dopamine D(1), D(2), and D(3) receptor antagonists, atypical antipsychotics, serotonin 5HT(1a) receptor antagonists, serotonin 5HT(2a/c) receptor antagonists, benzodiazepine and putative anxiolytics, antidepressants, and an anticholinergic. Senktide-induced tail whips were attenuated by dopamine D(2) receptor antagonists, atypical antipsychotics, serotonin 5HT(2a/c) antagonists, and benzodiazepine anxiolytics, but unaffected by drugs from other classes. Thus, the senktide-induced tail whip response is easily quantifiable, specific to the tachykinin NK(3) receptor, and provides valuable information on the downstream pharmacology of tachykinin NK(3) receptor activation. PMID:19540857

  4. Catalytic Analysis of APOBEC3G Involving Real-Time NMR Spectroscopy Reveals Nucleic Acid Determinants for Deamination

    PubMed Central

    Kamba, Keisuke; Nagata, Takashi; Katahira, Masato

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a single-stranded DNA-specific cytidine deaminase that preferentially converts cytidine to uridine at the third position of triplet cytosine (CCC) hotspots. A3G restricts the infectivity of viruses, such as HIV-1, by targeting CCC hotspots scattered through minus DNA strands, reverse-transcribed from genomic RNA. Previously, we developed a real-time NMR method and elucidated the origin of the 3'?5' polarity of deamination of DNA by the C-terminal domain of A3G (CD2), which is a phenomenon by which a hotspot located closer to the 5'-end is deaminated more effectively than one less close to the 5'-end, through quantitative analysis involving nonspecific binding to and sliding along DNA. In the present study we applied the real-time NMR method to analyze the catalytic activity of CD2 toward DNA oligonucleotides containing a nucleotide analog at a single or multiple positions. Analyses revealed the importance of the sugar and base moieties throughout the consecutive 5 nucleotides, the CCC hotspot being positioned at the center. It was also shown that the sugar or base moieties of the nucleotides outside this 5 nucleotide recognition sequence are also relevant as to CD2's activity. Analyses involving DNA oligonucleotides having two CCC hotspots linked by a long sequence of either deoxyribonucleotides, ribonucleotides or abasic deoxyribonucleotides suggested that the phosphate backbone is required for CD2 to slide along the DNA strand and to exert the 3'?5' polarity. Examination of the effects of different salt concentrations on the 3'?5' polarity indicated that the higher the salt concentration, the less prominent the 3'?5' polarity. This is most likely the result of alleviation of sliding due to a decrease in the affinity of CD2 with the phosphate backbone at high salt concentrations. We also investigated the reactivity of substrates containing 5-methylcytidine (5mC) or 5-hydroxymethylcytidine, and found that A3G exhibited low activity toward 5mC. PMID:25875164

  5. Experimental study of main rotor tip geometry and tail rotor interactions in hover. Volume 1. Text and figures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, D. T.; Lombardi, J.

    1985-01-01

    A model scale hover test was conducted in the Sikorsky Aircraft Model rotor hover Facility to identify and quantify the impact of the tail rotor on the demonstrated advantages of advanced geometry tip configurations. The test was conducted using the Basic Model Test Rig and two scaled main rotor systems, one representing a 1/5.727 scale UH-60A BLACK HAWK and the others a 1/4.71 scale S-76. Eight alternate rotor tip configurations were tested, 3 on the BLACK HAWK rotor and 6 on the S-76 rotor. Four of these tips were then selected for testing in close proximity to an operating tail rotor (operating in both tractor and pusher modes) to determine if the performance advantages that could be obtained from the use of advanced geometry tips in a main rotor only environment would still exist in the more complex flow field involving a tail rotor. The test showed that overall the tail rotor effects on the advanced tip configurations tested are not substantially different from the effects on conventional tips.

  6. Sex Differences in the Right Tail of Cognitive Abilities: A 30 Year Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wai, Jonathan; Cacchio, Megan; Putallaz, Martha; Makel, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    One factor in the debate surrounding the underrepresentation of women in science technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) involves male-female mathematical ability differences in the extreme right tail (top 1% in ability). The present study provides male-female ability ratios from over 1.6 million 7th grade students in the right tail (top 5%…

  7. Cleavage by signal peptide peptidase is required for the degradation of selected tail-anchored proteins

    PubMed Central

    Boname, Jessica M.; Bloor, Stuart; Wandel, Michal P.; Nathan, James A.; Antrobus, Robin; Dingwell, Kevin S.; Thurston, Teresa L.; Smith, Duncan L.; Smith, James C.; Randow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The regulated turnover of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–resident membrane proteins requires their extraction from the membrane lipid bilayer and subsequent proteasome-mediated degradation. Cleavage within the transmembrane domain provides an attractive mechanism to facilitate protein dislocation but has never been shown for endogenous substrates. To determine whether intramembrane proteolysis, specifically cleavage by the intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease signal peptide peptidase (SPP), is involved in this pathway, we generated an SPP-specific somatic cell knockout. In a stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture–based proteomics screen, we identified HO-1 (heme oxygenase-1), the rate-limiting enzyme in the degradation of heme to biliverdin, as a novel SPP substrate. Intramembrane cleavage by catalytically active SPP provided the primary proteolytic step required for the extraction and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of HO-1, an ER-resident tail-anchored protein. SPP-mediated proteolysis was not limited to HO-1 but was required for the dislocation and degradation of additional tail-anchored ER-resident proteins. Our study identifies tail-anchored proteins as novel SPP substrates and a specific requirement for SPP-mediated intramembrane cleavage in protein turnover. PMID:24958774

  8. [Determination of blood alcohol level of people who are involved in a judicial event of medical importance (case report)].

    PubMed

    Alkan, N; Demircan, T

    2001-10-01

    In some cases, determination of blood alcohol level is very important. The alcohol level at the time of an event, can affect the court decision and may lead to aggravate the penalty or on the contrary an acquittal. In this article, a criminal action, in one of Turkish High Criminal Court is examined. The case was about the death of a drunk person who had fallen down from the window of his girl friend's house which is on the third floor of an apartment. This person's parent applied to public prosecutor saying that their child did not fall down but was murdered by his girl friend. During this trial, in the victim's autopsy, no alcohol detected in blood in contrast with his girl friend's testimony. Because of this contradiction, a reasonable doubt has emerged that she was the murderer in this suspicious death. However, in the further stages of trial, the reasons of no alcohol detection in the autopsy is investigated. In the basis of this case, the importance and techniques of alcohol detection in blood is discussed with literature. PMID:11705087

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of thousands of TCGA tumors to determine the involvement of epigenetic regulators in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Many cancer cells show distorted epigenetic landscapes. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project profiles thousands of tumors, allowing the discovery of somatic alterations in the epigenetic machinery and the identification of potential cancer drivers among members of epigenetic protein families. Methods We integrated mutation, expression, and copy number data from 5943 tumors from 13 cancer types to train a classification model that predicts the likelihood of being an oncogene (OG), tumor suppressor (TSG) or neutral gene (NG). We applied this predictor to epigenetic regulator genes (ERGs), and used differential expression and correlation network analysis to identify dysregulated ERGs along with co-expressed cancer genes. Furthermore, we quantified global proteomic changes by mass spectrometry after EZH2 inhibition. Results Mutation-based classifiers uncovered the OG-like profile of DNMT3A and TSG-like profiles for several ERGs. Differential gene expression and correlation network analyses revealed that EZH2 is the most significantly over-expressed ERG in cancer and is co-regulated with a cell cycle network. Proteomic analysis showed that EZH2 inhibition induced down-regulation of cell cycle regulators in lymphoma cells. Conclusions Using classical driver genes to train an OG/TSG predictor, we determined the most predictive features at the gene level. Our predictor uncovered one OG and several TSGs among ERGs. Expression analyses elucidated multiple dysregulated ERGs including EZH2 as member of a co-expressed cell cycle network. PMID:26110843

  10. Development and application of a hybrid method involving interpolation and ab initio calculations for the determination of transition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrow, Anthony; Bell, Alexis T.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2008-11-01

    Transition state search algorithms, such as the nudged elastic band can fail, if a good initial guess of the transition state structure cannot be provided. The growing string method (GSM) [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 7877 (2004)] eliminates the need for an initial guess of the transition state. While this method only requires knowledge of the reactant and product geometries, it is computationally intensive. To alleviate the bottlenecks in the GSM, several modifications were implemented: Cartesian coordinates were replaced by internal coordinates, the steepest descent method for minimization of orthogonal forces to locate the reaction path was replaced by the conjugate gradient method, and an interpolation scheme was used to estimate the energy and gradient, thereby reducing the calls to the quantum mechanical (QM) code. These modifications were tested to measure the reduction in computational time for four cases of increasing complexity: the Müller-Brown potential energy surface, alanine dipeptide isomerization, H abstraction in methanol oxidation, and C-H bond activation in oxidative carbonylation of toluene to p-toluic acid. These examples show that the modified GSM can achieve two- to threefold speedups (measured in terms of the reduction in actual QM gradients computed) over the original version of the method without compromising accuracy of the geometry and energy of the final transition state. Additional savings in computational effort can be achieved by carrying out the initial search for the minimum energy pathway (MEP) using a lower level of theory (e.g., HF/STO-3G) and then refining the MEP using density functional theory at the B3LYP level with larger basis sets (e.g., 6-31G?, LANL2DZ). Thus, a general strategy for determining transition state structures is to initiate the modified GSM using a low level of theory with minimal basis sets and then refining the calculation at a higher level of theory with larger basis sets.

  11. Determination of Ghrelin Structure in the Barfin Flounder (Verasper moseri) and Involvement of Ingested Fatty Acids in Ghrelin Acylation

    PubMed Central

    Kaiya, Hiroyuki; Andoh, Tadashi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Amiya, Noriko; Matsuda, Kouhei; Kangawa, Kenji; Miyazato, Mikiya

    2013-01-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone that is acylated with a fatty acid, usually n-octanoic acid, at the third amino acid (aa) residue (usually a serine or threonine), and this acylation is known to be essential for ghrelin activity not only in mammals but also in non-mammals, such as fish. However, the modification mechanisms of ghrelin modification in fish are not known. In this study, we elucidated the structure of ghrelin in a teleost, the barfin flounder (Verasper moseri), and determined whether ingested free fatty acids of various chain lengths participated in ghrelin acylation. Complementary DNA cloning revealed the barfin flounder prepro-ghrelin to be a 106-aa peptide and the mature ghrelin to be a 20-aa peptide (GSSFLSPSHKPPNKGKPPRA). However, purification of ghrelin peptides from stomach extracts demonstrated that the major form of the hormone was a 19-aa decanoylated peptide [GSS(C10:0)FLSPSHKPPNKGKPPR] missing the last alanine of the 20-aa peptide. Ingestion of feed enriched with n-heptanoic acid (C7), n-octanoic acid (C8), or n-non-anoic acid (C9) changed the modification status of the peptide: ingestion of C8 or C9 increased the amount of C8:0 or C9:0 19-aa ghrelin, respectively, but no C7:0 ghrelin was isolated after ingestion of C7. These results indicate that ingested free fatty acids are substrates for ghrelin acylation in the barfin flounder, but the types of free fatty acids utilized as substrates may be limited. PMID:24027560

  12. Note on late-time tails of spherical nonlinear waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, Piotr; Rostworowski, Andrzej [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Chmaj, Tadeusz [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2008-07-15

    We consider the longtime behavior of small amplitude solutions of the semilinear wave equation ()squarelg(){phi}={phi}{sup p} in odd d{>=}5 spatial dimensions. We show that for the quadratic nonlinearity (p=2) the tail has an anomalously small amplitude and fast decay. The extension of the results to more general nonlinearities involving first derivatives is also discussed.

  13. 18 Sharp-tailed Grouse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Johnsgard

    2008-01-01

    Tympanuchus phasianellus (Linnaeus) 1858 Other vernacular names: Brush grouse, pintail grouse, prairie grouse, prairie pheasant, sharptail, speckle-belly, spike-tail, spring-tail, whitebelly, white-breasted grouse. Range: Currently from north central Alaska, Yukon, northern Mackenzie, northern Manitoba, northern Ontario, and central Quebec south to eastern Washington, extreme eastern Oregon, Idaho, northeastern Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado, and in the Great Plains from eastern Colorado and

  14. Development of a biologically inspired hydrobot tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Danielle; Janneh, Alhaji; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, has a large ocean underneath a thick layer of ice. In order to determine whether life exists, it has been proposed that an underwater glider (hydrobot) capable of propulsion could be sent to explore the vast ocean. In this research, we considered various smart materials to create a propulsion device inspired by dolphin tails. Dolphins are highly efficient and excellent gliders, which makes them the ideal candidate for ocean exploration. In order to select the best dolphin species, we began by reviewing literature and then utilized the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to compare the different species. Lagenorhynchus obliquidens (Pacific White-Sided Dolphin) was found to be the best choice for creating a bioinspired hydrobot. We then conducted literature review of various smart materials and using this knowledge constructed a hydrobot tail prototype. This prototype demonstrates that smart materials can be fashioned into suitable actuators to control a tail fashioned after a dolphin.

  15. Mine tailings composition in a historic site: implications for ecological restoration.

    PubMed

    Courtney, R

    2013-02-01

    Ecological restoration, using tolerant plant species and nutrient additions, is a low-cost option to decrease environmental risks associated with mine tailings. An attempt was previously made to establish such a vegetation cover on an abandoned tailings facility in Southern Ireland. Historically, the tailings site has been prone to dusting and is a potential source of contamination to the surrounding environment. The site was examined to determine the success of the previous restoration plan used to revegetate the site and to determine its suitability for further restoration. Three distinct floristic areas were identified (grassland, poor grassland and bare area) based on herbage compositions and elemental analysis. Surface and subsurface samples were taken to characterise tailings from within these areas of the tailings site. The pH of bare surface tailings (pH, 2.7) was significantly more acidic (p < 0.5) than in other areas. Additionally, negligible net neutralising potential resulted in the tailings being hostile to plant growth. Total metal concentrations in tailings were high (c. 10,000 mg kg(-1) for Pb and up to 20,000 mg kg(-1) for Zn). DTPA-extractable Zn and Pb were 16 and 11 % of the total amount, respectively. Metal content in grasses growing on some areas of the tailings were elevated and demonstrated the inability of the tailings to support sustainable plant growth. Due to the inherently hostile characteristics of these areas, future restoration work will employ capping with a barrier layer. PMID:22699431

  16. Evidence for involvement of 3'-untranslated region in determining angiotensin II receptor coupling specificity to G-protein.

    PubMed Central

    Thekkumkara, Thomas J; Linas, Stuart L

    2003-01-01

    The mRNA 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of many genes has been identified as an important regulator of the mRNA transcript itself as well as the translated product. Previously, we demonstrated that Chinese-hamster ovary-K1 cells stably expressing angiotensin receptor subtypes (AT(1A)) with and without 3'-UTR differed in AT(1A) mRNA content and its coupling with intracellular signalling pathways. Moreover, RNA mobility-shift assay and UV cross-linking studies using the AT(1A) 3'-UTR probe identified a major mRNA-binding protein complex of 55 kDa in Chinese-hamster ovary-K1 cells. In the present study, we have determined the functional significance of the native AT(1A) receptor 3'-UTR in rat liver epithelial (WB) cell lines by co-expressing the AT(1A) 3'-UTR sequence 'decoy' to compete with the native receptor 3'-UTR for its mRNA-binding proteins. PCR analysis using specific primers for the AT(1A) receptor and [(125)I]angiotensin II (AngII)-binding studies demonstrated the expression of the native AT(1A) receptors in WB (B(max)=2.7 pmol/mg of protein, K(d)=0.56 nM). Northern-blot analysis showed a significant increase in native receptor mRNA expression in 3'-UTR decoy-expressing cells, confirming the role of 3'-UTR in mRNA destabilization. Compared with vehicle control, AngII induced DNA and protein synthesis in wild-type WB as measured by [(3)H]thymidine and [(3)H]leucine incorporation respectively. Activation of [(3)H]thymidine and [(3)H]leucine correlated with a significant increase in cell number (cellular hyperplasia). In these cells, AngII stimulated GTPase activity by AT(1) receptor coupling with G-protein alpha i. We also delineated that functional coupling of AT(1A) receptor with G-protein alpha i is an essential mechanism for AngII-mediated cellular hyperplasia in WB by specifically blocking G-protein alpha i activation. In contrast with wild-type cells, stable expression of the 3'-UTR 'decoy' produced AngII-stimulated protein synthesis and cellular hypertrophy as demonstrated by a significant increase in [(3)H]leucine incorporation and no increase in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation and cell number. Furthermore, [(125)I]AngII cross-linking and immunoprecipitation studies using specific G-protein alpha antibodies showed that in wild-type cells, the AT(1A) receptor coupled with G-protein alpha i, whereas in cells expressing the 3'-UTR 'decoy', the AT(1A) receptor coupled with G-protein alpha q. These findings indicate that the 3'-UTR-mediated changes in receptor function may be mediated in part by a switch from G-protein alpha i to G-protein alpha q coupling of the receptor. Our results suggest that the 3'-UTR-mediated post-transcriptional modification of the AT(1A) receptor is critical for regulating tissue-specific receptor functions. PMID:12431186

  17. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be attributed to iron-bearing sulfide (and oxide) minerals present in the mill tailings. However, the concentration of available Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions can be reduced by the precipitation of insoluble ferric hydroxides (Fe(OH ){sub 3}) by seawater due to its near neutral pH. In such case, the oxidation of a sulfide mineral is inhibited due to the absence of an oxidizing agent (viz. oxygen and/or Fe{sup 3+} ions). The experiments carried out in this study provided a better understanding of behavior of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in subaqueous conditions and may be useful for further investigation of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in other environments.

  18. Iron isotope fractionation by biogeochemical processes in mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Roger B; Schippers, Axel

    2008-02-15

    Iron isotope ratios were determined for the pore water, the 1 M HCl/1 M hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH)-extractable solid phase, and the total extractable solid phase from sulfidic mine tailings in Impoundment 1, Kristineberg mine, northern Sweden. Within the tailings, pyrite oxidation occurs in a distinct Fe-depleted oxidation zone, and the greatest number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the profile occur close to the boundary between oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Above the oxidation front in the oxidized tailings, a large iron isotope fractionation (-1.3 to -2.4% per hundred) is measured between the pore water and the HAH-extractable solid phase. This isotope fractionation is explained by aqueous Fe(II)-Fe(III) equilibrium, microbial Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe(III) oxyhydroxide precipitation. The data suggests that pyrite in the tailings is enriched in 56Fe relative to Fe-rich silicates in the same material, such that pyrite oxidation results in a decrease in the mean delta56Fe value for the bulk tailings in the oxidized zone: a change in isotope composition that is not attributable to isotope fractionation. Iron isotope analyses yield valuable information on iron cycling in mine wastes, and they have the potential for becoming a tool for the prediction and control of acid mine drainage. PMID:18351081

  19. Large Variance and Fat Tail of Damage by Natural Disaster

    E-print Network

    Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    In order to account for large variance and fat tail of damage by natural disaster, we study a simple model by combining distributions of disaster and population/property with their spatial correlation. We assume fat-tailed or power-law distributions for disaster and population/property exposed to the disaster, and a constant vulnerability for exposed population/property. Our model suggests that the fat tail property of damage can be determined either by that of disaster or by those of population/property depending on which tail is fatter. It is also found that the spatial correlations of population/property can enhance or reduce the variance of damage depending on how fat the tails of population/property are. In case of tornadoes in the United States, we show that the damage does have fat tail property. Our results support that the standard cost-benefit analysis would not be reliable for social investment in vulnerability reduction and disaster prevention.

  20. Habitat selection and movement patterns of cattle and white-tailed deer in a temperate savanna

    E-print Network

    Depew, Jarrod Jason

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the use of high resolution satellite imagery in research involving habitat selection, and movement patterns of white-tailed deer and cattle in a semi-arid landscape. Vegetation classification was developed based on Ikonos...

  1. Habitat selection and movement patterns of cattle and white-tailed deer in a temperate savanna 

    E-print Network

    Depew, Jarrod Jason

    2005-11-01

    This study investigated the use of high resolution satellite imagery in research involving habitat selection, and movement patterns of white-tailed deer and cattle in a semi-arid landscape. Vegetation classification was ...

  2. Characterization of Emergent Data Networks Among Long-Tail Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, Mostafa; Kumar, Praveen; Hedstrom, Margaret; Myers, James; Plale, Beth; Marini, Luigi; McDonald, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Data curation underpins data-driven scientific advancements. It manages the information flux across multiple users throughout data life cycle as well as increases data sustainability and reusability. The exponential growth in data production spanning across the Earth Science involving individual and small research groups, which is termed as log-tail data, increases the data-knowledge latency among related domains. It has become clear that an advanced framework-agnostic metadata and ontologies for long-tail data is required to increase their visibility to each other, and provide concise and meaningful descriptions that reveal their connectivity. Despite the advancement that has been achieved by various sophisticated data management models in different Earth Science disciplines, it is not always straightforward to derive relationships among long-tail data. Semantic data clustering algorithms and pre-defined logic rules that are oriented toward prediction of possible data relationships, is one method to address these challenges. Our work advances the connectivity of related long-tail data by introducing the design for an ontology-based knowledge management system. In this work, we present the system architecture, its components, and illustrate how it can be used to scrutinize the connectivity among datasets. To demonstrate the capabilities of this "data network" prototype, we implemented this approach within the Sustainable Environment Actionable Data (SEAD) environment, an open-source semantic content repository that provides a RDF database for long-tail data, and show how emergent relationships among datasets can be identified.

  3. Abaxial tail attachment of bovine spermatozoa and its effect on fertility

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Albert D.

    1989-01-01

    The prevalence of abaxial sperm tails, accessory tails and double tails, was determined from semen evaluation records of 600 western Canadian range bulls and 449 bulls in Canadian artificial insemination centers. Spermatozoa with abaxial tails were produced by 10.5% of bulls, however, only 0.48% produced sperm with greater than 50% abaxial tails, and 0.86% of the 1049 bulls produced sperm with accessory and double tails. Three experiments were done to determine the importance of abaxial sperm tails to fertility. In experiments 1 and 2, frozen semen with 88%, 50% and 0% abaxial tails was used to inseminate synchronized heifers, which were allowed to develop pregnancy, and superovulated heifers, which were slaughtered prior to embryo recovery seven days after breeding. In experiment 3, a bull which produced 100% abaxial sperm was used in a competitive mating situation with three control bulls in a herd of 118 cows. The combined results of these experiments indicate that spermatozoa with abaxial tail attachment fertilize ova at a normal rate and are not associated with any increase in embryonic death. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6. PMID:17423394

  4. Environmental Isotopes as a Useful Tool for Studies at Mixed Uranium Mill Tailings Sites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Helling

    2000-01-01

    Groundwaters in the area of a mixed landfill (domestic waste above uranium mill tailings) in Dresden (Saxony, Germany) were investigated for their isotope signatures to distinguish between different groundwater types. To determine between the two contamination sources (waste and uranium mill tailings) a multi parameter interpretation was done using both, the main hydrochemical parameters the radionuclides U, U, Ra and

  5. Hydrochemistry at the Falls City Uranium Mine Tailings Remedial Action Project, Karnes County, Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. J. Jackson; C. W. Kreitler

    1994-01-01

    Acidic tailings and tailings solutions, created by sulfuric acid processing of uranium ores, were disposed on the outcrop of the Whitsett Formation (Eocene). These solutions have recharged the sandstones of the Whitsett since the 1960s. Previous work found a large, complex, and unexplained pattern of contamination. The present study determined the extent and nature of contamination by (1) characterizing the

  6. PARTICLE TRAJECTORIES IN MODEL CURRENT SHEETS. 2. APPLICATIONS TO AURORAS USING A GEOMAGNETIC TAIL MODEL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. W. Speiser

    1967-01-01

    Individual particle trajectories are determined analytically and numerically in two possible configurations of electric and magnetic fields in the geomagnetic tail. The models are based on reconnection models incorporating a neutral point with associated neutral or current sheet and on the observed neutral sheet in the geomagnetic tail. Both models contain magnetic field lines oppositely directed on either side of

  7. Liquid Chromatographic Detection of Permethrin from Filter Paper Wipes of White-tailed Deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, small-scale method for the determination of the presence or absence of permethrin on the hair coat of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann), by high performance liquid chromatography was developed. White-tailed deer in South Texas and the northeastern U.S. are routinely tr...

  8. Intracellular Phospholipase A1 and Acyltransferase, Which Are Involved in Caenorhabditis elegans Stem Cell Divisions, Determine the sn-1 Fatty Acyl Chain of Phosphatidylinositol

    PubMed Central

    Imae, Rieko; Kimura, Masako; Kanamori, Takahiro; Tomioka, Naoko H.; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Mitani, Shohei

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI), an important constituent of membranes, contains stearic acid as the major fatty acid at the sn-1 position. This fatty acid is thought to be incorporated into PI through fatty acid remodeling by sequential deacylation and reacylation. However, the genes responsible for the reaction are unknown, and consequently, the physiological significance of the sn-1 fatty acid remains to be elucidated. Here, we identified acl-8, -9, and -10, which are closely related to each other, and ipla-1 as strong candidates for genes involved in fatty acid remodeling at the sn-1 position of PI. In both ipla-1 mutants and acl-8 acl-9 acl-10 triple mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans, the stearic acid content of PI is reduced, and asymmetric division of stem cell-like epithelial cells is defective. The defects in asymmetric division of these mutants are suppressed by a mutation of the same genes involved in intracellular retrograde transport, suggesting that ipla-1 and acl genes act in the same pathway. IPLA-1 and ACL-10 have phospholipase A1 and acyltransferase activity, respectively, both of which recognize the sn-1 position of PI as their substrate. We propose that the sn-1 fatty acid of PI is determined by ipla-1 and acl-8, -9, -10 and crucial for asymmetric divisions. PMID:20668164

  9. Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks A tail density approach in extremal

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    property µ(tB) = t- µ(B), B, bounded away from 0, where > 0 is known as the tail index. Haijun Li A tail approach in extremal dependence analysis for vine copulas Haijun Li (Joint work with Peiling Wu) Department of Mathematics Washington State University Munich, May 2011 Haijun Li A tail density approach in extremal

  10. Mark-Recapture of White-Tailed Deer Using DNA

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    11/10/2010 1 Mark-Recapture of White-Tailed Deer Using DNA Sampling from Scat Matthew J. Goode M and biases Lost Marks Equal Catchability Closed Population Scat Randomly Dispersed Goal Determine if genetic markers from scat can give reliable population estimates 543 2 1 O B J E C TI V E 1 - D E N S I TY

  11. Tracking the global tilt using tails of radio guide stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erez N. Ribak; Roberto Ragazzoni; Vadim A. Parfenov

    2000-01-01

    The problem of global tilt arises when the downgoing light from an artificial guide star traces in reverse the upgoing laser beam. The problem also exists if the upgoing beam is in the radio, since we still cannot determine its absolute position to the required accuracy. We propose a way to solve this problem by tracing the tails of the

  12. Estimating Tails of Probability Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Smith

    1987-01-01

    We study the asymptotic properties of estimators of the tail of a distribution based on the excesses over a threshold. A key idea is the use of Pickands' generalised Pareto distribution and its fitting, in most cases, by the method of maximum likelihood. The results cover all three limiting types of extreme value theory. We propose a new estimator for

  13. Black-Tailed Prairie Dog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Black-tailed prairie dogs are quite susceptible to sylvatic plague, but a new plague vaccine put in their food shows significant promise in the laboratory. The prairie dogs transmit the disease to endangered black-footed ferrets, who eat the prairie dogs and are also quite susceptible to the disease...

  14. Mercury-Redstone Tail Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this 1959 photograph, technicians prepare tail sections for Mercury-Redstone vehicles in Building 4706 at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone, the Mercury-Redstone launched the first two marned U.S. missions.

  15. The ionospheres and plasma tails of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Ip, W.-H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the current state of knowledge about cometary plasma (type I) tails and ionospheres. Observational statistics for type I tails are examined along with spectroscopic observations of plasma tails, identified ion species in such tails, and the morphology of cometary plasma tails and ionospheres. Evidence for a strong interaction between comets and the solar wind is evaluated on the basis of observations of plasma-tail orientations, large accelerations of tail structures, and correlations between disturbances in type I tails and solar-wind or geomagnetic disturbances. The use of comets as solar-wind probes is discussed, the nature of comet-solar-wind interactions is investigated, and ionization sources for cometary gases are considered. Hydrodynamic models of comet-solar-wind interaction are summarized, and the structure and ion chemistry of cometary ionospheres are studied. Observations suggesting that significant magnetic fields are associated with comets are briefly reviewed and interpreted.

  16. Oil sands fine tailings - a resource material for potentially marketable products

    SciTech Connect

    Majid, A.; Sparks, B.D.; Coleman, R.D. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Oil sands fine tailings is a complex mixture of components each having specific physical or chemical characteristics. Studies on the fundamental properties of fine tailings have resulted in the development of methods to fractionate the tailings into products with market potential. These include: bitumen, for production of synthetic crude oil or as an ancillary fuel; clean kaolin for fine paper coating; a gelling agent for drilling mud formulation; emulsifying solids, for surfactant replacement; and a mineral fraction, for heavy metal recovery. In this investigation we have attempted to evaluate the economic potential of fine tailings as a resource material by determining the amount and value of these products; the prime objective was to determine the economic feasibility of a tailings treatment scheme.

  17. [Leaching kinetics of josephinite tailings with sulfuric acid].

    PubMed

    Chen, An-An; Zhou, Shao-Qi; Huang, Peng-Fei

    2013-07-01

    Leaching is the most important step of josephinite tailing recycle technology. This step can separate the valuable metal Mg from Si and other impure metal. Effects of sulfuric acid on leaching Mg efficiency from josephinite tailings were investigated. To obtain the leaching behavior, a modified unreacted shrinking core model that based on the experimental data was used to determine the dissolution kinetic parameters. The model was significant and showed that the dissolution of Mg2+ in josephinite tailing was controlled by the produce layer diffusion, apparent activation reaction energy E = 34.04 kJ x mol(-1). The produce layers obstruct the forward reaction of the dissolution of Mg2+. PMID:24028005

  18. Curved tails in polymerization-based bacterial motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Grant, Martin

    2001-08-01

    The curved actin ``comet-tail'' of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a visually striking signature of actin polymerization-based motility. Similar actin tails are associated with Shigella flexneri, spotted-fever Rickettsiae, the Vaccinia virus, and vesicles and microspheres in related in vitro systems. We show that the torque required to produce the curvature in the tail can arise from randomly placed actin filaments pushing the bacterium or particle. We find that the curvature magnitude determines the number of actively pushing filaments, independent of viscosity and of the molecular details of force generation. The variation of the curvature with time can be used to infer the dynamics of actin filaments at the bacterial surface.

  19. Spatial Coordination of Kindlin-2 with Talin Head Domain in Interaction with Integrin ? Cytoplasmic Tails*

    PubMed Central

    Bledzka, Kamila; Liu, Jianmin; Xu, Zhen; Perera, H. Dhanuja; Yadav, Satya P.; Bialkowska, Katarzyna; Qin, Jun; Ma, Yan-Qing; Plow, Edward F.

    2012-01-01

    Both talin head domain and kindlin-2 interact with integrin ? cytoplasmic tails, and they function in concert to induce integrin activation. Binding of talin head domain to ? cytoplasmic tails has been characterized extensively, but information on the interaction of kindin-2 with this integrin segment is limited. In this study, we systematically examine the interactions of kindlin-2 with integrin ? tails. Kindlin-2 interacted well with ?1 and ?3 tails but poorly with the ?2 cytoplasmic tail. This binding selectivity was determined by the non-conserved residues, primarily the three amino acids at the extreme C terminus of the ?3 tail, and the sequence in ?2 was non-permissive. The region at the C termini of integrin ?1 and ?3 tails recognized by kindlin-2 was a binding core of 12 amino acids. Kindlin-2 and talin head do not interact with one another but can bind simultaneously to the integrin ?3 tail without enhancing or inhibiting the interaction of the other binding partner. Kindlin-2 itself failed to directly unclasp integrin ?/? tail complex, indicating that kindlin-2 must cooperate with talin to support the integrin activation mechanism. PMID:22648415

  20. Spatial coordination of kindlin-2 with talin head domain in interaction with integrin ? cytoplasmic tails.

    PubMed

    Bledzka, Kamila; Liu, Jianmin; Xu, Zhen; Perera, H Dhanuja; Yadav, Satya P; Bialkowska, Katarzyna; Qin, Jun; Ma, Yan-Qing; Plow, Edward F

    2012-07-13

    Both talin head domain and kindlin-2 interact with integrin ? cytoplasmic tails, and they function in concert to induce integrin activation. Binding of talin head domain to ? cytoplasmic tails has been characterized extensively, but information on the interaction of kindin-2 with this integrin segment is limited. In this study, we systematically examine the interactions of kindlin-2 with integrin ? tails. Kindlin-2 interacted well with ?(1) and ?(3) tails but poorly with the ?(2) cytoplasmic tail. This binding selectivity was determined by the non-conserved residues, primarily the three amino acids at the extreme C terminus of the ?(3) tail, and the sequence in ?(2) was non-permissive. The region at the C termini of integrin ?(1) and ?(3) tails recognized by kindlin-2 was a binding core of 12 amino acids. Kindlin-2 and talin head do not interact with one another but can bind simultaneously to the integrin ?(3) tail without enhancing or inhibiting the interaction of the other binding partner. Kindlin-2 itself failed to directly unclasp integrin ?/? tail complex, indicating that kindlin-2 must cooperate with talin to support the integrin activation mechanism. PMID:22648415

  1. Tail morphology in the Western Diamond-backed rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox.

    PubMed

    Savitzky, Alan H; Moon, Brad R

    2008-08-01

    The shaker muscles in the tails of rattlesnakes are used to shake the rattle at very high frequencies. These muscles are physiologically specialized for sustaining high-frequency contractions. The tail skeleton is modified to support the enlarged shaker muscles, and the muscles have major anatomical modifications when compared with the trunk muscles and with the tail muscles of colubrid snakes. The shaker muscles have been known for many years to consist of three large groups of muscles on each side of the tail. However, the identities of these muscles and their serial homologies with the trunk muscles were not previously known. In this study, we used dissection and magnetic resonance imaging of the tail in the Western Diamond-backed Rattlesnake, Crotalus atrox, to determine that the three largest muscles that shake the rattle are the M. longissimus dorsi, the M. iliocostalis, and the M. supracostalis lateralis. The architecture of these muscles differs from their serial homologs in the trunk. In addition, the rattlesnake tail also contains three small muscles. The M. semispinalis-spinalis occurs in the tail, where it is a thin, nonvibratory, postural muscle that extends laterally along the neural spines. An additional muscle, which derives from fusion of the M. interarticularis inferior and M. levator costae, shares segmental insertions with the M. longissimus dorsi and M. iliocostalis. Several small, deep ventral muscles probably represent the Mm. costovertebrocostalis, intercostalis series, and transversohypapophyseus. The architectural rearrangements in the tail skeleton and shaker muscles, compared with the trunk muscles, probably relate to their roles in stabilizing the muscular part of the tail and to shaking the rattle at the tip of the tail. Based on comparisons with the tail muscles of a colubrid snake described in the literature, the derived tail muscle anatomy in rattlesnakes evolved either in the pitvipers or within the rattlesnakes. J. Morphol., 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:18553368

  2. NMR solution conformations and interactions of integrin alphaLbeta2 cytoplasmic tails.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Anirban; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Mohanram, Harini; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2009-02-01

    The integrins are bi-directional signal transducers. Devoid of enzymatic activity, the integrin cytoplasmic tail serves as a hub for the recruitment of cytosolic proteins, and many of these are signaling molecules. The leukocyte-restricted integrin alphaLbeta2 is essential for the adhesion, migration, and proliferation of leukocytes. Here we report solution conformations and interactions of the alphaLbeta2 cytoplasmic tails by NMR analyses. The alphaL tail is characterized by three helical segments in the order of helix 1-3 that are connected by two loops with helix 3 having a number of nuclear Overhauser effect contacts with helix 1 and helix 2. The conformation of the beta2 tail is less defined with only a helical segment restricted at its N terminus. Acidic residues from the helix 2-loop-helix 3 motif of alphaL were found to be responsible for its binding to calcium ion. There were detectable interactions between alphaL and beta2 tails, involving helix 1 and helix 3 of the alphaL tail and the N-terminal helix of the beta2 tail. Talin head domain that contains the FERM domain showed binding affinity of Kd approximately 0.5 microm with the beta2 tail. The binding affinity of alphaL and beta2 tails is Kd approximately 2.63 microm. These data are in line with the activating property of talin head domain on alphaLbeta2 by which binding of talin head domain to beta2 tail disrupts the interface of the alphaL and beta2 tails that constrains alphaLbeta2 in a resting state. PMID:19073598

  3. ARTHROPATHY IN WHITE-TAILED DEER AND A MOOSE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. WOBESER; W. RUNGE

    A bstract: Degenerative lesions were found in the skeletal system of 20 of 128 white-tailed deer (Odocoi!eus virginianus) examined. Similar changes were found in an aged male moose (A ices alces). Arthropathy involving the stifle joint was present in 60% (15\\/25) of male deer 4 years of age or older, and in 16.7% (4\\/25) of females in the same age

  4. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  5. Application of STR markers in wildlife forensic casework involving Australian black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.).

    PubMed

    White, Nicole E; Dawson, Rick; Coghlan, Megan L; Tridico, Silvana R; Mawson, Peter R; Haile, James; Bunce, Michael

    2012-09-01

    Parrots and cockatoos are highly prized aviary birds and the demands for such species has fuelled their illegal trade and harvest from the wild. Here we report on three forensic case studies involving black-cockatoos (Calyptorhynchus spp.) endemic to Australia. These cases involve suspected poaching and illegal killing of endangered red- and white-tailed black-cockatoos. Through the prior development of 20 polymorphic microsatellite loci and population databases for white- and red-tailed black-cockatoos, the tools are available to conduct high-resolution paternity and individual identity testing. In one case, we matched a red-tailed black-cockatoo nestling to a tree hollow from which it was poached through the use of DNA from eggshell recovered from the nest. For the second case, we utilized our provenance population database (nest sites), and identified the kinship and geographic origin of a white-tailed black-cockatoo, which was illegally harvested from the wild. The third case determined the number individual white-tailed black-cockatoos allegedly shot at a fruit grower's orchard from body part remains. These genetic investigations highlight the significance and statistical confidence of DNA profiling and associated databases for endangered taxa, such as exotic birds. Our cockatoo population databases are the first of their kind in Australia, and demonstrate the efficacy of such approaches to identify such illegal activity. With a robust set of genetic markers and methodologies in place, we aim to broaden our population databases to include other cockatoo species of conservation concern. PMID:22101117

  6. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles involved in 2-aminoethanethiol functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes for sensitive determination of cefexime in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Eren, Tanju; Atar, Necip

    2014-10-15

    The molecular imprinting technique depends on the molecular recognition. It is a polymerization method around the target molecule. Hence, this technique creates specific cavities in the cross-linked polymeric matrices. In present study, a sensitive imprinted electrochemical biosensor based on Fe@Au nanoparticles (Fe@AuNPs) involved in 2-aminoethanethiol (2-AET) functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNs) modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was developed for determination of cefexime (CEF). The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) confirmed the formation of the developed surfaces. CEF imprinted film was constructed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for 9 cycles in the presence of 80 mM pyrrole in phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 20mM CEF. The developed electrochemical biosensor was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) guideline and found to be linear, sensitive, selective, precise and accurate. The linearity range and the detection limit were obtained as 1.0 × 10(-10)-1.0 × 10(-8)M and 2.2 × 10(-11)M, respectively. The developed CEF imprinted sensor was successfully applied to real samples such as human plasma. In addition, the stability and reproducibility of the prepared molecular imprinted electrode were investigated. The excellent long-term stability and reproducibility of the prepared CEF imprinted electrodes make them attractive in electrochemical sensors. PMID:24832202

  7. Tail probabilities for non-standard risk and queueing processes with subexponential jumps

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Hanspeter Schmidli; Volker Schmidt

    1999-01-01

    A well-known result on the distribution tail of the maximum of a random walk with\\u000aheavy-tailed increments is extended to more general stochastic processes. Results are\\u000agiven in different settings, involving, for example, stationary increments and\\u000aregeneration. Several examples and counterexamples illustrate that the conditions of\\u000athe theorems can easily be verified in practice and are in part necessary. The

  8. Heavy metal leaching from mine tailings as affected by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, D.; Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-12-01

    A column experiment was conducted to determine the impact of soil cover and plants on heavy metal leaching from mine tailings and heavy metal contaminated soil. Columns made of PVC were constructed with 30 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm of clean topsoil. Two grasses, tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), were grown in the columns. The columns were leached at a slow rate for 1 yr with a 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution under unsaturated conditions. The presence of both tall fescue and big bluestem increased Zn and Cd concentrations in the leachate. Lead concentrations in leachates were not affected by the presence of plants. Although plants generally reduced the total amount of water leached, total mass of Zn and Cd leached generally was not impacted by plants. Total mass of Pb leached was positively correlated with total leachate collected from each column. Covering the mine tailings with 60 cm of topsoil increased the mass of Zn and Cd leached relative to no topsoil. When the subsoil was absent, Zn and Cd leaching increased by as much as 20-fold, verifying the ability of soil to act as a sink for metals. Mine tailing remediation by establishing vegetation can reduce Pb movement but may enhance short-term Cd and Zn leaching. However, the changes were relatively small and do not outweigh the benefits of using vegetation in mine tailings reclamation.

  9. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000 Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers.

  10. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers. PMID:25528133

  11. Tail Biting in Pigs: Blood Serotonin and Fearfulness as Pieces of the Puzzle?

    PubMed Central

    Ursinus, Winanda W.; Van Reenen, Cornelis G.; Reimert, Inonge; Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Tail biting in pigs is a widespread problem in intensive pig farming. The tendency to develop this damaging behaviour has been suggested to relate to serotonergic functioning and personality characteristics of pigs. We investigated whether tail biting in pigs can be associated with blood serotonin and with their behavioural and physiological responses to novelty. Pigs (n?=?480) were born in conventional farrowing pens and after weaning at four weeks of age they were either housed barren (B) or in straw-enriched (E) pens. Individual pigs were exposed to a back test and novel environment test before weaning, and after weaning to a novel object (i.e. bucket) test in an unfamiliar arena. A Principal Component Analysis on behaviours during the tests and salivary cortisol (novel object test only) revealed five factors for both housing systems, labeled ‘Early life exploration’, ‘Near bucket’, ‘Cortisol’, ‘Vocalizations & standing alert’, and ‘Back test activity’. Blood samples were taken at 8, 9 and 22 weeks of age to determine blood platelet serotonin. In different phases of life, pigs were classified as tail biter/non-tail biter based on tail biting behaviour, and as victim/non-victim based on tail wounds. A combination of both classifications resulted in four pig types: biters, victims, biter/victims, and neutrals. Generally, only in phases of life during which pigs were classified as tail biters, they seemed to have lower blood platelet serotonin storage and higher blood platelet uptake velocities. Victims also seemed to have lower blood serotonin storage. Additionally, in B housing, tail biters seemed to consistently have lower scores of the factor ‘Near bucket’, possibly indicating a higher fearfulness in tail biters. Further research is needed to elucidate the nature of the relationship between peripheral 5-HT, fearfulness and tail biting, and to develop successful strategies and interventions to prevent and reduce tail biting. PMID:25188502

  12. Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Copulas

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    of Copulas Haijun Li Department of Mathematics Washington State University lih@math.wsu.edu University of Toronto, May 27 2014 Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas University of Toronto, May 27 2014 1 / 22 #12 is a multivariate regularly varying distribution (MRV) with intensity measure µ, i.e., lim t P(X tB) P(X1 > t) = µ(B

  13. Enhancing the safety of tailings management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Meggyes, T.; Niederleithinger, E.; Witt, K.J.; Csovari, M.; Kreft-Burman, K.; Engels, J.; McDonald, C.; Roehl, K.E. [BAM, Berlin (Germany). Federal Institute for Material Research & Testing

    2008-07-01

    Unsafe tailings management facilities (TMFs) have caused serious accidents in Europe threatening human health/life and the environment. While advanced design, construction and management procedures are available, their implementation requires greater emphasis. An integrated research project funded by the European Union was carried out between 2002 and 2005 with the overall goal of improving the safety of TMFs (Sustainable Improvement in Safety of Tailings Facilities - TAILSAFE, http://www.tailsafe.com/). The objective of TAILSAFE was to develop and apply methods of parameter evaluation and measurement for the assessment and improvement of the safety state of tailings facilities, with particular attention to the stability of tailings dams and slurries, the special risks inherent when such materials include toxic or hazardous wastes, and authorization and management procedures for tailings facilities. Aspects of tailings facilities design, water management and slurry transport, non-destructive and minimally intrusive testing methods, monitoring and the application of sensors, intervention and remediation options were considered in TAILSAFE. A risk reduction framework (the TAILSAFE Parameter Framework) was established to contribute to the avoidance of catastrophic accidents and hazards from tailings facilities. Tailings from the mining and primary processing of metals, minerals and coal were included within the scope of TAILSAFE. The project focused on the avoidance of hazards by developing procedures and methods for investigating and improving the stability of tailings dams and tailings bodies.

  14. Tail Risk Measures Heavy-Tail Asymptotics: Regular Variation Multivariate Risks Concluding Remarks Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    at confidence level p (TCE, Expected Shortfall, Tail VaR, Conditional VaR), defined by TCEp(X) := E(X | X > Va, Tail VaR, Conditional VaR), defined by TCEp(X) := E(X | X > VaRp(X)). TCE is also known as Average VaR: TCEp(X) = 1 1-p 1 p VaR(X)d. Haijun Li Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk Humboldt Univ

  15. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Monument Valley Site, Monument Valley, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevalated the Monument Valley site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Monument Valley, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposure of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 1.1 million tons of tailings at the Monument Valley site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II through IV). Cost estimates for the four options range from about $6,600,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $15,900,000 for disposal at a distance of about 15 mi. Three principal alternatives for reprocessing the Monument Valley tailings were examined: heap leaching; Treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovery is economically unattractive.

  16. Moisture content analysis of covered uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    The use of vegetation and rock covers to stabilize uranium mill tailings cover systems is being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A modeling study of moisture movement through the tailings and cover layers was initiated to determine the effect of the stabilizing techniques. The cover system was simulated under climatic conditions occurring at Grand Junction, Colorado. The cover consisted of a layer of wet clay/gravel mix followed by a capillary barrier of washed rock and a surface layer of fill soil. Vegetation and rock were used to stabilize the surface layer. The simulation yielded moisture content and moisture storage values for the tailings and cover system along with information about moisture losses due to evaporation, transpiration, and drainage. The study demonstrates that different surface stabilization treatments lead to different degrees of moisture retention in the covered tailings pile. The evapotranspiration from vegetation can result in a relatively stable moisture content. Rock covers, however, may cause drainage to occur because they reduce evaporation and lead to a subsequent increase in moisture content. It is important to consider these effects when designing a surface stabilization treatment. Drainage may contribute to a groundwater pollution problem. A surface treatment that allows the cover system to dry out can increase the risk of atmospheric contamination through elevated radon emission rates.

  17. Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos

    PubMed Central

    Jusufi, Ardian; Goldman, Daniel I.; Revzen, Shai; Full, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Geckos are nature's elite climbers. Their remarkable climbing feats have been attributed to specialized feet with hairy toes that uncurl and peel in milliseconds. Here, we report that the secret to the gecko's arboreal acrobatics includes an active tail. We examine the tail's role during rapid climbing, aerial descent, and gliding. We show that a gecko's tail functions as an emergency fifth leg to prevent falling during rapid climbing. A response initiated by slipping causes the tail tip to push against the vertical surface, thereby preventing pitch-back of the head and upper body. When pitch-back cannot be prevented, geckos avoid falling by placing their tail in a posture similar to a bicycle's kickstand. Should a gecko fall with its back to the ground, a swing of its tail induces the most rapid, zero-angular momentum air-righting response yet measured. Once righted to a sprawled gliding posture, circular tail movements control yaw and pitch as the gecko descends. Our results suggest that large, active tails can function as effective control appendages. These results have provided biological inspiration for the design of an active tail on a climbing robot, and we anticipate their use in small, unmanned gliding vehicles and multisegment spacecraft. PMID:18347344

  18. Parent Involvement 

    E-print Network

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2005-05-10

    To be successful, a 4-H program must have parent involvement. Although 4-H leaders and Extension agents may interest young people in becoming members, they need the parents' goodwill and support to keep them interested, enthusiastic and active. Here...

  19. A Dog Tail for Utility Robots Exploring Affective Properties of Tail Movement

    E-print Network

    A Dog Tail for Utility Robots Exploring Affective Properties of Tail Movement Ashish Singh, James E}@cs.umanitoba.ca Abstract. We present a dog-tail interface for utility robots, as a means of com- municating high-level robotic state through affect. This interface leverages peo- ple's general knowledge of dogs

  20. Reduced-bias estimator of the Conditional Tail Expectation of heavy-tailed distributions

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Reduced-bias estimator of the Conditional Tail Expectation of heavy-tailed distributions El hadji in the literature. In this paper, we focus on the estimation of the Conditional Tail Expectation (CTE). Its. In this framework, we propose a reduced-bias estimator of the CTE. We illustrate the efficiency of our approach

  1. Tail asymptotics for the supercritical GaltonWatson process in the heavy-tailed case 1

    E-print Network

    Korshunov, Dmitry

    Tail asymptotics for the supercritical Galton­Watson process in the heavy-tailed case 1 Denis and University of Munich Abstract As well known, for a supercritical Galton­Watson process Zn whose off- spring: supercritical Galton­Watson process, martingale limit, large deviations, heavy-tailed distribution

  2. Improved visualization of the pancreatic tail after maximum distension of the stomach

    SciTech Connect

    Stuck, K.J.; Kuhns, L.R.

    1981-08-01

    Fifty-two computed tomography examinations through the region of the pancreas were retrospectively analyzed to determine if marked stomach distension influenced the visualization of the pancreatic tail. Of the 29 patients who had marked stomach distension, 25 (86%) had displacement of small bowel loops away from the ventral surface of the pancreatic tail. With moderate or minimal stomach distension, there was bowel loop displacement in 37% and 0% of cases, respectively. Marked stomach distension appears to be an effective means of improving visualization of the pancreatic tail.

  3. Ruin probabilities under general investments and heavy-tailed claims

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henrik Hult; Filip Lindskog

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the asymptotic decay of finite time ruin probabilities is studied. An insurance company is considered that\\u000a faces heavy-tailed claims and makes investments in risky assets whose prices evolve according to quite general semimartingales.\\u000a In this setting, the ruin problem corresponds to determining hitting probabilities for the solution to a randomly perturbed\\u000a stochastic integral equation. A large deviation

  4. Recombination via tail states in polythiophene:fullerene solar cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Kirchartz; Bart E. Pieters; James Kirkpatrick; Uwe Rau; Jenny Nelson

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art models used for drift-diffusion simulations of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells based on band transport are not capable of reproducing the voltage dependence of dark current density and carrier concentration of such devices, as determined by current-voltage and charge-extraction measurements. Here, we show how to correctly reproduce this experimental data by including an exponential tail of localized states into

  5. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the Gunnison Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Gunnison, Colorado. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bachrach, A.; Hoopes, J.; Morycz, D. (Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Bone, M.; Cox, S.; Jones, D.; Lechel, D.; Meyer, C.; Nelson, M.; Peel, R.; Portillo, R.; Rogers, L.; Taber, B.; Zelle, P. (Weston (Roy F.), Inc., Washington, DC (USA)); Rice, G. (Sergent, Hauskins and Beckwith (USA))

    1984-12-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Gunnison uranium of mill tailings site located 0.5 miles south of Gunnison, Colorado. The site covers 56 acres and contains 35 acres of tailings, 2 of the original mill buildings and a water tower. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control of Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated (vicinity) properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for the remedial actions (40 CFR 192). Remedial actions must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the occurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Four alternatives have been addressed in this document. The first alternative is to consolidate the tailings and associated contaminated soils into a recontoured pile on the southern portion of the existing site. A radon barrier of silty clay would be constructed over the pile and various erosion control measures would be taken to assure the long-term integrity of the pile. Two other alternatives which involve moving the tailings to new locations are assessed in this document. These alternatives generally involve greater short-term impacts and are more costly but would result in the tailings being stabilized in a location farther from the city of Gunnison. The no action alternative is also assessed.

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Tail Regeneration in the Lizard Anolis carolinensis Reveals Activation of Conserved Vertebrate Developmental and Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, Elizabeth D.; Markov, Glenn J.; Eckalbar, Walter L.; George, Rajani M.; King, Jesse M.; Tokuyama, Minami A.; Geiger, Lauren A.; Emmert, Nataliya; Ammar, Michael J.; Allen, April N.; Siniard, Ashley L.; Corneveaux, Jason J.; Fisher, Rebecca E.; Wade, Juli; DeNardo, Dale F.; Rawls, J. Alan; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Kusumi, Kenro

    2014-01-01

    Lizards, which are amniote vertebrates like humans, are able to lose and regenerate a functional tail. Understanding the molecular basis of this process would advance regenerative approaches in amniotes, including humans. We have carried out the first transcriptomic analysis of tail regeneration in a lizard, the green anole Anolis carolinensis, which revealed 326 differentially expressed genes activating multiple developmental and repair mechanisms. Specifically, genes involved in wound response, hormonal regulation, musculoskeletal development, and the Wnt and MAPK/FGF pathways were differentially expressed along the regenerating tail axis. Furthermore, we identified 2 microRNA precursor families, 22 unclassified non-coding RNAs, and 3 novel protein-coding genes significantly enriched in the regenerating tail. However, high levels of progenitor/stem cell markers were not observed in any region of the regenerating tail. Furthermore, we observed multiple tissue-type specific clusters of proliferating cells along the regenerating tail, not localized to the tail tip. These findings predict a different mechanism of regeneration in the lizard than the blastema model described in the salamander and the zebrafish, which are anamniote vertebrates. Thus, lizard tail regrowth involves the activation of conserved developmental and wound response pathways, which are potential targets for regenerative medical therapies. PMID:25140675

  7. A qualitative study on student attitudes towards a controversial species, the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynne Fox-Parrish

    2006-01-01

    This case study determined the attitudes held by high school students toward a controversial, yet keystone, species of the Great Plains, the black-tailed prairie dog. Black-tailed prairie dogs have declined dramatically over the past century as a result of large scale poisoning programs, plague, shooting, and habitat loss. The eradication programs put forth were primarily the result of strongly held

  8. Switching axial progenitors from producing trunk to tail tissues in vertebrate embryos.

    PubMed

    Jurberg, Arnon Dias; Aires, Rita; Varela-Lasheras, Irma; Nóvoa, Ana; Mallo, Moisés

    2013-06-10

    The vertebrate body is made by progressive addition of new tissue from progenitors at the posterior embryonic end. Axial extension involves different mechanisms that produce internal organs in the trunk but not in the tail. We show that Gdf11 signaling is a major coordinator of the trunk-to-tail transition. Without Gdf11 signaling, the switch from trunk to tail is significantly delayed, and its premature activation brings the hindlimbs and cloaca next to the forelimbs, leaving extremely short trunks. Gdf11 activity includes activation of Isl1 to promote formation of the hindlimbs and cloaca-associated mesoderm as the most posterior derivatives of lateral mesoderm progenitors. Gdf11 also coordinates reallocation of bipotent neuromesodermal progenitors from the anterior primitive streak to the tail bud, in part by reducing the retinoic acid available to the progenitors. Our findings provide a perspective to understand the evolution of the vertebrate body plan. PMID:23763947

  9. Integrated Tail Buffet Loads on the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; James, Kevin D.

    1994-01-01

    The unsteady pressures acting on the vertical tails of a full-scale F/A-18 fighter aircraft were studied to gain a better understanding of tail-buffet loads that frequently occur on fighter aircraft operating at high angles-of-attack. Data for the study were acquired during two test entries in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel wherein the aircraft was tested at wind speeds up to 100 knots and at angles-of-attack from 20deg to 40deg. For the purposes of this paper, the primary difference between the two tests is that, during the first wind-tunnel entry, the pressure transducers were more sparsely spaced and covered less of the fin than during the second entry. In addition to a brief description of the spectral analysis methods used for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures and loads, an analysis of the effects of sensor density on estimating integrated loads is presented. It was found that the integrated loads determined from sparse sensor arrays are significantly higher than actual loads. However, a modest increase in the number of sensors can greatly reduce the error and a method for correcting load estimates from sparse sensor arrays is also suggested. The results for the time-averaged, power-spectral analysis are then presented for the tail-fin bending moments. Power spectra are presented for the aircraft at zero sideslip over an angle-of-attack range from 20deg to 40deg and for the aircraft at an angle-of-attack of 30deg over a sideslip range from -16deg to 16deg. Since the aircraft was equipped with a removable leading-edge extension (LEX) fence to reduce tail-buffet loads, the tail-fin bending moment loads are also presented for that configuration. The LEX fence is shown to significantly reduce bending moment loads over a broad range frequencies, for all the aircraft attitudes presented.

  10. Notochord-derived hedgehog is essential for tail regeneration in Xenopus tadpole

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Appendage regeneration in amphibians is regulated by the combinatorial actions of signaling molecules. The requirement of molecules secreted from specific tissues is reflected by the observation that the whole process of regeneration can be inhibited if a certain tissue is removed from the amputated stump. Interestingly, urodeles and anurans show different tissue dependencies during tail regeneration. The spinal cord is essential for tail regeneration in urodele but not in anuran larva, whereas the notochord but not the spinal cord is essential for tail regeneration in anuran tadpoles. Sonic hedgehog is one of the signaling molecules responsible for such phenomenon in axolotl, as hedgehog signaling is essential for overall tail regeneration and sonic hedgehog is exclusively expressed in the spinal cord. In order to know whether hedgehog signaling is involved in the molecular mechanism underlying the inconsistent tissue dependency for tail regeneration between anurans and urodeles, we investigated expression of hedgehog signal-related genes in the regenerating tail of Xenopus tadpole and examined the effect of the hedgehog signal inhibitor, cyclopamine, on the tail regeneration. Results In Xenopus, sonic hedgehog is expressed exclusively in the notochord but not in the spinal cord of the regenerate. Overall regeneration was severely impaired in cyclopamine-treated tadpoles. Notochord maturation in the regenerate, including cell alignment and vacuolation, and myofiber formation were inhibited. Proliferation of spinal cord cells in the neural ampulla and of mesenchymal cells was also impaired. Conclusion As in the axolotl, hedgehog signaling is required for multiple steps in tail regeneration in the Xenopus tadpole, although the location of the Shh source is quite different between the two species. This difference in Shh localization is the likely basis for the differing tissue requirement for tail regeneration between urodeles and anurans. PMID:24941877

  11. Plant and soil reactions to nickel ore processed tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, P.J.; Volk, V.V.; Gardner, E.H.

    1982-07-01

    Greenhouse and laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect that tailings, produced during the processing of nickeliferous laterite ores by a proposed U.S. Bureau of Mines Process, would have on plant growth and soil properties. The tailings contained soluble salts (7.6 mmhos/cm), NH/sub 4/-N (877 ..mu..g/g), Ni (0.28%), Mn (82 ..mu..g/g DTPA-extractable), Cr (0.44%), P (2 and 6 ..mu..g/g acid F- and NaHCO/sub 3/-extractable, respectively), and Ca and Mg (1.0 and 20.7 meq/100 g NH/sub 4/Ac-extractable, respectively). Water leaching decreased the NH/sub 4/-N concentration to 53 ..mu..g/g and the EC to 0.4 mmhos/cm by removal of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MgSO/sub 4/ salts. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was grown on Eightlar clay soil (skeletal, serpentinitic, mesic Typic Xerochrept) amended with 0, 223, 446, and 669 g tailings/kg soil and pure, unleached tailings for 32 weeks in the greenhouse. Seedling establishment of plants grown on soil amended at the highest tailings rate and the pure tailings was initially slow, but plants grown on soil amended at lower rates established readily and grew well. Plant P was <0.24%, while plant Ca concentrations were <0.45% throughout the growth period even though Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 2/)/sub 2/ and gypsum had been added. Ammonium acetate-extractable Ca at the end of the growth period was <5.0 meq/100 g on all amended soils.The Mn, Ni, and Cr concentrations of plants grown on treated soils were within normal ranges, although soil-analysis values were higher than commonly found. It is recommended that the tailings be washed to reduce NH/sub 4/-N and soluble salts prior to revegetation, and that native soil be added to the surface to reduce crusting.

  12. Arsenic mobility in soils impacted by tailings at Zimapán, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora Armienta, M.; Resendiz, Isabel; Múgica, Violeta; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Ceniceros, Nora

    2014-05-01

    The Zimapán mining zone, in Central México is one of the worldwide sites known for As contamination. For more than 20 years and until recently, As-rich groundwater, mainly due to mineralization in a limestone aquifer, was an important source of As exposure to the inhabitants. In addition, decades of ore processing have produced hazardous wastes (tailings), many of them settled in the town outskirts. Although mineralogical and chemical differences exist among the various deposits; every one has high As contents (up to several thousands mg/kg) and other toxic elements that may be released to the nearby soils. To assess As mobility in soils impacted by tailings, total and sequential fractionation determinations were performed in 120 superficial and 40 cm depth samples collected at various distances near three of the impoundments. Higher total As concentrations were measured in the dry (up to 51,534 mg/kg) with respect to the rainy season (up to 23,570 mg/kg) indicating the occurrence of As wash off by rain. Although concentrations were lower in the deep regarding the superficial samples at most sites, As contents reached several thousands mg/kg at 40 cm depth indicating also its vertical transport that may reach the shallow aquifer. Sequential extractions showed differences between soils impacted by highly oxidized (red) tailings and low oxidized (gray) deposits. Most of the As occurs in the Fe-Mn oxides fraction (up to 92%) followed by the organic matter and sulfides fraction (up to 52 %) in soils close to red tailings, while organic matter and sulfide fraction contain most of the As (up to 95%) in soil samples close to low-oxidized deposits. Arsenic proportion in the residual fraction increased with distance from oxidized tailings. Low pH values (from 2.0 to 2.5) in superficial soils revealed the influence of acid mine drainage at distances up to 40 m from the red deposit. In contrast, the lowest pH was 7.1 in soils impacted by low-oxidized deposits, reflecting the limestone environment. Arsenic airborne transport was evidenced by the presence of a total As concentration of 30,780 mg/kg in soils collected at 120 m in front of the tailings crossing a ravine. Although sequential extraction showed that most of the As is present in relatively low-mobility fractions, total As concentrations indicate that tailings impoundments constitute another source of environmental As exposure.

  13. Effects of Tail on Spinning Aircraft Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takafumi Yamada; Takao Horichi; Yoshiaki Nakamura

    2005-01-01

    The experiment on aircraft spin phenomena was conducted at the low speed wind tunnel of Nagoya University with its exit test section inclined vertically. The model used in this experiment consists of three parts: a main wing, a fuselage, and a tail. Due to the stability effect of the tail, rotation of the model is decreased at low angles of

  14. Selective Tail Call Elimination Yasuhiko Minamide

    E-print Network

    Minamide, Yasuhiko

    a trampoline. To reduce the overhead of trampolining while preserving stack space asymptotically we propose of successive tail calls generated by the execution of an expression, and trampolines are introduced only when, proper tail calls can be implemented with a technique called a trampoline. However, the trampoline

  15. Tail and pelvis pathologies of ankylosaurian dinosaurs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria M. Arbour; Philip J. Currie

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosaurid dinosaurs had modified distal caudal vertebrae (the handle) and large terminal caudal osteoderms (the knob), which together form the tail club. The tail club may have been used as a weapon. Ankylosaur pelvic and caudal elements were surveyed for evidence of healing wounds that may indicate traumatic injury, and which could support clubbing behaviour. No pathologies were found in

  16. Heavy Tails 2 dim Mult Reg Var

    E-print Network

    Resnick, Sidney

    Boston University data; 4161 file sizes (F) and download times (L) noted and transmission rates (R. · The components are each univariate heavy tailed. Big issue: How to model the dependence? · The tail indices ('s asymptotic the- ory). ­ Parametric will fail goodness of fit with large data sets. ­ Semi

  17. VARIATION IN THE SHARP-TAILED SPARROWS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEVE N. G. HOWELL; DAVID A. SIBLEY

    1998-01-01

    In 1995, following Greenlaw (1993), the AOU split the Sharp-tailed Sparrow into two species, the Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) Sharp-tailed Sparrows. The former breeds in coastal saltmarshes of the central East Coast, the latter in the northern interior, around the southern coast of Hudson Bay, and along the northeastern seaboard. Both species winter along the southern Atlantic

  18. Evaluation of the rat tail model for estimating dermal absorption of lindane

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard P. Moody; Michael Grayhurst; Len Ritter

    1989-01-01

    Dermal absorption of the insecticide lindane was determined following topical application of ring C?labeled lindane to the tail of Sprague?Dawley rats. The tail was tested as a practical alternative to the rat mid?dorsal (back) region, and the data obtained were compared to those with rat back and with those of rhesus monkeys in our previous reports. There was no significant

  19. HABITAT SELECTION BY THE AMERICAN KESTREL (Falco sparverious) AND RED-TAILED HAWK (Buteojamaicensis) WINTERING IN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Habitat selection by the American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) and Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) in Madison County, Kentucky, was determined for the winter of 1980-81. Results showed that there was significant non-random use of 6 habitat types (Kestrels: X 2 = 629.5, P  0.05, d.f. = 5; Red-tailed Hawks: X 2 = 124.8, P  0.05, d.f. = 5) with

  20. Injurious tail biting in pigs: how can it be controlled in existing systems without tail docking?

    PubMed

    D'Eath, R B; Arnott, G; Turner, S P; Jensen, T; Lahrmann, H P; Busch, M E; Niemi, J K; Lawrence, A B; Sandøe, P

    2014-09-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some 'alternative' forms of pig production and certain countries do not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable substrates and feeder space affect damaging tail biting. Only epidemiological evidence was available for effects of temperature and season, and the effect of stocking density was unclear. Studies suggest that group size has little effect, and the effects of nutrition, disease and breed require further investigation. The review identifies a number of knowledge gaps and promising avenues for future research into prevention and mitigation. We illustrate the diversity of hypotheses concerning how different proposed risk factors might increase tail biting through their effect on each other or on the proposed underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible, manipulable natural materials can be of considerable benefit. Further comparative research is needed into materials, such as ropes, which are compatible with slatted floors. Also, materials which double as fuel for anaerobic digesters could be utilised. As well as optimising housing and management to reduce risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked under, could in future be automatically detected using precision livestock farming methods enabling earlier reaction and prevention of tail damage. However, there is a lack of scientific studies on how best to respond to outbreaks: the effectiveness of, for example, removing biters and/or bitten pigs, increasing enrichment, or applying substances to tails should be investigated. Finally, some breeding companies are exploring options for reducing the genetic propensity to tail bite. If these various approaches to reduce tail biting are implemented we propose that the need for tail docking will be reduced. PMID:25130712

  1. The H4 Tail Domain Participates in Intra- and Internucleosome Interactions with Protein and DNA during Folding and Oligomerization of Nucleosome Arrays

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pu-Yeh Kan; Tamara L. Caterino; Jeffrey J. Hayes

    2009-01-01

    The condensation of nucleosome arrays into higher-order secondary and tertiary chromatin structures likely involves long-range internucleosomal interactions mediated by the core histone tail domains. We have char- acterized interarray interactions mediated by the H4 tail domain, known to play a predominant role in the formation of such structures. We find that the N-terminal end of the H4 tail mediates interarray

  2. The Dust Tail of Asteroid (3200) Phaethon

    E-print Network

    Jewitt, David; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears >=350" (2.5x10^8 m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius ~1 micrometer and a combined mass ~3x10^5 kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures (~1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

  3. Assessment of computational prediction of tail buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Assessments of the viability of computational methods and the computer resource requirements for the prediction of tail buffeting are made. Issues involved in the use of Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in modeling vortex-dominated and buffet flows are discussed and the requirement for sufficient grid density to allow accurate, converged calculations is stressed. Areas in need of basic fluid dynamics research are highlighted: vorticity convection, vortex breakdown, dynamic turbulence modeling for free shear layers, unsteady flow separation for moderately swept, rounded leading-edge wings, vortex flows about wings at high subsonic speeds. An estimate of the computer run time for a buffeting response calculation for a full span F-15 aircraft indicates that an improvement in computer and/or algorithm efficiency of three orders of magnitude is needed to enable routine use of such methods. Attention is also drawn to significant uncertainties in the estimates, in particular with regard to nonlinearities contained within the modeling and the question of the repeatability or randomness of buffeting response.

  4. The cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin interacts with members of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) family of proteins: cell activation-dependent binding of Moesin but not Ezrin.

    PubMed

    Ivetic, Aleksandar; Deka, Jürgen; Ridley, Anne; Ager, Ann

    2002-01-18

    L-selectin regulates the recruitment of naive lymphocytes from the bloodstream to secondary lymphoid organs, mediating their initial capture and subsequent rolling along high endothelial cell surface-expressed ligands in peripheral lymph nodes. In vivo, distribution of L-selectin and cell surface levels determine the tethering efficiency and rolling velocity of leukocytes, respectively. Treatment of naive lymphocytes with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) induces rapid ectodomain proteolytic down-regulation (shedding) of surface L-selectin via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. In an attempt to isolate proteins that are involved in regulating L-selectin expression, an affinity column was constructed using the 17-amino acid cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin. Affinity purification of extracts from lymphocytes, pre-treated with or without PMA, allowed identification of proteins that interact with the affinity column under one condition but not the other. By using this approach, members of the Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin family of proteins were found to interact specifically with the cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin. Moesin from PMA-stimulated lymphocytes, but not from unstimulated lymphocytes, bound to L-selectin tail. In contrast, ezrin from unstimulated or PMA-stimulated lymphocytes associated with L-selectin tail with equal affinity. Furthermore, the PKC inhibitor Ro 31-8220 significantly reduced the interaction of moesin, but not ezrin, with L-selectin. Alanine mutations of membrane-proximal basic amino acid residues in the cytoplasmic domain of L-selectin identified arginine 357 as a critical residue for both ezrin and moesin interaction. Finally, BIAcore affinity analysis confirmed that N-terminal moesin interacts specifically with L-selectin cytoplasmic tail, with relatively high affinity (K(d) approximately 40 nm). Based on these findings, although moesin and ezrin bind to a similar region of the cytoplasmic tail of L-selectin, moesin binding is dependent on PKC activation, which suggests that ezrin and moesin are regulated differently in lymphocytes. PMID:11706008

  5. Synthesis of a single-tailed cationic lipid and investigation of its transfection.

    PubMed

    Tang, F; Hughes, J A

    1999-12-01

    Single-tailed cationic lipids were originally reported to have low transfection efficiency and high toxicity in plasmid delivery. We hypothesized that particular single-tailed cationic lipids may also function in plasmid transfection. To test this hypothesis, we synthesized a new cationic lipid-oleoyl ornithinate (OLON). To decrease cytotoxicity, we then introduced a potential biodegradable ester bond in the tail of lipid yielding 6-lauroxyhexyl ornithinate (LHON). The data demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of LHON was lower than that of 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or OLON. To investigate the transfection activity of the new lipids and determine the cellular uptake of DNA/liposome complexes, we compared the transfection of liposomes produced from double-tailed 1',2'-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3'-succinyl-1, 6-hexanediol ornithine conjugate (DOGSHDO) with an ornithine headgroup, single-tailed OLON with an ornithine head group, double-tailed DOTAP with quaternary amine group, and single-tailed cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with a quaternary amine group. At the optimal ratios as defined in transfection experiments, OLON/DOPE had more than 10 times the transgene expression than other liposomes even though the DNA uptake was not necessarily greater. In the experiments comparing the release of DNA from DNA/liposome complexes by anionic substances, a greater fraction of DNA was released from DNA/OLON/DOPE complexes than that from DNA/DOTAP/DOPE complexes. PMID:10528072

  6. Radon attenuation handbook for uranium mill tailings cover design

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    This handbook has been prepared to facilitate the design of earthen covers to control radon emission from uranium mill tailings. Radon emissions from bare and covered uranium mill tailings can be estimated from equations based on diffusion theory. Basic equations are presented for calculating surface radon fluxes from covered tailings, or alternately, the cover thicknesses required to satisfy a given radon flux criterion. Also described is a computer code, RAECOM, for calculating cover thicknesses and surface fluxes. Methods are also described for measuring diffusion coefficients for radon, or for estimating them from empirical correlations. Since long-term soil moisture content is a critical parameter in determining the value of the diffusion coefficient, methods are given for estimating the long-term moisture contents of soils. The effects of cover defects or advection are also discussed and guidelines are given for determining if they are significant. For most practical cases, advection and cover defect effects on radon flux can be neglected. Several examples are given to demonstrate cover design calculations, and an extensive list of references is included. 63 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

  7. Prediction of Power System Balancing Requirement and Tail Event

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; Brothers, Alan J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Pease, John

    2010-04-30

    This paper presents a methodology for the prediction of power system balancing requirement and the probability of tail event (large imbalance between generation and load). Maintaining sufficient balancing reserves to match the difference between hourly generation schedule and real-time variable load and intermittent resources, becomes more and more challenging with the increasing penetration of intermittent energy sources. The presented methodology uses a yearly distribution and an hourly distribution of balancing requirement and tail events to provide a high level look at the issue and warn system operators of those hours when problems are most likely to occur. For real-time prediction, a Bayes Net model is constructed to model the statistical relationships between system imbalance and forecast errors, generation schedule control errors and other influential factors. The methodology will be able to provide reference information to system operators in determining the sufficiency of system balancing reserve and taking appropriate control actions.

  8. Histochemical, Biochemical and Cell Biological aspects of tail regeneration in lizard, an amniote model for studies on tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Alibardi, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    The present review summarizes biochemical, histochemical and immunocytochemical aspects of the process of tissue regeneration in lizards, non-mammalian amniotes with high regenerative power. The amputated tail initially mobilizes the glycogen and lipid reserves during wound healing. In the following stage of formation of the regenerative blastema tissue remodeling produces a typical embryonic tissue, initially increasing the amount of water and glycosaminoglycans such as jaluronate, which are later replaced by sulfated glycosaminoglycans and collagen during tail elongation. In blastematic and early differentiating stages the initial anaerobic metabolism utilizes glycolysis and hexose monophosphate pathways to sustain high RNA production and lipid catabolism for energy production. This stage, after formation of blood vessels, is replaced by the energy-efficient aerobic metabolism based on the Krebs' cycle that is needed for the differentiation and growth of the new tissues of the regenerating tail. Specific proteins of the cytoskeleton, extracellular matrix, cell junctions, transcriptional and growth factors are actively produced in the embryonic environment of early stages of regeneration and allow for cell movement, signaling and differentiation. During wound healing, the production of anti-microbial peptides in granulocytes is likely involved in limiting inflammation and stimulates tissue regeneration in the tail while the lasting inflammatory reaction of the limb and spinal cord limits their potential of regeneration. Activated hemopoiesis, circulating blood, endocrine glands, liver, kidney and spleen supply the regenerating tissues with metabolites and hormones but also with phagocytes and immuno-competent cells that can inhibit tissue regeneration after repetitive amputations that elicit chronic inflammation. The latter aspect shows how successful tissue regeneration in an amniote can be turned into scarring by the alteration of the initial microenvironment and inflammatory course, an inspiring model for understanding failure of tissue regeneration in higher vertebrates and humans. The participation of 5-Bromo-deoxyuridine (5BrdU) long retention cells, indicated as putative stem cells, for the following regeneration is analyzed and it shows that different tissue sites of the original tail contain putative stem cells that are likely activated from the wounding signal. In particular, the permanence of stem cells in the central canal of the spinal cord can explain the limited but important neurogenesis present in the caudal but also in the lumbar-thoracic spinal cord. In the latter, the limited number of glial and neurons regenerated is however sufficient to recover some limited hind limb movement after injury or spinal transection. Finally, the presence of stem cells in the spinal cord, in the regenerative blastema and skin allow to use these organs as a source of cells for studies on gene activation during cell differentiation in the new spinal cord, tail and in the epidermis. The above information form the basic knowledge for the future molecular studies on the specific gene activation capable to determine tail regeneration in lizards, and more in general genes involved in the reactivation of regeneration process in amniotes and humans. PMID:24387878

  9. Thermal stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.R.; Williams, J.M.; Cokal, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The sintering of tailings at high temperatures (1200/sup 0/C) has shown promise as a conditioning approach that greatly reduces the /sup 222/Rn emanation of uranium mill tailings. The structure of thermally stabilized tailings has been appreciably altered producing a material that will have minimal management requirements and will be applicable to on-site processing and disposal. The mineralogy of untreated tailings is presented to define the structure of the original materials. Quartz predominates in most tailings samples; however, appreciable quantities of gypsum, clay, illite, or albites are found in some tailings. Samples from the Durango and Shiprock sites have plagioclase-type aluminosilicates and non-aluminum silicates as major components. The iron-rich vanadium tailings from the Salt Lake City site contain appreciable quantities of ..cap alpha..-hematite and chloroapatite. The reduction in radon emanation power and changes in mineralogy as a function of sintering temperature (500 to 1200(NiAsS) are considered possible species for consideraed. The calculated activity data of the various carbonate, sulfate and hydroxide species in the Li/sup +/Na/sup +/K/sup +//CO/sub 3/ = SO/sub 4/ = OH/sup -/ system have been combined f liquidus surfaces, and estimated error limits are given for each system. A comng payback period, but as the initial cost of the SAHPS is reduced and fuel prices increase, the payback period of a SAHPS will be shorter and could be competitive with other conventional heating/cooling systems.

  10. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Maybell Site, Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Maybell site in order to revise the October 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Maybell, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.6 million dry tons of tailings at the Maybell site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The two alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I), to disposal of the tailings in a nearby open pit mine and decontamination of the tailings site (Option II). Cost estimates for the two options are about $11,700,000 for stabilization in-place and about $22,700,000 for disposal within a distance of 2 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Maybell tailings were examined: (a) heap leaching; (b) treatment at an existing mill; and (c) reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $125 and $165/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ by heap leach and conventional plant processes, respectively. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present.

  11. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Mexican Hat Site, Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Mexican Hat site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Mexican Hat, Utah. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 2.2 million tons of tailings at the Mexican Hat site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The four alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment range from millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material to removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site. Cost estimates for the four options range from about $15,200,000 for stabilization in place, to about $45,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 16 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Mexican Hat tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be about $115/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by heap leach or conventional plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Reprocessing the Mexican Hat tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive under present conditions.

  12. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Slick Rock sites, Slick Rock, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah, Inc., has reevaluated the Slick Rock sites in order to revise the October 1977 engineering radioactive uranium mill tailings at Slick Rock, Colorado. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 387,000 tons of tailings at the Slick Rock sites constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The five alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material, consolidation of the piles, and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings sites. Cost estimates for the five options range from about $6,800,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $11,000,000 for disposal at a distance of about 6.5 mi. Three principal alternatives for the reprocessing of the Slick Rock tailings were examined: heap leaching; treatment at an existing mill; and reprocessing at a new conventional mill constructed for tailings reprocessing. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $800/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ whether by conventional or heap leach plant processes. The spot market price for uranium was $25/lb early in 1981. Therefore, reprocessing the tailings for uranium recovery is not economically attractive at present, nor for the foreseeable future.

  13. Uptake of trace elements and radionuclides from uranium mill tailings by four-wing saltbush (Atriplex canescens) and alkali sacaton (Sporobolus airoides). [Radium 226; Uranium; Molybdenum; Selenium; Vanadium; Astatine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. R. Dreesen; M. L. Marple

    1979-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was performed to determine the uptake of trace elements and radionuclides from uranium mill tailings by native plant species. Four-wing saltbush and alkali sacaton were grown in alkaline tailings covered with soil and in soil alone as controls. The tailings material was highly enriched in Ra-226, Mo, U, Se, V, and As compared with three local soils.

  14. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Green River Site, Green River, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1981-08-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Green River site in order to revise the December 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Green River, Utah. This evaluation has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative remedial actions. Radon gas released from the 123,000 tons of tailings at the Green River site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  15. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings, Tuba City site, Tuba City, Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Ford, Bacon and Davis Utah Inc. has reevaluated the Tuba City site in order to revise the March 1977 engineering assessment of the problems resulting from the existence of radioactive uranium mill tailings at Tuba City, Arizona. This engineering assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas released from the 0.8 million tons of tailings at the Tuba City site constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors.

  16. An Alternative Phosphorylation Switch in Integrin??2 (CD18) Tail for Dok1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sebanti; Chit, Joel Chia-Yeong; Feng, Chen; Bhunia, Anirban; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are involved in cell migration and adhesion. A large number of proteins interact with the cytoplasmic tails of integrins. Dok1 is a negative regulator of integrin activation and it binds to the phosphorylated membrane proximal NxxY motif in a number of integrin ? tails. The ? tail of the ?2 integrins contains a non-phosphorylatable NxxF motif. Hence it is unclear how Dok1 associates with the ?2 integrins. We showed in this study using NMR and cell based analyses that residues Ser745 and Ser756 in the integrin ?2 tail, which are adjacent to the NxxF motif, are required for Dok1 interaction. NMR analyses detected significant chemical shift changes and higher affinity interactions between Dok1 phospho-tyrosine binding (PTB) domain and integrin ?2 tail peptide containing pSer756 compared to pSer745. The phosphorylated ?2 peptide occupies the canonical ligand binding pocket of Dok1 based on the docked structure of the ?2 tail-Dok1 PTB complex. Taken together, our data suggest an alternate phosphorylation switch in ?2 integrins that regulates Dok1 binding. This could be important for cells of the immune system and their functions. PMID:26108885

  17. A Field and Modeling Study of Windblown Particles from a Uranium Mill Tailings Pile

    SciTech Connect

    Schwendiman, L. C.; Sehmel, G. A.; Horst, T. W.; Thomas, C. W.; Perkins, R. W.

    1980-06-01

    An extensive field study whose primary objective was to obtain knowledge and understanding of the nature and quantity of windblown particles from uranium mill tailings piles was conducted in the Ambrosia Lake District of New Mexico. The following major field tasks were undertaken: determination of physical, chemical, and radioactivity characteristics of mill tailings particles; an investigation of the nature and quantity of tailings particles in soil in the vicinity of tailings piles; and the determination of the nature and flux of particles being transported by wind as a function of wind speed and height. Results of the field study are presented. Particle size distributions and associated radioactivity were measured. Radioactivity relationships showed uranium daughters in mill tailings to be in essential radioactive equilibrium for the carbonate leach process but thorium-230 tends to be leached into the slurry water for the acid process mill tailings. One objective of the study was to relate windblown particle concentrations, fluxes, and particle sizes to wind speed. Hundreds of samples were taken and analyses were performed, but relationships between wind speed, airborne particle sizes and concentrations were found to be vague and inconclusive. A resuspension, deposition, and transport model was developed and applied using site meteorology. Ground deposition patterns predicted were similar to those found.

  18. A Christmas "E-Tail"

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Missner, Emily D.

    As the weather outside turns frightful, retail businesses with "e-tail" (electronic retail) Websites are hoping that consumers will turn to their home computers for their holiday shopping. A Forrester Research report estimates that seven million shoppers will spend close to $4 billion in online shopping, three times more than last year. However, this equals less than one percent of total holiday spending, estimated at $184 billion this holiday season. Most online retailers have increased the capacity and speed of their Websites in order to best serve holiday shoppers, hoping that this year's online shopping experiences will lead consumers to do a greater amount of next year's holiday shopping by way of the World Wide Web. While consumers are willing to try e-commerce sites, as many as 40 percent of experienced Internet users have found the process of online shopping confusing and complicated. This week's In the News examines the trend of online shopping with the following seven resources including news articles, advice, and related Websites.

  19. Lizard tail regeneration: regulation of two distinct cartilage regions by Indian hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Lozito, Thomas P; Tuan, Rocky S

    2015-03-15

    Lizards capable of caudal autotomy exhibit the remarkable ability to "drop" and then regenerate their tails. However, the regenerated lizard tail (RLT) is known as an "imperfect replicate" due to several key anatomical differences compared to the original tail. Most striking of these "imperfections" concerns the skeleton; instead of the vertebrae of the original tail, the skeleton of the RLT takes the form of an unsegmented cartilage tube (CT). Here we have performed the first detailed staging of skeletal development of the RLT CT, identifying two distinct mineralization events. CTs isolated from RLTs of various ages were analyzed by micro-computed tomography to characterize mineralization, and to correlate skeletal development with expression of endochondral ossification markers evaluated by histology and immunohistochemistry. During early tail regeneration, shortly after CT formation, the extreme proximal CT in direct contact with the most terminal vertebra of the original tail develops a growth plate-like region that undergoes endochondral ossification. Proximal CT chondrocytes enlarge, express hypertrophic markers, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), apoptose, and are replaced by bone. During later stages of tail regeneration, the distal CT mineralizes without endochondral ossification. The sub-perichondrium of the distal CT expresses Ihh, and the perichondrium directly calcifies without cartilage growth plate formation. The calcified CT perichondrium also contains a population of stem/progenitor cells that forms new cartilage in response to TGF-? stimulation. Treatment with the Ihh inhibitor cyclopamine inhibited both proximal CT ossification and distal CT calcification. Thus, while the two mineralization events are spatially, temporally, and mechanistically very different, they both involve Ihh. Taken together, these results suggest that Ihh regulates CT mineralization during two distinct stages of lizard tail regeneration. PMID:25596336

  20. Environmental Assessment of remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-06-01

    This document assesses and compares the environmental impacts of various alternatives for remedial action at the Ambrosia Lake uranium mill tailings site located near Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The designated site covers 196 acres and contains 111 acres of tailings and some of the original mill structures. The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA), Public Law 95-604, authorizes the US Department of Energy to clean up the site to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at the site and at associated properties off the site. The US Environmental Protection Agency promulgated standards for th remedial action (40 CFR Part 192). Remedial action must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The proposed action is to stabilize the tailings at their present location by consolidating the tailings and associated contaminated materials into a recontoured pile. A radon barrier would be constructed over the pile and various erosion protection measures would be taken to assure the long-term stability of the pile. Another alternative which would involve moving the tailings to a new location is also assessed in this document. This alternative would generally involve greater short-term impacts and costs but would result in stabilization of the tailings at an undeveloped location. The no action alternative is also assessed in this document.

  1. Hydrology and geochemistry of the uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming. Part II. History matching. [Mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Narasimhan, T.N.; White, A.F.; Tokunaga, T.

    1985-02-01

    In Part I of this series of two reports the observed fluid potential and geochemical characteristics in and around the inactive uranium mill tailings pile at Riverton, Wyoming were presented. The prupose of the present work is to attempt to simulate field observations using mathematical models. The results of the studies have not only helped identify the physicochemical mechanisms govering contaminant migration around the inactive mill tailings pile in Riverton, but also have indicated the feasibility of quantifying these mechanisms with the help of newly developed mathematical models. Much work needs to be done to validate and benchmark these models. The history-matching effort on hand involves the mathematical simulation of the observed fluid potentials within the tailings, and the observed distribution of various chemical species within and around the inactive uranium mill tailings. The simulation problem involves consideration of transient fluid flow and transient, reactive chemical transport in a variably saturated ground water system with time-dependent boundary conditions. 15 refs., 30 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. THE IMPACT OF ROUTINE PIGLET PROCESSING PROCEDURES ON WELL-BEING. I. TEETH RESECTION, TAIL-DOCKING, AND CASTRATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several potentially painful procedures are performed on piglets soon after birth. These procedures include teeth resection, tail docking, and castration. Several experiments were conducted to determine if less painful alternatives could be identified. Three experiments were conducted to compare: 1)...

  3. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    SciTech Connect

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 550 E. Tyler Mall, Room PSF-686 (P.O. Box 871404), Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA (United States); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia); Knezek, Patricia M., E-mail: karen.knierman@asu.edu, E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu, E-mail: tveach@asu.edu, E-mail: cgroppi@asu.edu, E-mail: mullan@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au, E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu [WIYN Consortium, Inc., 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 {mu}m [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous H{alpha} sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter H{alpha} source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation.

  4. BIOMECHANICS. Why the seahorse tail is square.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Adriaens, Dominique; Hatton, Ross L; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Whereas the predominant shapes of most animal tails are cylindrical, seahorse tails are square prisms. Seahorses use their tails as flexible grasping appendages, in spite of a rigid bony armor that fully encases their bodies. We explore the mechanics of two three-dimensional-printed models that mimic either the natural (square prism) or hypothetical (cylindrical) architecture of a seahorse tail to uncover whether or not the square geometry provides any functional advantages. Our results show that the square prism is more resilient when crushed and provides a mechanism for preserving articulatory organization upon extensive bending and twisting, as compared with its cylindrical counterpart. Thus, the square architecture is better than the circular one in the context of two integrated functions: grasping ability and crushing resistance. PMID:26138983

  5. Physical space and long-tail markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Madsen, Mark E.; Ormerod, Paul

    2009-03-01

    The Internet is known to have had a powerful impact on on-line retailer strategies in markets characterised by long-tail distribution of sales [C. Anderson, Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More, Hyperion, New York, 2006]. Such retailers can exploit the long tail of the market, since they are effectively without physical limit on the number of choices on offer. Here we examine two extensions of this phenomenon. First, we introduce turnover into the long-tail distribution of sales. Although over any given period such as a week or a month, the distribution is right-skewed and often power law distributed, over time there is considerable turnover in the rankings of sales of individual products. Second, we establish some initial results on the implications for shelf-space and physical retailers in such markets.

  6. Surface Plasmon Resonance Detection and Multispot Sensing for Direct Monitoring of Interactions Involving Low-Molecular-Weight Analytes and for Determination of Low Affinities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. Karlsson; R. Stahlberg

    1995-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance detection allows direct observation of molecular interactions between an analyte in solution and its immobilized binding partner. The use of simultaneous monitoring of interaction events on multiple sensing surfaces, with varying amounts of immobilized receptor, for detection of low-molecular-weight analytes and for determination of low affinities was investigated. Using multispot sensing and BIAcore 2000 instrumentation, analytes as

  7. The use of post detonation analysis of stable isotope ratios to determine the type and production process of the explosive involved

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.R.; Velsko, C.A.; Lee, C.G.; Raber, E.

    1993-03-05

    The detonation of a series of explosives was performed in a controlled manner to collect the resulting, solid residue or {open_quotes}soot.{close_quotes} This residue was examined to determine the ratios of the stable carbon, hydrogen, and nitrogen isotopes. The goal of the experiment was to determine if these ratios could be used to indicate, from the post detonation residues, the type and origin of the detonated explosive. The ratios of the stated stable isotopes in the undetonated explosive were also determined. Despite some reservations in the quality of the data resulting from contamination by nonexplosive components, certain trends can be discerned. (1) Carbon isotopes allow aromatic explosives to be distinguished from nonaromatic explosives. This trend seems to carry through the detonation so that the distinction might be made after the fact. (2) The amination process for TATB can be detected through the hydrogen and, to some extent, the nitrogen isotope ratios. Unfortunately, the data are not sufficiently good to determine if this differential carries through the detonation. (3) The relative magnitude and sign of the nitrogen isotope ratio seems to carry through the detonation: some exchange with atmospheric nitrogen is probable. Even though this set of experiments must also be viewed as preliminary, there is a definite indication that certain qualitative characteristics of explosives can be detected after the detonation. This {open_quotes}signature{close_quotes} could have application to both intelligence and counter terrorism.

  8. Optimizing habitat location for black-tailed prairie dogs in southwestern South Dakota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John Hof; Michael Bevers; Daniel W. Uresk; Gregory L. Schenbeck

    2002-01-01

    A spatial optimization model was formulated and used to maximize black-tailed prairie dog populations in the Badlands National Park and the Buffalo Gap National Grassland in South Dakota. The choice variables involved the strategic placement of limited additional protected habitat. Population dynamics were captured in formulations that reflected exponential population growth combined with the recalcitrant dispersal behavior of this social

  9. Time Dependent Simulation of Energetic Ion Tail Formation Coupled to Thermal Plasma Transport

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. B. Batchelor; L. A. Berry; D. E. Bernholdt; W. Elwasif; E. F. Jaeger; V. E. Lynch; R. W. Harvey; A. Bader; P. T. Bonoli; S. C. Jardin; L.-P. Ku

    2008-01-01

    Energetic ion populations have long been observed in tokamak plasmas heated by high power electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. Previous self-consistent simulations [1] of these tails have involved iteration between an RF field solver and a Fokker-Planck solver to find stationary field and particle distributions assuming fixed thermal plasma profiles. Now, using the SWIM Integrated Plasma

  10. Isolation and characterization of naphthenic acids from Athabasca oil sands tailings pond water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vincent V. Rogers; Karsten Liber; Michael D. MacKinnon

    2002-01-01

    A laboratory bench procedure was developed to efficiently extract naphthenic acids from bulk volumes of Athabasca oil sands tailings pond water (TPW) for use in mammalian oral toxicity testing. This solvent-based procedure involved low solvent losses and a good extraction yield with low levels of impurities. Importantly, labour-intensive centrifugation of source water to remove solids was avoided, allowing processing of

  11. Effects of White-Tailed Deer on Populations of an Understory Forb in Fragmented Deciduous Forests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Augustine; Lee E. Frelich

    1998-01-01

    The effects of grazing by white-tailed deer ( Odocoileus virginianus ) on populations of Trillium spp. were examined in remnant, old-growth patches of the highly fragmented Big Woods forest ecosystem in south- eastern Minnesota. We conducted three separate studies involving an exclosure experiment, transplant exper- iments, and comparisons of Trillium populations among study sites. The highest grazing intensity was ob-

  12. Cargo binding and regulatory sites in the tail of fungal conventional kinesin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephan Seiler; Jochen Kirchner; Christian Horn; Athina Kallipolitou; Günther Woehlke; Manfred Schliwa

    2000-01-01

    Here, using a quantitative in vivo assay, we map three regions in the carboxy terminus of conventional kinesin that are involved in cargo association, folding and regulation, respectively. Using C-terminal and internal deletions, point mutations, localization studies, and an engineered ‘minimal’ kinesin, we identify five heptads of a coiled-coil domain in the kinesin tail that are necessary and sufficient for

  13. SPATIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN WISCONSIN WHITE-TAILED DEER

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    SPATIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN WISCONSIN WHITE-TAILED DEER Damien O. Joly,1 to cause dramatic declines in deer and elk populations and perceived human health risks associated, typically involving culling to reduce deer populations. We characterized the spatial distribution of CWD

  14. Volume III, Chapter 13 Columbian White-tailed Deer

    E-print Network

    Volume III, Chapter 13 Columbian White-tailed Deer #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 13.0 Columbian White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus leucurus) ........................... 13-1 13.1 Introduction............................................................................. 13-20 #12;COLUMBIAN WHITE-TAILED DEER III, 13-1 May 2004 13.0 Columbian White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus

  15. The sodium tail of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  16. PRION PROTEIN GENE HETEROGENEITY IN FREE-RANGING WHITE-TAILED DEER WITHIN THE CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE AFFECTED REGION OF WISCONSIN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chad Johnson; Jody Johnson; Murray Clayton; Debbie McKenzie; Judd Aiken

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) was first identified in Wisconsin (USA) in white- tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in February 2002. To determine if prion protein gene (Prnp) allelic variability was associated with CWD in white-tailed deer from Wisconsin, we sequenced Prnp from 26 CWD-positive and 100 CWD-negative deer. Sequence analysis of Prnp suggests that at least 86-96% of the white-tailed deer

  17. Scorpion Sheds ‘Tail’ to Escape: Consequences and Implications of Autotomy in Scorpions (Buthidae: Ananteris)

    PubMed Central

    Mattoni, Camilo I.; García-Hernández, Solimary; Botero-Trujillo, Ricardo; Ochoa, José A.; Ojanguren-Affilastro, Andrés A.; Pinto-da-Rocha, Ricardo; Prendini, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Autotomy, the voluntary shedding or detachment of a body part at a determined cleavage plane, is a common anti-predation defense mechanism in several animal taxa, including arthropods. Among arachnids, autotomy has been observed in harvestmen, mites, and spiders, always involving the loss of legs. Autotomy of the opisthosoma (abdomen) was recently reported in a single species of the Neotropical buthid scorpion genus Ananteris Thorell, 1891, but few details were revealed. Based on observations in the field and laboratory, examination of material in museum collections, and scanning electron microscopy, we document autotomy of the metasoma (the hind part of the opisthosoma, or ‘tail’) in fourteen species of Ananteris. Autotomy is more common in males than females, and has not been observed in juveniles. When the scorpion is held by the metasoma, it is voluntarily severed at the joints between metasomal segments I and II, II and III, or III and IV, allowing the scorpion to escape. After detachment, the severed metasoma moves (twitches) automatically, much like the severed tail of a lizard or the severed leg of a spider, and reacts to contact, even attempting to sting. The severed surface heals rapidly, scar tissue forming in five days. The lost metasomal segments and telson cannot be regenerated. Autotomy of the metasoma and telson results in permanent loss of the posterior part of the scorpion’s digestive system (the anus is situated posteriorly on metasomal segment V) and the ability to inject venom by stinging. After autotomy, scorpions do not defecate and can only capture small prey items. However, males can survive and mate successfully for up to eight months in the laboratory. In spite of diminished predation ability after autotomy, survival allows males to reproduce. Autotomy in Ananteris therefore appears to be an effective, adaptive, anti-predation escape mechanism. PMID:25629529

  18. Flight investigation of the effect of tail boom strakes on helicopter directional control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelley, Henry L.; Crowell, Cynthia A.; Yenni, Kenneth R.; Lance, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A joint U.S. Army/NASA flight investigation was conducted utilizing an instrumented Bell 240B single-rotor helicopter to determine the effectiveness of horizontally-mounted tail boom strakes on directional controllability and tail rotor power required during low-speed, crosswind operating conditions. The purpose of the strakes was to separate airflow over the tail boom and change fuselage yawing moments in a direction to improve the yaw control margin and reduce tail rotor power required. Low-speed crosswind data were obtained in 5-knot increments at airspeeds of 0 knots to 35 knots and for 30 deg increments in wind azimuth from 0 to 330 deg. In right sideward flight at the most critical wind azimuth and airspeed (60 deg azimuth measured from the nose of the aircraft and 20 knots airspeed), the strakes improved the pedal margin by about 6 percent of total travel and reduced the tail rotor power required by 17 percent. The increase in yaw control and reduction in tail rotor power offered by the strakes can expand the operating envelope in terms of gross weight and altitude capability. No effects in forward flight were noted.

  19. Breeding biology and nest-site selection of red-tailed hawks in an altered desert grassland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hobbs, R.J.; DeStefano, S.; Halvorson, W.L.

    2006-01-01

    Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) have expanded their range as trees have invaded formerly-open grasslands. Desert grasslands of southern Arizona have been invaded by mesquite trees (Prosopis velutina) since Anglo-American settlement and now support a large population of Red-tailed Hawks. We studied a population of Red-tailed Hawks in an altered desert grassland in southern Arizona. Our objectives were to determine what environmental characteristics influence Red-tailed Hawk habitat selection in mesquite-invaded desert grasslands and to evaluate the habitat quality of these grasslands for Red-tailed Hawks based on nesting density, nest success, and productivity. Red-tailed Hawks had 86% (95% C.I. = 73-99) nest success and 1.82 young per breeding pair (95% C.I. = 1.41-2.23). Nesting density was 0.15 (95% CI = 0.08-0.21) breeding pairs/km2 and the mean nearest-neighbor distance was 1.95 km (95% C.I. = 1.74-2.16). Red-tailed Hawks selected nest-sites with taller nest-trees and greater tree height and cover than were available at random. Mesquite trees in desert grasslands provide abundant potential nesting structures for Red-tailed Hawks. ?? 2006 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  20. Static strain and vibration characteristics of a metal semimonocoque helicopter tail cone of moderate size

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielawa, Richard L.; Hefner, Rachel E.; Castagna, Andre

    1991-01-01

    The results are presented of an analytic and experimental research program involving a Sikorsky S-55 helicopter tail cone directed ultimately to the improved structural analysis of airframe substructures typical of moderate sized helicopters of metal semimonocoque construction. Experimental static strain and dynamic shake-testing measurements are presented. Correlation studies of each of these tests with a PC-based finite element analysis (COSMOS/M) are described. The tests included static loadings at the end of the tail cone supported in the cantilever configuration as well as vibrational shake-testing in both the cantilever and free-free configurations.

  1. Observation of the cervix and artificial insemination in captive white-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    Magyar, Stephen John

    1986-01-01

    semen proved to be successful in white-tailed deer. Due to the small size of the cervix and tight cervical rings in white-tailed deer one could only pass the AI catheter up to the first cervical ring and deposit the semen at that site. Depositing... in cervical mucus, and the onset of estrus as guides for determining the optimum time at which to carry out artificial insemination, and to determine what type of AI catheter allows effective semen deposition into the cervix. 3. To observe and record buck...

  2. Modelling the Neutral Sodium Tails of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and at some comets a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) data taken using CoCam [Cremonese et al, 1997], but since this initial detection similar features have been observed at a number of near-Sun comets using the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph. An understanding of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be developed using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout a comet's orbit. At present the source of neutral sodium in comets is unknown, primarily because the evolution of neutral cometary sodium is difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. Several authors [review presented in Cremonese et al, 1999] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail and ion tail. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three dimensional, heliocentric distance dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model (initially based on a model developed by [Brown et al, 1998]). Our model is known as COMPASS (Cometary Orbital Motion at Perihelion: an Adaptable Sodium Simulation), and incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. We present the initial results of a comparison between COMPASS and observational data. We have found good agreement between the overall morphology of the neutral sodium tail imaged at comet Hale-Bopp and COMPASS, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present a comparison between simulated COMPASS spectra and observations. The versatility of COMPASS allows it to be easily adapted to any other neutral cometary sodium tail observations available.

  3. Asymptotic solutions of decoupled continuous-time random walks with superheavy-tailed waiting time and heavy-tailed jump length distributions.

    PubMed

    Denisov, S I; Yuste, S B; Bystrik, Yu S; Kantz, H; Lindenberg, K

    2011-12-01

    We study the long-time behavior of decoupled continuous-time random walks characterized by superheavy-tailed distributions of waiting times and symmetric heavy-tailed distributions of jump lengths. Our main quantity of interest is the limiting probability density of the position of the walker multiplied by a scaling function of time. We show that the probability density of the scaled walker position converges in the long-time limit to a nondegenerate one only if the scaling function behaves in a certain way. This function as well as the limiting probability density are determined in explicit form. Also, we express the limiting probability density which has heavy tails in terms of the Fox H function and find its behavior for small and large distances. PMID:22304076

  4. NESTING HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS OF SYMPATRIC CRESTED CARACARAS, RED-TAILED HAWKS, ANDWHITE-TAILED HAWKS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Actkinson; WILLIAM P. KUVLESKY JR; Clint W. Boal; Leonard A. Brennan; Fidel Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    We quantified nesting-site habitats for sympatric White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus )( n 40), Red-tailed Hawks (B. jamaicensis )( n 39), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway )( n 24) in the Coastal Sand Plain of south Texas. White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracara nest sites occurred in savannas, whereas Red-tailed Hawk nest sites occurred in woodlands on the edge of savannas. White-tailed

  5. Tailings Pond Characterization And Designing Through Geophysical Surveys In Dipping Sedimentary Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, D.; Andrade, R.; Anand, K.; Sathish, R.; Goud, K.

    2009-12-01

    Mining activities results into generation of disintegrated waste materials attaining increased mobilization status and requires a safe disposal mechanism through back filling process or secluded storage on surface with prevention of its interaction with environment cycle. The surface disposal of waste materials will become more critical in case of mined minerals having toxic or radioactive elements. In such cases, the surface disposal site is to be characterized for its sub-surface nature to understand its role in environmental impact due to the loading of waste materials. Near surface geophysics plays a major role in mapping the geophysical characters of the sub-surface formations in and around the disposal site and even to certain extent helps in designing of the storage structure. Integrated geophysical methods involving resistivity tomography, ground magnetic and shallow seismic studies were carried out over proposed tailings pond area of 0.3 sq. kms underlined by dipping sedimentary rocks consisting of ferruginous shales and dolomitic to siliceous limestone with varying thicknesses. The investigated site being located in tectonically disturbed area, geophysical investigations were carried out with number of profiles to visualize the sub-surface nature with clarity. The integration of results of twenty profiles of resistivity tomography with 2 m (shallow) and 10 m (moderate depth) electrode spacing’s enabled in preparing probable sub-surface geological section along the strike direction of the formation under the tailings pond with some geo-tectonic structure inferred to be a fault. Similarly, two resistivity tomography profiles perpendicular to the strike direction of the formations brought out the existence of buried basic intrusive body on the northern boundary of the proposed tailings pond. Two resistivity tomography profiles in criss-cross direction over the suspected fault zone confirmed fault existence on the north-eastern part of tailings pond. Thirty two magnetic profiles inside the tailings pond and surrounding areas on the southern part of the tailings pond enabled in identifying two parallel east-west intrusive bodies forming the impermeable boundary for the tailings pond. The shallow seismic refraction and the geophysical studies in and around the proposed tailings pond brought out the suitability of the site, even when the toxic elements percolates through the subsurface formations in to the groundwater system, the existence of dykes on either side of the proposed ponding area won’t allow the water to move across them thus by restricting the contamination within the tailings pond area. Similarly, the delineation of a fault zone within the tailings pond area helped in shifting the proposed dam axis of the pond to avoid leakage through the fault zone causing concern to environment pollution.

  6. X-ray Tail in NGC 7619

    E-print Network

    Dong-Woo Kim; Eunhyeuk Kim; Giuseppina Fabbiano; Ginevra Trinchieri

    2008-09-25

    We present new observational results of NGC 7619, an elliptical galaxy with a prominent X-ray tail and a dominant member of the Pegasus group. With Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, we confirm the presence of a long X-ray tail in the SW direction; moreover, we identify for the first time a sharp discontinuity of the X-ray surface brightness in the opposite (NE) side of the galaxy. The density, temperature and pressure jump at the NE discontinuity suggest a Mach number ~1, corresponding to a galaxy velocity of ~500 km s-1, relative to the surrounding hot gas. Spectral analysis of these data shows that the Iron abundance of the hot gaseous medium is much higher (1-2 solar) near the center of NGC 7619 and in the tail extending from the core than in the surrounding regions (< 1/2 solar), indicating that the gas in the tail is originated from the galaxy. The possible origin of the head-tail structure is either on-going ram-pressure stripping or sloshing. The morphology of the structure is more in line with a ram pressure stripping phenomenon, while the position of NGC 7619 at the center of the Pegasus I group, and its dominance, would prefer sloshing.

  7. THE DUST TAIL OF ASTEROID (3200) PHAETHON

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Li Jing [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Agarwal, Jessica, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears {approx}>350'' (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius {approx}1 {mu}m and a combined mass {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures ({approx}1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

  8. Structure and function of tuna tail tendons.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, Robert E; Rapoport, H Scott; Fenger, Joelle M

    2002-12-01

    The caudal tendons in tunas and other scombrid fish link myotomal muscle directly to the caudal fin rays, and thus serve to transfer muscle power to the hydrofoil-like tail during swimming. These robust collagenous tendons have structural and mechanical similarity to tendons found in other vertebrates, notably the leg tendons of terrestrial mammals. Biochemical studies indicate that tuna tendon collagen is composed of the (alpha1)(2),alpha2 heterotrimer that is typical of vertebrate Type I collagen, while tuna skin collagen has the unusual alpha1,alpha2,alpha3 trimer previously described in the skin of some other teleost species. Tuna collagen, like that of other fish, has high solubility due to the presence of an acid-labile intermolecular cross-link. Unlike collagen in mammalian tendons, no differences related to cross-link maturation were detected among tendons in tuna ranging from 0.05 to 72 kg (approx. 0.25-6 years). Tendons excised post-mortem were subjected to load cycling to determine the modulus of elasticity and resilience (mean of 1.3 GPa and 90%, respectively). These material properties compare closely to those of leg tendons from adult mammals that can function as effective biological springs in terrestrial locomotion, but the breaking strength is substantially lower. Peak tendon forces recorded during steady swimming appear to impose strains of much less than 1% of tendon length, and no more than 1.5% during bursts. Thus, the caudal tendons in tunas do not appear to function as elastic storage elements, even at maximal swimming effort. PMID:12485695

  9. Factors affecting methylmercury distribution in surficial, acidic, base-metal mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Winch, S; Praharaj, T; Fortin, D; Lean, D R S

    2008-03-25

    The most toxic form of Hg commonly of concern in the environment is methylmercury (MeHg), as it accumulates in living tissues and bioconcentrates in food webs. Sulfide-rich metal ores are often enriched in Hg, but little is known regarding the potential for Hg methylation in acidic tailings produced from these ores. This study examined acidic tailings from four mines in northern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether they could be an important source of MeHg to downstream environments. Where sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) were abundant and active in pH-circumneutral, unoxidized layers (Potter mine), negligible MeHg was detected. By contrast, a zone of active sulfate reduction found in the acidic, oxidizing, surficial layers of tailings from the Kidd Metsite contained the highest concentrations of MeHg in bulk tailings (12.1 nmol kg(-1) dry wt. of sediment) and porewaters (88 pM) measured in this study. Cell count estimates of SRB by the "most-probable-number" (MPN) method were low in these surficial tailings, suggesting that sulfate reducers from this environment were acidophilic and did not thrive under the pH-neutral conditions of the MPN incubations. A later study of bacterial DNA from these tailings produced evidence of a novel Deltaproteobacterium which has only previously been detected in acid mine drainage environments. Further research will be necessary to determine whether this Deltaproteobacterium is a sulfate reducer and/or an efficient Hg methylator. Surface water concentrations of MeHg did not exceed Canadian water quality guidelines at any of the sites sampled, but one site (Broulan) featured total Hg (HgT) concentrations of 838 pM in filtered samples, far in excess of recommended levels. Trends in surface water MeHg and HgT reflected corresponding values in porewaters from the same sites, indicating that concentrations of these substances in tailings influence surface water concentrations. PMID:18191180

  10. Role of the charged tail in localization of a surface protein antigen of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Y; Yamashita, Y; Nakano, Y; Ito, H O; Yu, H; Koga, T

    1997-01-01

    To make clear the role of the C terminus of a surface protein antigen (PAc) of Streptococcus mutans, stepwise truncations beginning at the C terminus of PAc were performed by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis. A remarkable increase in the amount of cell-free PAc was observed upon deletion of four or more amino acid residues at the C terminus. On the other hand, the amount of cell surface PAc gradually decreased when increasing numbers (four or more) of amino acid residues were deleted at the C terminus, and deletion of six amino acids involving both the total charged tail and Leu, an amino acid residue immediately upstream of the charged tail, resulted in a drastic reduction in the amount of cell surface PAc. These results indicate that the cytoplasmic charged tail and Leu residue are required for cell surface localization of PAc in S. mutans. PMID:9119499

  11. Survival, growth, and bioaccumulation of heavy metals by juvenile tanner crabs (Chionoecetes bairdi) held on weathered mine tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, R.P.; Johnson, S.W. [National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AL (United States)] [National Marine Fisheries Service, Juneau, AL (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Between 1891 and 1944, over 80 million metric tons of tailings from three gold mines (Alaska-Gastineau, Alaska-Juneau, and Treadwell) were deposited in Gastineau Channel near Juneau, Alaska. Tailings are rock materials that have been subjected to some form of milling and mineral separation process. After at least 50 years of weathering (e.g., rain, tidal flushing) or continuous submergence in seawater, elevated levels of some metals have been found in these tailings, but their present availability to biota are unknown. With renewed interest to reopen one of these mines and marine disposal of tailings a possible option, examination of the impact historic tailings have on the environment may reflect future environmental conditions. Thus, further study is needed to document and identify metal concentrations in these weathered tailings and to determine availability and possible impacts to marine life. The objectives of this study were to determine the bioavailability of heavy metals to juvenile Tanner crabs held for 500+ days on weathered mine tailings and to examine possible effects on survival, growth, and health of the animals. 12 refs., 3 tabs.

  12. Structural determinants within residues 180-199 of the rodent. alpha. 5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit involved in. alpha. -bungarotoxin binding

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, K.E.; Xiadong Wu; Conti-Tronconi, B.M. (Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul (United States))

    1991-11-05

    Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequence segments of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) {alpha} subunits have been used to identify regions that contribute to formation of the binding sites for cholinergic ligands. The authors have previously defined {alpha}-bungarotoxin ({alpha}-BTX) binding sequences between residues 180 and 199 of a putative rat neuronal nAChR {alpha} subunit, designated {alpha}5, and between residues 181 and 200 of the chick neuronal {alpha}7 and {alpha}8 subunits. These sequences are relatively divergent compared with the Torpedo and muscle nAChR {alpha}1 {alpha}-BTX binding sites, which indicates a serious limitation of predicting functional domains of proteins based on homology in general. Given the highly divergent nature of the {alpha}5 sequence, they were interested in determining the critical amino acid residues for {alpha}-BTX binding. In the present study, the effects of single amino acid substitutions of Gly or Ala for each residue of the rat {alpha}(180-199) sequence were tested, using a competition assay, in which peptides compete for {sup 125}I-{alpha}-BTX binding with native Torpedo nAChR. These results indicate that a disulfide bridge between the vicinal cysteines at positions 191 and 192 of the {alpha}5 sequence is not an absolute requirement for {alpha}-BTX binding activity.

  13. Effects of tail docking on milk quality and cow cleanliness.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, D A; Ruegg, P L

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of tail docking on somatic cell count (SCC), intramammary infection (IMI), and udder and leg cleanliness in commercial dairy herds. Lactating dairy cows (n = 1250) from eight Wisconsin farms were blocked by farm and randomly allocated to tail docked (D) or control (C) groups. Milk samples, somatic cell counts, and hygiene scores were collected for 8 to 9 mo. The prevalence of IMI was determined for each of the five occasions when milk samples were obtained. Udder and leg cleanliness were assessed during milk sample collection. Docked and control animals were compared by logSCC, prevalence of IMI, and leg and udder cleanliness score. Variables were analyzed according to all treatment, period, and farm interactions. At the end of the study period 76 (12.2%) and 81 (13%) of cows were culled in the D and C groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in the initial data for parity, daily milk yield, logSCC, or DIM between treatment groups. Effects significant to farms were identified for all variables over all periods. Period was significant for all variables except for the prevalence of environmental pathogens, but no period x treatment interactions were detected. There was no significant difference between treatment groups for somatic cell count. The prevalence of contagious, environmental, or minor pathogens did not differ significantly between treatment groups. This study did not identify any differences in udder or leg hygiene or milk quality that could be attributed to tail docking. PMID:12416802

  14. Sunward Electric Current In The Geomagnetic Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelevich, P.; Ershkovich, A.; Tsyganenko, N.

    Analysis of Geotail magnetic data enables us to reveal the antisunward electric cur- rent flowing along the tail axis. Distributions of the magnetic field and electric current density (along with their dependencies on the tilt angle of the Earth's dipole and com- ponents of the interplanetary magnetic field) have been derived directly from Geotail data, without any ad hoc assumptions. Analysis of the electric current density distri- bution shows that, in addition to currents associated with the geomagnetic tail flaring, there is a current (tentatively identified as the Hall current) flowing antisunward along the tail axis. The total strength of this current is of the order of 1 MA. It closes through the midnight sector of the auroral zone resulting in field-aligned currents in the region of the Harang discontinuity.

  15. Radial tail resolution in the SELEX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Morelos, A.; Mata, J.; Cooper, P.S.; Engelfried, J.; Aguilera-Servin, J.L.; /San Luis Potosi U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The authors use a 7 Million event data sample of 600 GeV/c single track pion events, where the pion track is reconstructed upstream and downstream of the SELEX RICH. They build the RICH ring radius histogram distribution and count the tail events that fall outside 5{sigma}, giving a fraction of 4 x 10{sup -5} events outside the Gaussian tails. This control of events establishes the ability of using the RICH as velocity spectrometer for high precision searches of the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay like it is planned in the CKM experiment.

  16. Modeling river flows with heavy tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul L.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    1998-09-01

    Recent advances in time series analysis provide alternative models for river flows in which the innovations have heavy tails, so that some of the moments do not exist. The probability of large fluctuations is much larger than for standard models. We survey some recent theoretical developments for heavy tail time series models and illustrate their practical application to river flow data from the Salt River near Roosevelt, Arizona. We also include some simple diagnostics that the practitioner can use to identify when the methods of this paper may be useful.

  17. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  18. Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings

    PubMed Central

    Wielinga, Bruce; Lucy, Juliette K.; Moore, Johnnie N.; Seastone, October F.; Gannon, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The fluvial deposition of mine tailings generated from historic mining operations near Butte, Montana, has resulted in substantial surface and shallow groundwater contamination along Silver Bow Creek. Biogeochemical processes in the sediment and underlying hyporheic zone were studied in an attempt to characterize interactions consequential to heavy-metal contamination of shallow groundwater. Sediment cores were extracted and fractionated based on sediment stratification. Subsamples of each fraction were assayed for culturable heterotrophic microbiota, specific microbial guilds involved in metal redox transformations, and both aqueous- and solid-phase geochemistry. Populations of cultivable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria were most prominent in the anoxic, circumneutral pH regions associated with a ferricrete layer or in an oxic zone high in organic carbon and soluble iron. Sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria were distributed in discrete zones throughout the tailings and were often recovered from sections at and below the anoxic groundwater interface. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were also widely distributed in the cores and often occurred in zones overlapping iron and sulfur oxidizers. Sulfate-reducing bacteria were consistently recovered from oxic zones that contained high concentrations of metals in the oxidizable fraction. Altogether, these results suggest a highly varied and complex microbial ecology within a very heterogeneous geochemical environment. Such physical and biological heterogeneity has often been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal contaminated environments are formulated. PMID:10103249

  19. Histone H3 tail clipping regulates gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Rosa, Helena; Kirmizis, Antonis; Nelson, Christopher; Bartke, Till; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques; Kouzarides, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Induction of gene expression in yeast and human cells involves changes in histone modifications associated with promoters. Here we identify a histone H3 endopeptidase activity in S. cerevisiae that may regulate these events. The endopeptidase cleaves H3 after alanine 21, generating a histone lacking the first 21 residues and displays a preference for H3 tails carrying repressive modifications. In vivo, the H3 N-terminus is clipped, specifically within the promoter of genes following the induction of transcription. H3 clipping precedes the process of histone eviction seen when genes become fully active. A truncated H3 product is not generated in yeast carrying a mutation of the endopeptidase recognition site (H3 Q19L20->AA) and the gene induction is defective in these cells. These findings identify clipping of H3 tails as a novel modification of promoter-bound nucleosomes, which may result in the localised clearing of repressive signals during the induction of gene expression. PMID:19079264

  20. The long-term environmental impacts of the Mount Polley mine tailings spill, British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Patrick; Hudson-Edwards, Karen; Macklin, Mark; Brewer, Paul; Bird, Graham; Williams, Richard

    2015-04-01

    On the 4th August 2014 a tailings impoundment failure at the Mount Polley gold and copper mine in British Columbia, Canada, released approximately 25 million m3 of solid and liquid waste into Hazeltine Creek, Quesnel Lake and Polley Lake. The sheer volume of the tailings released caused Haseltine Creek channel to expand from 2m to over 25m in width and Polley Lake water level to rise by 1.7m. The spill also removed trees in a 900 km2 corridor either side of Hazeltine Creek. Local residents and government officials have expressed serious concerns regarding the potential long-term effects on regional biodiversity, water security and to the livelihoods of First Nation communities. Among impoundment failures, the Mount Polley disaster is unique in that the solid tailings contain an unusual mixture of metal contaminants (arsenic, copper, gold, manganese, nickel, lead, vanadium). As particulate matter is the principal carrier of metal contaminants, the spilled tailings may reside in the regional soils and sediments for 1000s of years serving as a secondary source of pollution. The environmental risk posed by the spilled tailings is compounded by the location of the spill in a mountainous forested catchment, affected by severe winters with prominent spring snow melts that have the potential to remobilise very large quantities of spilled tailings. No data currently exist on the short- to long-term behaviour of these tailings in soils and sediments and the effects of the clean-up operations on their behaviour in this type of river environment. In this study, we adopt a multidisciplinary approach to determine the environmental and geomorphological impacts of the tailings spill. We have two specific objectives. (1) The physicochemical speciation and geochemical stability of spilled tailings will be characterised in surface and hyporheic sediments using bulk chemistry, mineralogical (XRD and SEM) and speciation methods (sequential extractions, electron microprobe analysis, XAS). (2) Pre- and post-remediation geomorphological assessments will use unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photographic surveys and ground-based topographic surveys to (i) establish the efficacy of remediation efforts in stabilising Hazeltine Creek channel and (ii) quantify the physical remobilisation of tailings during the spring snowmelt.

  1. Flight costs of long, sexually selected tails in hummingbirds

    PubMed Central

    James Clark, Christopher; Dudley, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The elongated tails adorning many male birds have traditionally been thought to degrade flight performance by increasing body drag. However, aerodynamic interactions between the body and tail can be substantial in some contexts, and a short tail may actually reduce rather than increase overall drag. To test how tail length affects flight performance, we manipulated the tails of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) by increasing their length with the greatly elongated tail streamers of the red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) and reducing their length by removing first the rectrices and then the entire tail (i.e. all rectrices and tail covert feathers). Flight performance was measured in a wind tunnel by measuring (i) the maximum forward speed at which the birds could fly and (ii) the metabolic cost of flight while flying at airspeeds from 0 to 14?m?s?1. We found a significant interaction effect between tail treatment and airspeed: an elongated tail increased the metabolic cost of flight by up to 11 per cent, and this effect was strongest at higher flight speeds. Maximum flight speed was concomitantly reduced by 3.4 per cent. Also, removing the entire tail decreased maximum flight speed by 2 per cent, suggesting beneficial aerodynamic effects for tails of normal length. The effects of elongation are thus subtle and airspeed-specific, suggesting that diversity in avian tail morphology is associated with only modest flight costs. PMID:19324747

  2. Flight costs of long, sexually selected tails in hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher James; Dudley, Robert

    2009-06-01

    The elongated tails adorning many male birds have traditionally been thought to degrade flight performance by increasing body drag. However, aerodynamic interactions between the body and tail can be substantial in some contexts, and a short tail may actually reduce rather than increase overall drag. To test how tail length affects flight performance, we manipulated the tails of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) by increasing their length with the greatly elongated tail streamers of the red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) and reducing their length by removing first the rectrices and then the entire tail (i.e. all rectrices and tail covert feathers). Flight performance was measured in a wind tunnel by measuring (i) the maximum forward speed at which the birds could fly and (ii) the metabolic cost of flight while flying at airspeeds from 0 to 14 m s(-1). We found a significant interaction effect between tail treatment and airspeed: an elongated tail increased the metabolic cost of flight by up to 11 per cent, and this effect was strongest at higher flight speeds. Maximum flight speed was concomitantly reduced by 3.4 per cent. Also, removing the entire tail decreased maximum flight speed by 2 per cent, suggesting beneficial aerodynamic effects for tails of normal length. The effects of elongation are thus subtle and airspeed-specific, suggesting that diversity in avian tail morphology is associated with only modest flight costs. PMID:19324747

  3. Self-assembly behavior of tail-to-tail superstructure formed by mono-6-O-(4-carbamoylmethoxy-benzoyl)-?-cyclodextrin in solution and the solid state.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhe; Chen, Xin; Liu, Jing; Yan, Dong-Qing; Diao, Chun-Hua; Guo, Min-Jie; Fan, Zhi

    2014-07-01

    A novel mono-modified ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) consisting of 4-carbamoylmethoxy-benzoyl unit at the primary side was synthesized and its self-assembly behavior was determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. The crystal structure shows a 'Yin-Yang'-like packing mode, in which the modified ?-CD exhibits a channel superstructure formed by a tail-to-tail dimer as the repeating motif with the substituted group embedded within the hydrophobic cavity of the facing ?-CD. The geometry of the substituted group is determined by the inclusion of the cavity and is further stabilized by two intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl O atom and phenyl group. Furthermore, NMR ROESY investigation indicates that the self-assembly behavior of the substituted group within the ?-CD cavity is retained in aqueous solution, and the effective binding constant Ka was calculated to be 1330 M(-1) by means of (1)H NMR titration according to iterative determination. PMID:24887704

  4. Site and landscape conditions at white-tailed deer\\/vehicle collision locations in Illinois

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rebecca A. Finder; John L. Roseberry; Alan Woolf

    1999-01-01

    Motor vehicle collisions with white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) present several problems including danger to humans, vehicle damage, and deer mortality. Knowledge of factors influencing deer movements onto or across roads and highways may reduce deer\\/vehicle collisions on existing roads, and improve planning for future roads. We used remotely sensed data to determine characteristics associated with high accident areas. Topographic features

  5. Estimation of Presettlement Populations of the Black-Tailed Prairie Dog: A Reply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dallas Virchow; Scott E. Hygnstrom

    2002-01-01

    Determination of the historical distribution and abundance of the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicanus) is important as a component of the science underlying decisions on the future management of this species. Clearly, we differ from Knowles and colleagues (2002) in our interpretation of those data (see below). In addition, Knowles et al. (2002) introduce other lines of evidence rather than

  6. DENSITY-DEPENDENT RESPONSES OF GRAY-TAILED VOLES TO MOWING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Voles (Microtus spp.) commonly inhabit forage crops and may cause excessive damage to these crops. owever, cover removal by mowing or haying may cause vole populations to decline. o determine if gray-tailed voles responded to mowing of alfalfa in a density-dependent manner, the a...

  7. Activity and reproduction of the black-tailed jackrabbit in the Coastal Cordgrass Prairie of Texas

    E-print Network

    Haug, Joseph Carroll

    1969-01-01

    of the variations in daily and seasonal activity pat- terms, and to determine reproductive patterns in the black-tailed jackrabbit (~Le us californicus merriami) 1 in the Coastal Bend area of Texas. Data were collected from June li)66 through August of 1...

  8. Spatial population structure in the banner-tailed kangaroo rat, Dipodomys spectabilis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Priyanga Amarasekare

    1994-01-01

    I attempted to characterize spatial units of local dynamics and dispersal in banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis), to determine if spatial structure influenced population dynamics in the way predicted by current metapopulation models. D. spectabilis exhibited a hierarchical spatial structure. “Local populations” that appeared as discrete entities on a scale of kilometers were subdivided into clusters of mounds on a

  9. Banner-tailed kangaroo rat burrow mounds and desert grassland habitats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark C. Andersen; Fenton R. Kay

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the density of banner-tailed kangaroo rat (Dipodomys spectabilis) mounds across a range of habitat types near Las Cruces, New Mexico was determined. Mound density varied four-fold between sites. Mound, vegetation and soil characteristics that might explain mound density variation were examined. Mounds influenced vegetation and soil characteristics by altering plant cover, and this effect varied between sites.

  10. The Netherlands strain of BTV serotype 8 in white-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the susceptibility of U.S. white-tailed deer to the European strain of BTV-8 (EU-BTV-8) isolated in The Netherlands, eight seronegative deer were injected subcutaneously in the neck and intradermally in the inner left leg. Two deer were sham inoculated to serve as uninfected controls an...

  11. White-tailed Deer are Susceptible to Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral Inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesi...

  12. The Mechanical Properties of Rat Tail Tendon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BERNARD J. RIGBY; OHN D. SPIKES; HENRY EYRING

    1959-01-01

    The load-strain and stress-relaxation behavior of wet rat tail tendon has been examined with respect to the parameters strain, rate of strain- ing, and temperature. It is found that this mechanical behavior is reproducible after resting tile tendon for a few minutes after each extension so long as the strain does not exceed about 4 per cent. If this strain

  13. Functional morphology of the aardvark tail.

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Mori, K; Koyabu, D; Kawada, S; Komiya, T; Itou, T; Koie, H; Kitagawa, M; Sakai, T

    2013-04-01

    The musculoskeletal system of the aardvark (Orycteropus afer) tail was morphologically examined in two adult specimens. The tail musculature comprised three muscular groups, viz. a dorsal sacrocaudal system that consisted of the irregularly oriented Musculus sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis and M. sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis, a lateral inter-vertebral connecting system, and a ventral sacrocaudal system characterized by the thick M. sacrocaudalis ventralis lateralis and M. sacrocaudalis ventralis medialis. Both the dorsal and ventral systems possessed large tendon groups that strengthened the tail structure. Computed tomography (CT) examination showed the presence of large but homogeneous cartilaginous inter-vertebral discs, whereas V-shaped bones were situated at the ventral aspect of the caudal vertebrae at the level of the inter-vertebral discs. CT visualization of the tendons and V-shaped bones in various tail positions suggested that these structures contribute to the tunnel digging action by bearing the trunk weight and lending force when the aardvark are displacing the soil by means of the forelimbs. PMID:22713114

  14. Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) tail camera video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) was a joint research project by NASA and the FAA to test a survivable aircraft impact using a remotely piloted Boeing 720 aircraft. The tail camera movie is one shot running 27 seconds. It shows the impact from the perspective of a camera mounted high on the vertical stabilizer, looking forward over the fuselage and wings.

  15. TAIL-MOUNTED RADIO TRANSMITTERS FOR WATERFOWL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEAN-FRANCOIS GIROUX; DAVID V. BELL; STEVE PERCIVAL; RON W. SUMMERS

    We successfully tested tail-mounted radio transmitters on Pink-footed Geese (Anser brachyrhynchus), Barnacle Geese (Branta leucopsis), Brant (Branta bernicla) and Eur- asian Wigeon (Anas penelope). The range of detection of the transmitters was approximately 1 km and some birds were tracked for up to 4 mo. Movements and activity of the birds were not affected by the packages. We conclude that

  16. Tales and Tails and Stuff and Nonsense

    E-print Network

    Philip Pearle

    1998-05-17

    In an informal way I review collapse models and my part in constructing them, and I recall some encounters with Abner Shimony. In particular, I address the question of the nature of spacetime reality in collapse models, stimulated by Abner's criticism of the "tail" possessed by statevectors in such models.

  17. Structural Equation Modeling with Heavy Tailed Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Bentler, Peter M.; Chan, Wai

    2004-01-01

    Data in social and behavioral sciences typically possess heavy tails. Structural equation modeling is commonly used in analyzing interrelations among variables of such data. Classical methods for structural equation modeling fit a proposed model to the sample covariance matrix, which can lead to very inefficient parameter estimates. By fitting a…

  18. 5?Tailed Octanucleotide Primers for Cycle Sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Loakes; F. Hill; D. M. Brown; S. Ball; M. A. Reeve; P. S. Robinson

    1999-01-01

    Recently we reported the use of octamer primers tailed with 5-nitroindole for use as primers in cycle sequencing reactions. Here we report the successful use of some other universal base analogues to improve the effectiveness of an octamer sequencing primer. These analogues are 5-nitroindazole, 3-nitropyrrole and benzimidazole.

  19. Fins, limbs, and tails: outgrowths and axial

    E-print Network

    Cohn, Martin

    .g., sharks). Vertebrate fins and limbs have diversified repeatedly around conserved anatomical themesFins, limbs, and tails: outgrowths and axial patterning in vertebrate evolution Michael I. Coates1* and Martin J. Cohn2 Summary Current phylogenies show that paired fins and limbs are unique to jawed verte

  20. Black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys Zudovicianus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John P. Farrar; Karin L. Coleman; David S. Lynch

    The policy of relocating the black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys ludovicianus, is becoming more popular than outright extermination. However, the effects of the relocation process on the behavior of these animals is not known. We hypothesized that relocated prairie dogs would not show behavioral differences relative to non- relocated prairie dogs. We recorded response distances to a human intruder in three

  1. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-print Network

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

  2. Unique Structural Features Facilitate Lizard Tail Kristian W. Sanggaard1

    E-print Network

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its

  3. 14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race and trestle used to carry excavated rock and construction materials across tail race. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  4. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  5. Activity and reproduction of the black-tailed jackrabbit in the Coastal Cordgrass Prairie of Texas 

    E-print Network

    Haug, Joseph Carroll

    1969-01-01

    of' ommrttee ember ~HA ID p t t ember) NAY 1$6$ ABSTRACT Activity and reproduction of the black-tailed jackrabbit in the Coastal Cordgz ass Prairie of Texas. (May lcI6&3) Joseph C. Haug, B. S. , St. I~orbert College; Directed by Dr. James G... of the variations in daily and seasonal activity pat- terms, and to determine reproductive patterns in the black-tailed jackrabbit (~Le us californicus merriami) 1 in the Coastal Bend area of Texas. Data were collected from June li)66 through August of 1...

  6. TAIL ASYMPTOTICS FOR THE SUM OF TWO HEAVY-TAILED DEPENDENT RISKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Dominik Kortschak

    2005-01-01

    Let X1, X2 denote positive exchangable heavy-tailed random variables with continuous marginal distribution function F. The asymptotic behavior of the tail of X1 + X2 is studied in a general copula framework and some bounds and extremal properties are provided. For more specific assumptions on F and the underlying dependence structure of X1 and X2, we survey explicit asymptotic results

  7. A new clinical scintillation camera with pulse tail extrapolation electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewellen, T.K.; Pollard, K.R.; Bice, A.N.; Zhu, J.B. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (USA))

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports the performance of a new scintillation camera, designed for high event rate capability, evaluated. The system consisted of a 400 mm field-of-view NaI(Tl) camera with 61 photomultiplier tubes and modified Starcam electronics. A significant feature of the system was circuitry for performing pulse tail extrapolation and separation of individual pulses involved in pulse pile-up events. System deadtime, flood field uniformity, energy resolution, linearity, spatial resolution bar phantom image quality and misplaced events were evaluated for count rates up to 200 kcps in a 20% photopeak window. The authors' results indicate that this camera design does not compromise image quality at normal clinical count rates and at higher event rates can provide better image quality and increased sensitivity over many Anger cameras currently employed in nuclear medicine.

  8. Engineering assessment of inactive uranium mill tailings: Lakeview site, Lakeview, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1981-10-01

    This assessment has included the preparation of topographic maps, the performance of core drillings and radiometric measurements sufficient to determine areas and volumes of tailings and radiation exposures of individuals and nearby populations, the investigations of site hydrology and meteorology, and the evaluation and costing of alternative corrective actions. Radon gas constitutes the most significant environmental impact, although windblown tailings and external gamma radiation also are factors. The three alternative actions presented in this engineering assessment include millsite decontamination with the addition of 3 m of stabilization cover material (Option I) and removal of the tailings to remote disposal sites and decontamination of the tailings site (Options II and III). Cost estimates range from about $6,000,000 for stabilization in-place, to about $7,500,000 for disposal at a distance of about 10 miles. Three alternatives for reprocessing the Lakeview tailings were examined: heap leaching, treatment at an existing mill, and reprocessing at a new conventional mill. The cost of the uranium recovered would be over $450/lb of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ and hence reprocessing is not economical.

  9. Spinal cord injury increases the reactivity of rat tail artery to angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Al Dera, Hussain; Brock, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Studies in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) suggest the vasculature is hyperreactive to angiotensin II (Ang II). In the present study, the effects of SCI on the reactivity of the rat tail and mesenteric arteries to Ang II have been investigated. In addition, the effects of SCI on the facilitatory action of Ang II on nerve-evoked contractions of these vessels were determined. Isometric contractions of artery segments from T11 (tail artery) or T4 (mesenteric arteries) spinal cord-transected rats and sham-operated rats were compared 6–7 weeks postoperatively. In both tail and mesenteric arteries, SCI increased nerve-evoked contractions. In tail arteries, SCI also greatly increased Ang II-evoked contractions and the facilitatory effect of Ang II on nerve-evoked contractions. By contrast, SCI did not detectably change the responses of mesenteric arteries to Ang II. These findings provide the first direct evidence that SCI increases the reactivity of arterial vessels to Ang II. In addition, in tail artery, the findings indicate that Ang II may contribute to modifying their responses following SCI. PMID:25610365

  10. Animal model of simulated microgravity: a comparative study of hindlimb unloading via tail versus pelvic suspension.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Parimal; Long, Ashley; Harris, Gabrielle; Soulsby, Michael E; Dobretsov, Maxim

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare physiological effects of hindlimb suspension (HLS) in tail- and pelvic-HLS rat models to determine if severe stretch in the tail-HLS rats lumbosacral skeleton may contribute to the changes traditionally attributed to simulated microgravity and musculoskeletal disuse in the tail-HLS model. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into suspended and control-nonsuspended groups were subjected to two separate methods of suspension and maintained with regular food and water for 2 weeks. Body weights, food and water consumption, soleus muscle weight, tibial bone mineral density, random plasma insulin, and hindlimb pain on pressure threshold (PPT) were measured. X-ray analysis demonstrated severe lordosis in tail- but not pelvic-HLS animals. However, growth retardation, food consumption, and soleus muscle weight and tibial bone density (decreased relative to control) did not differ between two HLS models. Furthermore, HLS rats developed similar levels of insulinopenia and mechanical hyperalgesia (decreased PPT) in both tail- and pelvic-HLS groups. In the rat-to-rat comparisons, the growth retardation and the decreased PPT observed in HLS-rats was most associated with insulinopenia. In conclusion, these data suggest that HLS results in mild prediabetic state with some signs of pressure hyperalgesia, but lumbosacral skeleton stretch plays little role, if any, in these pathological changes. PMID:24303103

  11. Male-specific use of the purr in the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta).

    PubMed

    Bolt, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, purring has been described in mostly affiliative contexts. In the ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta), both males and females purr, but only males were observed purring in agonistic contexts. In order to determine whether male ring-tailed lemurs purr as aggressive displays during intrasexual agonistic encounters, 480 h of focal data were collected on 25 adult males from Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, from March to July 2010. The male purring rate increased during periods of male-male agonism when compared to times without intrasexual agonism, and the purring rate was positively correlated with male dominance rank. However, the purring rate was not significantly higher during winning agonistic interactions when compared with losing encounters. My results indicate that the male ring-tailed lemur purr is used most frequently as an agonistic vocalization in male-male encounters, in addition to being used less frequently in other social contexts, including during tail-waving at females, resting, scent-marking, feeding and copulation. Dominant males have higher purring rates across social situations, suggesting that the purring rate may be driven by intrinsic male qualities rather than functioning as a meaningful signal in each disparate social context. Male purring in intrasexual agonistic encounters can be added to previously described social contexts for ring-tailed lemur purring. PMID:25139722

  12. Head-tail instability and Landau damping in bunches with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilov, V.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2010-11-01

    Head-tail modes in bunches with space charge are studied using particle tracking simulations. The eigenfrequencies and eigenfunctions of transverse coherent oscillations in a Gaussian bunch are determined and compared with theories. A model for an airbag distribution in a barrier potential gives good predictions for the head-tail spectrum and for eigenfunctions in bunches with space charge. Using numerical simulations, space-charge induced Landau damping in a bunch is demonstrated. The damping rates are quantified for different modes and space-charge tune shifts. Finally, the head-tail instability with space charge is studied for the resistive-wall impedance below the mode coupling threshold. Results demonstrate that space-charge induced damping can suppress the instability for moderately strong space charge; instability growth rates saturate at strong space charge, in agreement with theoretical predictions.

  13. Atrophy and growth failure of rat hindlimb muscles in tail-cast suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaspers, S. R.; Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    The primary objective of the present study is related to an evaluation of a modified tail-cast suspension model as a means of identifying metabolic factors which control or are associated with muscle atrophy and growth failure. Two different control conditions (normal and tail-casted weight bearing) were studied to determine the appropriate control for tail-cast suspension. A description is presented of a model which is most useful for studying atrophy of hindlimb muscles under certain conditions. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were employed in the experiments. Attention is given to growth rate and urinary excretion of urea and ammonia in different types of rats, the relationship between body weight and skeletal muscle weight, and the relationship between animal body weight and rates of protein synthesis and protein degradation.

  14. Ecological studies of the white-tailed deer in western Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick, R.D.; Kennedy, M.L. (Memphis State Univ., TN (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Activity patterns and microhabitat utilization of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are being studied at the Milan Army Ammunition Plant in Carroll and Gibson counties, Tennessee. Ten white-tailed deer have been fitted with radio-collars, and locations are being monitored using standard techniques. Home ranges and daily activity patterns are being determined. Preliminary analyses have shown that white-tailed deer are readily located using radio-techniques. Microhabitat utilization is being assessed by pellet transects and radio locations. Pellet counts from transects located in pastures and old fields are significantly different from those in other habitat types. Use of honeysuckle (Lonicera sp.) is being examined by observing the degree of browse along transects. No significant difference in utilization has been seen between the honeysuckle transects.

  15. Tissue fluid shift, forelimb loading, and tail tension in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Johansson, C.; Tipton, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The tail suspension model (head-down tilt) simulates hypogravity in terms of musculoskeletal loss in the rat. However, little is known of tissue fluid shifts and body weight distribution in this model. Tissue fluid pressures were measured by wick catheters in 12 Munich-Wistar rats before, during, and after 48 hrs of tail suspension (about 30 deg head-down tilt). Subcutaneous tissue fluid pressure in the neck increased from -2.2 + or - 0.4 (normal horizontal position) to +4.0 + or - 1.5 cm H2O during tail suspension, indicating a cephalic fluid shift and significant edema during head-down tilt. In a separate study, six rats were suspended at 30-70 deg, and forelimb load and tail tension were measured by a balance and force transducer, respectively. Approximately 50 percent of body weight (BW) was loaded on forelimbs at a head-down tilt angle of 30 deg and forelimb load declined linearly to 10 percent BW at 70 deg. Furthermore, tail tension increased from 50 percent BW at 30 deg to 85 percent BW at 70 deg. These results indicate that less than normal loads are applied to forelimbs of rats suspended at angles of less than 30 deg and that the tail bears an increasing proportion of the rat's body weight at head-down tilt angles of less than 30 deg.

  16. One-Tailed F-Tests in Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Banas, John

    2002-01-01

    Documents the recent use of one-tailed F-tests in communication journals, and examines the arguments both for and against their use. Examines the use of these tests within the broader unresolved controversy surrounding the use of one-tailed tests. Recommends that future researchers should most often avoid one-tailed Fs, and generally exercise…

  17. Driven inelastic Maxwell models with high energy tails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Ernst; R. Brito

    2002-01-01

    The solutions of the homogeneous nonlinear Boltzmann equation for inelastic Maxwell models, when driven by different types of thermostats, show, in general, overpopulated high energy tails of the form ~exp(-ac), with power law tails and Gaussian tails as border line cases. The results are compared with those for inelastic hard spheres, and a comprehensive picture of the long time behavior

  18. TECHNICAL NOTE Individual identification of Sitka black-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    TECHNICAL NOTE Individual identification of Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis for extracting DNA from fecal pellets from Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) and evaluated. Keywords Alaska Á DNA Á Feces Á Microsatellites Á Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis Á Sitka black-tailed deer

  19. APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION PION RIDGE TAILINGS FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    ) and the State of Colorado. The Radiation Control Program of CDPHE is currently reviewing the tailings cell plans Corporation Prepared By: 44 Union Boulevard, Suite 600 Lakewood, Colorado 80228 U.S. Environmental Protection, Tailings Cells and Evaporation Ponds, Piñon Ridge Mill by Energy Fuels Attachment 2 Uranium Mill Tailings

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of the bacteriophage K1F tail gene encoding endo-N-acylneuraminidase (endo-N) and comparison to an endo-N homolog in bacteriophage PK1E.

    PubMed Central

    Petter, J G; Vimr, E R

    1993-01-01

    Endo-N-acylneuraminidase (endo-N) is a phage-encoded depolymerase that degrades the alpha (2-8)-linked polysialic acid chains of K1 serotypes of Escherichia coli and vertebrate neural cell adhesion molecules. We have determined the DNA sequence of the bacteriophage K1F tail protein structural gene, which codes for a polypeptide of 920 residues. Purification of the tail protein yields a 102-kDa species upon denaturing gel electrophoresis and detection by Western immunoblot analysis. An identical polypeptide was detected by Western blot analysis of K1F virions. Peptide sequencing confirmed that the open reading frame determined by nucleotide sequencing encodes endo-N. Immunoelectron microscopy with neutralizing antibodies raised against the depolymerase confirmed that endo-N is a component of the K1F tail apparatus. Antibodies in the serum cross-reacted with endo-N from another K1-specific phage, PK1E, demonstrating the presence of shared epitopes. Homology between K1F and PK1E endo-N was confirmed by Southern, Northern (RNA), and Western blot analyses. The endo-N amino-terminal domain is homologous to the amino termini of phage T7 and T3 tail proteins, indicating by analogy that this domain functions in attachment of endo-N to the K1F virion's head. A central domain of 495 residues has weak similarity to sea urchin aryl sulfatase, suggesting that this region may contain the endo-N catalytic site. Failure to detect homology between the PK1E homolog and the carboxy-terminal domain of K1F endo-N is consistent with the central domain's involvement in binding and catalysis of polysialic acid. These results provide the initial molecular and genetic description of polysialic acid depolymerase, which has so far been detected only in K1-specific phage. Images PMID:8331067

  1. Mechano-Coupling and Regulation of Contractility by the Vinculin Tail Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja; Kollmannsberger, Philip; Paranhos Zitterbart, Daniel; Smith, James; Fabry, Ben; Goldmann, Wolfgang Heinrich

    2008-01-01

    Vinculin binds to multiple focal adhesion and cytoskeletal proteins and has been implicated in transmitting mechanical forces between the actin cytoskeleton and integrins or cadherins. It remains unclear to what extent the mechano-coupling function of vinculin also involves signaling mechanisms. We report the effect of vinculin and its head and tail domains on force transfer across cell adhesions and the generation of contractile forces. The creep modulus and the adhesion forces of F9 mouse embryonic carcinoma cells (wild-type), vinculin knock-out cells (vinculin ?/?), and vinculin ?/? cells expressing either the vinculin head domain, tail domain, or full-length vinculin (rescue) were measured using magnetic tweezers on fibronectin-coated super-paramagnetic beads. Forces of up to 10 nN were applied to the beads. Vinculin ?/? cells and tail cells showed a slightly higher incidence of bead detachment at large forces. Compared to wild-type, cell stiffness was reduced in vinculin ?/? and head cells and was restored in tail and rescue cells. In all cell lines, the cell stiffness increased by a factor of 1.3 for each doubling in force. The power-law exponent of the creep modulus was force-independent and did not differ between cell lines. Importantly, cell tractions due to contractile forces were suppressed markedly in vinculin ?/? and head cells, whereas tail cells generated tractions similar to the wild-type and rescue cells. These data demonstrate that vinculin contributes to the mechanical stability under large external forces by regulating contractile stress generation. Furthermore, the regulatory function resides in the tail domain of vinculin containing the paxillin-binding site. PMID:17890382

  2. Low molecular weight carboxylic acids in oxidizing porphyry copper tailings.

    PubMed

    Dold, Bernhard; Blowes, David W; Dickhout, Ralph; Spangenberg, Jorge E; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf

    2005-04-15

    The distribution of low molecular weight carboxylic acids (LMWCA) was investigated in pore water profiles from two porphyry copper tailings impoundments in Chile (Piuquenes at La Andina and Cauquenes at El Teniente mine). The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the distribution of LMWCA, which are interpreted to be the metabolic byproducts of the autotroph microbial community in this low organic carbon system, and (2) to infer the potential role of these acids in cycling of Fe and other elements in the tailings impoundments. The speciation and mobility of iron, and potential for the release of H+ via hydrolysis of the ferric iron, are key factors in the formation of acid mine drainage in sulfidic mine wastes. In the low-pH oxidation zone of the Piuquenes tailings, Fe(III) is the dominant iron species and shows high mobility. LMWCA, which occur mainly between the oxidation front down to 300 cm below the tailings surface at both locations (e.g., max concentrations of 0.12 mmol/L formate, 0.17 mmol/L acetate, and 0.01 mmol/L pyruvate at Piuquenes and 0.14 mmol/L formate, 0.14 mmol/L acetate, and 0.006 mmol/L pyruvate at Cauquenes), are observed at the same location as high Fe concentrations (up to 71.2 mmol/L Fe(II) and 16.1 mmol/L Fe(III), respectively). In this zone, secondary Fe(III) hydroxides are depleted. Our data suggest that LMWCA may influence the mobility of iron in two ways. First, complexation of Fe(III), through formation of bidentate Fe(III)-LMWCA complexes (e.g., pyruvate, oxalate), may enhance the dissolution of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides or may prevent precipitation of Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides. Soluble Fe(III) chelate complexes which may be mobilized downward and convert to Fe(II) by Fe(III) reducing bacteria. Second, monodentate LMWCA (e.g., acetate and formate) can be used by iron-reducing bacteria as electron donors (e.g., Acidophilum spp.), with ferric iron as the electron acceptor. These processes may, in part, explain the low abundances of secondary Fe(III) hydroxide precipitates below the oxidation front and the high concentrations of Fe(II) observed in the pore waters of some low-sulfide systems. The reduction of Fe(III) and the subsequent increase of iron mobility and potential acidity transfer (Fe(II) oxidation can result in the release of H+ in an oxic environment) should be taken in account in mine waste management strategies. PMID:15884343

  3. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  4. High-velocity tails on the velocity distribution of solar wind ions

    SciTech Connect

    Ogilvie, K.W. (Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Geiss, J. (Univ. of Bern (Swaziland)); Gloeckler, G. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States)); Berdichevsky, D. (Highes-STX, Lanham, MD (United States)); Wilken, B. (Max-Plank-Institut fuer Aeronomie Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany))

    1993-03-01

    Recent observations of the solar wind using the SWICS instrument on the Ulysses spacecraft have shown the presence of high-velocity [open quotes]tails[close quotes] on the velocity distribution of protons. Similar features have also been observed on the velocity distributions of helium and oxygen ions. Of the order of 1% of the solar wind density is involved in these tails, which are approximately exponential in shape and persist to V = V[sub B] + 10V[sub th] or beyond, where V[sub B] is the bulk velocity and V[sub th] the thermal velocity of the solar wind. This paper contains a preliminary description of the phenomenon. It is clear that it is ultimately connected with the passage of interplanetary shocks past the spacecraft and that particle acceleration at oblique shocks is involved. 21 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo [Unit of Signal Transduction and Gastrointestinal Cancer, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE Digestive Diseases Research Center and Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States); Rozengurt, Enrique [Unit of Signal Transduction and Gastrointestinal Cancer, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE Digestive Diseases Research Center and Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States); Rey, Osvaldo [Unit of Signal Transduction and Gastrointestinal Cancer, Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, CURE Digestive Diseases Research Center and Molecular Biology Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles (United States)]. E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  6. Baseline risk assessment for groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Monument Valley, Arizona. Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment evaluates potential impact to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site near Monument Valley, Arizona. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being relocated and stabilized in a disposal cell at Mexican Hat, Utah, through the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The tailings removal is planned for completion by spring 1994. After the tailings are removed, groundwater contamination at the site will continue to be evaluated. This risk assessment is the first document specific to this site for the Groundwater Project. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site.

  7. Effect of measured material properties on the finite element analysis of an OH-58 composite tail boom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    A static and dynamic finite element analysis is conducted on a U.S. Army OH-58 composite tail boom and compared with test data. The tail boom is a filament-wound graphite/epoxy monocoque structure. The structural design of the composite tail boom skin is based on 50-percent graphite fiber volume. However, material tests on representative samples of the tail boom skin reveal that the graphite fiber-volume fraction varied from 44.6 to 49.3 percent. To determine the effect of using measured material properties, static and dynamic finite element analyses are conducted for three fiber-volume conditions of 45, 48, and 50 percent. The static and dynamic model with the 45-percent fiber-volume graphite skins gives the closest agreement with test data.

  8. Short-tailed shrews: Toxicity and residue relationships of DDT, dieldrin, and endrin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence J. Blus

    1978-01-01

    Experiments involving dietary toxicity and residue relationships of DDT, dieldrin, and endrin were conducted with short-tailed\\u000a shrews. Dietary concentrations of DDT dissolved in vegetable oils were usually more toxic than diets containing comparable\\u000a amounts of powdered DDT. Younger shrews, particularly females, were more tolerant of powdered DDT than older animals; yet,\\u000a there were no conspicuous age differences in toxicity of

  9. The tail of the Ordovician fish Sacabambaspis.

    PubMed

    Pradel, Alan; Sansom, Ivan J; Gagnier, Pierre-Yves; Cespedes, Ricardo; Janvier, Philippe

    2007-02-22

    The tail of the earliest known articulated fully skeletonized vertebrate, the arandaspid Sacabambaspis from the Ordovician of Bolivia, is redescribed on the basis of further preparation of the only specimen in which it is most extensively preserved. The first, but soon discarded, reconstruction, which assumed the presence of a long horizontal notochordal lobe separating equal sized dorsal and ventral fin webs, appears to have considerable merit. Although the ventral web is significantly smaller than the dorsal one, the presence of a very long notochordal lobe bearing a small terminal web is confirmed. The discrepancy in the size of the ventral and dorsal webs rather suggests that the tail was hypocercal, a condition that would better accord with the caudal morphology of the living agnathans and the other jawless stem gnathostomes. PMID:17443969

  10. Adenocarcinoma associated with tail gut cyst

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Susannah; Maloney-Patel, Nell; Rezac, Craig; Poplin, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinomas of the presacral (retrorectal) space are rare. The diagnosis is usually delayed because of non-specific symptoms, and is made after a biopsy or surgery. These carcinomas arise from cystic lesions developing from remnants of the embryological postanal gut containing mucous-secreting epithelium, known as tail gut cysts. The potential for infection, perianal fistulas and most importantly, malignant change warrants an early complete surgical resection. From an oncologist’s perspective, the management of these carcinomas has varied, and has included adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. We describe here a rare case of adenocarcinoma associated with a tail gut cyst that was discovered incidentally and resected by a posterior approach (Kraske procedure). The patient has had clinical and periodic radiologic surveillance without any evidence of cancer recurrence for over a year and a half. PMID:23450681

  11. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt.

  12. RED-TAILED HAWK (Buteo jamaicensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM A. DEGRAw; N. C. CLAMPITT

    Daily fluctuations in resting heart rate (HR) were studied in a captive ? Red-tailed Hawk (Buteojamaicensis) using radiotelemetry. HR's were recorded hourly during 10 consecutive days while the hawk was housed in an outdoor pen. Daytime HR's averaged 202 beats\\/min and were significantly higher than the average nocturnal HR of 134 beats\\/min (P < 0.001). Maximum HR's ( >200 beats\\/min)

  13. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    For the UMTRA Project site located near Canonsburg, Pennsylvania (the Canonsburg site), the Surface Project cleanup occurred from 1983 to 1985, and involved removing the uranium processing mill tailings and radioactively contaminated soils and materials from their original locations and placing them in a disposal cell located on the former Canonsburg uranium mill site. This disposal cell is designed to minimize radiation emissions and further contamination of ground water beneath the site. The Ground Water Project will evaluate the nature and the extent of ground water contamination resulting from uranium processing at the former Canonsburg uranium mill site, and will determine a ground water strategy for complying with the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) ground water standards established for the UMTRA Project. For the Canonsburg site, an evaluation was made to determine whether exposure to ground water contaminated by uranium processing could affect people`s health. This risk assessment report is the first site-specific document prepared for the UMTRA Ground Water Project at the Canonsburg site. The results of this report and further site characterization of the Canonsburg site will be used to determine how to protect public health and the environment, and how to comply with the EPA standards.

  14. Further characterization of the genetic defect of the Bent tail mouse, a mouse model for human neural tube defects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. D. Klootwijk; Mascha M. V. A. P. Schijvenaars; Edwin C. M. Mariman; Barbara Franke

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs) are congenital malformations arising mostly from incomplete neural tube closure during early embryogenesis. Most NTDs in humans have a complex etiology, with involvement of both genetic and environmental factors. More than 100 mouse models for human neural tube defects exist; Bent tail is one of them. The mouse mutant is caused by a submicroscopic deletion

  15. Serum 25-Hydroxvitamin D Concentrations in Captive and Free-Ranging, White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT: Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were determined for free-ranging and captive white-tailed deer (WTD, Odocoileus virginianus). Effects of gender, season, and age on 25(OH)D concentrations were determined as well as comparisons to concentrations in serum from captive re...

  16. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, C. [Dept. of Energy, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

  17. Citizen knowledge and perception of black-tailed prairie dog management; report to respondents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, N.R.; Brinson, Ayeisha; Ponds, P.D.; Cline, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    In the late summer of 2000, we canvassed a random sample of residents in the 11-state short grass prairie region of the United States. We asked about peoplea??s attitude toward and knowledge of black-tailed prairie dogs and their management. The survey received 1,933 useable responses with a response rate of 56.4% (margin of error +/- 2.2%). We developed a questionnaire (OMB Control Number: 1028-0073; see Appendix B) to answer the following questions: * What is the level of citizen knowledge regarding black-tailed prairie dogs? * What are citizensa?? attitudes and preferences regarding black-tailed prairie dogs and the environment in general? * What are the factors that explain difference in attitudes and knowledge about prairie dogs? * What are the factors that explain citizen participation in these types of issues? * What are the important differences between rural and urban citizens regarding their political participation and their knowledge and attitudes about prairie dogs? In general, we found that citizens do not have a high regard for black-tailed prairie dogs. Citizens generally have a positive orientation toward the environment and favor a balanced or somewhat environmental approach on questions--like prairie dog management--that involve environmental protection and economic considerations. People having direct experience with prairie dogs specifically, most citizens did not believe the question of what to do about these animals was a highly important environmental issue.

  18. A novel method for poly(A) fractionation reveals a large population of mRNAs with a short poly(A) tail in mammalian cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hedda A. Meijer; Martin Bushell; Kirsti Hill; Timothy W. Gant; Anne E. Willis; Peter Jones; Cornelia H. de Moor

    2007-01-01

    The length of the poly(A) tail of an mRNA plays an important role in translational efficiency, mRNA stability and mRNA degradation. Regulated poly- adenylation and deadenylation of specific mRNAs is involved in oogenesis, embryonic development, spermatogenesis, cell cycle progression and synap- tic plasticity. Here we report a new technique to analyse the length of poly(A) tails and to separate a

  19. Changes in zinc speciation with mine tailings acidification in a semi-arid weathering environment

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Sarah M.; O’Day, Peggy A.; Webb, Sam M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2011-01-01

    High concentrations of residual metal contaminants in mine tailings can be transported easily by wind and water, particularly when tailings remain unvegetated for decades following mining cessation, as is the case in semi-arid landscapes. Understanding the speciation and mobility of contaminant metal(loid)s, particularly in surficial tailings, is essential to controlling their phytotoxicities and to revegetating impacted sites. In prior work, we showed that surficial tailings samples from the Klondyke State Superfund Site (AZ, USA), ranging in pH from 5.4 to 2.6, represent a weathering series, with acidification resulting from sulfide mineral oxidation, long-term Fe hydrolysis, and a concurrent decrease in total (6,000 to 450 mg kg?1) and plant-available (590 to 75 mg kg?1) Zn due to leaching losses and changes in Zn speciation. Here, we used bulk and micro-focused Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data and a six-step sequential extraction procedure to determine tailings solid phase Zn speciation. Bulk sample spectra were fit by linear combination using three references: Zn-rich phyllosilicate (Zn0.8talc), Zn sorbed to ferrihydrite (ZnadsFeOx), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO4·7H2O). Analyses indicate that Zn sorbed in tetrahedral coordination to poorly-crystalline Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides decreases with acidification in the weathering sequence, whereas octahedral zinc in sulfate minerals and crystalline Fe oxides undergoes a relative accumulation. Micro-scale analyses identified hetaerolite (ZnMn2O4), hemimorphite (Zn4Si2O7(OH)2·H2O) and sphalerite (ZnS) as minor phases. Bulk and micro-focused spectroscopy complement the chemical extraction results and highlight the importance of using a multi-method approach to interrogate complex tailings systems. PMID:21761897

  20. Quantitative microbial community analysis of three different sulfidic mine tailing dumps generating acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kock, Dagmar; Schippers, Axel

    2008-08-01

    The microbial communities of three different sulfidic and acidic mine waste tailing dumps located in Botswana, Germany, and Sweden were quantitatively analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), catalyzed reporter deposition-FISH (CARD-FISH), Sybr green II direct counting, and the most probable number (MPN) cultivation technique. Depth profiles of cell numbers showed that the compositions of the microbial communities are greatly different at the three sites and also strongly varied between zones of oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Maximum cell numbers of up to 10(9) cells g(-1) dry weight were determined in the pyrite or pyrrhotite oxidation zones, whereas cell numbers in unoxidized tailings were significantly lower. Bacteria dominated over Archaea and Eukarya at all tailing sites. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and/or sulfur-oxidizing Acidithiobacillus spp. dominated over the acidophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing Leptospirillum spp. among the Bacteria at two sites. The two genera were equally abundant at the third site. The acidophilic Fe(II)- and sulfur-oxidizing Sulfobacillus spp. were generally less abundant. The acidophilic Fe(III)-reducing Acidiphilium spp. could be found at only one site. The neutrophilic Fe(III)-reducing Geobacteraceae as well as the dsrA gene of sulfate reducers were quantifiable at all three sites. FISH analysis provided reliable data only for tailing zones with high microbial activity, whereas CARD-FISH, Q-PCR, Sybr green II staining, and MPN were suitable methods for a quantitative microbial community analysis of tailings in general. PMID:18586975

  1. Using soil island plantings as dispersal vectors in large area copper tailings reforestation

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, G.; Everett, R. [Dept. of Agriculture, Wenatchee, WA (United States). Forestry Science Lab.

    1998-12-31

    The Wenatchee National Forest undertook the reforestation of the 80 acre (35 ha) Holden copper mine tailings of Washington State in 1989 by using 20, one-fourth acre, triangular shaped soil islands as a source of plant propagules targeted for gravel-covered tailings surfaces. The islands were constructed of soil and surface litter transported from a nearby gravel pit, and planted with four species of conifer seedlings, the shrub Sitka alder (Alnus sinuata) and eight species of grasses. Conifer and alder seedlings were also planted in graveled covered tailings with amendments. Since reproductive status of the conifers would not occur for several years, this propagule vector hypothesis was tested by measuring the distances traveled onto the tailings surface by grass seeds. The number of grass shoots established in four treatment blocks in target plots downwind from the soil island source plantings was also determined. After 36 months, grass seed had migrated to a distance of 32 feet (11 m) from the soil island source. Grass shoots were present within 10 feet (3 m) downwind of the soil island, the most frequent being Mountain brome (Bromus marginatus). Among the tree species, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Sitka alder grew an average of 6 inches (15--16 cm) after 40 months on the soil islands but somewhat less on the tailing surface. By the third growing season, the only tree species in reproductive condition on the tailings was alder. The soil-island technique is successful for grass dispersal and may have potential for conifer and alder migration.

  2. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  3. Changes in Zinc Speciation with Mine Tailings Acidification in a Semiarid Weathering Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, Sarah M.; O’ Day, Peggy A.; Webb, Sam M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon (UCM); (SLAC); (Ariz)

    2012-10-09

    High concentrations of residual metal contaminants in mine tailings can be transported easily by wind and water, particularly when tailings remain unvegetated for decades following mining cessation, as is the case in semiarid landscapes. Understanding the speciation and mobility of contaminant metal(loid)s, particularly in surficial tailings, is essential to controlling their phytotoxicities and to revegetating impacted sites. In prior work, we showed that surficial tailings samples from the Klondyke State Superfund Site (AZ, USA), ranging in pH from 5.4 to 2.6, represent a weathering series, with acidification resulting from sulfide mineral oxidation, long-term Fe hydrolysis, and a concurrent decrease in total (6000 to 450 mg kg{sup -1}) and plant-available (590 to 75 mg kg{sup -1}) Zn due to leaching losses and changes in Zn speciation. Here, we used bulk and microfocused Zn K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data and a six-step sequential extraction procedure to determine tailings solid phase Zn speciation. Bulk sample spectra were fit by linear combination using three references: Zn-rich phyllosilicate (Zn{sub 0.8}talc), Zn sorbed to ferrihydrite (Zn{sub adsFeOx}), and zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O). Analyses indicate that Zn sorbed in tetrahedral coordination to poorly crystalline Fe and Mn (oxyhydr)oxides decreases with acidification in the weathering sequence, whereas octahedral zinc in sulfate minerals and crystalline Fe oxides undergoes a relative accumulation. Microscale analyses identified hetaerolite (ZnMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}), hemimorphite (Zn{sub 4}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}(OH){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O) and sphalerite (ZnS) as minor phases. Bulk and microfocused spectroscopy complement the chemical extraction results and highlight the importance of using a multimethod approach to interrogate complex tailings systems.

  4. DOE/EIS-0355 Remediation of the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings, Grand and San Juan Counties, Utah, Final Environmental Impact Statement (July 2005)

    SciTech Connect

    N /A

    2005-08-05

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) is proposing to clean up surface contamination and implement a ground water compliance strategy to address contamination that resulted from historical uranium-ore processing at the Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Site (Moab site), Grand County, Utah. Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), 42 United States Code (U.S.C.) {section} 4321 et seq., DOE prepared this environmental impact statement (EIS) to assess the potential environmental impacts of remediating the Moab site and vicinity properties (properties where uranium mill tailings were used as construction or fill material before the potential hazards associated with the tailings were known). DOE analyzed the potential environmental impacts of both on-site and off-site remediation and disposal alternatives involving both surface and ground water contamination. DOE also analyzed the No Action alternative as required by NEPA implementing regulations promulgated by the Council on Environmental Quality. DOE has determined that its preferred alternatives are the off-site disposal of the Moab uranium mill tailings pile, combined with active ground water remediation at the Moab site. The preferred off-site disposal location is the Crescent Junction site, and the preferred method of transportation is rail. The basis for this determination is discussed later in this Summary. DOE has entered into agreements with 12 federal, tribal, state, and local agencies to be cooperating agencies in the development and preparation of this EIS. Several of the cooperating agencies have jurisdiction by law and intend to use the EIS to support their own decisionmaking. The others have expertise relevant to potential environmental, social, or economic impacts within their geographic regions. During the preparation of the EIS, DOE met with the cooperating agencies, provided them with opportunities to review preliminary versions of the document, and addressed their comments and concerns to the fullest extent possible. DOE received over 1,600 comments on the draft EIS from the public, federal, state and local agencies, tribes, governors, and members of Congress. DOE has considered these comments in finalizing the EIS and has provided responses to all comments in the EIS.

  5. Pain-Suppressed Behaviors in the Red-tailed Hawk 1 (Buteo jamaicensis)

    PubMed Central

    Mazor-Thomas, Jana E.; Mann, Phyllis E.; Karas, Alicia Z.; Tseng, Flo

    2014-01-01

    Our ability to provide analgesia in wild and exotic patients is hampered by a lack of species-specific information on effective drugs and protocols. One contributing factor is the difficulty of applying data from traditional laboratory tests of nociception to clinical conditions frequently involving combinations of inflammatory, mechanical, and neuropathic pain. Pain-suppressed behaviors have become a valuable predictor of clinical utility in other species; in this study we extend this framework to red -tailed hawks in a wildlife hospital, in an attempt to develop a new, humane testing method for birds of prey. We scored six behaviors in hawks hospitalized either for orthopedic trauma or for non-painful conditions. These behaviors included: movement about the cage, grooming, head motions, foot shifts, beak clacks, and rouse. Movement, head motions, and beak clacks were all significantly reduced in hawks with recent orthopedic injury, but not in hawks with healed or minor injuries (P<0.05 for all behaviors). However, it should be noted that due to stringent admission criteria, and the difficulties inherent in studying naturally-occuring injury in wild patients, this study only included -subjects in four experimental groups, and this limited our ability to fully investigate confounds within our data. A follow-up experiment was conducted to determine potential effects of buprenorphine, a mu opioid agonist, on the behaviors listed above. Buprenorphine in the absence of pain caused minor, non-significant decreases in most behaviors, and had no effect on head movement frequency. This suggests that head movements in particular may be sensitive to pain but not to sedative side-effects of buprenorphine. Overall, red -tailed hawks with recent orthopedic trauma show consistent and marked red uctions in several normal maintenance behaviors. Head movements, reported for the first time in this study as a potential marker of pain in birds, in particular seem to be insensitive to sedative side effects of buprenorphine, while being a sensitive measu re of affective state in hawks with painful injuries. These behaviors can be scored humanely and with minimal expense, and should be considered for further research on pain and analgesia in avian species. PMID:24904190

  6. Tail asymptotics for the sum of two heavy-tailed dependent risks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hansjörg Albrecher; Søren Asmussen; Dominik Kortschak

    2006-01-01

    Let X\\u000a 1\\u000a , X\\u000a 2 denote positive heavy-tailed random variables with continuous marginal distribution functions F\\u000a 1 and F\\u000a 2, respectively. The asymptotic behavior of the tail of X\\u000a 1\\u000a +X\\u000a 2 is studied in a general copula framework and some bounds and extremal properties are provided. For more specific assumptions on F\\u000a 1\\u000a , F\\u000a 2 and the

  7. Tailed pooled suppression subtractive hybridization (PSSH) adaptors do not alter efficiency.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Robert S; Gill, Steven R

    2010-11-01

    Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) and its derivative, Pooled Suppression Subtractive hybridization (PSSH), are powerful tools used to study variances larger than ~100 bp in prokaryotic genome structure. The initial steps involve ligating an oligonucleotide of known sequence (the "adaptor") to a fragmented genome to facilitate amplification, subtraction and downstream sequencing. SSH results in the creation of a library of unique DNA fragments which have been traditionally analyzed via Sanger sequencing. Numerous next generation sequencing technologies have entered the market yet SSH is incompatible with these platforms. This is due to the high level of sequence conservation of the oligonucleotide used for SSH. This rigid adherence is partly because it has yet to be determined if alteration of this oligonucleotide will have a deleterious impact on subtraction efficiency. The subtraction occurs when non-unique fragments are inhibited by a secondary self-pairing structure which requires exact nucleotide sequence. We determine if appending custom sequence to the 5' terminal ends of these oligonucleotides during the nested PCR stages of PSSH will reduce subtraction efficiency. We compare a pool of ten S. aureus clinical isolates with a standard PSSH and custom tailed-PSSH. We detected no statistically significant difference between their subtraction efficiencies. Our observations suggest that the adaptor's terminal ends may be labeled during the nested PCR step. This produces libraries labeled with custom sequence. This does not lead to loss of subtraction efficiency and would be invaluable for groups wishing to combine SSH or PSSH with their own downstream applications, such as a high throughput sequencing platform. PMID:20532817

  8. Flight Measurements of Horizontal-Tail Loads on the Bell X-5 Research Airplane at a Sweep Angle of 58.7 Deg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Robert D

    1955-01-01

    A flight investigation was made at altitudes of 40,000, 25,000 and 15,000 feet to determine the horizontal-tail loads of the Bell X-5 research airplane at a sweep angle of 58.7 deg over the lift range of the airplane for Mach numbers from 0.61 to 1.00. The horizontal-tail loads were found to be nonlinear with lift throughout the lift ranges tested at all Mach numbers except at a Mach number of 1.00. The balancing tail loads reflected the changes which occur in the wing characteristics with increasing angle of attack. The nonlinearities were, in general, more pronounced at the higher angles of attack near the pitch-up where the balancing tail loads indicate that the wing-fuselage combination becomes unstable. No apparent effects of altitude on the balancing tail loads were evident over the comparable lift ranges of these tests at altitudes from 40,000 feet to 15,000 feet. Comparisons of balancing tail loads obtained from flight and windtunnel tests indicated discrepancies in absolute magnitudes, but the general trends of the data agree. Some differences in absolute magnitude may be accounted for by the tail load carried inboard of the strain-gage station and the load induced on the fuselage by the presence of the tail. These loads were not measured in flight.

  9. 40 CFR 61.253 - Determining compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Operating Mill Tailings § 61.253 Determining compliance. Compliance with the emission standard in...

  10. 40 CFR 61.253 - Determining compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Operating Mill Tailings § 61.253 Determining compliance. Compliance with the emission standard in...

  11. 40 CFR 61.253 - Determining compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Operating Mill Tailings § 61.253 Determining compliance. Compliance with the emission standard in...

  12. 40 CFR 61.253 - Determining compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Operating Mill Tailings § 61.253 Determining compliance. Compliance with the emission standard in...

  13. 40 CFR 61.253 - Determining compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS National Emission Standards for Radon Emissions From Operating Mill Tailings § 61.253 Determining compliance. Compliance with the emission standard in...

  14. Star Clusters in the Tidal Tails of Interacting Galaxies: Cluster Populations Across a Variety of Tail Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullan, B.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Kepley, A. A.; Lee, K. H.; Charlton, J. C.; Knierman, K.; Bastian, N.; Chandar, R.; Durrell, P. R.; Elmegreen, D.; English, J.; Gallagher, S. C.; Gronwall, C.; Hibbard, J. E.; Hunsberger, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Maybhate, A.; Palma, C.; Trancho, G.; Vacca, W. D.

    2011-04-01

    We have searched for compact stellar structures within 17 tidal tails in 13 different interacting galaxies using F606W- and F814W-band images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample of tidal tails includes a diverse population of optical properties, merging galaxy mass ratios, H I content, and ages. Combining our tail sample with Knierman et al., we find evidence of star clusters formed in situ with M V < -8.5 and V - I < 2.0 in 10 of 23 tidal tails; we are able to identify cluster candidates to M V = -6.5 in the closest tails. Three tails offer clear examples of "beads on a string" star formation morphology in V - I color maps. Two tails present both tidal dwarf galaxy candidates and cluster candidates. Statistical diagnostics indicate that clusters in tidal tails may be drawn from the same power-law luminosity functions (with logarithmic slopes ?-2 to -2.5) found in quiescent spiral galaxies and interiors of interacting systems. We find that the tail regions with the largest number of observable clusters are relatively young (lsim250 Myr old) and bright (V <~ 24 mag arcsec-2), probably attributed to the strong bursts of star formation in interacting systems soon after periapse. Otherwise, we find no statistical difference between cluster-rich and cluster-poor tails in terms of many observable characteristics, though this analysis suffers from complex, unresolved gas dynamics and projection effects.

  15. Correlation between aggregation structure and tailing mineral crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen-tao; Li, Xin-wei; Wang, Hua-jun; Sun, Chuan-yao; Duan, Xu-qin

    2014-09-01

    Direct reduction is an emerging technology for the utilization of refractory iron ore. With this technology, iron oxides in the ore can be reduced to recoverable elemental iron. The structure of granular aggregates in direct reduction products was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that iron is mainly generated as a shell in the outer edge of the aggregates. The thermal conductivity of the iron shell is higher than that of other minerals. Thus, minerals close to the iron shell cool faster than those in the inner shells and do not crystallize well. These minerals mainly become stage 2 tailings. Hence the XRD intensity of stage 2 tailings is lower than that of stage 1 tailings. When iron is mainly generated in the interior of the aggregates, the crystallinity of stage 2 tailings will be higher than that of stage 1 tailings. This indicates that the crystallinity of tailings can be used as a marker for the aggregate structure.

  16. On the importance of tail ratios for psychological science.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Mohr, Elisabeth; Hagmann, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Even small group-mean differences (whether combined with variance differences or not) or variance differences alone (absent mean differences) can generate marked and sometimes surprising imbalances in the representation of the respective groups compared in the distributional tail regions. Such imbalances in group representation, quantified as tail ratios, have general importance in the context of any threshold, susceptibility, diathesis-stress, selection, or similar models (including the study of sex differences), as widely conceptualized and applied in the psychological, social, medical, and biological sciences. However, commonly used effect-size measures, such as Cohen's d, largely exploit data information around the center of distributions, rather than from the tails, thereby missing potentially important patterns found in the tail regions. This account reviews the background and history of tail ratios, emphasizes their importance for psychological research, proposes a consensus approach for defining and interpreting them, introduces a tail-ratio calculator, and outlines future research agenda. PMID:24245078

  17. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground.

    Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born.

    The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light.

    This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  18. Cross-tail current, field-aligned current, and B(y)

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufmann, R.L.; Lu, C.; Larson, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    Orbits of individual charged particles were traced in a one-dimensional magnetic field model that included a uniform cross-tail component B[sub yo]. The effects of B(sub yo) on the cross-tail current distribution j[sub y](z), the average cross-tail drift velocity(nu[sub y]z), and the average pitch angle change(delta alpha) experienced during current sheet encounters were calculated. The addition of a B[sub yo] that exceeded several tenths of one nanotesla completely eliminated all resonance effects for odd-N orbits. An odd-N resonance involves ions that enter and exit the current sheet on the same side. Pitch angles of nearly all such ions changed substantially during a typical current sheet interaction, and there was no region of large cross-tail drift velocity in the presence of a modest B[sub yo]. The addition of a very large B[sub yo] guide field in the direction that enhances the natural drift produces a large j(y) and small (Delta alpha) for ions with all energies. The addition of a modest B[sub yo] had less effect near even-N resonances. In this case, ions in a small energy range were found to undergo so little change in pitch angle that particles which originated in the ionosphere would pass through the current sheet and return to the conjugate ionosphere. Finally, the cross-tail drift of ions from regions dominated by stochastic orbits to regions dominated by either resonant or guiding center orbits was considered. The ion drift speed changed substantially during such transitions. The accompanying electrons obey the guiding center equations, so electron drift is more uniform. Any difference between gradients in the fluxes associated with electron and ion drifts requires the presence of a Birkeland current in order to maintain charge neutrality. This plasma sheet region therefore serves as a current generator.

  19. HERA BEAM TAIL SHAPING BY TUNE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2003-05-19

    To study CP violation, the HEM-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  20. The Damping Tail of CMB Anisotropies

    E-print Network

    Wayne Hu; Martin White

    1996-09-10

    By decomposing the damping tail of CMB anisotropies into a series of transfer functions representing individual physical effects, we provide ingredients that will aid in the reconstruction of the cosmological model from small-scale CMB anisotropy data. We accurately calibrate the model-independent effects of diffusion and reionization damping which provide potentially the most robust information on the background cosmology. Removing these effects, we uncover model-dependent processes such as the acoustic peak modulation and gravitational enhancement that can help distinguish between alternate models of structure formation and provide windows into the evolution of fluctuations at various stages in their growth.

  1. Plasma flow pulsations in earth's magnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Scarf, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    On November 9, 1972 Imp 7 was in the plasma sheet from 0430 to 1000 UT and detected strong earthward plasma flows. A series of nine temporal pulsations were observed to vary in bulk speed from 0 to about 1500 km/s and to occur at 15-30 minute intervals. A positive correlation exists between the speed variations and changes in the standard deviation of the magnetic field. Evident periodicity was not found corresponding to Imp 7 pulsations and other magnetospheric or solar wind data. It is felt that the pulsations may indicate that tail reconnection is unsteady in periods of 10-30 minutes.

  2. 54. Photocopied August 1978. INTERIOR OF A TAIL PIT OR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photocopied August 1978. INTERIOR OF A TAIL PIT OR TAIL RACE AT THE EAST END OF THE POWER HOUSE, SEPTEMBER 17, 1900. THE PRE-MOULDED BLOCKS WHICH FORMED THE SIDE WALLS AND THE ARCHED FOREBAY WALL ARE CLEARLY VISIBLE. THE MONOLITHIC FLOOR OF THE TAIL PIT, HOWEVER, HAS NOT YET BEEN POURED: NEITHER HAS THE MONOLITHIC ARCHED ROOF. (75) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  3. Rare Events Simulation for Heavy-Tailed Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Klemens Binswanger; Bjarne Højgaard

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies rare events simulation for the heavy--tailed case, where some of theunderlying distributions fail to have the exponential moments required for the standardalgorithms for the light--tailed case. Several counterexamples are given to indicate that inthe heavy--tailed case, there are severe problems with the approach of developing limit resultsfor the conditional distribution given the rare event and use this

  4. Female choice selects for extreme tail length in a widowbird

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malte Andersson

    1982-01-01

    Darwin's1 hypothesis that male secondary sexual ornaments evolve through female preferences is theoretically plausible2-7, but there is little experimental field evidence that such preferences exist8-10. I have studied female choice in relation to male tail length in the long-tailed widowbird, Euplectes progne, and report here that males in which the tail was experimentally elongated showed higher mating success than males

  5. NESTING ECOLOGY OF SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHERS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENNETH R. NOLTE

    1996-01-01

    We examined nest-site selection and nesting success of the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (TyrunnusforJicatus) on the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge, San Patricia County, Texas in 1992-1993. Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) comprised 22% of available shrubs; however, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers used shrubs out of proportion to their availability, placing 91% of their nests in mesquite. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher nests were placed in taller

  6. Splaying of Aliphatic Tails Plays a Central Role in Barrier Crossing During Liposome Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Mirjanian, Dina; Dickey, Allison N.; Hoh, Jan H.; Woolf, Thomas B.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    The fusion between two lipid bilayers involves crossing a complicated energy landscape. The limiting barrier in the process appears to be between two closely opposed bilayers, and the intermediate state where the outer leaflets are fused. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the free energy barrier for the fusion of two liposomes and to examine the molecular details of barrier crossing. In order to capture the slow dynamics of fusion, a model using coarse-grained representations of lipids was used. The fusion between pairs of liposomes was simulated for four systems: DPPC, DOPC, a 3:1 mixture of DPPC/DPPE and an asymmetric lipid tail system in which one tail of DPPC was reduced to half the length (ASTail). The weighted histogram method was used to compute the free energy as a function of separation distance. The relative barrier heights for these systems was found to be ASTail?DPPC>DPPC/DPPE>DOPC, in agreement with experimental observations. Further, the free energy curves for all four can be overlayed on a single curve by plotting the free energy versus the surface separation (differing only in the point of fusion). These simulations also confirm that the two main contributions to the free energy barrier are the removal of water between the vesicles and the deformation of the vesicle. The most prominent molecular detail of barrier crossing in all cases examined was the splaying of lipid tails, where a single splayed lipid formed a bridge between the two outer leaflets that promotes additional lipid mixing between the vesicles and eventually leads to fusion. The tail splay appears to be closely connected to the energetics of the process. For example, the high barrier for the ASTail is the result of a smaller distance between terminal methyl groups in the splayed molecule. The shortening of this distance requires the liposomes to be closer together, which significantly increases the cost of water removal and bilayer deformation. Before tail splay can initiate fusion, contact must occur between a tail end and the external water. In isolated vesicles, the contact fraction is correlated to the fusogenicity difference between DPPC and DOPC. Moreover, for planar bilayers the contact fraction is much lower for DPPC, which is consistent with its lack of fusion in giant vesicles. The simulation results show the key roles of lipid tail dynamics in governing the fusion energy landscape. PMID:20701307

  7. Monitoring black-tailed prairie dog colonies with high-resolution satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sidle, J.G.; Johnson, D.H.; Euliss, B.R.; Tooze, M.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Fish and Wildlife Service has determined that the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) warrants listing as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. Central to any conservation planning for the black-tailed prairie dog is an appropriate detection and monitoring technique. Because coarse-resolution satellite imagery is not adequate to detect black-tailed prairie dog colonies, we examined the usefulness of recently available high-resolution (1-m) satellite imagery. In 6 purchased scenes of national grasslands, we were easily able to visually detect small and large colonies without using image-processing algorithms. The Ikonos (Space Imaging(tm)) satellite imagery was as adequate as large-scale aerial photography to delineate colonies. Based on the high quality of imagery, we discuss a possible monitoring program for black-tailed prairie dog colonies throughout the Great Plains, using the species' distribution in North Dakota as an example. Monitoring plots could be established and imagery acquired periodically to track the expansion and contraction of colonies.

  8. Baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Gunnison, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Groundwater Contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site Near Gunnison, Colorado evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from groundwater contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site are being placed in an off-site disposal cell by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. Currently, the UMTRA Project is evaluating groundwater contamination. This is the second risk assessment of groundwater contamination at this site. The first risk assessment was performed primarily to evaluate existing domestic wells. This risk assessment evaluates the most contaminated monitor wells at the processing site. It will be used to assist in determining what remedial action is needed for contaminated groundwater at the site after the tailings are relocated. This risk assessment follows an approach outlined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first step is to evaluate groundwater data collected from monitor wells at the site. Evaluation of these data showed that the main contaminants in the groundwater are cadmium, cobalt, iron, manganese, sulfate, uranium, and some of the products of radioactive decay of uranium.

  9. Effect of metabolic acidosis on white-tailed deer antler development.

    PubMed

    Campbell, T A; Hewitt, D G

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis can result when herbivores consume browse diets high in plant secondary compounds. One mechanism for buffering excess acid is the mobilization of calcium and other alkaline salts from the skeletal system. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and other cervids consuming browse during antler formation may use minerals essential for antler development as buffers, resulting in altered antler characteristics. Our research objectives were to examine the effects of metabolic acidosis on mineral metabolism, acid-base homeostasis, and antler development in white-tailed deer. Fifteen male white-tailed deer were assigned to one of three diets: 2% NH(4)Cl, 3% commercial tannic acid, or a basal ration without additive. Two feeding trials were completed on each deer to determine nutrient use. Urine pH and the percentage of urinary nitrogen excreted as NH+4 varied by diet. No significant diet or trial effects occurred for nitrogen, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, or sodium use. Urinary calcium excretion varied between diets. No dietary differences were observed for antler characteristics. The NH(4)Cl diet induced metabolic acidosis but did not alter antler development in white-tailed deer. Skeletal mineral reserves and mineral intake appeared sufficient to buffer excess acids and support antler development. PMID:11121351

  10. Exploring Stellar Populations in the Tidal Tails of NGC3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy interactions can inject material into the intergalactic medium via violent gravitational dynamics, often visualized in tidal tails. The composition of these tails has remained a mystery, as previous studies have focused on detecting tidal features, rather than the composite material itself. With this in mind, we have developed an observing program using deep, multiband imaging to probe the chaotic regions of tidal tails in search for an underlying stellar population. NGC3256's Western and Eastern tidal tails serve as a case study for this new technique. Our results show median color values of u - g = 1.12 and r - i = 0.09 for the Western tail, and u - g = 1.29 and r - i = 0.21 for the Eastern tail, corresponding to ages of approximately 450 Myr and 900 Myr for the tails, respectively. A u - g color gradient is seen in the Western tail as well, running from 1.32 to 1.08 (~2000 Myr to 400 Myr), suggesting ages inside tidal tails can have significant variations.

  11. Evaluating target cold spots by the use of tail EUDs *†

    PubMed Central

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Dempsey, James F.; Halabi, Tarek; Romeijn, H. Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To propose a new measure of target underdose that can be used in the evaluation and optimization of radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods and Materials We compare various formulations of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and introduce a modification of existing EUD definitions, which we call tail EUD. Tail EUD is a measure of “cold spots” below the prescription dose in the target dose distribution. It has units of Gy. We investigate the mathematical properties of various target EUD concepts, including tail EUD. We apply the tail EUD measure retrospectively to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans from our plan database. We also use tail EUD as an optimization objective in the optimization of prostate, pancreas, and head&neck plans. Results Tail EUD has desirable mathematical properties. In particular, it is convex and it leads to convex level sets (i.e., no local minima) if the EUD from which it is derived is concave. The tail EUD value is correlated with the subjective degree of target coverage. Constraining tail EUDs to a certain level in plan optimization leads to comparable target coverage in different plans and treatment sites. Conclusions The newly introduced concept of tail EUD appears to be useful both for plan evaluation and optimization. In addition, it can potentially be applied in the design of new clinical protocols. PMID:18440728

  12. Review of fugitive dust control for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.T.; Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    An immediate concern associated with the disposal of uranium mill tailings is that wind erosion of the tailings from an impoundment area will subsequently deposit tailings on surrounding areas. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating the current technology for fugitive dust control. Different methods of fugitive dust control, including chemical, physical, and vegetative, have been used or tested on mill tailings piles. This report presents the results of a literature review and discussions with manufacturers and users of available stabilization materials and techniques.

  13. EGFR: tale of the C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Gajiwala, Ketan S

    2013-07-01

    The carboxy terminal tail of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a critical role in the regulation of the enzyme activity of the kinase. There is a good structural model for the mechanism by which the C-terminal tail proximal to the kinase domain contributes to the negative regulation of the activity. Its conformation in the active state, conversely, has remained elusive due to its dynamic nature. A recently published structure of EGFR kinase domain shows the conformation of the proximal C-terminal tail in the active kinase. Analysis of this conformational state of the C-terminal tail is presented, and some of the mutagenesis data is revisited. PMID:23674349

  14. Estimating Impact Forces of Tail Club Strikes by Ankylosaurid Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Victoria Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been assumed that the unusual tail club of ankylosaurid dinosaurs was used actively as a weapon, but the biological feasibility of this behaviour has not been examined in detail. Ankylosaurid tail clubs are composed of interlocking vertebrae, which form the handle, and large terminal osteoderms, which form the knob. Methodology/Principal Findings Computed tomographic (CT) scans of several ankylosaurid tail clubs referred to Dyoplosaurus and Euoplocephalus, combined with measurements of free caudal vertebrae, provide information used to estimate the impact force of tail clubs of various sizes. Ankylosaurid tails are modeled as a series of segments for which mass, muscle cross-sectional area, torque, and angular acceleration are calculated. Free caudal vertebrae segments had limited vertical flexibility, but the tail could have swung through approximately 100° laterally. Muscle scars on the pelvis record the presence of a large M. longissimus caudae, and ossified tendons alongside the handle represent M. spinalis. CT scans showed that knob osteoderms were predominantly cancellous, which would have lowered the rotational inertia of the tail club and made it easier to wield as a weapon. Conclusions/Significance Large knobs could generate sufficient force to break bone during impacts, but average and small knobs could not. Tail swinging behaviour is feasible in ankylosaurids, but it remains unknown whether the tail was used for interspecific defense, intraspecific combat, or both. PMID:19707581

  15. Tail loss and thermoregulation in the common lizard Zootoca vivipara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gábor; Kovács, Tibor; Tóth, Tamás; Török, János; Korsós, Zoltán; Merilä, Juha

    2004-10-01

    Tail autotomy in lizards is an adaptive strategy that has evolved to reduce the risk of predation. Since tail loss reduces body mass and moving ability—which in turn are expected to influence thermal balance—there is potential for a trade-off between tail autotomy and thermoregulation. To test this hypothesis, we studied a common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) population at high latitude, inhabiting a high-cost thermal environment. Z. vivipara is a small, non-territorial lizard known as a very accurate thermoregulator. We made two predictions: (1) the reduced body weight due to tail loss results in faster heating rate (a benefit), and (2) the reduction in locomotor ability after tail loss induces a shift to the use of thermally poorer microhabitats (a cost), thus decreasing the field body temperatures of active lizards. We did not find any effect of tail loss on heating rate in laboratory experiments conducted under different thermal conditions. Likewise, no significant relationship between tail condition and field body temperatures, or between tail condition and thermal microhabitat use, were detected. Thus, our results suggest that tail autotomy does not influence the accuracy of thermoregulation in small-bodied lizards.

  16. Influence of histone tails and H4 tail acetylations on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lu, Chenning; Yang, Ye; Fan, Yanping; Yang, Renliang; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2011-12-16

    Nucleosome-nucleosome interaction plays a fundamental role in chromatin folding and self-association. The cation-induced condensation of nucleosome core particles (NCPs) displays properties similar to those of chromatin fibers, with important contributions from the N-terminal histone tails. We study the self-association induced by addition of cations [Mg(2+), Ca(2+), cobalt(III)hexammine(3+), spermidine(3+) and spermine(4)(+)] for NCPs reconstituted with wild-type unmodified histones and with globular tailless histones and for NCPs with the H4 histone tail having lysine (K) acetylations or lysine-to-glutamine mutations at positions K5, K8, K12 and K16. In addition, the histone construct with the single H4K16 acetylation was investigated. Acetylated histones were prepared by a semisynthetic native chemical ligation method. The aggregation behavior of NCPs shows a general cation-dependent behavior similar to that of the self-association of nucleosome arrays. Unlike nucleosome array self-association, NCP aggregation is sensitive to position and nature of the H4 tail modification. The tetra-acetylation in the H4 tail significantly weakens the nucleosome-nucleosome interaction, while the H4 K?Q tetra-mutation displays a more modest effect. The single H4K16 acetylation also weakens the self-association of NCPs, which reflects the specific role of H4K16 in the nucleosome-nucleosome stacking. Tailless NCPs can aggregate in the presence of oligocations, which indicates that attraction also occurs by tail-independent nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and DNA-DNA attraction in the presence of cations. The experimental data were compared with the results of coarse-grained computer modeling for NCP solutions with explicit presence of mobile ions. PMID:22051513

  17. Time Dependent Simulation of Energetic Ion Tail Formation Coupled to Thermal Plasma Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Bernholdt, D. E.; Elwasif, W.; Jaeger, E. F.; Lynch, V. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Bader, A.; Bonoli, P. T.; Jardin, S. C.; Ku, L.-P.

    2008-11-01

    Energetic ion populations have long been observed in tokamak plasmas heated by high power electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. Previous self-consistent simulations [1] of these tails have involved iteration between an RF field solver and a Fokker-Planck solver to find stationary field and particle distributions assuming fixed thermal plasma profiles. Now, using the SWIM Integrated Plasma Simulator framework to couple the AORSA full-wave RF code, the CQL3D Fokker-Planck solver and the TSC tokamak simulation code, we are able to perform time-dependent simulations describing the evolution of the tail population including its effect on heating of the thermal plasma. Comparison will be presented with charge exchange neutral particle analysis measurements on Alcator C-Mod. [1] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, S.D. Ahern, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13, 056101-1 (2006).

  18. Radiologic characterization of the Mexican Hat, Utah, uranium mill tailings remedial action site: Addendum D1

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlam, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    This radiologic characterization of the inactive uranium millsite at Mexican Hat, Utah, was conducted by Bendix Field Engineering Corporation for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Grand Junctions Project Office in response to and in accord with a Statement of Work prepared by the DOE Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) Technical Assistance Contractor, Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc. The objective of this project was to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of contamination that exceeds the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards at the Mexican Hat site. The data presented in this report are required for characterization of the areas adjacent to the Mexican Hat tailings piles and for the subsequent design of cleanup activities. Some on- pile sampling was required to determine the depth of the 15-pCi/g Ra- 226 interface in an area where wind and water erosion has taken place.

  19. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Timothy A.; Strand, Nicholas S.; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S.; Moon, Randall T.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC+, mpo+) and macrophages (mpeg1+) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/?-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  20. INTERPRETATION OF (596) SCHEILA'S TRIPLE DUST TAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hanayama, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hideaki; Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hsieh, Henry H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Vaubaillon, Jeremie J. [Observatoire de Paris, I.M.C.C.E., Denfert Rochereau, Bat. A., FR-75014 Paris (France); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ohta, Kouji [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hamanowa, Hiromi [Hamanowa Astronomical Observatory, Motomiya, Fukushima 969-1204 (Japan); Kim, Junhan [Yangcheon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Nakamura, Akiko M., E-mail: ishiguro@snu.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Strange-looking dust cloud around asteroid (596) Scheila was discovered on 2010 December 11.44-11.47. Unlike normal cometary tails, it consisted of three tails and faded within two months. We constructed a model to reproduce the morphology of the dust cloud based on the laboratory measurement of high-velocity impacts and the dust dynamics. As a result, we succeeded in reproducing the peculiar dust cloud by an impact-driven ejecta plume consisting of an impact cone and downrange plume. Assuming an impact angle of 45 Degree-Sign , our model suggests that a decameter-sized asteroid collided with (596) Scheila from the direction of ({alpha}{sub im}, {delta}{sub im}) = (60 Degree-Sign , -40 Degree-Sign ) in J2000 coordinates on 2010 December 3. The maximum ejection velocity of the dust particles exceeded 100 m s{sup -1}. Our results suggest that the surface of (596) Scheila consists of materials with low tensile strength.

  1. Effects of Tail Clipping on Larval Performance and Tail Regeneration Rates in the Near Eastern Fire Salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Ori; Polevikove, Antonina; Blank, Lior; Goedbloed, Daniel; Küpfer, Eliane; Gershberg, Anna; Koplovich, Avi; Blaustein, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tail-tip clipping is a common technique for collecting tissue samples from amphibian larvae and adults. Surprisingly, studies of this invasive sampling procedure or of natural tail clipping – i.e., bites inflicted by predators including conspecifics - on the performance and fitness of aquatic larval stages of urodeles are scarce. We conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects of posterior tail clipping (~30 percent of tail) on Near Eastern fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) larvae. In a laboratory study, we checked regeneration rates of posterior tail-tip clipping at different ages. Regeneration rates were hump-shaped, peaking at the age of ~30 days and then decreasing. This variation in tail regeneration rates suggests tradeoffs in resource allocation between regeneration and somatic growth during early and advanced development. In an outdoor artificial pond experiment, under constant larval densities, we assessed how tail clipping of newborn larvae affects survival to, time to, and size at metamorphosis. Repeated measures ANOVA on mean larval survival per pond revealed no effect of tail clipping. Tail clipping had correspondingly no effect on larval growth and development expressed in size (mass and snout-vent length) at, and time to, metamorphosis. We conclude that despite the given variation in tail regeneration rates throughout larval ontogeny, clipping of 30% percent of the posterior tail area seems to have no adverse effects on larval fitness and survival. We suggest that future use of this imperative tool for the study of amphibian should take into account larval developmental stage during the time of application and not just the relative size of the clipped tail sample. PMID:26065683

  2. Effects of Tail Clipping on Larval Performance and Tail Regeneration Rates in the Near Eastern Fire Salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata.

    PubMed

    Segev, Ori; Polevikove, Antonina; Blank, Lior; Goedbloed, Daniel; Küpfer, Eliane; Gershberg, Anna; Koplovich, Avi; Blaustein, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tail-tip clipping is a common technique for collecting tissue samples from amphibian larvae and adults. Surprisingly, studies of this invasive sampling procedure or of natural tail clipping - i.e., bites inflicted by predators including conspecifics - on the performance and fitness of aquatic larval stages of urodeles are scarce. We conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects of posterior tail clipping (~30 percent of tail) on Near Eastern fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) larvae. In a laboratory study, we checked regeneration rates of posterior tail-tip clipping at different ages. Regeneration rates were hump-shaped, peaking at the age of ~30 days and then decreasing. This variation in tail regeneration rates suggests tradeoffs in resource allocation between regeneration and somatic growth during early and advanced development. In an outdoor artificial pond experiment, under constant larval densities, we assessed how tail clipping of newborn larvae affects survival to, time to, and size at metamorphosis. Repeated measures ANOVA on mean larval survival per pond revealed no effect of tail clipping. Tail clipping had correspondingly no effect on larval growth and development expressed in size (mass and snout-vent length) at, and time to, metamorphosis. We conclude that despite the given variation in tail regeneration rates throughout larval ontogeny, clipping of 30% percent of the posterior tail area seems to have no adverse effects on larval fitness and survival. We suggest that future use of this imperative tool for the study of amphibian should take into account larval developmental stage during the time of application and not just the relative size of the clipped tail sample. PMID:26065683

  3. Culturable and molecular phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms in an open-dumped, extremely acidic Pb/Zn mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Tan, Gui-Liang; Shu, Wen-Sheng; Hallberg, Kevin B; Li, Fang; Lan, Chong-Yu; Zhou, Wen-Hua; Huang, Li-Nan

    2008-09-01

    A combination of cultivation-based and molecular-based approaches was used to reveal the culturable and molecular diversity of the microbes inhabiting an open-dumped Pb/Zn mine tailings that was undergoing intensive acid generation (pH 1.9). Culturable bacteria found in the extremely acidic mine tailings were Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Sulfobacillus thermotolerans and Acidiphilium cryptum, where the number of acidophilic heterotrophs was ten times higher than that of the iron- and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria. Cloning and phylogenetic analysis revealed that, in contrast to the adjacent AMD, the mine tailings possessed a low microbial diversity with archaeal sequence types dominating the 16S rRNA gene library. Of the 141 clones examined, 132 were represented by two sequence types phylogenetically affiliated with the iron-oxidizing archaea Ferroplasma acidiphilum and three belonged to two tentative groups within the Thermoplasma lineage so far represented by only a few environmental sequences. Six clones in the library were represented by the only bacterial sequence type and were closely related to the well-described iron-oxidizer L. ferriphilum. The significant differences in the prokaryotic community structures of the extremely acidic mine tailings and the AMD associated with it highlights the importance of studying the microbial communities that are more directly involved in the iron and sulfur cycles of mine tailings. PMID:18512002

  4. Our involvement only Your involvement with us

    E-print Network

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Our involvement only Your involvement with us Search Process & Timeline Pre-Search Analysis Search expectations and candidate criteria · Develop Search Strategy · Confirm compensation package, benefits, etc Manage- ment Selection and Hiring Final Interviews Approval Reference Checks Job Offer and Negotiation

  5. GnRH immunocontraception of male and female white-tailed deer fawns

    Microsoft Academic Search

    LOWELL A. MILLER; JAMES P. G IONFRIDDO; JACK C. RHYAN; KATHLEEN A. FAGERSTONE; DONALD C. WAGNER; GARY J. KILLIAN

    Immunocontraceptive vaccines based on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) have been tested in adult white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), but their effects on fawns are unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine if early immunization against GnRH would induce a long-lasting immune response in fawns, and if it would delay or prevent sexual development. We gave primary and subsequent booster injections

  6. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN PREDATOR REMOVAL AND WHITE-TAILED DEER NET PRODUCTIVITY1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SAMUEL L. BEASOM

    This study was conducted to determine the impact of predation on productivity of white- tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in South Texas by removing predators from one area and compar- ing the results to a control area. A total of 188 coyotes (Canis latrans) and 120 bobcats (Lynx rufus) were removed during predator removal efforts on the approximately 5,400-acre (2,186-ha) experimental

  7. Centrally Acting Imidazolines Stimulate Vascular Alpha 1A-Adrenergic Receptors in Rat-Tail Artery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wentsworth B. Kennedy; Louis Crane; Ramon R. Gonzalez; Oommen K. George; Lincoln P. Edwards

    2006-01-01

    ?  1. Centrally acting imidazoline antihypertensive agents clonidine and moxonidine also act peripherally to contract blood vessels. While these agents act at both I1-imidazoline and alpha 2 adrenergic receptors centrally, the receptor types by which they mediate contraction require further definition. We therefore characterized the receptor subtype by which these agents mediate contraction of proximal rat-tail artery.2. Dose–response curves were determined

  8. Comparison of the chemical composition and functional properties of Phaseolus lunatus prime and tailing starches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Betancur-Ancona; J. López-Luna; L. Chel-Guerrero

    2003-01-01

    A physicochemical characterization was made of the tailing starch isolated from the legume Phaseolus lunatus L. Proximate composition was: 1.33% protein, 3.64% fibre, 0.18% fat, 1.10% ash and 93.8% carbohydrates as nitrogen-free extract. Total dietary fibre content was 22.0%, soluble fibre was 2.28%, and insoluble fibre was 19.7%, as determined using the Prosky AOAC 71, 1017 (1988) method. Amylose, as

  9. Laboratory efficacy study of six concentrations of warfarin bait for black-tailed prairie dogs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeff J. Mach; Scott E. Hygnstrom; Richard M. Poché

    2002-01-01

    Six different concentrations of warfarin bait (0.0, 44.7, 89.5, 233.0, 407.0, and 777.6ppm) were fed for 15 days to black-tailed prairie dogs to determine efficacy. The resulting mortality was 0, 30, 50, 60, 100, and 80%, respectively. No difference in mortality was observed among the sexes. Differences in bait consumption were greater between the control group and all treatment groups

  10. Thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen from rat tail tendon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alina Sionkowska; Alina Kami?ska

    1999-01-01

    The thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen solution, collagen film and pieces of rat tail tendon (RTT) were compared. Their thermal stability’s were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by viscometric measurements. The denaturation temperatures of collagen solution, film and pieces of RTT were different. The helix-coil transition occur near 40°C in collagen solution, near 112°C in collagen

  11. A proactive approach to sustainable management of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edraki, Mansour; Baumgartl, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The reactive strategies to manage mine tailings i.e. containment of slurries of tailings in tailings storage facilities (TSF's) and remediation of tailings solids or tailings seepage water after the decommissioning of those facilities, can be technically inefficient to eliminate environmental risks (e.g. prevent dispersion of contaminants and catastrophic dam wall failures), pose a long term economic burden for companies, governments and society after mine closure, and often fail to meet community expectations. Most preventive environmental management practices promote proactive integrated approaches to waste management whereby the source of environmental issues are identified to help make a more informed decisions. They often use life cycle assessment to find the "hot spots" of environmental burdens. This kind of approach is often based on generic data and has rarely been used for tailings. Besides, life cycle assessments are less useful for designing operations or simulating changes in the process and consequent environmental outcomes. It is evident that an integrated approach for tailings research linked to better processing options is needed. A literature review revealed that there are only few examples of integrated approaches. The aim of this project is to develop new tailings management models by streamlining orebody characterization, process optimization and rehabilitation. The approach is based on continuous fingerprinting of geochemical processes from orebody to tailings storage facility, and benchmark the success of such proactive initiatives by evidence of no impacts and no future projected impacts on receiving environments. We present an approach for developing such a framework and preliminary results from a case study where combined grinding and flotation models developed using geometallurgical data from the orebody were constructed to predict the properties of tailings produced under various processing scenarios. The modelling scenarios based on the case study data provide the capacity to predict the composition of tailings and the resulting environmental management implications. For example, the type and content of clay minerals in tailings will affect the geotechnical stability and water recovery. Clay content will also influence decisions made for paste or thickened tailings and underground backfilling. It is possible by using an integrated assessment framework to evaluate more alternatives, including the production of additional saleable and benign streams, alternative tailings treatment and disposal, as well as options for reuse, recycling and pre-processing of existing tailings.

  12. Centrally acting imidazolines stimulate vascular alpha 1A-adrenergic receptors in Rat-Tail Artery.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Wentsworth B; Crane, Louis; Gonzalez, Ramon R; George, Oommen K; Edwards, Lincoln P

    2006-01-01

    : 1. Centrally acting imidazoline antihypertensive agents clonidine and moxonidine also act peripherally to contract blood vessels. While these agents act at both I(1)-imidazoline and alpha 2 adrenergic receptors centrally, the receptor types by which they mediate contraction require further definition. We therefore characterized the receptor subtype by which these agents mediate contraction of proximal rat-tail artery. 2. Dose-response curves were determined for phenylephrine and for several imidazoline ligands, using endothelium denuded, isolated ring segments, of tail arteries from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Ring segments were mounted on a force transducer with platinum wires and immersed in a tissue bath containing Krebs solution, to which drugs could be added. Signals were digitized and recorded by a computer. 3. Tail artery contractions expressed as a percent of contraction to 106 mM potassium were phenylephrine (96%), moxonidine (88%), clonidine (52%), and UK14304 (30%). Neither rilmenidine nor harmane caused contraction. Contraction of tail artery to moxonidine or clonidine could be blocked by alpha 1 antagonist urapidil or prazosin, and also by alpha 1A subtype selective antagonist WB4101. Schild plots were generated and a calculated pA2 value of 9.2 for prazosin in the presence of clonidine confirms clonidine as an agonist at alpha 1A receptors in proximal segments of rat-tail artery. 4. Our work suggests that clonidine and moxonidine are promiscuous compounds at micromolar concentrations and that harmane and rilmenidine are more selective compounds for in vivo imidazoline research. PMID:16897362

  13. Parent Involvement: Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde Park - Kenwood Community Conference, Chicago, IL. Child Care Task Force.

    The focus of this paper is on the immediate and long-range advantages of parent involvement, the definitions and implications of varying levels of parent involvement in child care center operations, and the general means by which a chosen level of involvement might be achieved. The advantages of parent involvement are discussed briefly in terms of…

  14. Pharmacological recruitment of the GABAergic tail of the ventral tegmental area by acute drug exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Waltisperger, Elisabeth; Bourdy, Romain; Valera, Antoine; Veinante, Pierre; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The tail of the ventral tegmental area (tVTA), also called the rostromedial tegmental nucleus, is a newly defined brain structure and a potential control centre for dopaminergic activity. It was identified by the induction of DeltaFosB following chronic cocaine exposure. In this work, we screened 20 drugs for their ability to induce FosB/DeltaFosB in the tVTA. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Immunohistochemistry following systemic drug administration was used to study FosB/DeltaFosB induction in the tVTA of adult rats. Double-staining was used to determine whether dopamine or GABA neurones are involved in this induction. KEY RESULTS The acute injection of the psychostimulant drugs cocaine, D-amphetamine, (+/?)-3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylphenidate or caffeine, induced the expression of FosB/DeltaFosB in the tVTA GABAergic cells. No induction was observed following exposure to ethanol, diazepam, ?-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), morphine, ketamine, phencyclidine (PCP), ?9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), sodium valproic acid or gabapentin. To evaluate the role of monoamine transporters in the psychostimulant-induced expression of FosB/DeltaFosB, we tested the antidepressant drugs reboxetine, nortriptyline, fluoxetine and venlafaxine (which target the noradrenaline and/or the 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters), the 5-hydroxytryptamine releasing agent dexfenfluramine, and the dopamine transporter inhibitor GBR12909. Only GBR12909 was able to induce FosB/DeltaFosB expression in the tVTA, showing that this induction is mediated by dopamine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Newly described brain structures may help to increase our knowledge of brain function, pathology and targets for treatments. FosB/DeltaFosB induction in the tVTA is a common feature of drugs sharing psychostimulant properties but not of drugs sharing risk of abuse. PMID:21087442

  15. Performance analysis with truncated heavy{tailed distributions

    E-print Network

    Asmussen, Søren

    Performance analysis with truncated heavy{tailed distributions S#28;ren Asmussen #3;y Mats Pihlsg is heavy{tailed, say Pareto or Weibull, and a typically large K, say much larger than EU . We study, say Pareto or Weibull, and a typically large K, say much larger than EU . An earlier study

  16. 106. Photocopied August 1978. EXTENSION OF TAIL PIT WALLS, APRIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Photocopied August 1978. EXTENSION OF TAIL PIT WALLS, APRIL 28, 1917. THE TIMBERWORK IN THE FOREGROUND WAS USED AS A COMBINATION COFFER DAM AND FORM FOR POURING THE CONCRETE TAIL RACE WALL EXTENSION. IN THE BACKGROUND ALONG THE POWER HOUSE SEVERAL COMPLETED WALL EXTENSIONS CAN BE SEEN DIMLY. (787) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  17. The vertebrate tail bud: three germ layers from one tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. May Griffith; M. J. Wiley; Esmond J. Sanders

    1992-01-01

    The tail bud of amniote embryos comprises a mass of apparently undifferentiated mesenchymal cells located at the caudal limit of the embryo, representing the remains of Hensen's node and the primitive streak. These cells have the potential to give rise to a variety of different tissues including the posterior or ‘secondary’ neural tube, the tail gut, and somites and their

  18. Neospora caninum antibodies detected in Midwestern white-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve to maintain the Neospora caninum life cycle in the wild. Sera from white tailed deer from south central Wisconsin and southeastern Missouri, USA were tested for antibodies to N. caninum. Seroreactivity against N. caninum surface antigens was observe...

  19. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497 Aeronautics and Space ...AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497 Aeronautics and Space ...AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the...

  1. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497 Aeronautics and Space ...AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the...

  2. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  3. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  4. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  5. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  6. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  7. Research Article Spread of Plague Among Black-Tailed Prairie

    E-print Network

    Collinge, Sharon K.

    Sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) is an exotic pathogen that is highly virulent in black-tailed prairie-state, Program MARK, Yersinia pestis. Exotic zoonotic diseases pose a substantial threat to native wildlife is an exotic vector-borne disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Black-tailed prairie dogs are highly

  8. A Glimpse of the genomic diversity of haloarchaeal tailed viruses.

    PubMed

    Sen?ilo, Ana; Roine, Elina

    2014-01-01

    Tailed viruses are the most common isolates infecting prokaryotic hosts residing in hypersaline environments. Archaeal tailed viruses represent only a small portion of all characterized tailed viruses of prokaryotes. But even this small dataset revealed that archaeal tailed viruses have many similarities to their counterparts infecting bacteria, the bacteriophages. Shared functional homologs and similar genome organizations suggested that all microbial tailed viruses have common virion architectural and assembly principles. Recent structural studies have provided evidence justifying this thereby grouping archaeal and bacterial tailed viruses into a single lineage. Currently there are 17 haloarchaeal tailed viruses with entirely sequenced genomes. Nine viruses have at least one close relative among the 17 viruses and, according to the similarities, can be divided into three groups. Two other viruses share some homologs and therefore are distantly related, whereas the rest of the viruses are rather divergent (or singletons). Comparative genomics analysis of these viruses offers a glimpse into the genetic diversity and structure of haloarchaeal tailed virus communities. PMID:24659986

  9. Mercury speciation in tailings of the Idrija mercury mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald Biester; Mateja Gosar; German Müller

    1999-01-01

    Five hundred years of mercury (Hg) mining activity in Idrija, Slovenia caused widespread Hg contamination. Besides Hg emissions from the ore smelter, tailings have been found to be the major source of river sediment contamination. In the present study, solid phase binding forms and the aqueous mobility of Hg have been investigated in tailings of the Idrija Hg mine by

  10. Managing White-Tailed Deer in Suburban Environments

    E-print Network

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    Managing White-Tailed Deer in Suburban Environments A Technical Guide Anthony J. DeNicola, Kurt C University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583 ISBN 1-57753-296-1 Acknowledgments The Suburban Deer Technical. 2); R. Pooler (Figs. 16, 20). #12;About This Guide 2 Introduction 3 Biology of the White-Tailed Deer

  11. 12. Credit PED. View of tail race and dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Credit PED. View of tail race and dam showing dumping of construction rubble into river bed by rail car; and preparations for pouring a concrete cap onto tail race wall. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  12. Functional Morphology of the Radialis Muscle in Shark Tails

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    of the caudal fin in most sharks. Caudal fin morphology (Affleck, 1950; Alexander, 1965; Lingham-Soliar, 2005 of the functional internal anatomy of the tail fin. The caudal fin of sharks is the most prominent control surfaceFunctional Morphology of the Radialis Muscle in Shark Tails Brooke E. Flammang* Museum

  13. NONINVASIVE, CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF RAT TAIL SKIN TEMPERATURE BY RADIOTELEMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tail skin temperature (Tsk) can provide a wealth of information on the thermoregulatory status of the rat. Drug- and toxic-induced changes in body temperature are often mediated by vasodilation or constriction of blood flow to the tail and Tsk can generally be used as an indica...

  14. Analysis of Circadian Regulation of Poly(A) Tail Length

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Green, Carla B.

    2015-01-01

    The poly(A) tail is found on the 3’-end of most eukaryotic mRNAs, and its length significantly contributes to the mRNAs half-life and translational competence. Circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length is a powerful mechanism to confer rhythmicity in gene expression post-transcriptionally, and provides a means to regulate protein levels independent of rhythmic transcription in the nucleus. Therefore, analysis of circadian poly(A) tail length regulation is important for a complete understanding of rhythmic physiology, since rhythmically expressed proteins are the ultimate mediators of rhythmic function. Nevertheless, it has previously been challenging to measure changes in poly(A) tail length, especially at a global level, due to technical constraints. However, new methodology based on differential fractionation of mRNAs based on the length of their tails has recently been developed. In this chapter, we will describe these methods as used for examining the circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length and will provide detailed experimental procedures to measure poly(A) tail length both at a the single mRNA level and the global level. Although this chapter concentrates on methods we used for analyzing poly(A) tail length in the mammalian circadian system, the methods described here can be applicable to any organisms and any biological processes. PMID:25662466

  15. The function and evolution of the tail streamer in hirundines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise V. Rowe; Matthew R. Evans; Katherine L. Buchanan

    2001-01-01

    The morphology of a bird's tail may result from compromises between aerodynamic efficiency, phylogenetic constraints and selection for non-aerodynamic characteristics, such as mate attraction. A good example of a trait shaped by trade-offs between aerodynamic efficiency and reproductive benefits mediated through female preference is the tail streamer of the barn swallow. Here we use a standardized task to measure the

  16. Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 42 Degree Sweptback Wing and Tail Combination at a Reynolds Number of 6.8 x 10(exp 6)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, Stanley H; Martina, Albert P

    1948-01-01

    Results are given of a wind-tunnel investigation at a Reynolds number of 6.8 x 10(exp 6) to determine the static longitudinal stability characteristics of a 42 degree sweptback wing and fuselage combination with a sweptback horizontal tail. Included are the effects of vertical position of fuselage and tail with respect to wing for several combinations of high-lift and staff-control devices. Also included is the effect of a simulated ground.

  17. The Logarithmic Tail of Néel Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, Christof

    We study the multiscale problem of a parametrized planar 180° rotation of magnetization states in a thin ferromagnetic film. In an appropriate scaling and when the film thickness is comparable to the Bloch line width, the underlying variational principle has the form where the reduced stray-field operator Q approximates (-?)1/2 as the quality factor Q tends to zero. We show that the associated Néel wall profile u exhibits a very long logarithmic tail. The proof relies on limiting elliptic regularity methods on the basis of the associated Euler-Lagrange equation and symmetrization arguments on the basis of the variational principle. Finally we study the renormalized limit behavior as Q tends to zero.

  18. Sulfur Biogeochemistry of Athabasca Oilsands Composite Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. A.; Kendra, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands tailings are important, globally relevant, S reservoirs, known to contain active and diverse microbial communities. As evidenced by increasing S emissions from the oil sands, active biogeochemical S cycling within composite tailings (CT, a mixture of tailings, post-processed sand and gypsum, used for dry reclamation), is likely; however the S biogeochemistry of these residues has not been investigated to date. With surface mining of Alberta's oil sands spanning over 142,000 square km and accelerated production, these tailings-based landscapes will become increasingly prevalent with the potential for significant environmental impacts. The objectives here, were thus to characterize depth dependent S biogeochemistry of a 40 meter CT deposit (Fort McMurray, AB, CANADA). Drill samples were collected in December of 2012 from 5 depths spanning 36 m in the CT deposit, for geochemical, metagenomic and functional enrichment analyses. Results establish widespread microbial S biogeochemical cycling within the CT deposit. Porewater H2S was detected extensively throughout the deposit with background levels ranging from 14-23 ?M and a concentrated pocket of 300 ?M occurring at depth. Porewater Fe(II) (1-40 ?M) was detected only within surficial depth samples. Current Fe(II) concentrations are not sufficient to sequester the levels of H2S generated by CT, indicating CT may become a net source of S emissions, as generated H2S at depth migrates to the surface, in untreated CT deposits. Metagenomic (454 pyrosequencing) characterization revealed highly diverse CT microbial communities, with 21 different phyla encountered overall and 1/3 of these presenting as candidate divisions. The cultivation independent identification of several known IRB and sulphate (SRB) reducing bacteria within these communities was consistent with observed positive growth in IRB and SRB functional metabolic enrichments. Furthermore, two depth dependent structurally distinct communities emerged: a surficial CT zone of Fe(III) reduction and an underlying zone of sulphate reduction, from multivariate statistical analyses of phylogenetic data (UniFrac http://bmf.colorado.edu/unifrac). The emergence of a distinct IRB surficial zone, despite ~65% of the total bacterial community putatively having the capacity for Fe(III) reduction over the entire deposit depth and evident and increasing Fe(III) sources down core, suggests limitation of Fe(III) reducing bacteria (IRB) through some other factor. Indeed UniFrac analyses identified that the differentiation in microbial communities occurring in these Fe and S zones was driven by environmental parameters of DOC, ORP and salinity; revealing that IRB may be unable to access the more complex OC constituents of these materials. Pilot reclamation for CT is currently focusing on capping CT with a freshwater fen, which may provide a more labile OC source for CT associated IRB, potentially stimulating greater H2S sequestration through FeS formation. These processes will be evaluated in the on-going assessment of S biogeochemistry within untreated and treated CT as pilot reclamation proceeds.

  19. Lifshitz Tails in Constant Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Frédéric Klopp; Georgi Raikov

    2005-09-12

    We consider the 2D Landau Hamiltonian $H$ perturbed by a random alloy-type potential, and investigate the Lifshitz tails, i.e. the asymptotic behavior of the corresponding integrated density of states (IDS) near the edges in the spectrum of $H$. If a given edge coincides with a Landau level, we obtain different asymptotic formulae for power-like, exponential sub-Gaussian, and super-Gaussian decay of the one-site potential. If the edge is away from the Landau levels, we impose a rational-flux assumption on the magnetic field, consider compactly supported one-site potentials, and formulate a theorem which is analogous to a result obtained in the case of a vanishing magnetic field.

  20. Numerical investigation of tail buffet on F-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Yehia M.; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Gee, Ken

    1992-01-01

    Numerical investigation of vortex induced tail buffet is conducted on the F-18 aircraft at high angles of attack. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated using a time-accurate, implicit procedure. A generalized overset zonal grid scheme is used to decompose the computational space around the complete aircraft with faired-over inlet. A weak coupling between the aerodynamics and structures is assumed to compute the structural oscillation of the flexible vertical tail. Time-accurate computations of the turbulent flow around the F-18 aircraft at 30 degrees angle of attack show the surface and off-surface flowfield details, including the unsteadiness created by the vortex burst and its interaction with the vertical twin tail which causes the tail buffet. The effect of installing a LEX fence on modifying the vortex structure upstream of the tail is also examined.

  1. SEROPREVALENCE OF NEOSPORA CANINUM AND TOXOPLASMA GONDII IN BLACK TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS COLUMBIANUS) AND MULE DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS HEMIONUS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deer are considered important intermediate hosts for the coccidian parasites, Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Antibodies to N. caninum and T. gondii were determined in sera of 42 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) and 43 black tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) from the Wash...

  2. Possible Vector Dissemination by Swift Foxes following a Plague Epizootic in Black-tailed Prairie Dogs in Northwestern Texas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brady K. McGee; Matthew J. Butler; Danny B. Pence; James L. Alexander; Janet B. Nissen

    To determine whether swift foxes (Vulpes velox) could facilitate transmission of Yersinia pestis to uninfected black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies by ac- quiring infected fleas, ectoparasite and sero- logic samples were collected from swift foxes living adjacent to prairie dog towns during a 2004 plague epizootic in northwestern Texas, USA. A previous study (1999-2001) indicated that these swift foxes

  3. Genetic Analysis of White-tailed Deer Population Structure in Iowa: Identifying Potential Patterns and Rates of Disease Spread

    E-print Network

    Koford, Rolf R.

    Genetic Analysis of White-tailed Deer Population Structure in Iowa: Identifying Potential Patterns and Objectives: o Conduct a statewide assessment of deer population genetic structure in Iowa to determine the degree of genetic connectivity between free-ranging deer populations in Iowa and free-ranging deer

  4. THE EFFECT OF EXERCISE ON PLASMA ACTIVITIES OF LACTATE DEHYDROGENASE AND CREATINE KINASE IN RED-TAILED HAWKS (Buteo jamaicensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    SHANNON T. KNUTH; SUSAN B. CHAPLIN

    Plasma activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LD) and creatine kinase (CK) have been used as diagnostic indicators of muscle fitness and damage, respectively, in mammals. Activities of these enzymes were measured in three groups of red-tailed hawks (Buteojamaicensis) differing in flight capability (trained, untrained, and disabled) to determine whether their plasma enzyme activities were indicative of muscle fitness and flight training

  5. The effect of selenium on reproduction of black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in Shasta County California

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Flueck

    1989-01-01

    This study was to determine if nutritional inadequacy of selenium may be responsible for a declining reproductive rate of a migratory herd of black-tailed deer. Selenium is an essential trace mineral for mammalian herbivores. Deficiency affects primarily neonates resulting in increased mortality rates. Shasta County, California is indigenously low in selenium due to soil characteristics. Local livestock enterprises have experienced

  6. Congener-specific analysis of polychlorinated biphenyls in white-tailed sea eagles Haliaeetus albicilla collected in Poland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Falandysz; N. Yamashita; S. Tanabe; R. Tatsukawa; L. Rucifiska; T. Mizera; B. Jakuczun

    1994-01-01

    The concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) congeners including highly toxic non-, mono-, and di-ortho coplanar members as well as their pattern were determined in breast muscles of white-tailed sea eagles collected dead between 1982 and 1990 in Poland. There was a wide variation in total PCB residue concentrations among eagles from various breeding sites, with the Baltic Sea coast registering

  7. Relationship between altered axial curvature and neural tube closure in normal and mutant ( curly tail ) mouse embryos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marian C. E. Peeters; Johan W. M. Hekking; Henny W. M. Straaten; Alisa S. W. Shum; Andrew J. Copp

    1996-01-01

    Neural tube defects, including spina bifida, develop in the curly tail mutant mouse as a result of delayed closure of the posterior neuropore at 10.5 days of gestation. Affected embryos are characterized by increased ventral curvature of the caudal region. To determine whether closure of the neuropore could be affected by this angle of curvature, we experimentally enhanced the curvature

  8. Deceleration and acceleration in the rate of posterior neuropore closure during neurulation in the curly tail ( ct ) mouse embryo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henny W. M. Straaten; Johan W. M. Hekking; Andrew J. Copp; Merton Bernfield

    1992-01-01

    Curly tail (ct) is a mouse mutant producing spinal neural tube defects as a result of delayed closure of the posterior neuropore (PNP). The purpose of the present study was to determine in ct\\/ct embryos the time of onset of the delay in PNP closure, and the pattern of this closure, as well as to study the possibility that reopening

  9. Poly(A)-tail profiling reveals an embryonic switch in translational control

    E-print Network

    Subtelny, Alexander Orest

    Poly(A) tails enhance the stability and translation of most eukaryotic messenger RNAs, but difficulties in globally measuring poly(A)-tail lengths have impeded greater understanding of poly(A)-tail function. Here we describe ...

  10. Ram pressure statistics for bent tail radio galaxies

    E-print Network

    Mguda, Zolile; van der Heyden, Kurt; Gottlöber, Stefan; Cress, Catherine; Vaisanen, Petri; Yepes, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we use the MareNostrum Universe Simulation, a large scale, hydrodynamic, non-radiative simulation in combination with a simple abundance matching approach to determine the ram pressure statistics for bent radio sources (BRSs). The abundance matching approach allows us to determine the locations of all galaxies with stellar masses $> 10^{11} MSol$ in the simulation volume. Assuming ram pressure exceeding a critical value causes bent morphology, we compute the ratio of all galaxies exceeding the ram pressure limit (RPEX galaxies) relative to all galaxies in our sample. According to our model 50% of the RPEX galaxies at $z = 0$ are found in clusters with masses larger than $10^{14.5}MSol$ the other half resides in lower mass clusters. Therefore, the appearance of bent tail morphology alone does not put tight constraints on the host cluster mass. In low mass clusters, $M 10^{15}Msol$ they can be found at distances up to 1.5Mpc. Only clusters with masses $> 10^{15}MSol $ are likely to host more than...

  11. A balanced ratio of proteins from gene G and frameshift-extended gene GT is required for phage lambda tail assembly

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Hendrix, Roger W.; Duda, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    In bacteriophage ?, the overlapping open reading frames G and T are expressed by a programmed translational frameshift similar to that of the gag-pol genes of many retroviruses, to produce the proteins gpG and gpGT. An analogous frameshift is widely conserved among other dsDNA tailed phages in their corresponding “G” and “GT” tail genes even in the absence of detectable sequence homology. The longer protein gpGT is known to be essential for tail assembly, but the requirement for the shorter gpG remained unclear because mutations in gene G affect both proteins. A plasmid system that can direct the efficient synthesis of tails was created and used to show that gpG and gpGT are both essential for correct tail assembly. Phage complementation assays under conditions where levels of plasmid-expressed gpG or gpGT could be altered independently revealed that the correct molar ratio of these two related proteins, normally determined by the efficiency of the frameshift, is also crucial for efficient assembly of functional tails. Finally, the physical connection between the G and T domains of gpGT, a consequence of the frameshift mechanism of protein expression, appears to be important for efficient tail assembly. PMID:23851014

  12. Parental Involvement in School : A Literature Review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francesco Avvisati; Bruno Besbas; Nina Guyon

    2010-01-01

    Parents are actively involved in their children?s education at all ages, and school-based parental involvement programmes are in fashion in developed countries. Yet so far, economists have devoted little attention to determinants, levels and effects of parental involvement. This review is concerned with parental involvement for school-aged children. We comprehensively survey the economic literature on the topic, and selectively review

  13. Nesting habitat relationships of sympatric Crested Caracaras, Red-tailed Hawks, and White-tailed Hawks in South Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Actkinson, M.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P., Jr.; Boal, C.W.; Brennan, L.A.; Hernandez, F.

    2007-01-01

    We quantified nesting-site habitats for sympatric White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus) (n = 40), Red-tailed Hawks (B. jamaicensis) (n = 39), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway) (n = 24) in the Coastal Sand Plain of south Texas. White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracara nest sites occurred in savannas, whereas Red-tailed Hawk nest sites occurred in woodlands on the edge of savannas. White-tailed Hawk nest sites were in shrubs and trees that were shorter (3.5 ?? 1.0 m) and had smaller canopy diameters (5.5 ?? 2.1 m) than those of Red-tailed Hawks (10.1 ?? 2.0 m, 13.7 ?? 5.8 m) and Crested Caracaras (5.6 ?? 1.7 m, 8.5 ?? 3.5 m). Red-tailed Hawk nest sites had higher woody densities (15.7 ?? 9.6 plants) and more woody cover (84 ?? 19%) than those of White-tailed Hawks (5.6 ?? 5.8 plants, 20 ?? 21%) and Crested Caracaras (9.9 ?? 6.7 plants, 55 ?? 34%). Crested Caracara nest sites were in dense, multi-branched shrubs composed of more living material (97 ?? 3%) than those of White-tailed (88 ?? 18%) and Red-tailed hawks (88 ?? 18%). Nest sites of White-tailed Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Crested Caracaras were similar to random samples from the surrounding habitat indicating that preferred nesting habitat was available for each of these species at least within 60 m of active nest sites. Nest tree height, along with woody plant and native grass cover best discriminated nest sites among the three raptor species. There was no overlap at Red-tailed and White-tailed hawk nest sites in vegetation structure, while Crested Caracara nests were in habitat intermediate between the two other species. Partitioning of nesting habitat may be how these raptor species co-exist at the broader landscape scale of our study area in the Coastal Sand Plain of Texas.

  14. Magnetic properties of the high-latitude tail boundary - Draping of magnetosheath field lines and tail-aligned current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Kokubun, S.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic properties of the high-latitude tail boundary are examined with IMP 8 magnetometer data. The high-latitude tail boundary separates the tail lobe from the magnetosheath. Magnetic fields are stable in the tail lobe, but very irregular in the magnetosheath. Boundary crossings are marked by the rotation of magnetic components parallel to the boundary plane. The magnetic component normal to the boundary, if any, is very small in comparison to this rotational change. Despite large magnetic fluctuations in the magnetosheath, the magnetosheath-side field orientation is consistent with the draping of the IMF against the magnetotail. The boundary current has a component parallel to the lobe field (tail-aligned current), as well as a circumferential component. The IMF orientation controls the sheath-side B(Y), while the lobe-side field has a more rigid configuration flaring antisunward.

  15. Monomeric and dimeric conformation of the vinculin tail five-helix bundle in solution studied by EPR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abé, Christoph; Dietrich, Franziska; Gajula, Prasad; Benz, Monique; Vogel, Klaus-Peter; van Gastel, Maurice; Illenberger, Susanne; Ziegler, Wolfgang H; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    The cytoskeletal adaptor protein vinculin plays an important role in the control of cell adhesion and migration, linking the actin cytoskeleton to adhesion receptor complexes in cell adhesion sites. The conformation of the vinculin tail dimer, which is crucial for protein function, was analyzed using site-directed spin labeling in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Interspin distances for a set of six singly and four doubly spin-labeled mutants of the tail domain of vinculin were determined and used as constraints for modeling of the vinculin tail dimer. A comparison of the results obtained by molecular dynamic simulations and a rotamer library approach reveals that the crystal structure of the vinculin tail monomer is essentially preserved in aqueous solution. The orientation of monomers within the dimer observed previously by x-ray crystallography agrees with the solution electron paramagnetic resonance data. Furthermore, the distance between positions 1033 is shown to increase by >3 nm upon interaction of the vinculin tail domain with F-actin. PMID:21961604

  16. Monomeric and Dimeric Conformation of the Vinculin Tail Five-Helix Bundle in Solution Studied by EPR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Abé, Christoph; Dietrich, Franziska; Gajula, Prasad; Benz, Monique; Vogel, Klaus-Peter; van Gastel, Maurice; Illenberger, Susanne; Ziegler, Wolfgang H.; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    The cytoskeletal adaptor protein vinculin plays an important role in the control of cell adhesion and migration, linking the actin cytoskeleton to adhesion receptor complexes in cell adhesion sites. The conformation of the vinculin tail dimer, which is crucial for protein function, was analyzed using site-directed spin labeling in electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Interspin distances for a set of six singly and four doubly spin-labeled mutants of the tail domain of vinculin were determined and used as constraints for modeling of the vinculin tail dimer. A comparison of the results obtained by molecular dynamic simulations and a rotamer library approach reveals that the crystal structure of the vinculin tail monomer is essentially preserved in aqueous solution. The orientation of monomers within the dimer observed previously by x-ray crystallography agrees with the solution electron paramagnetic resonance data. Furthermore, the distance between positions 1033 is shown to increase by >3 nm upon interaction of the vinculin tail domain with F-actin. PMID:21961604

  17. The cytosolic tail of the tumor marker protein Trop2 - a structural switch triggered by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Pavši?, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Vidmar, Tilen; Plavec, Janez; Lenar?i?, Brigita

    2015-01-01

    Trop2 is a transmembrane signaling glycoprotein upregulated in stem and carcinoma cells. Proliferation-enhancing signaling involves regulated intramembrane proteolytic release of a short cytoplasmic fragment, which is later engaged in a cytosolic signaling complex. We propose that Trop2 function is modulated by phosphorylation of a specific serine residue within this cytosolic region (Ser303), and by proximity effects exerted on the cytosolic tail by Trop2 dimerization. Structural characterization of both the transmembrane (Trop2TM) and cytosolic regions (Trop2IC) support this hypothesis, and shows that the central region of Trop2IC forms an ?-helix. Comparison of NMR structures of non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms suggest that phosphorylation of Trop2IC triggers salt bridge reshuffling, resulting in significant conformational changes including ordering of the C-terminal tail. In addition, we demonstrate that the cytosolic regions of two Trop2 subunits can be brought into close proximity via transmembrane part dimerization. Finally, we show that Ser303-phosphorylation significantly affects the structure and accessibility of functionally important regions of the cytosolic tail. These observed structural features of Trop2 at the membrane-cytosol interface could be important for regulation of Trop2 signaling activity. PMID:25981199

  18. The cytosolic tail of the tumor marker protein Trop2 - a structural switch triggered by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Pavši?, Miha; Ilc, Gregor; Vidmar, Tilen; Plavec, Janez; Lenar?i?, Brigita

    2015-01-01

    Trop2 is a transmembrane signaling glycoprotein upregulated in stem and carcinoma cells. Proliferation-enhancing signaling involves regulated intramembrane proteolytic release of a short cytoplasmic fragment, which is later engaged in a cytosolic signaling complex. We propose that Trop2 function is modulated by phosphorylation of a specific serine residue within this cytosolic region (Ser303), and by proximity effects exerted on the cytosolic tail by Trop2 dimerization. Structural characterization of both the transmembrane (Trop2TM) and cytosolic regions (Trop2IC) support this hypothesis, and shows that the central region of Trop2IC forms an ?-helix. Comparison of NMR structures of non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated forms suggest that phosphorylation of Trop2IC triggers salt bridge reshuffling, resulting in significant conformational changes including ordering of the C-terminal tail. In addition, we demonstrate that the cytosolic regions of two Trop2 subunits can be brought into close proximity via transmembrane part dimerization. Finally, we show that Ser303-phosphorylation significantly affects the structure and accessibility of functionally important regions of the cytosolic tail. These observed structural features of Trop2 at the membrane-cytosol interface could be important for regulation of Trop2 signaling activity. PMID:25981199

  19. Survivability of ancient man-made earthen mounds: implications for uranium mill tailings impoundments

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.G.; Mishima, J.; King, S.E.; Walters, W.H.

    1983-06-01

    As part of a study for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is investigating long-term stabilization techniques for uranium mill impoundments. Part of this investigation involves the design of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of the underlying soil cover, which in turn prevents exposure of the tailings to the environment. However, the need for the armoring blanket, as well as the blanket's effectiveness, depends on the stability of the underlying soil cap (radon suppression cover) and on the tailings themselves. Compelling evidence in archaeological records suggests that large man-made earthen structures can remain sound and intact for time periods comparable to those required for the stabilization of the tailings piles if properly constructed. We present archaeological evidence on the existence and survivability of man-made earthen and rock structures through specific examples of such structures from around the world. We also review factors contributing to their survival or destruction and address the influence of climate, building materials, and construction techniques on survivability.

  20. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the uranium mill tailings site Salt Lake City, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This baseline risk assessment of groundwater contamination at the uranium mill tailings site near Salt Lake City, Utah, evaluates potential public health or environmental impacts resulting from ground water contamination at the former uranium ore processing site. The tailings and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell located at Clive, Utah, in 1987 by the US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate residual ground water contamination at the former uranium processing site, known as the Vitro processing site. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document under the Ground Water Project. It will help determine the appropriate remedial action for contaminated ground water at the site.

  1. Abstract Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers that

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Jeff

    Abstract Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are conspicuous ecosystem engineers in deserts of south- western

  2. STAR CLUSTERS IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF INTERACTING GALAXIES: CLUSTER POPULATIONS ACROSS A VARIETY OF TAIL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, B.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lee, K. H.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S.; Palma, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16803 (United States); Kepley, A. A.; Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Knierman, K. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Bateman Physical Sciences Center, Arizona State University, F-wing Room 686, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Bastian, N. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Elmegreen, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Box 745, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); English, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hibbard, J. E. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Maybhate, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Trancho, G. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, Colina el Pino S/N, La Serena (Chile); Vacca, W. D., E-mail: mullan@astro.psu.edu [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy/Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 144-2, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2011-04-20

    We have searched for compact stellar structures within 17 tidal tails in 13 different interacting galaxies using F606W- and F814W-band images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample of tidal tails includes a diverse population of optical properties, merging galaxy mass ratios, H I content, and ages. Combining our tail sample with Knierman et al., we find evidence of star clusters formed in situ with M{sub V} < -8.5 and V - I < 2.0 in 10 of 23 tidal tails; we are able to identify cluster candidates to M{sub V} = -6.5 in the closest tails. Three tails offer clear examples of 'beads on a string' star formation morphology in V - I color maps. Two tails present both tidal dwarf galaxy candidates and cluster candidates. Statistical diagnostics indicate that clusters in tidal tails may be drawn from the same power-law luminosity functions (with logarithmic slopes {approx}-2 to -2.5) found in quiescent spiral galaxies and interiors of interacting systems. We find that the tail regions with the largest number of observable clusters are relatively young ({approx}<250 Myr old) and bright (V {approx}< 24 mag arcsec{sup -2}), probably attributed to the strong bursts of star formation in interacting systems soon after periapse. Otherwise, we find no statistical difference between cluster-rich and cluster-poor tails in terms of many observable characteristics, though this analysis suffers from complex, unresolved gas dynamics and projection effects.

  3. Environmental isotopes as a useful tool for studies at mixed uranium mill tailings sites.

    PubMed

    Helling, C

    2000-01-01

    Groundwaters in the area of a mixed landfill (domestic waste above uranium mill tailings) in Dresden (Saxony, Germany) were investigated for their isotope signatures to distinguish between different groundwater types. To determine between the two contamination sources (waste and uranium mill tailings) a multi parameter interpretation was done using both, the main hydrochemical parameters the radionuclides 234U, 238U, 226Ra and 222Rn as well as the environmental isotopes of the elements hydrogen, oxygen, sulphur and carbon. The seepage water from the landfill shows higher delta34S, delta18O and tritium values as the inflow. The tritium values give an idea about water movement in the dump and mean residence time of the groundwater. The water in the dump shows varying delta13C values which indicate different processes occurring in the dump. PMID:11501701

  4. Remediation of uranium mill tailings by an integrated biological and chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1992-12-31

    Dilute calcium chloride brine solution was found to be effective in the solubilization of toxic heavy metals and long half-life radionuclides (Th-230, Ra-226 and Pb-210) from uranium ores and mill tailings. The recovery of heavy metals and radionuclides from uranium mill tailing effluents was studied with calcium alginate beads. The maximum cadmium and zinc uptakes by calcium alginate beads were determined to be 2.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} and 2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} mol/dry weight of alginate. The kinetic values, V{sub m} and K, were calculated for uranium uptake by calcium alginate to be 96.2 mg/l/s and 0.125 g/l, respectively.

  5. Remediation of uranium mill tailings by an integrated biological and chemical process

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Dilute calcium chloride brine solution was found to be effective in the solubilization of toxic heavy metals and long half-life radionuclides (Th-230, Ra-226 and Pb-210) from uranium ores and mill tailings. The recovery of heavy metals and radionuclides from uranium mill tailing effluents was studied with calcium alginate beads. The maximum cadmium and zinc uptakes by calcium alginate beads were determined to be 2.8 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] and 2.3 [times] 10[sup [minus]3] mol/dry weight of alginate. The kinetic values, V[sub m] and K, were calculated for uranium uptake by calcium alginate to be 96.2 mg/l/s and 0.125 g/l, respectively.

  6. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Riverton, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This Risk Assessment evaluated potential impacts to public health or the environment caused by ground water contamination at the former uranium mill processing site. In the first phase of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the tailing and other contaminated material at this site were placed in a disposal cell near the Gas Hills Plant in 1990. The second phase of the UMTRA Project is to evaluate ground water contamination. This risk assessment is the first site-specific document to evaluate potential health and environmental risks for the Riverton site under the Ground Water Project; it will help determine whether remedial actions are needed for contaminated ground water at the site.

  7. Near-threshold quantization for potentials with inverse-cube tails

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Tim-Oliver; Friedrich, Harald [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    For potential wells with long-range attractive tails proportional to -1/r{sup 3}, as occur in the resonant dipole-dipole interaction in homonuclear alkali-metal dimers, we present a highly accurate analytical expression for the tail contribution to the quantization function F(E). This quantization function determines the near-threshold bound-state energies via the quantization rule n{sub th}-n=F(E{sub n}). The performance of the quantization function derived in this paper is demonstrated by applying it to a model Lennard-Jones potential and to vibrational bound-state spectra of sodium dimers (Na{sub 2}). These results are compared with those obtained via the semiclassical LeRoy-Bernstein formula which neglects quantum effects that are important in the near-threshold regime.

  8. Star formation in shocked cluster spirals and their tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Brüggen, M.; Owers, M. S.; Ebeling, H.; Sun, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent observations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in clusters revealed details of the stripping process, i.e. the truncation of all interstellar medium phases and of star formation (SF) in the disc, and multiphase star-forming tails. Some stripped galaxies, in particular in merging clusters, develop spectacular star-forming tails, giving them a jellyfish-like appearance. In merging clusters, merger shocks in the intracluster medium (ICM) are thought to have overrun these galaxies, enhancing the ambient ICM pressure and thus triggering SF, gas stripping, and tail formation. We present idealized hydrodynamical simulations of this scenario, including standard descriptions for SF and stellar feedback. To aid the interpretation of recent and upcoming observations, we focus on particular structures and dynamics in SF patterns in the remaining gas disc and in the near tails, which are easiest to observe. The observed jellyfish morphology is qualitatively reproduced for, both, face-on and edge-on stripping. In edge-on stripping, the interplay between the ICM wind and the disc rotation leads to asymmetries along the ICM wind direction and perpendicular to it. The apparent tail is still part of a highly deformed gaseous and young stellar disc. In both geometries, SF takes place in knots throughout the tail, such that the stars in the tails show no ordered age gradients. Significant SF enhancement in the disc occurs only at radii where the gas will be stripped in due course.

  9. Citizen knowledge of and attitudes toward black-tailed prairie dogs: completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lamb, B.L.; Cline, Kurt; Brinson, Ayeisha; Sexton, N.R.; Ponds, P.D.

    2001-01-01

    In the late summer of 2000, we canvassed a random sample of residents in the 11-sate short grass prairie region of the United States. We asked about peoplea??s attitude toward and knowledge of black-tailed prairie dogs and their management. The survey received 1,933 useable responses with a response rate of 56.4% (margin of error 2.2%). We developed a questionnaire (OMB Control Number: 1028-0073; see Appendix B) to answer the following questions: * What is the level of citizen knowledge regarding black-tailed prairie dogs? * What are citizensa?? attitudes and preferences regarding black-tailed prairie dogs and the environment in general? * What are the factors that explain difference in attitudes and knowledge about prairie dogs? * What are the factors that explain citizen participation in these types of issues? * What are the important differences between rural and urban citizens regarding their political participation and their knowledge and attitude about prairie dogs? In general, we found that citizens do not have a high regard for black-tailed prairie dogs. Citizens generally have a positive orientation towards the environment and favor a balanced or somewhat environmental approach on questions--like prairie dog management--that involve environmental protection and economic considerations. People having direct experience with prairie dogs are less inclined to view them as beneficial to society than are those who infrequently see or come in contact with the animals. When asked about prairie dogs specifically, most citizens did not believe the question of what to do about these animals was a highly important environmental issue.

  10. A New Test of Attention in Listening (TAIL) Predicts Auditory Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Xuan; Barry, Johanna G.; Moore, David R.; Amitay, Sygal

    2012-01-01

    Attention modulates auditory perception, but there are currently no simple tests that specifically quantify this modulation. To fill the gap, we developed a new, easy-to-use test of attention in listening (TAIL) based on reaction time. On each trial, two clearly audible tones were presented sequentially, either at the same or different ears. The frequency of the tones was also either the same or different (by at least two critical bands). When the task required same/different frequency judgments, presentation at the same ear significantly speeded responses and reduced errors. A same/different ear (location) judgment was likewise facilitated by keeping tone frequency constant. Perception was thus influenced by involuntary orienting of attention along the task-irrelevant dimension. When information in the two stimulus dimensions were congruent (same-frequency same-ear, or different-frequency different-ear), response was faster and more accurate than when they were incongruent (same-frequency different-ear, or different-frequency same-ear), suggesting the involvement of executive control to resolve conflicts. In total, the TAIL yielded five independent outcome measures: (1) baseline reaction time, indicating information processing efficiency, (2) involuntary orienting of attention to frequency and (3) location, and (4) conflict resolution for frequency and (5) location. Processing efficiency and conflict resolution accounted for up to 45% of individual variances in the low- and high-threshold variants of three psychoacoustic tasks assessing temporal and spectral processing. Involuntary orientation of attention to the irrelevant dimension did not correlate with perceptual performance on these tasks. Given that TAIL measures are unlikely to be limited by perceptual sensitivity, we suggest that the correlations reflect modulation of perceptual performance by attention. The TAIL thus has the power to identify and separate contributions of different components of attention to auditory perception. PMID:23300934

  11. Low Probability Tail Event Analysis and Mitigation in BPA Control Area: Task One Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2009-04-01

    This is a report for task one of the tail event analysis project for BPA. Tail event refers to the situation in a power system when unfavorable forecast errors of load and wind are superposed onto fast load and wind ramps, or non-wind generators falling short of scheduled output, the imbalance between generation and load becomes very significant. This type of events occurs infrequently and appears on the tails of the distribution of system power imbalance; therefore, is referred to as tail events. This report analyzes what happened during the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) reliability event on February 26, 2008, which was widely reported because of the involvement of wind generation. The objective is to identify sources of the problem, solutions to it and potential improvements that can be made to the system. Lessons learned from the analysis include the following: (1) Large mismatch between generation and load can be caused by load forecast error, wind forecast error and generation scheduling control error on traditional generators, or a combination of all of the above; (2) The capability of system balancing resources should be evaluated both in capacity (MW) and in ramp rate (MW/min), and be procured accordingly to meet both requirements. The resources need to be able to cover a range corresponding to the variability of load and wind in the system, additional to other uncertainties; (3) Unexpected ramps caused by load and wind can both become the cause leading to serious issues; (4) A look-ahead tool evaluating system balancing requirement during real-time operations and comparing that with available system resources should be very helpful to system operators in predicting the forthcoming of similar events and planning ahead; and (5) Demand response (only load reduction in ERCOT event) can effectively reduce load-generation mismatch and terminate frequency deviation in an emergency situation.

  12. Western Red-tailed Skink Distribution in Southern Nevada: Pilot Study Results

    SciTech Connect

    Derek Hall, Paul Greger

    2008-11-12

    The western red-tailed skink (Eumeces gilberti rubricaudatus) is a sensitive species that is on the Nevada Natural Heritage Program’s “Animal and Plant At-Risk Tracking List.” Information about this species is lacking, especially for southern Nevada. A pilot project was initiated in 2006 on portions of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to (1) develop techniques for determining western red-tailed skink distribution, (2) determine if skinks are still present at historic locations, (3) evaluate habitat use by trapping in a variety of habitats, and (4) collect tissue samples for genetic analysis. Skink capture success was compared in trap arrays with and without drift fences. A total of 9 western red-tailed skinks were captured in 6,092 trap days (0.1%, 1 skink/677 trap days). No skinks were captured in trap arrays with drift fences, which suggests that funnel traps set near rocks or vegetation without drift fences is a viable technique for capturing skinks. This greatly reduces the effort and cost to capture skinks. Skinks were captured at one of the three historic locations. Captures occurred in a variety of habitats including springs, ephemeral washes, and dry rocky areas. Genetic analysis revealed that NTS skinks are part of the Inyo clade, and are most closely related to skinks from slightly further north in Esmeralda County, Nevada, and west into the Panamint and Inyo/White Mountains in California. Results from this pilot study will be used to develop a western red-tailed skink distribution study for the entire NTS.

  13. Involving Latino Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quezada, Reyes L.; Diaz, Delia M.; Sanchez, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Describes barriers to Latino parent involvement in educational activities, factors to consider when involving Latino parents, and two examples of Latino involvement programs in California: Family Literacy Workshop at James Monroe Elementary School, Madera Unified School District, and Parents Take P.A.R.T. (Parent Assisted Reading Training) at…

  14. An experimental study of the effect of tail configuration on the spinning characteristics of general aviation aircraft. M.S. Thesis; [static wind tunnel force measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballin, M. G.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using static wind tunnel tests to obtain information about spin damping characteristics of an isolated general aviation aircraft tail was investigated. A representative tail section was oriented to the tunnel free streamline at angles simulating an equilibrium spin. A full range of normally encountered spin conditions was employed. Results of parametric studies performed to determine the effect of spin damping on several tail design parameters show satisfactory agreement with NASA rotary balance tests. Wing and body interference effects are present in the NASA studies at steep spin attitudes, but agreement improves with increasing pitch angle and spin rate, suggesting that rotational flow effects are minimal. Vertical position of the horizontal stabilizer is found to be a primary parameter affecting yaw damping, and horizontal tail chordwise position induces a substantial effect on pitching moment.

  15. Bifid tail of the pancreas with localized acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koyasu, Sho; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Nakase, Hiroshi; Kodama, Yuzo; Chiba, Tsutomu; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-12-25

    Bifid tail of the pancreas is an extremely rare developmental anomaly, and its clinical importance is not well known. We report the case of a 28-year-old man with acute pancreatitis limited to one side of a bifid tail with no otherwise detectable parenchymal edema on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Neither was there evidence of other anatomical ductal abnormalities that could have contributed to the patient's pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that bifid tail of the pancreas might cause acute pancreatitis. PMID:24172786

  16. Tail terms in gravitational radiation reaction via effective field theory

    E-print Network

    S. Foffa; R. Sturani

    2012-12-24

    Gravitational radiation reaction affects the dynamics of gravitationally bound binary systems. Here we focus on the leading "tail" term which modifies binary dynamics at fourth post-Newtonian order, as first computed by Blanchet and Damour. We re-produce this result using effective field theory techniques in the framework of the Lagrangian formalism suitably extended to include dissipation effects. We recover the known logarithmic tail term, consistently with the recent interpretation of the logarithmic tail term in the mass parameter as a renormalization group effect of the Bondi mass of the system.

  17. Spin-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the NASA F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) with and without Vertical Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fremaux, C. Michael

    1997-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the NASA Langley 20-Foot Vertical Spin Tunnel to determine the developed spin and spin-recovery characteristics of a 1/28-scale, free-spinning model of the NASA F-18 HARV (High Alpha Research Vehicle) airplane that can configured with and without the vertical tails installed. The purpose of the test was to determine what effects, if any, the absence of vertical tails (and rudders) had on the spin and spin-recovery capabilities of the HARV. The model was ballasted to dynamically represent the full-scale airplane at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Erect and inverted spin tests with symmetric mass loadings were conducted with the free-spinning model. The model results indicate that the basic airplane with vertical tails installed (with unaugmented control system) will exhibit fast, flat erect and inverted spins from which acceptable recoveries can be made. Removing the vertical tails had little effect on the erect spin mode, but did degrade recoveries from erect spins. In contrast, inverted spins without the vertical tails were significantly more severe than those with the tails installed.

  18. Acetylation of LYS-16 of H4 Histone Tail May Sequester the Tail and Inhibit its Interactions with Neighboring Nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit; Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Histone tails are highly flexible N terminal protrusions of histone proteins, which help to fold DNA into dense superstructures known as chromatin. On a molecular scale histone tails are poly-electrolites with high degree of conformational disorder, allowing them to function as bio-molecular ``switches,'' regulating various genetic regulatory processes via diverse types of covalent modifications. Because of being intrinsically disordered, the structural and dynamical aspects of histone tails are still poorly understood. Using multiple explicit solvent and coarse-grained MD simulations we have investigated the impact of the acetylation of LYS-16 residue on the conformational and DNA-binding propensities of H4 histone tail. The potential of mean force computed as a function of distance between a model DNA and histone tail center of mass showed a dramatic enhancement of binding affinity upon mono-acetylation of the H4 tail. The estimated binding free energy gain for the wild type is 2kT, while for the acetylated it reaches 4-5 kT. Additionally our structural analysis shows that acetylation is driving the chain into collapsed states, which get enriched in secondary structural elements upon binding to the DNA. We suggest a non-electrostatic mechanism that explains the enhanced binding affinity of the acetylated H4 tail. At last our findings lead us to propose a hypothesis that can potentially account for the celebrated chromatin ``fiber loosening effects'' observed in many experiments.

  19. Aeroelastic characteristics of the AH-64 bearingless tail rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a wind tunnel test program to determine the performance loads and dynamic characteristics of the Composite Flexbeam Tail Rotor (CFTR) for the AH-64 Advanced Attack Helicopter are reported. The CFTR uses an elastomeric shear attachment of the flexbeam to the hub to provide soft-inplane S-mode and stiff-inplane C-mode configuration. The properties of the elastomer were selected for proper frequency placement and scale damping of the inplane S-mode. Kinematic pitch-lag coupling was introduced to provide the first cyclic inplane C-mode damping at high collective pitch. The CFTR was tested in a wind tunnel over the full slideslip envelop of the AH-64. It is found that the rotor was aeroelastically stable throughout the complete collective pitch range and up to rotor speeds of 1403 rpm. The dynamic characteristics of the rotor were found to be satisfactory at all pitch angles and rotor speeds of the tunnel tests. The design characteristics of the rotor which permit the high performance characteristics are discussed. Several schematic drawings and photographs of the rotor are provided.

  20. Resistance to plague among black-tailed prairie dog populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R.; Busch, Joseph D.; Antolin, Michael F.; Wagner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogenous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance.

  1. Simulation model of a twin-tail, high performance airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buttrill, Carey S.; Arbuckle, P. Douglas; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1992-01-01

    The mathematical model and associated computer program to simulate a twin-tailed high performance fighter airplane (McDonnell Douglas F/A-18) are described. The simulation program is written in the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language. The simulation math model includes the nonlinear six degree-of-freedom rigid-body equations, an engine model, sensors, and first order actuators with rate and position limiting. A simplified form of the F/A-18 digital control laws (version 8.3.3) are implemented. The simulated control law includes only inner loop augmentation in the up and away flight mode. The aerodynamic forces and moments are calculated from a wind-tunnel-derived database using table look-ups with linear interpolation. The aerodynamic database has an angle-of-attack range of -10 to +90 and a sideslip range of -20 to +20 degrees. The effects of elastic deformation are incorporated in a quasi-static-elastic manner. Elastic degrees of freedom are not actively simulated. In the engine model, the throttle-commanded steady-state thrust level and the dynamic response characteristics of the engine are based on airflow rate as determined from a table look-up. Afterburner dynamics are switched in at a threshold based on the engine airflow and commanded thrust.

  2. Resistance to Plague Among Black-Tailed Prairie Dog Populations

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R.; Busch, Joseph D.; Antolin, Michael F.; Wagner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogenous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance. PMID:21923261

  3. Resistance to plague among black-tailed prairie dog populations.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R; Busch, Joseph D; Antolin, Michael F; Wagner, David M

    2012-02-01

    In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogeneous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance. PMID:21923261

  4. "Tail" tuning of iron(II) spin crossover temperature by 100 K.

    PubMed

    Feltham, Humphrey L C; Johnson, Chloe; Elliott, Anastasia B S; Gordon, Keith C; Albrecht, Martin; Brooker, Sally

    2015-03-16

    Two new Rdpt ligands featuring long "tails", padpt (N-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3,5-di(2-pyridyl)palmitamide) and hpdpt (4-(4-heptadecafluoroctylphenyl)-3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole), were made and reacted with [Fe(II)(py)4(NCS)2] to give pinkish-red [Fe(II)(padpt)2(SCN)2] (1) and purple-red [Fe(II)(hpdpt)2(SCN)2] (2) as solvent-free crystals. Magnetic measurements reveal that both 1 and 2 exhibit complete and reproducible spin crossovers, with a far lower T1/2 for the amide-alkyl tailed 1 (182 K) than for the fluorocarbon tailed 2 (248 K), which in turn is far lower than the T1/2 of 290 K previously reported for the nonamide-alkyl tailed analogue [Fe(II)(C16dpt)2(SCN)2]·(2)/3H2O (3). Structure determinations for 1 and 2 in both the high spin (HS) and low spin (LS) states confirm the expected trans-NCS conformation and reveal that (a) the "tails" interdigitate and (b) the LS forms are less distorted than the HS forms (? = 58-70° vs 47-54°). DSC and Raman spectroscopy confirmed the high tail-dependence of the SCO events in 1 and 2, as well as in 3, with the Raman data giving T1/2 values of 190, 243, and 285 K, respectively. Bright orange single crystals of the solvatomorph [Fe(II)(hpdpt)2(SCN)2]·MeOH·H2O (2solv) were also structurally and magnetically characterized and, in contrast to 2, found to remain HS down to 4 K, providing further evidence of the huge impact of crystal packing on SCO. Both 1 and 2 form stable Langmuir films at an air-water interface, a single layer of which can be transferred to a solid support. PMID:25732607

  5. Tailing RFID Tags for Clone Detection Davide Zanetti

    E-print Network

    Capkun, Srdjan

    Tailing RFID Tags for Clone Detection Davide Zanetti ETH Zurich, Switzerland zanettid, simply "wireless barcodes," themselves vulnerable to cloning and counterfeiting. While continuous monitoring can, in principle, detect cloning at- tacks, real-world supply chains often contain significant

  6. Star Formation in the Cometary Tails Associated with Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagami, Takahiro; Fujita, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the star-formation in cometary tails of galaxies in clusters. In particular, we focus on the evolution of molecular clouds in the tails that generate the stars. Assuming that the gas tails had been derived from the galaxies through ram-pressure stripping, we found that the gas must have been stripped mostly not in the form of molecular clouds, but in the form of H I gas or molecular gas that is not in clouds. Moreover, the molecular clouds are condensed in the tails, even away from the host galaxies. We also found that magnetic fields may be required to suppress the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability on the surface of molecular clouds, because otherwise the KH instability may destroy the molecular clouds before stars are formed in them.

  7. J SERIES MAGAZINE. J 106 INTERIOR. BOMB TAILS ON LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    J SERIES MAGAZINE. J 106 INTERIOR. BOMB TAILS ON LEFT. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Inert Storehouse Type, Twelfth Street between Kwajulein & New Mexico Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Radon Diffusion Through Uranium Mill Tailings and Cover Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D. W.; Zimmerman, D. A.

    1981-12-01

    Research was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to define the effects of cover defects on the emission of radon gas from covered uranium mill tailings piles. This report describes the results from the analysis of four geometrically simplified cover defects.

  9. MULTIPLE ANOMALIES IN A WHITE-TAILED DEER FETUS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. WOBESER; W. RUNGE

    Multiple defects consisting of disproportionate dwarfism, internal hydro- cephalus,porencephaly,inferiorbrachygnathia,multiple hepatic cysts and renal dysplasiawith cystictubulardilation, were diagnosed in a fetus from an apparently normal wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus z'irginianus).

  10. Sandia's activities in uranium mill tailings remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 requires that remedial action be taken at over 20 inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the United States. Standards promulgated by the EPA under this act are to be the operative standards for this activity. Proposed standards must still undergo internal review, public comment, and receive Nuclear Regulatory Commission concurrence before being finalized. Briefly reviewed, the standards deal separately with new disposal sites (Part A) and cleanup of soil and contaminated structures at existing locations (Part B). In several cases, the present sites are felt to be too close to human habitations or to be otherwise unacceptably located. These tailings will probably be relocated. New disposal sites for relocated tailings must satisfy certain standards. The salient features of these standards are summarized.

  11. Intrinsically disordered tubulin tails: complex tuners of microtubule functions?

    PubMed

    Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are essential cellular polymers assembled from tubulin heterodimers. The tubulin dimer consists of a compact folded globular core and intrinsically disordered C-terminal tails. The tubulin tails form a lawn of densely grafted, negatively charged, flexible peptides on the exterior of the microtubule, potentially akin to brush polymers in the field of synthetic materials. These tails are hotspots for conserved, chemically complex posttranslational modifications that have the potential to act in a combinatorial fashion to regulate microtubule polymer dynamics and interactions with microtubule effectors, giving rise to a "tubulin code". In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of the enzymes that generate the astonishing tubulin chemical diversity observed in cells and describe recent advances in deciphering the roles of tubulin C-terminal tails and their posttranslational modifications in regulating the activity of molecular motors and microtubule associated proteins. Lastly, I outline the promises, challenges and potential pitfalls of deciphering the tubulin code. PMID:25307498

  12. Thyroxine Induced Resorption of Xenopus Laevis Tail Tissue in Vitro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scadding, Steven R.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method of studying thyroxine-induced resorption of tadpole tails in vitro is described. This procedure demonstrates that resorption is dependent on thyroxine and requires protein synthesis. It introduces students to the use of tissue culture methods. (Author)

  13. Concordia discors: duality in the origin of the vertebrate tail

    PubMed Central

    Handrigan, Gregory R

    2003-01-01

    The vertebrate tail is an extension of the main body axis caudal to the anus. The developmental origin of this structure has been a source of debate amongst embryologists for the past century. Some view tail development as a continuation of the morphogenetic processes that shape the head and trunk (i.e. gastrulation). The alternative view, secondary development, holds that the tail forms in a manner similar to limb development, i.e. by secondary induction. Previous developmental studies have provided support for both views. Here I revisit these studies, describing caudal morphogenesis in select vertebrates, the associated genes and developmental defects, and, as a relevant aside, consider the developmental and evolutionary relationships of primary and secondary neurulation. I conclude that caudal development enlists both gastrulation and secondary induction, and that the application of recent high-resolution cell labelling technology may clarify how these discordant programmes interact in building the vertebrate tail. PMID:12713266

  14. Texas white-tailed deer Internet harvest model

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Jennifer Nicole

    2009-05-15

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is an intensively managed game species throughout Texas and the United States. Modeling is a tool that has been used to evaluate various management practices and their potential impacts on wildlife...

  15. 42. FOUNDATIONS TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. FOUNDATIONS - TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5393. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  16. Final Report Review of Existing and Proposed Tailings Impoundment Technologies

    E-print Network

    ....................................................................... 3 4.0 Comparison of Uranium Tailings Disposal Technology with the Requirements of RCRA, Subtitle C ............................................................... 1 2.0 Profile of the Existing Industry........................................................................................... 2 3.0 Anticipated Changes in the Industry Profile

  17. Adrenal weight in a Texas white-tailed deer herd 

    E-print Network

    Ramsey, Charles Warren

    1975-01-01

    corresponded to the quality of the range. Taber (1953) found that following improvement in forage conditions, black-tailed deer had greater ovulation rates, He also correlated nutrition levels with population changes (Taber 1956). Robinette et al. (1955...

  18. Genetic basis of neural tube defects: the mouse gene loop-tail maps to a region of chromosome 1 syntenic with human 1q21–q23

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip Stanier; Jennifer N. Henson; Jane Eddleston; Gudrun E. Moore; Andrew J. Copp

    1995-01-01

    A genetic basis for neural tube defects (NTD) is rarely doubted, but the genes involved have not yet been identified. This is partly due to a lack of suitable families on which to perform linkage analysis. An alternative approach is to use the many mouse genes that cause NTD as a means of isolating their human homologues. Loop-tail (Lp) is

  19. Phosphorus Sequestration in Lake Sediment with Iron Mine Tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MAUREEN E. CLAYTON; SARAH LIEGEOIS; EDWARD J. BROWN

    2004-01-01

    Internal phosphorus loading can lead to eutrophication in lakes when anoxic sediments release bioavailable phosphorus into the water column. In laboratory experiments, iron mine tailings helped to sequester phosphorus in sediment from a eutrophic lake. Phosphorus release from the sediments after extraction with distilled water or 0.02 N H2SO4 was significantly reduced when mine tailings were added (1:1 w\\/w), even

  20. Tail Biting Trellis Representation of Codes: Decoding and Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao. Rose Y.; Lin, Shu; Fossorier, Marc

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents two new iterative algorithms for decoding linear codes based on their tail biting trellises, one is unidirectional and the other is bidirectional. Both algorithms are computationally efficient and achieves virtually optimum error performance with a small number of decoding iterations. They outperform all the previous suboptimal decoding algorithms. The bidirectional algorithm also reduces decoding delay. Also presented in the paper is a method for constructing tail biting trellises for linear block codes.

  1. Texas white-tailed deer Internet harvest model 

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Jennifer Nicole

    2009-05-15

    TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER INTERNET HARVEST MODEL A Thesis by JENNIFER NICOLE GARRETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER INTERNET HARVEST MODEL A Thesis by JENNIFER NICOLE GARRETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  2. Colorful tails fade when lizards adopt less risky behaviors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dror Hawlena

    2009-01-01

    Colorful tails that become cryptic during ontogeny are found in diverse taxa. Nevertheless, the evolutionary bases for this\\u000a change remain debated. Recent work suggests that colorful tails, deflective displays, and striped patterns may represent antipredator\\u000a mechanisms used by immature lizards to compensate for being more active and hence more vulnerable to predation (increased\\u000a movement hypothesis, IMH). I challenged the generality

  3. Testing tail-mounted transmitters with Myocastor coypus (nutria)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merino, S.; Carter, J.; Thibodeaux, G.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a tail-mounted radio-transmitter for Myocastor coypus (nutria) that offers a practical and efficient alternative to collar or implant methods. The mean retention time was 96 d (range 57-147 d, n = 7), making this a practical method for short-term studies. The tail-mounts were less injurious to animals than collars and easier for field researchers to implement than either collars or surgically implanted transmitters.

  4. The dynamics of tidal tails from massive satellites

    E-print Network

    Jun-Hwan Choi; Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

    2007-08-03

    (Abbreviated) We investigate the dynamical mechanisms responsible for producing tidal tails from dwarf satellites using N-body simulations. We identify two important dynamical co-conspirators: 1) the points where the attractive force of the host halo and satellite are balanced do not occur at equal distances from the satellite centre or at the same equipotential value for massive satellites, breaking the morphological symmetry of the leading and trailing tails; and 2) the escaped ejecta in the leading (trailing) tail continues to be decelerated (accelerated) by the satellite's gravity leading to large offsets of the ejecta orbits from the satellite orbit. The effect of the satellite's self gravity decreases only weakly with a decreasing ratio of satellite mass to host halo mass, demonstrating the importance of these effects over a wide range of subhalo masses. Not only will the morphology of the leading and trailing tails for massive satellites be different, but the observed radial velocities of the tails will be displaced from that of the satellite orbit; both the displacement and the peak radial velocity is proportional to satellite mass. If the tails are assumed to follow the progenitor satellite orbits, the tails from satellites with masses greater than 0.0001 of the host halo virial mass in a spherical halo will appear to indicate a flattened halo. Therefore, a constraint on the Milky Way halo shape using tidal streams requires mass-dependent modelling. Similarly, we compute the the distribution of tail orbits both in E_{r}-r^{-2} space and in E-L_{z} space, advocated for identifying satellite stream relics. The acceleration of ejecta by a massive satellite during escape spreads the velocity distribution and obscures the signature of a well-defined ``moving group'' in phase space.

  5. RED-TAILED HAWK NEST SITES IN PUERTO RICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduarixi Santana C; J Eddie N. Laboy; James A. Mosher; Stanley A. Temple

    ABSTRACT.-We describe Red-tailed Hawk,(Buteo jamaicensis) nest sites in four habitats in Puerto Rico. Forty-nine nests were located in 2 1 species of trees. Red-tailed Hawks nested in trees that were taller than the mean,canopy,height of trees in surrounding,plots and that allowed a view of at least 50% of their territory. Most nests were in the upper,third of the tree on

  6. Misprescription and misuse of one-tailed tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CELIA M. LOMBARDI; STUART H. HURLBERT

    2009-01-01

    One-tailed statistical tests are often used in ecology, animal behaviour and in most other fields in the biologicalandsocialsciences.Herewereviewthefrequencyoftheiruseinthe1989and2005volumesoftwojournals (Animal Behaviour and Oecologia), their advantages and disadvantages, the extensive erroneous advice on them in both older and modern statistics texts and their utility in certain narrow areas of applied research. Of those articles with data sets susceptible to one-tailed tests, at

  7. Performance Analysis with Truncated Heavy-Tailed Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Mats Pihlsgård

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with queues and insurance risk processes where a generic service time, resp. generic claim, has the form\\u000a U ? K for some r.v. U with distribution B which is heavy-tailed, say Pareto or Weibull, and a typically large K, say much larger than \\u000a $$\\\\mathbb{E}U$$\\u000a . We study the compound Poisson ruin probability ?(u) or, equivalently, the tail

  8. Physical stability of asphalt emulsion admix seal radon barrier for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, T.E.

    1983-09-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory, is investigating the use of an asphalt emulsion admix seal to reduce the release of radon from uranium mill tailings. A key requirement of any cover system is its long-term stability; the cover must withstand failure over very long periods of time. An important determinant of overall cover system stability is the integrity of the 6.35-cm (2.5-in.) thick asphalt admix seal. Therefore, the physical stability of this seal was examined. The investigation considered the mechanical interaction between the tailings pile and cover. The potential effect of differential settlement of the tailings pile on the integrity of the seal system was also examined. Results indicate that the minimum span length the seal could withstand without failing is 0.34 m (1.1 ft). This assumes a differential settlement of 4.92 cm (1.94 in.) at the center resulting from the application of a 0.76-m (2.5-ft) cover. At spans greater than 0.60 m (1.97 ft), no tensile strain would develop.

  9. Environmental factors affecting long-term stabilization of radon suppression covers for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.K.; Long, L.W.; Reis, J.W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is investigating the use of a rock armoring blanket (riprap) to mitigate wind and water erosion of an earthen radon suppression cover applied to uranium mill tailings. To help determine design stresses for the tailings piles, environmental parameters are characterized for the five active uranium-producing regions on a site-specific basis. Only conventional uranium mills that are currently operating or that are scheduled to open in the mid 1980s are considered. Available data indicate that flooding has the most potential for disrupting a tailings pile. The arid regions of the Wyoming Basins and the Colorado Plateau are subject to brief storms of high intensity. The Texas Gulf Coast has the highest potential for extreme precipitation from hurricane-related storms. Wind data indicate average wind speeds from 3 to 6 m/sec for the sites, but extremes of 40 m/sec can be expected. Tornado risks range from low to moderate. The Colorado Plateau has the highest seismic potential, with maximum acceleration caused by earthquakes ranging from 0.2 to 0.4 g. Any direct effect from volcanic eruption is negligible, as all mills are located 90 km or more from an igneous or hydrothermal system.

  10. Summary report on reprocessing evaluation of selected inactive uranium mill tailings sites

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been assisting the Department of Energy in the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Actions Program (UMTRAP) the purpose of which is to implement the provisions of Title I of Public Law 95-604, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.'' As part of this program, there was a need to evaluate the mineral concentration of the residual radioactive materials at some of the designated processing sites to determine whether mineral recovery would be practicable. Accordingly, Sandia contracted Mountain States Research and Development (MSRD), a division of Mountain States Mineral Enterprises, to drill, sample, and test tailings at 12 sites to evaluate the cost of and the revenue that could be derived from mineral recovery. UMTRAP related environmental and engineering sampling and support activities were performed in conjunction with the MSRD operations. This summary report presents a brief description of the various activities in the program and of the data and information obtained and summarizes the results. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  11. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site near Maybell, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project consists of the Surface Project (Phase I) and the Ground Water Project (Phase II). Under the UMTRA Surface Project, tailings, contaminated soil, building foundations, and materials associated with the former processing of uranium ore at UMTRA Project sites are placed into disposal cells. The cells are designed to reduce radon and other radiation emissions and to prevent further contamination of ground water. One UMTRA Project site is near Maybell, Colorado. Surface cleanup at this site began in 1995 and is scheduled for completion in 1996. The tailings are being stabilized in place at this site. The disposal area has been withdrawn from public use by the DOE and is referred to as the permanent withdrawal area. The Ground Water Project evaluates the nature and extent of ground water contamination resulting from past uranium ore processing activities. The Ground Water Project at this site is in its beginning stages. This report is a site-specific document that will be used to evaluate current and future potential impacts to the public and the environment from exposure to contaminated ground water. The results presented in this document and other evaluations will determine whether any action is needed to protect human health or the environment.

  12. Sensory Neuron Development in Mouse Coccygeal Vertebrae and Its Relationship to Tail Biopsies for Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Jerald; Hendricks, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    A common method of genotyping mice is via tissue obtained from tail biopsies. However, there is no available information on the temporal development of sensory neurons in the tail and how their presence or absence might affect the age for performing tail biopsies. The goals of this study were to determine if afferent sensory neurons, and in particular nociceptive neurons, are present in the coccygeal vertebrae at or near the time of birth and if not, when they first can be visualized on or in those vertebrae. Using toluidine blue neuronal staining, transmission electron microscopy, and calcitonin-related gene peptide immunostaining, we found proximal to distal maturation of coccygeal nerve growth in the C57BL/6J mouse. Single nerve bundles were first seen on postpartum day (PPD) 0. On PPD 3 presumptive nociceptive sensory nerve fibers were seen entering the vertebral perichondrium. Neural development continued through the last time point (PPD 7) but at no time were neural fibers seen entering the body of the vertebrae. The effect of age on the development of pain perception in the neonatal mouse is discussed. PMID:24505409

  13. Net Phosphorus Requirements of Dorper×Thin-tailed Han Crossbred Ram Lambs

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Shoukun; Xu, Guishan; Jiang, Chenggang; Deng, Kaidong; Tu, Yan; Zhang, Naifeng; Ma, Tao; Lou, Can; Diao, Qiyu

    2013-01-01

    A comparative slaughter trial was conducted to estimate the phosphorus (P) requirement for maintenance and growth of crossbred lambs of Dorper with a Chinese indigenous sheep breed, thin-tailed Han sheep. Thirty-five Dorper×thin-tailed Han crossbred, noncastrated ram lambs (20.3±0.22 kg of shrunk body weight (SBW)) were used. Seven lambs were randomly chosen and slaughtered at 20 kg SBW as the baseline group for measuring initial body composition. Another seven lambs were also randomly chosen and offered a pelleted mixed diet for ad libitum intake and slaughtered at 28 kg SBW. The remaining 21 sheep were randomly divided into 3 groups with 7 sheep each and subject to the same diet of either 70 or 40% of ad libitum intake. The 3 groups were slaughtered when the sheep fed ad libitum reached 35 kg of SBW. Body P contents were determined after slaughter. The results showed that the net P requirement for maintenance was 30.0 mg/kg of empty body weight (EBW) or 23.4 mg/kg body weight (BW), and the P requirement for growth decreased from 5.3 to 5.0 g/kg of EBW gain as the lamb grew from 20 to 35 kg. The net P requirement for growth of Dorper×thin-tailed Han crossbred ram lambs was lower than that of sheep adopted by the American nutritional system. PMID:25049910

  14. Physiologic reference ranges for captive black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Keckler, M Shannon; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Langham, Gregory L; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L; Carroll, Darin S

    2010-05-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a member of the order Rodentia and the family Sciuridae. Ecologically, prairie dogs are a keystone species in prairie ecology. This species is used as an animal model for human gallbladder disease and diseases caused by infection with Clostridium difficile, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and most recently, Orthopoxvirus. Despite increasing numbers of prairie dogs used in research and kept as pets, few data are available on their baseline physiology in animal facility housing conditions. To establish baseline physiologic reference ranges, we designed a study using 18 wild-caught black-tailed prairie dogs. Telemetry data were analyzed to establish circadian rhythms for activity and temperature. In addition, hematologic and serum chemistry analyses were performed. Baseline measurements were used to establish the mean for each animal, which then were compiled and analyzed to determine the reference ranges. Here we present physiologic data on serum chemistry and hematology profiles, as well as weight, core body temperature, and daily activity patterns for black-tailed prairie dogs. These results reflect the use of multiple measurements from species- and age-matched prairie dogs and likely will be useful to ecologists, scientists interested in using this animal model in research, and veterinarians caring for pet prairie dogs. PMID:20587156

  15. Physiologic Reference Ranges for Captive Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus)

    PubMed Central

    Keckler, M Shannon; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Langham, Gregory L; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L; Carroll, Darin S

    2010-01-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a member of the order Rodentia and the family Sciuridae. Ecologically, prairie dogs are a keystone species in prairie ecology. This species is used as an animal model for human gallbladder disease and diseases caused by infection with Clostridium difficile, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and most recently, Orthopoxvirus. Despite increasing numbers of prairie dogs used in research and kept as pets, few data are available on their baseline physiology in animal facility housing conditions. To establish baseline physiologic reference ranges, we designed a study using 18 wild-caught black-tailed prairie dogs. Telemetry data were analyzed to establish circadian rhythms for activity and temperature. In addition, hematologic and serum chemistry analyses were performed. Baseline measurements were used to establish the mean for each animal, which then were compiled and analyzed to determine the reference ranges. Here we present physiologic data on serum chemistry and hematology profiles, as well as weight, core body temperature, and daily activity patterns for black-tailed prairie dogs. These results reflect the use of multiple measurements from species- and age-matched prairie dogs and likely will be useful to ecologists, scientists interested in using this animal model in research, and veterinarians caring for pet prairie dogs. PMID:20587156

  16. Accounting for the extreme events tail in probabilistic hazard maps for volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, E. S.; Pitman, B.; Wolpert, R.; Bayarri, S.; Berger, J.; Spiller, E.

    2009-12-01

    It is increasingly being understood that development of mathematical models of a geophysical phenomena, while a fundamental step, is only part of the process of modeling and predicting inundation limits for natural hazards. In this work we combine data from hundreds of observed volcanic avalanches at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, a geophysical flow model, and statistical modeling to derive a new methodology for generating probabilistic hazard maps. The initial step consists of estimating probabilities of inundation at particular discrete points of interest (e.g. airport and city centre). The methodology starts with a computer model of the geophysical process, in this case the TITAN2D model that has been developed for modeling geophysical mass flows. A key input to the computer model is the probability distribution for the initial volume and direction of the flows based on observed data. An important limitation is that for modeling purposes, the observations represent relatively scarce datasets, while from a volcanological perspective datasets such as those from the prolonged and relatively well-monitored eruption of the Soufriere Hills Volcano, are as complete as can be realistically obtained. By combining flow event data, probability modeling and statistical methods, a probability distribution of severity and frequency of flow events is derived. Understanding and predicting the effects of volcanic hazards involves understanding the extreme event tail (the largest flow events) but this is notoriously difficult, especially with the limited data and prohibitively expensive to compute. Instead a statistical emulator (or surrogate of the computer model) is used, a computationally cheap response surface approximating the output of the flow simulations, which is constructed based on carefully chosen computer model runs. The speed of the emulator then allows to ‘solve the inverse problem’: that is, to determine regions of inputs values (characteristics of the flow) which result in a events of interest (such as one that that reaches a given critical point). The flow frequency distribution is then used to determine the probability of this region, that is, the probability that an event of a given magnitude will occur at a particular site. Using quantitative measures like these to solve for the probabilities across an area, zoned maps could be generated from which civil protection authorities can make more informed decisions about hazard mitigation.

  17. Evidence for the involvement of descending pain-inhibitory mechanisms in the antinociceptive effect of hecogenin acetate.

    PubMed

    Gama, Kelly Barbosa; Quintans, Jullyana S S; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J; Santana, Wagno Alcântara; Branco, Alexsandro; Soares, Milena Botelho Pereira; Villarreal, Cristiane Flora

    2013-04-26

    Hecogenin is a sapogenin present in the leaves of species from the Agave genus, with a wide spectrum of reported pharmacological activities. The present study was undertaken to evaluate whether hecogenin acetate (1) has antinociceptive properties and to determine its mechanism of action. The nociceptive threshold was evaluated using the tail flick test in mice. Mice motor performance was evaluated in a Rotarod test. By using Fos expression as a marker of neural activation, the involvement of the periaqueductal gray in 1-induced antinociception was evaluated. Intraperitoneal administration of 1 (5-40 mg/kg) produced a dose-dependent increase in the tail flick latency time compared to vehicle-treated group (p < 0.01). Mice treated with 1 (40 mg/kg) did not show motor performance alterations. The antinociception of 1 (40 mg/kg) was prevented by naloxone (nonselective opioid receptor antagonist; 5 mg/kg), CTOP (?-opioid receptor antagonist; 1 mg/kg), nor-BNI (?-opioid receptor antagonist; 0.5 mg/kg), naltrindole (?-opioid receptor antagonist; 3 mg/kg), or glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K(+) channel blocker; 2 mg/kg). Systemic administration of 1 (5-40 mg/kg) increased the number of Fos positive cells in the periaqueductal gray. The present study has demonstrated for the first time that 1 produces consistent antinociception mediated by opioid receptors and endogenous analgesic mechanisms. PMID:23437926

  18. Mobilization and retention of heavy metals in mill-tailings from Garpenberg sulfide mines, Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhixun Lin

    1997-01-01

    The Lilla Bredsjön tailings contain less than 30% residual sulfide minerals, and an average initial content of 4% calcium carbonate. The tailings are divided into an active oxidation horizon near the surface of the tailings impoudment, an underlying intermediate horizon and a water-saturated horizon. Extensive oxidation of sulfide minerals near the tailings surface results in depletion of carbonate minerals and

  19. Sexual Dimorphism and Population Differences in Structural Properties of Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) Wing and Tail Feathers.

    PubMed

    Pap, Péter L; Osváth, Gergely; Aparicio, José Miguel; B?rbos, L?rinc; Matyjasiak, Piotr; Rubolini, Diego; Saino, Nicola; Vágási, Csongor I; Vincze, Orsolya; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-01-01

    Sexual selection and aerodynamic forces affecting structural properties of the flight feathers of birds are poorly understood. Here, we compared the structural features of the innermost primary wing feather (P1) and the sexually dimorphic outermost (Ta6) and monomorphic second outermost (Ta5) tail feathers of barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from a Romanian population to investigate how sexual selection and resistance to aerodynamic forces affect structural differences among these feathers. Furthermore, we compared structural properties of Ta6 of barn swallows from six European populations. Finally, we determined the relationship between feather growth bars width (GBW) and the structural properties of tail feathers. The structure of P1 indicates strong resistance against aerodynamic forces, while the narrow rachis, low vane density and low bending stiffness of tail feathers suggest reduced resistance against airflow. The highly elongated Ta6 is characterized by structural modifications such as large rachis width and increased barbule density in relation to the less elongated Ta5, which can be explained by increased length and/or high aerodynamic forces acting at the leading tail edge. However, these changes in Ta6 structure do not allow for full compensation of elongation, as reflected by the reduced bending stiffness of Ta6. Ta6 elongation in males resulted in feathers with reduced resistance, as shown by the low barb density and reduced bending stiffness compared to females. The inconsistency in sexual dimorphism and in change in quality traits of Ta6 among six European populations shows that multiple factors may contribute to shaping population differences. In general, the difference in quality traits between tail feathers cannot be explained by the GBW of feathers. Our results show that the material and structural properties of wing and tail feathers of barn swallows change as a result of aerodynamic forces and sexual selection, although the result of these changes can be contrasting. PMID:26110255

  20. Sexual Dimorphism and Population Differences in Structural Properties of Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica) Wing and Tail Feathers

    PubMed Central

    Pap, Péter L.; Osváth, Gergely; Aparicio, José Miguel; B?rbos, L?rinc; Matyjasiak, Piotr; Rubolini, Diego; Saino, Nicola; Vágási, Csongor I.; Vincze, Orsolya; Møller, Anders Pape

    2015-01-01

    Sexual selection and aerodynamic forces affecting structural properties of the flight feathers of birds are poorly understood. Here, we compared the structural features of the innermost primary wing feather (P1) and the sexually dimorphic outermost (Ta6) and monomorphic second outermost (Ta5) tail feathers of barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) from a Romanian population to investigate how sexual selection and resistance to aerodynamic forces affect structural differences among these feathers. Furthermore, we compared structural properties of Ta6 of barn swallows from six European populations. Finally, we determined the relationship between feather growth bars width (GBW) and the structural properties of tail feathers. The structure of P1 indicates strong resistance against aerodynamic forces, while the narrow rachis, low vane density and low bending stiffness of tail feathers suggest reduced resistance against airflow. The highly elongated Ta6 is characterized by structural modifications such as large rachis width and increased barbule density in relation to the less elongated Ta5, which can be explained by increased length and/or high aerodynamic forces acting at the leading tail edge. However, these changes in Ta6 structure do not allow for full compensation of elongation, as reflected by the reduced bending stiffness of Ta6. Ta6 elongation in males resulted in feathers with reduced resistance, as shown by the low barb density and reduced bending stiffness compared to females. The inconsistency in sexual dimorphism and in change in quality traits of Ta6 among six European populations shows that multiple factors may contribute to shaping population differences. In general, the difference in quality traits between tail feathers cannot be explained by the GBW of feathers. Our results show that the material and structural properties of wing and tail feathers of barn swallows change as a result of aerodynamic forces and sexual selection, although the result of these changes can be contrasting. PMID:26110255

  1. Importance of regions outside the cytoplasmic tail of G-protein-coupled receptors for phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    GEHRET, Austin U.; HINKLE, Patricia M.

    2010-01-01

    Two GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), TRHR (thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor) and ?2AR (?2-adrenergic receptor), are regulated in distinct manners. Following agonist binding, TRHR undergoes rapid phosphorylation attributable to GRKs (GPCR kinases); ?2AR is phosphorylated by both second messenger-activated PKA (protein kinase A) and GRKs with slower kinetics. TRHR co-internalizes with arrestin, whereas ?2AR recruits arrestin, but internalizes without it. Both receptors are dephosphorylated following agonist removal, but TRHR is dephosphorylated much more rapidly while it remains at the plasma membrane. We generated chimaeras swapping the C-terminal domains of these receptors to clarify the role of different receptor regions in phosphorylation, internalization and dephosphorylation. ?2AR with a TRHR cytoplasmic tail (?2AR–TRHR) and TRHR with a ?2AR tail (TRHR–?2AR) signalled to G-proteins normally. ?2AR–TRHR was phosphorylated well at the PKA site in the third intracellular loop, but poorly at GRK sites in the tail, whereas TRHR–?2AR was phosphorylated strongly at GRK sites in the tail (Ser355/Ser356 of the ?2AR). Both chimaeric receptors exhibited prolonged, but weak, association with arrestin at the plasma membrane, but high-affinity arrestin interactions and extensive co-internalization of receptor with arrestin required a phosphorylated TRHR tail. In contrast, swapping C-terminal domains did not change the rates of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation or the dependence of TRHR dephosphorylation on the length of agonist exposure. Thus the interactions of GPCRs with GRKs and phosphatases are determined not simply by the amino acid sequences of the substrates, but by regions outside the cytoplasmic tails. PMID:20345371

  2. Design of a sensor network for structural health monitoring of a full-scale composite horizontal tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Dongyue; Wang, Yishou; Wu, Zhanjun; Rahim, Gorgin; Bai, Shengbao

    2014-05-01

    The detection capability of a given structural health monitoring (SHM) system strongly depends on its sensor network placement. In order to minimize the number of sensors while maximizing the detection capability, optimal design of the PZT sensor network placement is necessary for structural health monitoring (SHM) of a full-scale composite horizontal tail. In this study, the sensor network optimization was simplified as a problem of determining the sensor array placement between stiffeners to achieve the desired the coverage rate. First, an analysis of the structural layout and load distribution of a composite horizontal tail was performed. The constraint conditions of the optimal design were presented. Then, the SHM algorithm of the composite horizontal tail under static load was proposed. Based on the given SHM algorithm, a sensor network was designed for the full-scale composite horizontal tail structure. Effective profiles of cross-stiffener paths (CRPs) and uncross-stiffener paths (URPs) were estimated by a Lamb wave propagation experiment in a multi-stiffener composite specimen. Based on the coverage rate and the redundancy requirements, a seven-sensor array-network was chosen as the optimal sensor network for each airfoil. Finally, a preliminary SHM experiment was performed on a typical composite aircraft structure component. The reliability of the SHM result for a composite horizontal tail structure under static load was validated. In the result, the red zone represented the delamination damage. The detection capability of the optimized sensor network was verified by SHM of a full-scale composite horizontal tail; all the diagnosis results were obtained in two minutes. The result showed that all the damage in the monitoring region was covered by the sensor network.

  3. In-situ dewatering techniques for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Wardwell, R.E.; Nelson, J.D.; Abt, S.R.; Staub, W.P.

    1983-09-01

    The state-of-the-art regarding methods for the in-place dewatering of uranium mill tailings is described. Since large amounts of water in tailing impoundments can cause long-term seepage problems, drainage of the tailings both during operations and during the reclamation stage is highly desirable. Dewatering of tailings also provides for settlement prior to the placement of the cover and increases the pile's stability for earth-moving equipment during site reclamation and cover placement. The application of various drainage techniques is discussed with regard to their effectiveness in minimizing the amount of water remaining in an impoundment during long-term reclamation. Drainage techniques that are reviewed include underdrain gravity-flow systems, single wells and well-points, electro-osmosis, vertical drains, and evapotranspiration. It has been shown that the underdrain gravity systems provide an effective and reliable means of dewatering tailings. If feasible, they will probably prove to be the best option for the in situ dewatering of tailings because of their practicality and relatively low cost. The other methods would be recommended only as backup systems or in existing impoundments that do not have underdrain systems.

  4. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. The configuration model is statically pitched at 30 deg. angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4 deg. and reduced frequency of pi and 2(pi). The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The configuration is investigated for inboard position of the twin tails which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% wing span. The computed results are compared with the results of stationary configuration, which previously have been validated using experimental data. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration.

  5. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A. [Technical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland); Sztaba, K.S. [Univ. of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  6. Synthesis process of forsterite refractory by iron ore tailings.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jihui; Li, Peng

    2009-01-01

    With mineral resources becoming gradually more deficient, as well as the issue of mine tailings causing environmental pollution, more and more people have realized the great significance of tailings utilization. Iron ore tailings, as a kind of secondary resource, have been developed in recycling industries. The feasibility to produce forsterite refractory from high-silicon iron tailings and high-magnesium raw materials were discussed. Also, the synthesis reaction processes were studied from the results of the laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that the synthesis processes can be separated into three steps when using iron tailings to synthesize forsterite: (1) produce magnesium iron sosoloid (Mg1-XFeXO) and magnesium metasilicate (MgSiO3), (2) form the fayalite, and (3) create the forsterite. The synthetic productions are primarily forsterite, hortonolite, and small amounts of magnesium metasilicate (MgSiO3). The hortonolite is wrapped around the surface of the forsterite particles and formed the cementing phase. In addition, the method to produce forsterite refractory and lightweight forsterite refractory from iron tailings were offered. PMID:25084443

  7. Arsenic bioaccessibility in gold mine tailings of Delita, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Toujaguez, R; Ono, F B; Martins, V; Cabrera, P P; Blanco, A V; Bundschuh, J; Guilherme, L R G

    2013-11-15

    A bioaccessibility test was carried out in four tailings collected at a former mining area in Delita, Cuba. A previous risk assessment study identified arsenic (As) as the main critical contaminant in this area and showed that the tailings had high As concentrations (up to 3.5%). This study aimed at: (i) evaluating As bioaccessibility in four tailings (R1, R2, R3 and R4) from a gold mining area to obtain a better health risk estimate; and, (ii) identifying the mineral phases responsible for most of the bioaccessible As using XRD, SEM-EDS, and XAS. The results showed that bioaccessible As in the tailings ranged from 0.65 to 40.5%. The main factors influencing As bioaccessibility were a high occurrence of amorphous iron arsenate; occurrence, even at low content, of iron oxyhydroxides and stability of mineral phases in the environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Although arsenopyrite, arsenates and goethite were confirmed by mineralogical methods such as optical microscopy, XRD, and SEM-EDS, XAS showed that scorodite-oxidation state As(+V)-was dominant in most of the tailings. This confirms that the low bioaccessibility of As in most of the tailings is due to the slow kinetics of As release from scorodite. PMID:23428178

  8. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-03-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  9. Revegetation potential of acidic mill tailings in southwestern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, J.M.; Beeson, D.L.; Gomez, M. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Lindemann, W.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture; Whitford, W.G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.; Zehner, W.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A greenhouse project was conducted to examine the revegetation potential of acid mill tailings from an abandoned mill site near Silver City, Grant County, New Mexico. The tailings piles covered about 35 acres, had percent level concentrations of Zn, Cu, Pb, an average pH of 2.2, and an average net neutralization potential of 120 tons calcium carbonate per kiloton tailings. To successfully revegetate the tailings, five problems must be overcome: (1) neutralization of current and future acidity, (2) immobilization of metals, (3) restoration of biological activity, (4) improvement of water holding capacity, and (5) increasing the supply of plant nutrients. Tailings material was mixed with crushed limestone and divided into greenhouse pots in a randomized complete block design with factorial arrangement of treatments, including nine plant species and four organic amendments. Fertilizer was added based on soil fertility analysis. Germination and growth characteristics of plant species, and physical and chemical characteristics of soil were examined. Liming effectively removed or moderated most chemical plant growth problems. Water soluble and plant available metals in neutralized tailings were slightly higher than in native soils.

  10. Postautotomy tail activity in the Balearic lizard, Podarcis lilfordi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafilis, Panayiotis; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín; Valakos, Efstratios

    2008-03-01

    Caudal autotomy is an effective antipredator strategy widespread among lizards. The shed tail thrashes vigorously for long periods to distract the predator and facilitate the lizard’s escape. This movement is maintained by energy supplied by the anaerobic conversion of glycogen into lactate. It has been suggested that lactate accumulation serves as an index for the vigor of tail thrashing. We made three predictions: (1) tail loss frequency should be higher under heavier predation regime, (2) the duration of postautotomy tail movement should be extended in populations under heavy predation pressure as an adaptation to the higher risk and the increased need for defense, and (3) as result, lactate in these tail tissues should be concentrated at higher levels. To eliminate the impact of phylogeny and environmental factors on the interpretation of our result, we focused exclusively on one species, the Balearic lizard ( Podarcis lilfordi). We studied three populations under different predation pressure but sharing the same climatic conditions. We found no differences among the studied populations either in postautotomy duration of tail movement or in levels of final lactate accumulation while autotomy frequency was higher where predation pressure was more intense. ?ail loss effectiveness is directly influenced by the level of predation, while secondary features of the trait appear to remain independent from the impact of environment.

  11. Coupled thermal, hydraulic and geochemical evolution of pyritic tailings in unsaturated column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, Patricia; Ayora, Carlos; Carrera, Jesús

    2007-11-01

    The evolution of pore-water and the composition of solid phases in the vadose zone of pyritic tailings was studied by means of unsaturated column experiments. Several columns of water-saturated mine tailings were dried during 125 days under controlled laboratory conditions. The columns were dismantled at four successive drying stages and the evolution of pore-water, mineralogy, water content and temperature was characterized. Sulfide and aluminosilicate minerals present in the waste dissolved, releasing sulfate and other solutes (mainly Fe, Zn, Cu, Al, Mg and Ca) to the pore-water. Evaporation caused a crust of efflorescent, water-soluble sulfates to develop over the complete top surface of the columns and into the pores of the underlying waste material. This crust, which has also been identified in the field, changed the hydraulic properties of the tailings and produced a decrease in the evaporation rate of the columns. Moreover, these water-soluble precipitates (mainly rozenite, szomolnokite, halotrichite, hexahydrite, mirabilite and gypsum) acted as temporary sinks for Cd, Pb, Co and Ni, which could be released to the surface run-off or the groundwaters during rainfall events under field conditions. Pore-water evolution was determined not only by geochemical processes (dissolution of sulfides and aluminosilicates, precipitation of secondary phases) but also by thermal and hydraulic processes. Progressive dilution was observed in the lower part of the columns. Dilution was caused by the thermally driven vapor flux from the top of the column to its colder bottom and subsequent condensation therein. This process, which may also occur in tailings under sub-arid climate, played a key role on the evolution of pore-water with increasing drying.

  12. Potential of castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) for phytoremediation of mine tailings and oil production.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Olivares, Alejandro; Carrillo-González, Rogelio; González-Chávez, Ma del Carmen A; Soto Hernández, Ramón Marcos

    2013-01-15

    Bioenergy production combined with phytoremediation has been suggested to help in solving two critical world problems: the gradual reduction of fossil fuels and soil contamination. The aim of this research was to investigate the potential for the use of Ricinus communis L. (castor oil plant) as an energy crop and plant species to remediate metal-polluted sites. This study was performed in mine tailings containing high concentrations of Cu, Zn, Mn, Pb and Cd. Physico-chemical characterization, total, DTPA-extractable and water-soluble metals in rhizospheric tailings heap samples were carried. Metal concentrations in plant tissues and translocation factors (TFs) were also determined. The Ricinus seed-oil content was high between 41 and 64%, seeds from San Francisco site 6 had the highest oil content, while these from site 7 had the lowest. No trend between oil yield vs seed origin site was observed. Seed-oil content was negatively correlated with root concentration of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd, but no correlation was observed with the extractable-metals. According to its shoot metal concentrations and TFs, castor bean is not a metal accumulator plant. This primary colonizing plant is well suited to cope with the local toxic conditions and can be useful for the stabilization of these residues, and for then decreasing metal bioavailability, dispersion and human health risks on these barren tailings heaps and in the surrounding area. Our work is the first report regarding combined oil production and a phytostabilization role for Ricinus plants in metal mine tailings and may give a new value to suitable metal-polluted areas. PMID:23171605

  13. A Hydrodynamical Solution for the "Twin-tailed" Colliding Galaxy Cluster "El Gordo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor M.; Broadhurst, Tom

    2015-02-01

    The distinctive cometary X-ray morphology of the recently discovered massive galaxy cluster "El Gordo" (ACT-CT J0102-4915 z = 0.87) indicates that an unusually high-speed collision is ongoing between two massive galaxy clusters. A bright X-ray "bullet" leads a "twin-tailed" wake, with the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) centroid at the end of the northern tail. We show how the physical properties of this system can be determined using our FLASH-based, N-body/hydrodynamic model, constrained by detailed X-ray, SZ, and Hubble lensing and dynamical data. The X-ray morphology and the location of the two dark matter components and the SZ peak are accurately described by a simple binary collision viewed about 480 million years after the first core passage. We derive an impact parameter of sime300 kpc, and a relative initial infall velocity of sime2250 km s-1 when separated by the sum of the two virial radii assuming an initial total mass of 2.15 × 1015 M ? and a mass ratio of 1.9. Our model demonstrates that tidally stretched gas accounts for the northern X-ray tail along the collision axis between the mass peaks, and that the southern tail lies off axis, comprising compressed and shock heated gas generated as the less massive component plunges through the main cluster. The challenge for ?CDM will be to find out if this physically extreme event can be plausibly accommodated when combined with the similarly massive, high-infall-velocity case of the Bullet cluster and other such cases being uncovered in new SZ based surveys.

  14. Loss of long-term depression in the insular cortex after tail amputation in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Gang; Zhuo, Min

    2014-01-01

    The insular cortex (IC) is an important forebrain structure involved in pain perception and taste memory formation. Using a 64-channel multi-electrode array system, we recently identified and characterized two major forms of synaptic plasticity in the adult mouse IC: long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). In this study, we investigate injury-related metaplastic changes in insular synaptic plasticity after distal tail amputation. We found that tail amputation in adult mice produced a selective loss of low frequency stimulation-induced LTD in the IC, without affecting (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-evoked LTD. The impaired insular LTD could be pharmacologically rescued by priming the IC slices with a lower dose of DHPG application, a form of metaplasticity which involves activation of protein kinase C but not protein kinase A or calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. These findings provide important insights into the synaptic mechanisms of cortical changes after peripheral amputation and suggest that restoration of insular LTD may represent a novel therapeutic strategy against the synaptic dysfunctions underlying the pathophysiology of phantom pain. PMID:24398034

  15. Risk factors associated with prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira interrogans in a metapopulation of black-tailed prairie dogs in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Montiel-Arteaga, Ana; Atilano, Daniel; Ayanegui, Alejandra; Ceballos, Gerardo; Suzán, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Interest in the study of infectious diseases of wildlife has grown in recent decades and now focuses on understanding host-parasite dynamics and factors involved in disease occurrence. The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a useful species for this type of investigation because it lives in heterogeneous landscapes where human activities take place, and its populations are structured as a metapopulation. Our goal was to determine if colony area, density, and proximity to human settlements are associated with prevalence of antibodies to Leptospira interrogans in black-tailed prairie dogs of northwestern Chihuahua State, Mexico. We captured 266 prairie dogs in 11 colonies in 2009 and analyzed 248 serum samples with the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for antibody to any of the 12 pathogenic serovars of L. interrogans. Serologically positive test results for only serovars Bratislava, Canicola, Celledoni, and Tarassovi were considered for statistical analysis. Almost 80% of sera were positive for at least one pathogenic serovar (MAT titer ?1?80). The highest recorded antibody prevalences were to serovars Bratislava and Canicola. Correlation analysis showed a negative relationship between L. interrogans antibody prevalence and colony area (r?=?-0.125, P<0.005), suggesting that animals living in larger colonies were at a lower risk than those in smaller colonies. The correlation between the serovar Canicola and distance was negative (r?=?-0.171, P<0.007), and this relationship may be explained by the presence of domestic dogs associated with human dwellings. This is the first study of Leptospira spp. antibody prevalence in prairie dogs, and it provides valuable insights into the dynamics of leptospirosis in threatened wildlife species. Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of Leptospira serovars in metapopulations of prairie dogs and other domestic and wild mammals in grassland communities. PMID:25380365

  16. Involvement of AACTE Institutions in CBTE Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Douglas C.; Sandefur, Walter

    1975-01-01

    Reports the results of a survey of teacher education institutions affiliated with the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education to determine the extent to which each was involved in competency-based programs. (Author/IRT)

  17. The impact of unconfined mine tailings in residential areas from a mining town in a semi-arid environment: Nacozari, Sonora, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Figueroa, Diana; Maier, Raina M.; de la O-Villanueva, Margarita; Gómez-Alvarez, Agustín; Moreno-Zazueta, Alan; Rivera, Jacinto; Campillo, Alberto; Grandlic, Christopher; Anaya, Ricardo; Palafox-Reyes, Juan

    2009-01-01

    Past mining activities in northern Mexico left a legacy of delerict landscapes devoid of vegetation and seasonal formation of salt efflorescence. Metal content was measured in mine tailings, efflorescent salts, soils, road dust and residential soils to investigate contamination. Climatic effects such as heavy wind and rainfall events can have great impact on the dispersion of metals in semi-arid areas, since soils are typically sparsely vegetated. Geochemical analysis of this site revealed that even though total metal content in mine tailings was relatively low (e.g. Cu = 1000 mg kg-1), metals including Mn, Ba, Zn, and Cu were all found at significantly higher levels in efflorescence salts formed by evaporation on the tailings impoundment surface following the rainy season (e.g. Cu=68000 mg kg-1). Such efflorescent fine-grained salts are susceptible to wind erosion resulting in increased metal spread to nearby residential soils. Our results highlight the importance of seasonally dependent salt-formation and wind erosion in determining risk levels associated with potential inhalation or ingestion of airborne particulates originating from contaminated sites such as tailings impoundments. In low metal-content mine tailings located in arid and semi-arid environments, efflorescence salts could represent a human health risk and a challenge for plant establishment in mine tailings. PMID:19500816

  18. Student Involvement in Community-Based Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Deborah; Fox, Linette; Priest, Thomas; McBride, Freda

    2002-01-01

    Describes how Johnson C. Smith University in Charlotte, North Carolina, an "Implementing Urban Missions" grantee, used an Urban Research Group model to involve undergraduates in community research; the needs of community-based organizations and the service mission of the university determine the amount of student involvement. (EV)

  19. Transmission Efficiency of Two Flea Species (Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris and Oropsylla hirsuta) Involved in Plague

    E-print Network

    Antolin, Michael F.

    ) Involved in Plague Epizootics among Prairie Dogs Aryn P. Wilder,1,2 Rebecca J. Eisen,1 Scott W. Bearden,1. Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are highly sus- ceptible to infection, often experiencing mortality of nearly all individuals in a town as a result of plague. The fleas of black

  20. The H3-H4 N-Terminal Tail Domains Are the Primary Mediators of Transcription Factor IIIA Access to 5S DNA within a Nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Vitolo, Joseph M.; Thiriet, Christophe; Hayes, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Reconstitution of a DNA fragment containing a Xenopus borealis somatic type 5S rRNA gene into a nucleosome greatly restricts the binding of transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) to its cognate DNA sequence within the internal promoter of the gene. Removal of all core histone tail domains by limited trypsin proteolysis or acetylation of the core histone tails significantly relieves this inhibition and allows TFIIIA to exhibit high-affinity binding to nucleosomal DNA. Since only a single tail or a subset of tails may be primarily responsible for this effect, we determined whether removal of the individual tail domains of the H2A-H2B dimer or the H3-H4 tetramer affects TFIIIA binding to its cognate DNA site within the 5S nucleosome in vitro. The results show that the tail domains of H3 and H4, but not those of H2A and/or H2B, directly modulate the ability of TFIIIA to bind nucleosomal DNA. In vitro transcription assays carried out with nucleosomal templates lacking individual tail domains show that transcription efficiency parallels the binding of TFIIIA. In addition, we show that the stoichiometry of core histones within the 5S DNA-core histone-TFIIIA triple complex is not changed upon TFIIIA association. Thus, TFIIIA binding occurs by displacement of H2A-H2B–DNA contacts but without complete loss of the dimer from the nucleoprotein complex. These data, coupled with previous reports (M. Vettese-Dadey, P. A. Grant, T. R. Hebbes, C. Crane-Robinson, C. D. Allis, and J. L. Workman, EMBO J. 15:2508–2518, 1996; L. Howe, T. A. Ranalli, C. D. Allis, and J. Ausio, J. Biol. Chem. 273:20693–20696, 1998), suggest that the H3/H4 tails are the primary arbiters of transcription factor access to intranucleosomal DNA. PMID:10688663

  1. Myosin isoform expression in the prehensile tails of didelphid marsupials: functional differences between arboreal and terrestrial opossums.

    PubMed

    Rupert, J E; Schmidt, E Cordero; Moreira-Soto, A; Herrera, B Rodríguez; Vandeberg, J L; Butcher, M T

    2014-08-01

    Prehensile tails are defined as having the ability to grasp objects and are commonly used as a fifth appendage during arboreal locomotion. Despite the independent evolution of tail prehensility in numerous mammalian genera, data relating muscle structure, physiology, and function of prehensile tails are largely incomplete. Didelphid marsupials make an excellent model to relate myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fiber type with structure/function of caudal muscles, as all opossums have a prehensile tail and tail use varies between arboreal and terrestrial forms. Expanding on our previous work in the Virginia opossum, this study tests the hypothesis that arboreal and terrestrial opossums differentially express faster versus slower MHC isoforms, respectively. MHC isoform expression and percent fiber type distribution were determined in the flexor caudae longus (FCL) muscle of Caluromys derbianus (arboreal) and Monodelphis domestica (terrestrial), using a combination of gel electrophoresis and immunohistochemistry analyses. C. derbianus expresses three MHC isoforms (1, 2A, 2X) that are distributed (mean percentage) as 8.2% MHC-1, 2.6% 1/2A, and 89.2% 2A/X hybrid fibers. M. domestica also expresses MHC-1, 2A, and 2X, in addition to the 2B isoform, distributed as 17.0% MHC-1, 1.3% 1/2A, 9.0% 2A, 75.2% 2A/X, and 0.3% 2X/B hybrid fibers. The distribution of similar isoform fiber types differed significantly between species (P?tail of an arboreal specialist supports our hypothesis, and correlates with higher muscle force required for tail hanging and arboreal maneuvering on terminal substrates. Conversely, a broader distribution of highly oxidative fibers in the caudal musculature is well suited for tail nest building/remodeling behaviors of terrestrial opossums. PMID:24832677

  2. Glass ceramic obtained by tailings and tin mine waste reprocessing from Llallagua, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia, Jony Roger Hans; Villarino, Cecilia; Alfonso, Pura; Garcia-Valles, Maite; Martinez, Salvador; Parcerisa, David

    2014-05-01

    In Bolivia Sn mining activity produces large tailings of SiO2-rich residues. These tailings contain potentially toxic elements that can be removed into the surface water and produce a high environmental pollution. This study determines the thermal behaviour and the viability of the manufacture of glass-ceramics from glass. The glass has been obtained from raw materials representative of the Sn mining activities from Llallagua (Bolivia). Temperatures of maximum nucleation rate (Tn) and crystallization (Tcr) were calculated from the differential thermal analyses. The final mineral phases were determined by X-ray diffraction and textures were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline phases are nefeline occurring with wollastonite or plagioclase. Tn for nepheline is between 680 ºC and 700 ºC, for wollastonite, 730 ºC and for plagioclase, 740 ºC. Tcr for nefeline is between 837 and 965 ºC; for wollastonite, 807 ºC and for plagioclase, 977 ºC. In order to establish the mechanical characteristics and efficiency of the vitrification process in the fixation of potentially toxic elements the resistance to leaching and micro-hardness were determined. The obtained contents of the elements leached from the glass ceramic are well below the limits established by the European legislation. So, these analyses confirm that potentially toxic elements remain fixed in the structure of mineral phases formed in the glass-ceramic process. Regarding the values of micro-hardness results show that they are above those of a commercial glass. The manufacture of glass-ceramics from mining waste reduces the volume of tailings produced for the mining industry and, in turn enhances the waste, transforming it into a product with industrial application. Acknowledgements: This work was partly financed by the project AECID: A3/042750/11, and the SGR 2009SGR-00444.

  3. Tailings reprocessing as source control for acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Balderrama, R.M. [Bureau of Mines, Reno, NV (United States). Reno Research Center

    1995-12-31

    Bench-scale laboratory flotation and gravity separation tests were conducted on tailings samples to remove the sulfidic material, mainly pyrite, the source of acid generation. A combination of xanthate collectors, promoters, and frothers were used during flotation. Pyrite recoveries were in the range of 42 to 97%, depending on the tailings being treated. Sulfide sulfur contents of 12.8 to 0.37% in the feeds were reduced to 8.68 to 0.01% in the treated tails. Flotation tests were conducted to evaluate the ARD potential as a function of percent pyrite remaining in the tails. Standard ARD predictive tests were used to evaluate the success of the treatment. In some cases, removal of only 50 to 55% of the pyritic fraction was required, thereby demonstrating the conversion of the waste material from acidic to non-acidic. A laboratory vanning table was used to evaluate the amenability of sulfide-bearing tailings samples to gravity separation. The pyrite recoveries varied from 38 to 86%. The sulfide sulfur content of 12.8 to 0.37% in the feeds was reduced to 6.0 to 0.14% in the treated tails. Predictive ARD tests performed on tailings before and after the gravity removal of pyrite showed that most samples changed from probably acid producing to the uncertain range. Data reported and analyzed int his paper demonstrate source control for ARD prevention through the removal of metal sulfides from sulfide-bearing wastes using conventional flotation and gravity separation techniques.

  4. The Tail-Elicited Tail Withdrawal Reflex of "Aplysia" Is Mediated Centrally at Tail Sensory-Motor Synapses and Exhibits Sensitization across Multiple Temporal Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of "Aplysia californica" have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have…

  5. A modified permeameter for determination of unsaturated coefficient of permeability

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sai K. Vanapalli; Vinod K. Garga; Patrick Brisson

    2007-01-01

    The design details of a modified permeameter used for determining the unsaturated coefficient of permeability of tailings\\u000a are presented in this Paper. This permeameter can accommodate a large tailings specimen, 200  ×  200 ×  400 mm high, and uses\\u000a the Instantaneous Profile Method (IPM) to determine the variation of unsaturated coefficient of permeability with respect\\u000a to soil suction using a single specimen. The soil-water characteristic

  6. SEMI-MELANISTIC WHITE-TAILED DEER IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN --Melanistic color morphs of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are

    E-print Network

    125 SEMI-MELANISTIC WHITE-TAILED DEER IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN -- Melanistic color morphs of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are differentiated from other recognized color morphs by having uniform melanin and is considered rare in white-tailed deer populations (Severinghaus and Cheatum 1956, Sauer 1984

  7. Kidney structure and function of obligate and facultative hibernators: the white-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys leucurus ) and the black-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys ludovicianus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Harlow; E. J. Braun

    1995-01-01

    The white-tailed prairie dog is an obligate hibernator that enters a heterothermic phase when maintained in the cold with low intensity light and ad libitum food and water. The black-tailed prairie dog (a facultative hibernator) will not hibernate under similar conditions. It has been suggested that the black tailed prairie dog remains active during the winter because it can conserve

  8. Thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen from rat tail tendon.

    PubMed

    Sionkowska, A; Kami?ska, A

    1999-05-01

    The thermal helix-coil transition in UV irradiated collagen solution, collagen film and pieces of rat tail tendon (RTT) were compared. Their thermal stability's were determined by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and by viscometric measurements. The denaturation temperatures of collagen solution, film and pieces of RTT were different. The helix-coil transition occur near 40 degrees C in collagen solution, near 112 degrees C in collagen film, and near 101 degrees C in pieces of RTT. After UV irradiation the thermal helix-coil transition of collagen samples were changed. These changes depend on the degree of hydratation. PMID:10408640

  9. Free-flight model investigation of a vertical-attitude VTOL fighter with twin vertical tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grafton, S. B.; Anglin, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    Free-flight tests were conducted in the Langley full-scale tunnel to determine the stability and control characteristics of a vertical-attitude VTOL fighter having twin vertical tails and a pivoted fuselage forebody (nose-cockpit) arrangement. The flight tests included hovering flights and transition flights from hover to conventional forward flight. Static force tests were also made to aid in the analysis of the flight tests. The model exhibited satisfactory stability and control characteristics, and the transition from hovering flight to conventional forward flight was relatively smooth and straightforward.

  10. Experimental contagious ecthyma in mule deer, white-tailed deer, pronghorn and wapiti.

    PubMed

    Lance, W R; Hibler, C P; DeMartini, J

    1983-07-01

    Hand-reared mule deer fawns (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer fawns (Odocoileus virginianus), pronghorn fawns (Antilocapra americana) and wapiti calves (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) were exposed to contagious ecthyma lesion material obtained from Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis canadensis) to determine the susceptibility and pathogenesis in these species. All four species developed mucocutaneous proliferative lesions of the oral cavity, grossly and histologically compatible with contagious ecthyma. The limited clinical responses to the virus indicated that contagious ecthyma would not seriously impact free-ranging individuals. PMID:6685778

  11. Who's Committed? Who's Involved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipps, Carol

    1970-01-01

    Describes a teaching strategy which aims at success by using peer groups and questions designed to enable students to think independently. Results of using this method indicate more student involvement and commitment. (FL)

  12. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an acidic environment in which As-bearing FEPs were stable. The addition of binders increased the tailings' acid-neutralizing capacity and introduced more Ca-ions and Fe-precipitates into the tailings matrix, both of which may facilitate As adsorption and reduce the potential for sulphide oxidation on a long-term basis.

  13. A descriptive and quantitative approach regarding erosion and development of landforms on abandoned mine tailings: New insights and environmental implications from SE Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín Duque, J. F.; Zapico, I.; Oyarzun, R.; López García, J. A.; Cubas, P.

    2015-06-01

    The San Cristóbal-Perules mining site in Mazarrón in southeast Spain was subjected to about a hundred years of intense mining activity for lead, silver, and zinc. Metallurgical operations (smelting, calcination, gravity concentration) carried out during the late nineteenth century-early twentieth century induced significant land transformation, and the most conspicuous wastes of this period consist of a chaotic piling of 'old' tailing deposits. Later on, during the mid-twentieth century, 'modern' tailings resulting from froth flotation were accumulated filling small valleys; these latter valley-fill tailings rose sequentially according to the upstream construction method, progressively raising the level of the dam during the process. Once abandoned, both types of tailing deposits underwent severe erosion, resulting in a mosaic of erosional and sedimentary landforms developed upon (e.g., gully formation) and within them (e.g., piping). We made an inventory and classification of these landforms. Our study shows the geomorphic work to reestablish a new steady state between the tailings deposits and the local erosive conditions. This scenario implies several hazards related to the extremely high heavy metal contents of these tailings and the geomorphic instability of the deposits. We also quantified the tailings tonnage and erosion that occurred at one of the tailings dams (El Roble). As shown by an oblique aerial photograph taken in 1968, this dam had a terraced topography, whereas in 2013 this morphology had evolved into a badland-type relief with deep parallel gullies. By recognizing and surveying specific, remnant points along the benches and outslopes of the older terraced topography, we were able to build up a first digital elevation model (DEM1) reflecting the initial topography. A second DEM, this time showing the present topography, allowed quantification of erosion via Material Loss = DEM1 - DEM2. This yields an erosion rate (1968-2009) of 151.8 Mg (MT) ha- 1 y- 1, which matches well typical values for erosion of mined areas, commonly above 100 Mg (MT) ha- 1 y- 1. Abandoned mine tailing deposits are extremely common in the semiarid scenarios of the SW USA, Australia, Chile, and Peru. Given the similarities of these scenarios with SE Spain, the example from Mazarrón may provide useful new insights regarding the erosion and geomorphic evolution of such tailing deposits. These matters should be addressed in key environmental actions such as mine closure plans and land reclamation projects. A solution may come via restoration of these deposits through landform design involving the building up of stable mature landscapes, which in turn can withstand erosion much more easily.

  14. Structural implications of the C-terminal tail in the catalytic and stability properties of manganese peroxidases from ligninolytic fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Fueyo, Elena [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Acebes, Sandra [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Martínez, María Jesús; Romero, Antonio; Medrano, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Guallar, Victor, E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [Barcelona Supercomputing Center, Jordi Girona 29, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); ICREA, Passeig Lluís Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Martínez, Angel T., E-mail: fjmedrano@cib.csic.es [CSIC, Ramiro de Maeztu 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-12-01

    The variable C-terminal tail of manganese peroxidases, a group of enzymes involved in lignin degradation, is implicated in their catalytic and stability properties, as shown by new crystal structures, molecular-simulation and directed-mutagenesis data. Based on this structural–functional evaluation, short and long/extralong manganese peroxidase subfamilies have been accepted; the latter are characterized by exceptional stability, while it is shown for the first time that the former are able to oxidize other substrates at the same site where manganese(II) is oxidized. The genome of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora includes 13 manganese peroxidase (MnP) genes representative of the three subfamilies described in ligninolytic fungi, which share an Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and have varying lengths of the C-terminal tail. Short, long and extralong MnPs were heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized, and the first structure of an extralong MnP was solved. Its C-terminal tail surrounds the haem-propionate access channel, contributing to Mn{sup 2+} oxidation by the internal propionate, but prevents the oxidation of 2, 2?-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), which is only oxidized by short MnPs and by shortened-tail variants from site-directed mutagenesis. The tail, which is anchored by numerous contacts, not only affects the catalytic properties of long/extralong MnPs but is also associated with their high acidic stability. Cd{sup 2+} binds at the Mn{sup 2+}-oxidation site and competitively inhibits oxidation of both Mn{sup 2+} and ABTS. Moreover, mutations blocking the haem-propionate channel prevent substrate oxidation. This agrees with molecular simulations that position ABTS at an electron-transfer distance from the haem propionates of an in silico shortened-tail form, while it cannot reach this position in the extralong MnP crystal structure. Only small differences exist between the long and the extralong MnPs, which do not justify their classification as two different subfamilies, but they significantly differ from the short MnPs, with the presence/absence of the C-terminal tail extension being implicated in these differences.

  15. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  16. Nonideal Sorption-Desorption and Extensive Elution Tailing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A. E.; Akyol, N. H.; Schnaar, G. A.; Johnson, G. R.; Yolcubal, I.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Contamination of subsurface environments by organic compounds continues to pose a risk to the environment. Sorption is a critical process that influences the transport and fate of organic contaminants. Contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and the effectiveness of remediation efforts are mediated in part by sorption/desorption processes. Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to characterize long-term, low-concentration elution tailing associated with sorption/desorption processes. A variety of soils and aquifer sediments, representing a range of particle-size distributions and organic-carbon contents, were employed, and trichloroethene (TCE) was used as the model organic compound. Trichloroethene transport exhibited extensive elution tailing for all media, with several hundred to several thousand pore volumes of water flushing required to reach the detection limit (~0.1 ?g/L). The elution tailing was more extensive for the media with higher organic-carbon contents and associated retardation factors. However, when normalized by retardation, the extent of tailing did not correlate directly to organic-carbon content. These latter results suggest that differences in the geochemical nature of organic carbon (e.g., composition, structure) among the various media influenced observed behavior. A mathematical model incorporating nonlinear, rate-limited sorption/desorption described by a continuous-distribution function was used to successfully simulate trichloroethene transport, including the extensive elution tailing.

  17. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

  18. Design plans for an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter.

    PubMed

    Otto, Aaron; Butcher, Greg Q; Messina, Troy C

    2011-01-01

    While the pedagogical benefits of incorporating inquiry driven labs into an undergraduate curriculum are well established, often the prohibitive costs of providing equipment for such labs limits the types of experiences that can be offered. For example, the lab portion of Advanced Neuroscience at Centenary College of Louisiana consists of a semester-long research project developed by the students. Frequently, these junior- and senior-level students generate interesting research questions that must be culled or scaled back simply due to a lack of appropriate equipment. In the most recent iteration of the class, the students wanted to examine analgesia using the tail flick test, a measure of spinal nociception. In this test a rodent subject is restrained; its tail is exposed to a heat source; and the latency to flick its tail away from the noxious stimuli is recorded. As commercial devices were far beyond the lab budget, we sought to develop an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter that was easy to use and generated reliable data. The prototype device was tested by students in the above-mentioned class and was found to consistently produce reliable data in agreement with the literature. Here we present plans for a tail flick analgesia meter that can be constructed for $50-75, roughly 100 times cheaper than commercial devices. PMID:23626497

  19. Design, synthesis and antibacterial activity of minor groove binders: the role of non-cationic tail groups.

    PubMed

    Khalaf, Abedawn I; Bourdin, Claire; Breen, David; Donoghue, Gavin; Scott, Fraser J; Suckling, Colin J; Macmillan, Donna; Clements, Carol; Fox, Keith; Sekibo, Doreen A T

    2012-10-01

    The design and synthesis of a new class of minor groove binder (MGBs) in which, the cationic tail group has been replaced by a neutral, polar variant including cyanoguanidine, nitroalkene, and trifluoroacetamide groups. Antibacterial activity (against Gram positive bacteria) was found for both the nitroalkene and trifluoroacetamide groups. For the case of the nitroalkene tail group, strong binding of a minor groove binder containing this tail group was demonstrated by both DNA footprinting and melting temperature measurements, showing a correlation between DNA binding and antibacterial activity. The compounds have also been evaluated for binding to the hERG ion channel to determine whether non-cationic but polar substituents might have an advantage compared with conventional cationic tail groups in avoiding hERG binding. In this series of compounds, it was found that whilst non-cationic compounds generally had lower affinity to the hERG ion channel, all of the compounds studied bound weakly to the hERG ion channel, probably associated with the hydrophobic head groups. PMID:22948178

  20. Simulation studies of structure and edge tension of lipid bilayer edges: effects of tail structure and force-field.

    PubMed

    West, Ana; Ma, Kevin; Chung, Jonathan L; Kindt, James T

    2013-08-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayer ribbons have been performed to investigate the structures and line tensions associated with free bilayer edges. Simulations carried out for dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine with three different force-field parameter sets yielded edge line tensions of 45 ± 2 pN, over 50% greater than the most recently reported experimentally determined value for this lipid. Edge tensions obtained from simulations of a series of phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer ribbons with saturated acyl tails of length 12-16 carbons and with monounsaturated acyl tails of length 14-18 carbons could be correlated with the excess area associated with forming the edge, through a two-parameter fit. Saturated-tail lipids underwent local thickening near the edge, producing denser packing that correlated with lower line tensions, while unsaturated-tail lipids showed little or no local thickening. In a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine ribbon initiated in a tilted gel-phase structure, lipid headgroups tended to tilt toward the nearer edge producing a herringbone pattern, an accommodation that may account for the reported edge-induced stabilization of an ordered structure at temperatures near a lipid gel-fluid phase transition. PMID:23556409