Sample records for tail disease wtd

  1. Experimental transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) of elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) to white-tailed deer by intracerebral route

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To compare clinicopathological findings of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a natural host, three groups (n = 5) of white-tailed deer (WTD) fawns were intracerebrally inoculated with WTD, mule deer or elk isolates of CWD. Three other uninoculated fawns served as controls. Approximately 10 months pos...

  2. White Tail Disease of Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    PubMed

    Sahul Hameed, A S; Bonami, Jean-Robert

    2012-09-01

    Macrobrachium rosenbergii is the most important cultured freshwater prawn in the world and it is now farmed on a large scale in many countries. Generally, freshwater prawn is considered to be tolerant to diseases but a disease of viral origin is responsible for severe mortalities in larval, post-larval and juvenile stages of prawn. This viral infection namely white tail disease (WTD) was reported in the island of Guadeloupe in 1995 and later in Martinique (FrenchWest Indies) in Taiwan, the People's Republic of China, India, Thailand, Australia and Malaysia. Two viruses, Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV) and extra small virus-like particle (XSV) have been identified as causative agents of WTD. MrNV is a small icosahedral non-enveloped particle, 26-27 nm in diameter, identified in the cytoplasm of connective cells. XSV is also an icosahedral virus and 15 nm in diameter. Clinical signs observed in the infected animals include lethargy, opaqueness of the abdominal muscle, degeneration of the telson and uropods, and up to 100 % within 4 days. The available diagnostic methods to detect WTD include RT-PCR, dot-blot hybridization, in situ hybridization and ELISA. In experimental infection, these viruses caused 100 % mortality in post-larvae but failed to cause mortality in adult prawns. The reported hosts for these viruses include marine shrimp, Artemia and aquatic insects. Experiments were carried out to determine the possibility of vertical transmission of MrNV and XSV in M. rosenbergii. The results indicate that WTD may be transferred from infected brooders to their offspring during spawning. Replication of MrNV and XSV was investigated in apparently healthy C6/36 Aedes albopictus and SSN-1 cell lines. The results revealed that C6/36 and SSN-1cells were susceptible to these viruses. No work has been carried out on control and prevention of WTD and dsRNA against protein B2 produced RNAi that was able to functionally prevent and reduce mortality in WTD-infected redclaw crayfish. PMID:23997437

  3. Presence and Seeding Activity of Pathological Prion Protein (PrPTSE) in Skeletal Muscles of White-Tailed Deer Infected with Chronic Wasting Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Martin L. Daus; Johanna Breyer; Katja Wagenfuehr; Wiebke M. Wemheuer; Achim Thomzig; Walter J. Schulz-Schaeffer; Michael Beekes

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a contagious, rapidly spreading transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), or prion disease, occurring in cervids such as white tailed-deer (WTD), mule deer or elk in North America. Despite efficient horizontal transmission of CWD among cervids natural transmission of the disease to other species has not yet been observed. Here, we report for the first time a

  4. BLUETONGUE AND EPIZOOTIC HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE VIRUS INFECTIONS OF PULMONARY ARTERY ENDOTHELIAL CELLS FROM CATTLE, SHEEP AND DEER: COMPARISON OF REPLICATION KINETICS AND CELLULAR INJURY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Replication of Bluetongue (BTV) and epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHDV) viruses in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (ECs) cultured from cattle, sheep, black-tailed (BTD) and white-tailed (WTD) deer was compared Purified EC cultures from the pulmonary arteries of cattle, sheep, BTD and WTD were u...

  5. Experimental transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) of elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) to white-tailed deer by intracerebral route.

    PubMed

    Hamir, A N; Richt, J A; Miller, J M; Kunkle, R A; Hall, S M; Nicholson, E M; O'Rourke, K I; Greenlee, J J; Williams, E S

    2008-05-01

    To compare clinical and pathologic findings of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in a natural host, 3 groups (n = 5) of white-tailed deer (WTD) fawns were intracerebrally inoculated with a CWD prion of WTD, mule deer, or elk origin. Three other uninoculated fawns served as controls. Approximately 10 months postinoculation (MPI), 1 deer from each of the 3 inoculated groups was necropsied and their tissues were examined for lesions of spongiform encephalopathy (SE) and for the presence of abnormal prion protein (PrP(d)) by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and Western blot (WB). The remaining deer were allowed to live until they developed clinical signs of the disease which began approximately 18 MPI. By 26 MPI, all deer were euthanatized on humane grounds. Obvious differences in clinical signs or the incubation periods were not observed between the 3 groups of deer given CWD. In 1 of 3 nonclinical deer euthanatized at 10 MPI, minimal microscopic lesions of SE were seen in the central nervous system (CNS) tissues, and PrP(d) was observed by IHC in tissues of all 3 deer. In the clinical deer, CNS lesions of SE and PrP(d) accumulations were more severe and extensive. It is concluded that the 3 sources of CWD prion did not induce significant differences in time to clinical disease or qualitative differences in signs or lesions in WTD. However, this observation does not imply that these CWD agents would necessarily behave similarly in other recipient species. PMID:18487485

  6. Experimental Infection of White-Tailed Deer with Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Etiologic Agent of Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Tate, Cynthia M.; Mead, Daniel G.; Luttrell, M. Page; Howerth, Elizabeth W.; Dugan, Vivien G.; Munderloh, Ulrike G.; Davidson, William R.

    2005-01-01

    Serologic and molecular evidence of Anaplasma phagocytophilum has been demonstrated in white-tailed deer (WTD; Odocoileus virginianus), and deer are an important host for the tick vector Ixodes scapularis. In this study, we describe experimental infection of WTD with A. phagocytophilum. We inoculated four WTD with a human isolate of A. phagocytophilum propagated in tick cells. Two additional deer served as negative controls. All inoculated deer developed antibodies (titers, ?64) to A. phagocytophilum, as determined by an indirect fluorescent antibody test, between 14 and 24 days postinfection [p.i.]), and two deer maintained reciprocal titers of ?64 through the end of the 66-day study. Although morulae were not observed in granulocytes and A. phagocytophilum was not reisolated via tick cell culture of blood, 16S reverse transcriptase nested PCR (RT-nPCR) results indicated that A. phagocytophilum circulated in peripheral blood of three deer through at least 17 days p.i. and was present in two deer at 38 days p.i. Femoral bone marrow from one deer was RT-nPCR positive for A. phagocytophilum at 66 days p.i. There was no indication of clinical disease. These data confirm that WTD are susceptible to infection with a human isolate of A. phagocytophilum and verify that WTD produce detectable antibodies upon exposure to the organism. Because adults are the predominant life stage of I. scapularis found on deer and because adult I. scapularis ticks do not transmit A. phagocytophilum transovarially, it is unlikely that WTD are a significant source of A. phagocytophilum for immature ticks even though deer have a high probability of natural infection. However, the susceptibility and immunologic response of WTD to A. phagocytophilum render them suitable candidates as natural sentinels for this zoonotic tick-borne organism. PMID:16081884

  7. A Virulent Babesia bovis Strain Failed to Infect White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Jeanne M.; Johnson, Wendell C.; Scoles, Glen A.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife are an important component in the vector-host-pathogen triangle of livestock diseases, as they maintain biological vectors that transmit pathogens and can serve as reservoirs for such infectious pathogens. Babesia bovis is a tick-borne pathogen, vectored by cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp., that can cause up to 90% mortality in naive adult cattle. While cattle are the primary host for cattle fever ticks, wild and exotic ungulates, including white-tailed deer (WTD), are known to be viable alternative hosts. The presence of cattle fever tick populations resistant to acaricides raises concerns regarding the possibility of these alternative hosts introducing tick-borne babesial parasites into areas free of infection. Understanding the B. bovis reservoir competence of these alternative hosts is critical to mitigating the risk of introduction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that WTD are susceptible to infection with a B. bovis strain lethal to cattle. Two groups of deer were inoculated intravenously with either B. bovis blood stabilate or a larval extract supernatant containing sporozoites from infected R. microplus larvae. The collective data demonstrated that WTD are neither a transient host nor reservoir of B. bovis. This conclusion is supported by the failure of B. bovis to establish an infection in deer regardless of inoculum. Although specific antibody was detected for a short period in the WTD, the PCR results were consistently negative at multiple time points throughout the experiment and blood from WTD that had been exposed to parasite, transferred into naïve recipient susceptible calves, failed to establish infection. In contrast, naïve steers inoculated intravenously with either B. bovis blood stabilate or the larval extract supernatant containing sporozoites rapidly succumbed to disease. These findings provide evidence that WTD are not an epidemiological component in the maintenance of B. bovis infectivity to livestock. PMID:26083429

  8. A Virulent Babesia bovis Strain Failed to Infect White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Ueti, Massaro W; Olafson, Pia U; Freeman, Jeanne M; Johnson, Wendell C; Scoles, Glen A

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife are an important component in the vector-host-pathogen triangle of livestock diseases, as they maintain biological vectors that transmit pathogens and can serve as reservoirs for such infectious pathogens. Babesia bovis is a tick-borne pathogen, vectored by cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus spp., that can cause up to 90% mortality in naive adult cattle. While cattle are the primary host for cattle fever ticks, wild and exotic ungulates, including white-tailed deer (WTD), are known to be viable alternative hosts. The presence of cattle fever tick populations resistant to acaricides raises concerns regarding the possibility of these alternative hosts introducing tick-borne babesial parasites into areas free of infection. Understanding the B. bovis reservoir competence of these alternative hosts is critical to mitigating the risk of introduction. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that WTD are susceptible to infection with a B. bovis strain lethal to cattle. Two groups of deer were inoculated intravenously with either B. bovis blood stabilate or a larval extract supernatant containing sporozoites from infected R. microplus larvae. The collective data demonstrated that WTD are neither a transient host nor reservoir of B. bovis. This conclusion is supported by the failure of B. bovis to establish an infection in deer regardless of inoculum. Although specific antibody was detected for a short period in the WTD, the PCR results were consistently negative at multiple time points throughout the experiment and blood from WTD that had been exposed to parasite, transferred into naïve recipient susceptible calves, failed to establish infection. In contrast, naïve steers inoculated intravenously with either B. bovis blood stabilate or the larval extract supernatant containing sporozoites rapidly succumbed to disease. These findings provide evidence that WTD are not an epidemiological component in the maintenance of B. bovis infectivity to livestock. PMID:26083429

  9. Blood Chemistry of Free-Ranging and Captive White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Texas 

    E-print Network

    Smith, Melanie Love

    2012-07-16

    Blood samples were collected from 602 white-tailed deer (WTD) (Odocoileus virginianus) between October 2008 – October 2009, from 15 different counties throughout Texas. White-tailed deer were evaluated for serum biochemical parameters (total...

  10. Occurrence, isolation, and genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii from white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in New Jersey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White tailed deer (WTD) is an important reservoir host for Toxoplasma gondii. Each yr hundreds of thousands WTD are hunted or die in road accidents in the U.S.A. Humans and animals can become infected with T. gondii by eating infected venison. Wild felids that eat infected deer tissues can shed oocy...

  11. Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer DANIEL J. STORM,1,7, MICHAEL D. SAMUEL,2 ROBERT E. ROLLEY,3 PAUL SHELTON,4 NICHOLAS S. KEULER,5. Richards, and T. R. Van Deelen. 2013. Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic

  12. Disease limits populations: plague and black-tailed prairie dogs.

    PubMed

    Cully, Jack F; Johnson, Tammi L; Collinge, Sharon K; Ray, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Plague is an exotic vector-borne disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis that causes mortality rates approaching 100% in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). We mapped the perimeter of the active portions of black-tailed prairie dog colonies annually between 1999 and 2005 at four prairie dog colony complexes in areas with a history of plague, as well as at two complexes that were located outside the distribution of plague at the time of mapping and had therefore never been affected by the disease. We hypothesized that the presence of plague would significantly reduce overall black-tailed prairie dog colony area, reduce the sizes of colonies on these landscapes, and increase nearest-neighbor distances between colonies. Within the region historically affected by plague, individual colonies were smaller, nearest-neighbor distances were greater, and the proportion of potential habitat occupied by active prairie dog colonies was smaller than at plague-free sites. Populations that endured plague were composed of fewer large colonies (>100 ha) than populations that were historically plague free. We suggest that these differences among sites in colony size and isolation may slow recolonization after extirpation. At the same time, greater intercolony distances may also reduce intercolony transmission of pathogens. Reduced transmission among smaller and more distant colonies may ultimately enhance long-term prairie dog population persistence in areas where plague is present. PMID:20158327

  13. Disease limits populations: plague and black-tailed prairie dogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cully, Jack F., Jr.; Johnson, T.; Collinge, S.K.; Ray, C.

    2010-01-01

    Plague is an exotic vector-borne disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis that causes mortality rates approaching 100% in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus). We mapped the perimeter of the active portions of black-tailed prairie dog colonies annually between 1999 and 2005 at four prairie dog colony complexes in areas with a history of plague, as well as at two complexes that were located outside the distribution of plague at the time of mapping and had therefore never been affected by the disease. We hypothesized that the presence of plague would significantly reduce overall black-tailed prairie dog colony area, reduce the sizes of colonies on these landscapes, and increase nearest-neighbor distances between colonies. Within the region historically affected by plague, individual colonies were smaller, nearest-neighbor distances were greater, and the proportion of potential habitat occupied by active prairie dog colonies was smaller than at plague-free sites. Populations that endured plague were composed of fewer large colonies (>100 ha) than populations that were historically plague free. We suggest that these differences among sites in colony size and isolation may slow recolonization after extirpation. At the same time, greater intercolony distances may also reduce intercolony transmission of pathogens. Reduced transmission among smaller and more distant colonies may ultimately enhance long-term prairie dog population persistence in areas where plague is present.

  14. Evaluating Spatial Overlap and Relatedness of White-tailed Deer in a Chronic Wasting Disease Management

    E-print Network

    Evaluating Spatial Overlap and Relatedness of White- tailed Deer in a Chronic Wasting Disease Overlap and Relatedness of White-tailed Deer in a Chronic Wasting Disease Management Zone. PLoS ONE 8 and indirect transmission of infectious diseases such chronic wasting disease (CWD) or bovine tuberculosis. We

  15. Morphological and Genetic Comparisons between Babesia bovis and Trypanosoma spp. Found in Cattle and White-tailed Deer

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Amanda

    2012-10-19

    (Cervus canadensis), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), black-tailed deer (O. h. columbianus), WTD (Odocoileus virginianus), moose (Alces alces shirasi), pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and bison 14 (Bison bison) in Wyoming (Kingston et al., 1986...

  16. Chronic wasting disease in free-ranging Wisconsin white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joly, D.O.; Ribic, C.A.; Langenberg, J.A.; Beheler, K.; Batha, C.A.; Dhuey, B.J.; Rolley, R.E.; Bartelt, G.; VanDeelen, T.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Three White-tailed Deer shot within 5 km during the 2001 hunting season in Wisconsin tested positive for chronic wasting disease, a prion disease of cervids. Subsequent sampling within 18 km showed a 3% prevalence (n=476). This discovery represents an important range extension for chronic wasting disease into the eastern United States.

  17. Demographic Patterns and Harvest Vulnerability of Chronic Wasting Disease Infected White-Tailed Deer in Wisconsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    DANIEL A. GREAR; MICHAEL D. SAMUEL; JULIE A. LANGENBERG; DELWYN KEANE

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal disease of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) caused by transmissible protease-resistant prions. Since the discovery of CWD in southern Wisconsin in 2001, more than 20,000 deer have been removed from a .2,500-km2 disease eradication zone surrounding the three initial cases. Nearly all deer removed were tested for CWD infection and sex, age, and harvest

  18. SPATIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN WISCONSIN WHITE-TAILED DEER

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    SPATIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN WISCONSIN WHITE-TAILED DEER Damien O. Joly,1 to cause dramatic declines in deer and elk populations and perceived human health risks associated, typically involving culling to reduce deer populations. We characterized the spatial distribution of CWD

  19. AN EPIZOOTIC OF ADENOVIRUS-INDUCED HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE IN CAPTIVE BLACK-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter M. Boyce; Leslie W. Woods; M. Kevin Keel; N. James MacLachlan; Charles O. Porter; Howard D. Lehmkuhl

    Ten fawns and four adult black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus) in a captive herd died as a result of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic disease. Acute, systemic infections were characterized by hemorrhagic enteropathy, pulmonary edema, and occasional ulceration of the upper alimentary tract. Localized infections were limited to the upper alimentary tract and included stomatitis, pharyngitis, mandibular osteomyelitis, and rumenitis. In deer with acute,

  20. Scraping Behavior in Male White-tailed Deer as a Potential Means of Transmitting Chronic Wasting Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Travis C Kinsell

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has become a concern for wildlife managers and hunters across the United States. High prevalence of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in older male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) suggests that sex-specific social behavior may contribute to the spread of the disease among males. Scraping is a marking behavior performed by male white-tailed deer during the rut in

  1. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  2. An adenovirus linked to mortality and disease in long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hollmén, Tuula E.; Franson, J.C.; Flint, P.L.; Grand, J.B.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Docherty, D.E.; Wilson, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    An adenovirus was isolated from intestinal samples of two long-tailed ducks (Clangula hyemalis) collected during a die-off in the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska in 2000. The virus was not neutralized by reference antiserum against known group I, II, or III avian adenoviruses and may represent a new serotype. The prevalence of the virus was determined in live-trapped long-tailed ducks at the mortality site and at a reference site 100 km away where no mortality was observed. Prevalence of adenovirus antibodies in serum samples at the mortality site was 86% compared to 10% at the reference site. Furthermore, 50% of cloacal swabs collected at the mortality site and only 7% of swabs from the reference site were positive for adenoviruses. In 2001, no mortality was observed at either of the study areas, and virus prevalence in both serum and cloacal samples was low, providing further evidence that the adenovirus was linked to the mortality event in 2000. The virus was used to infect long-tailed ducks under experimental conditions and resulted in lesions previously described for avian adenovirus infections and similar to those observed in long-tailed duck carcasses from the Beaufort Sea. The status of long-tailed ducks has recently become a concern in Alaska due to precipitous declines in breeding populations there since the mid-1970s. Our findings suggest that the newly isolated adenovirus is a disease agent and source of mortality in long-tailed ducks, and thus could be a contributing factor in population declines.

  3. Serum 25-Hydroxvitamin D Concentrations in Captive and Free-Ranging, White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ABSTRACT: Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] were determined for free-ranging and captive white-tailed deer (WTD, Odocoileus virginianus). Effects of gender, season, and age on 25(OH)D concentrations were determined as well as comparisons to concentrations in serum from captive re...

  4. CORRELATION OF CYTOKINE GENE EXPRESSION WITH PATHOLOGY IN WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) INFECTED WITH MYCOBACTERIUM BOVIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis infected white-tailed deer (WTD) were detected in northeast Michigan in 1994. Subsequent surveys revealed a focus of infection that represents the first known reservoir of M. bovis in North America. Relatively little work has been done to characterize the immune response of white...

  5. ANTIBODY PREVALENCE OF EIGHT RUMINANT INFECTIOUS DISEASES IN CALIFORNIA MULE AND BLACK-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruno B. Chomel; Marius L. Carniciu; Rickie W. Kasten; Paolo M. Castelli; Thierry M. Work; David A. Jessup

    We tested 276 sera from 18 free-ranging black-tailed and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) herds in California (USA) collected from 1987 to 1991 in five biogeographical habitat types, for antibodies against eight infectious disease agents. Overall antibody prevalence was 56% for Anaplasma marginale, 31% for Borrelia burgdorferi, 16% for bluetongue virus serotype 17, 15% for epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus, 7% for

  6. Transmission of chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin white-tailed deer: implications for disease spread and management.

    PubMed

    Jennelle, Christopher S; Henaux, Viviane; Wasserberg, Gideon; Thiagarajan, Bala; Rolley, Robert E; Samuel, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the rate of infection or mode of transmission for wildlife diseases, and the implications of alternative management strategies. We used hunter harvest data from 2002 to 2013 to investigate chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection rate and transmission modes, and address how alternative management approaches affect disease dynamics in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer population. Uncertainty regarding demographic impacts of CWD on cervid populations, human and domestic animal health concerns, and potential economic consequences underscore the need for strategies to control CWD distribution and prevalence. Using maximum-likelihood methods to evaluate alternative multi-state deterministic models of CWD transmission, harvest data strongly supports a frequency-dependent transmission structure with sex-specific infection rates that are two times higher in males than females. As transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are an important and difficult-to-study class of diseases with major economic and ecological implications, our work supports the hypothesis of frequency-dependent transmission in wild deer at a broad spatial scale and indicates that effective harvest management can be implemented to control CWD prevalence. Specifically, we show that harvest focused on the greater-affected sex (males) can result in stable population dynamics and control of CWD within the next 50 years, given the constraints of the model. We also provide a quantitative estimate of geographic disease spread in southern Wisconsin, validating qualitative assessments that CWD spreads relatively slowly. Given increased discovery and distribution of CWD throughout North America, insights from our study are valuable to management agencies and to the general public concerned about the impacts of CWD on white-tailed deer populations. PMID:24658535

  7. Serologic survey of selected zoonotic disease agents in black-tailed jack rabbits from western Texas.

    PubMed

    Henke, S E; Pence, D B; Demarais, S; Johnson, J R

    1990-01-01

    A serologic survey for the agents of Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) (Rickettsia rickettsii), Borrelia spp. including the causative agent for Lyme disease (Borrelia burgdorferi), and plague (Yersinia pestis) was conducted on blood samples collected from 30 and 46 black-tailed jack rabbits (Lepus californicus) from an urban environment in Lubbock, Texas (USA) during winter 1987 and the following spring 1988, respectively. Antibody titers to the agents of RMSF and borreliosis were detected in sera of 28 and 1% of the jack rabbits, respectively. Neither organisms (rickettsiae and/or spirochetes) nor their associated antigens were detected in any of the tissue or whole blood samples; plague antibodies were not detected in the 76 jack rabbits sampled. Four of 18 ticks (Dermacentor parumapertus) removed from 12 jack rabbits were positive for RMSF using the fluorescent antibody test. The black-tailed jack rabbit is a common wildlife species living in close proximity to higher density human populations in many areas of the southwestern United States. Our results indicate the potential importance of urban populations of this mammal as reservoirs for at least one important zoonotic disease, RMSF, in western Texas. PMID:2106044

  8. Demographic patterns and harvest vulnerability of chronic wasting disease infected white-tailed deer in Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grear, D.A.; Samuel, M.D.; Langenberg, J.A.; Keane, D.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal disease of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) caused by transmissible protease-resistant prions. Since the discovery of CWD in southern Wisconsin in 2001, more than 20,000 deer have been removed from a >2,500-km2 disease eradication zone surrounding the three initial cases. Nearly all deer removed were tested for CWD infection and sex, age, and harvest location were recorded. Our analysis used data from a 310-km2 core study area where disease prevalence was higher than surrounding areas. We found no difference in harvest rates between CWD infected and noninfected deer. Our results show that the probability of infection increased with age and that adult males were more likely to be infected than adult females. Six fawns tested positive for CWD, five fawns from the core study area, including the youngest (5 months) free-ranging cervid to test positive. The increase in male prevalence with age is nearly twice the increase found in females. We concluded that CWD is not randomly distributed among deer and that differential transmission among sex and age classes is likely driving the observed patterns in disease prevalence. We discuss alternative hypotheses for CWD transmission and spread and, in addition, discuss several possible nonlinear relationships between prevalence and age. Understanding CWD transmission in free-ranging cervid populations will be essential to the development of strategies to manage this disease in areas where CWD is found, as well as for surveillance strategies in areas where CWD threatens to spread.

  9. Spatial epidemiology of chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Joly, D.O.; Samuel, M.D.; Langenberg, J.A.; Blanchong, Julie A.; Batha, C.A.; Rolley, R.E.; Keane, D.P.; Ribic, C.A.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, emerging disease of cervids associated with transmissible protease-resistant prion proteins. The potential for CWD to cause dramatic declines in deer and elk populations and perceived human health risks associated with consuming CWD-contaminated venison have led wildlife agencies to embark on extensive CWD control programs, typically involving culling to reduce deer populations. We characterized the spatial distribution of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Wisconsin to facilitate CWD management. We found that CWD prevalence declined with distance from a central location, was locally correlated at a scale of 3.6 km, and was correlated with deer habitat abundance. The latter result is consistent with patterns expected for a positive relationship between density and prevalence of CWD. We recommend management activities focused on culling in geographic areas with high prevalence to have the greatest probability of removing infected individuals. Further research is needed to elucidate the factors in envolved in CWD spread and infection rates, especially the role of density-dependent transmission. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2006.

  10. Monitoring for Chronic Wasting Disease in Mule Deer and White-tailed Deer at Wind Cave National Park: Investigating an Emerging Epizootic

    E-print Network

    Monitoring for Chronic Wasting Disease in Mule Deer and White-tailed Deer at Wind Cave National University 2006 #12;11 Monitoring for Chronic Wasting Disease in Mule Deer and White-tailed Deer at Wind Cave would bring in a dead deer or need some veterinary expertise. I also would like to thank Dr. April

  11. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: Complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: Complement wasting disease Complement system Conditional logistic regression Prion Prnp Transmissible spongiform of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic

  12. Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.; Bochsler, P.N.; Hall, S.M.; Gidlewski, T.; O'Rourke, K. I.; Spraker, T.R.; Samuel, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    In September 2002, chronic wasting disease (CWD), a prion disorder of captive and wild cervids, was diagnosed in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from a captive farm in Wisconsin. The facility was subsequently quarantined, and in January 2006 the remaining 76 deer were depopulated. Sixty animals (79%) were found to be positive by immunohistochemical staining for the abnormal prion protein (PrPCWD) in at least one tissue; the prevalence of positive staining was high even in young deer. Although none of the deer displayed clinical signs suggestive of CWD at depopulation, 49 deer had considerable accumulation of the abnormal prion in the medulla at the level of the obex. Extraneural accumulation of the abnormal protein was observed in 59 deer, with accumulation in the retropharyngeal lymph node in 58 of 59 (98%), in the tonsil in 56 of 59 (95%), and in the rectal mucosal lymphoid tissue in 48 of 58 (83%). The retina was positive in 4 deer, all with marked accumulation of prion in the obex. One deer was considered positive for PrPCWD in the brain but not in the extraneural tissue, a novel observation in white-tailed deer. The infection rate in captive deer was 20-fold higher than in wild deer. Although weakly related to infection rates in extraneural tissues, prion genotype was strongly linked to progression of prion accumulation in the obex. Antemortem testing by biopsy of rectoanal mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (or other peripheral lymphoid tissue) may be a useful adjunct to tonsil biopsy for surveillance in captive herds at risk for CWD infection.

  13. Spatial epidemiology of chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Joly, Damien O; Samuel, Michael D; Langenberg, Julia A; Blanchong, Julie A; Batha, Carl A; Rolley, Robert E; Keane, Delwyn P; Ribic, Christine A

    2006-07-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, emerging disease of cervids associated with transmissible protease-resistant prion proteins. The potential for CWD to cause dramatic declines in deer and elk populations and perceived human health risks associated with consuming CWD-contaminated venison have led wildlife agencies to embark on extensive CWD control programs, typically involving culling to reduce deer populations. We characterized the spatial distribution of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Wisconsin to facilitate CWD management. We found that CWD prevalence declined with distance from a central location, was locally correlated at a scale of 3.6 km, and was correlated with deer habitat abundance. The latter result is consistent with patterns expected for a positive relationship between density and prevalence of CWD. We recommend management activities focused on culling in geographic areas with high prevalence to have the greatest probability of removing infected individuals. Further research is needed to elucidate the factors involved in CWD spread and infection rates, especially the role of density-dependent transmission. PMID:17092889

  14. Uncertainty in the Tail of the Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Epidemic in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Garske, Tini; Ghani, Azra C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite low case numbers the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease epidemic poses many challenges for public health planning due to remaining uncertainties in disease biology and transmission routes. We develop a stochastic model for variant CJD transmission, taking into account the known transmission routes (food and red-cell transfusion) to assess the remaining uncertainty in the epidemic. We use Bayesian methods to obtain scenarios consistent with current data. Our results show a potentially long but uncertain tail in the epidemic, with a peak annual incidence of around 11 cases, but the 95% credibility interval between 1 and 65 cases. These cases are predicted to be due to past food-borne transmissions occurring in previously mostly unaffected genotypes and to transmissions via blood transfusion in all genotypes. However, we also show that the latter are unlikely to be identifiable as transfusion-associated cases by case-linking. Regardless of the numbers of future cases, even in the absence of any further control measures, we do not find any self-sustaining epidemics. PMID:21203419

  15. PRION PROTEIN GENE HETEROGENEITY IN FREE-RANGING WHITE-TAILED DEER WITHIN THE CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE AFFECTED REGION OF WISCONSIN

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chad Johnson; Jody Johnson; Murray Clayton; Debbie McKenzie; Judd Aiken

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) was first identified in Wisconsin (USA) in white- tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in February 2002. To determine if prion protein gene (Prnp) allelic variability was associated with CWD in white-tailed deer from Wisconsin, we sequenced Prnp from 26 CWD-positive and 100 CWD-negative deer. Sequence analysis of Prnp suggests that at least 86-96% of the white-tailed deer

  16. Identification and pathogenicity of Aeromonas sobria on tail-rot disease in juvenile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya; Cai, Shuang-Hu

    2011-02-01

    Thirty-six strains, numbered from PY01 to PY36, were isolated from six moribund Oreochromis niloticus. The biochemical characteristics of all strains conformed to the species description of Aeromonas sobria on the basis of API 20E and Biolog GN system. Furthermore, gyrB sequence of strain PY36 was sequenced and showed high similarity (99.8%) with A. sobria in Genbank. Antibiotic-resistance of strain PY36 was assessed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method, and the results showed it was susceptible and moderately susceptible to 12 and 3 of the 19 antimicrobials tested. Virulence of strain PY36 to juvenile tilapia was also tested, and we found that LD?? was about 4.17 × 10³ CFU per fish in intraperitoneal injection. This is the first article to report that A. sobria was the pathogenic agent of tail-rot disease in juvenile tilapia. A. sobria was multi-resistant to the most frequently used antimicrobial drugs in China, so the antimicrobial resistance test should be carried out when these bacteria are isolated from biological samples in order to avoid therapeutic failures and spread of the pathogenic organisms in the environment. PMID:20853167

  17. Diversity and Distribution of White-Tailed Deer mtDNA Lineages in Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Outbreak Areas in Southern Wisconsin, USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kip G. Rogers; Stacie J. Robinson; Michael D. Samuel; Daniel A. Grear

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. Because it is uniformly fatal, the disease is a major concern in the management of white-tailed deer populations. Management programs to control CWD require improved knowledge of deer interaction, movement, and population connectivity that could influence disease transmission and spread. Genetic methods were employed to evaluate connectivity

  18. EXPERIMENTAL TRANSMISSION OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD) OF ELK (CERVUS ELAPHUS NELSONI), WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS), AND MULE DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS HEMIONUS) TO WHITE-TAILED DEER BY INTRACEREBRAL ROUTE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) affecting elk, white-tailed deer, and mule deer. Intra-species transmission of CWD is readily accomplished via oral administration of CWD-affected brain. And while the exact mode of natural transmission is unclear, ho...

  19. Landscape influences on dispersal of white-tailed deer and attendant risk of chronic wasting disease spread as assessed by a landscape genetics approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Krista Renee Lang

    2010-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence the spread of wildlife diseases is crucial for designing effective surveillance programs and appropriate management strategies. The potential introduction of chronic wasting disease (CWD) to Iowa is of significant management concern because it is found in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) populations in several bordering states, including Wisconsin. To address this concern, I used a landscape

  20. Preclinical diagnosis of chronic wasting disease in captive mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) using tonsillar biopsy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret A. Wild; Terry R. Spraker; Christina J. Sigurdson; Katherine I. O'Rourke; Michael W. Miller

    The usefulness of tonsillar biopsy on live deer for preclinical diagnosis of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy chronic wasting disease (CWD) was evaluated. Disease was tracked in a CWD-endemic herd using serial tonsillar biopsies collected at 6 to 9 month intervals from 34 captive mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and five white-tailed deer (O. virginianus). Tonsillar biopsies were examined for accumulation of

  1. Detection of arenavirus in a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) with inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Saey, Veronique; Martel, An

    2015-03-01

    A captive bred red tail boa (Boa constrictor constrictor) was presented with a large intraoral mass originating from the buccal gingiva, attached to the right dentary teeth row. Based on the clinical features and histological examination, the diagnosis of a peripheral odontogenic fibromyxoma was made. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few eosinophilic intracytoplasmic inclusion bodies, indistinguishable from those observed in inclusion body disease-affected snakes. Inclusion bodies were not observed in cells comprising the neoplastic mass. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), arenavirus was detected in the neoplastic tissue. Two years after surgical removal of the mass, recurrence of the neoplastic lesion was observed. Numerous large inclusion body disease inclusions were abundantly present in the neoplastic cells of the recurrent fibromyxoma. Sections of liver biopsies and circulating lymphocytes contained relatively few intracytoplasmic inclusions. The RT-PCR revealed the presence of arenavirus in blood, a liver biopsy, and neoplastic tissue. The present case describes the co-occurrence of an arenavirus infection and an odontogenic fibromyxoma in a red tail boa. PMID:25776548

  2. Chronic wasting disease in a Wisconsin white-tailed deer farm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of deer and elk in North America. All diseases in this family are characterized by long preclinical incubation periods following by a relatively short clinical course. Endpoint disease is characterized by ext...

  3. Molecular genealogy tools for white-tailed deer with chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of deer, elk, and moose. CWD is a fatal neurologic disease with a long preclinical incubation period, during which the disease is probably transmitted to healthy animals through direct exposure or environ...

  4. The importance of localized culling in stabilizing chronic wasting disease prevalence in white-tailed deer populations.

    PubMed

    Manjerovic, Mary Beth; Green, Michelle L; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra; Novakofski, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Strategies to contain the spread of disease often are developed with incomplete knowledge of the possible outcomes but are intended to minimize the risks associated with delaying control. Culling of game species by government agencies is one approach to control disease in wild populations but is unpopular with hunters and wildlife enthusiasts, politically unpalatable, and erodes public support for agencies responsible for wildlife management. We addressed the functional differences between hunting and government culling programs for managing chronic wasting disease (CWD) in white-tailed deer by comparing prevalence over a 10-year period in Illinois and Wisconsin. When both Illinois and Wisconsin were actively culling from 2003 - 2007, there were no statistical differences between state CWD prevalence estimates. Wisconsin government culling concluded in 2007 and average prevalence over the next five years was 3.09 ± 1.13% with an average annual increase of 0.63%. During that same time period, Illinois continued government culling and there was no change in prevalence throughout Illinois. Despite its unpopularity among hunters, localized culling is a disease management strategy that can maintain low disease prevalence while minimizing impacts on recreational deer harvest. PMID:24128754

  5. Evaluating spatial overlap and relatedness of white-tailed deer in a chronic wasting disease management zone.

    PubMed

    Magle, Seth B; Samuel, Michael D; Van Deelen, Timothy R; Robinson, Stacie J; Mathews, Nancy E

    2013-01-01

    Wildlife disease transmission, at a local scale, can occur from interactions between infected and susceptible conspecifics or from a contaminated environment. Thus, the degree of spatial overlap and rate of contact among deer is likely to impact both direct and indirect transmission of infectious diseases such chronic wasting disease (CWD) or bovine tuberculosis. We identified a strong relationship between degree of spatial overlap (volume of intersection) and genetic relatedness for female white-tailed deer in Wisconsin's area of highest CWD prevalence. We used volume of intersection as a surrogate for contact rates between deer and concluded that related deer are more likely to have contact, which may drive disease transmission dynamics. In addition, we found that age of deer influences overlap, with fawns exhibiting the highest degree of overlap with other deer. Our results further support the finding that female social groups have higher contact among related deer which can result in transmission of infectious diseases. We suggest that control of large social groups comprised of closely related deer may be an effective strategy in slowing the transmission of infectious pathogens, and CWD in particular. PMID:23437171

  6. Tail-flick test response in 3×Tg-AD mice at early and advanced stages of disease.

    PubMed

    Baeta-Corral, Raquel; Defrin, Ruti; Pick, Chagi G; Giménez-Llort, Lydia

    2015-07-23

    Despite the impact of pain in cognitive dysfunctions and affective disorders has been largely studied, the research that examines pain dimensions in cognitive impairment or dementia is still scarce. In patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias, management of pain is challenging. While the sensory-discriminative dimension of pain is preserved, the cognitive-evaluative and the affective-motivational pain dimensions are affected. Due to the complexity of the disease and the poor self-reports, pain is underdiagnosed and undertreated. In confluence with an impaired thermoregulatory behavior, the patients' ability to confront environmental stressors such as cold temperature can put them at risk of fatal accidental hypothermia. Here, 3xTg-AD mice demonstrate that the sensorial-discriminative threshold to a noxious cold stimulus, as measured by the latency of tail-flicking, was preserved at early and advances stages of disease (7 and 11 month-old, respectively) as compared to age-matched (adulthood and middle aged, respectively) non-transgenic mice (NTg). In both genotypes, the sensory deterioration and poor thermoregulatory behavior associated to age was observed as an increase of tail-flick response and poor sensorimotor performance. At both stages studied, 3xTg-AD mice exhibited BPSD (Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia)-like alterations in the corner, open-field, dark-light box and the T-maze tests. In the adult NTg mice, this nociceptive withdrawal response was correlated with copying with stress-related behaviors. This integrative behavioral profile was lost in both groups of 3xTg-AD mice and middle aged controls, suggesting derangements in their subjacent networks and the complex interplay between the pain dimensions in the elderly with dementia. PMID:26091881

  7. Effects of chronic wasting disease on reproduction and fawn harvest vulnerability in Wisconsin white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Blanchong, Julie A; Grear, Daniel A; Weckworth, Byron V; Keane, Delwyn P; Scribner, Kim T; Samuel, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, transmissible spongiform encephalopathy that affects free-ranging and captive North American cervids. Although the impacts of CWD on cervid survival have been documented, little is known about the disease impacts on reproduction and recruitment. We used genetic methods and harvest data (2002-04) to reconstruct parentage for a cohort of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawns born in spring 2002 and evaluate the effects of CWD infection on reproduction and fawn harvest vulnerability. There was no difference between CWD-positive and CWD-negative male deer in the probability of being a parent. However, CWD-positive females were more likely to be parents than CWD-negative females. Because our results are based on harvested animals, we evaluated the hypothesis that higher parentage rates occurred because fawns with CWD-positive mothers were more vulnerable to harvest. Male fawns with CWD-positive mothers were harvested earlier (>1 mo relative to their mother's date of harvest) and farther away from their mothers than male fawns with CWD-negative mothers. Male fawns with CWD-positive mothers were also harvested much earlier and farther away than female fawns from CWD-positive mothers. Most female fawns (86%) with CWD-positive mothers were harvested from the same section as their mothers, while almost half of male and female fawns with CWD-negative mothers were farther away. We conclude that preclinical stages of CWD infection do not prohibit white-tailed deer from successfully reproducing. However, apparently higher harvest vulnerability of male fawns with CWD-positive mothers suggests that CWD infection may make females less capable of providing adequate parental care to ensure the survival and recruitment of their fawns. PMID:22493111

  8. SPATIAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN WISCONSIN WHITE-TAILED DEER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Damien O. Joly; Michael D. Samuel; Julia A. Langenberg; Julie A. Blanchong; Carl A. Batha; Robert E. Rolley; Delwyn P. Keane; Christine A. Ribic

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal, emerging disease of cervids associated with transmissible protease-resistant prion proteins. The potential for CWD to cause dramatic declines in deer and elk populations and perceived human health risks associated with consuming CWD- contaminated venison have led wildlife agencies to embark on extensive CWD control programs, typically involving culling to reduce deer populations. We

  9. Mucosal immunization with an attenuated Salmonella vaccine partially protects white-tailed deer from chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Goñi, Fernando; Mathiason, Candace K; Yim, Lucia; Wong, Kinlung; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Nalls, Amy; Peyser, Daniel; Estevez, Veronica; Denkers, Nathaniel; Xu, Jinfeng; Osborn, David A; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Brown, David R; Chabalgoity, Jose A; Hoover, Edward A; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2015-01-29

    Prion disease is a unique category of illness, affecting both animals and humans, in which the underlying pathogenesis is related to a conformational change of a normal, self-protein called PrP(C) (C for cellular) to a pathological and infectious conformer known as PrP(Sc) (Sc for scrapie). Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a prion disease believed to have arisen from feeding cattle with prion contaminated meat and bone meal products, crossed the species barrier to infect humans. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) infects large numbers of deer and elk, with the potential to infect humans. Currently no prionosis has an effective treatment. Previously, we have demonstrated we could prevent transmission of prions in a proportion of susceptible mice with a mucosal vaccine. In the current study, white-tailed deer were orally inoculated with attenuated Salmonella expressing PrP, while control deer were orally inoculated with vehicle attenuated Salmonella. Once a mucosal response was established, the vaccinated animals were boosted orally and locally by application of polymerized recombinant PrP onto the tonsils and rectal mucosa. The vaccinated and control animals were then challenged orally with CWD-infected brain homogenate. Three years post CWD oral challenge all control deer developed clinical CWD (median survival 602 days), while among the vaccinated there was a significant prolongation of the incubation period (median survival 909 days; p=0.012 by Weibull regression analysis) and one deer has remained CWD free both clinically and by RAMALT and tonsil biopsies. This negative vaccinate has the highest titers of IgA in saliva and systemic IgG against PrP. Western blots showed that immunoglobulins from this vaccinate react to PrP(CWD). We document the first partially successful vaccination for a prion disease in a species naturally at risk. PMID:25539804

  10. White-tailed deer harvest from the chronic wasting disease eradication zone in south-central Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Joly, D.O.; Samuel, M.D.; Langenberg, J.A.; Rolley, R.E.; Sausen, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) was discovered in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in south-central Wisconsin in 2002. The current control method for CWD in the state is the harvest of deer from affected areas to reduce population density and lower CWD transmission. We used spatial regression methods to identify factors associated with deer harvest across south-central Wisconsin. Harvest of deer by hunters was positively related to deer density (slope=0.003, 95% CI=0.0001-0.006), the number of landowners that requested harvest permits (slope=0.071, 95% CI=0.037-0.105), and proximity to the area of highest CWD infection (slope=-0.041, 95% CI=-0.056- -0.027). Concomitantly, harvest was not impacted in areas where landowners signed a petition protesting intensive deer reduction (slope=-0.00006, 95% CI=-0.0005-0.0003). Our results suggest that the success of programs designed to reduce deer populations for disease control or to reduce overabundance in Wisconsin are dependent on landowner and hunter participation. We recommend that programs or actions implemented to eradicate or mitigate the spread of CWD should monitor and assess deer population reduction and evaluate factors affecting program success to improve methods to meet management goals.

  11. From the field: Efficacy of detecting Chronic Wasting Disease via sampling hunter-killed white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Boyd, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Surveillance programs for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids often use a standard of being able to detect 1% prevalence when determining minimum sample sizes. However, 1% prevalence may represent >10,000 infected animals in a population of 1 million, and most wildlife managers would prefer to detect the presence of CWD when far fewer infected animals exist. We wanted to detect the presence of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Pennsylvania when the disease was present in only 1 of 21 wildlife management units (WMUs) statewide. We used computer simulation to estimate the probability of detecting CWD based on a sampling design to detect the presence of CWD at 0.1% and 1.0% prevalence (23-76 and 225-762 infected deer, respectively) using tissue samples collected from hunter-killed deer. The probability of detection at 0.1% prevalence was <30% with sample sizes of ???6,000 deer, and the probability of detection at 1.0% prevalence was 46-72% with statewide sample sizes of 2,000-6,000 deer. We believe that testing of hunter-killed deer is an essential part of any surveillance program for CWD, but our results demonstrated the importance of a multifaceted surveillance approach for CWD detection rather than sole reliance on testing hunter-killed deer.

  12. Molecular study of free-ranging mule deer and white-tailed deer from British Columbia, Canada, for evidence of Anaplasma spp. and Ehrlichia spp.

    PubMed

    Lobanov, V A; Gajadhar, A A; Al-Adhami, B; Schwantje, H M

    2012-06-01

    Twenty-three free-ranging white-tailed deer (WTD; Odocoileus virginianus) and six mule deer (MD; Odocoileus hemionus) from south-central British Columbia, Canada, were tested for Anaplasma marginale by msp5 gene-specific PCR and Ehrlichia spp. by 16S rRNA or citrate synthase (gltA) gene-specific PCR, as well as by PCR with universal 16S rRNA primers detecting a wide range of bacteria. No deer tested positive for A. marginale. Amplification with universal 16S rRNA primers followed by sequencing of cloned fragments detected an Anaplasma sp. in one of 23 (4.3%) WTD and six of six (100%) MD and Bartonella sp. in four of 23 (17.4%) WTD. The Anaplasma sp. was genetically distinct from A. marginale and all other recognized members of the genus. Four of six (66.7%) MD and 0 of 23 (0%) WTD were Ehrlichia positive by PCR with primers for 16S rRNA and gltA genes. The sequences of gltA PCR fragments were identical to each other and to the respective region of the gltA gene of an Ehrlichia sp. which we detected previously in naturally infected cattle from the same area, suggesting the possibility of biological transmission of this rickettsia between cattle and wild cervids. Antibodies reactive with the MSP5 protein of A. marginale were detected using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in two of six (33.3%) MD, but not in WTD. The two seropositive MD were PCR positive for both the Anaplasma sp. and Ehrlichia sp. detected in this study, suggesting a reaction of antibodies against one or both of these rickettsias with the MSP5 antigen. PMID:21933360

  13. Aerosol transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    Denkers, Nathaniel D; Hayes-Klug, Jeanette; Anderson, Kelly R; Seelig, Davis M; Haley, Nicholas J; Dahmes, Sallie J; Osborn, David A; Miller, Karl V; Warren, Robert J; Mathiason, Candace K; Hoover, Edward A

    2013-02-01

    While the facile transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) remains incompletely elucidated, studies in rodents suggest that exposure of the respiratory mucosa may be an efficient pathway. The present study was designed to address this question in the native cervid host. Here, we demonstrate aerosol transmission of CWD to deer with a prion dose >20-fold lower than that used in previous oral inoculations. Inhalation of prions may facilitate transmission of CWD and, perhaps, other prion infections. PMID:23175370

  14. Demodectic mange, dermatophilosis, and other parasitic and bacterial dermatologic diseases in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in the United States from 1975 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, N M; Ruder, M G; Gerhold, R W; Brown, J D; Munk, B A; Oesterle, P T; Kubiski, S V; Keel, M K

    2014-05-01

    The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is a common and widespread North American game species. To evaluate the incidence, clinical manifestations, demography, and pathology of bacterial and parasitic dermatologic diseases in white-tailed deer in the southeastern United States, we retrospectively evaluated white-tailed deer cases submitted to the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study from 1975 to 2012. Among 2569 deer examined, bacterial or parasitic dermatologic disease was diagnosed in 88 (3.4%) individuals, with Demodex spp (n = 37; 42.0%) and Dermatophilus congolensis (n = 19; 21.6%) as the most common causes. Demodicosis was significantly more common in deer older than 2 years and was most often detected in the fall; no statistically significant sex predilection was identified. Affected animals had patchy to generalized alopecia, often distributed over the head, neck, limbs, and trunk; microscopic lesions included epidermal crusts and cutaneous nodules with mild perifollicular, lymphoplasmacytic inflammation. Dermatophilosis was most common in males younger than 1 year that were often found dead. Crusting, erythema, and alopecia occurred on the face, ears, and distal extremities. Less commonly, infectious dermatologic diseases were associated with other bacteria (n = 13; 14.8%), fungi (n = 5; 5.7%), ectoparasites (chiggers, lice, mites, and ticks; n = 11; 12.5%), and larval nematodes (n = 7; 8.0%). Population-level effects of these diseases in white-tailed deer are likely minimal; however, due to their dramatic presentation, demodicosis, dermatophilosis, and other infectious skin diseases can be of concern to hunters and, in some cases, may have zoonotic potential. PMID:23912715

  15. Reproductive disease associated with inoculation of pregnant white-tailed deer with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose was to study the effects of BVDV infection in pregnant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). To this end 11 white-tailed deer was purchased and housed in BSL2 containment. Pregnancy status was confirmed and the calculated stage of pregnancy was based on date of contact with buck....

  16. Polymorphisms in the prion precursor functional gene but not the pseudogene are associated with susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine I. O'Rourke; Terry R. Spraker; Linda K. Hamburg; Thomas E. Besser; Kelly A. Brayton; Donald P. Knowles

    2004-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) status and PrP genotypes were determined for a group of 133 wild white-tailed deer in a 780 acre enclosure in western Nebraska, USA. Approximately half of the deer tested showed evidence of PrPd in the brainstem or lymphoid tissues. Four PRNP alleles encoding amino acid substitutions were identified, with substitutions at residues 95 (QRH), 96 (GRS)

  17. Broad and fine-scale genetic analysis of white-tailed deer populations: estimating the relative risk of chronic wasting disease spread.

    PubMed

    Cullingham, Catherine I; Merrill, Evelyn H; Pybus, Margo J; Bollinger, Trent K; Wilson, Gregory A; Coltman, David W

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of cervids, similar to sheep scrapie that has only recently been detected in wild populations of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) in western Canada. Relatively little is known about local transmission dynamics of the disease or the potential for long-distance spread. We analysed the population genetic structure of over 2000 white-tailed deer sampled from Alberta, British Columbia, and Saskatchewan using microsatellite profiles and mtDNA sequencing to assess the relative risk of disease spread. There was very little differentiation among subpopulations and a weak trend of increasing differentiation with geographic distance. This suggests that the potential for long-distance disease spread through the dispersal of infected individuals is possible, yet the risk of spread should gradually diminish with distance from infection foci. Within subpopulations, females were more related than expected by chance (R > 0) within a radius of approximately 500 m. Sex-biased philopatry and social interactions among related females may facilitate local disease transmission within social groups. Local herd reduction may therefore be an effective tool for reducing the disease prevalence when implemented at the appropriate spatial scale. PMID:25567957

  18. Study on thermal properties and crystallization behavior of electron beam irradiated ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/waste tyre dust (WTD) blends in the presence of polyethylene graft maleic anhydride (PEgMAH)

    SciTech Connect

    Ramli, Syuhada; Ahmad, S. H. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan (Malaysia); Ratnam, C. T. [Radiation Processing Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia), Bangi, 43000 Kajang (Malaysia); Athirah, Nurul [School of Materials and Mineral Resources, USM Engineering Campus (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The aim of this article is to show the effects of the electron beam irradiation dose and presence of a compatibiliser on the thermal properties and crystallinity of EVA/WTD blends. The purpose of applying electron beam radiation with doses range 50 to 200 kGy and adding a compatibiliser was to enhance the compatibility of the studied blends and at the same time to investigate the possibility of using this technique in the process of recycling polymeric materials. As the compatibilisers, the polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PEgMAH) was utilized, they were added at the amounts of 1-5 phr respectively. The enhancement of thermal properties was accompanied by the following effects, discussed in this article: i) an irradiated EVA/WTD blend at 200kGy was found to improve the thermal properties of EVA, ii) the addition of PEgMAH in EVA/WTD blends and the subsequent irradiation allowed prevention of degradation mechanism. iii) the ?H{sub f} and crystallinity percentage decrease at higher PEgMAH content.

  19. Study on thermal properties and crystallization behavior of electron beam irradiated ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA)/waste tyre dust (WTD) blends in the presence of polyethylene graft maleic anhydride (PEgMAH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, Syuhada; Ratnam, C. T.; Ahmad, S. H.; Athirah, Nurul

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this article is to show the effects of the electron beam irradiation dose and presence of a compatibiliser on the thermal properties and crystallinity of EVA/WTD blends. The purpose of applying electron beam radiation with doses range 50 to 200 kGy and adding a compatibiliser was to enhance the compatibility of the studied blends and at the same time to investigate the possibility of using this technique in the process of recycling polymeric materials. As the compatibilisers, the polyethylene grafted maleic anhydride (PEgMAH) was utilized, they were added at the amounts of 1-5 phr respectively. The enhancement of thermal properties was accompanied by the following effects, discussed in this article: i) an irradiated EVA/WTD blend at 200kGy was found to improve the thermal properties of EVA, ii) the addition of PEgMAH in EVA/WTD blends and the subsequent irradiation allowed prevention of degradation mechanism. iii) the ?Hf and crystallinity percentage decrease at higher PEgMAH content.

  20. Prion protein in cardiac muscle of elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) infected with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Jewell, Jean E; Brown, Jeremy; Kreeger, Terry; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2006-11-01

    To investigate the possible presence of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) in striated muscle of chronic wasting disease (CWD)-affected cervids, samples of diaphragm, tongue, heart and three appendicular skeletal muscles from mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) and moose (Alces alces shirasi) were examined by ELISA, Western immunoblot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). PrP(d) was detected in samples of heart muscle from seven of 16 CWD-infected white-tailed deer, including one free-ranging deer, and in 12 of 17 CWD-infected elk, but not in any of 13 mule deer samples, nor in the single CWD-infected moose. For white-tailed deer, PrP(d) was detected by Western blot at multiple sites throughout the heart; IHC results on ventricular sections of both elk and white-tailed deer showed positive staining in cardiac myocytes, but not in conduction tissues or nerve ganglia. Levels of PrP(d) in cardiac tissues were estimated from Western blot band intensity to be lower than levels found in brain tissue. PrP(d) was not detected in diaphragm, triceps brachii, semitendinosus, latissiumus dorsi or tongue muscles for any of the study subjects. This is the first report of PrP(d) in cardiac tissue from transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-infected ruminants in the human food chain and the first demonstration by immunological assays of PrP(d) in any striated muscle of CWD-infected cervids. PMID:17030881

  1. Diversity and distribution of white-tailed deer mtdna lineages in chronic wasting disease (cwd) outbreak areas in southern wisconsin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, K.G.; Robinson, S.J.; Samuel, M.D.; Grear, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting North American cervids. Because it is uniformly fatal, the disease is a major concern in the management of white-tailed deer populations. Management programs to control CWD require improved knowledge of deer interaction, movement, and population connectivity that could influence disease transmission and spread. Genetic methods were employed to evaluate connectivity among populations in the CWD management zone of southern Wisconsin. A 576-base-pair region of the mitochondrial DNA of 359 white-tailed deer from 12 sample populations was analyzed. Fifty-eight variable sites were detected within the sequence, defining 43 haplotypes. While most sample populations displayed similar levels of haplotype diversity, individual haplotypes were clustered on the landscape. Spatial clusters of different haplotypes were apparent in distinct ecoregions surrounding CWD outbreak areas. The spatial distribution of mtDNA haplotypes suggests that clustering of the deer matrilineal groups and population connectivity are associated with broad-scale geographic landscape features. These landscape characteristics may also influence the contact rates between groups and therefore the potential spread of CWD; this may be especially true of local disease spread between female social groups. Our results suggest that optimal CWD management needs to be tailored to fit gender-specific dispersal behaviors and regional differences in deer population connectivity. This information will help wildlife managers design surveillance and monitoring efforts based on population interactions and potential deer movement among CWD-affected and unaffected areas. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  2. Epethelial Presence of Trueperella pyogenes Predicts Site-Level Presence of Cranial Abscess Disease in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    PubMed Central

    Belser, Emily H.; Cohen, Bradley S.; Keeler, Shamus P.; Killmaster, Charles H.; Bowers, John W.; Miller, Karl V.

    2015-01-01

    Cranial/intracranial abscess disease is an emerging source of significant mortality for male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Most cases of cranial/intracranial abscess disease are associated with infection by the opportunistic pathogen Trueperella pyogenes although the relationship between the prevalence of the bacteria and occurrence of disease is speculative. We examined 5,612 hunter-harvested deer from 29 sites across all physiographic provinces in Georgia for evidence of cranial abscess disease and sampled the forehead, lingual, and nasal surfaces from 692 deer. We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to determine presence of T. pyogenes from these samples. We found T. pyogenes prevalence at a site was a predictor for the occurrence of cranial abscess disease. Prevalence of T. pyogenes did not differ between samples from the nose or tongue although prevalence along the forehead was greater for males than females (p = 0.04), particularly at sites with high occurrence of this disease. Socio-sexual behaviors, bacterial prevalence, or physiological characteristics may predispose male deer to intracranial/cranial abscess disease. Determination of factors that affect T. pyogenes prevalence among sites may help explain the occurrence of this disease among populations. PMID:25803047

  3. Genetic Analysis of White-tailed Deer Population Structure in Iowa: Identifying Potential Patterns and Rates of Disease Spread

    E-print Network

    Koford, Rolf R.

    Genetic Analysis of White-tailed Deer Population Structure in Iowa: Identifying Potential Patterns and Objectives: o Conduct a statewide assessment of deer population genetic structure in Iowa to determine the degree of genetic connectivity between free-ranging deer populations in Iowa and free-ranging deer

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of rectal mucosa biopsy testing for chronic wasting disease within white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) herds in North America: effects of age, sex, polymorphism at PRNP codon 96, and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Bruce V; Schneider, David A; O'Rourke, Katherine I; Gidlewski, Thomas; McLane, James; Allen, Robert W; McIsaac, Alex A; Mitchell, Gordon B; Keane, Delwyn P; Spraker, Terry R; Balachandran, Aru

    2012-09-01

    An effective live animal diagnostic test is needed to assist in the control of chronic wasting disease (CWD), which has spread through captive and wild herds of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Canada and the United States. In the present study, the diagnostic accuracy of rectal mucosa biopsy sample testing was determined in white-tailed deer from 4 CWD-infected captive herds. Specifically, the current study compared the immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated prion protein in postmortem rectal mucosa biopsy samples to the CWD status of each deer as determined by immunodiagnostic evaluations of the brainstem at the obex, the medial retropharyngeal lymph node, and the palatine tonsil. The effects of age, sex, genotype, and disease progression were also evaluated. Diagnostic sensitivity on rectal biopsy samples for CWD in white-tailed deer ranged from 63% to 100%; the pooled estimate of sensitivity was 68% with 95% confidence limits (95% CLs) of 49% and 82%. However, diagnostic sensitivity was dependent on genotype at prion protein gene (PRNP) codon 96 and on disease progression as assessed by obex grade. Diagnostic sensitivity was 76% (95% CLs: 49%, 91%) for 96GG deer but only 42% (95% CLs: 13%, 79%) for 96GS deer. Furthermore, diagnostic sensitivity was only 36% for deer in the earliest stage of disease (obex grade 0) but was 100% for deer in the last 2 stages of preclinical disease (obex grades 3 and 4). The overall diagnostic specificity was 99.8%. Selective use of antemortem rectal biopsy sample testing would provide valuable information during disease investigations of CWD-suspect deer herds. PMID:22914819

  5. Evaluation of a wild white-tailed deer population management program for controlling chronic wasting disease in Illinois, 2003-2008.

    PubMed

    Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Shelton, Paul; Novakofski, Jan

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated population management programs for controlling chronic wasting disease (CWD) in wild white-tailed deer in Illinois between November 2002 and March 2008. The intervention consisted of measures of deer removal from three deer population control programs: Illinois Department of Natural Resources culling, deer population control permits and nuisance deer removal permits. We included in the analysis a total of 14,650 white-tailed deer CWD test results. These data also included location and demographic data collected from both deer harvested in the interventions as well as deer from hunter harvests and deer vehicle collisions. We quantified intervention pressures as the number of years of intervention, the total number of deer removed and the average number of deer removed per year. We accounted for temporal and spatial variations of intervention by using mixed logistic regression to model the association between intervention pressures and CWD prevalence change. The results showed that deer population management intervention as practiced in Illinois during the study period was negatively associated with CWD prevalence and the strength of association varied depending on age of deer and the measure of intervention pressure. The population management programs showed a more consistent association with reduced CWD prevalence in fawn and yearling white-tailed deer than in adult deer. Our results also suggested that frequent and continuing intervention events with at least moderate intensity of culling were needed to reduce CWD prevalence. A longer study period, however, is needed to make a more definite conclusion about the effectiveness of similar population management programs for controlling CWD in wild white-tailed deer. PMID:23558033

  6. Animal Tails

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sohmer, Rachel.

    2003-01-01

    Call it tail envy. With only a vestigial nub to show for ourselves, perhaps it's no wonder that animal tails capture our attention. The following Web sites present some of the more interesting tails to be found in the animal kingdom. The first Web site contains a recent article from Discovery News describing new findings that at least one species of scorpion produces two distinct types of tail venom, which have completely different effects on their victims (1). The next site from Singapore Zoological Gardens introduces the cebids (our New World monkey cousins), some of which have amazing prehensile tails that are used like a fifth limb (2). The rattlesnake is another famously-tailed creature, highlighted in the following site from the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum (3). The site covers the main aspects of rattlesnake natural history, including a section on how the rattle forms. The Great Plains Nature Center in Wichita, Kansas, offers a Web page devoted to the beaver, including tail trivia and an audio clip of a resident beaver surprised in his den at the Kansas Wildlife Exhibit (4). Anyone who has witnessed the freakishly fascinating spectacle of a gecko leaving its tail behind to distract a would-be predator will appreciate this brief bio of the Tokay gecko, presented by ReptileCenter.com, the Herpetologist's Portal (5). Stacy's Wag'N'Train -- offering dog-training classes in San Jose, California -- provides this online guide to dog body language, which would have a very limited vocabulary without the tail (6). So, how did the peacock get its tail? It's a simple question that has driven zoologists crazy for over a century. The next Web site (7) contains an in-depth article on the subject from the Independent (London), offered through National Geographic News. And finally, the bizarre gulper eel -- able to tie its tail in several knots -- gets is own Web page on Pangea, the Web server for the Department of Educational Leadership and Technology at Southeastern Louisiana University (8). This deep-sea curiosity uses its bioluminescent tail tip to lure hapless prey into its impossibly gigantic mouth.

  7. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scribner, Kim T.; Libants, Scot V.; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case–control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n = 68) and CWD-negative (n = 91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p < 0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  8. Tail Buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdrashitov, G.

    1943-01-01

    An approximate theory of buffeting is here presented, based on the assumption of harmonic disturbing forces. Two cases of buffeting are considered: namely, for a tail angle of attack greater and less than the stalling angle, respectively. On the basis of the tests conducted and the results of foreign investigators, a general analysis is given of the nature of the forced vibrations the possible load limits on the tail, and the methods of elimination of buffeting.

  9. Host culling as an adaptive management tool for chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer: a modelling study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gideon Wasserberg; Erik E. Osnas; Robert E. Rolley; Michael D. Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Summary 1. Emerging wildlife diseases pose a significant threat to natural and human systems. Because of real or perceived risks of delayed actions, disease management strategies such as culling are often implemented before thorough scientific knowledge of disease dynamics is available. Adaptive management is a valuable approach in addressing the uncertainty and complexity associated with wildlife disease problems and can

  10. Influence of landscape factors and management decisions on spatial and temporal patterns of the transmission of chronic wasting disease transmission in white-tailed deer.

    PubMed

    O'Hara Ruiz, Marilyn; Kelly, Amy C; Brown, William M; Novakofski, Jan E; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E

    2013-11-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) has been reported in white-tailed deer at the border of the US states of Illinois and Wisconsin since 2002. Transmission of infectious prions between animals and from the environment has resulted in spatial and temporal structure observable in the spatio-temporal patterns of reported cases. Case locations of 382 positive cases from 28,954 deer tested between 2002 and 2009 provided insight into the potential risk factors and landscape features associated with transmission using a combination of clustering, generalised linear modelling and descriptive evaluations of a risk map of predicted cases of CWD. A species distribution map of white-tailed deer developed using MaxEnt provided an estimate of deer locations. We found that deer probability increased in areas with larger forests and less urban and agricultural lands. Spatial clustering analysis revealed a core area of persistent CWD transmission in the northern part of the region. The regression model indicated that larger and more compact forests were associated with higher risk for CWD. High risk areas also had soils with less clay and more sand than other parts of the region. The transmission potential was higher where landscape features indicated the potential for higher deer concentrations. The inclusion of spatial lag variables improved the model. Of the 102 cases reported in the study area in the two years following the study period, 89 (87%) of those were in the 32% of the study area with the highest 50% of predicted risk of cases. PMID:24258897

  11. Chronic wasting disease infection patterns in female white-tailed deer related to demographics, genetic relationships, and spatial proximity of infected deer in southern Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grear, Daniel A.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal disease of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) caused by transmissible protease resistant prions. Since the discovery of CWD in southern Wisconsin in 2001, more than 20,000 deer have been removed from a >2,500 km2 disease eradication zone surrounding the three initial cases. Nearly all deer removed were tested for CWD infection and sex, age, and harvest location were recorded. Our analysis used data from a 310 kin2 core study area where disease prevalence was higher than surrounding areas. We found no difference in harvest rates between CWD infected and non-infected deer. Ow results show that the probability of infection increased with age and that adult males were more likely to be infected than adult females. Six fawns tested positive for CWD, five fawns from the core study area, including the youngest (5 months) kee-ranging cervid to test positive. The increase in male prevalence with age is nearly twice the increase found in females. We concluded that CWD is not randomly distributed among deer and that differential transmission among sex and age classes is likely driving the observed patterns in disease prevalence. We discuss alternative hypotheses for CWD transmission and spread and, in addition, discuss several possible non-linear relationships between prevalence and age. Understanding CWD transmission in free-ranging cervid populations will be essential to the development of strategies to manage this disease in areas where CWD is found as well as for surveillance strategies in areas where CWD threatens to spread.

  12. Safety of Tailings Dams

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Contains information on different aspects of tailings dams; tailings dam properties, disasters, failure modes, slurry waves, stability analysis, and safe tailings disposal. Also includes a slope stability calculator and a tailings flow slide calculator.

  13. Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Outbreak in a Captive Facility Housing White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus Virginianus), Bison (Bison Bison), Elk (Cervus Elaphus), Cattle (Bos Taurus) and Goats (Capra Hircus) in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A captive wildlife research facility in Fort Collins, Colorado experienced mortality in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) due to epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) infection in late summer and early fall of 2007. RNA from EHDV was amplified by RT-PCR from the spleen and lung tissues...

  14. Black-Tailed Prairie Dog

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Black-tailed prairie dogs are quite susceptible to sylvatic plague, but a new plague vaccine put in their food shows significant promise in the laboratory. The prairie dogs transmit the disease to endangered black-footed ferrets, who eat the prairie dogs and are also quite susceptible to the disease...

  15. Temporal and spatial dynamics of trypanosomes infecting the brush-tailed bettong (Bettongia penicillata): a cautionary note of disease-induced population decline

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The brush-tailed bettong or woylie (Bettongia penicillata) is on the brink of extinction. Its numbers have declined by 90% since 1999, with their current distribution occupying less than 1% of their former Australian range. Woylies are known to be infected with three different trypanosomes (Trypanosoma vegrandis, Trypanosoma copemani and Trypanosoma sp. H25) and two different strains of T. copemani that vary in virulence. However, the role that these haemoparasites have played during the recent decline of their host is unclear and is part of ongoing investigation. Methods Woylies were sampled from five locations in southern Western Australia, including two neighbouring indigenous populations, two enclosed (fenced) populations and a captive colony. PCR was used to individually identify the three different trypanosomes from blood and tissues of the host, and to investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of trypanosome infections. Results The spatial pattern of trypanosome infection varied among the five study sites, with a greater proportion of woylies from the Perup indigenous population being infected with T. copemani than from the neighbouring Kingston indigenous population. For an established infection, T. copemani detection was temporally inconsistent. The more virulent strain of T. copemani appeared to regress at a faster rate than the less virulent strain, with the infection possibly transitioning from the acute to chronic phase. Interspecific competition may also exist between T. copemani and T. vegrandis, where an existing T. vegrandis infection may moderate the sequential establishment of the more virulent T. copemani. Conclusion In this study, we provide a possible temporal connection implicating T. copemani as the disease agent linked with the recent decline of the Kingston indigenous woylie population within the Upper Warren region of Western Australia. The chronic association of trypanosomes with the internal organs of its host may be potentially pathogenic and adversely affect their long term fitness and coordination, making the woylie more susceptible to predation. PMID:24708757

  16. Injurious tail biting in pigs: how can it be controlled in existing systems without tail docking?

    PubMed

    D'Eath, R B; Arnott, G; Turner, S P; Jensen, T; Lahrmann, H P; Busch, M E; Niemi, J K; Lawrence, A B; Sandøe, P

    2014-09-01

    Tail biting is a serious animal welfare and economic problem in pig production. Tail docking, which reduces but does not eliminate tail biting, remains widespread. However, in the EU tail docking may not be used routinely, and some 'alternative' forms of pig production and certain countries do not allow tail docking at all. Against this background, using a novel approach focusing on research where tail injuries were quantified, we review the measures that can be used to control tail biting in pigs without tail docking. Using this strict criterion, there was good evidence that manipulable substrates and feeder space affect damaging tail biting. Only epidemiological evidence was available for effects of temperature and season, and the effect of stocking density was unclear. Studies suggest that group size has little effect, and the effects of nutrition, disease and breed require further investigation. The review identifies a number of knowledge gaps and promising avenues for future research into prevention and mitigation. We illustrate the diversity of hypotheses concerning how different proposed risk factors might increase tail biting through their effect on each other or on the proposed underlying processes of tail biting. A quantitative comparison of the efficacy of different methods of provision of manipulable materials, and a review of current practices in countries and assurance schemes where tail docking is banned, both suggest that daily provision of small quantities of destructible, manipulable natural materials can be of considerable benefit. Further comparative research is needed into materials, such as ropes, which are compatible with slatted floors. Also, materials which double as fuel for anaerobic digesters could be utilised. As well as optimising housing and management to reduce risk, it is important to detect and treat tail biting as soon as it occurs. Early warning signs before the first bloody tails appear, such as pigs holding their tails tucked under, could in future be automatically detected using precision livestock farming methods enabling earlier reaction and prevention of tail damage. However, there is a lack of scientific studies on how best to respond to outbreaks: the effectiveness of, for example, removing biters and/or bitten pigs, increasing enrichment, or applying substances to tails should be investigated. Finally, some breeding companies are exploring options for reducing the genetic propensity to tail bite. If these various approaches to reduce tail biting are implemented we propose that the need for tail docking will be reduced. PMID:25130712

  17. Validation of Use of Rectoanal Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue for Immunohistochemical Diagnosis of Chronic Wasting Disease in White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Delwyn Keane; Daniel Barr; Rebecca Osborn; Julie Langenberg; Katherine O'Rourke; David Schneider; Philip Bochsler

    The examination of rectoanal mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (RAMALT) biopsy specimens for the diagnosis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies has been described in sheep, elk, and small numbers of mule and white-tailed deer. Previous sample numbers have been too small to validate examination of this type of tissue as a viable antemortem diagnostic test. In this study, we examined RAMALT collected postmor-

  18. Acaricidal Treatment of White-Tailed Deer to Control Ixodes Scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) in a New York Lyme Disease-Endemic Community

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 4-Poster device for the topical treatment of white-tailed deer, Odocoileus virginianus (Zimmermann) against ticks using the acaricide amitraz was evaluated in a Lyme borreliosis endemic community in Connecticut. As part of a 5-year project from 1997 to 2002, 21–24 of the 4-Posters were distribut...

  19. Research Article Spread of Plague Among Black-Tailed Prairie

    E-print Network

    Collinge, Sharon K.

    Sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) is an exotic pathogen that is highly virulent in black-tailed prairie-state, Program MARK, Yersinia pestis. Exotic zoonotic diseases pose a substantial threat to native wildlife is an exotic vector-borne disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. Black-tailed prairie dogs are highly

  20. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: Complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie A. Blanchong; Dennis M. Heisey; Kim T. Scribner; Scot V. Libants; Chad Johnson; Judd M. Aiken; Julia A. Langenberg; Michael D. Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease

  1. Floods from tailings dam failures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rico; G. Benito; A. Díez-Herrero

    2008-01-01

    This paper compiles the available information on historic tailings dam failures with the purpose to establish simple correlations between tailings ponds geometric parameters (e.g., dam height, tailings volume) and the hydraulic characteristics of floods resulting from released tailings. Following the collapse of a mining waste dam, only a part of tailings and polluted water stored at the dam is released,

  2. Kinesin: the tail unfolds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Cross; Jonathan Scholey

    1999-01-01

    The cargo-binding tail of the motor protein kinesin acts as a regulator of kinesin-driven vesicle transport. In the absence of bound cargo, the kinesin tail interacts with the motor domains and inhibits their activity. Cargo binding blocks this interaction and relieves the inhibition.

  3. Reported tailings dam failures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Rico; G. Benito; A. R. Salgueiro; A. D ´ õez-Herrero; H. G. Pereira

    2008-01-01

    A detailed search and re-evaluation of the known historical cases of tailings dam failure was carried out. A corpus of 147 cases of worldwide tailings dam disasters, from which 26 located in Europe, was compiled in a database. This contains six sections, including dam location, its physical and constructive characteristics, actual and putative failure cause, sludge hydrodynamics, socio-economical consequences and

  4. A Mass in the Junction of the Body and Tail of the Pancreas with Negative IgG4 Serology: IgG4-Related Disease with Negative Serology

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Williams, Frederick K.

    2015-01-01

    Patient:Female, 55 Final Diagnosis: Autoimmune pancreatitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • weight loss Medication: Prednisone Clinical Procedure: Admitted to the hospital Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is an IgG4-related fibroinflammatory condition often associated with obstructive jaundice, as most lesions are located at the head of the pancreas. IgG4 level can help in the diagnosis, but it is normal in nearly 30% of affected patients. Case Report: A 55-year-old woman presented with a 5-month history of 20-pound unintentional weight loss and intermittent abdominal pain. She had an unremarkable abdominal exam and significant findings included a small, non-mobile rubbery left axillary lymph node. Complete blood count, complete metabolic panel, amylase, anti-smooth muscle antibody, antimitochondrial antibody, carcinoembryonic antigen, Ca 19-9, complement C3 and C4, antinuclear antibody, anti-Smith double-strand antibody, and IgG4 were all within normal limits. CT of the abdomen showed a mass in the junction of the body and tail of the pancreas and endoscopic ultrasound showed it as encasing the splenic artery. Fine-needle aspiration cytology demonstrated follicular hyperplasia, obliterative phlebitis, storiform fibrosis, and negative staining for IgG4 and malignancy. Left axillary lymph node biopsy demonstrated follicular hyperplasia. PET scan revealed hypermetabolic uptake of the pancreas tail, bone marrow, and spleen, as well as diffuse lymphadenopathy. Bone marrow biopsy showed follicular hyperplasia and was negative for malignancy. The patient was started on 40 mg of oral prednisone for possible autoimmune disease. During follow-up, she reported progressive improvement and a repeat PET scan 6 months later showed marked improvement. Conclusions: A normal IgG4 value should not decrease the clinical suspicion of IgG4-related disease. If clinical, histological, and radiological findings coincide, glucocorticoids should be initiated with subsequent follow-up to evaluate for a response. PMID:26001036

  5. DECODING THE FUNCTION OF THE N-TERMINAL TAIL OF THE CELLULAR PRION PROTEIN TO INSPIRE NOVEL THERAPEUTIC AVENUES FOR NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Iraci, Nunzio; Stincardini, Claudia; Barreca, Maria Letizia; Biasini, Emiliano

    2014-10-23

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), a cell surface glycoprotein involved in prion disorders, has been shown to mediate the toxicity of several pathological aggregates, including its own misfolded state and some oligomeric assemblies of the amyloid ? peptide, which are thought to be primarily responsible for the synaptic dysfunction characterizing Alzheimer's disease. Thus, elucidating the physiological function of PrP(C), and how it could be corrupted by the interaction with misfolded proteins, may provide important insights to understand the pathological processes of prion and Alzheimer's diseases, and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders. In this manuscript, we review the data supporting a role for PrP(C) at the intersection of different neurodegenerative diseases, discuss potential mechanisms by which this protein could mediate neurotoxic signals, and examine therapeutic approaches that may arise from the identification of PrP(C)-directed compounds. PMID:25456402

  6. Surveillance for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in Scavengers of White-Tailed Deer Carcasses in the Chronic Wasting Disease Area of Wisconsin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a class of neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) occurring in cervids, is found in a number of states and provinces across North America. Misfolded prions, the infectious agents of CWD, are deposited in the environment via carcass remains an...

  7. Preliminary observations on the experimental transmission of chronic wasting disease (CWD) from elk and white-tailed deer to fallow deer (Dama dama)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine the transmissibility of chronic wasting disease (CWD) to fallow deer (Cervus dama) and to provide information about clinical course, lesions and suitability of currently used diagnostic procedures for detection of CWD in this species, 13 fawns were inoculated intracerebrally with CWD br...

  8. Surveillance for Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathy in Scavengers of White-Tailed Deer Carcasses in the Chronic Wasting Disease Area of Wisconsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher S. Jennelle; Michael D. Samuel; Cherrie A. Nolden; Delwyn P. Keane; Daniel J. Barr; Chad Johnson; Joshua P. Vanderloo; Judd M. Aiken; Amir N. Hamir; Edward A. Hoover

    2009-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD), a class of neurodegenerative transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) occurring in cervids, is found in a number of states and provinces across North America. Misfolded prions, the infectious agents of CWD, are deposited in the environment via carcass remains and excreta, and pose a threat of cross-species transmission. In this study tissues were tested from 812 representative

  9. Modelling spread of foot-and-mouth disease in wild white-tailed deer and feral pig populations using a geographic-automata model and animal distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael P. Ward; Shawn W. Laffan; Linda D. Highfield

    2009-01-01

    We investigated how the size and distribution of wild deer and feral pigs – species that might act as potential foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus maintenance hosts – might affect the persistence and spread of FMD. We used a susceptible-latent-infected-recovered geographic-automata model and spatially referenced data from southern Texas, USA. Within this study area, 100 locations were randomly selected and FMD

  10. Happy Tailings to You

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this activity, students prepare a sample of "mine tailings", then separate out desirable materials using whatever method they choose, and quantify the results. They will discover that sometimes it's hard to separate desirable minerals from undesirable ones, especially if they look alike or the crystals are of similar sizes. Students learn that old, worked-out mines contain some desirable minerals (in small quantities) mixed in with unwanted minerals, but that doesn't stop some people from trying to squeeze out the last drop. Once considered tailings (or trash), the mix may now be profitable for mining. Desirable minerals can be separated physically and chemically.

  11. WILDLIFE DISEASES SURVEILLANCE TO DETECT CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE IN

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus of 2002 and 2003 to determine the distribution of CWD in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Deer wasting disease, disease surveillance, Odocoileus virginianus, white- tailed deer, Wisconsin. INTRODUCTION

  12. CDC takes a large tiger by the tail: how to handle post-exposure treatment. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    PubMed

    1997-09-01

    Guidelines for post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for occupational exposures and sexual and injection drug use exposures continue to be controversial. Occupational exposures are usually single exposures, whereas sexual and drug use exposures may be the result of repeated exposures. Occupational exposure risk is unavoidable for health care workers and PEP can reduce the risk. Patients for whom PEP may be appropriate include rape victims, high-risk couples who have had risky sexual relations, and injection drug users who have shared dirty needles. AIDS activists and health officials have raised concerns that PEP may undermine prevention efforts. There is little efficacy data and many ethical issues are related to aggressively treating potential AIDS infections. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) met with behavioral and medical researchers to create guidelines of the best current practices to insure that patients are receiving useful interventions. PMID:11364588

  13. REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    REAR PROFILE OF TAIL FROM SECOND LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND, SHOWING AIRCRAFT NUMBER (319), HORIZONTAL STABILIZER, TAIL CONE AND COOLING CTS FOR THE AUXILIARY POWER UNIT (APU), MECHANIC PAUL RIDEOUT IS LOWERING THE BALANCE PANELS ON THE STABILIZERS FOR LUBRICATION AND INSPECTION. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  14. Dolphin Skeleton - Tail

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ketan Patel (California State University, Fullerton; Student, Biological Sciences)

    2007-07-14

    The dolphin is built to be sleek. Its body is made of almost entirely backbone (a gliding joint) which makes it very flexible under water. The ribs protect the inner organs of the dolphin and the tail beats from side to side, thrusting the animal forward.

  15. The ‘Swallow Tail’ Appearance of the Healthy Nigrosome – A New Accurate Test of Parkinson's Disease: A Case-Control and Retrospective Cross-Sectional MRI Study at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Stefan T.; Afzal, Mohammed; Morgan, Paul S.; Bajaj, Nin; Gowland, Penny A.; Auer, Dorothee P.

    2014-01-01

    There is no well-established in vivo marker of nigral degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). An ideal imaging marker would directly mirror the loss of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurones, which is most prominent in sub-regions called nigrosomes. High-resolution, iron-sensitive, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 7T allows direct nigrosome-1 visualisation in healthy people but not in PD. Here, we investigated the feasibility of nigrosome-1 detection using 3T - susceptibility-weighted (SWI) MRI and the diagnostic accuracy that can be achieved for diagnosing PD in a clinical population. 114 high-resolution 3T – SWI-scans were reviewed consisting of a prospective case-control study in 19 subjects (10 PD, 9 controls) and a retrospective cross-sectional study in 95 consecutive patients undergoing routine clinical SWI-scans (>50 years, 9 PD, 81 non-PD, 5 non-diagnostic studies excluded). Two raters independently classified subjects into PD and non-PD according to absence or presence of nigrosome-1, followed by consensus reading. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed against clinical diagnosis as gold standard. Absolute inter- and intra-rater agreement was ?94% (kappa?0.82, p<0.001). In the prospective study 8/9 control and 8/10 PD; and in the retrospective study 77/81 non-PD and all 9 PD subjects were correctly classified. Diagnostic accuracy of the retrospective cohort was: sensitivity 100%, specificity 95%, NPV 1, PPV 0.69 and accuracy 96% which dropped to 91% when including non-diagnostic scans (‘intent to diagnose’). The healthy nigrosome-1 can be readily depicted on high-resolution 3T - SWI giving rise to a ‘swallow tail’ appearance of the dorsolateral substantia nigra, and this feature is lost in PD. Visual radiological assessment yielded a high diagnostic accuracy for PD vs. an unselected clinical control population. Assessing the substantia nigra on SWI for the typical ‘swallow tail’ appearance has potential to become a new and easy applicable 3T MRI diagnostic tool for nigral degeneration in PD. PMID:24710392

  16. Peer Reviewed White-Tailed Deer Harvest From the Chronic Wasting

    E-print Network

    Mladenoff, David

    Peer Reviewed White-Tailed Deer Harvest From the Chronic Wasting Disease Eradication Zone in South Chronic wasting disease (CWD) was discovered in free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in south-central Wisconsin in 2002. The current control method for CWD in the state is the harvest of deer

  17. Preventive Effect of Pine Bark Extract (Flavangenol) on Metabolic Disease in Western Diet-Loaded Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Tsutomu; Kosugi, Mitsutaka; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Tsubata, Masahito; Kamiya, Tomoyasu; Sameshima, Mayu; Nagamine, Rika; Takagaki, Kinya; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi; Aburada, Masaki

    2011-01-01

    It is known that the metabolic syndrome has a multi-factorial basis involving both genetic and environmental risk factors. In this study, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, a mouse model of multi-factorial, hereditary, obese type II diabetes, were given a Western diet (WTD) as an environmental factor to prepare a disease model (TSOD-WTD) and to investigate the preventive effects of Pine bark extract (Flavangenol) against obesity and various features of metabolic disease appearing in this animal model. In contrast to control Tsumura Suzuki Non-obesity (TSNO) mice, TSOD mice were obese and suffered from other metabolic complications. WTD-fed TSOD mice developed additional features such as hyperinsulinemia, abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and fatty liver. The treatment with Flavangenol had a suppressive effect on increase in body weight and accumulation of visceral and subcutaneous fat, and also showed preventive effects on symptoms related to insulin resistance, abnormal glucose/lipid metabolism and hypertension. Flavangenol also increased the plasma concentration of adiponectin and decreased the plasma concentration of TNF-?. We next investigated the effect of Flavangenol on absorption of meal-derived lipids. Flavangenol suppressed absorption of neutral fat in an olive-oil-loading test (in vivo) and showed an inhibitory effect on pancreatic lipase (in vitro). The above results suggest that Flavangenol has a preventive effect on severe metabolic disease due to multiple causes that involve both genetic and environmental risk factors. The mechanism of action might involve a partial suppressive effect of meal-derived lipids on absorption. PMID:21607011

  18. The geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J. (USAF, Geophysics Laboratory, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    A review is presented of the plasma sheet and lobe regions of the magnetotail, focusing principally on large-scale processes or microprocesses with some large-scale effects. Consideration is given to quiet and average structures, not necessarily related to activity phases, with quasi-steady convection aspects, and with the characteristics of dynamic phases including acceleration mechanisms and single particle aspects. Attention is given to various activity models, average and quiet time properties, properties and effects of magnetospheric convection, dynamics of the magnetotail, and the near tail, substorm current wedge.

  19. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-01-01

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington

  20. Heavy Tails Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    that µ(B) = 0 (Resnick, 2007). Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal Dependence MMR2011 Densities of Copulas and Extremal Dependence Haijun Li (Joint work with Peiling Wu) Department of Mathematics Washington State University MMR2011, Beijing Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas and Extremal

  1. Runaway tails in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.; Rowland, H. L.; Papadopoulos, K.

    1985-01-01

    The evolution of a runaway tail driven by a dc electric field in a magnetized plasma is analyzed. Depending on the strength of the electric field and the ratio of plasma to gyrofrequency, there are three different regimes in the evolution of the tail. The tail can be (1) stable with electrons accelerated to large parallel velocities, (2) unstable to Cerenkov resonance because of the depletion of the bulk and the formation of a positive slope, (3) unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance instability driven by the large velocity anisotropy in the tail. Once an instability is triggered (Cerenkov or anomalous Doppler resonance) the tail relaxes into an isotropic distribution. The role of a convection type loss term is also discussed.

  2. [Tail Plane Icing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Aviation Safety Program initiated by NASA in 1997 has put greater emphasis in safety related research activities. Ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) has been identified by the NASA Lewis Icing Technology Branch as an important activity for aircraft safety related research. The ICTS phenomenon is characterized as a sudden, often uncontrollable aircraft nose- down pitching moment, which occurs due to increased angle-of-attack of the horizontal tailplane resulting in tailplane stall. Typically, this phenomenon occurs when lowering the flaps during final approach while operating in or recently departing from icing conditions. Ice formation on the tailplane leading edge can reduce tailplane angle-of-attack range and cause flow separation resulting in a significant reduction or complete loss of aircraft pitch control. In 1993, the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) and NASA embarked upon a four-year research program to address the problem of tailplane stall and to quantify the effect of tailplane ice accretion on aircraft performance and handling characteristics. The goals of this program, which was completed in March 1998, were to collect aerodynamic data for an aircraft tail with and without ice contamination and to develop analytical methods for predicting the effects of tailplane ice contamination. Extensive dry air and icing tunnel tests which resulted in a database of the aerodynamic effects associated with tailplane ice contamination. Although the FAA/NASA tailplane icing program generated some answers regarding ice-contaminated-tailplane stall (ICTS) phenomena, NASA researchers have found many open questions that warrant further investigation into ICTS. In addition, several aircraft manufacturers have expressed interest in a second research program to expand the database to other tail configurations and to develop experimental and computational methodologies for evaluating the ICTS phenomenon. In 1998, the icing branch at NASA Lewis initiated a second multi-phase research program for tailplane icing (TIP II) to develop test methodologies and tailplane performance and handling qualities evaluation tools. The main objectives of this new NASA/Industry/Academia collaborative research programs were: (1) define and evaluate a sub-scale wind tunnel test methodology for determining tailplane performance degradation due to icing. (2) develop an experimental database of tailplane aerodynamic performance with and without ice contamination for a range of tailplane configurations. Wind tunnel tests were planned with representative general aviation aircraft, i.e., the Learjet 45, and a twin engine low speed aircraft. This report summarizes the research performed during the first year of the study, and outlines the work tasks for the second year.

  3. 18 Sharp-tailed Grouse

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. Johnsgard

    2008-01-01

    Tympanuchus phasianellus (Linnaeus) 1858 Other vernacular names: Brush grouse, pintail grouse, prairie grouse, prairie pheasant, sharptail, speckle-belly, spike-tail, spring-tail, whitebelly, white-breasted grouse. Range: Currently from north central Alaska, Yukon, northern Mackenzie, northern Manitoba, northern Ontario, and central Quebec south to eastern Washington, extreme eastern Oregon, Idaho, northeastern Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado, and in the Great Plains from eastern Colorado and

  4. Tail bud determination in the vertebrate embryo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Abigail S. Tucker; Jonathan M. W. Slack

    1995-01-01

    Background: Although as humans we lose our tails in the second month of embryonic development, a persistent tail is a prominent structural feature of most adult vertebrates. Indeed, the post-anal tail is part of the definition of a chordate. The internal organization of the developing tail — with neural tube, notochord and paired somites — is the same as that

  5. SUBAQUEOUS DISPOSAL OF MILL TAILINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeraj K. Mendiratta; Roe-Hoan Yoon; Paul Richardson

    1999-09-03

    A study of mill tailings and sulfide minerals was carried out in order to understand their behavior under subaqueous conditions. A series of electrochemical experiments, namely, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and galvanic coupling tests were carried out in artificial seawater and in pH 6.8 buffer solutions with chloride and ferric salts. Two mill tailings samples, one from the Kensington Mine, Alaska, and the other from the Holden Mine, Washington, were studied along with pyrite, galena, chalcopyrite and copper-activated sphalerite. SEM analysis of mill tailings revealed absence of sulfide minerals from the Kensington Mine mill tailings, whereas the Holden Mine mill tailings contained approximately 8% pyrite and 1% sphalerite. In order to conduct electrochemical tests, carbon matrix composite (CMC) electrodes of mill tailings, pyrite and galena were prepared and their feasibility was established by conducting a series of cyclic voltammetry tests. The cyclic voltammetry experiments carried out in artificial seawater and pH 6.8 buffer with chloride salts showed that chloride ions play an important role in the redox processes of sulfide minerals. For pyrite and galena, peaks were observed for the formation of chloride complexes, whereas pitting behavior was observed for the CMC electrodes of the Kensington Mine mill tailings. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy conducted in artificial seawater provided with the Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena. The Nyquist plots of pyrite and galena exhibited an inert range of potential indicating a slower rate of leaching of sulfide minerals in marine environments. The galvanic coupling experiments were carried out to study the oxidation of sulfide minerals in the absence of oxygen. It was shown that in the absence of oxygen, ferric (Fe3+) ions might oxidize the sulfide minerals, thereby releasing undesirable oxidation products in the marine environment. The source of Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions may be attributed to iron-bearing sulfide (and oxide) minerals present in the mill tailings. However, the concentration of available Fe{sup 3{minus}} ions can be reduced by the precipitation of insoluble ferric hydroxides (Fe(OH ){sub 3}) by seawater due to its near neutral pH. In such case, the oxidation of a sulfide mineral is inhibited due to the absence of an oxidizing agent (viz. oxygen and/or Fe{sup 3+} ions). The experiments carried out in this study provided a better understanding of behavior of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in subaqueous conditions and may be useful for further investigation of sulfide minerals and mill tailings in other environments.

  6. Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks A tail density approach in extremal

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    property µ(tB) = t- µ(B), B, bounded away from 0, where > 0 is known as the tail index. Haijun Li A tail approach in extremal dependence analysis for vine copulas Haijun Li (Joint work with Peiling Wu) Department of Mathematics Washington State University Munich, May 2011 Haijun Li A tail density approach in extremal

  7. Estimating Tails of Probability Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard L. Smith

    1987-01-01

    We study the asymptotic properties of estimators of the tail of a distribution based on the excesses over a threshold. A key idea is the use of Pickands' generalised Pareto distribution and its fitting, in most cases, by the method of maximum likelihood. The results cover all three limiting types of extreme value theory. We propose a new estimator for

  8. Mercury-Redstone Tail Sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1959-01-01

    In this 1959 photograph, technicians prepare tail sections for Mercury-Redstone vehicles in Building 4706 at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by Dr. Wernher von Braun and the rocket team at Redstone, the Mercury-Redstone launched the first two marned U.S. missions.

  9. The ionospheres and plasma tails of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendis, D. A.; Ip, W.-H.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews the current state of knowledge about cometary plasma (type I) tails and ionospheres. Observational statistics for type I tails are examined along with spectroscopic observations of plasma tails, identified ion species in such tails, and the morphology of cometary plasma tails and ionospheres. Evidence for a strong interaction between comets and the solar wind is evaluated on the basis of observations of plasma-tail orientations, large accelerations of tail structures, and correlations between disturbances in type I tails and solar-wind or geomagnetic disturbances. The use of comets as solar-wind probes is discussed, the nature of comet-solar-wind interactions is investigated, and ionization sources for cometary gases are considered. Hydrodynamic models of comet-solar-wind interaction are summarized, and the structure and ion chemistry of cometary ionospheres are studied. Observations suggesting that significant magnetic fields are associated with comets are briefly reviewed and interpreted.

  10. Direct actin binding to A- and B-type lamin tails and actin filament bundling by the lamin A tail

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Dan N; Zastrow, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear intermediate filament networks formed by A- and B-type lamins are major components of the nucleoskeleton. Lamins have growing links to human physiology and disease including Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD), lipodystrophy, cardiomyopathy, neuropathy, cerebellar disorders and segmental accelerated ‘aging’ syndromes. How lamins interact with other nucleoskeletal components, and even the identities of these other components, are open questions. Previous studies suggested lamins might bind actin. We report that the recombinant C-terminal tail domain of human A- and B-type lamins binds directly to purified actin in high-speed pelleting assays. This interaction maps to a conserved Actin Binding site (AB-1) comprising lamin A residues 461–536 in the Ig-fold domain, which are 54% identical in lamin B1. Two EDMD-causing missense mutations (R527P and L530P) in lamin A that are predicted to disrupt the Ig-fold, each reduced F-actin binding by ?66%, whereas the surface-exposed lipodystrophy-causing R482Q mutation had no significant effect. The lamin A tail was unique among lamins in having a second actin-binding site (AB-2). This second site was mapped to lamin A tail residues 564–608, based on actin-binding results for the lamin C tail and internal deletions in the lamin A tail that cause Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (?35, ?50) or restrictive dermopathy (?90). Supporting the presence of two actin-binding sites, recombinant precursor (unmodified) and mature lamin A tails (not C or B1 tails) each bundled F-actin in vitro: furthermore F-actin bundling was reduced 25–40% by the R527P, L530P, ?35 and ?50 mutations, and was abolished by ?90. Unexpectedly, the mature lamin A tail bound F-actin significantly more efficiently than did the prelamin A tail; this suggested unmodified residues 647–664, unique to prelamin A, might auto-inhibit binding to actin (and potentially other partners). These biochemical results suggest direct mechanisms by which lamins, particularly lamin A, might impact the concentration of free actin in the nucleus or pathways including transcription, nuclear export, chromatin remodeling, chromatin movement and nuclear assembly that require nuclear myosin 1c and polymerizable actin. PMID:21327074

  11. WHITE-TAILED DEER INFECTED WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS HYICUS IN SOUTH DAKOTA --On 25 November 2002, the South Dakota Department of

    E-print Network

    177 NOTES WHITE-TAILED DEER INFECTED WITH STAPHYLOCOCCUS HYICUS IN SOUTH DAKOTA -- On 25 November plate was positive (Table 1). Based on these results, Staphylococcus hyicus was identified with white-tailed deer. Staphylococcus hyicus causes exudative epidermitis, or greasy pig disease, in young

  12. Survival patterns in white-tailed and mule deer after oral inoculation with a standardized, conspecific prion dose.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michael W; Wolfe, Lisa L; Sirochman, Tracey M; Sirochman, Michael A; Jewell, Jean E; Williams, Elizabeth S

    2012-04-01

    We orally inoculated white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) with a standardized, conspecific prion dose and collected biologic samples throughout the disease course. Mule deer (PRNP genotype 225SS) and PRNP genotype 96GG white-tailed deer succumbed along similar trajectories, but 96GS- and 96SS-genotype individuals tended to survive longer. PMID:22493138

  13. CAUSES OF MORTALITY IN WHITE-TAILED SEA EAGLES FROM GERMANY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Oliver Krone; Torsten Langgemach; Paul Sömmer; Norbert Kenntner

    White-tailed Sea Eagles Haliaeetus albicilla found moribund or dead in the field were submitted for necropsy to the Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (IZW) and to the Institute for Food, Drugs and Animal Diseases (ILAT), Berlin, Germany. The moribund eagles had died in rehabilitation stations or were euthanized. Onehundred-twenty White-tailed Sea Eagles were examined between 1990 and 2000, comprising

  14. Wasting and neurologic signs associated with cerebrovascular mineralization in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileu virginianus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of wasting and neurologic syndrome (WANS) of white-tailed deer was evaluated by histopathology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for disease associated prion protein (PrP**d). Some of the clinical and pathological features of this case were similar to chronic wasting disease (CWD) of w...

  15. What Makes a Tidal Tail?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Konstantopoulos, I.; Charlton, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy interactions are famous for creating some of the most visually stunning scenes in astronomy, particularly in the cases of tidal tails. These chaotic regions are known to house breeding grounds for young stellar clusters, as shown through past imaging and spectroscopic studies, but the underlying material remains a mystery. While we know that gas is easily stripped from the parent galaxies, what about the stars? The presence of an older stellar population is crucial to dynamical simulations of tidal tails, but has not yet been confirmed by observation. We use the twin tidal tails of NGC3256 as a case study for determining the presence of an old, underlying stellar population. Newly acquired ugriz Gemini data allows us to distinguish between young and old stars, while previous HST data pinpoints the locations of these objects. Deep imaging surveys have often been used to detect tidal features, including these ancient relics, but our survey will be the first to measure the colors of such objects. This will lead us to place constraints on the original composition of the material that was ejected from the interacting/merging galaxies, and the star formation history.

  16. Tail Density Archimedean and t Copulas Tail Densities of Vines Concluding Remarks Tail Densities of Copulas

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    of Copulas Haijun Li Department of Mathematics Washington State University lih@math.wsu.edu University of Toronto, May 27 2014 Haijun Li Tail Densities of Copulas University of Toronto, May 27 2014 1 / 22 #12 is a multivariate regularly varying distribution (MRV) with intensity measure µ, i.e., lim t P(X tB) P(X1 > t) = µ(B

  17. Enhancing the safety of tailings management facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Meggyes, T.; Niederleithinger, E.; Witt, K.J.; Csovari, M.; Kreft-Burman, K.; Engels, J.; McDonald, C.; Roehl, K.E. [BAM, Berlin (Germany). Federal Institute for Material Research & Testing

    2008-07-01

    Unsafe tailings management facilities (TMFs) have caused serious accidents in Europe threatening human health/life and the environment. While advanced design, construction and management procedures are available, their implementation requires greater emphasis. An integrated research project funded by the European Union was carried out between 2002 and 2005 with the overall goal of improving the safety of TMFs (Sustainable Improvement in Safety of Tailings Facilities - TAILSAFE, http://www.tailsafe.com/). The objective of TAILSAFE was to develop and apply methods of parameter evaluation and measurement for the assessment and improvement of the safety state of tailings facilities, with particular attention to the stability of tailings dams and slurries, the special risks inherent when such materials include toxic or hazardous wastes, and authorization and management procedures for tailings facilities. Aspects of tailings facilities design, water management and slurry transport, non-destructive and minimally intrusive testing methods, monitoring and the application of sensors, intervention and remediation options were considered in TAILSAFE. A risk reduction framework (the TAILSAFE Parameter Framework) was established to contribute to the avoidance of catastrophic accidents and hazards from tailings facilities. Tailings from the mining and primary processing of metals, minerals and coal were included within the scope of TAILSAFE. The project focused on the avoidance of hazards by developing procedures and methods for investigating and improving the stability of tailings dams and tailings bodies.

  18. Tail Risk Measures Heavy-Tail Asymptotics: Regular Variation Multivariate Risks Concluding Remarks Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    at confidence level p (TCE, Expected Shortfall, Tail VaR, Conditional VaR), defined by TCEp(X) := E(X | X > Va, Tail VaR, Conditional VaR), defined by TCEp(X) := E(X | X > VaRp(X)). TCE is also known as Average VaR: TCEp(X) = 1 1-p 1 p VaR(X)d. Haijun Li Regularly Varying Asymptotics for Tail Risk Humboldt Univ

  19. Active tails enhance arboreal acrobatics in geckos

    PubMed Central

    Jusufi, Ardian; Goldman, Daniel I.; Revzen, Shai; Full, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Geckos are nature's elite climbers. Their remarkable climbing feats have been attributed to specialized feet with hairy toes that uncurl and peel in milliseconds. Here, we report that the secret to the gecko's arboreal acrobatics includes an active tail. We examine the tail's role during rapid climbing, aerial descent, and gliding. We show that a gecko's tail functions as an emergency fifth leg to prevent falling during rapid climbing. A response initiated by slipping causes the tail tip to push against the vertical surface, thereby preventing pitch-back of the head and upper body. When pitch-back cannot be prevented, geckos avoid falling by placing their tail in a posture similar to a bicycle's kickstand. Should a gecko fall with its back to the ground, a swing of its tail induces the most rapid, zero-angular momentum air-righting response yet measured. Once righted to a sprawled gliding posture, circular tail movements control yaw and pitch as the gecko descends. Our results suggest that large, active tails can function as effective control appendages. These results have provided biological inspiration for the design of an active tail on a climbing robot, and we anticipate their use in small, unmanned gliding vehicles and multisegment spacecraft. PMID:18347344

  20. Tail loss compromises immunity in the many-lined skink, Eutropis multifasciata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chi-Chien; Yao, Chiou-Ju; Lin, Te-En; Liu, Hsu-Che; Hsu, Yu-Cheng; Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Huang, Wen-San

    2013-04-01

    Tail autotomy incurs energetic costs, and thus, a trade-off in resource allocation may lead to compromised immunity in lizards. We tested the hypothesis that tailless lizards will favor constitutive innate immunity responses over an energetically costly inflammatory response. The influence of fasting and colorful ornamentation was also investigated. We experimentally induced tail autotomy in the lizard Eutropis multifasciata and found that inflammation was suppressed by tail loss, but not further affected by fasting; the suppressive effect of colorful ornamentation was manifested only in males, but not in females. Constitutive innate immunity was not affected by any of these factors. As expected, only costly inflammation was compromised, and a less expensive constitutive innate immunity might be favored as a competent first-line defense during energetically demanding periods. After considering conventional trade-offs among tail regeneration and reproduction, further extending these studies to incorporate disease risk and how this influences escape responses to predators and future reproduction would make worthwhile studies.

  1. A Dog Tail for Utility Robots Exploring Affective Properties of Tail Movement

    E-print Network

    A Dog Tail for Utility Robots Exploring Affective Properties of Tail Movement Ashish Singh, James E}@cs.umanitoba.ca Abstract. We present a dog-tail interface for utility robots, as a means of com- municating high-level robotic state through affect. This interface leverages peo- ple's general knowledge of dogs

  2. Reduced-bias estimator of the Conditional Tail Expectation of heavy-tailed distributions

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Reduced-bias estimator of the Conditional Tail Expectation of heavy-tailed distributions El hadji in the literature. In this paper, we focus on the estimation of the Conditional Tail Expectation (CTE). Its. In this framework, we propose a reduced-bias estimator of the CTE. We illustrate the efficiency of our approach

  3. Tail asymptotics for the supercritical GaltonWatson process in the heavy-tailed case 1

    E-print Network

    Korshunov, Dmitry

    Tail asymptotics for the supercritical Galton­Watson process in the heavy-tailed case 1 Denis and University of Munich Abstract As well known, for a supercritical Galton­Watson process Zn whose off- spring: supercritical Galton­Watson process, martingale limit, large deviations, heavy-tailed distribution

  4. Effects of Tail on Spinning Aircraft Model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Takafumi Yamada; Takao Horichi; Yoshiaki Nakamura

    2005-01-01

    The experiment on aircraft spin phenomena was conducted at the low speed wind tunnel of Nagoya University with its exit test section inclined vertically. The model used in this experiment consists of three parts: a main wing, a fuselage, and a tail. Due to the stability effect of the tail, rotation of the model is decreased at low angles of

  5. Selective Tail Call Elimination Yasuhiko Minamide

    E-print Network

    Minamide, Yasuhiko

    a trampoline. To reduce the overhead of trampolining while preserving stack space asymptotically we propose of successive tail calls generated by the execution of an expression, and trampolines are introduced only when, proper tail calls can be implemented with a technique called a trampoline. However, the trampoline

  6. Tail and pelvis pathologies of ankylosaurian dinosaurs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Victoria M. Arbour; Philip J. Currie

    2011-01-01

    Ankylosaurid dinosaurs had modified distal caudal vertebrae (the handle) and large terminal caudal osteoderms (the knob), which together form the tail club. The tail club may have been used as a weapon. Ankylosaur pelvic and caudal elements were surveyed for evidence of healing wounds that may indicate traumatic injury, and which could support clubbing behaviour. No pathologies were found in

  7. Heavy Tails 2 dim Mult Reg Var

    E-print Network

    Resnick, Sidney

    Boston University data; 4161 file sizes (F) and download times (L) noted and transmission rates (R. · The components are each univariate heavy tailed. Big issue: How to model the dependence? · The tail indices ('s asymptotic the- ory). ­ Parametric will fail goodness of fit with large data sets. ­ Semi

  8. VARIATION IN THE SHARP-TAILED SPARROWS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    STEVE N. G. HOWELL; DAVID A. SIBLEY

    1998-01-01

    In 1995, following Greenlaw (1993), the AOU split the Sharp-tailed Sparrow into two species, the Saltmarsh (Ammodramus caudacutus) and Nelson's (A. nelsoni) Sharp-tailed Sparrows. The former breeds in coastal saltmarshes of the central East Coast, the latter in the northern interior, around the southern coast of Hudson Bay, and along the northeastern seaboard. Both species winter along the southern Atlantic

  9. The Dust Tail of Asteroid (3200) Phaethon

    E-print Network

    Jewitt, David; Agarwal, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears >=350" (2.5x10^8 m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius ~1 micrometer and a combined mass ~3x10^5 kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures (~1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

  10. CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TYPE A ENTEROTOXEMIA IN A CAPTIVE ADULT WHITE-TAILED DEER --On the morning of 6 June 2005, a captive adult

    E-print Network

    2006 All deer removed from the captive facility also were tested for chronic wasting disease197 CLOSTRIDIUM PERFRINGENS TYPE A ENTEROTOXEMIA IN A CAPTIVE ADULT WHITE-TAILED DEER -- On the morning of 6 June 2005, a captive adult white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) was found dead

  11. Wind-tunnel Investigation of End-plate Effects of Horizontal Tails on a Vertical Tail Compared with Available Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murray, Harry E

    1946-01-01

    A vertical-tail model with stub fuselage was tested in combination with various simulated horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and location on the aerodynamic characteristics of the vertical tail. Available theoretical data on end-plate effects were collected and presented in the form most suitable for design purposes. Reasonable agreement was obtained between the measured and theoretical end-plate effects of horizontal tails on vertical tails, and the data indicated that the end-plate effect was determined more by the location of the horizontal tail than by the span of the horizontal tail. The horizontal tail gave most end-plate effect when located near either tip of the vertical tail and, when located near the base of the vertical tail, the end-plate effect was increased by moving the horizontal tail rearward.

  12. Epizootic hemorrhagic disease in Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed

    Pybus, Margo J; Ravi, Madhu; Pollock, Colleen

    2014-07-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) virus serotype 2 was identified by reverse-transcription (RT)-PCR in a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) found dead in southern Alberta in September 2013. Field observations indicate at least 50 deer, primarily white-tailed deer, and three pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) died during a suspected localized EHD outbreak. PMID:24807363

  13. Thermal stabilization of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Dreesen, D.R.; Williams, J.M.; Cokal, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The sintering of tailings at high temperatures (1200/sup 0/C) has shown promise as a conditioning approach that greatly reduces the /sup 222/Rn emanation of uranium mill tailings. The structure of thermally stabilized tailings has been appreciably altered producing a material that will have minimal management requirements and will be applicable to on-site processing and disposal. The mineralogy of untreated tailings is presented to define the structure of the original materials. Quartz predominates in most tailings samples; however, appreciable quantities of gypsum, clay, illite, or albites are found in some tailings. Samples from the Durango and Shiprock sites have plagioclase-type aluminosilicates and non-aluminum silicates as major components. The iron-rich vanadium tailings from the Salt Lake City site contain appreciable quantities of ..cap alpha..-hematite and chloroapatite. The reduction in radon emanation power and changes in mineralogy as a function of sintering temperature (500 to 1200(NiAsS) are considered possible species for consideraed. The calculated activity data of the various carbonate, sulfate and hydroxide species in the Li/sup +/Na/sup +/K/sup +//CO/sub 3/ = SO/sub 4/ = OH/sup -/ system have been combined f liquidus surfaces, and estimated error limits are given for each system. A comng payback period, but as the initial cost of the SAHPS is reduced and fuel prices increase, the payback period of a SAHPS will be shorter and could be competitive with other conventional heating/cooling systems.

  14. White-Tailed Deer Susceptible to Scrapie by Natural Route of Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. Previous experiments demonstrated that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep-derived scrapie by intracranial inoculation. The purpose of this study was to determ...

  15. White-tailed Deer are Susceptible to Sheep Scrapie by Intracerebral Inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesi...

  16. White-Tailed Deer Susceptible to Scrapie by Natural Route of Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. Previous experiments demonstrated that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep-derived scrapie by intracranial inoculation. The purpose of an ongoing study is to...

  17. Flea Abundance on Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs ( Cynomys ludovicianus ) Increases During Plague Epizootics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel W. Tripp; Kenneth L. Gage; John A. Montenieri; Michael F. Antolin

    2009-01-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) on the Great Plains of the United States are highly susceptible to plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, with mortality on towns during plague epizootics often ap- proaching 100%. The ability of flea-borne transmission to sustain disease spread has been questioned because of inefficiency of flea vectors. However, even with low individual efficiency, overall

  18. Landscape Structure and Plague Occurrence in Black-tailed Prairie Dogs on Grasslands of the Western USA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sharon K. Collinge; Whitney C. Johnson; Chris Ray; Randy Matchett; John Grensten; Jack F. Cully Jr.; Kenneth L. Gage; Michael Y. Kosoy; Jenella E. Loye; Andrew P. Martin

    2005-01-01

    Landscape structure influences the abundance and distribution of many species, including pathogens that cause infectious diseases. Black-tailed prairie dogs in the western USA have declined precipitously over the past 100 years, most recently due to grassland conversion and their susceptibility to sylvatic plague. We assembled and analyzed two long-term data sets on plague occurrence in black-tailed prairie dogs to explore the

  19. A Christmas "E-Tail"

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Missner, Emily D.

    As the weather outside turns frightful, retail businesses with "e-tail" (electronic retail) Websites are hoping that consumers will turn to their home computers for their holiday shopping. A Forrester Research report estimates that seven million shoppers will spend close to $4 billion in online shopping, three times more than last year. However, this equals less than one percent of total holiday spending, estimated at $184 billion this holiday season. Most online retailers have increased the capacity and speed of their Websites in order to best serve holiday shoppers, hoping that this year's online shopping experiences will lead consumers to do a greater amount of next year's holiday shopping by way of the World Wide Web. While consumers are willing to try e-commerce sites, as many as 40 percent of experienced Internet users have found the process of online shopping confusing and complicated. This week's In the News examines the trend of online shopping with the following seven resources including news articles, advice, and related Websites.

  20. Chronic Wasting Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. S. Williams

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a unique transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), white-tailed deer (O. virginianus), and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni). The natural history of CWD is incompletely understood, but it differs from scrapie and bovine spon- giform encephalopathy (BSE) by virtue of its occurrence in nondomestic and free-ranging species. CWD has many features

  1. TIDAL TAILS OF MINOR MERGERS. II. COMPARING STAR FORMATION IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF NGC 2782

    SciTech Connect

    Knierman, Karen A.; Scowen, Paul; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Christopher [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, 550 E. Tyler Mall, Room PSF-686 (P.O. Box 871404), Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Mullan, Brendan; Charlton, Jane [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Penn State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA (United States); Konstantopoulos, Iraklis [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde NSW 1670 (Australia); Knezek, Patricia M., E-mail: karen.knierman@asu.edu, E-mail: paul.scowen@asu.edu, E-mail: tveach@asu.edu, E-mail: cgroppi@asu.edu, E-mail: mullan@astro.psu.edu, E-mail: iraklis@aao.gov.au, E-mail: pknezek@noao.edu [WIYN Consortium, Inc., 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-09-10

    The peculiar spiral NGC 2782 is the result of a minor merger with a mass ratio {approx}4: 1 occurring {approx}200 Myr ago. This merger produced a molecular and H I-rich, optically bright eastern tail and an H I-rich, optically faint western tail. Non-detection of CO in the western tail by Braine et al. suggested that star formation had not yet begun. However, deep UBVR and H{alpha} narrowband images show evidence of recent star formation in the western tail, though it lacks massive star clusters and cluster complexes. Using Herschel PACS spectroscopy, we discover 158 {mu}m [C II] emission at the location of the three most luminous H{alpha} sources in the eastern tail, but not at the location of the even brighter H{alpha} source in the western tail. The western tail is found to have a normal star formation efficiency (SFE), but the eastern tail has a low SFE. The lack of CO and [C II] emission suggests that the western tail H II region may have a low carbon abundance and be undergoing its first star formation. The western tail is more efficient at forming stars, but lacks massive clusters. We propose that the low SFE in the eastern tail may be due to its formation as a splash region where gas heating is important even though it has sufficient molecular and neutral gas to make massive star clusters. The western tail, which has lower gas surface density and does not form high-mass star clusters, is a tidally formed region where gravitational compression likely enhances star formation.

  2. BIOMECHANICS. Why the seahorse tail is square.

    PubMed

    Porter, Michael M; Adriaens, Dominique; Hatton, Ross L; Meyers, Marc A; McKittrick, Joanna

    2015-07-01

    Whereas the predominant shapes of most animal tails are cylindrical, seahorse tails are square prisms. Seahorses use their tails as flexible grasping appendages, in spite of a rigid bony armor that fully encases their bodies. We explore the mechanics of two three-dimensional-printed models that mimic either the natural (square prism) or hypothetical (cylindrical) architecture of a seahorse tail to uncover whether or not the square geometry provides any functional advantages. Our results show that the square prism is more resilient when crushed and provides a mechanism for preserving articulatory organization upon extensive bending and twisting, as compared with its cylindrical counterpart. Thus, the square architecture is better than the circular one in the context of two integrated functions: grasping ability and crushing resistance. PMID:26138983

  3. Physical space and long-tail markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, R. Alexander; Madsen, Mark E.; Ormerod, Paul

    2009-03-01

    The Internet is known to have had a powerful impact on on-line retailer strategies in markets characterised by long-tail distribution of sales [C. Anderson, Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More, Hyperion, New York, 2006]. Such retailers can exploit the long tail of the market, since they are effectively without physical limit on the number of choices on offer. Here we examine two extensions of this phenomenon. First, we introduce turnover into the long-tail distribution of sales. Although over any given period such as a week or a month, the distribution is right-skewed and often power law distributed, over time there is considerable turnover in the rankings of sales of individual products. Second, we establish some initial results on the implications for shelf-space and physical retailers in such markets.

  4. Forest cover influences dispersal distance of white-tailed deer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, E.S.; Diefenbach, D.R.; Rosenberry, C.S.; Wallingford, B.D.; Grund, M.D.

    2005-01-01

    Animal dispersal patterns influence gene flow, disease spread, population dynamics, spread of invasive species, and establishment of rare or endangered species. Although differences in dispersal distances among taxa have been reported, few studies have described plasticity of dispersal distance among populations of a single species. In 2002-2003, we radiomarked 308 juvenile (7- to 10-month-old), male white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in 2 study areas in Pennsylvania. By using a meta-analysis approach, we compared dispersal rates and distances from these populations together with published reports of 10 other nonmigratory populations of white-tailed deer. Population density did not influence dispersal rate or dispersal distance, nor did forest cover influence dispersal rate. However, average (r2 = 0.94, P < 0.001, d.f. = 9) and maximum (r2 = 0.86, P = 0.001, d.f. = 7) dispersal distances of juvenile male deer were greater in habitats with less forest cover. Hence, dispersal behavior of this habitat generalist varies, and use of landscape data to predict population-specific dispersal distances may aid efforts to model population spread, gene flow, or disease transmission. ?? 2005 American Society of Mammalogists.

  5. Asbestos tailings as aggregates for asphalt mixture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xiaoming Liu; Linrong Xu

    2011-01-01

    To use many asbestos tailings collected in Ya-Lu highway, and to explore the feasibility of using asbestos tailings as aggregates\\u000a in common asphalt mixtures, and properties of some asphalt mixtures were evaluated as well. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray\\u000a fluorescent (XRF), and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) were employed to determine the solid waste content of copper,\\u000a zinc, lead, and cadmium. Volume

  6. Volume III, Chapter 13 Columbian White-tailed Deer

    E-print Network

    Volume III, Chapter 13 Columbian White-tailed Deer #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 13.0 Columbian White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus leucurus) ........................... 13-1 13.1 Introduction............................................................................. 13-20 #12;COLUMBIAN WHITE-TAILED DEER III, 13-1 May 2004 13.0 Columbian White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus

  7. The sodium tail of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, M.; Smith, S.; Baumgardner, J.; Wilson, J.; Martinis, C.; Mendillo, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the few days centered about new Moon, the lunar surface is optically hidden from Earth-based observers. However, the Moon still offers an observable: an extended sodium tail. The lunar sodium tail is the escaping "hot" component of a coma-like exosphere of sodium generated by photon-stimulated desorption, solar wind sputtering and meteoroid impact. Neutral sodium atoms escaping lunar gravity experience solar radiation pressure that drives them into the anti-solar direction forming a comet-like tail. During new Moon time, the geometry of the Sun, Moon and Earth is such that the anti-sunward sodium flux is perturbed by the terrestrial gravitational field resulting in its focusing into a dense core that extends beyond the Earth. An all-sky camera situated at the El Leoncito Observatory (CASLEO) in Argentina has been successfully imaging this tail through a sodium filter at each lunation since April 2006. This paper reports on the results of the brightness of the lunar sodium tail spanning 31 lunations between April 2006 and September 2008. Brightness variability trends are compared with both sporadic and shower meteor activity, solar wind proton energy flux and solar near ultra violet (NUV) patterns for possible correlations. Results suggest minimal variability in the brightness of the observed lunar sodium tail, generally uncorrelated with any single source, yet consistent with a multi-year period of minimal solar activity and non-intense meteoric fluxes.

  8. Modelling the Neutral Sodium Tails of Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, K. S.; Jones, G. H.; Coates, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral sodium is typically easy to detect in active comets around perihelion, due to the very high efficiency of the sodium D transition, and at some comets a distinct neutral sodium tail is observed. The first distinct neutral sodium tail images were apparent in comet Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1) data taken using CoCam [Cremonese et al, 1997], but since this initial detection similar features have been observed at a number of near-Sun comets using the SOHO/LASCO coronagraph. An understanding of the distribution and evolution of neutral cometary sodium may best be developed using a combination of spectra and images in different filters at multiple times throughout a comet's orbit. At present the source of neutral sodium in comets is unknown, primarily because the evolution of neutral cometary sodium is difficult to intuitively predict due to the Swings and Greenstein effects. Several authors [review presented in Cremonese et al, 1999] have suggested various combinations of sources of neutral sodium in the nuclear region, near-nuclear region, dust tail and ion tail. In order to understand the wide variety of cometary observations of neutral sodium available we have developed the first fully three dimensional, heliocentric distance dependent, versatile Monte Carlo neutral sodium tail model (initially based on a model developed by [Brown et al, 1998]). Our model is known as COMPASS (Cometary Orbital Motion at Perihelion: an Adaptable Sodium Simulation), and incorporates the unintuitive variation in radiation pressure influences on sodium atoms with different heliocentric velocities. We present the initial results of a comparison between COMPASS and observational data. We have found good agreement between the overall morphology of the neutral sodium tail imaged at comet Hale-Bopp and COMPASS, and have begun to extend the study to other comets of interest. We also present a comparison between simulated COMPASS spectra and observations. The versatility of COMPASS allows it to be easily adapted to any other neutral cometary sodium tail observations available.

  9. NESTING HABITAT RELATIONSHIPS OF SYMPATRIC CRESTED CARACARAS, RED-TAILED HAWKS, ANDWHITE-TAILED HAWKS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael A. Actkinson; WILLIAM P. KUVLESKY JR; Clint W. Boal; Leonard A. Brennan; Fidel Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    We quantified nesting-site habitats for sympatric White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus )( n 40), Red-tailed Hawks (B. jamaicensis )( n 39), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway )( n 24) in the Coastal Sand Plain of south Texas. White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracara nest sites occurred in savannas, whereas Red-tailed Hawk nest sites occurred in woodlands on the edge of savannas. White-tailed

  10. X-ray Tail in NGC 7619

    E-print Network

    Dong-Woo Kim; Eunhyeuk Kim; Giuseppina Fabbiano; Ginevra Trinchieri

    2008-09-25

    We present new observational results of NGC 7619, an elliptical galaxy with a prominent X-ray tail and a dominant member of the Pegasus group. With Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, we confirm the presence of a long X-ray tail in the SW direction; moreover, we identify for the first time a sharp discontinuity of the X-ray surface brightness in the opposite (NE) side of the galaxy. The density, temperature and pressure jump at the NE discontinuity suggest a Mach number ~1, corresponding to a galaxy velocity of ~500 km s-1, relative to the surrounding hot gas. Spectral analysis of these data shows that the Iron abundance of the hot gaseous medium is much higher (1-2 solar) near the center of NGC 7619 and in the tail extending from the core than in the surrounding regions (< 1/2 solar), indicating that the gas in the tail is originated from the galaxy. The possible origin of the head-tail structure is either on-going ram-pressure stripping or sloshing. The morphology of the structure is more in line with a ram pressure stripping phenomenon, while the position of NGC 7619 at the center of the Pegasus I group, and its dominance, would prefer sloshing.

  11. THE DUST TAIL OF ASTEROID (3200) PHAETHON

    SciTech Connect

    Jewitt, David; Li Jing [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, 595 Charles Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1567 (United States); Agarwal, Jessica, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Max-Planck-Str. 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2013-07-10

    We report the discovery of a comet-like tail on asteroid (3200) Phaethon when imaged at optical wavelengths near perihelion. In both 2009 and 2012, the tail appears {approx}>350'' (2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} m) in length and extends approximately in the projected anti-solar direction. We interpret the tail as being caused by dust particles accelerated by solar radiation pressure. The sudden appearance and the morphology of the tail indicate that the dust particles are small, with an effective radius {approx}1 {mu}m and a combined mass {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} kg. These particles are likely products of thermal fracture and/or desiccation cracking under the very high surface temperatures ({approx}1000 K) experienced by Phaethon at perihelion. The existence of the tail confirms earlier inferences about activity in this body based on the detection of anomalous brightening. Phaethon, the presumed source of the Geminid meteoroids, is still active.

  12. Sunward Electric Current In The Geomagnetic Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelevich, P.; Ershkovich, A.; Tsyganenko, N.

    Analysis of Geotail magnetic data enables us to reveal the antisunward electric cur- rent flowing along the tail axis. Distributions of the magnetic field and electric current density (along with their dependencies on the tilt angle of the Earth's dipole and com- ponents of the interplanetary magnetic field) have been derived directly from Geotail data, without any ad hoc assumptions. Analysis of the electric current density distri- bution shows that, in addition to currents associated with the geomagnetic tail flaring, there is a current (tentatively identified as the Hall current) flowing antisunward along the tail axis. The total strength of this current is of the order of 1 MA. It closes through the midnight sector of the auroral zone resulting in field-aligned currents in the region of the Harang discontinuity.

  13. Evolution of "Rhabditidae" and the Male Tail

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, David H. A.

    2000-01-01

    Evolution of diverse male tail epidermal features of representative species in the family Rhabditidae (Nematoda:Rhabditida) was mapped by parsimony on a molecular phylogeny inferred with nearly complete DNA sequences of small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. Although the molecular phylogeny is consistent with some previously proposed relationships, there are also some major differences, suggesting a revision of rhabditid taxonomy is required. To reconstruct male tail evolution, character states and homologies were determined with the aid of developmental profiling at the level of single cells. Because the model genetic system Caenorhabditis elegans is a member of Rhabditidae and allows the genetic and developmental mechanisms of morphogenesis to be elucidated, candidate genes and pathways can be proposed for several of the reconstructed evolutionary changes in male tail morphology. PMID:19270972

  14. Loss of Desmoplakin Tail Causes Lethal Acantholytic Epidermolysis Bullosa*

    PubMed Central

    Jonkman, Marcel F.; Pasmooij, Anna M. G.; Pasmans, Suzanne G. M. A.; van den Berg, Maarten P.; ter Horst, Henk J.; Timmer, Albertus; Pas, Hendri H.

    2005-01-01

    The cytoplasmic plaque protein desmoplakin (DP), which is located in desmosomes, plays a major role in epithelial and muscle cell adhesion by linking the transmembrane cadherins to the cytoplasmic intermediate filament network. Mutations of DP may cause striate palmoplantar keratoderma, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, skin fragility/woolly hair syndrome, Naxos-like disease, and Carvajal syndrome. DP must be indispensable, because DP-/- mice are early abortive. Here, we report a patient with severe fragility of skin and mucous membranes caused by genetic truncation of the DP tail. The new phenotype is lethal in the neonatal period because of immense transcutaneous fluid loss. The phenotype also comprised universal alopecia, neonatal teeth, and nail loss. Histology showed suprabasal clefting and acantholysis throughout the spinous layer, mimicking pemphigus. Electron microscopy revealed disconnection of keratin intermediate filaments from desmosomes. Immunofluorescence staining of DP showed a distinct punctate intercellular pattern in the patient’s skin. Protein analysis revealed expression of truncated DP polypeptides. Mutational analysis of the patient demonstrated compound heterozygosity for two DP mutations, 6079C?T (R1934X) and 6370delTT, respectively. Aberrant mRNA transcripts that predict premature termination of translation with loss of the three intermediate filament-binding subdomains in the DP tail were detected by RT-PCR. The new dramatic phenotype, which we named “lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa,” underscores the paramount role of DP in epidermal integrity. PMID:16175511

  15. Radial tail resolution in the SELEX RICH

    SciTech Connect

    Morelos, A.; Mata, J.; Cooper, P.S.; Engelfried, J.; Aguilera-Servin, J.L.; /San Luis Potosi U. /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    The authors use a 7 Million event data sample of 600 GeV/c single track pion events, where the pion track is reconstructed upstream and downstream of the SELEX RICH. They build the RICH ring radius histogram distribution and count the tail events that fall outside 5{sigma}, giving a fraction of 4 x 10{sup -5} events outside the Gaussian tails. This control of events establishes the ability of using the RICH as velocity spectrometer for high precision searches of the K{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay like it is planned in the CKM experiment.

  16. Modeling river flows with heavy tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Paul L.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    1998-09-01

    Recent advances in time series analysis provide alternative models for river flows in which the innovations have heavy tails, so that some of the moments do not exist. The probability of large fluctuations is much larger than for standard models. We survey some recent theoretical developments for heavy tail time series models and illustrate their practical application to river flow data from the Salt River near Roosevelt, Arizona. We also include some simple diagnostics that the practitioner can use to identify when the methods of this paper may be useful.

  17. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  18. Effect of Horizontal-Tail Span and Vertical Location on the Aerodynamic Characteristics of an Unswept Tail Assembly in Sideslip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Donald R

    1954-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley stability tunnel on a vertical-tail model with a stub fuselage in combination with various horizontal tails to determine the effect of horizontal-tail span and vertical location of the horizontal tail relative to the vertical tail on the aerodynamic characteristics of an unswept tail assembly in sideslip. The results of the investigation indicated that the induced loading carried by the horizontal tail produced a rolling moment about the point of attachment to the vertical tail which was strongly influenced by horizontal-tail span and vertical locations. The greatest effect of horizontal-tail span on the rolling-moment derivative of the complete tail assembly was obtained for horizontal-tail locations near the top of the vertical tail. Span loadings which were reduced to the static-stability derivatives were calculated for each configuration tested by applying the well-known finite-step method used for wings to the intersecting surfaces of the vertical and horizontal tails. The finite-step method provides a simple and effective means of investigating the span loadings of intersecting surfaces.

  19. FIELD APPLICATION OF ANTIBODY-BASED TESTS FOR THE DETECTION OF TUBERCULOUS DEER IN MICHIGAN, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective was to determine the potential for field application of antibody-based tests to detect tuberculosis in free-ranging white-tailed deer (WTD). Hunters and Michigan Department of Natural Resources personnel collected 177 blood samples from WTD (November - December, 2004) killed in the tub...

  20. Casein Kinase 2 Reverses Tail-Independent Inactivation of Kinesin-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Reddy, Babu J. N.; Anand, Preetha; Shu, Zhanyong; Cermelli, Silvia; Mattson, Michelle K.; Tripathy, Suvranta K.; Hoss, Matthew T.; James, Nikita S.; King, Stephen J.; Huang, Lan; Bardwell, Lee; Gross, Steven P.

    2013-01-01

    Kinesin-1 is a plus-end microtubule-based motor, and defects in kinesin-based transport are linked to diseases including neurodegeneration. Kinesin can auto-inhibit via a head-tail interaction, but is believed to be active otherwise. Here we report a tail-independent inactivation of kinesin, reversible by the disease-relevant signaling protein, casein kinase 2 (CK2). The majority of initially active kinesin (native or tail-less) loses its ability to interact with microtubules in vitro, and CK2 reverses this inactivation (~ 4-fold) without altering kinesin’s single motor properties. This activation pathway does not require motor phosphorylation, and is independent of head-tail auto-inhibition. In cultured mammalian cells, reducing CK2 expression, but not its kinase activity, decreases the force required to stall lipid droplet transport, consistent with a decreased number of active kinesin motors. Our results provide the first direct evidence of a protein kinase up-regulating kinesin-based transport, and suggest a novel pathway for regulating the activity of cargo-bound kinesin. PMID:22453827

  1. Flight costs of long, sexually selected tails in hummingbirds

    PubMed Central

    James Clark, Christopher; Dudley, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The elongated tails adorning many male birds have traditionally been thought to degrade flight performance by increasing body drag. However, aerodynamic interactions between the body and tail can be substantial in some contexts, and a short tail may actually reduce rather than increase overall drag. To test how tail length affects flight performance, we manipulated the tails of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) by increasing their length with the greatly elongated tail streamers of the red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) and reducing their length by removing first the rectrices and then the entire tail (i.e. all rectrices and tail covert feathers). Flight performance was measured in a wind tunnel by measuring (i) the maximum forward speed at which the birds could fly and (ii) the metabolic cost of flight while flying at airspeeds from 0 to 14?m?s?1. We found a significant interaction effect between tail treatment and airspeed: an elongated tail increased the metabolic cost of flight by up to 11 per cent, and this effect was strongest at higher flight speeds. Maximum flight speed was concomitantly reduced by 3.4 per cent. Also, removing the entire tail decreased maximum flight speed by 2 per cent, suggesting beneficial aerodynamic effects for tails of normal length. The effects of elongation are thus subtle and airspeed-specific, suggesting that diversity in avian tail morphology is associated with only modest flight costs. PMID:19324747

  2. Flight costs of long, sexually selected tails in hummingbirds.

    PubMed

    Clark, Christopher James; Dudley, Robert

    2009-06-01

    The elongated tails adorning many male birds have traditionally been thought to degrade flight performance by increasing body drag. However, aerodynamic interactions between the body and tail can be substantial in some contexts, and a short tail may actually reduce rather than increase overall drag. To test how tail length affects flight performance, we manipulated the tails of Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) by increasing their length with the greatly elongated tail streamers of the red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) and reducing their length by removing first the rectrices and then the entire tail (i.e. all rectrices and tail covert feathers). Flight performance was measured in a wind tunnel by measuring (i) the maximum forward speed at which the birds could fly and (ii) the metabolic cost of flight while flying at airspeeds from 0 to 14 m s(-1). We found a significant interaction effect between tail treatment and airspeed: an elongated tail increased the metabolic cost of flight by up to 11 per cent, and this effect was strongest at higher flight speeds. Maximum flight speed was concomitantly reduced by 3.4 per cent. Also, removing the entire tail decreased maximum flight speed by 2 per cent, suggesting beneficial aerodynamic effects for tails of normal length. The effects of elongation are thus subtle and airspeed-specific, suggesting that diversity in avian tail morphology is associated with only modest flight costs. PMID:19324747

  3. Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richards, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an always-fatal, neurological illness occurring in North American cervids (members of the deer family), including white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. Since its discovery in 1967, CWD has spread geographically and increased in prevalence locally. CWD is contagious; it can be transmitted freely within and among free-ranging populations. It is likely that diseased animals can transmit CWD to healthy animals long before they become clinically ill. Managing CWD in free-ranging populations is extremely difficult, therefore preventative measures designed to reduce the chance for disease spread are critically important.

  4. The Mechanical Properties of Rat Tail Tendon

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BERNARD J. RIGBY; OHN D. SPIKES; HENRY EYRING

    1959-01-01

    The load-strain and stress-relaxation behavior of wet rat tail tendon has been examined with respect to the parameters strain, rate of strain- ing, and temperature. It is found that this mechanical behavior is reproducible after resting tile tendon for a few minutes after each extension so long as the strain does not exceed about 4 per cent. If this strain

  5. Functional morphology of the aardvark tail.

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Mori, K; Koyabu, D; Kawada, S; Komiya, T; Itou, T; Koie, H; Kitagawa, M; Sakai, T

    2013-04-01

    The musculoskeletal system of the aardvark (Orycteropus afer) tail was morphologically examined in two adult specimens. The tail musculature comprised three muscular groups, viz. a dorsal sacrocaudal system that consisted of the irregularly oriented Musculus sacrocaudalis dorsalis medialis and M. sacrocaudalis dorsalis lateralis, a lateral inter-vertebral connecting system, and a ventral sacrocaudal system characterized by the thick M. sacrocaudalis ventralis lateralis and M. sacrocaudalis ventralis medialis. Both the dorsal and ventral systems possessed large tendon groups that strengthened the tail structure. Computed tomography (CT) examination showed the presence of large but homogeneous cartilaginous inter-vertebral discs, whereas V-shaped bones were situated at the ventral aspect of the caudal vertebrae at the level of the inter-vertebral discs. CT visualization of the tendons and V-shaped bones in various tail positions suggested that these structures contribute to the tunnel digging action by bearing the trunk weight and lending force when the aardvark are displacing the soil by means of the forelimbs. PMID:22713114

  6. Experiments on a Tail-wheel Shimmy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harling, R; Dietz, O

    1954-01-01

    Model tests on the "running belt" and tests with a full-scale tail wheel were made on a rotating drum as well as on a runway in order to investigate the causes of the undesirable shimmy phenomena frequently occurring on airplane tail wheels, and the means of avoiding them. The small model (scale 1:10) permitted simulation of the mass, moments of inertia, and fuselage stiffness of the airplane and determination of their influence on the shimmy, whereas by means of the larger model with pneumatic tires (scale 1:2) more accurate investigations were made on the tail wheel itself. The results of drum and road tests show good agreement with one another and with model values. Detailed investigations were made regarding the dependence of the shimmy tendency on trail, rolling speed, load, size of tires, ground friction,and inclination of the swivel axis; furthermore, regarding the influence of devices with restoring effect on the tail wheel, and the friction damping required for prevention of shimmy. Finally observations from slow-motion pictures are reported and conclusions drawn concerning the influence of tire deformation.

  7. Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) tail camera video

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) was a joint research project by NASA and the FAA to test a survivable aircraft impact using a remotely piloted Boeing 720 aircraft. The tail camera movie is one shot running 27 seconds. It shows the impact from the perspective of a camera mounted high on the vertical stabilizer, looking forward over the fuselage and wings.

  8. TAIL-MOUNTED RADIO TRANSMITTERS FOR WATERFOWL

    Microsoft Academic Search

    JEAN-FRANCOIS GIROUX; DAVID V. BELL; STEVE PERCIVAL; RON W. SUMMERS

    We successfully tested tail-mounted radio transmitters on Pink-footed Geese (Anser brachyrhynchus), Barnacle Geese (Branta leucopsis), Brant (Branta bernicla) and Eur- asian Wigeon (Anas penelope). The range of detection of the transmitters was approximately 1 km and some birds were tracked for up to 4 mo. Movements and activity of the birds were not affected by the packages. We conclude that

  9. Tales and Tails and Stuff and Nonsense

    E-print Network

    Philip Pearle

    1998-05-17

    In an informal way I review collapse models and my part in constructing them, and I recall some encounters with Abner Shimony. In particular, I address the question of the nature of spacetime reality in collapse models, stimulated by Abner's criticism of the "tail" possessed by statevectors in such models.

  10. Structural Equation Modeling with Heavy Tailed Distributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Ke-Hai; Bentler, Peter M.; Chan, Wai

    2004-01-01

    Data in social and behavioral sciences typically possess heavy tails. Structural equation modeling is commonly used in analyzing interrelations among variables of such data. Classical methods for structural equation modeling fit a proposed model to the sample covariance matrix, which can lead to very inefficient parameter estimates. By fitting a…

  11. 5?Tailed Octanucleotide Primers for Cycle Sequencing

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Loakes; F. Hill; D. M. Brown; S. Ball; M. A. Reeve; P. S. Robinson

    1999-01-01

    Recently we reported the use of octamer primers tailed with 5-nitroindole for use as primers in cycle sequencing reactions. Here we report the successful use of some other universal base analogues to improve the effectiveness of an octamer sequencing primer. These analogues are 5-nitroindazole, 3-nitropyrrole and benzimidazole.

  12. Fins, limbs, and tails: outgrowths and axial

    E-print Network

    Cohn, Martin

    .g., sharks). Vertebrate fins and limbs have diversified repeatedly around conserved anatomical themesFins, limbs, and tails: outgrowths and axial patterning in vertebrate evolution Michael I. Coates1* and Martin J. Cohn2 Summary Current phylogenies show that paired fins and limbs are unique to jawed verte

  13. Black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys Zudovicianus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John P. Farrar; Karin L. Coleman; David S. Lynch

    The policy of relocating the black-tailed prairie dog, Cynomys ludovicianus, is becoming more popular than outright extermination. However, the effects of the relocation process on the behavior of these animals is not known. We hypothesized that relocated prairie dogs would not show behavioral differences relative to non- relocated prairie dogs. We recorded response distances to a human intruder in three

  14. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-print Network

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÑON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

  15. Unique Structural Features Facilitate Lizard Tail Kristian W. Sanggaard1

    E-print Network

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    remains unclear. In the present study, we showed that tail shedding by the Tokay gecko (Gekko gecko-imaging techniques demonstrated that the tail of Gekko gecko was pre-severed at distinct sites and that its

  16. 14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Credit PED. Downstream elevation, near completion, showing tail race and trestle used to carry excavated rock and construction materials across tail race. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  17. Intervention to Improve the Quality of Life of a Bottlenose Dolphin That Developed Necrosis on the Tail Flukes

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Keiichi; Murakami, Masahito; Kato, Junichi; Miyahara, Hirokazu; Izumisawa, Yasuharu

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose, Case, and Methods] A female bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) in captivity developed necrosis of the tail flukes. Although the diseased site healed after surgical resection, the loss of approximately 75% of the tail greatly affected her swimming performance. To restore swimming ability, we developed artificial tail flukes as a prosthetic swimming aid and provided physical therapy that included swimming training from postoperative day 1 to day 1427. [Results] The prosthetic enabled the dolphin to recover swimming ability almost to the level prior to disease onset, but even acquire applied movement, and reestablish social relationships, thus greatly improving the animal's quality of life. [Conclusion] The results clearly demonstrate that, as in postoperative rehabilitation in humans, the use of prosthetic devices in physical therapy can be beneficial for marine animals such as dolphins. PMID:24259946

  18. TAIL ASYMPTOTICS FOR THE SUM OF TWO HEAVY-TAILED DEPENDENT RISKS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Dominik Kortschak

    2005-01-01

    Let X1, X2 denote positive exchangable heavy-tailed random variables with continuous marginal distribution function F. The asymptotic behavior of the tail of X1 + X2 is studied in a general copula framework and some bounds and extremal properties are provided. For more specific assumptions on F and the underlying dependence structure of X1 and X2, we survey explicit asymptotic results

  19. Orthopoxvirus variola infection of Cynomys ludovicianus (North American black tailed prairie dog).

    PubMed

    Carroll, Darin S; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Braden, Zach H; Patel, Nishi; Abel, Jason; Li, Yu; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L

    2013-09-01

    Since the eradication of Smallpox, researchers have attempted to study Orthopoxvirus pathogenesis and immunity in animal models in order to correlate results human smallpox. A solely human pathogen, Orthopoxvirus variola fails to produce authentic smallpox illness in any other animal species tested to date. In 2003, an outbreak in the USA of Orthopoxvirus monkeypox, revealed the susceptibility of the North American black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) to infection and fulminate disease. Prairie dogs infected with Orthopoxvirus monkeypox present with a clinical scenario similar to ordinary smallpox, including prodrome, rash, and high mortality. This study examines if Black-tailed prairie dogs can become infected with O. variola and serve as a surrogate model for the study of human smallpox disease. Substantive evidence of infection is found in immunological seroconversion of animals to either intranasal or intradermal challenges with O. variola, but in the absence of overt illness. PMID:23809939

  20. Tissue fluid shift, forelimb loading, and tail tension in tail-suspended rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargens, A. R.; Steskal, J.; Johansson, C.; Tipton, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    The tail suspension model (head-down tilt) simulates hypogravity in terms of musculoskeletal loss in the rat. However, little is known of tissue fluid shifts and body weight distribution in this model. Tissue fluid pressures were measured by wick catheters in 12 Munich-Wistar rats before, during, and after 48 hrs of tail suspension (about 30 deg head-down tilt). Subcutaneous tissue fluid pressure in the neck increased from -2.2 + or - 0.4 (normal horizontal position) to +4.0 + or - 1.5 cm H2O during tail suspension, indicating a cephalic fluid shift and significant edema during head-down tilt. In a separate study, six rats were suspended at 30-70 deg, and forelimb load and tail tension were measured by a balance and force transducer, respectively. Approximately 50 percent of body weight (BW) was loaded on forelimbs at a head-down tilt angle of 30 deg and forelimb load declined linearly to 10 percent BW at 70 deg. Furthermore, tail tension increased from 50 percent BW at 30 deg to 85 percent BW at 70 deg. These results indicate that less than normal loads are applied to forelimbs of rats suspended at angles of less than 30 deg and that the tail bears an increasing proportion of the rat's body weight at head-down tilt angles of less than 30 deg.

  1. One-Tailed F-Tests in Communication Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Banas, John

    2002-01-01

    Documents the recent use of one-tailed F-tests in communication journals, and examines the arguments both for and against their use. Examines the use of these tests within the broader unresolved controversy surrounding the use of one-tailed tests. Recommends that future researchers should most often avoid one-tailed Fs, and generally exercise…

  2. Driven inelastic Maxwell models with high energy tails

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. H. Ernst; R. Brito

    2002-01-01

    The solutions of the homogeneous nonlinear Boltzmann equation for inelastic Maxwell models, when driven by different types of thermostats, show, in general, overpopulated high energy tails of the form ~exp(-ac), with power law tails and Gaussian tails as border line cases. The results are compared with those for inelastic hard spheres, and a comprehensive picture of the long time behavior

  3. TECHNICAL NOTE Individual identification of Sitka black-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    TECHNICAL NOTE Individual identification of Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis for extracting DNA from fecal pellets from Sitka black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis) and evaluated. Keywords Alaska Á DNA Á Feces Á Microsatellites Á Odocoileus hemionus sitkensis Á Sitka black-tailed deer

  4. APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF CONSTRUCTION PION RIDGE TAILINGS FACILITIES

    E-print Network

    ) and the State of Colorado. The Radiation Control Program of CDPHE is currently reviewing the tailings cell plans Corporation Prepared By: 44 Union Boulevard, Suite 600 Lakewood, Colorado 80228 U.S. Environmental Protection, Tailings Cells and Evaporation Ponds, Piñon Ridge Mill by Energy Fuels Attachment 2 Uranium Mill Tailings

  5. COLUMBIAN BLACK-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS HEMIONUS COLUMBIANUS) AS HOSTS FOR BORRELIA SPP. IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeomhee Mun; John M. Parker; Marshall White

    2005-01-01

    The prevalence of infection of Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) with Borrelia spp. was evaluated in an area of northwestern California (USA) where Lyme disease is endemic and the relapsing-fever group spirochete Borrelia coriaceae is enzootic, and in a far-removed comparison area having a disparate climate and lower density of vector ticks. Blood samples collected from both deer herds

  6. The walk is never random: subtle landscape effects shape gene flow in a continuous white-tailed deer

    E-print Network

    of a large population of deer spanning the area of Wisconsin and Illinois, USA, affected by chronic wasting-tailed deer population in the Midwestern United States STACIE J. ROBINSON,* MICHAEL D. SAMUEL, DAVIN L. LOPEZ disease. We combined multiscale investigation, landscape genetic techniques and spatial statistical

  7. Bovine viral diarrhea virus multi-organ infection in two white-tailed deer in southeastern South Dakota

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The role of wild ruminants especially cervids in the transmission of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) has remained an enigma. Two white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) were submitted to the Animal Disease Research and Diagnostic Laboratory (ADRDL) in the fall of 2003 by the South Dakota Game ...

  8. Parallel changes in metabolite and expression profiles in crooked-tail mutant and folate-reduced wild-type mice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sheila Ernest; Michelle Carter; Haifeng Shao; Angela Hosack; Natalia Lerner; Clemencia Colmenares; David S. Rosenblatt; Yoh-Han Pao; M. Elizabeth Ross; Joseph H. Nadeau

    2006-01-01

    Anomalies in homocysteine (HCY) and folate metabolism are associated with common birth defects and adult diseases, several of which can be suppressed with dietary folate supplementation. Although supplemen- tation reduces the occurrence and severity of neural tube defects (NTDs), many cases are resistant to these beneficial effects. The basis for variable response and biomarkers that predict responsiveness are unknown. Crooked-tail

  9. The kangaroo's tail propels and powers pentapedal locomotion.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Shawn M; Dawson, Terence J; Kram, Rodger; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2014-07-01

    When moving slowly, kangaroos plant their tail on the ground in sequence with their front and hind legs. To determine the tail's role in this 'pentapedal' gait, we measured the forces the tail exerts on the ground and calculated the mechanical power it generates. We found that the tail is responsible for as much propulsive force as the front and hind legs combined. It also generates almost exclusively positive mechanical power, performing as much mass-specific mechanical work as does a human leg during walking at the same speed. Kangaroos use their muscular tail to support, propel and power their pentapedal gait just like a leg. PMID:24990111

  10. The kangaroo's tail propels and powers pentapedal locomotion

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Shawn M.; Dawson, Terence J.; Kram, Rodger; Donelan, J. Maxwell

    2014-01-01

    When moving slowly, kangaroos plant their tail on the ground in sequence with their front and hind legs. To determine the tail's role in this ‘pentapedal’ gait, we measured the forces the tail exerts on the ground and calculated the mechanical power it generates. We found that the tail is responsible for as much propulsive force as the front and hind legs combined. It also generates almost exclusively positive mechanical power, performing as much mass-specific mechanical work as does a human leg during walking at the same speed. Kangaroos use their muscular tail to support, propel and power their pentapedal gait just like a leg. PMID:24990111

  11. The tail of the Ordovician fish Sacabambaspis.

    PubMed

    Pradel, Alan; Sansom, Ivan J; Gagnier, Pierre-Yves; Cespedes, Ricardo; Janvier, Philippe

    2007-02-22

    The tail of the earliest known articulated fully skeletonized vertebrate, the arandaspid Sacabambaspis from the Ordovician of Bolivia, is redescribed on the basis of further preparation of the only specimen in which it is most extensively preserved. The first, but soon discarded, reconstruction, which assumed the presence of a long horizontal notochordal lobe separating equal sized dorsal and ventral fin webs, appears to have considerable merit. Although the ventral web is significantly smaller than the dorsal one, the presence of a very long notochordal lobe bearing a small terminal web is confirmed. The discrepancy in the size of the ventral and dorsal webs rather suggests that the tail was hypocercal, a condition that would better accord with the caudal morphology of the living agnathans and the other jawless stem gnathostomes. PMID:17443969

  12. Adenocarcinoma associated with tail gut cyst

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Susannah; Maloney-Patel, Nell; Rezac, Craig; Poplin, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinomas of the presacral (retrorectal) space are rare. The diagnosis is usually delayed because of non-specific symptoms, and is made after a biopsy or surgery. These carcinomas arise from cystic lesions developing from remnants of the embryological postanal gut containing mucous-secreting epithelium, known as tail gut cysts. The potential for infection, perianal fistulas and most importantly, malignant change warrants an early complete surgical resection. From an oncologist’s perspective, the management of these carcinomas has varied, and has included adjuvant chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. We describe here a rare case of adenocarcinoma associated with a tail gut cyst that was discovered incidentally and resected by a posterior approach (Kraske procedure). The patient has had clinical and periodic radiologic surveillance without any evidence of cancer recurrence for over a year and a half. PMID:23450681

  13. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L.; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.

    1980-06-01

    Uranium mill tailings are a source of low-level radiation and radioactive materials that may be released into the environment. Stabilization or disposal of these tailings in a safe and environmentally sound way is necessary to minimize radon exhalation and other radioactive releases. One of the most promising concepts for stabilizing uranium tailings is being investigated at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory: the use of asphalt emulsion to contain radon and other potentially hazardous materials in uranium tailings. Results of these studies indicate that radon flux from uranium tailings can be reduced by greater than 99% by covering the tailings with an asphalt emulsion that is poured on or sprayed on (3.0 to 7.0 mm thick), or mixed with some of the tailings and compacted to form an admixture seal (2.5 to 15.2 cm) containing 18 wt % residual asphalt.

  14. RED-TAILED HAWK (Buteo jamaicensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM A. DEGRAw; N. C. CLAMPITT

    Daily fluctuations in resting heart rate (HR) were studied in a captive ? Red-tailed Hawk (Buteojamaicensis) using radiotelemetry. HR's were recorded hourly during 10 consecutive days while the hawk was housed in an outdoor pen. Daytime HR's averaged 202 beats\\/min and were significantly higher than the average nocturnal HR of 134 beats\\/min (P < 0.001). Maximum HR's ( >200 beats\\/min)

  15. Development of a biologically inspired hydrobot tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Danielle; Janneh, Alhaji; Philen, Michael

    2014-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, has a large ocean underneath a thick layer of ice. In order to determine whether life exists, it has been proposed that an underwater glider (hydrobot) capable of propulsion could be sent to explore the vast ocean. In this research, we considered various smart materials to create a propulsion device inspired by dolphin tails. Dolphins are highly efficient and excellent gliders, which makes them the ideal candidate for ocean exploration. In order to select the best dolphin species, we began by reviewing literature and then utilized the Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP) to compare the different species. Lagenorhynchus obliquidens (Pacific White-Sided Dolphin) was found to be the best choice for creating a bioinspired hydrobot. We then conducted literature review of various smart materials and using this knowledge constructed a hydrobot tail prototype. This prototype demonstrates that smart materials can be fashioned into suitable actuators to control a tail fashioned after a dolphin.

  16. Wu-Tou Decoction Inhibits Chronic Inflammatory Pain in Mice: Participation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Chunfang; Wan, Hongye; Sun, Danni; Xu, Tengfei; Yang, Yue; Qu, Yakun; Xu, Ying; Jing, Xianghong; Liu, Junling; Chen, Shuping; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Wu-tou decoction (WTD) is a classic traditional Chinese medicine formula and has been used effectively to treat joint diseases clinically. Previous reports indicated that WTD possesses anti-inflammatory activity; however, its actions on pain have not been clarified. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive activity of WTD in CFA-induced mice, and its possible mechanism of the action associated with transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels was also explored. Our results showed that 1.58, 3.15, and 6.30?g/kg WTD significantly attenuated mechanical, cold, and heat hypersensitivities. Moreover, WTD effectively inhibited spontaneous nociceptive responses to intraplantar injections of capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde, respectively. WTD also effectively suppressed jumping and wet-dog-shake behaviors to intraperitoneal injection of icilin. Additionally, WTD significantly reduced protein expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglia and skins of injured paw. Collectively, our data demonstrate firstly that WTD exerts antinociceptive activity in inflammatory conditions by attenuating mechanical, cold, and heat hypersensitivities. This antinociceptive effect may result in part from inhibiting the activities of TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8, and the suppression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 protein by WTD was also highly effective. These findings suggest that WTD might be an attractive and suitable therapeutic agent for the management of chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:25839032

  17. Wu-tou decoction inhibits chronic inflammatory pain in mice: participation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 ion channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Liu, Chunfang; Wan, Hongye; Wang, Danhua; Sun, Danni; Xu, Tengfei; Yang, Yue; Qu, Yakun; Xu, Ying; Jing, Xianghong; Liu, Junling; Chen, Shuping; Liu, Zhiqiang; Lin, Na

    2015-01-01

    Wu-tou decoction (WTD) is a classic traditional Chinese medicine formula and has been used effectively to treat joint diseases clinically. Previous reports indicated that WTD possesses anti-inflammatory activity; however, its actions on pain have not been clarified. Here, we investigated the antinociceptive activity of WTD in CFA-induced mice, and its possible mechanism of the action associated with transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels was also explored. Our results showed that 1.58, 3.15, and 6.30?g/kg WTD significantly attenuated mechanical, cold, and heat hypersensitivities. Moreover, WTD effectively inhibited spontaneous nociceptive responses to intraplantar injections of capsaicin and cinnamaldehyde, respectively. WTD also effectively suppressed jumping and wet-dog-shake behaviors to intraperitoneal injection of icilin. Additionally, WTD significantly reduced protein expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglia and skins of injured paw. Collectively, our data demonstrate firstly that WTD exerts antinociceptive activity in inflammatory conditions by attenuating mechanical, cold, and heat hypersensitivities. This antinociceptive effect may result in part from inhibiting the activities of TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8, and the suppression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 protein by WTD was also highly effective. These findings suggest that WTD might be an attractive and suitable therapeutic agent for the management of chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:25839032

  18. Metal mobilization under alkaline conditions in ash-covered tailings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jinmei; Alakangas, Lena; Wanhainen, Christina

    2014-06-15

    The aim of this study was to determine element mobilization and accumulation in mill tailings under alkaline conditions. The tailings were covered with 50 cm of fly ash, and above a sludge layer. The tailings were geochemically and mineralogically investigated. Sulfides, such as pyrrhotite, sphalerite and galena along with gangue minerals such as dolomite, calcite, micas, chlorite, epidote, Mn-pyroxene and rhodonite were identified in the unoxidized tailings. The dissolution of the fly ash layer resulted in a high pH (close to 12) in the underlying tailings. This, together with the presence of organic matter, increased the weathering of the tailings and mobilization of elements in the uppermost 47 cm of the tailings. All primary minerals were depleted, except quartz and feldspar which were covered by blurry secondary carbonates. Sulfide-associated elements such as Cd, Fe, Pb, S and Zn and silicate-associated elements such as Fe, Mg and Mn were released from the depletion zone and accumulated deeper down in the tailings where the pH decreased to circum-neutral. Sequential extraction suggests that Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, S and Zn were retained deeper down in the tailings and were mainly associated with the sulfide phase. Calcium, Cr, K and Ni released from the ash layer were accumulated in the uppermost depletion zone of the tailings. PMID:24681363

  19. White-tailed deer are susceptible to the agent of sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Justin J; Smith, Jodi D; Kunkle, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Interspecies transmission studies afford the opportunity to better understand the potential host range and origins of prion diseases. The purpose of this experiment was to determine susceptibility of white-tailed deer to the agent of scrapie after intracerebral inoculation and to compare clinical signs and lesions to those reported for chronic wasting disease (CWD). Deer (n = 5) were inoculated with 1 mL of a 10% (wt/vol) brain homogenate derived from a sheep clinically affected with scrapie. A non-inoculated deer was maintained as a negative control. Deer were observed daily for clinical signs of disease and euthanized and necropsied when unequivocal signs of scrapie were noted. One animal died 7 months post inoculation (pi) due to intercurrent disease. Examinations of brain tissue for the presence of the disease-associated abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)) by western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were negative whereas IHC of lymphoid tissues was positive. Deer necropsied at 15-22 months pi were positive for scrapie by IHC and WB. Deer necropsied after 20 months pi had clinical signs of depression and progressive weight loss. Tissues with PrP(Sc) immunoreactivity included brain (at levels of cerebrum, hippocampus, colliculus, cerebellum, and brainstem), trigeminal ganglion, neurohypophysis, retina, spinal cord, and various lymphoid tissues including tonsil, retropharyngeal and mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, and spleen. This work demonstrates for the first time that white-tailed deer are susceptible to sheep scrapie by intracerebral inoculation. To further test the susceptibility of white-tailed deer to scrapie these experiments will be repeated with a more natural route of inoculation. PMID:21988781

  20. Tail asymptotics for the sum of two heavy-tailed dependent risks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hansjörg Albrecher; Søren Asmussen; Dominik Kortschak

    2006-01-01

    Let X\\u000a 1\\u000a , X\\u000a 2 denote positive heavy-tailed random variables with continuous marginal distribution functions F\\u000a 1 and F\\u000a 2, respectively. The asymptotic behavior of the tail of X\\u000a 1\\u000a +X\\u000a 2 is studied in a general copula framework and some bounds and extremal properties are provided. For more specific assumptions on F\\u000a 1\\u000a , F\\u000a 2 and the

  1. Physiologic reference ranges for captive black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus).

    PubMed

    Keckler, M Shannon; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Langham, Gregory L; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L; Carroll, Darin S

    2010-05-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a member of the order Rodentia and the family Sciuridae. Ecologically, prairie dogs are a keystone species in prairie ecology. This species is used as an animal model for human gallbladder disease and diseases caused by infection with Clostridium difficile, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and most recently, Orthopoxvirus. Despite increasing numbers of prairie dogs used in research and kept as pets, few data are available on their baseline physiology in animal facility housing conditions. To establish baseline physiologic reference ranges, we designed a study using 18 wild-caught black-tailed prairie dogs. Telemetry data were analyzed to establish circadian rhythms for activity and temperature. In addition, hematologic and serum chemistry analyses were performed. Baseline measurements were used to establish the mean for each animal, which then were compiled and analyzed to determine the reference ranges. Here we present physiologic data on serum chemistry and hematology profiles, as well as weight, core body temperature, and daily activity patterns for black-tailed prairie dogs. These results reflect the use of multiple measurements from species- and age-matched prairie dogs and likely will be useful to ecologists, scientists interested in using this animal model in research, and veterinarians caring for pet prairie dogs. PMID:20587156

  2. Physiologic Reference Ranges for Captive Black-Tailed Prairie Dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus)

    PubMed Central

    Keckler, M Shannon; Gallardo-Romero, Nadia F; Langham, Gregory L; Damon, Inger K; Karem, Kevin L; Carroll, Darin S

    2010-01-01

    The black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a member of the order Rodentia and the family Sciuridae. Ecologically, prairie dogs are a keystone species in prairie ecology. This species is used as an animal model for human gallbladder disease and diseases caused by infection with Clostridium difficile, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, and most recently, Orthopoxvirus. Despite increasing numbers of prairie dogs used in research and kept as pets, few data are available on their baseline physiology in animal facility housing conditions. To establish baseline physiologic reference ranges, we designed a study using 18 wild-caught black-tailed prairie dogs. Telemetry data were analyzed to establish circadian rhythms for activity and temperature. In addition, hematologic and serum chemistry analyses were performed. Baseline measurements were used to establish the mean for each animal, which then were compiled and analyzed to determine the reference ranges. Here we present physiologic data on serum chemistry and hematology profiles, as well as weight, core body temperature, and daily activity patterns for black-tailed prairie dogs. These results reflect the use of multiple measurements from species- and age-matched prairie dogs and likely will be useful to ecologists, scientists interested in using this animal model in research, and veterinarians caring for pet prairie dogs. PMID:20587156

  3. Star Clusters in the Tidal Tails of Interacting Galaxies: Cluster Populations Across a Variety of Tail Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullan, B.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Kepley, A. A.; Lee, K. H.; Charlton, J. C.; Knierman, K.; Bastian, N.; Chandar, R.; Durrell, P. R.; Elmegreen, D.; English, J.; Gallagher, S. C.; Gronwall, C.; Hibbard, J. E.; Hunsberger, S.; Johnson, K. E.; Maybhate, A.; Palma, C.; Trancho, G.; Vacca, W. D.

    2011-04-01

    We have searched for compact stellar structures within 17 tidal tails in 13 different interacting galaxies using F606W- and F814W-band images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample of tidal tails includes a diverse population of optical properties, merging galaxy mass ratios, H I content, and ages. Combining our tail sample with Knierman et al., we find evidence of star clusters formed in situ with M V < -8.5 and V - I < 2.0 in 10 of 23 tidal tails; we are able to identify cluster candidates to M V = -6.5 in the closest tails. Three tails offer clear examples of "beads on a string" star formation morphology in V - I color maps. Two tails present both tidal dwarf galaxy candidates and cluster candidates. Statistical diagnostics indicate that clusters in tidal tails may be drawn from the same power-law luminosity functions (with logarithmic slopes ?-2 to -2.5) found in quiescent spiral galaxies and interiors of interacting systems. We find that the tail regions with the largest number of observable clusters are relatively young (lsim250 Myr old) and bright (V <~ 24 mag arcsec-2), probably attributed to the strong bursts of star formation in interacting systems soon after periapse. Otherwise, we find no statistical difference between cluster-rich and cluster-poor tails in terms of many observable characteristics, though this analysis suffers from complex, unresolved gas dynamics and projection effects.

  4. Mycobacteriosis in a black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) caused by Mycobacterium kansasii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hall, P.B.; Bender, L.C.; Garner, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    An eviscerated hunter-harvested female black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) was submitted to the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. The deer was emaciated, devoid of adipose tissue, and the parietal surface of the thoracic cavity contained multiple granulomas. Acid-fast bacteria were detected histologically from the granulomas and were isolated and identified as Mycobacterium kansasii, a nontuberculous mycobacterium sporadically reported to cause tuberculosis-like disease in a variety of vertebrates. This was the first report of symptomatic disease caused by M. kansasii in free-ranging deer. This case indicates that atypical mycobacteria can cause tuberculosis-like disease in free-ranging deer and illustrates the importance of identifying causative agents of tuberculosis-like disease in wildlife. Copyright 2005 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

  5. Correlation between aggregation structure and tailing mineral crystallinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wen-tao; Li, Xin-wei; Wang, Hua-jun; Sun, Chuan-yao; Duan, Xu-qin

    2014-09-01

    Direct reduction is an emerging technology for the utilization of refractory iron ore. With this technology, iron oxides in the ore can be reduced to recoverable elemental iron. The structure of granular aggregates in direct reduction products was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that iron is mainly generated as a shell in the outer edge of the aggregates. The thermal conductivity of the iron shell is higher than that of other minerals. Thus, minerals close to the iron shell cool faster than those in the inner shells and do not crystallize well. These minerals mainly become stage 2 tailings. Hence the XRD intensity of stage 2 tailings is lower than that of stage 1 tailings. When iron is mainly generated in the interior of the aggregates, the crystallinity of stage 2 tailings will be higher than that of stage 1 tailings. This indicates that the crystallinity of tailings can be used as a marker for the aggregate structure.

  6. On the importance of tail ratios for psychological science.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Mohr, Elisabeth; Hagmann, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Even small group-mean differences (whether combined with variance differences or not) or variance differences alone (absent mean differences) can generate marked and sometimes surprising imbalances in the representation of the respective groups compared in the distributional tail regions. Such imbalances in group representation, quantified as tail ratios, have general importance in the context of any threshold, susceptibility, diathesis-stress, selection, or similar models (including the study of sex differences), as widely conceptualized and applied in the psychological, social, medical, and biological sciences. However, commonly used effect-size measures, such as Cohen's d, largely exploit data information around the center of distributions, rather than from the tails, thereby missing potentially important patterns found in the tail regions. This account reviews the background and history of tail ratios, emphasizes their importance for psychological research, proposes a consensus approach for defining and interpreting them, introduces a tail-ratio calculator, and outlines future research agenda. PMID:24245078

  7. Dwarf Galaxies Swimming in Tidal Tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false-color infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows little 'dwarf galaxies' forming in the 'tails' of two larger galaxies that are colliding together. The big galaxies are at the center of the picture, while the dwarfs can be seen as red dots in the red streamers, or tidal tails. The two blue dots above the big galaxies are stars in the foreground.

    Galaxy mergers are common occurrences in the universe; for example, our own Milky Way galaxy will eventually smash into the nearby Andromeda galaxy. When two galaxies meet, they tend to rip each other apart, leaving a trail, called a tidal tail, of gas and dust in their wake. It is out of this galactic debris that new dwarf galaxies are born.

    The new Spitzer picture demonstrates that these particular dwarfs are actively forming stars. The red color indicates the presence of dust produced in star-forming regions, including organic molecules called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. These carbon-containing molecules are also found on Earth, in car exhaust and on burnt toast, among other places. Here, the molecules are being heated up by the young stars, and, as a result, shine in infrared light.

    This image was taken by the infrared array camera on Spitzer. It is a 4-color composite of infrared light, showing emissions from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange), and 8.0 microns (red). Starlight has been subtracted from the orange and red channels in order to enhance the dust features.

  8. HERA BEAM TAIL SHAPING BY TUNE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2003-05-19

    To study CP violation, the HEM-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  9. The Damping Tail of CMB Anisotropies

    E-print Network

    Wayne Hu; Martin White

    1996-09-10

    By decomposing the damping tail of CMB anisotropies into a series of transfer functions representing individual physical effects, we provide ingredients that will aid in the reconstruction of the cosmological model from small-scale CMB anisotropy data. We accurately calibrate the model-independent effects of diffusion and reionization damping which provide potentially the most robust information on the background cosmology. Removing these effects, we uncover model-dependent processes such as the acoustic peak modulation and gravitational enhancement that can help distinguish between alternate models of structure formation and provide windows into the evolution of fluctuations at various stages in their growth.

  10. Plasma flow pulsations in earth's magnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Frank, L. A.; Ackerson, K. L.; Lepping, R. P.; Scarf, F. L.

    1978-01-01

    On November 9, 1972 Imp 7 was in the plasma sheet from 0430 to 1000 UT and detected strong earthward plasma flows. A series of nine temporal pulsations were observed to vary in bulk speed from 0 to about 1500 km/s and to occur at 15-30 minute intervals. A positive correlation exists between the speed variations and changes in the standard deviation of the magnetic field. Evident periodicity was not found corresponding to Imp 7 pulsations and other magnetospheric or solar wind data. It is felt that the pulsations may indicate that tail reconnection is unsteady in periods of 10-30 minutes.

  11. 54. Photocopied August 1978. INTERIOR OF A TAIL PIT OR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    54. Photocopied August 1978. INTERIOR OF A TAIL PIT OR TAIL RACE AT THE EAST END OF THE POWER HOUSE, SEPTEMBER 17, 1900. THE PRE-MOULDED BLOCKS WHICH FORMED THE SIDE WALLS AND THE ARCHED FOREBAY WALL ARE CLEARLY VISIBLE. THE MONOLITHIC FLOOR OF THE TAIL PIT, HOWEVER, HAS NOT YET BEEN POURED: NEITHER HAS THE MONOLITHIC ARCHED ROOF. (75) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  12. Rare Events Simulation for Heavy-Tailed Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Klemens Binswanger; Bjarne Højgaard

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies rare events simulation for the heavy--tailed case, where some of theunderlying distributions fail to have the exponential moments required for the standardalgorithms for the light--tailed case. Several counterexamples are given to indicate that inthe heavy--tailed case, there are severe problems with the approach of developing limit resultsfor the conditional distribution given the rare event and use this

  13. Female choice selects for extreme tail length in a widowbird

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Malte Andersson

    1982-01-01

    Darwin's1 hypothesis that male secondary sexual ornaments evolve through female preferences is theoretically plausible2-7, but there is little experimental field evidence that such preferences exist8-10. I have studied female choice in relation to male tail length in the long-tailed widowbird, Euplectes progne, and report here that males in which the tail was experimentally elongated showed higher mating success than males

  14. NESTING ECOLOGY OF SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHERS IN SOUTH TEXAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KENNETH R. NOLTE

    1996-01-01

    We examined nest-site selection and nesting success of the Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (TyrunnusforJicatus) on the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation Refuge, San Patricia County, Texas in 1992-1993. Mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) comprised 22% of available shrubs; however, Scissor-tailed Flycatchers used shrubs out of proportion to their availability, placing 91% of their nests in mesquite. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher nests were placed in taller

  15. Chronic Wasting Disease Prions in Elk Antler Velvet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of captive and free ranging white tailed deer, mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk and moose in the some parts of the United States and Canada. The presence of the disease has sharply curtailed movement of captive...

  16. Exploring Stellar Populations in the Tidal Tails of NGC3256

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodruck, Michael; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy interactions can inject material into the intergalactic medium via violent gravitational dynamics, often visualized in tidal tails. The composition of these tails has remained a mystery, as previous studies have focused on detecting tidal features, rather than the composite material itself. With this in mind, we have developed an observing program using deep, multiband imaging to probe the chaotic regions of tidal tails in search for an underlying stellar population. NGC3256's Western and Eastern tidal tails serve as a case study for this new technique. Our results show median color values of u - g = 1.12 and r - i = 0.09 for the Western tail, and u - g = 1.29 and r - i = 0.21 for the Eastern tail, corresponding to ages of approximately 450 Myr and 900 Myr for the tails, respectively. A u - g color gradient is seen in the Western tail as well, running from 1.32 to 1.08 (~2000 Myr to 400 Myr), suggesting ages inside tidal tails can have significant variations.

  17. Evaluating target cold spots by the use of tail EUDs *†

    PubMed Central

    Bortfeld, Thomas; Craft, David; Dempsey, James F.; Halabi, Tarek; Romeijn, H. Edwin

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To propose a new measure of target underdose that can be used in the evaluation and optimization of radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods and Materials We compare various formulations of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and introduce a modification of existing EUD definitions, which we call tail EUD. Tail EUD is a measure of “cold spots” below the prescription dose in the target dose distribution. It has units of Gy. We investigate the mathematical properties of various target EUD concepts, including tail EUD. We apply the tail EUD measure retrospectively to intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans from our plan database. We also use tail EUD as an optimization objective in the optimization of prostate, pancreas, and head&neck plans. Results Tail EUD has desirable mathematical properties. In particular, it is convex and it leads to convex level sets (i.e., no local minima) if the EUD from which it is derived is concave. The tail EUD value is correlated with the subjective degree of target coverage. Constraining tail EUDs to a certain level in plan optimization leads to comparable target coverage in different plans and treatment sites. Conclusions The newly introduced concept of tail EUD appears to be useful both for plan evaluation and optimization. In addition, it can potentially be applied in the design of new clinical protocols. PMID:18440728

  18. Review of fugitive dust control for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C.T.; Elmore, M.R.; Hartley, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    An immediate concern associated with the disposal of uranium mill tailings is that wind erosion of the tailings from an impoundment area will subsequently deposit tailings on surrounding areas. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is investigating the current technology for fugitive dust control. Different methods of fugitive dust control, including chemical, physical, and vegetative, have been used or tested on mill tailings piles. This report presents the results of a literature review and discussions with manufacturers and users of available stabilization materials and techniques.

  19. EGFR: tale of the C-terminal tail.

    PubMed

    Gajiwala, Ketan S

    2013-07-01

    The carboxy terminal tail of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays a critical role in the regulation of the enzyme activity of the kinase. There is a good structural model for the mechanism by which the C-terminal tail proximal to the kinase domain contributes to the negative regulation of the activity. Its conformation in the active state, conversely, has remained elusive due to its dynamic nature. A recently published structure of EGFR kinase domain shows the conformation of the proximal C-terminal tail in the active kinase. Analysis of this conformational state of the C-terminal tail is presented, and some of the mutagenesis data is revisited. PMID:23674349

  20. Estimating Impact Forces of Tail Club Strikes by Ankylosaurid Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Arbour, Victoria Megan

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been assumed that the unusual tail club of ankylosaurid dinosaurs was used actively as a weapon, but the biological feasibility of this behaviour has not been examined in detail. Ankylosaurid tail clubs are composed of interlocking vertebrae, which form the handle, and large terminal osteoderms, which form the knob. Methodology/Principal Findings Computed tomographic (CT) scans of several ankylosaurid tail clubs referred to Dyoplosaurus and Euoplocephalus, combined with measurements of free caudal vertebrae, provide information used to estimate the impact force of tail clubs of various sizes. Ankylosaurid tails are modeled as a series of segments for which mass, muscle cross-sectional area, torque, and angular acceleration are calculated. Free caudal vertebrae segments had limited vertical flexibility, but the tail could have swung through approximately 100° laterally. Muscle scars on the pelvis record the presence of a large M. longissimus caudae, and ossified tendons alongside the handle represent M. spinalis. CT scans showed that knob osteoderms were predominantly cancellous, which would have lowered the rotational inertia of the tail club and made it easier to wield as a weapon. Conclusions/Significance Large knobs could generate sufficient force to break bone during impacts, but average and small knobs could not. Tail swinging behaviour is feasible in ankylosaurids, but it remains unknown whether the tail was used for interspecific defense, intraspecific combat, or both. PMID:19707581

  1. Tail loss and thermoregulation in the common lizard Zootoca vivipara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gábor; Kovács, Tibor; Tóth, Tamás; Török, János; Korsós, Zoltán; Merilä, Juha

    2004-10-01

    Tail autotomy in lizards is an adaptive strategy that has evolved to reduce the risk of predation. Since tail loss reduces body mass and moving ability—which in turn are expected to influence thermal balance—there is potential for a trade-off between tail autotomy and thermoregulation. To test this hypothesis, we studied a common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) population at high latitude, inhabiting a high-cost thermal environment. Z. vivipara is a small, non-territorial lizard known as a very accurate thermoregulator. We made two predictions: (1) the reduced body weight due to tail loss results in faster heating rate (a benefit), and (2) the reduction in locomotor ability after tail loss induces a shift to the use of thermally poorer microhabitats (a cost), thus decreasing the field body temperatures of active lizards. We did not find any effect of tail loss on heating rate in laboratory experiments conducted under different thermal conditions. Likewise, no significant relationship between tail condition and field body temperatures, or between tail condition and thermal microhabitat use, were detected. Thus, our results suggest that tail autotomy does not influence the accuracy of thermoregulation in small-bodied lizards.

  2. Influence of histone tails and H4 tail acetylations on nucleosome-nucleosome interactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Lu, Chenning; Yang, Ye; Fan, Yanping; Yang, Renliang; Liu, Chuan-Fa; Korolev, Nikolay; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2011-12-16

    Nucleosome-nucleosome interaction plays a fundamental role in chromatin folding and self-association. The cation-induced condensation of nucleosome core particles (NCPs) displays properties similar to those of chromatin fibers, with important contributions from the N-terminal histone tails. We study the self-association induced by addition of cations [Mg(2+), Ca(2+), cobalt(III)hexammine(3+), spermidine(3+) and spermine(4)(+)] for NCPs reconstituted with wild-type unmodified histones and with globular tailless histones and for NCPs with the H4 histone tail having lysine (K) acetylations or lysine-to-glutamine mutations at positions K5, K8, K12 and K16. In addition, the histone construct with the single H4K16 acetylation was investigated. Acetylated histones were prepared by a semisynthetic native chemical ligation method. The aggregation behavior of NCPs shows a general cation-dependent behavior similar to that of the self-association of nucleosome arrays. Unlike nucleosome array self-association, NCP aggregation is sensitive to position and nature of the H4 tail modification. The tetra-acetylation in the H4 tail significantly weakens the nucleosome-nucleosome interaction, while the H4 K?Q tetra-mutation displays a more modest effect. The single H4K16 acetylation also weakens the self-association of NCPs, which reflects the specific role of H4K16 in the nucleosome-nucleosome stacking. Tailless NCPs can aggregate in the presence of oligocations, which indicates that attraction also occurs by tail-independent nucleosome-nucleosome stacking and DNA-DNA attraction in the presence of cations. The experimental data were compared with the results of coarse-grained computer modeling for NCP solutions with explicit presence of mobile ions. PMID:22051513

  3. Macrophages modulate adult zebrafish tail fin regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Timothy A.; Strand, Nicholas S.; Tsung-Yang, Chao; Rabinowitz, Jeremy S.; Moon, Randall T.

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils and macrophages, as key mediators of inflammation, have defined functionally important roles in mammalian tissue repair. Although recent evidence suggests that similar cells exist in zebrafish and also migrate to sites of injury in larvae, whether these cells are functionally important for wound healing or regeneration in adult zebrafish is unknown. To begin to address these questions, we first tracked neutrophils (lyzC+, mpo+) and macrophages (mpeg1+) in adult zebrafish following amputation of the tail fin, and detailed a migratory timecourse that revealed conserved elements of the inflammatory cell response with mammals. Next, we used transgenic zebrafish in which we could selectively ablate macrophages, which allowed us to investigate whether macrophages were required for tail fin regeneration. We identified stage-dependent functional roles of macrophages in mediating fin tissue outgrowth and bony ray patterning, in part through modulating levels of blastema proliferation. Moreover, we also sought to detail molecular regulators of inflammation in adult zebrafish and identified Wnt/?-catenin as a signaling pathway that regulates the injury microenvironment, inflammatory cell migration and macrophage phenotype. These results provide a cellular and molecular link between components of the inflammation response and regeneration in adult zebrafish. PMID:24961798

  4. INTERPRETATION OF (596) SCHEILA'S TRIPLE DUST TAILS

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hanayama, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), JAXA, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hideaki; Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hsieh, Henry H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Vaubaillon, Jeremie J. [Observatoire de Paris, I.M.C.C.E., Denfert Rochereau, Bat. A., FR-75014 Paris (France); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ohta, Kouji [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hamanowa, Hiromi [Hamanowa Astronomical Observatory, Motomiya, Fukushima 969-1204 (Japan); Kim, Junhan [Yangcheon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Nakamura, Akiko M., E-mail: ishiguro@snu.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2011-11-15

    Strange-looking dust cloud around asteroid (596) Scheila was discovered on 2010 December 11.44-11.47. Unlike normal cometary tails, it consisted of three tails and faded within two months. We constructed a model to reproduce the morphology of the dust cloud based on the laboratory measurement of high-velocity impacts and the dust dynamics. As a result, we succeeded in reproducing the peculiar dust cloud by an impact-driven ejecta plume consisting of an impact cone and downrange plume. Assuming an impact angle of 45 Degree-Sign , our model suggests that a decameter-sized asteroid collided with (596) Scheila from the direction of ({alpha}{sub im}, {delta}{sub im}) = (60 Degree-Sign , -40 Degree-Sign ) in J2000 coordinates on 2010 December 3. The maximum ejection velocity of the dust particles exceeded 100 m s{sup -1}. Our results suggest that the surface of (596) Scheila consists of materials with low tensile strength.

  5. Effects of Tail Clipping on Larval Performance and Tail Regeneration Rates in the Near Eastern Fire Salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata

    PubMed Central

    Segev, Ori; Polevikove, Antonina; Blank, Lior; Goedbloed, Daniel; Küpfer, Eliane; Gershberg, Anna; Koplovich, Avi; Blaustein, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tail-tip clipping is a common technique for collecting tissue samples from amphibian larvae and adults. Surprisingly, studies of this invasive sampling procedure or of natural tail clipping – i.e., bites inflicted by predators including conspecifics - on the performance and fitness of aquatic larval stages of urodeles are scarce. We conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects of posterior tail clipping (~30 percent of tail) on Near Eastern fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) larvae. In a laboratory study, we checked regeneration rates of posterior tail-tip clipping at different ages. Regeneration rates were hump-shaped, peaking at the age of ~30 days and then decreasing. This variation in tail regeneration rates suggests tradeoffs in resource allocation between regeneration and somatic growth during early and advanced development. In an outdoor artificial pond experiment, under constant larval densities, we assessed how tail clipping of newborn larvae affects survival to, time to, and size at metamorphosis. Repeated measures ANOVA on mean larval survival per pond revealed no effect of tail clipping. Tail clipping had correspondingly no effect on larval growth and development expressed in size (mass and snout-vent length) at, and time to, metamorphosis. We conclude that despite the given variation in tail regeneration rates throughout larval ontogeny, clipping of 30% percent of the posterior tail area seems to have no adverse effects on larval fitness and survival. We suggest that future use of this imperative tool for the study of amphibian should take into account larval developmental stage during the time of application and not just the relative size of the clipped tail sample. PMID:26065683

  6. Effects of Tail Clipping on Larval Performance and Tail Regeneration Rates in the Near Eastern Fire Salamander, Salamandra infraimmaculata.

    PubMed

    Segev, Ori; Polevikove, Antonina; Blank, Lior; Goedbloed, Daniel; Küpfer, Eliane; Gershberg, Anna; Koplovich, Avi; Blaustein, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Tail-tip clipping is a common technique for collecting tissue samples from amphibian larvae and adults. Surprisingly, studies of this invasive sampling procedure or of natural tail clipping - i.e., bites inflicted by predators including conspecifics - on the performance and fitness of aquatic larval stages of urodeles are scarce. We conducted two studies in which we assessed the effects of posterior tail clipping (~30 percent of tail) on Near Eastern fire salamander (Salamandra infraimmaculata) larvae. In a laboratory study, we checked regeneration rates of posterior tail-tip clipping at different ages. Regeneration rates were hump-shaped, peaking at the age of ~30 days and then decreasing. This variation in tail regeneration rates suggests tradeoffs in resource allocation between regeneration and somatic growth during early and advanced development. In an outdoor artificial pond experiment, under constant larval densities, we assessed how tail clipping of newborn larvae affects survival to, time to, and size at metamorphosis. Repeated measures ANOVA on mean larval survival per pond revealed no effect of tail clipping. Tail clipping had correspondingly no effect on larval growth and development expressed in size (mass and snout-vent length) at, and time to, metamorphosis. We conclude that despite the given variation in tail regeneration rates throughout larval ontogeny, clipping of 30% percent of the posterior tail area seems to have no adverse effects on larval fitness and survival. We suggest that future use of this imperative tool for the study of amphibian should take into account larval developmental stage during the time of application and not just the relative size of the clipped tail sample. PMID:26065683

  7. A proactive approach to sustainable management of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edraki, Mansour; Baumgartl, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    The reactive strategies to manage mine tailings i.e. containment of slurries of tailings in tailings storage facilities (TSF's) and remediation of tailings solids or tailings seepage water after the decommissioning of those facilities, can be technically inefficient to eliminate environmental risks (e.g. prevent dispersion of contaminants and catastrophic dam wall failures), pose a long term economic burden for companies, governments and society after mine closure, and often fail to meet community expectations. Most preventive environmental management practices promote proactive integrated approaches to waste management whereby the source of environmental issues are identified to help make a more informed decisions. They often use life cycle assessment to find the "hot spots" of environmental burdens. This kind of approach is often based on generic data and has rarely been used for tailings. Besides, life cycle assessments are less useful for designing operations or simulating changes in the process and consequent environmental outcomes. It is evident that an integrated approach for tailings research linked to better processing options is needed. A literature review revealed that there are only few examples of integrated approaches. The aim of this project is to develop new tailings management models by streamlining orebody characterization, process optimization and rehabilitation. The approach is based on continuous fingerprinting of geochemical processes from orebody to tailings storage facility, and benchmark the success of such proactive initiatives by evidence of no impacts and no future projected impacts on receiving environments. We present an approach for developing such a framework and preliminary results from a case study where combined grinding and flotation models developed using geometallurgical data from the orebody were constructed to predict the properties of tailings produced under various processing scenarios. The modelling scenarios based on the case study data provide the capacity to predict the composition of tailings and the resulting environmental management implications. For example, the type and content of clay minerals in tailings will affect the geotechnical stability and water recovery. Clay content will also influence decisions made for paste or thickened tailings and underground backfilling. It is possible by using an integrated assessment framework to evaluate more alternatives, including the production of additional saleable and benign streams, alternative tailings treatment and disposal, as well as options for reuse, recycling and pre-processing of existing tailings.

  8. Pattern of tick aggregation on mice: larger than expected distribution tail enhances the spread of tick-borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ferreri, Luca; Giacobini, Mario; Bajardi, Paolo; Bertolotti, Luigi; Bolzoni, Luca; Tagliapietra, Valentina; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Rosà, Roberto

    2014-11-01

    The spread of tick-borne pathogens represents an important threat to human and animal health in many parts of Eurasia. Here, we analysed a 9-year time series of Ixodes ricinus ticks feeding on Apodemus flavicollis mice (main reservoir-competent host for tick-borne encephalitis, TBE) sampled in Trentino (Northern Italy). The tail of the distribution of the number of ticks per host was fitted by three theoretical distributions: Negative Binomial (NB), Poisson-LogNormal (PoiLN), and Power-Law (PL). The fit with theoretical distributions indicated that the tail of the tick infestation pattern on mice is better described by the PL distribution. Moreover, we found that the tail of the distribution significantly changes with seasonal variations in host abundance. In order to investigate the effect of different tails of tick distribution on the invasion of a non-systemically transmitted pathogen, we simulated the transmission of a TBE-like virus between susceptible and infective ticks using a stochastic model. Model simulations indicated different outcomes of disease spreading when considering different distribution laws of ticks among hosts. Specifically, we found that the epidemic threshold and the prevalence equilibria obtained in epidemiological simulations with PL distribution are a good approximation of those observed in simulations feed by the empirical distribution. Moreover, we also found that the epidemic threshold for disease invasion was lower when considering the seasonal variation of tick aggregation. PMID:25393293

  9. Resistance to plague among black-tailed prairie dog populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rocke, Tonie E.; Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R.; Busch, Joseph D.; Antolin, Michael F.; Wagner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogenous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance.

  10. Experimental vacuolar myelinopathy in red-tailed hawks.

    PubMed

    Fischer, John R; Lewis-Weis, Lynn A; Tate, Cynthia M

    2003-04-01

    Avian vacuolar myelinopathy (AVM) was recognized in 1994 as a cause of wild bird mortality when 29 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) succumbed to the disease at DeGray Lake, Arkansas (USA). The cause of AVM and its source remain undetermined despite extensive diagnostic and research investigations. Two years later, when AVM killed 26 eagles in the same area in Arkansas, it became apparent that American coots (Fulica americana) had identical neurologic signs and lesions, and it was hypothesized that eagles acquired AVM via ingestion of affected coots. In order to test this hypothesis, we fed coot tissues (brain, liver, kidney, muscle, fat, and intestinal tract) to rehabilitated, non-releasable red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). Five hawks received tissues from coots with AVM lesions, and one hawk received tissues from coots without brain lesions that had been collected at a site where AVM never has been documented. All hawks received 12-70 g/day (mean = 38 g) of coot tissues for 28 days. All six hawks remained clinically normal during the study. The birds were euthanatized on day 29 and microscopic lesions of AVM were found in all hawks that received tissues from affected coots, but not in the hawk that received tissues from unaffected coots. This marks the first time that AVM has been produced in birds under laboratory conditions and proves that birds of prey can acquire AVM via ingestion of tissues from affected coots. PMID:12910768

  11. Resistance to Plague Among Black-Tailed Prairie Dog Populations

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R.; Busch, Joseph D.; Antolin, Michael F.; Wagner, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogenous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance. PMID:21923261

  12. Resistance to plague among black-tailed prairie dog populations.

    PubMed

    Rocke, Tonie E; Williamson, Judy; Cobble, Kacy R; Busch, Joseph D; Antolin, Michael F; Wagner, David M

    2012-02-01

    In some rodent species frequently exposed to plague outbreaks caused by Yersinia pestis, resistance to the disease has evolved as a population trait. As a first step in determining if plague resistance has developed in black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), animals captured from colonies in a plague-free region (South Dakota) and two plague-endemic regions (Colorado and Texas) were challenged with Y. pestis at one of three doses (2.5, 250, or 2500 mouse LD50s). South Dakota prairie dogs were far more susceptible to plague than Colorado and Texas prairie dogs (p<0.001), with a mortality rate of nearly 100% over all doses. Colorado and Texas prairie dogs were quite similar in their response, with overall survival rates of 50% and 60%, respectively. Prairie dogs from these states were heterogeneous in their response, with some animals dying at the lowest dose (37% and 20%, respectively) and some surviving even at the highest dose (29% and 40%, respectively). Microsatellite analysis revealed that all three groups were distinct genetically, but further studies are needed to establish a genetic basis for the observed differences in plague resistance. PMID:21923261

  13. Ectoderm to Mesoderm Lineage Switching During Axolotl Tail Regeneration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen Echeverri; Elly M. Tanaka

    2002-01-01

    Foreign environments may induce adult stem cells to switch lineages and populate multiple tissue types, but whether this mechanism is used for tissue repair remains uncertain. Urodele amphibians can regenerate fully functional, multitissue structures including the limb and tail. To determine whether lineage switching is an integral feature of this regeneration, we followed individual spinal cord cells live during tail

  14. Performance analysis with truncated heavy{tailed distributions

    E-print Network

    Asmussen, Søren

    Performance analysis with truncated heavy{tailed distributions S#28;ren Asmussen #3;y Mats Pihlsg is heavy{tailed, say Pareto or Weibull, and a typically large K, say much larger than EU . We study, say Pareto or Weibull, and a typically large K, say much larger than EU . An earlier study

  15. 106. Photocopied August 1978. EXTENSION OF TAIL PIT WALLS, APRIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    106. Photocopied August 1978. EXTENSION OF TAIL PIT WALLS, APRIL 28, 1917. THE TIMBERWORK IN THE FOREGROUND WAS USED AS A COMBINATION COFFER DAM AND FORM FOR POURING THE CONCRETE TAIL RACE WALL EXTENSION. IN THE BACKGROUND ALONG THE POWER HOUSE SEVERAL COMPLETED WALL EXTENSIONS CAN BE SEEN DIMLY. (787) - Michigan Lake Superior Power Company, Portage Street, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  16. The vertebrate tail bud: three germ layers from one tissue

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. May Griffith; M. J. Wiley; Esmond J. Sanders

    1992-01-01

    The tail bud of amniote embryos comprises a mass of apparently undifferentiated mesenchymal cells located at the caudal limit of the embryo, representing the remains of Hensen's node and the primitive streak. These cells have the potential to give rise to a variety of different tissues including the posterior or ‘secondary’ neural tube, the tail gut, and somites and their

  17. Neospora caninum antibodies detected in Midwestern white-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) serve to maintain the Neospora caninum life cycle in the wild. Sera from white tailed deer from south central Wisconsin and southeastern Missouri, USA were tested for antibodies to N. caninum. Seroreactivity against N. caninum surface antigens was observe...

  18. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497 Aeronautics and Space ...AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the...

  19. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497 Aeronautics and Space ...AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the...

  20. 14 CFR 25.497 - Tail-wheel yawing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Tail-wheel yawing. 25.497 Section 25.497 Aeronautics and Space ...AIRPLANES Structure Ground Loads § 25.497 Tail-wheel yawing. (a) A vertical ground reaction equal to the...

  1. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  2. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  3. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  4. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  5. 14 CFR 29.547 - Main and tail rotor structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...false Main and tail rotor structure. 29.547 Section 29...547 Main and tail rotor structure. (a) A rotor is...including a detailed failure analysis to identify all failures...occurrence. (c) The rotor structure must be designed to...

  6. A Glimpse of the genomic diversity of haloarchaeal tailed viruses.

    PubMed

    Sen?ilo, Ana; Roine, Elina

    2014-01-01

    Tailed viruses are the most common isolates infecting prokaryotic hosts residing in hypersaline environments. Archaeal tailed viruses represent only a small portion of all characterized tailed viruses of prokaryotes. But even this small dataset revealed that archaeal tailed viruses have many similarities to their counterparts infecting bacteria, the bacteriophages. Shared functional homologs and similar genome organizations suggested that all microbial tailed viruses have common virion architectural and assembly principles. Recent structural studies have provided evidence justifying this thereby grouping archaeal and bacterial tailed viruses into a single lineage. Currently there are 17 haloarchaeal tailed viruses with entirely sequenced genomes. Nine viruses have at least one close relative among the 17 viruses and, according to the similarities, can be divided into three groups. Two other viruses share some homologs and therefore are distantly related, whereas the rest of the viruses are rather divergent (or singletons). Comparative genomics analysis of these viruses offers a glimpse into the genetic diversity and structure of haloarchaeal tailed virus communities. PMID:24659986

  7. Mercury speciation in tailings of the Idrija mercury mine

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Harald Biester; Mateja Gosar; German Müller

    1999-01-01

    Five hundred years of mercury (Hg) mining activity in Idrija, Slovenia caused widespread Hg contamination. Besides Hg emissions from the ore smelter, tailings have been found to be the major source of river sediment contamination. In the present study, solid phase binding forms and the aqueous mobility of Hg have been investigated in tailings of the Idrija Hg mine by

  8. Managing White-Tailed Deer in Suburban Environments

    E-print Network

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    Managing White-Tailed Deer in Suburban Environments A Technical Guide Anthony J. DeNicola, Kurt C University of Nebraska Lincoln, NE 68583 ISBN 1-57753-296-1 Acknowledgments The Suburban Deer Technical. 2); R. Pooler (Figs. 16, 20). #12;About This Guide 2 Introduction 3 Biology of the White-Tailed Deer

  9. 12. Credit PED. View of tail race and dam showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Credit PED. View of tail race and dam showing dumping of construction rubble into river bed by rail car; and preparations for pouring a concrete cap onto tail race wall. Photo c. 1909. - Dam No. 4 Hydroelectric Plant, Potomac River, Martinsburg, Berkeley County, WV

  10. Functional Morphology of the Radialis Muscle in Shark Tails

    E-print Network

    Lauder, George V.

    of the caudal fin in most sharks. Caudal fin morphology (Affleck, 1950; Alexander, 1965; Lingham-Soliar, 2005 of the functional internal anatomy of the tail fin. The caudal fin of sharks is the most prominent control surfaceFunctional Morphology of the Radialis Muscle in Shark Tails Brooke E. Flammang* Museum

  11. NONINVASIVE, CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF RAT TAIL SKIN TEMPERATURE BY RADIOTELEMETRY.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tail skin temperature (Tsk) can provide a wealth of information on the thermoregulatory status of the rat. Drug- and toxic-induced changes in body temperature are often mediated by vasodilation or constriction of blood flow to the tail and Tsk can generally be used as an indica...

  12. Analysis of Circadian Regulation of Poly(A) Tail Length

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Shihoko; Green, Carla B.

    2015-01-01

    The poly(A) tail is found on the 3’-end of most eukaryotic mRNAs, and its length significantly contributes to the mRNAs half-life and translational competence. Circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length is a powerful mechanism to confer rhythmicity in gene expression post-transcriptionally, and provides a means to regulate protein levels independent of rhythmic transcription in the nucleus. Therefore, analysis of circadian poly(A) tail length regulation is important for a complete understanding of rhythmic physiology, since rhythmically expressed proteins are the ultimate mediators of rhythmic function. Nevertheless, it has previously been challenging to measure changes in poly(A) tail length, especially at a global level, due to technical constraints. However, new methodology based on differential fractionation of mRNAs based on the length of their tails has recently been developed. In this chapter, we will describe these methods as used for examining the circadian regulation of poly(A) tail length and will provide detailed experimental procedures to measure poly(A) tail length both at a the single mRNA level and the global level. Although this chapter concentrates on methods we used for analyzing poly(A) tail length in the mammalian circadian system, the methods described here can be applicable to any organisms and any biological processes. PMID:25662466

  13. The function and evolution of the tail streamer in hirundines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Louise V. Rowe; Matthew R. Evans; Katherine L. Buchanan

    2001-01-01

    The morphology of a bird's tail may result from compromises between aerodynamic efficiency, phylogenetic constraints and selection for non-aerodynamic characteristics, such as mate attraction. A good example of a trait shaped by trade-offs between aerodynamic efficiency and reproductive benefits mediated through female preference is the tail streamer of the barn swallow. Here we use a standardized task to measure the

  14. The Logarithmic Tail of Néel Walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, Christof

    We study the multiscale problem of a parametrized planar 180° rotation of magnetization states in a thin ferromagnetic film. In an appropriate scaling and when the film thickness is comparable to the Bloch line width, the underlying variational principle has the form where the reduced stray-field operator Q approximates (-?)1/2 as the quality factor Q tends to zero. We show that the associated Néel wall profile u exhibits a very long logarithmic tail. The proof relies on limiting elliptic regularity methods on the basis of the associated Euler-Lagrange equation and symmetrization arguments on the basis of the variational principle. Finally we study the renormalized limit behavior as Q tends to zero.

  15. Sulfur Biogeochemistry of Athabasca Oilsands Composite Tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, L. A.; Kendra, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Oil sands tailings are important, globally relevant, S reservoirs, known to contain active and diverse microbial communities. As evidenced by increasing S emissions from the oil sands, active biogeochemical S cycling within composite tailings (CT, a mixture of tailings, post-processed sand and gypsum, used for dry reclamation), is likely; however the S biogeochemistry of these residues has not been investigated to date. With surface mining of Alberta's oil sands spanning over 142,000 square km and accelerated production, these tailings-based landscapes will become increasingly prevalent with the potential for significant environmental impacts. The objectives here, were thus to characterize depth dependent S biogeochemistry of a 40 meter CT deposit (Fort McMurray, AB, CANADA). Drill samples were collected in December of 2012 from 5 depths spanning 36 m in the CT deposit, for geochemical, metagenomic and functional enrichment analyses. Results establish widespread microbial S biogeochemical cycling within the CT deposit. Porewater H2S was detected extensively throughout the deposit with background levels ranging from 14-23 ?M and a concentrated pocket of 300 ?M occurring at depth. Porewater Fe(II) (1-40 ?M) was detected only within surficial depth samples. Current Fe(II) concentrations are not sufficient to sequester the levels of H2S generated by CT, indicating CT may become a net source of S emissions, as generated H2S at depth migrates to the surface, in untreated CT deposits. Metagenomic (454 pyrosequencing) characterization revealed highly diverse CT microbial communities, with 21 different phyla encountered overall and 1/3 of these presenting as candidate divisions. The cultivation independent identification of several known IRB and sulphate (SRB) reducing bacteria within these communities was consistent with observed positive growth in IRB and SRB functional metabolic enrichments. Furthermore, two depth dependent structurally distinct communities emerged: a surficial CT zone of Fe(III) reduction and an underlying zone of sulphate reduction, from multivariate statistical analyses of phylogenetic data (UniFrac http://bmf.colorado.edu/unifrac). The emergence of a distinct IRB surficial zone, despite ~65% of the total bacterial community putatively having the capacity for Fe(III) reduction over the entire deposit depth and evident and increasing Fe(III) sources down core, suggests limitation of Fe(III) reducing bacteria (IRB) through some other factor. Indeed UniFrac analyses identified that the differentiation in microbial communities occurring in these Fe and S zones was driven by environmental parameters of DOC, ORP and salinity; revealing that IRB may be unable to access the more complex OC constituents of these materials. Pilot reclamation for CT is currently focusing on capping CT with a freshwater fen, which may provide a more labile OC source for CT associated IRB, potentially stimulating greater H2S sequestration through FeS formation. These processes will be evaluated in the on-going assessment of S biogeochemistry within untreated and treated CT as pilot reclamation proceeds.

  16. Lifshitz Tails in Constant Magnetic Fields

    E-print Network

    Frédéric Klopp; Georgi Raikov

    2005-09-12

    We consider the 2D Landau Hamiltonian $H$ perturbed by a random alloy-type potential, and investigate the Lifshitz tails, i.e. the asymptotic behavior of the corresponding integrated density of states (IDS) near the edges in the spectrum of $H$. If a given edge coincides with a Landau level, we obtain different asymptotic formulae for power-like, exponential sub-Gaussian, and super-Gaussian decay of the one-site potential. If the edge is away from the Landau levels, we impose a rational-flux assumption on the magnetic field, consider compactly supported one-site potentials, and formulate a theorem which is analogous to a result obtained in the case of a vanishing magnetic field.

  17. Numerical investigation of tail buffet on F-18 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizk, Yehia M.; Guruswamy, Guru P.; Gee, Ken

    1992-01-01

    Numerical investigation of vortex induced tail buffet is conducted on the F-18 aircraft at high angles of attack. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations are integrated using a time-accurate, implicit procedure. A generalized overset zonal grid scheme is used to decompose the computational space around the complete aircraft with faired-over inlet. A weak coupling between the aerodynamics and structures is assumed to compute the structural oscillation of the flexible vertical tail. Time-accurate computations of the turbulent flow around the F-18 aircraft at 30 degrees angle of attack show the surface and off-surface flowfield details, including the unsteadiness created by the vortex burst and its interaction with the vertical twin tail which causes the tail buffet. The effect of installing a LEX fence on modifying the vortex structure upstream of the tail is also examined.

  18. Poly(A)-tail profiling reveals an embryonic switch in translational control

    E-print Network

    Subtelny, Alexander Orest

    Poly(A) tails enhance the stability and translation of most eukaryotic messenger RNAs, but difficulties in globally measuring poly(A)-tail lengths have impeded greater understanding of poly(A)-tail function. Here we describe ...

  19. Evaluation of host preferences by helminths and ectoparasites among black-tailed jackrabbits in northern California.

    PubMed

    Clemons, C; Rickard, L G; Keirans, J E; Botzler, R G

    2000-07-01

    Fifty-four black-tailed jackrabbits (Lepus californicus) (five juvenile males, 22 adult males, five juvenile females, and 22 adult females) from Humboldt County, California (USA) were evaluated for sex and age-specific differences in parasite prevalences and intensities, 26 February through 30 October 1996. Nematodes found included Biogastranema leporis in 42 hares (78% prevalence), Rauschia triangularis in 26 hares (48%), Trichostrongylus calcaratus in 14 hares (26%), and Trichuris sylvilagi in two hares (4%). Cestodes found included Taenia sp. cysticerci in five hares (9%) and Taenia sp. coenurus found in one hare (2%). Ectoparasites found included the ticks Dermacentor variabilis on 10 hares (19%) and Ixodes spinipalpis (= Ixodes neotomae) on nine hares (17%), as well as the anoplurid louse Haemodipsus setoni on 12 hares (22%). No significant differences in the parasite prevalences or intensities were found between male and female jackrabbits; this was for all males and females collectively, juvenile males and females only, as well as adult males and females only. Combining male and female hosts, adult jackrabbits had a significantly higher prevalence of B. leporis and R. triangularis compared to juveniles. This is the first known report of Trichostrongylus calcaratus, Rauschia triangularis, Trichuris sylvilagi, and Dermacentor variabilis among black-tailed jackrabbits and the first known report of T. calcaratus and T. sylvilagi in the western USA. This is the first published report of I. spinipalpis, the vector for Lyme disease in California, on black-tailed jackrabbits. PMID:10941744

  20. Reduced West Nile Virus Transmission Around Communal Roosts of Great-Tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus).

    PubMed

    Komar, Nicholas; Colborn, James M; Horiuchi, Kalanthe; Delorey, Mark; Biggerstaff, Brad; Damian, Dan; Smith, Kirk; Townsend, John

    2015-03-01

    West Nile virus has caused several outbreaks among humans in the Phoenix metropolitan area (Arizona, southwest USA) within the last decade. Recent ecologic studies have implicated Culex quinquefasciatus and Culex tarsalis as the mosquito vectors and identified three abundant passerine birds-great-tailed grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus), house sparrow (Passer domesticus), and house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus)-as key amplifiers among vertebrates. Nocturnal congregations of certain species have been suggested as critical for late summer West Nile virus amplification. We evaluated the hypothesis that house sparrow (P. domesticus) and/or great-tailed grackle (Q. mexicanus) communal roost sites (n = 22 and n = 5, respectively) in a primarily suburban environment were spatially associated with West Nile virus transmission indices during the 2010 outbreak of human neurological disease in metropolitan Phoenix. Spatial associations between human case residences and communal roosts were non-significant for house sparrows, and were negative for great-tailed grackle. Several theories that explain these observations are discussed, including the possibility that grackle communal roosts are protective. PMID:25480320

  1. Nesting habitat relationships of sympatric Crested Caracaras, Red-tailed Hawks, and White-tailed Hawks in South Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Actkinson, M.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P., Jr.; Boal, C.W.; Brennan, L.A.; Hernandez, F.

    2007-01-01

    We quantified nesting-site habitats for sympatric White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus) (n = 40), Red-tailed Hawks (B. jamaicensis) (n = 39), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway) (n = 24) in the Coastal Sand Plain of south Texas. White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracara nest sites occurred in savannas, whereas Red-tailed Hawk nest sites occurred in woodlands on the edge of savannas. White-tailed Hawk nest sites were in shrubs and trees that were shorter (3.5 ?? 1.0 m) and had smaller canopy diameters (5.5 ?? 2.1 m) than those of Red-tailed Hawks (10.1 ?? 2.0 m, 13.7 ?? 5.8 m) and Crested Caracaras (5.6 ?? 1.7 m, 8.5 ?? 3.5 m). Red-tailed Hawk nest sites had higher woody densities (15.7 ?? 9.6 plants) and more woody cover (84 ?? 19%) than those of White-tailed Hawks (5.6 ?? 5.8 plants, 20 ?? 21%) and Crested Caracaras (9.9 ?? 6.7 plants, 55 ?? 34%). Crested Caracara nest sites were in dense, multi-branched shrubs composed of more living material (97 ?? 3%) than those of White-tailed (88 ?? 18%) and Red-tailed hawks (88 ?? 18%). Nest sites of White-tailed Hawks, Red-tailed Hawks, and Crested Caracaras were similar to random samples from the surrounding habitat indicating that preferred nesting habitat was available for each of these species at least within 60 m of active nest sites. Nest tree height, along with woody plant and native grass cover best discriminated nest sites among the three raptor species. There was no overlap at Red-tailed and White-tailed hawk nest sites in vegetation structure, while Crested Caracara nests were in habitat intermediate between the two other species. Partitioning of nesting habitat may be how these raptor species co-exist at the broader landscape scale of our study area in the Coastal Sand Plain of Texas.

  2. Magnetic properties of the high-latitude tail boundary - Draping of magnetosheath field lines and tail-aligned current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Kokubun, S.

    1991-01-01

    Magnetic properties of the high-latitude tail boundary are examined with IMP 8 magnetometer data. The high-latitude tail boundary separates the tail lobe from the magnetosheath. Magnetic fields are stable in the tail lobe, but very irregular in the magnetosheath. Boundary crossings are marked by the rotation of magnetic components parallel to the boundary plane. The magnetic component normal to the boundary, if any, is very small in comparison to this rotational change. Despite large magnetic fluctuations in the magnetosheath, the magnetosheath-side field orientation is consistent with the draping of the IMF against the magnetotail. The boundary current has a component parallel to the lobe field (tail-aligned current), as well as a circumferential component. The IMF orientation controls the sheath-side B(Y), while the lobe-side field has a more rigid configuration flaring antisunward.

  3. Abstract Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers that

    E-print Network

    Kelly, Jeff

    Abstract Banner-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are prominent ecosystem engineers-tailed kangaroo rats (Dipodomys spectabilis) are conspicuous ecosystem engineers in deserts of south- western

  4. STAR CLUSTERS IN THE TIDAL TAILS OF INTERACTING GALAXIES: CLUSTER POPULATIONS ACROSS A VARIETY OF TAIL ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mullan, B.; Konstantopoulos, I. S.; Lee, K. H.; Charlton, J. C.; Gronwall, C.; Hunsberger, S.; Palma, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16803 (United States); Kepley, A. A.; Johnson, K. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Knierman, K. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Bateman Physical Sciences Center, Arizona State University, F-wing Room 686, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Bastian, N. [School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Chandar, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Durrell, P. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Elmegreen, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Box 745, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); English, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hibbard, J. E. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Maybhate, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Trancho, G. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, Colina el Pino S/N, La Serena (Chile); Vacca, W. D., E-mail: mullan@astro.psu.edu [Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy/Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 144-2, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2011-04-20

    We have searched for compact stellar structures within 17 tidal tails in 13 different interacting galaxies using F606W- and F814W-band images from the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 on the Hubble Space Telescope. The sample of tidal tails includes a diverse population of optical properties, merging galaxy mass ratios, H I content, and ages. Combining our tail sample with Knierman et al., we find evidence of star clusters formed in situ with M{sub V} < -8.5 and V - I < 2.0 in 10 of 23 tidal tails; we are able to identify cluster candidates to M{sub V} = -6.5 in the closest tails. Three tails offer clear examples of 'beads on a string' star formation morphology in V - I color maps. Two tails present both tidal dwarf galaxy candidates and cluster candidates. Statistical diagnostics indicate that clusters in tidal tails may be drawn from the same power-law luminosity functions (with logarithmic slopes {approx}-2 to -2.5) found in quiescent spiral galaxies and interiors of interacting systems. We find that the tail regions with the largest number of observable clusters are relatively young ({approx}<250 Myr old) and bright (V {approx}< 24 mag arcsec{sup -2}), probably attributed to the strong bursts of star formation in interacting systems soon after periapse. Otherwise, we find no statistical difference between cluster-rich and cluster-poor tails in terms of many observable characteristics, though this analysis suffers from complex, unresolved gas dynamics and projection effects.

  5. Experimental oral transmission of chronic wasting disease to reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or TSE of wild and farmed cervid ruminants in the North America, including white tailed, black tailed and mule deer, Rocky Mountain elk and Shira's moose. CWD, like the other TSEs, is associated with accumulation of an abnorm...

  6. Regional assessment on influence of landscape configuration and connectivity on range size of white-tailed deer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. David Walter; Kurt C. VerCauteren; Henry Campa; William R. Clark; Justin W. Fischer; Scott E. Hygnstrom; Nancy E. Mathews; Clayton K. Nielsen; Eric M. Schauber; Timothy R. Van Deelen; Scott R. Winterstein

    2009-01-01

    Variation in the size of home range of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) has broad implications for managing populations, agricultural damage, and disease spread and transmission. Size of home\\u000a range of deer also varies seasonally because plant phenology dictates the vegetation types that are used as foraging or resting\\u000a sites. Knowledge of the landscape configuration and connectivity that contributes to variation

  7. High prevalence of Yersinia pestis in black-tailed prairie dog colonies during an apparent enzootic phase of sylvatic plague

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Hanson; Hugh B. Britten; Marco Restani; Leigh R. Washburn

    2007-01-01

    Sylvatic plague (Yersinia pestis) was introduced into North America over 100 years ago. The disease causes high mortality and extirpations in black-tailed\\u000a prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus), which is of conservation concern because prairie dogs provide habitat for the critically endangered black-footed ferret\\u000a (Mustela nigripes). Our goal was to help elucidate the mechanism Y. pestis uses to persist in prairie ecosystems during

  8. Tail Lobe Revisited: Magnetic Field Modeling Based on Plasma Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karlsson, S. B. P.; Tsyganenko, N. A.

    1999-01-01

    Plasma data from the ISEE-1 and -2 spacecraft during 1977-1980 have been used to determine the distribution of data points in the magnetotail in the range of distances -20 < XGSM < --15, i.e. which of the records that were located in the current sheet, in the tail lobe, in the magnetosheath and in the boundary layers respectively. The ISEE-1 and -2 magnetic field data for the records in the tail lobe were then used to model the tail lobe magnetic field dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure, on the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and on the Dst index. The tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be dependent on the square root of the dynamic pressure based on the balance between the total magnetic pressure in the tail lobes and the dynamic pressure of the solar wind. The IMF dependent terms, added to the pressure term, were sought in many different forms while the Dst dependence of the tail lobe magnetic field was assumed to be linear. The field shows a strong dependence on the square root of the dynamic pressure and the different IMF dependent terms all constitute a significant contribution to the total field. However, the dependence on the Dst index turned out to be very weak at those down-tail distances. The results of this study are intended to be used for parameterizing future versions of the data-based models of the global magnetospheric magnetic field.

  9. Star formation in shocked cluster spirals and their tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roediger, E.; Brüggen, M.; Owers, M. S.; Ebeling, H.; Sun, M.

    2014-09-01

    Recent observations of ram pressure stripped spiral galaxies in clusters revealed details of the stripping process, i.e. the truncation of all interstellar medium phases and of star formation (SF) in the disc, and multiphase star-forming tails. Some stripped galaxies, in particular in merging clusters, develop spectacular star-forming tails, giving them a jellyfish-like appearance. In merging clusters, merger shocks in the intracluster medium (ICM) are thought to have overrun these galaxies, enhancing the ambient ICM pressure and thus triggering SF, gas stripping, and tail formation. We present idealized hydrodynamical simulations of this scenario, including standard descriptions for SF and stellar feedback. To aid the interpretation of recent and upcoming observations, we focus on particular structures and dynamics in SF patterns in the remaining gas disc and in the near tails, which are easiest to observe. The observed jellyfish morphology is qualitatively reproduced for, both, face-on and edge-on stripping. In edge-on stripping, the interplay between the ICM wind and the disc rotation leads to asymmetries along the ICM wind direction and perpendicular to it. The apparent tail is still part of a highly deformed gaseous and young stellar disc. In both geometries, SF takes place in knots throughout the tail, such that the stars in the tails show no ordered age gradients. Significant SF enhancement in the disc occurs only at radii where the gas will be stripped in due course.

  10. Linking Bovine Tuberculosis on Cattle Farms to White-Tailed Deer and Environmental Variables Using Bayesian Hierarchical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, W. David; Smith, Rick; Vanderklok, Mike; VerCauteren, Kurt C.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a bacterial disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis in livestock and wildlife with hosts that include Eurasian badgers (Meles meles), brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Risk-assessment efforts in Michigan have been initiated on farms to minimize interactions of cattle with wildlife hosts but research on M. bovis on cattle farms has not investigated the spatial context of disease epidemiology. To incorporate spatially explicit data, initial likelihood of infection probabilities for cattle farms tested for M. bovis, prevalence of M. bovis in white-tailed deer, deer density, and environmental variables for each farm were modeled in a Bayesian hierarchical framework. We used geo-referenced locations of 762 cattle farms that have been tested for M. bovis, white-tailed deer prevalence, and several environmental variables that may lead to long-term survival and viability of M. bovis on farms and surrounding habitats (i.e., soil type, habitat type). Bayesian hierarchical analyses identified deer prevalence and proportion of sandy soil within our sampling grid as the most supported model. Analysis of cattle farms tested for M. bovis identified that for every 1% increase in sandy soil resulted in an increase in odds of infection by 4%. Our analysis revealed that the influence of prevalence of M. bovis in white-tailed deer was still a concern even after considerable efforts to prevent cattle interactions with white-tailed deer through on-farm mitigation and reduction in the deer population. Cattle farms test positive for M. bovis annually in our study area suggesting that the potential for an environmental source either on farms or in the surrounding landscape may contributing to new or re-infections with M. bovis. Our research provides an initial assessment of potential environmental factors that could be incorporated into additional modeling efforts as more knowledge of deer herd factors and cattle farm prevalence is documented. PMID:24595231

  11. From dinosaurs to birds: a tail of evolution.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Dana J; Chapman, Susan C; Larsson, Hans Ce; Organ, Chris L; Bebin, Anne-Gaelle; Merzdorf, Christa S; Bradley, Roger; Horner, John R

    2014-01-01

    A particularly critical event in avian evolution was the transition from long- to short-tailed birds. Primitive bird tails underwent significant alteration, most notably reduction of the number of caudal vertebrae and fusion of the distal caudal vertebrae into an ossified pygostyle. These changes, among others, occurred over a very short evolutionary interval, which brings into focus the underlying mechanisms behind those changes. Despite the wealth of studies delving into avian evolution, virtually nothing is understood about the genetic and developmental events responsible for the emergence of short, fused tails. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the signaling pathways and morphological events that contribute to tail extension and termination and examine how mutations affecting the genes that control these pathways might influence the evolution of the avian tail. To generate a list of candidate genes that may have been modulated in the transition to short-tailed birds, we analyzed a comprehensive set of mouse mutants. Interestingly, a prevalent pleiotropic effect of mutations that cause fused caudal vertebral bodies (as in the pygostyles of birds) is tail truncation. We identified 23 mutations in this class, and these were primarily restricted to genes involved in axial extension. At least half of the mutations that cause short, fused tails lie in the Notch/Wnt pathway of somite boundary formation or differentiation, leading to changes in somite number or size. Several of the mutations also cause additional bone fusions in the trunk skeleton, reminiscent of those observed in primitive and modern birds. All of our findings were correlated to the fossil record. An open question is whether the relatively sudden appearance of short-tailed birds in the fossil record could be accounted for, at least in part, by the pleiotropic effects generated by a relatively small number of mutational events. PMID:25621146

  12. Efficacy of Oral and Parenteral Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG Danish Strain 1331) in Protecting White-tailed Deer (Odecoileus Virginianus) against Bovine Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wildlife Disease Association Annual Conference, August 6-10, 2006 Terry Amundson Student Presentation Award Oral Presentation EFFICACY OF ORAL AND PARENTERAL BACILLE CALMETTE-GUERIN (BCG DANISH STRAIN 1331) IN PROTECTING WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODECOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) AGAINST BOVINE TUBERCULOSIS Paulin...

  13. Bifid tail of the pancreas with localized acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Koyasu, Sho; Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Nakase, Hiroshi; Kodama, Yuzo; Chiba, Tsutomu; Togashi, Kaori

    2013-12-25

    Bifid tail of the pancreas is an extremely rare developmental anomaly, and its clinical importance is not well known. We report the case of a 28-year-old man with acute pancreatitis limited to one side of a bifid tail with no otherwise detectable parenchymal edema on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Neither was there evidence of other anatomical ductal abnormalities that could have contributed to the patient's pancreatitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to suggest that bifid tail of the pancreas might cause acute pancreatitis. PMID:24172786

  14. Tail terms in gravitational radiation reaction via effective field theory

    E-print Network

    S. Foffa; R. Sturani

    2012-12-24

    Gravitational radiation reaction affects the dynamics of gravitationally bound binary systems. Here we focus on the leading "tail" term which modifies binary dynamics at fourth post-Newtonian order, as first computed by Blanchet and Damour. We re-produce this result using effective field theory techniques in the framework of the Lagrangian formalism suitably extended to include dissipation effects. We recover the known logarithmic tail term, consistently with the recent interpretation of the logarithmic tail term in the mass parameter as a renormalization group effect of the Bondi mass of the system.

  15. Acetylation of LYS-16 of H4 Histone Tail May Sequester the Tail and Inhibit its Interactions with Neighboring Nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potoyan, Davit; Papoian, Garegin

    2012-02-01

    Histone tails are highly flexible N terminal protrusions of histone proteins, which help to fold DNA into dense superstructures known as chromatin. On a molecular scale histone tails are poly-electrolites with high degree of conformational disorder, allowing them to function as bio-molecular ``switches,'' regulating various genetic regulatory processes via diverse types of covalent modifications. Because of being intrinsically disordered, the structural and dynamical aspects of histone tails are still poorly understood. Using multiple explicit solvent and coarse-grained MD simulations we have investigated the impact of the acetylation of LYS-16 residue on the conformational and DNA-binding propensities of H4 histone tail. The potential of mean force computed as a function of distance between a model DNA and histone tail center of mass showed a dramatic enhancement of binding affinity upon mono-acetylation of the H4 tail. The estimated binding free energy gain for the wild type is 2kT, while for the acetylated it reaches 4-5 kT. Additionally our structural analysis shows that acetylation is driving the chain into collapsed states, which get enriched in secondary structural elements upon binding to the DNA. We suggest a non-electrostatic mechanism that explains the enhanced binding affinity of the acetylated H4 tail. At last our findings lead us to propose a hypothesis that can potentially account for the celebrated chromatin ``fiber loosening effects'' observed in many experiments.

  16. Experimental oral transmission of chronic wasting disease to red deer (Cervus elaphus elaphus): Early detection and late stage distribution of protease-resistant prion protein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease CWD is the transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of wild and farmed cervid ruminants, including Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), or moose (Alces alces). Reliable data ...

  17. Assessment of computational prediction of tail buffeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Assessments of the viability of computational methods and the computer resource requirements for the prediction of tail buffeting are made. Issues involved in the use of Euler and Navier-Stokes equations in modeling vortex-dominated and buffet flows are discussed and the requirement for sufficient grid density to allow accurate, converged calculations is stressed. Areas in need of basic fluid dynamics research are highlighted: vorticity convection, vortex breakdown, dynamic turbulence modeling for free shear layers, unsteady flow separation for moderately swept, rounded leading-edge wings, vortex flows about wings at high subsonic speeds. An estimate of the computer run time for a buffeting response calculation for a full span F-15 aircraft indicates that an improvement in computer and/or algorithm efficiency of three orders of magnitude is needed to enable routine use of such methods. Attention is also drawn to significant uncertainties in the estimates, in particular with regard to nonlinearities contained within the modeling and the question of the repeatability or randomness of buffeting response.

  18. Wing-Fuselage Interference, Tail Buffeting, and Air Flow About the Tail of a Low-Wing Monoplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, James A; Hood, Manley J

    1935-01-01

    This report presents the results of wind tunnel tests on a Mcdonnell Douglas airplane to determine the wing-fuselage interference of a low-wing monoplane. The tests included a study of tail buffeting and the air flow in the region of the tail. The airplane was tested with and without the propeller slipstream, both in the original condition and with several devices designed to reduce or eliminate tail buffeting. The devices used were wing-fuselage fillets, a NACA cowling, reflexed trailing edge of the wing, and stub auxiliary airfoils.

  19. Tailing RFID Tags for Clone Detection Davide Zanetti

    E-print Network

    Capkun, Srdjan

    Tailing RFID Tags for Clone Detection Davide Zanetti ETH Zurich, Switzerland zanettid, simply "wireless barcodes," themselves vulnerable to cloning and counterfeiting. While continuous monitoring can, in principle, detect cloning at- tacks, real-world supply chains often contain significant

  20. Star Formation in the Cometary Tails Associated with Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamagami, Takahiro; Fujita, Yutaka

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the star-formation in cometary tails of galaxies in clusters. In particular, we focus on the evolution of molecular clouds in the tails that generate the stars. Assuming that the gas tails had been derived from the galaxies through ram-pressure stripping, we found that the gas must have been stripped mostly not in the form of molecular clouds, but in the form of H I gas or molecular gas that is not in clouds. Moreover, the molecular clouds are condensed in the tails, even away from the host galaxies. We also found that magnetic fields may be required to suppress the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability on the surface of molecular clouds, because otherwise the KH instability may destroy the molecular clouds before stars are formed in them.

  1. Elucidating Internucleosome Interactions and the Roles of Histone Tails

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steven C.; Andresen, Kurt; Jimenez-Useche, Isabel; Yuan, Chongli; Qiu, Xiangyun

    2013-01-01

    The nucleosome is the first level of genome organization and regulation in eukaryotes where negatively charged DNA is wrapped around largely positively charged histone proteins. Interaction between nucleosomes is dominated by electrostatics at long range and guided by specific contacts at short range, particularly involving their flexible histone tails. We have thus quantified how internucleosome interactions are modulated by salts (KCl, MgCl2) and histone tail deletions (H3, H4 N-terminal), using small-angle x-ray scattering and theoretical modeling. We found that measured effective charges at low salts are ?1/5th of the theoretically predicted renormalized charges and that H4 tail deletion suppresses the attraction at high salts to a larger extent than H3 tail deletion. PMID:23823239

  2. J SERIES MAGAZINE. J 106 INTERIOR. BOMB TAILS ON LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    J SERIES MAGAZINE. J 106 INTERIOR. BOMB TAILS ON LEFT. - Naval Magazine Lualualei, Headquarters Branch, Inert Storehouse Type, Twelfth Street between Kwajulein & New Mexico Streets, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Radon Diffusion Through Uranium Mill Tailings and Cover Defects

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D. W.; Zimmerman, D. A.

    1981-12-01

    Research was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to define the effects of cover defects on the emission of radon gas from covered uranium mill tailings piles. This report describes the results from the analysis of four geometrically simplified cover defects.

  4. MULTIPLE ANOMALIES IN A WHITE-TAILED DEER FETUS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. WOBESER; W. RUNGE

    Multiple defects consisting of disproportionate dwarfism, internal hydro- cephalus,porencephaly,inferiorbrachygnathia,multiple hepatic cysts and renal dysplasiawith cystictubulardilation, were diagnosed in a fetus from an apparently normal wild white-tailed deer (Odocoileus z'irginianus).

  5. Sandia's activities in uranium mill tailings remedial action

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, S.

    1980-01-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 requires that remedial action be taken at over 20 inactive uranium mill tailings sites in the United States. Standards promulgated by the EPA under this act are to be the operative standards for this activity. Proposed standards must still undergo internal review, public comment, and receive Nuclear Regulatory Commission concurrence before being finalized. Briefly reviewed, the standards deal separately with new disposal sites (Part A) and cleanup of soil and contaminated structures at existing locations (Part B). In several cases, the present sites are felt to be too close to human habitations or to be otherwise unacceptably located. These tailings will probably be relocated. New disposal sites for relocated tailings must satisfy certain standards. The salient features of these standards are summarized.

  6. Intrinsically disordered tubulin tails: complex tuners of microtubule functions?

    PubMed

    Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules are essential cellular polymers assembled from tubulin heterodimers. The tubulin dimer consists of a compact folded globular core and intrinsically disordered C-terminal tails. The tubulin tails form a lawn of densely grafted, negatively charged, flexible peptides on the exterior of the microtubule, potentially akin to brush polymers in the field of synthetic materials. These tails are hotspots for conserved, chemically complex posttranslational modifications that have the potential to act in a combinatorial fashion to regulate microtubule polymer dynamics and interactions with microtubule effectors, giving rise to a "tubulin code". In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of the enzymes that generate the astonishing tubulin chemical diversity observed in cells and describe recent advances in deciphering the roles of tubulin C-terminal tails and their posttranslational modifications in regulating the activity of molecular motors and microtubule associated proteins. Lastly, I outline the promises, challenges and potential pitfalls of deciphering the tubulin code. PMID:25307498

  7. Thyroxine Induced Resorption of Xenopus Laevis Tail Tissue in Vitro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scadding, Steven R.

    1984-01-01

    A simple method of studying thyroxine-induced resorption of tadpole tails in vitro is described. This procedure demonstrates that resorption is dependent on thyroxine and requires protein synthesis. It introduces students to the use of tissue culture methods. (Author)

  8. Concordia discors: duality in the origin of the vertebrate tail

    PubMed Central

    Handrigan, Gregory R

    2003-01-01

    The vertebrate tail is an extension of the main body axis caudal to the anus. The developmental origin of this structure has been a source of debate amongst embryologists for the past century. Some view tail development as a continuation of the morphogenetic processes that shape the head and trunk (i.e. gastrulation). The alternative view, secondary development, holds that the tail forms in a manner similar to limb development, i.e. by secondary induction. Previous developmental studies have provided support for both views. Here I revisit these studies, describing caudal morphogenesis in select vertebrates, the associated genes and developmental defects, and, as a relevant aside, consider the developmental and evolutionary relationships of primary and secondary neurulation. I conclude that caudal development enlists both gastrulation and secondary induction, and that the application of recent high-resolution cell labelling technology may clarify how these discordant programmes interact in building the vertebrate tail. PMID:12713266

  9. Texas white-tailed deer Internet harvest model

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Jennifer Nicole

    2009-05-15

    White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) is an intensively managed game species throughout Texas and the United States. Modeling is a tool that has been used to evaluate various management practices and their potential impacts on wildlife...

  10. 42. FOUNDATIONS TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    42. FOUNDATIONS - TAIL RACE, ETC., POWER HOUSE SANTA ANA RIVER NO. 2, EDISON ELECTRIC CO., NOV. 3, 1904. SCE drawing no. 5393. - Santa Ana River Hydroelectric System, SAR-2 Powerhouse, Redlands, San Bernardino County, CA

  11. Final Report Review of Existing and Proposed Tailings Impoundment Technologies

    E-print Network

    ....................................................................... 3 4.0 Comparison of Uranium Tailings Disposal Technology with the Requirements of RCRA, Subtitle C ............................................................... 1 2.0 Profile of the Existing Industry........................................................................................... 2 3.0 Anticipated Changes in the Industry Profile

  12. Adrenal weight in a Texas white-tailed deer herd 

    E-print Network

    Ramsey, Charles Warren

    1975-01-01

    corresponded to the quality of the range. Taber (1953) found that following improvement in forage conditions, black-tailed deer had greater ovulation rates, He also correlated nutrition levels with population changes (Taber 1956). Robinette et al. (1955...

  13. Western Red-tailed Skink Distribution in Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, D. B. and Gergor, P. D.

    2011-11-01

    This slide show reports a study to: determine Western Red-tailed Skink (WRTS) distribution on Nevada National Security Site (NNSS); identify habitat where WRTS occur; learn more about WRTS natural history; and document distribution of other species.

  14. Landscape genetics and the spatial distribution of chronic wasting disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Julie A. Blanchong; Michael D. Samuel; Kim T. Scribner; Byron V. Weckworth; Julia A. Langenberg; Kristine B. Filcek

    2007-01-01

    Predicting the spread of wildlife disease is critical for identifying populations at risk, tar- geting surveillance and designing proactive management programmes. We used a landscape genetics approach to identify landscape features that influenced gene flow and the distribution of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. CWD prevalence was nega- tively correlated with genetic differentiation of study area deer

  15. Phosphorus Sequestration in Lake Sediment with Iron Mine Tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MAUREEN E. CLAYTON; SARAH LIEGEOIS; EDWARD J. BROWN

    2004-01-01

    Internal phosphorus loading can lead to eutrophication in lakes when anoxic sediments release bioavailable phosphorus into the water column. In laboratory experiments, iron mine tailings helped to sequester phosphorus in sediment from a eutrophic lake. Phosphorus release from the sediments after extraction with distilled water or 0.02 N H2SO4 was significantly reduced when mine tailings were added (1:1 w\\/w), even

  16. Tail Biting Trellis Representation of Codes: Decoding and Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shao. Rose Y.; Lin, Shu; Fossorier, Marc

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents two new iterative algorithms for decoding linear codes based on their tail biting trellises, one is unidirectional and the other is bidirectional. Both algorithms are computationally efficient and achieves virtually optimum error performance with a small number of decoding iterations. They outperform all the previous suboptimal decoding algorithms. The bidirectional algorithm also reduces decoding delay. Also presented in the paper is a method for constructing tail biting trellises for linear block codes.

  17. Texas white-tailed deer Internet harvest model 

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Jennifer Nicole

    2009-05-15

    TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER INTERNET HARVEST MODEL A Thesis by JENNIFER NICOLE GARRETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences TEXAS WHITE-TAILED DEER INTERNET HARVEST MODEL A Thesis by JENNIFER NICOLE GARRETT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies...

  18. Colorful tails fade when lizards adopt less risky behaviors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dror Hawlena

    2009-01-01

    Colorful tails that become cryptic during ontogeny are found in diverse taxa. Nevertheless, the evolutionary bases for this\\u000a change remain debated. Recent work suggests that colorful tails, deflective displays, and striped patterns may represent antipredator\\u000a mechanisms used by immature lizards to compensate for being more active and hence more vulnerable to predation (increased\\u000a movement hypothesis, IMH). I challenged the generality

  19. Testing tail-mounted transmitters with Myocastor coypus (nutria)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Merino, S.; Carter, J.; Thibodeaux, G.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a tail-mounted radio-transmitter for Myocastor coypus (nutria) that offers a practical and efficient alternative to collar or implant methods. The mean retention time was 96 d (range 57-147 d, n = 7), making this a practical method for short-term studies. The tail-mounts were less injurious to animals than collars and easier for field researchers to implement than either collars or surgically implanted transmitters.

  20. Pharmacological characterization of senktide-induced tail whips.

    PubMed

    Nordquist, Rebecca E; Ballard, Theresa M; Algeyer, Brigitte; Pauly-Evers, Meike; Ozmen, Laurence; Spooren, Will

    2010-01-01

    The tachykinin NK(3) receptor shows promise as a novel target for antipsychotics, but knowledge of downstream activity following tachykinin NK(3) receptor activation is lacking. To determine the practical utility of senktide-induced tail whips in mice as a tool for determining and characterizing downstream activity following tachykinin NK(3) receptor activation, mice were injected with 0.05 nmol of senktide i.c.v. and the number of tail whip bouts was counted for 20 min. Strain differences were observed, with NMRI mice showing a stronger tail whip response than C57Bl/6J mice. Tachykinin NK(3) receptor specificity was confirmed by the absence of the senktide-induced tail whip response in tachykinin NK(3) receptor knockout mice. Effects of tachykinin receptor pharmacological agents were tested by pretreatment with tachykinin NK(3) receptor antagonists (SB222200, talnetant and osanetant), which attenuated senktide-induced tail whips, and the tachykinin NK(1) receptor antagonist MK869, which had no effect on senktide-induced tail whips. Pharmacological interactions with other neurotransmitter systems were determined by pretreatment with dopamine D(1), D(2), and D(3) receptor antagonists, atypical antipsychotics, serotonin 5HT(1a) receptor antagonists, serotonin 5HT(2a/c) receptor antagonists, benzodiazepine and putative anxiolytics, antidepressants, and an anticholinergic. Senktide-induced tail whips were attenuated by dopamine D(2) receptor antagonists, atypical antipsychotics, serotonin 5HT(2a/c) antagonists, and benzodiazepine anxiolytics, but unaffected by drugs from other classes. Thus, the senktide-induced tail whip response is easily quantifiable, specific to the tachykinin NK(3) receptor, and provides valuable information on the downstream pharmacology of tachykinin NK(3) receptor activation. PMID:19540857

  1. The dynamics of tidal tails from massive satellites

    E-print Network

    Jun-Hwan Choi; Martin D. Weinberg; Neal Katz

    2007-08-03

    (Abbreviated) We investigate the dynamical mechanisms responsible for producing tidal tails from dwarf satellites using N-body simulations. We identify two important dynamical co-conspirators: 1) the points where the attractive force of the host halo and satellite are balanced do not occur at equal distances from the satellite centre or at the same equipotential value for massive satellites, breaking the morphological symmetry of the leading and trailing tails; and 2) the escaped ejecta in the leading (trailing) tail continues to be decelerated (accelerated) by the satellite's gravity leading to large offsets of the ejecta orbits from the satellite orbit. The effect of the satellite's self gravity decreases only weakly with a decreasing ratio of satellite mass to host halo mass, demonstrating the importance of these effects over a wide range of subhalo masses. Not only will the morphology of the leading and trailing tails for massive satellites be different, but the observed radial velocities of the tails will be displaced from that of the satellite orbit; both the displacement and the peak radial velocity is proportional to satellite mass. If the tails are assumed to follow the progenitor satellite orbits, the tails from satellites with masses greater than 0.0001 of the host halo virial mass in a spherical halo will appear to indicate a flattened halo. Therefore, a constraint on the Milky Way halo shape using tidal streams requires mass-dependent modelling. Similarly, we compute the the distribution of tail orbits both in E_{r}-r^{-2} space and in E-L_{z} space, advocated for identifying satellite stream relics. The acceleration of ejecta by a massive satellite during escape spreads the velocity distribution and obscures the signature of a well-defined ``moving group'' in phase space.

  2. RED-TAILED HAWK NEST SITES IN PUERTO RICO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eduarixi Santana C; J Eddie N. Laboy; James A. Mosher; Stanley A. Temple

    ABSTRACT.-We describe Red-tailed Hawk,(Buteo jamaicensis) nest sites in four habitats in Puerto Rico. Forty-nine nests were located in 2 1 species of trees. Red-tailed Hawks nested in trees that were taller than the mean,canopy,height of trees in surrounding,plots and that allowed a view of at least 50% of their territory. Most nests were in the upper,third of the tree on

  3. Misprescription and misuse of one-tailed tests

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CELIA M. LOMBARDI; STUART H. HURLBERT

    2009-01-01

    One-tailed statistical tests are often used in ecology, animal behaviour and in most other fields in the biologicalandsocialsciences.Herewereviewthefrequencyoftheiruseinthe1989and2005volumesoftwojournals (Animal Behaviour and Oecologia), their advantages and disadvantages, the extensive erroneous advice on them in both older and modern statistics texts and their utility in certain narrow areas of applied research. Of those articles with data sets susceptible to one-tailed tests, at

  4. Performance Analysis with Truncated Heavy-Tailed Distributions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Mats Pihlsgård

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with queues and insurance risk processes where a generic service time, resp. generic claim, has the form\\u000a U ? K for some r.v. U with distribution B which is heavy-tailed, say Pareto or Weibull, and a typically large K, say much larger than \\u000a $$\\\\mathbb{E}U$$\\u000a . We study the compound Poisson ruin probability ?(u) or, equivalently, the tail

  5. Mobilization and retention of heavy metals in mill-tailings from Garpenberg sulfide mines, Sweden

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhixun Lin

    1997-01-01

    The Lilla Bredsjön tailings contain less than 30% residual sulfide minerals, and an average initial content of 4% calcium carbonate. The tailings are divided into an active oxidation horizon near the surface of the tailings impoudment, an underlying intermediate horizon and a water-saturated horizon. Extensive oxidation of sulfide minerals near the tailings surface results in depletion of carbonate minerals and

  6. In-situ dewatering techniques for uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Wardwell, R.E.; Nelson, J.D.; Abt, S.R.; Staub, W.P.

    1983-09-01

    The state-of-the-art regarding methods for the in-place dewatering of uranium mill tailings is described. Since large amounts of water in tailing impoundments can cause long-term seepage problems, drainage of the tailings both during operations and during the reclamation stage is highly desirable. Dewatering of tailings also provides for settlement prior to the placement of the cover and increases the pile's stability for earth-moving equipment during site reclamation and cover placement. The application of various drainage techniques is discussed with regard to their effectiveness in minimizing the amount of water remaining in an impoundment during long-term reclamation. Drainage techniques that are reviewed include underdrain gravity-flow systems, single wells and well-points, electro-osmosis, vertical drains, and evapotranspiration. It has been shown that the underdrain gravity systems provide an effective and reliable means of dewatering tailings. If feasible, they will probably prove to be the best option for the in situ dewatering of tailings because of their practicality and relatively low cost. The other methods would be recommended only as backup systems or in existing impoundments that do not have underdrain systems.

  7. Effect of Dynamic Rolling Oscillations on Twin Tail Buffet Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheta, Essam F.; Kandil, Osama A.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of dynamic rolling oscillations of delta-wing/twin-tail configuration on twin-tail buffet response is investigated. The computational model consists of a sharp-edged delta wing of aspect ratio one and swept-back flexible twin tail with taper ratio of 0.23. The configuration model is statically pitched at 30 deg. angle of attack and then forced to oscillate in roll around the symmetry axis at a constant amplitude of 4 deg. and reduced frequency of pi and 2(pi). The freestream Mach number and Reynolds number are 0.3 and 1.25 million, respectively. This multidisciplinary problem is solved using three sets of equations on a dynamic multi-block grid structure. The first set is the unsteady, full Navier-Stokes equations, the second set is the aeroelastic equations for coupled bending and torsion vibrations of the tails, and the third set is the grid-displacement equations. The configuration is investigated for inboard position of the twin tails which corresponds to a separation distance between the twin tails of 33% wing span. The computed results are compared with the results of stationary configuration, which previously have been validated using experimental data. The results conclusively showed that the rolling oscillations of the configuration have led to higher loads, higher deflections, and higher excitation peaks than those of the stationary configuration. Moreover, increasing the reduced frequency has led to higher loads and excitation peaks and lower bending and torsion deflections and acceleration.

  8. Beneficiation of flotation tailing from Polish copper sulfide ores

    SciTech Connect

    Luszczkiewicz, A. [Technical Univ. of Wroclaw (Poland); Sztaba, K.S. [Univ. of Mining and Metallurgy, Krakow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Flotation tailing of Polish copper sulfide ores represents more than 90% of the mass of run-of-mine ore. The tailing contains mainly quartz, dolomite, clay minerals, traces of sulfides, and some accessory minerals. Almost all minerals of the tailing are well liberated and, therefore, any further beneficiation process applied to the tailing is expected to be inexpensive. In this work, results of investigations on utilization of flotation tailing using classification and gravity concentration are presented. It is shown that due to classification of flotation tailing in hydrocyclones, the coarse fraction becomes suitable material for gravity separation providing backfill material for underground mines as well as heavy minerals, a source of valuable rare elements. It was also found that heavy minerals separated by gravity methods contain a significant amount of rare elements such as zirconium, titanium, silver, rare earth metals, and uranium. The light fraction of the gravity separation contains well deslimed quartz particles and meets strict requirements for hydraulic filling material used for structural support in underground mines. Evaluation of the cost of the proposed technology indicated that investment to implement the method would provide a return within 2--4 years.

  9. Synthesis process of forsterite refractory by iron ore tailings.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Qi; Liu, Jihui; Li, Peng

    2009-01-01

    With mineral resources becoming gradually more deficient, as well as the issue of mine tailings causing environmental pollution, more and more people have realized the great significance of tailings utilization. Iron ore tailings, as a kind of secondary resource, have been developed in recycling industries. The feasibility to produce forsterite refractory from high-silicon iron tailings and high-magnesium raw materials were discussed. Also, the synthesis reaction processes were studied from the results of the laboratory experiments. The experiments showed that the synthesis processes can be separated into three steps when using iron tailings to synthesize forsterite: (1) produce magnesium iron sosoloid (Mg1-XFeXO) and magnesium metasilicate (MgSiO3), (2) form the fayalite, and (3) create the forsterite. The synthetic productions are primarily forsterite, hortonolite, and small amounts of magnesium metasilicate (MgSiO3). The hortonolite is wrapped around the surface of the forsterite particles and formed the cementing phase. In addition, the method to produce forsterite refractory and lightweight forsterite refractory from iron tailings were offered. PMID:25084443

  10. Iron isotope fractionation by biogeochemical processes in mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Roger B; Schippers, Axel

    2008-02-15

    Iron isotope ratios were determined for the pore water, the 1 M HCl/1 M hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH)-extractable solid phase, and the total extractable solid phase from sulfidic mine tailings in Impoundment 1, Kristineberg mine, northern Sweden. Within the tailings, pyrite oxidation occurs in a distinct Fe-depleted oxidation zone, and the greatest number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria in the profile occur close to the boundary between oxidized and unoxidized tailings. Above the oxidation front in the oxidized tailings, a large iron isotope fractionation (-1.3 to -2.4% per hundred) is measured between the pore water and the HAH-extractable solid phase. This isotope fractionation is explained by aqueous Fe(II)-Fe(III) equilibrium, microbial Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe(III) oxyhydroxide precipitation. The data suggests that pyrite in the tailings is enriched in 56Fe relative to Fe-rich silicates in the same material, such that pyrite oxidation results in a decrease in the mean delta56Fe value for the bulk tailings in the oxidized zone: a change in isotope composition that is not attributable to isotope fractionation. Iron isotope analyses yield valuable information on iron cycling in mine wastes, and they have the potential for becoming a tool for the prediction and control of acid mine drainage. PMID:18351081

  11. Large Variance and Fat Tail of Damage by Natural Disaster

    E-print Network

    Jo, Hang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    In order to account for large variance and fat tail of damage by natural disaster, we study a simple model by combining distributions of disaster and population/property with their spatial correlation. We assume fat-tailed or power-law distributions for disaster and population/property exposed to the disaster, and a constant vulnerability for exposed population/property. Our model suggests that the fat tail property of damage can be determined either by that of disaster or by those of population/property depending on which tail is fatter. It is also found that the spatial correlations of population/property can enhance or reduce the variance of damage depending on how fat the tails of population/property are. In case of tornadoes in the United States, we show that the damage does have fat tail property. Our results support that the standard cost-benefit analysis would not be reliable for social investment in vulnerability reduction and disaster prevention.

  12. Arsenic bioaccessibility in gold mine tailings of Delita, Cuba.

    PubMed

    Toujaguez, R; Ono, F B; Martins, V; Cabrera, P P; Blanco, A V; Bundschuh, J; Guilherme, L R G

    2013-11-15

    A bioaccessibility test was carried out in four tailings collected at a former mining area in Delita, Cuba. A previous risk assessment study identified arsenic (As) as the main critical contaminant in this area and showed that the tailings had high As concentrations (up to 3.5%). This study aimed at: (i) evaluating As bioaccessibility in four tailings (R1, R2, R3 and R4) from a gold mining area to obtain a better health risk estimate; and, (ii) identifying the mineral phases responsible for most of the bioaccessible As using XRD, SEM-EDS, and XAS. The results showed that bioaccessible As in the tailings ranged from 0.65 to 40.5%. The main factors influencing As bioaccessibility were a high occurrence of amorphous iron arsenate; occurrence, even at low content, of iron oxyhydroxides and stability of mineral phases in the environment of the gastrointestinal tract. Although arsenopyrite, arsenates and goethite were confirmed by mineralogical methods such as optical microscopy, XRD, and SEM-EDS, XAS showed that scorodite-oxidation state As(+V)-was dominant in most of the tailings. This confirms that the low bioaccessibility of As in most of the tailings is due to the slow kinetics of As release from scorodite. PMID:23428178

  13. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Albert R.; Chou, S.-T.

    1987-03-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from an airfoil of infinite span chopping through a skewed line vortex. To analyze the interactions between helicopter tail rotor and main rotor tip vortices, we developed a two-step approach: (1) the main rotor tip vortex system is obtained through a free wake geometry calculation of the main rotor using CAMRAD code; (2) acoustic analysis takes the results from the aerodynamic interaction analysis and calculates the farfield pressure signatures for the interactions. It is found that under a wide range of helicopter flight conditions, acoustic pressure fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly on the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors. fluctuations of significant magnitude can be generated by tail rotors due to a series of interactions with main rotor tip vortices. This noise mechanism depends strongly upon the helicopter flight conditions and the relative location and phasing of the main and tail rotors.

  14. Revegetation potential of acidic mill tailings in southwestern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, J.M.; Beeson, D.L.; Gomez, M. [Ecology and Environment, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Lindemann, W.C. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture; Whitford, W.G. [Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.; Zehner, W.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A greenhouse project was conducted to examine the revegetation potential of acid mill tailings from an abandoned mill site near Silver City, Grant County, New Mexico. The tailings piles covered about 35 acres, had percent level concentrations of Zn, Cu, Pb, an average pH of 2.2, and an average net neutralization potential of 120 tons calcium carbonate per kiloton tailings. To successfully revegetate the tailings, five problems must be overcome: (1) neutralization of current and future acidity, (2) immobilization of metals, (3) restoration of biological activity, (4) improvement of water holding capacity, and (5) increasing the supply of plant nutrients. Tailings material was mixed with crushed limestone and divided into greenhouse pots in a randomized complete block design with factorial arrangement of treatments, including nine plant species and four organic amendments. Fertilizer was added based on soil fertility analysis. Germination and growth characteristics of plant species, and physical and chemical characteristics of soil were examined. Liming effectively removed or moderated most chemical plant growth problems. Water soluble and plant available metals in neutralized tailings were slightly higher than in native soils.

  15. Postautotomy tail activity in the Balearic lizard, Podarcis lilfordi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pafilis, Panayiotis; Pérez-Mellado, Valentín; Valakos, Efstratios

    2008-03-01

    Caudal autotomy is an effective antipredator strategy widespread among lizards. The shed tail thrashes vigorously for long periods to distract the predator and facilitate the lizard’s escape. This movement is maintained by energy supplied by the anaerobic conversion of glycogen into lactate. It has been suggested that lactate accumulation serves as an index for the vigor of tail thrashing. We made three predictions: (1) tail loss frequency should be higher under heavier predation regime, (2) the duration of postautotomy tail movement should be extended in populations under heavy predation pressure as an adaptation to the higher risk and the increased need for defense, and (3) as result, lactate in these tail tissues should be concentrated at higher levels. To eliminate the impact of phylogeny and environmental factors on the interpretation of our result, we focused exclusively on one species, the Balearic lizard ( Podarcis lilfordi). We studied three populations under different predation pressure but sharing the same climatic conditions. We found no differences among the studied populations either in postautotomy duration of tail movement or in levels of final lactate accumulation while autotomy frequency was higher where predation pressure was more intense. ?ail loss effectiveness is directly influenced by the level of predation, while secondary features of the trait appear to remain independent from the impact of environment.

  16. Public health assessment for Richardson Flat Tailings, Park City, Summit County, Utah, Region 8. Cerclis No. UTD980952840. Addendum. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-03

    The document is an addendum to the preliminary public health assessment prepared for the Richardson Flat Tailings site by the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in July 1990 (PB90-260092). ATSDR's Health Activities Recommendation Panel (HARP) has evaluated the data and information developed in the Richardson Flat Tailings Public Health Assessment. The panel determined that, because of the apparent lack of past and present public health hazards and community health concerns, no follow-up health activities are indicated at this time.

  17. Structure and function of tuna tail tendons.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, Robert E; Rapoport, H Scott; Fenger, Joelle M

    2002-12-01

    The caudal tendons in tunas and other scombrid fish link myotomal muscle directly to the caudal fin rays, and thus serve to transfer muscle power to the hydrofoil-like tail during swimming. These robust collagenous tendons have structural and mechanical similarity to tendons found in other vertebrates, notably the leg tendons of terrestrial mammals. Biochemical studies indicate that tuna tendon collagen is composed of the (alpha1)(2),alpha2 heterotrimer that is typical of vertebrate Type I collagen, while tuna skin collagen has the unusual alpha1,alpha2,alpha3 trimer previously described in the skin of some other teleost species. Tuna collagen, like that of other fish, has high solubility due to the presence of an acid-labile intermolecular cross-link. Unlike collagen in mammalian tendons, no differences related to cross-link maturation were detected among tendons in tuna ranging from 0.05 to 72 kg (approx. 0.25-6 years). Tendons excised post-mortem were subjected to load cycling to determine the modulus of elasticity and resilience (mean of 1.3 GPa and 90%, respectively). These material properties compare closely to those of leg tendons from adult mammals that can function as effective biological springs in terrestrial locomotion, but the breaking strength is substantially lower. Peak tendon forces recorded during steady swimming appear to impose strains of much less than 1% of tendon length, and no more than 1.5% during bursts. Thus, the caudal tendons in tunas do not appear to function as elastic storage elements, even at maximal swimming effort. PMID:12485695

  18. Tailings reprocessing as source control for acid rock drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Balderrama, R.M. [Bureau of Mines, Reno, NV (United States). Reno Research Center

    1995-12-31

    Bench-scale laboratory flotation and gravity separation tests were conducted on tailings samples to remove the sulfidic material, mainly pyrite, the source of acid generation. A combination of xanthate collectors, promoters, and frothers were used during flotation. Pyrite recoveries were in the range of 42 to 97%, depending on the tailings being treated. Sulfide sulfur contents of 12.8 to 0.37% in the feeds were reduced to 8.68 to 0.01% in the treated tails. Flotation tests were conducted to evaluate the ARD potential as a function of percent pyrite remaining in the tails. Standard ARD predictive tests were used to evaluate the success of the treatment. In some cases, removal of only 50 to 55% of the pyritic fraction was required, thereby demonstrating the conversion of the waste material from acidic to non-acidic. A laboratory vanning table was used to evaluate the amenability of sulfide-bearing tailings samples to gravity separation. The pyrite recoveries varied from 38 to 86%. The sulfide sulfur content of 12.8 to 0.37% in the feeds was reduced to 6.0 to 0.14% in the treated tails. Predictive ARD tests performed on tailings before and after the gravity removal of pyrite showed that most samples changed from probably acid producing to the uncertain range. Data reported and analyzed int his paper demonstrate source control for ARD prevention through the removal of metal sulfides from sulfide-bearing wastes using conventional flotation and gravity separation techniques.

  19. The Tail-Elicited Tail Withdrawal Reflex of "Aplysia" Is Mediated Centrally at Tail Sensory-Motor Synapses and Exhibits Sensitization across Multiple Temporal Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philips, Gary T.; Sherff, Carolyn M.; Menges, Steven A.; Carew, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The defensive withdrawal reflexes of "Aplysia californica" have provided powerful behavioral systems for studying the cellular and molecular basis of memory formation. Among these reflexes the (T-TWR) has been especially useful. In vitro studies examining the monosynaptic circuit for the T-TWR, the tail sensory-motor (SN-MN) synapses, have…

  20. SEMI-MELANISTIC WHITE-TAILED DEER IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN --Melanistic color morphs of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are

    E-print Network

    125 SEMI-MELANISTIC WHITE-TAILED DEER IN NORTHERN WISCONSIN -- Melanistic color morphs of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) are differentiated from other recognized color morphs by having uniform melanin and is considered rare in white-tailed deer populations (Severinghaus and Cheatum 1956, Sauer 1984

  1. Kidney structure and function of obligate and facultative hibernators: the white-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys leucurus ) and the black-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys ludovicianus )

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. J. Harlow; E. J. Braun

    1995-01-01

    The white-tailed prairie dog is an obligate hibernator that enters a heterothermic phase when maintained in the cold with low intensity light and ad libitum food and water. The black-tailed prairie dog (a facultative hibernator) will not hibernate under similar conditions. It has been suggested that the black tailed prairie dog remains active during the winter because it can conserve

  2. Chronic wasting disease in bank voles: characterisation of the shortest incubation time model for prion diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to assess the susceptibility of bank voles to chronic wasting disease (CWD), we inoculated voles carrying isoleucine or methionine at codon 109 (Bv109I and Bv109M, respectively) with CWD isolates from elk, mule deer and white-tailed deer. Efficient transmission rate (100%) was observed with...

  3. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 41(4), 2005, pp. 820824 Wildlife Disease Association 2005

    E-print Network

    disease, mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus, O. virginianus, pri- on, tonsillar biopsy, tonsillar follicles@yahoo.com) ABSTRACT: Preclinical antemortem testing of deer (Odocoileus spp.) for chronic wasting dis- ease (CWD) can) in southeast and southwest Minnesota and white-tailed and mule deer (O. hemionus) in Wind Cave National Park

  4. A tail of two sites: a bipartite mechanism for recognition of notch ligands by mind bomb E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Brian J; Schnute, Björn; Ohlenhard, Nadja; Zimmerman, Brandon; Miles, Laura; Beglova, Natalia; Klein, Thomas; Blacklow, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Mind bomb (Mib) proteins are large, multi-domain E3 ligases that promote ubiquitination of the cytoplasmic tails of Notch ligands. This ubiquitination step marks the ligand proteins for epsin-dependent endocytosis, which is critical for in vivo Notch receptor activation. We present here crystal structures of the substrate recognition domains of Mib1, both in isolation and in complex with peptides derived from Notch ligands. The structures, in combination with biochemical, cellular, and in vivo assays, show that Mib1 contains two independent substrate recognition domains that engage two distinct epitopes from the cytoplasmic tail of the ligand Jagged1, one in the intracellular membrane proximal region and the other near the C terminus. Together, these studies provide insights into the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer by Mind bomb E3 ligases, illuminate a key event in ligand-induced activation of Notch receptors, and identify a potential target for therapeutic modulation of Notch signal transduction in disease. PMID:25747658

  5. Evaluation of the antipsoriatic activity of Aloe vera leaf extract using a mouse tail model of psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Dhanabal, S P; Priyanka Dwarampudi, L; Muruganantham, N; Vadivelan, R

    2012-04-01

    Aloe vera gel is used traditionally for the treatment of skin diseases, including psoriasis. An ethanolic extract of the gel was assessed for antipsoriatic activity using a mouse tail model of psoriasis. The extract produced a significant differentiation in the epidermis, as seen from its degree of orthokeratosis (85.07 ± 3.36%) when compared with the negative control (17.30 ± 4.09%). This was equivalent to the effect of the standard positive control, tazarotene (0.1%) gel, which showed a 90.03 ± 2.00% degree of orthokeratosis. The ethanolic extract of Aloe vera leaf gel also produced a significant increase in relative epidermal thickness when compared with the control group, whereas the standard tazarotene showed no change. Taken together, the extract showed an overall antipsoriatic activity of 81.95%, compared with 87.94 for tazarotene, in the mouse tail model for psoriasis. PMID:21915932

  6. Use of cemented paste backfill in arsenic-rich tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamberg, Roger; Maurice, Christian; Alakangas, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Gold is extracted by cyanide leaching from inclusions in arsenopyrite from a mine in the north of Sweden. The major ore mineral assemblage consists of pyrrhotite and arsenopyrite-loellingite. Effluents from the gold extraction were treated with Fe2(SO4)3, with the aim to form stable As-bearing Fe-precipitates (FEP). The use of the method called cemented paste backfill (CPB) is sometimes suggested for the management of tailings. In CPB, tailings are commonly mixed with low proportions (3 - 7 %) of cement and backfilled into underground excavated area. To reduce costs, amendments such as granulated blast furnace slag (GBFS), biofuel fly ash (BFA) and cement kiln dust (CKD) are used for partial replacement of cement in CPB due to their pozzolanic and alkaline properties. The objective for this study was to evaluate the leaching behaviour of As in CPB-mixtures with low proportions (1 - 3 %) of BFA and ordinary cement and unmodified tailings. The selection of CPB-recipies was made based on technical and economical criterias to adress the demands deriving from the mining operations. Speciation of the As in ore and tailings samples revealed that mining processes have dissolved the majority of the arsenopyrite in the ore, causing secondary As phases to co-precipitate with newly formed FEP:s. Tank leaching tests (TLT) and weathering cells (WCT) were used to compare leaching behaviour in a monolithic mass contra a crushed material. Quantification of the presumed benefit of CPB was made by calculation of the cumulative leaching of As. Results from the leaching tests (TLT and WCT) showed that the inclusion of As-rich tailings into a cementitious matrix increased leaching of As. This behaviour could partially be explained by an increase of pH. The addition of alkaline binder materials to tailings increased As leaching due to the relocation of desorbed As from FEPs into less acid-tolerant species such as Ca-arsenates and cementitious As-phases. Unmodified tailings generated an acidic environment in which As-bearing FEPs were stable. The addition of binders increased the tailings' acid-neutralizing capacity and introduced more Ca-ions and Fe-precipitates into the tailings matrix, both of which may facilitate As adsorption and reduce the potential for sulphide oxidation on a long-term basis.

  7. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. Nonideal Sorption-Desorption and Extensive Elution Tailing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, A. E.; Akyol, N. H.; Schnaar, G. A.; Johnson, G. R.; Yolcubal, I.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Contamination of subsurface environments by organic compounds continues to pose a risk to the environment. Sorption is a critical process that influences the transport and fate of organic contaminants. Contaminant mobility, bioavailability, and the effectiveness of remediation efforts are mediated in part by sorption/desorption processes. Miscible-displacement experiments were conducted to characterize long-term, low-concentration elution tailing associated with sorption/desorption processes. A variety of soils and aquifer sediments, representing a range of particle-size distributions and organic-carbon contents, were employed, and trichloroethene (TCE) was used as the model organic compound. Trichloroethene transport exhibited extensive elution tailing for all media, with several hundred to several thousand pore volumes of water flushing required to reach the detection limit (~0.1 ?g/L). The elution tailing was more extensive for the media with higher organic-carbon contents and associated retardation factors. However, when normalized by retardation, the extent of tailing did not correlate directly to organic-carbon content. These latter results suggest that differences in the geochemical nature of organic carbon (e.g., composition, structure) among the various media influenced observed behavior. A mathematical model incorporating nonlinear, rate-limited sorption/desorption described by a continuous-distribution function was used to successfully simulate trichloroethene transport, including the extensive elution tailing.

  9. Characterization of Emergent Data Networks Among Long-Tail Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, Mostafa; Kumar, Praveen; Hedstrom, Margaret; Myers, James; Plale, Beth; Marini, Luigi; McDonald, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Data curation underpins data-driven scientific advancements. It manages the information flux across multiple users throughout data life cycle as well as increases data sustainability and reusability. The exponential growth in data production spanning across the Earth Science involving individual and small research groups, which is termed as log-tail data, increases the data-knowledge latency among related domains. It has become clear that an advanced framework-agnostic metadata and ontologies for long-tail data is required to increase their visibility to each other, and provide concise and meaningful descriptions that reveal their connectivity. Despite the advancement that has been achieved by various sophisticated data management models in different Earth Science disciplines, it is not always straightforward to derive relationships among long-tail data. Semantic data clustering algorithms and pre-defined logic rules that are oriented toward prediction of possible data relationships, is one method to address these challenges. Our work advances the connectivity of related long-tail data by introducing the design for an ontology-based knowledge management system. In this work, we present the system architecture, its components, and illustrate how it can be used to scrutinize the connectivity among datasets. To demonstrate the capabilities of this "data network" prototype, we implemented this approach within the Sustainable Environment Actionable Data (SEAD) environment, an open-source semantic content repository that provides a RDF database for long-tail data, and show how emergent relationships among datasets can be identified.

  10. Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. [UMTRA project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The mission of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is explicitly stated and directed in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, hereinafter referred to as the Act.'' Title I of the Act authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake remedial action at designated inactive uranium processing sites (Attachment 1 and 2) and associated vicinity properties containing uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials derived from the processing site. The purpose of the remedial actions is to stabilize and control such uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials in a safe and environmentally sound manner to minimize radiation health hazards to the public. The principal health hazards and environmental concerns are: the inhalation of air particulates contaminated as a result of the emanation of radon from the tailings piles and the subsequent decay of radon daughters; and the contamination of surface and groundwaters with radionuclides or other chemically toxic materials. This UMTRA Project Plan identifies the mission and objectives of the project, outlines the technical and managerial approach for achieving them, and summarizes the performance, cost, and schedule baselines which have been established to guide operational activity. Estimated cost increases by 15 percent, or if the schedule slips by six months. 4 refs.

  11. Design plans for an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter.

    PubMed

    Otto, Aaron; Butcher, Greg Q; Messina, Troy C

    2011-01-01

    While the pedagogical benefits of incorporating inquiry driven labs into an undergraduate curriculum are well established, often the prohibitive costs of providing equipment for such labs limits the types of experiences that can be offered. For example, the lab portion of Advanced Neuroscience at Centenary College of Louisiana consists of a semester-long research project developed by the students. Frequently, these junior- and senior-level students generate interesting research questions that must be culled or scaled back simply due to a lack of appropriate equipment. In the most recent iteration of the class, the students wanted to examine analgesia using the tail flick test, a measure of spinal nociception. In this test a rodent subject is restrained; its tail is exposed to a heat source; and the latency to flick its tail away from the noxious stimuli is recorded. As commercial devices were far beyond the lab budget, we sought to develop an inexpensive tail flick analgesia meter that was easy to use and generated reliable data. The prototype device was tested by students in the above-mentioned class and was found to consistently produce reliable data in agreement with the literature. Here we present plans for a tail flick analgesia meter that can be constructed for $50-75, roughly 100 times cheaper than commercial devices. PMID:23626497

  12. Rescuing Alu: Recovery of New Inserts Shows LINE-1 Preserves Alu Activity through A-Tail Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Wagstaff, Bradley J.; Hedges, Dale J.; Derbes, Rebecca S.; Campos Sanchez, Rebeca; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D.; Roy-Engel, Astrid M.

    2012-01-01

    Alu elements are trans-mobilized by the autonomous non-LTR retroelement, LINE-1 (L1). Alu-induced insertion mutagenesis contributes to about 0.1% human genetic disease and is responsible for the majority of the documented instances of human retroelement insertion-induced disease. Here we introduce a SINE recovery method that provides a complementary approach for comprehensive analysis of the impact and biological mechanisms of Alu retrotransposition. Using this approach, we recovered 226 de novo tagged Alu inserts in HeLa cells. Our analysis reveals that in human cells marked Alu inserts driven by either exogenously supplied full length L1 or ORF2 protein are indistinguishable. Four percent of de novo Alu inserts were associated with genomic deletions and rearrangements and lacked the hallmarks of retrotransposition. In contrast to L1 inserts, 5? truncations of Alu inserts are rare, as most of the recovered inserts (96.5%) are full length. De novo Alus show a random pattern of insertion across chromosomes, but further characterization revealed an Alu insertion bias exists favoring insertion near other SINEs, highly conserved elements, with almost 60% landing within genes. De novo Alu inserts show no evidence of RNA editing. Priming for reverse transcription rarely occurred within the first 20 bp (most 5?) of the A-tail. The A-tails of recovered inserts show significant expansion, with many at least doubling in length. Sequence manipulation of the construct led to the demonstration that the A-tail expansion likely occurs during insertion due to slippage by the L1 ORF2 protein. We postulate that the A-tail expansion directly impacts Alu evolution by reintroducing new active source elements to counteract the natural loss of active Alus and minimizing Alu extinction. PMID:22912586

  13. Flea abundance on black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) increases during plague epizootics.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Daniel W; Gage, Kenneth L; Montenieri, John A; Antolin, Michael F

    2009-06-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) on the Great Plains of the United States are highly susceptible to plague, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis, with mortality on towns during plague epizootics often approaching 100%. The ability of flea-borne transmission to sustain disease spread has been questioned because of inefficiency of flea vectors. However, even with low individual efficiency, overall transmission can be increased if flea abundance (the number of fleas on hosts) increases. Changes in flea abundance on hosts during plague outbreaks were recorded during a large-scale study of plague outbreaks in prairie dogs in north central Colorado during 3 years (2004-2007). Fleas were collected from live-trapped black-tailed prairie dogs before and during plague epizootics and tested by PCR for the presence of Y. pestis. The predominant fleas were two prairie dog specialists (Oropsylla hirsuta and Oropsylla tuberculata cynomuris), and a generalist flea species (Pulex simulans) was also recorded from numerous mammals in the area. The three species differ in seasonal abundance, with greatest abundance in spring (February and March) and fall (September and October). Flea abundance and infestation intensity increased during epizootics and were highest on prairie dogs with Y. pestis-infected fleas. Seasonal occurrence of epizootics among black-tailed prairie dogs was found to coincide with seasonal peaks in flea abundance. Concentration of infected fleas on surviving animals may account for rapid spread of plague during epizootics. In particular, the role of the generalist flea P. simulans was previously underappreciated. PMID:19492944

  14. Environmental Risk Assessment System for Phosphogypsum Tailing Dams

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Tang, Xiaolong; Yi, Honghong; Li, Kai; Zhou, Lianbi; Xu, Xianmang

    2013-01-01

    This paper may be of particular interest to the readers as it provides a new environmental risk assessment system for phosphogypsum tailing dams. In this paper, we studied the phosphogypsum tailing dams which include characteristics of the pollution source, environmental risk characteristics and evaluation requirements to identify the applicable environmental risk assessment methods. Two analytical methods, that is, the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and fuzzy logic, were used to handle the complexity of the environmental and nonquantitative data. Using our assessment method, different risk factors can be ranked according to their contributions to the environmental risk, thereby allowing the calculation of their relative priorities during decision making. Thus, environmental decision-makers can use this approach to develop alternative management strategies for proposed, ongoing, and completed PG tailing dams. PMID:24382947

  15. Asphalt emulsion sealing of uranium mill tailings. 1980 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hartley, J.N.; Koehmstedt, P.L; Esterl, D.J.; Freeman, H.D.; Buelt, J.L.; Nelson, D.A.; Elmore, M.R.

    1981-05-01

    Studies of asphalt emulsion sealants conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have demonstrated that the sealants are effective in containing radon and other potentially hazardous material within uranium tailings. The laboratory and field studies have further demonstrated that radon exhalation from uranium tailings piles can be reduced by greater than 99% to near background levels. Field tests at the tailings pile in Grand Junction, Colorado, confirmed that an 8-cm admix seal containing 22 wt% asphalt could be effectively applied with a cold-mix paver. Other techniques were successfully tested, including a soil stabilizer and a hot, rubberized asphalt seal that was applied with a distributor truck. After the seals were applied and compacted, overburden was applied over the seal to protect the seal from ultraviolet degradation.

  16. [Leaching kinetics of josephinite tailings with sulfuric acid].

    PubMed

    Chen, An-An; Zhou, Shao-Qi; Huang, Peng-Fei

    2013-07-01

    Leaching is the most important step of josephinite tailing recycle technology. This step can separate the valuable metal Mg from Si and other impure metal. Effects of sulfuric acid on leaching Mg efficiency from josephinite tailings were investigated. To obtain the leaching behavior, a modified unreacted shrinking core model that based on the experimental data was used to determine the dissolution kinetic parameters. The model was significant and showed that the dissolution of Mg2+ in josephinite tailing was controlled by the produce layer diffusion, apparent activation reaction energy E = 34.04 kJ x mol(-1). The produce layers obstruct the forward reaction of the dissolution of Mg2+. PMID:24028005

  17. Curved tails in polymerization-based bacterial motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutenberg, Andrew D.; Grant, Martin

    2001-08-01

    The curved actin ``comet-tail'' of the bacterium Listeria monocytogenes is a visually striking signature of actin polymerization-based motility. Similar actin tails are associated with Shigella flexneri, spotted-fever Rickettsiae, the Vaccinia virus, and vesicles and microspheres in related in vitro systems. We show that the torque required to produce the curvature in the tail can arise from randomly placed actin filaments pushing the bacterium or particle. We find that the curvature magnitude determines the number of actively pushing filaments, independent of viscosity and of the molecular details of force generation. The variation of the curvature with time can be used to infer the dynamics of actin filaments at the bacterial surface.

  18. Measurements of atmospheric turbulence effects on tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, Martin J.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Signor, David B.; Mosher, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of atmospheric turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. In contradiction to current theories, increasing rotor inflow and rotor thrust were found to increase turbulence ingestion noise. This is the final report of Task 13A--Helicopter Tail Rotor Noise, of the NASA/United Kingdom Defense Research Agency cooperative Aeronautics Research Program.

  19. Radon diffusion in candidate soils for covering uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Silker, W.B.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    Diffusion coefficients were measured for radon in 34 soils that had been identified by mill personnel as candidate covers for their tailings piles in order to reduce radon emission. These coefficients referred to diffusion in the total pore space of the soils. They were measured in the laboratory by a steady-state method using soil columns compacted to greater than 80% of their Proctor maximum packing densities but with moisture contents generally less than would be expected at a tailings site. An empirical equation was used to extrapolate measured coefficients to value expected at soil-moisture contents representative of tailings sites in the western United States. Extrapolated values for silty sands and clayey sands ranged from 0.004 to 0.06 cm/sup 2//s. Values for inorganic silts and clays ranged from 0.001 to 0.02 cm/sup 2//s.

  20. Empirical study of the tails of mutual fund size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzkopf, Yonathan; Farmer, J. Doyne

    2010-06-01

    The mutual fund industry manages about a quarter of the assets in the U.S. stock market and thus plays an important role in the U.S. economy. The question of how much control is concentrated in the hands of the largest players is best quantitatively discussed in terms of the tail behavior of the mutual fund size distribution. We study the distribution empirically and show that the tail is much better described by a log-normal than a power law, indicating less concentration than, for example, personal income. The results are highly statistically significant and are consistent across fifteen years. This contradicts a recent theory concerning the origin of the power law tails of the trading volume distribution. Based on the analysis in a companion paper, the log-normality is to be expected, and indicates that the distribution of mutual funds remains perpetually out of equilibrium.

  1. Method for controlling flocculant addition to tar sand tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Fuhr, B.J.; Liu, J.K.

    1981-08-04

    The hot water extraction process for recovering bitumen from tar sand produces a large volume of solids-laden aqueous tailings as a waste product. The solids in the tailings stream may be flocculated by the addition of time and the components of the stream then separated into a water-free solids phase and a clarified water phase. During flocculation, the zeta potential of the stream is monitored. It rises from an initial negative zeta potential, as the lime is added. Flocculation is terminated when the zeta potential is about zero. At this point, the tailings are in optimum condition for separation into the water-free solids phase and the clarified water phase. Separation is preferably effected by vacuum filtration.

  2. H4 tail interactions revealed by fluorescent fluctuation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurse, Nathan; Yuan, Chongli

    2015-03-01

    Post-translational modifications to histone tails nave been shown to play a large role in dictating the conformation of chromatin. Structural changes in chromatin can play a large role in gene expression as compact chromatin can occlude transcriptional machinery. The role of the flexible regions of H4 N terminal tails is investigated using fluorescent correlation spectroscopy and the photon counting histogram. The combination of these techniques allows for the distinction between intra-array and inter-array interactions, as well as reveals structural changes that result from these interactions. The H4 tail was found to partake in attractive intra-array interactions that compact the 6x167 nucleosome arrays but did not partake in inter-array interactions that lead to oligomerization.

  3. The Anatomy of the Long Tail of Consumer Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broder, Andrei

    The long tail of consumer demand is consistent with two fundamentally different theories. The first, and more popular hypothesis, is that a majority of consumers have similar tastes and only few have any interest in niche content; the second, is that everyone is a bit eccentric, consuming both popular and niche products. By examining extensive data on user preferences for movies, music, web search, and web browsing, we found overwhelming support for the latter theory. Our investigation suggests an additional factor in the success of "infinite-inventory" retailers such as Netflix and Amazon: besides the significant revenue obtained from tail sales, tail availability may boost head sales by offering consumers the convenience of "one-stop shopping" for both their mainstream and niche interests.

  4. The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex.

    PubMed

    Borazjani, Iman; Daghooghi, Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    The tail (caudal fin) is one of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern it creates is fundamental to understanding how its motion generates locomotor forces. A mechanism that is known to greatly enhance locomotor forces in insect and bird flight is the leading edge vortex (LEV) reattachment, i.e. a vortex (separation bubble) that stays attached at the leading edge of a wing. However, this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis on the trailing wake, and the fact that the flow does not separate along the body of undulating swimmers. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the vortex reattachment at the leading edge of the fish tail using three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of self-propelled virtual swimmers with different tail shapes. We show that at Strouhal numbers (a measure of lateral velocity to the axial velocity) at which most fish swim in nature (approx. 0.25) an attached LEV is formed, whereas at a higher Strouhal number of approximately 0.6 the LEV does not reattach. We show that the evolution of the LEV drastically alters the pressure distribution on the tail and the force it generates. We also show that the tail's delta shape is not necessary for the LEV reattachment and fish-like kinematics is capable of stabilising the LEV. Our results suggest the need for a paradigm shift in fish-like swimming research to turn the focus from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the tail. PMID:23407826

  5. The fish tail motion forms an attached leading edge vortex

    PubMed Central

    Borazjani, Iman; Daghooghi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    The tail (caudal fin) is one of the most prominent characteristics of fishes, and the analysis of the flow pattern it creates is fundamental to understanding how its motion generates locomotor forces. A mechanism that is known to greatly enhance locomotor forces in insect and bird flight is the leading edge vortex (LEV) reattachment, i.e. a vortex (separation bubble) that stays attached at the leading edge of a wing. However, this mechanism has not been reported in fish-like swimming probably owing to the overemphasis on the trailing wake, and the fact that the flow does not separate along the body of undulating swimmers. We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of the vortex reattachment at the leading edge of the fish tail using three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of self-propelled virtual swimmers with different tail shapes. We show that at Strouhal numbers (a measure of lateral velocity to the axial velocity) at which most fish swim in nature (approx. 0.25) an attached LEV is formed, whereas at a higher Strouhal number of approximately 0.6 the LEV does not reattach. We show that the evolution of the LEV drastically alters the pressure distribution on the tail and the force it generates. We also show that the tail's delta shape is not necessary for the LEV reattachment and fish-like kinematics is capable of stabilising the LEV. Our results suggest the need for a paradigm shift in fish-like swimming research to turn the focus from the trailing edge to the leading edge of the tail. PMID:23407826

  6. Heavy metal leaching from mine tailings as affected by plants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, D.; Schwab, A.P.; Banks, M.K.

    1999-12-01

    A column experiment was conducted to determine the impact of soil cover and plants on heavy metal leaching from mine tailings and heavy metal contaminated soil. Columns made of PVC were constructed with 30 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm subsoil covered by 30 cm of mine tailings followed by 0, 30, or 60 cm of clean topsoil. Two grasses, tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) and big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), were grown in the columns. The columns were leached at a slow rate for 1 yr with a 0.001 M CaCl{sub 2} solution under unsaturated conditions. The presence of both tall fescue and big bluestem increased Zn and Cd concentrations in the leachate. Lead concentrations in leachates were not affected by the presence of plants. Although plants generally reduced the total amount of water leached, total mass of Zn and Cd leached generally was not impacted by plants. Total mass of Pb leached was positively correlated with total leachate collected from each column. Covering the mine tailings with 60 cm of topsoil increased the mass of Zn and Cd leached relative to no topsoil. When the subsoil was absent, Zn and Cd leaching increased by as much as 20-fold, verifying the ability of soil to act as a sink for metals. Mine tailing remediation by establishing vegetation can reduce Pb movement but may enhance short-term Cd and Zn leaching. However, the changes were relatively small and do not outweigh the benefits of using vegetation in mine tailings reclamation.

  7. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000 Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers.

  8. Spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of mine tailings.

    PubMed

    Placencia-Gómez, Edmundo; Parviainen, Annika; Slater, Lee; Leveinen, Jussi

    2015-02-01

    Mine tailings impoundments are a source of leachates known as acid mine drainage (AMD) which can pose a contamination risk for surrounding surface and groundwater. Methodologies which can help management of this environmental issue are needed. We carried out a laboratory study of the spectral induced polarization (SIP) response of tailings from the Haveri Au-Cu mine, SW Finland. The primary objectives were, (1) to determine possible correlations between SIP parameters and textural properties associated with oxidative-weathering mechanisms, mineralogical composition and metallic content, and (2) to evaluate the effects of the pore water chemistry on SIP parameters associated with redox-inactive and redox-active electrolytes varying in molar concentration, conductivity and pH. The Haveri tailings exhibit well defined relaxation spectra between 100 and 10,000Hz. The relaxation magnitudes are governed by the in-situ oxidative-weathering conditions on sulphide mineral surfaces contained in the tailings, and decrease with the oxidation degree. The oxidation-driven textural variation in the tailings results in changes to the frequency peak of the phase angle, the imaginary conductivity and chargeability, when plotted versus the pore water conductivity. In contrast, the real and the formation electrical conductivity components show a single linear dependence on the pore water conductivity. The increase of the pore water conductivity (dominated by the increase of ions concentration in solution) along with a transition to acidic conditions shifts the polarization peak towards higher frequencies. These findings show the unique sensitivity of the SIP method to potentially discriminate AMD discharges from reactive oxidation zones in tailings, suggesting a significant advantage for monitoring threatened aquifers. PMID:25528133

  9. no tail integrates two modes of mesoderm induction

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Steven A.; Tümpel, Stefan; Dubrulle, Julien; Schier, Alexander F.; Smith, James C.

    2010-01-01

    During early zebrafish development the nodal signalling pathway patterns the embryo into three germ layers, in part by inducing the expression of no tail (ntl), which is essential for correct mesoderm formation. When nodal signalling is inhibited ntl fails to be expressed in the dorsal margin, but ventral ntl expression is unaffected. These observations indicate that ntl transcription is under both nodal-dependent and nodal-independent regulation. Consistent with these observations and with a role for ntl in mesoderm formation, some somites form within the tail region of embryos lacking nodal signalling. In an effort to understand how ntl is regulated and thus how mesoderm forms, we have mapped the elements responsible for nodal-dependent and nodal-independent expression of ntl in the margin of the embryo. Our work demonstrates that expression of ntl in the margin is the consequence of two separate enhancers, which act to mediate different mechanisms of mesoderm formation. One of these enhancers responds to nodal signalling, and the other to Wnt and BMP signalling. We demonstrate that the nodal-independent regulation of ntl is essential for tail formation. Misexpression of Wnt and BMP ligands can induce the formation of an ectopic tail, which contains somites, in embryos devoid of nodal signalling, and this tail formation is dependent on ntl function. Similarly, nodal-independent tail somite formation requires ntl. At later stages in development ntl is required for notochord formation, and our analysis has also led to the identification of the enhancer required for ntl expression in the developing notochord. PMID:20215349

  10. Health status of mule deer and white-tailed deer herds on the Rocky Mountain Arsenal

    SciTech Connect

    Creekmore, T.E.; Franson, J.C.; Sileo, L. [National Wildlife Health Research Center, Madison, WI (United States); Griess, J.M.; Roy, R.R. [Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City, CO (United States); Baker, D.L. [Colorado Division of Wildlife, Ft. Collins, CO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal is a fenced, 6,900-ha Superfund site under remediation by the US Army and the Shell Oil Company. A variety of environmental contaminants including organochlorine pesticides, metals, and nerve-gas-production by-products are in the soil or in the water on the site. The authors evaluated the health of 18 radio-collared deer (13 mule deer [Odocoileus hemionus] and 5 white-tailed deer [O. virginianus]) collected by gunshot. Prior to collection, more than 4,000 locations of the 18 deer were plotted during a period of more than 2 years. Blood samples from the euthanized animals were collected for serologic, hematologic, and contaminant evaluations. Necropsies were preformed and tissues collected for histopathologic examinations and environmental contaminants analyses. Results indicate that the physical conditions of the mule deer were fair/good and of the white-tailed deer were good. Antibody prevalence against epizootic hemorrhagic disease serotype 2 was 85% and bovine virus diarrhea 56%. Two mule deer had severe testicular atrophy, and one of these animals also had antler deformities. Three mule deer had alopecia with dermatitis and hyperkeratosis. Results of heavy metal, and organochlorine pesticide analyses from blood and tissue samples and other analyses will be presented.

  11. Predicting PDF tails of flux in plasma sheath region

    E-print Network

    Anderson, Johan

    2009-01-01

    This letter provides the first prediction of the probability density function (PDF) of flux $R$ in plasma sheath sheath region in magnetic fusion devices which is characterized by dynamical equations with exponential non-linearities. By using a non-perturbative statistical theory (instantons), the PDF tails of first moment are shown to be modified Gumbel distribution which represents a frequency distribution of the extreme values of the ensemble. The non-Gaussian PDF tails that are enhanced over Gaussian predictions are the result of intermittency caused by short lived coherent structures (instantons).

  12. The symmetries and scaling of tidal tails in galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struck, Curtis; Smith, Beverly J.

    2012-05-01

    We present analytic models for the formation and evolution of tidal tails and related structures following single or multiple impulsive disturbances in galaxy collisions. Since the epicyclic approximation is not valid for large radial excursions, we use orbital equations of the form we call p-ellipses (a class of precessing ellipses). These have been shown to provide accurate representations of orbits in logarithmic and power-law halo potentials. In the simplest case of an impulsive collision yielding a purely tidal disturbance the resulting tidal tails have simple structure. Scalings for their maximum lengths and other characteristics as non-linear functions of the tidal amplitude and the exponent of the power-law potentials are described. The analytic model shows that azimuthal caustics (orbit crossing zones of high density also seen in numerical models) are produced generically in these tails at a fixed azimuth relative to the point of closest approach. Long tails, with high-order caustics at their base, and ocular waveforms are also produced at larger amplitudes. The analysis is then extended to non-linear disturbances and multiple encounters, which break the symmetries of purely tidal perturbations. The p-ellipse orbital solutions are similar to those in the linear tidal case. However, as the strength of the non-linear terms is varied the structure of the resulting forms varies from symmetric tails to one-armed plumes. Cases with two or more impulse disturbances are also considered as the simplest analytic models distinguishing between prograde and retrograde encounters. The model shows explicitly how tail growth differs in the two cases. In the prograde case a specific mechanism for the formation of tidal dwarf galaxies at the end of tails is suggested as a consequence of resonance effects in multiple or prolonged encounters. Qualitative comparisons to Arp Atlas systems suggest that the limiting analytic cases are realized in real systems. For example, we identify a few Arp systems which have multiple tidal strands meeting near the base of long tails. These may be swallowtail caustics, where dissipative gas streams are converging and triggering star formation. Ultraviolet and optical images reveal luminous knots of young stars at these 'hinge clump' locations.

  13. Tailings dam-break flow - Analysis of sediment transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleixo, Rui; Altinakar, Mustafa

    2015-04-01

    A common solution to store mining debris is to build tailings dams near the mining site. These dams are usually built with local materials such as mining debris and are more vulnerable than concrete dams (Rico et al. 2008). of The tailings and the pond water generally contain heavy metals and various toxic chemicals used in ore extraction. Thus, the release of tailings due to a dam-break can have severe ecological consequences in the environment. A tailings dam-break has many similarities with a common dam-break flow. It is highly transient and can be severely descructive. However, a significant difference is that the released sediment-water mixture will behave as a non-Newtonian flow. Existing numerical models used to simulate dam-break flows do not represent correctly the non-Newtonian behavior of tailings under a dam-break flow and may lead to unrealistic and incorrect results. The need for experiments to extract both qualitative and quantitative information regarding these flows is therefore real and actual. The present paper explores an existing experimental data base presented in Aleixo et al. (2014a,b) to further characterize the sediment transport under conditions of a severe transient flow and to extract quantitative information regarding sediment flow rate, sediment velocity, sediment-sediment interactions a among others. Different features of the flow are also described and analyzed in detail. The analysis is made by means of imaging techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry and Particle Tracking Velocimetry that allow extracting not only the velocity field but the Lagrangian description of the sediments as well. An analysis of the results is presented and the limitations of the presented experimental approach are discussed. References Rico, M., Benito, G., Salgueiro, AR, Diez-Herrero, A. and Pereira, H.G. (2008) Reported tailings dam failures: A review of the European incidents in the worldwide context , Journal of Hazardous Materials, 152, 846-852 . Aleixo, R., Ozeren, Y., Altinakar, M. and Wren, D. (2014a) Velocity Measurements using Particle Tracking in Tailings dam Failure experiments, Proceedings of the 3rd IAHR-Europe conference, Porto, Portugal. Aleixo, R., Ozeren, Y., Altinakar, M. (2014b) Tailing dam-break analysis by means of a combined PIV-PTV tool, Proceedings of the River Flow Conference, Lausanne, Switzerland.

  14. Weighted Kolmogorov-Smirnov test: accounting for the tails.

    PubMed

    Chicheportiche, Rémy; Bouchaud, Jean-Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Accurate goodness-of-fit tests for the extreme tails of empirical distributions is a very important issue, relevant in many contexts, including geophysics, insurance, and finance. We have derived exact asymptotic results for a generalization of the large-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, well suited to testing these extreme tails. In passing, we have rederived and made more precise the approximate limit solutions found originally in unrelated fields, first in [L. Turban, J. Phys. A 25, 127 (1992)] and later in [P. L. Krapivsky and S. Redner, Am. J. Phys. 64, 546 (1996)]. PMID:23214537

  15. Wake patterns of the wings and tail of hovering hummingbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Douglas L.; Princevac, Marko; Pan, Hansheng; Lozano, Jesse

    2009-05-01

    The flow fields of slowly flying bats and faster-flying birds differ in that bats produce two vortex loops during each stroke, one per wing, and birds produce a single vortex loop per stroke. In addition, the circulation at stroke transition approaches zero in bats but remains strong in birds. It is unknown if these difference derive from fundamental differences in wing morphology or are a consequence of flight speed. Here, we present an analysis of the horizontal flow field underneath hovering Anna’s hummingbirds ( Calypte anna) to describe the wake of a bird flying at zero forward velocity. We also consider how the hummingbird tail interacts with the wake generated by the wings. High-speed image recording and analysis from three orthogonal perspectives revealed that the wing tips reach peak velocities in the middle of each stroke and approach zero velocity at stroke transition. Hummingbirds use complex tail kinematic patterns ranging from in phase to antiphase cycling with respect to the wings, covering several phase shifted patterns. We employed particle image velocimetry to attain detailed horizontal flow measurements at three levels with respect to the tail: in the tail, at the tail tip, and just below the tail. The velocity patterns underneath the wings indicate that flow oscillates along the ventral-dorsal axis in response to the down- and up-strokes and that the sideways flows with respect to the bird are consistently from the lateral to medial. The region around the tail is dominated by axial flows in dorsal to ventral direction. We propose that these flows are generated by interaction between the wakes of the two wings at the end of the upstroke, and that the tail actively defects flows to generate moments that contribute to pitch stability. The flow fields images also revealed distinct vortex loops underneath each wing, which were generated during each stroke. From these data, we propose a model for the primary flow structures of hummingbirds that more strongly resembles the bat model. Thus, pairs of unconnected vortex loops may be shared features of different animals during hovering and slow forward flight.

  16. Wake patterns of the wings and tail of hovering hummingbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altshuler, Douglas L.; Princevac, Marko; Pan, Hansheng; Lozano, Jesse

    The flow fields of slowly flying bats and fasterflying birds differ in that bats produce two vortex loops during each stroke, one per wing, and birds produce a single vortex loop per stroke. In addition, the circulation at stroke transition approaches zero in bats but remains strong in birds. It is unknown if these difference derive from fundamental differences in wing morphology or are a consequence of flight speed. Here, we present an analysis of the horizontal flow field underneath hovering Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna) to describe the wake of a bird flying at zero forward velocity. We also consider how the hummingbird tail interacts with the wake generated by the wings. High-speed image recording and analysis from three orthogonal perspectives revealed that the wing tips reach peak velocities in the middle of each stroke and approach zero velocity at stroke transition. Hummingbirds use complex tail kinematic patterns ranging from in phase to antiphase cycling with respect to the wings, covering several phase shifted patterns. We employed particle image velocimetry to attain detailed horizontal flow measurements at three levels with respect to the tail: in the tail, at the tail tip, and just below the tail. The velocity patterns underneath the wings indicate that flow oscillates along the ventral-dorsal axis in response to the down- and up-strokes and that the sideways flows with respect to the bird are consistently from the lateral to medial. The region around the tail is dominated by axial flows in dorsal to ventral direction. We propose that these flows are generated by interaction between the wakes of the two wings at the end of the upstroke, and that the tail actively defects flows to generate moments that contribute to pitch stability. The flow fields images also revealed distinct vortex loops underneath each wing, which were generated during each stroke. From these data, we propose a model for the primary flow structures of hummingbirds that more strongly resembles the bat model. Thus, pairs of unconnected vortex loops may be shared features of different animals during hovering and slow forward flight.

  17. Metals in obex and retropharyngeal lymph nodes of Illinois white-tailed deer and their variations associated with CWD status.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Nelda A; Novakofski, Jan; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Kelly, Amy; Satterthwaite-Phillips, Damian; Ruiz, Marilyn O; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra

    2015-01-01

    Prion proteins (PrP(C)) are cell membrane glycoproteins that can be found in many cell types, but specially in neurons. Many studies have suggested PrP(C)'s participation in metal transport and cellular protection against stress in the central nervous system (CNS). On the other hand PrP(Sc), the misfolded isoform of PrP(C) and the pathogenic agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE), has been associated with brain metal dyshomeostasis in prion diseases. Thus, changes in metal concentration associated with protein misfolding and aggregation have been reported for human and animal prion diseases, as well as for other neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. The use of metal concentrations in tissues as surrogate markers for early detection of TSEs has been suggested. Studies on the accumulation of metals in free-ranging white-tailed deer have not been conducted. This study established concentrations of copper, iron, manganese, and magnesium in 2 diagnostic tissues used for CWD testing (obex and retropharyngeal lymph nodes (RLN)). We compared these concentrations between tissues and in relation to CWD status. We established reference intervals (RIs) for these metals and explored their ability to discriminate between CWD-positive and CWD-negative animals. Our results indicate that independent of CWD status, white-tailed deer accumulate higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Mg in RLN than in obex. White-tailed deer infected with CWD accumulated significantly lower concentrations of Mn and Fe than CWD-negative deer. These patterns differed from other species infected with prion diseases. Overlapping values between CWD positive and negative groups indicate that evaluation of these metals in obex and RLN may not be appropriate as a diagnostic tool for CWD infection in white-tailed deer. Because the CWD-negative deer were included in constructing the RIs, high specificities were expected and should be interpreted with caution. Due to the low sensitivity derived from the RIs, we do not recommend using metal concentrations for disease discrimination. PMID:25695915

  18. Helping to Combat Chronic Wasting Disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2003-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a disease of the nervous system that results in distinctive brain lesions. CWD affects elk, white-tailed deer, and mule deer, but has not been documented in livestock or humans. The origins of the disease, as well as the modes of transmission, remain unknown. Infected deer and elk appear robust and healthy in the early stages of CWD; clinical signs might not show for years. Mortality typically occurs within months after the appearance of clinical signs. The route of transmission is unknown; likely routes include direct transmission between infected and noninfected animals and infected animals contaminating local environments.

  19. Refsum Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Organizations What is Refsum Disease? Adult Refsum disease (ARD) is a rare genetic disease that causes weakness ... neuropathy). Due to a genetic abnormality, people with ARD disease lack the enzyme in peroxisomes that break ...

  20. Fabry's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Fabry Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Fabry Disease? Is there any ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fabry Disease? Fabry disease is caused by the lack of ...

  1. Graves' Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... information Autoimmune diseases fact sheet Diabetes fact sheet Hashimoto's disease fact sheet Illnesses and disabilities Lupus fact ... of overactive thyroid. It is closely related to Hashimoto's disease, another autoimmune disease affecting the thyroid. Return ...

  2. Behcet's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Behcet's Disease Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What is Behcet's Disease? Is there any ... Trials Organizations Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Behcet's Disease? Behcet's disease is a rare, chronic inflammatory disorder. ...

  3. Lentil Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major lentil diseases around the world have been described and reviewed. The major diseases include Ascochyta blight, Fusarium wilt, Botrytis Gray Mold, Lentil rust, Stemphylium blight, Anthracnose, and virus diseases. The management practices for these diseases are also presented....

  4. Crohn's disease

    MedlinePLUS

    Inflammatory bowel disease - Crohn's disease; Regional enteritis; Ileitis; Granulomatous ileocolitis; IBD- Crohn's disease ... Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2010:chap 111. Lichenstein GR. Inflammatory bowel disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine . ...

  5. A retrospective study of postmortem findings in red-tailed hawks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.; Thomas, N.J.; Smith, M.R.; Robbins, A.H.; Newman, S.; McCartin, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    We studied necropsy results from carcasses of 163 red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center from 1975 through 1992. The most frequent postmortem finding was emaciation of unknown etiology, diagnosed in 33 (20%) carcasses. Proportionally more juveniles than adults were emaciated. Evidence of non-gunshot trauma, often suggestive of collision with vehicles or structures near roadways, was found in 29 (18%) birds. Of 25 (15%) toxicoses, 20 were attributed to agricultural pesticides, including famphur (4), fenthion (3), carbofuran (2), phosphamidon (2), endrin (1), and unidentified organophosphorus compounds (8). Lead and strychnine poisoning were diagnosed in two birds each, and selenium poisoning in one. Diseases, including aspergillosis, tuberculosis, pasteurellosis, and pox, were found in 21 (13%) hawks. Gunshot and electrocution were each diagnosed in six (4%) birds, one (0.6%) was trapped, miscellaneous conditions were found in 10 (6%), and no diagnosis could be determined for 32 (19%) of the carcasses.

  6. 78 FR 68411 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ...A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat (crawfish) from the People's Republic...Than Fair Value: Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of...

  7. 76 FR 30648 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ...Administration [A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final...administrative review of freshwater crawfish tail meat (``crawfish tail meat'') from the People's Republic of...

  8. 78 FR 24723 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Initiation of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ...A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the [[Page 24724

  9. 77 FR 21529 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ...A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China...Department) published Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of...

  10. 75 FR 64249 - Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China: Extension of the Final Results...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ...A-570-848] Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of China...duty order on freshwater crawfish tail meat from the People's Republic of China. See Freshwater Crawfish Tail Meat From the People's Republic of...

  11. One and Two-Tailed t-Tests

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Stockburger, David W.

    This website, created by David W. Stockburger, provides a basic explanation with diagrams of the one and two-tailed t-tests. The page does more than simply provide explanations of the test, but it actually compares the t-tests showing their strengths and weaknesses. This is a nice presentation that is apart of a larger piece of work by the author.

  12. Extremal Dependence of Copulas: A Tail Density August 2011

    E-print Network

    Li, Haijun

    for extremal dependence analysis on a vine copula, for which the tail density can be written recursively, vine copula. 1 Introduction The dependence among multivariate extremes can be described by the relative and vine copulas, are specified only by densities. Let X = (X1, . . . , Xd) be a random vector

  13. Does Gray-Tailed Vole Activity Affect Soil Quality?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Voles are well-known crop pests, especially when peak populations are present, but their role in soil fertility and impacts on agricultural sustainability are not well understood. Five months after the abrupt disappearance of a peak in a gray-tailed vole (Microtus canicaudus) population, we examined...

  14. REPRODUCTIVE AND BEHAVIORAL BIOLOGY OF THE GRAY-TAILED VOLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the reproductive biology of the gray-tailed vole and relates behavioral and morphological features in the mating system. he breeding season extended from March through December, mean litter size was 4.4 young, and hip (scent) glands were prominent in adult ma...

  15. Mark-Recapture of White-Tailed Deer Using DNA

    E-print Network

    Gray, Matthew

    11/10/2010 1 Mark-Recapture of White-Tailed Deer Using DNA Sampling from Scat Matthew J. Goode M and biases Lost Marks Equal Catchability Closed Population Scat Randomly Dispersed Goal Determine if genetic markers from scat can give reliable population estimates 543 2 1 O B J E C TI V E 1 - D E N S I TY

  16. BVDV infection of pregnant white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: Serological, experimental and individual case studies have explored the presence and pathogenesis of the virus in wild ungulates; however there remain large gaps in knowledge regarding BVDV infection in non-bovine species. Previously we have shown that inoculation of white-tailed deer (Odoco...

  17. A simplified metabolism cage and tail cup for young rats

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. L. Frape; J. Wilkinson; L. G. Chubb

    1970-01-01

    SUMMARY A description is given of an inexpensive metabolism cage, in which powdered diets can be fed without measurable loss. Coprophagy is completely eliminated in rats fitted with a new design of tail cup, and in this way total collections of faeces and urine are readily achieved. Cups of a similar design have been fitted both to young male and

  18. [Morphogenetic changes during newt tail regeneration under changed gravity conditions].

    PubMed

    Radugina, E A; Grigorian, É N

    2012-01-01

    Gravity-dependent shape alterations in newt tail regenerates are described, which were previously noticed in experiments onboard satellites Foton M2, M3 and in corresponding laboratory controls. Laboratory conditions were developed that allow reproducing this phenomenon persistently in the adult newts Pleurodeles waltl (Michahelles, 1830). The newts kept in an aquarium (in partial weightlessness) after 1/3 tail amputation developed normal lanceolate regenerates, while those that stayed on a moist mat (exposed to greater gravity than in aquarium) developed curved tail regenerates. Dynamics of the shape alterations were described using computer morphometric analysis. The curve was shown to develop at stage III of regeneration and to be caused by bending of the developing axial structures: the ependymal tube and the cartilage rode. Cellular processes were described that accompany the tail shape changes, such as cell migration and formation of dense aggregates. Unequal proliferation throughout the wound epidermis and blastema was revealed using BrdU assay. Proliferation increased within dorsal and apical regions of the regenerates in the newts kept on the mat cell compared with the aquarian animals. PMID:23136735

  19. Tissue Plasminogen Activator Binding to the Annexin II Tail Domain

    E-print Network

    Chait, Brian T.

    and Gaseous Ion Chemistry, Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10021 Tissue plasminogen activator binds annexin II but not by its "core" fragment (residues 25­339). Two overlapping "tail" pep- tides was confirmed upon specific inhibition by the hexapep- tide LCKLSL (residues 7­12). Expressed C9G annexin II

  20. 1. OVERALL VIEW OF SPILLWAY SHOWING BAFFLE WALL AND TAIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OVERALL VIEW OF SPILLWAY SHOWING BAFFLE WALL AND TAIL WATERS, WITH POWERHOUSE (MI-98-C) AND SUBSTATION (MI-98-D) AT LEFT. VIEW TO SOUTH. - Cooke Hydroelectric Plant, Spillway, Cook Dam Road at Au Sable River, Oscoda, Iosco County, MI

  1. Annealed upper tails for the energy of a polymer

    E-print Network

    Amine Asselah

    2009-09-29

    We study the upper tails for the energy of a randomly charged symmetric and transient random walk. We assume that only charges on the same site interact pairwise. We consider annealed estimates, that is when we average over both randomness, in dimension three or more. We obtain a large deviation principle, and an explicit rate function for a large class of charge distributions.

  2. Landscape effects on black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Whitney C. Johnson; Sharon K. Collinge

    2004-01-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) increasingly compete for available habitat with human development in the Colorado Front Range. Because the effects of increased urbanization on prairie dog colonies are unknown, we studied how landscape context affects prairie dog density in Boulder County, Colorado, USA. We used burrow density as a proxy for prairie dog density because these variables were correlated

  3. Edinburgh Research Explorer HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU LOSE?

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    copyright please contact openaccess@ed.ac.uk providing details, and we will remove access to the work immediately and investigate your claim. Download date: 14. Jun. 2014 #12;Heads I win, Tails you lose? A career been used as a lens through which to scrutinise corporate control (Cosh and Hughes, 1987; Jensen

  4. Tail-Measurability in Monotone Latent Variable Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Jules L.; Junker, Brian W.

    1997-01-01

    Latent variable models for an infinite sequence (or universe) of manifest variables that may be discrete, continuous, or a combination of both, are considered. A main theorem is presented that characterizes when it is possible to construct latent variable models that satisfy unidimensionality, monotonicity, conditional independence, and tail

  5. Heavy-Tailed Probability Distributions in the World Wide Web

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Azer Bestavros; Mark E. Crovella; S Murad; Murad S. Taqqu; Raisa Feldman; Robert Adler

    1998-01-01

    The explosion of the World Wide Web as a medium for informationdissemination has made it important to understand its characteristics, inparticular the distribution of its file sizes. This paper presents evidencethat a number of file size distributions in the Web exhibit heavy tails,including files requested by users, files transmitted through the network,transmission durations of files, and files stored on servers.

  6. Theileriosis in a White-tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) Fawn

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael J. Yabsley; Tracie C. Quick; Susan E. Little

    A white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) fawn was collected in Missouri (USA) and submitted for diagnostic evaluation. Necropsy and histologic examination revealed severe Amblyomma americanum infestation, pronounced icterus, and marked hemosiderin deposition in the liver and spleen. Whole blood evaluation revealed a normocytic normochro- mic anemia and a piroplasm parasitemia of ap- proximately 70%. The piroplasm was identified as Theileria cervi

  7. The fine structure of differentiating muscle in the salamander tail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth D. Hay

    1963-01-01

    Thin methacrylate sections of developing tails of Amblystoma opacum larvae were examined in the electron microscope and a series of stages in the differentiation of the myotome musculature was reconstructed from electron micrographs and earlier light microscopic studies of living muscle. The earliest muscle cell precursor that can be clearly identified is a round or oval cell with abundant cytoplasm

  8. Moisture content analysis of covered uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, D.W.; Beedlow, P.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1981-12-01

    The use of vegetation and rock covers to stabilize uranium mill tailings cover systems is being investigated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A modeling study of moisture movement through the tailings and cover layers was initiated to determine the effect of the stabilizing techniques. The cover system was simulated under climatic conditions occurring at Grand Junction, Colorado. The cover consisted of a layer of wet clay/gravel mix followed by a capillary barrier of washed rock and a surface layer of fill soil. Vegetation and rock were used to stabilize the surface layer. The simulation yielded moisture content and moisture storage values for the tailings and cover system along with information about moisture losses due to evaporation, transpiration, and drainage. The study demonstrates that different surface stabilization treatments lead to different degrees of moisture retention in the covered tailings pile. The evapotranspiration from vegetation can result in a relatively stable moisture content. Rock covers, however, may cause drainage to occur because they reduce evaporation and lead to a subsequent increase in moisture content. It is important to consider these effects when designing a surface stabilization treatment. Drainage may contribute to a groundwater pollution problem. A surface treatment that allows the cover system to dry out can increase the risk of atmospheric contamination through elevated radon emission rates.

  9. A new trajectory concept for exploring the earth's geomagnetic tail

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. W. Farquhar; D. W. Dunham

    1981-01-01

    An innovative trajectory technique for a magnetotail mapping mission is described which can control the apsidal rotation of an elliptical earth orbit and keep its apogee segment inside the tail region. The required apsidal rotation rate of approximately 1 deg\\/day is achieved by using the moon to carry out a prescribed sequence of gravity-assist maneuvers. Apogee distances are alternately raised

  10. 4-Poster Tick Management and White-tailed Deer Management

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    Update on: 4-Poster Tick Management and White-tailed Deer Management Tim Green Environmental · Is a delivery system to kill ticks on deer NYSDEC required supplemental testing · Experiments conducted 2010: · Car deer accidents didn't really change · Deer didn't move out of home ranges · Raccoons, squirrels

  11. MOVEMENTS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE IN TEXAS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    KEITH A. ARNOLD; LEON J. FOLSE

    The Great-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) is an interesting species in that it has expanded its distribution rather dramatically in the 20th century (Selander and Giller 1961, Oherholser 1974). The species has received much attention, including systematics (Selander and Giller 1961)) vocal behavior (Kok 1971)) food habits (Davis and Arnold 1972)) and growth rate and thermoregulation (Gotie and Kroll 1973). Little

  12. AFC-Enabled Vertical Tail System Integration Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, Helen P.; Brandt, John B.; Lacy, Douglas S.; Whalen, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    This document serves as the final report for the SMAAART AFC-Enabled Vertical Tail System Integration Study. Included are the ground rule assumptions which have gone into the study, layouts of the baseline and AFC-enabled configurations, critical sizing information, system requirements and architectures, and assumed system properties that result in an NPV assessment of the two candidate AFC technologies.

  13. The effect of tip shields on a horizontal tail surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dronin, Paul V; Ramsden, Earl I; Higgins, George J

    1928-01-01

    A series of experiments made in the wind tunnel of the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aeronautics, New York University, on the effect of tip shields on a horizontal tail surface are described and discussed. It was found that some aerodynamic gain can be obtained by the use of tip shields though it is considered doubtful whether their use would be practical.

  14. Note on late-time tails of spherical nonlinear waves

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, Piotr; Rostworowski, Andrzej [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Chmaj, Tadeusz [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Cracow University of Technology, Krakow (Poland)

    2008-07-15

    We consider the longtime behavior of small amplitude solutions of the semilinear wave equation ()squarelg(){phi}={phi}{sup p} in odd d{>=}5 spatial dimensions. We show that for the quadratic nonlinearity (p=2) the tail has an anomalously small amplitude and fast decay. The extension of the results to more general nonlinearities involving first derivatives is also discussed.

  15. Avian pox in a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. E. Fitzner; R. A. Miller; C. A. R. A. Pierce; S. E. Rowe

    1985-01-01

    Avian pox has been reported in at least 60 species of birds belonging to 20 different families. However, poxvirus infection in birds of prey is apparently uncommon. On 18 May 1981, an adult male red-tailed hawk was found on the US Department of Energy's Arid Land Ecology Reserve in Benton County, Washington. The bird was incapable of flight and was

  16. 25. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND. SHOWS ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND. SHOWS ROASTER ON LEFT EDGE OF VIEW. THE SECONDARY THICKENER No. 7 IS OFF VIEW TO THE RIGHT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  17. Helicopter tail rotor blade-vortex interaction noise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Albert R. George; S.-T. Chou

    1987-01-01

    A study is made of helicopter tail rotor noise, particularly that due to the interactions with main rotor tip vortices. Summarized here are present analysis, the computer codes, and the results of several test cases. Amiet's unsteady thin airfoil theory is used to calculate the acoustics of blade-vortex interaction. The noise source is modelled as a force dipole resulting from

  18. LEFT WING AND FUSELAGE FROM THIRD LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LEFT WING AND FUSELAGE FROM THIRD LEVEL OF TAIL DOCK STAND. THE WING IS PREPARED FOR BASIC LUBRICATION WITH E SPOILER BOARDS UP AND ALL SAFETY LOCKS IN PLACE TO PROTECT MECHANICS FROM INJURY. ON THE WING AN INSPECTOR CHECKS THE ACTUATORS. - Greater Buffalo International Airport, Maintenance Hangar, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  19. 2. VIEW OF EAST TAILING DAM (FOREGROUND), LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF EAST TAILING DAM (FOREGROUND), LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST UP WASH TOWARD ORE BIN, OVERBURDEN, ADITS, AND ROAD SHOWN IN CA-290-1. MILL SITE IS UP AND TO THE RIGHT OF THIS VIEW. STANDARD FIFTY-GALLON DRUM IN FOREGROUND GIVES SCALE OF WALL. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. Searching for Heavy Tails in Web Robot Traffic

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Derek Doran; Swapna S. Gokhale

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study on whether the heavy-tailed trends reported in Web traffic are present in the traffic generated by Web robots. The study is motivated by three factors: (i) a significant volume of Web server traffic can now be attributed to Web robots, (ii) the Web is continuing to evolve into a semantic and service-oriented environment where Web

  1. 7. View northwest showing tail end of west bascule leaf ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View northwest showing tail end of west bascule leaf and pierced arch concrete rails and recessed panel railing piers around the west pedestrian alcove on the north side of the bridge. - Yellow Mill Bridge, Spanning Yellow Mill Channel at Stratford Avenue, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  2. Tracking the global tilt using tails of radio guide stars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erez N. Ribak; Roberto Ragazzoni; Vadim A. Parfenov

    2000-01-01

    The problem of global tilt arises when the downgoing light from an artificial guide star traces in reverse the upgoing laser beam. The problem also exists if the upgoing beam is in the radio, since we still cannot determine its absolute position to the required accuracy. We propose a way to solve this problem by tracing the tails of the

  3. Ribbing disease

    PubMed Central

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-01-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc. PMID:20351994

  4. Ribbing disease.

    PubMed

    Mukkada, Philson J; Franklin, Teenu; Rajeswaran, Rangasami; Joseph, Santhosh

    2010-02-01

    Ribbing disease is a rare sclerosing dysplasia that involves long tubular bones, especially the tibia and femur. It occurs after puberty and is reported to be more common in women. In this article we describe how Ribbing disease can be differentiated from diseases like Engelmann-Camurati disease, van Buchem disease, Erdheim-Chester disease, osteoid osteoma, chronic osteomyelitis, stress fracture, etc. PMID:20351994

  5. Calcium Causes a Conformational Change in Lamin A Tail Domain that Promotes Farnesyl-Mediated Membrane Association

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowski, Agnieszka; Qin, Zhao; Coffey, Kelli; Kodali, Ravi; Buehler, Markus J.; Lösche, Mathias; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2013-01-01

    Lamin proteins contribute to nuclear structure and function, primarily at the inner nuclear membrane. The posttranslational processing pathway of lamin A includes farnesylation of the C-terminus, likely to increase membrane association, and subsequent proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminus. Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome is a premature aging disorder wherein a mutant version of lamin A, ?50 lamin A, retains its farnesylation. We report here that membrane association of farnesylated ?50 lamin A tail domains requires calcium. Experimental evidence and molecular dynamics simulations collectively suggest that the farnesyl group is sequestered within a hydrophobic region in the tail domain in the absence of calcium. Calcium binds to the tail domain with an affinity KD ? 250 ?M where it alters the structure of the Ig-fold and increases the solvent accessibility of the C-terminus. In 2 mM CaCl2, the affinity of the farnesylated protein to a synthetic membrane is KD ? 2 ?M, as measured with surface plasmon resonance, but showed a combination of aggregation and binding. Membrane binding in the absence of calcium could not be detected. We suggest that a conformational change induced in ?50 lamin A with divalent cations plays a regulatory role in the posttranslational processing of lamin A, which may be important in disease pathogenesis. PMID:23708364

  6. Burst Tails from SGR J1550-5418 Observed with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer

    E-print Network

    Mus, Sinem Sasmaz; Kaneko, Yuki; Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Aydin, Berk

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of our extensive search using the Bayesian block method for long tails following short bursts from a magnetar, SGR J1550-5418, over all RXTE observations of the source. We identified four bursts with extended tails, most of which occurred during its 2009 burst active episode. The durations of tails range between ~13 s and over 3 ks, which are much longer than the typical duration of bursts. We performed detailed spectral and temporal analysis of the burst tails. We find that the spectra of three tails show a thermal nature with a trend of cooling throughout the tail. We compare the results of our investigations with the properties of four other extended tails detected from SGR 1900+14 and SGR 1806-20 and suggest a scenario for the origin of the tail in the framework of the magnetar model.

  7. White-tailed deer population dynamics and management on the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    E-print Network

    Whisenant, Shane Weston

    2004-11-15

    -tailed deer: ecology and management. Stackpole Books, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA. 26 Miller, L. A., B. E. Johns, and G. J. Killian. 2000. Immunocontraception of white-tailed deer using native and recombinant zona pellucida vaccines. Animal...

  8. Environmental impact assessment of tailings dispersal from a uranium mine using toxicity testing protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Rippon, G.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Canberra (Australia); Riley, S.J. [Univ. of Western Sydney-Nepean, Kingswood (Australia)

    1996-12-01

    Toxicity testing is a means of establishing the environmental risk of uranium tailings release. It is valuable in designing tailings containment structures because it assists in setting acceptable levels of risk of the design. This paper presents details of toxicity tests of the tailings from Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia. The results suggest that the non-radiological toxicity of the tailings is low. The environmental risk of a tailings release is more likely to be related to the physical impacts of the tailings, including infilling of billabongs and changes in the sedimentology of riparian ecosystems rather than their biogeochemical impact. Two major results were: (1) water from treatment with washed tailing fines was not toxic to Hydra viridissima, and (2) mixtures of washed tailings fines and natural floodplain sediment (overlying water or elutriates) were not toxic to Hydra viridissima or Moinodaphnia macleayi. 33 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Wilson Bull., 107(4), 1995, pp. 615-628 ARE RED-TAILED HAWKS AND

    E-print Network

    Meyers, Ron

    -NOCTURNAL DIETARY COUNTERPARTS? CARL D. MARTI' AND MICHAEL N. KOCHERT* ABSTRACT.-Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis 15 May 1995. Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) and Great Horned Owls (B&o virginianus) have been

  10. HEPATIC MINERALS OF WHITE-TAILED AND MULE DEER IN THE SOUTHERN BLACK HILLS, SOUTH DAKOTA

    E-print Network

    concentrations from sympatric white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus status, and species. Key words: Black Hills, elements, fire, liver, mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus, Odocoileus virginianus, reproduction, South Dakota, white-tailed deer. INTRODUCTION Limited information

  11. SOCIAL GROUP FISSION AND GENE DYNAMICS AMONG BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS

    E-print Network

    Foltz, David W.

    SOCIAL GROUP FISSION AND GENE DYNAMICS AMONG BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS (CYNOMYS LUDOVICIANUS fission. Key words: coancestry, competition, cooperation, Cynomys ludovicianus, dispersal, fission, gene al. 1990). Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus; hereafter, simply ``prairie dogs

  12. Emergent Data-Networks from Long-Tail Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, M.; Kumar, P.; Marini, L.; Hedstrom, M.; Myers, J. D.; Plale, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Synthesis of scientific data coming from individuals and small research group activities, known as long-tail data, with the existing resources elucidates useful scientific knowledge. In general, long-tail data are irreplaceable, expensive to reproduce, infrequently reused, follow no predefined data model, and they are often bounded in different information systems. The contextual relationships across the many attributes among such data in a data collection are herewith defined as data-network. These relationships have the potential to provide deep insights for the scientific challenges that require multidisciplinary interaction by identifying a new data object in the broader context of other data objects, and characterizing its spatial and temporal dependencies with others. Despite the advancement that has been achieved in various geoscience information models, it is not always straightforward to identify and characterize the contextual relationships among long-tail data because information models focus on profiling data attributes more than exploring data tie-ins. To address this need, we have designed the Long Tail Data Networks (LTDN) engine, which depends on a context-based approach to analyze the data attributes, predict data contextual relationships, and publish these relationships as a RDF graph. The engine groups data using their geographic location in spatial collections, and applies binary logic predicates to analyze the spatial, temporal, and variable attributes associated with data entities of each spatial collection to infer their relationships. Here we present the design of the LTDN engine and demonstrate its application for predicting the latent connectivity among long-tail data collections. To demonstrate the capabilities of the engine, we implemented this approach within the Sustainable Environment Actionable Data (SEAD) environment, an open-source semantic content repository that supports long-tail data curation and preservation, and show how relationships among datasets can be extracted. Results of this work demonstrates the capabilities of LTDN engine to predict the latent connectivity among long-tail geoscience data across their domain boundaries, as well as temporal and spatial windows to establish dynamic Web-based data-networks in the Semantic Web context.

  13. Plant and soil reactions to nickel ore processed tailings

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, P.J.; Volk, V.V.; Gardner, E.H.

    1982-07-01

    Greenhouse and laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the effect that tailings, produced during the processing of nickeliferous laterite ores by a proposed U.S. Bureau of Mines Process, would have on plant growth and soil properties. The tailings contained soluble salts (7.6 mmhos/cm), NH/sub 4/-N (877 ..mu..g/g), Ni (0.28%), Mn (82 ..mu..g/g DTPA-extractable), Cr (0.44%), P (2 and 6 ..mu..g/g acid F- and NaHCO/sub 3/-extractable, respectively), and Ca and Mg (1.0 and 20.7 meq/100 g NH/sub 4/Ac-extractable, respectively). Water leaching decreased the NH/sub 4/-N concentration to 53 ..mu..g/g and the EC to 0.4 mmhos/cm by removal of (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and MgSO/sub 4/ salts. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) was grown on Eightlar clay soil (skeletal, serpentinitic, mesic Typic Xerochrept) amended with 0, 223, 446, and 669 g tailings/kg soil and pure, unleached tailings for 32 weeks in the greenhouse. Seedling establishment of plants grown on soil amended at the highest tailings rate and the pure tailings was initially slow, but plants grown on soil amended at lower rates established readily and grew well. Plant P was <0.24%, while plant Ca concentrations were <0.45% throughout the growth period even though Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 2/)/sub 2/ and gypsum had been added. Ammonium acetate-extractable Ca at the end of the growth period was <5.0 meq/100 g on all amended soils.The Mn, Ni, and Cr concentrations of plants grown on treated soils were within normal ranges, although soil-analysis values were higher than commonly found. It is recommended that the tailings be washed to reduce NH/sub 4/-N and soluble salts prior to revegetation, and that native soil be added to the surface to reduce crusting.

  14. Arsenic mobility in soils impacted by tailings at Zimapán, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurora Armienta, M.; Resendiz, Isabel; Múgica, Violeta; Cruz, Olivia; Aguayo, Alejandra; Ceniceros, Nora

    2014-05-01

    The Zimapán mining zone, in Central México is one of the worldwide sites known for As contamination. For more than 20 years and until recently, As-rich groundwater, mainly due to mineralization in a limestone aquifer, was an important source of As exposure to the inhabitants. In addition, decades of ore processing have produced hazardous wastes (tailings), many of them settled in the town outskirts. Although mineralogical and chemical differences exist among the various deposits; every one has high As contents (up to several thousands mg/kg) and other toxic elements that may be released to the nearby soils. To assess As mobility in soils impacted by tailings, total and sequential fractionation determinations were performed in 120 superficial and 40 cm depth samples collected at various distances near three of the impoundments. Higher total As concentrations were measured in the dry (up to 51,534 mg/kg) with respect to the rainy season (up to 23,570 mg/kg) indicating the occurrence of As wash off by rain. Although concentrations were lower in the deep regarding the superficial samples at most sites, As contents reached several thousands mg/kg at 40 cm depth indicating also its vertical transport that may reach the shallow aquifer. Sequential extractions showed differences between soils impacted by highly oxidized (red) tailings and low oxidized (gray) deposits. Most of the As occurs in the Fe-Mn oxides fraction (up to 92%) followed by the organic matter and sulfides fraction (up to 52 %) in soils close to red tailings, while organic matter and sulfide fraction contain most of the As (up to 95%) in soil samples close to low-oxidized deposits. Arsenic proportion in the residual fraction increased with distance from oxidized tailings. Low pH values (from 2.0 to 2.5) in superficial soils revealed the influence of acid mine drainage at distances up to 40 m from the red deposit. In contrast, the lowest pH was 7.1 in soils impacted by low-oxidized deposits, reflecting the limestone environment. Arsenic airborne transport was evidenced by the presence of a total As concentration of 30,780 mg/kg in soils collected at 120 m in front of the tailings crossing a ravine. Although sequential extraction showed that most of the As is present in relatively low-mobility fractions, total As concentrations indicate that tailings impoundments constitute another source of environmental As exposure.

  15. Ixodid ticks on white-tailed deer and feral swine in Florida.

    PubMed

    Allan, S A; Simmons, L A; Burridge, M J

    2001-06-01

    A state-wide survey was conducted in Florida during the 1997-99 hunting seasons to examine white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and feral swine (Sus scrofa) for potential indigenous vectors of the rickettsial agent of heartwater, Cowdria ruminantium. A total of 504 white-tailed deer and 166 feral swine was examined from 30 wildlife management areas across the state. Amblyomma maculatum, an experimental vector of C. ruminantium, was common on both deer and feral swine throughout the state. Of the collection of 3,169 ticks, 34.5% were Ixodes scapularis Say, 34.0% Amblyomma americanum (L.), 25.5% Amblyomma maculatum Koch, 5.8% Dermacentor variabilis (Say), 0.4% Ixodes affinis Neumann, 0.03% Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Latreille) and 0.01% Amblyomma auricularium (Conil). The only exotic tick collected was A. auricularium, which is found on armadillos in Central and South America and is not known to be associated with any disease. Overall, the most prevalent species on deer were I. scapularis (51.1%) and A. maculatum (35.8%), with A. americanum less prevalent (16.0%) and D. variabilis (3.0%) and I. affinis (1.9%) rare. On feral swine, the most prevalent species were I. scapularis (69.7%) and D. variabilis (56.9%), with A. maculatum (16.2%) and A. americanum (4.6%) less common. The geographic distribution of ticks differed significantly throughout the state. Both A. maculatum and Dermacentor variabilis were more prevalent on deer from southern Florida compared to northern and central Florida. In contrast, A. americanum were more prevalent in northern and central Florida but rare in southern Florida, and I. scapularis were more common in southern compared to northern Florida. These geographic differences may reflect differences in the risk of tick-borne diseases to domestic animals, wildlife and humans within Florida. PMID:11469190

  16. Integrated Tail Buffet Loads on the F/A-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyn, Larry A.; James, Kevin D.

    1994-01-01

    The unsteady pressures acting on the vertical tails of a full-scale F/A-18 fighter aircraft were studied to gain a better understanding of tail-buffet loads that frequently occur on fighter aircraft operating at high angles-of-attack. Data for the study were acquired during two test entries in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel wherein the aircraft was tested at wind speeds up to 100 knots and at angles-of-attack from 20deg to 40deg. For the purposes of this paper, the primary difference between the two tests is that, during the first wind-tunnel entry, the pressure transducers were more sparsely spaced and covered less of the fin than during the second entry. In addition to a brief description of the spectral analysis methods used for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures and loads, an analysis of the effects of sensor density on estimating integrated loads is presented. It was found that the integrated loads determined from sparse sensor arrays are significantly higher than actual loads. However, a modest increase in the number of sensors can greatly reduce the error and a method for correcting load estimates from sparse sensor arrays is also suggested. The results for the time-averaged, power-spectral analysis are then presented for the tail-fin bending moments. Power spectra are presented for the aircraft at zero sideslip over an angle-of-attack range from 20deg to 40deg and for the aircraft at an angle-of-attack of 30deg over a sideslip range from -16deg to 16deg. Since the aircraft was equipped with a removable leading-edge extension (LEX) fence to reduce tail-buffet loads, the tail-fin bending moment loads are also presented for that configuration. The LEX fence is shown to significantly reduce bending moment loads over a broad range frequencies, for all the aircraft attitudes presented.

  17. The macrophage scavenger receptor CD163: endocytic properties of cytoplasmic tail variants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marianne Jensby Nielsen; Mette Madsen; Holger J. Møller; Søren K. Moestrup

    2006-01-01

    CD163 is the monocyte\\/macrophage- specific receptor for haptoglobin-hemoglobin (Hp- Hb) complexes. The cytoplasmic tail of human CD163 exists as a short tail variant and two long tail variants. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that all three CD163 variants are substantially expressed in blood, liver, and spleen, and the short tail variant is the predominant mRNA species. Using cell trans-

  18. Interactions of tailings leachate with local liner materials found at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania.

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, M.E.; Gee, G.W.; Serne, R.J.

    1984-04-01

    The mill tailings site at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania is the first mill site to receive remedial action under the Department of Energy's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program. Part of this remedial action will require excavating the 53,500 m/sup 3/ (70,000 yd/sup 3/) of tailings on the site having a specific activity exceeding 100 pCi/g, and encapsulating these contaminated tailings in a clay-lined cell. As part of the remedial action effort, Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been studying the interactions of tailings and tailings leachate with locally occurring clays proposed for liner materials. These studies include physical and chemical characterization of amended and unamended local clays, chemical characterization of the tailings, column studies of tailings leached with deionized water, and column studies of clays contacted with tailings solutions to determine the attenuation properties of the proposed liner materials. Column studies of tailings leached with deionized water indicated that the Canonsburg tailings could represent a source of soluble radium-226 and uranium-238, several trace metals, cations, and the anions SO/sub 4/, NO/sub 3/, and Cl. Of these soluble contaminants, uranium-238, radium-226, the trace metals As and Mo, and the anions F and SO/sub 4/ were present at levels exceeding maximum concentration levels in the tailings leaching column effluents. However, local clays, both in amended and unamended form were effective in attenuating contaminant migration. The soil amendments tested failed to increase radium attenuation. The tailings leaching studies indicated that the tailings will produce leachates of neutral pH and relatively low contaminant levels for at least 200 years. We believe that compacting the tailings within the encapsulation cell will help to reduce leaching of contaminants from the liner system, since very low permeabilities (<10/sup -8/ cm/s) were observed for even slightly compacted tailings materials.

  19. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003

    Microsoft Academic Search

    2004-01-01

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural

  20. Long Tail or Steep Tail? A Field Investigation into How Online Popularity Information Affects the Distribution of Customer Choices

    E-print Network

    Tucker, Catherine

    2007-12-07

    The internet has made it easier for customers to find and buy a wide variety of products. This may lead to a "long tail" effect as more customers buy low-volume products. However, the internet has also made it easier for ...

  1. Environmental impact assessment of tailings dispersal from a uranium mine using toxicity testing protocols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. D. Rippon; S. J. Riley

    1996-01-01

    Toxicity testing is a means of establishing the environmental risk of uranium tailings release. It is valuable in designing tailings containment structures because it assists in setting acceptable levels of risk of the design. This paper presents details of toxicity tests of the tailings from Ranger Uranium Mine, Northern Territory, Australia. The results suggest that the non-radiological toxicity of the

  2. Max-Weight Scheduling in Queueing Networks With Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-print Network

    Markakis, Mihalis G.

    We consider the problem of scheduling in a single-hop switched network with a mix of heavy-tailed and light-tailed traffic and analyze the impact of heavy-tailed traffic on the performance of Max-Weight scheduling. As a ...

  3. THE DYNAMICS OF SNAKE HARASSMENT BY BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS

    E-print Network

    Loughry, Jim

    THE DYNAMICS OF SNAKE HARASSMENT BY BLACK-TAILED PRAIRIE DOGS by W. J. LOUGHRY')') (Animal Behavior-tailed prairie dogs, have been observed to harass snakes (Owings &Coss, 1977; OWINGS&OWINGS, 1979; HENNESSYet at status, and time (before and after pup emergence) on how black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys tudovicianus

  4. Spatial variation in keystone effects: small mammal diversity associated with black-tailed prairie dog colonies

    E-print Network

    Collinge, Sharon K.

    vary spatially. Black-tailed prairie dogs Cynomys ludovicianus occur from Canada to Mexico in grasslands of the western Great Plains of North America. Black-tailed prairie dogs alter vegetation and dig composition have earned them status as a keystone species. We examined the impact of black-tailed prairie dogs

  5. The tale of the tail: limb function and locomotor mechanics in Alligator mississippiensis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jeffrey S. Willey; Audrone R. Biknevicius; Stephen M. Reilly; Kathleen D. Earls

    2004-01-01

    Crocodilians tow their large muscular tail behind them during terrestrial bouts when they high walk (a walking trot). Analysis of ground reaction forces in the American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) revealed the consequences of tail-dragging. Individual limb and tail ground reaction force records show that the hindlimbs of Alligator take on a substantial role in body mass support consistent with the

  6. Edinburgh Research Explorer Localised axial progenitor cell populations in the avian tail bud

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Localised axial progenitor cell populations in the avian tail bud, 'Localised axial progenitor cell populations in the avian tail bud are not committed to a posterior Hox. Further (secondary body) development derives from a caudal cap of tissue, the tail bud, which generates

  7. MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE

    E-print Network

    1099 MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE Abstract: Movements (e.g., migration, dispersal) of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) vary greatly to effectively manage deer populations. Movements of white-tailed deer have been well documented in forest

  8. GENETIC STRUCTURING OF COUES WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES

    E-print Network

    GENETIC STRUCTURING OF COUES WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES By Roy G. Lopez STRUCTURING OF COUES WHITE-TAILED DEER IN THE SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES Roy G. Lopez The manuscripts in this thesis examine different aspects of white-tailed deer. In the first manuscript I used microsatellite DNA

  9. D. Aaron Haines Student Projects Fecal Testing, Baiting & White-tailed Deer

    E-print Network

    Boal, Jean

    D. Aaron Haines Student Projects Fecal Testing, Baiting & White-tailed Deer January 2013 ­ Present Due to the potential negative impacts of baiting on white­tailed deer, and the philosophy of fair as internationally. The objective of this study is to determine whether baiting activity on white-tailed deer can

  10. Evaluation of Reproductive Behavior in White-tailed Deer through Genetic Parentage Analysis

    E-print Network

    Ditchkoff, Steve

    Evaluation of Reproductive Behavior in White-tailed Deer through Genetic Parentage Analysis of the requirements for the Degree of Master of Science Auburn, Alabama August 6, 2011 Keywords: White-tailed deer have utilized genetic technology to examine reproductive behavior in white-tailed deer through

  11. On the Formation and Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies in Tidal Tails

    E-print Network

    Weilbacher, Peter

    On the Formation and Evolution of Dwarf Galaxies in Tidal Tails Dissertation zur Erlangung des;Abstract Tidal Dwarf Galaxies (TDGs) are a class of dwarf galaxies that form in tidal tails of interacting their surrounding tidal tail and therefore true Tidal Dwarf Galaxies. Finally, we combined new near-infrared imaging

  12. Research Article Habitat Use by Sympatric Mule and White-Tailed

    E-print Network

    Wallace, Mark C.

    competition, compositional analysis, habitat use, mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus, O. virginianus, sympatry, Texas, white- tailed deer. White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and mule deer (O. hemionus) occur, and Fisheries Management, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409, USA Abstract White-tailed deer (Odocoileus

  13. Leverage Causes Fat Tails and Clustered Volatility By Stefan Thurner, J. Doyne Farmer and John Geanakoplos

    E-print Network

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Leverage Causes Fat Tails and Clustered Volatility By Stefan Thurner, J. Doyne Farmer and John funds use leverage, price fluctuations become heavy tailed and display clustered volatility, similar to what is observed in real markets. Previous explanations of fat tails and clustered volatility depended

  14. Characterization and availability of cyanide in solid mine tailings from gold extraction plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gérald J. Zagury; Kahina Oudjehani; Louise Deschênes

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the availability and fate of cyanide in gold mill solid tailings. For this purpose, aged (6–9 years) and recently discharged (3 months) tailings were sampled at various depths from two gold mining sites in Quebec (Canada). A physicochemical characterization of the tailings along with a bacterial enumeration was performed and batch-leaching tests

  15. Evidence of three new members of malignant catarrhal fever virus group in Muskox (Ovibos moschatus), Nubian ibex (Capra nubiana), and gemsbok (Oryx gazella)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Li, H.; Gailbreath, K.; Bender, L.C.; West, K.; Keller, J.; Crawford, T.B.

    2003-01-01

    Six members of the malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) virus group of ruminant rhadinoviruses have been identified to date. Four of these viruses are clearly associated with clinical disease: alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1) carried by wildebeest (Connochaetes spp.); ovine herpesvirus 2 (OvHV-2), ubiquitous in domestic sheep; caprine herpesvirus 2 (CpHV-2), endemic in domestic goats; and the virus of unknown origin found causing classic MCF in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus; MCFV-WTD). Using serology and polymerase chain reaction with degenerate primers targeting a portion of the herpesviral DNA polymerase gene, evidence of three previously unrecognized rhadinoviruses in the MCF virus group was found in muskox (Ovibos moschatus), Nubian ibex (Capra nubiana), and gemsbok (South African oryx, Oryx gazella), respectively. Based on sequence alignment, the viral sequence in the muskox is most closely related to MCFV-WTD (81.5% sequence identity) and that in the Nubian ibex is closest to CpHV-2 (89.3% identity). The viral sequence in the gemsbok is most closely related to AlHV-1 (85.1% identity). No evidence of disease association with these viruses has been found. ?? Wildlife Disease Association 2003.

  16. Genetic population structure and relatedness of Colorado mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and incidence of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy or prion disease of farmed and free ranging mule deer, white tailed deer, Rocky Mountain elk, and moose in some areas of the United States. The disease is enzootic in herds of free ranging mule deer in the Rocky Mountain National ...

  17. Ectodermal dysplasias: the p63 tail.

    PubMed

    Tadini, G; Santagada, F; Brena, M; Pezzani, L; Nannini, P

    2013-02-01

    Various combinations of limb anomalies, ectodermal dysplasias and orofacial clefts characterize heterozygous mutations in the transcription factor gene p63. The causative gene is crucial during embryonic ontogenesis, mostly in the development of limbs and other ectodermal derived tissues. The pattern of mutations in six different p63-related syndromes (EEC syndrome, AEC syndrome, ADULT syndrome, LMS syndrome, RHS syndrome, SHFM syndrome) shows genotype-phenotype correlations. The most frequent p63 mutation syndrome is the EEC syndrome, characterized by ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft lip/palate. Ectodermal dysplasia is characterized by ectrodactyly often associated with syndactyly, sparse hair, dry skin, hypo-anodontia, dysplastic nails and alterations in sebaceous glands, mammary glands and nipples. The third hallmark of the EEC syndrome is orofacial clefting, in particular lip and palate. p63 mutations also cause the other five inherited syndromes: symptoms are overlapping, but each of these diseases has its own characteristic phenotypic features: for instance AEC syndrome (ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate) has as distinctive feature ankyloblepharon, while mammary glands and nipples hypoplasia are frequent findings in LMS syndrome and in ADULT syndrome (acro-dermato-ungual-lacrimal-tooth syndrome). The latter can be distinguished from other p63 syndromes by the absence of orofacial clefting and by prominent ectodermal signs. The narrowest genotype-phenotype correlation is in the EEC and AEC syndromes. All EEC missense mutations are clustered in the DNA binding domain and do not bind to DNA; in contrast, all missens mutations reported in AEC syndrome are localized in the ?-motif domain, and it has been demonstrated that they disrupt interaction with other proteins. LMS and ADULT syndrome have their own unique mutated amino-acid residues. Only two amino-acid residues are known to be mutated amongst ADULT syndrome: asparagines 6 and arginine 298. Although R298 is in the DNA binding domain, it is functionally different from the EEC mutations, because its substitution by glutamine does not lead to a loss of DNA binding, but to a gain of transactivation activity of the ?Np63? isoform. In this paper we discuss the consistent phenotypic features associated with these gain of function mutations. PMID:23407076

  18. Comparison of the breeding biology of sympatric red-tailed Hawks, White-tailed Hawks, and Crested Caracaras in south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Actkinson, M.A.; Kuvlesky, W.P., Jr.; Boal, C.W.; Brennan, L.A.; Hernandez, F.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the breeding biology of sympatric nesting Red-tailed Hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), White-tailed Hawks (Buteo albicaudatus), and Crested Caracaras (Caracara cheriway) in south Texas during 2003 and 2004. We monitored 46 breeding attempts by Red-tailed Hawks, 56 by White-tailed Hawks, and 27 by Crested Caracaras. Observed nesting success was similar for Red-tailed Hawks (62%) and Crested Caracaras (61%), but lower for White-tailed Hawks (51%). Daily survival rates (0.99) were the same for all three species. Red-tailed Hawks and White-tailed Hawks both fledged 1.13 young per nesting pair and Crested Caracaras fledged 1.39 young per nesting pair. All three species nested earlier in 2004 than in 2003; in addition, the overall nesting density of these three species almost doubled from 2003 (1.45 pairs/km2) to 2004 (2.71 pairs/km2). Estimated productivity of all three species was within the ranges reported from other studies. Given extensive and progressive habitat alteration in some areas of south Texas, and the limited distributions of White-tailed Hawks and Crested Caracaras, the presence of large ranches managed for free-range cattle production and hunting leases likely provides important habitat and may be key areas for conservation of these two species. ?? 2009 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.

  19. SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY IN FREE-RANGING MULE DEER (ODOCOILEUS HE\\/Id\\/ONUS), WHITE-TAILED DEER (ODOCOILEUS VIRGINIANUS) AND ROCKY MOUNTAIN ELK (CERVUS ELAPHUS NELSON\\/) IN NORTHCENTRAL COLORADO

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. R. Spraker; M. W. Miller; E. S. Williams; D. M. Getzy; W. J. Adrian; G. G. Schoonveld; R. A. Spowart; K. I. O'Rourke; J. M. Miller; P. A. Merz

    Between March 1981 and June 1995, a neurological disease characterized histolog- ically by spongiform encephalopathy was diagnosed in 49 free-ranging cervids from northcentral Colorado (USA). Mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) were the primary species affected and ac- counted for 41 (84%) of the 49 cases, but six Rocky Mountain elk (Cerous eluphus nelsoni) and two white-tailed deer (Odocoileus oirginianus) were also

  20. Molecular genetic dissection of mouse unconventional myosin-VA: tail region mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J D; Mermall, V; Strobel, M C; Russell, L B; Mooseker, M S; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A

    1998-01-01

    We used an RT-PCR-based sequencing approach to identify the mutations responsible for 17 viable dilute alleles, a mouse-coat-color locus encoding unconventional myosin-VA. Ten of the mutations mapped to the MyoVA tail and are reported here. These mutations represent the first extensive collection of tail mutations reported for any unconventional mammalian myosin. They identify sequences important for tail function and identify domains potentially involved in cargo binding and/or proper folding of the MyoVA tail. Our results also provide support for the notion that different myosin tail isoforms produced by alternative splicing encode important cell-type-specific functions. PMID:9560409

  1. Experimental determination of the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon: A transient photocurrent analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.P.; Chan, F.Y.M.; Zou, X.C.; Chan, Y.C.; Lam, Y.W.; Lin, S.H.; O'Leary, S.K.; Lim, P.K.

    1997-07-01

    Recent experimental developments have cast doubt on the validity of the common assumption that the distribution of tail states of hydrogenated amorphous silicon exhibits a single exponential functional form. The authors employ transient photocurrent decay measurements to determine this distribution of tail states. In their approach, however, they determine the distribution of tail states directly from the experimental data, without assuming, a priori, a specific functional form. It is found that these experimental results are consistent with other more recent experimental determinations of the distribution of tail states, suggesting the possibility of deviations from a single exponential distribution of tail states in hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  2. Surveillance of chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Japan

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kimi Shimada; Yoshifumi Iwamaru; Hiroko Hayashi; Morikazu Imamura; Masuhiro Takata; Yuko Ushiki; Kumiko Kimura; Yuichi Tagawa; Motohiro Horiuchi; Morikazu Shinagawa; Takashi Yokoyama

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) in cervids including elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer, is a member of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). CWD is a serious problem in North America. The detection of abnormal isoforms of prion protein (PrPSc) is a key factor for the diagnosis of CWD, similar to other TSEs. The surveillance program for TSEs in animals is

  3. CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE OF CAPTIVE MULE DEER: A SPONGIFORM ENCEPHALOPATHY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. S. WILLIAMS; S. YOUNG

    In the past 12 years (1967-79) a syndrome we identify as chronic wasting disease has been observed in 53 mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus) and one black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) held in captivity in several wildlife facilities in Colorado and more recently in Wyoming. Clinical signs were seen in adultdeerand includedbehavioral alterations, progressive weight loss and death in 2

  4. Geochemical modeling of cyanide in tailing dam gold processing plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodadadi, Ahmad; Monjezi, M.; Mehrpouya, H.; Dehghani, H.

    2009-09-01

    This research is aimed at investigating possible neutralization of cyanide in tailing dam of Muteh gold processing plant in Isfahan, Iran at various conditions such as pH and temperature using USEPA Visual MINTEQ geochemical model simulation. The model is based on geochemical equilibrium which uses the simultaneous solution of the non-linear mass action expressions and linear mass balance relationships to formulate and solve the multiple-component chemical equilibrium problems. In this study the concentration of aqueous species in tailing dam as an aqueous, solid and gaseous were used as input in the model. Temperature and pH variation were simulated. The results of the model indicated that cyanide may be complexes in 10 < pH < 5. In other pH values complexation is not important. The results also indicated that cyanide reduction mechanism in acidic pH and temperature above 30°C is due to cyanide acid formation which is vaporized.

  5. Dark Matter Constraints from the Sagittarius Dwarf and Tail System

    E-print Network

    Steven R. Majewski; David R. Law; Kathryn V. Johnston; Michael F. Skrutskie; Martin D. Weinberg

    2003-11-23

    2MASS has provided a three-dimensional map of the >360 degree, wrapped tidal tails of the Sagittarius (Sgr) dwarf spheroidal galaxy, as traced by M giant stars. With the inclusion of radial velocity data for stars along these tails, strong constraints exist for dynamical models of the Milky Way-Sgr interaction. N-body simulations of Sgr disruption with model parameters spanning a range of initial conditions (e.g., Sgr mass and orbit, Galactic rotation curve, halo flattening) are used to find parameterizations that match almost every extant observational constraint of the Sgr system. We discuss the implications of the Sgr data and models for the orbit, mass and M/L of the Sgr bound core as well as the strength, flattening, and lumpiness of the Milky Way potential.

  6. Mechanical vibrations from tadpoles' flapping tails transform salamander's carnivorous morphology

    PubMed Central

    Michimae, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Kinya; Wakahara, Masami

    2005-01-01

    Some prey or predator organisms exhibit striking rapid morphological plastic changes with distinct morphology under the condition of predator or prey presence. Remote chemicals propagating from the inducing agents are the prevalent induction cues for most examples of induction of distinct morphs. Sonic and visual cues, as well as chemical cues, are known as triggers for induction of behavioural plasticity. Here we show that hydraulic vibration originating from flapping tails of anuran tadpoles is a key cue in relation to induction of a distinct carnivorous morphology, a broad-headed morph, in larval salamander Hynobius retardatus, which is able to efficiently capture and handle prey. This result was further supported by the fact that simple mechanical vibrations of tail-like vinyl fins were able to induce the morph without any biological cues. Induction of the morph triggered by hydraulic vibration provides a novel concept for understanding the proximate mechanisms of induction of morphological changes. PMID:17148132

  7. Cross-tail expansion of dipolarizing flux bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiang; Angelopoulos, V.; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Yao, Zhong-Hua; Runov, A.

    2015-04-01

    Dipolarizing flux bundles (DFBs), magnetotail flux tubes with stronger, more dipolar magnetic field than the background magnetotail plasma, which are led by dipolarization fronts, typically propagate earthward within bursty bulk flows. Although DFBs are localized (typically 1-3 RE) in the cross-tail direction, many of them may combine to cause global effects, such as the substorm current wedge. Knowledge of how this local-to-global coupling happens is crucial for understanding magnetotail dynamics. We investigate how the coupling happens using multipoint observations from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms mission. Our results show that most DFBs expand in the cross-tail direction as they propagate earthward. Through such expansion, azimuthally localized DFBs can cover a wide region to cause global effects when they arrive at the inner edge of the plasma sheet.

  8. Prediction of Power System Balancing Requirement and Tail Event

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Makarov, Yuri V.; Brothers, Alan J.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Pease, John

    2010-04-30

    This paper presents a methodology for the prediction of power system balancing requirement and the probability of tail event (large imbalance between generation and load). Maintaining sufficient balancing reserves to match the difference between hourly generation schedule and real-time variable load and intermittent resources, becomes more and more challenging with the increasing penetration of intermittent energy sources. The presented methodology uses a yearly distribution and an hourly distribution of balancing requirement and tail events to provide a high level look at the issue and warn system operators of those hours when problems are most likely to occur. For real-time prediction, a Bayes Net model is constructed to model the statistical relationships between system imbalance and forecast errors, generation schedule control errors and other influential factors. The methodology will be able to provide reference information to system operators in determining the sufficiency of system balancing reserve and taking appropriate control actions.

  9. High-energy tail distributions and resonant wave particle interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leubner, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    High-energy tail distributions (k distributions) are used as an alternative to a bi-Lorentzian distribution to study the influence of energetic protons on the right- and left-hand cyclotron modes in a hot two-temperature plasma. Although the parameters are chosen to be in a range appropriate to solar wind or magnetospheric configurations, the results apply not only to specific space plasmas. The presence of energetic particles significantly alters the behavior of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes, leading to a wide range of unstable frequencies and increased growth rates. From the strongly enhanced growth rates it can be concluded that high-energy tail distributions should not show major temperature anisotropies, which is consistent with observations.

  10. Effect of inert tails on the thermodynamics of DNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Di Michele, Lorenzo; Mognetti, Bortolo M; Yanagishima, Taiki; Varilly, Patrick; Ruff, Zachary; Frenkel, Daan; Eiser, Erika

    2014-05-01

    The selective hybridization of DNA is of key importance for many practical applications such as gene detection and DNA-mediated self-assembly. These applications require a quantitative prediction of the hybridization free energy. Existing methods ignore the effects of non-complementary ssDNA tails beyond the first unpaired base. We use experiments and simulations to show that the binding strength of complementary ssDNA oligomers is altered by these sequences of non-complementary nucleotides. Even a small number of non-binding bases are enough to raise the hybridization free energy by approximately 1 kcal/mol at physiological salt concentrations. We propose a simple analytical expression that accounts quantitatively for this variation as a function of tail length and salt concentration. PMID:24750023

  11. Polar's Observations of Pc Pulsations in Near-Earth Tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Y. S.; Russell, C. T.

    2005-12-01

    When the Polar spacecraft passes the magnetospheric equator at 9 RE in the tail, very monochromatic continuous pulsations (Pc pulsations) are seen. The frequencies of the pulsations observed varies from 4 to 17 mHz which are within Pc 4 and Pc 5 pulsation frequency band. While most events are Pc 4 pulsations and waves are transverse, one event of frequency 4 mHz has a larger compressional component than transverse. The IMF during these waves is mostly radial and northward. The pulsations appear to occur during the quiet times of tail following disturbed times. Cold plasma data from TIDE on Polar has been also examined. Clear correlation between cold plasma pressure and magnetic pressure is seen in all events within the central plasma sheet, while the plasma pressure is anti-correlated with magnetic pressure when the wave is close to the boundary of the plasma sheet.

  12. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND MILL SITE IS AT TOP CENTER IN THE DISTANCE. THE DARK SPOT JUST BELOW THE TRAM TERMINAL ARE REMAINS OF THE DEWATERING BUILDING. THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS WHERE TAILINGS FROM THE MILL SETTLED IN A CYANIDE SOLUTION IN ORDER TO RECLAIM ANY GOLD CONTENT. THE PREGNANT SOLUTION WAS THEN RUN THROUGH THE ZINC BOXES ON THE GROUND AT CENTER RIGHT, WHERE ZINC SHAVINGS WERE INTRODUCED, CAUSING THE GOLD TO PRECIPITATE OUT OF THE CYANIDE SOLUTION, WHICH COULD BE USED AGAIN. THE FLAT AREA IN THE FOREGROUND WITH THE TANK AND TANK HOOPS IS THE FOOTPRINT OF A LARGE BUILDING WHERE THE PRECIPITATION AND FURTHER FILTERING AND FINAL CASTING TOOK PLACE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  13. Cytoplasmic RNA: a case of the tail wagging the dog.

    PubMed

    Norbury, Chris J

    2013-10-01

    The addition of poly(A) tails to eukaryotic nuclear mRNAs promotes their stability, export to the cytoplasm and translation. Subsequently, the balance between exonucleolytic deadenylation and selective re-establishment of translation-competent poly(A) tails by cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerases is essential for the appropriate regulation of gene expression from oocytes to neurons. In recent years, surprising roles for cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase-related enzymes that add uridylyl, rather than adenylyl, residues to RNA 3' ends have also emerged. These terminal uridylyl transferases promote the turnover of certain mRNAs but also modify microRNAs, their precursors and other small RNAs to modulate their stability or biological functions. PMID:23989958

  14. Effects of ingested atmospheric turbulence on measured tail rotor acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Signor, David B.; Yamauchi, Gloria K.; Mosher, Marianne; Hagen, Martin J.; George, Albert R.

    1992-01-01

    Results from an outdoor hover test of a full-scale Lynx tail rotor are presented. The investigation was designed to further the understanding of the acoustics of an isolated tail rotor hovering out-of-ground effect in atmospheric turbulence, without the effects of the main rotor wake or other helicopter components. Measurements include simultaneous rotor performance, noise, inflow, and far-field atmospheric turbulence. Results with grid-generated inflow turbulence are also presented. The effects of turbulence ingestion on rotor noise are quantified. Turbulence ingestion noise is found to be the dominant noise mechanism at locations near the rotor axis. At these locations, the sound radiated by the hovering rotor increases with both increasing atmospheric wind speed and ingested rms turbulent velocity.

  15. Ring-tailed lemurs: a species re-imagined.

    PubMed

    Sauther, Michelle L; Gould, Lisa; Cuozzo, Frank P; O'Mara, M Teague

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, ring-tailed lemurs have been studied continuously in the wild. As one of the most long-studied primate species, the length and breadth of their study is comparable to research on Japanese macaques, baboons and chimpanzees. They are also one of the most broadly observed of all primates, with comprehensive research conducted on their behaviour, biology, ecology, genetics, palaeobiology and life history. However, over the last decade, a new generation of lemur scholars, working in conjunction with researchers who have spent decades studying this species, have greatly enhanced our knowledge of ring-tailed lemurs. In addition, research on this species has expanded beyond traditional gallery forest habitats to now include high altitude, spiny thicket, rocky outcrop and anthropogenically disturbed coastal forest populations. The focus of this special volume is to 're-imagine' the 'flagship species of Madagascar', bringing together three generations of lemur scholars. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel. PMID:26022295

  16. A new trajectory concept for exploring the earth's geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farquhar, R. W.; Dunham, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    An innovative trajectory technique for a magnetotail mapping mission is described which can control the apsidal rotation of an elliptical earth orbit and keep its apogee segment inside the tail region. The required apsidal rotation rate of approximately 1 deg/day is achieved by using the moon to carry out a prescribed sequence of gravity-assist maneuvers. Apogee distances are alternately raised and lowered by the lunar-swingby maneuvers; several categories of the 'sun-synchronous' swingby trajectories are identified. The strength and flexibility of the new trajectory concept is demonstrated by using real-world simulations showing that a large variety of trajectory shapes can be used to explore the earth's geomagnetic tail between 60 and 250 R sub E.

  17. A new trajectory concept for exploring the earth's geomagnetic tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquhar, R. W.; Dunham, D. W.

    1981-04-01

    An innovative trajectory technique for a magnetotail mapping mission is described which can control the apsidal rotation of an elliptical earth orbit and keep its apogee segment inside the tail region. The required apsidal rotation rate of approximately 1 deg/day is achieved by using the moon to carry out a prescribed sequence of gravity-assist maneuvers. Apogee distances are alternately raised and lowered by the lunar-swingby maneuvers; several categories of the 'sun-synchronous' swingby trajectories are identified. The strength and flexibility of the new trajectory concept is demonstrated by using real-world simulations showing that a large variety of trajectory shapes can be used to explore the earth's geomagnetic tail between 60 and 250 R sub E.

  18. Elevation information in tail (EIT) technique for lidar altimetry.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yongxiang; Powell, Kathy; Vaughan, Mark; Tepte, Charles; Weimer, Carl; Beherenfeld, Mike; Young, Stuart; Winker, David; Hostetler, Chris; Hunt, William; Kuehn, Ralph; Flittner, David; Cisewski, Mike; Gibson, Gary; Lin, Bing; Macdonnell, David

    2007-10-29

    A technique we refer to as Elevation Information in Tail (EIT) has been developed to provide improved lidar altimetry from CALIPSO lidar data. The EIT technique is demonstrated using CALIPSO data and is applicable to other similar lidar systems with low-pass filters. The technique relies on an observed relation between the shape of the surface return signals (peak shape) and the detector photo-multiplier tube transient response (transient response tail). Application of the EIT to CALIPSO data resulted in an order of magnitude or better improvement in the CALIPSO land surface 30-meter elevation measurements. The results of EIT compared very well with the National Elevation Database (NED) high resolution elevation maps, and with the elevation measurements from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). PMID:19550729

  19. Head-Tail Instability of a Super-bunch

    SciTech Connect

    Shimosaki, Yoshito; Toyama, Takeshi; Takayama, Ken [Accelerator Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2005-06-08

    Super-bunch acceleration is a key concept in an induction synchrotron. In the induction synchrotron, super-bunches confined in the longitudinal direction by a pair of barrier voltages are accelerated with long induction step voltage pulses. Synchrotron oscillation of the super-bunch is notable, which consists of long drifting between the barriers and quick reflection in the barrier regions. This is apparently distinguished from that of the conventional RF bunch, which is the pendulum oscillation. This property has been supposed to bring about qualitatively different features in the head-tail instability of the super-bunch. Recently the head-tail instability of the super-bunch has been systematically examined. In this paper, the preliminary results of macro-particle simulations is reported.

  20. Shocking Tails in the Major Merger Abell 2744

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owers, Matt S.; Couch, Warrick J.; Nulsen, Paul E. J.; Randall, Scott W.

    2012-05-01

    We identify four rare "jellyfish" galaxies in Hubble Space Telescope imagery of the major merger cluster Abell 2744. These galaxies harbor trails of star-forming knots and filaments which have formed in situ in gas tails stripped from the parent galaxies, indicating they are in the process of being transformed by the environment. Further evidence for rapid transformation in these galaxies comes from their optical spectra, which reveal starburst, poststarburst, and active galactic nucleus features. Most intriguingly, three of the jellyfish galaxies lie near intracluster medium features associated with a merging "Bullet-like" subcluster and its shock front detected in Chandra X-ray images. We suggest that the high-pressure merger environment may be responsible for the star formation in the gaseous tails. This provides observational evidence for the rapid transformation of galaxies during the violent core passage phase of a major cluster merger.

  1. ISAL experiment documentation of vertical tail and OMS pods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Investigation of Space Transportation System (STS) Atmospheric Luminosities (ISAL) experiment documentation includes vertical tail and orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods with surface glow against the blackness of space. This glowing scene was provided by a long duration exposure with a 35mm camera aimed toward the tail of the Earth-orbiting Challenger, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 099. OV-099 was maneuvered to a 120-nautical-mile altitude and flown with open payload bay (PLB) in the velocity vector for the conducting of a test titled, 'Evaluation of Oxygen Interaction with Materials (EOIM)'. Atomic oxygen within the low orbital environment is known to be extremely reactive when in contact with solid surfaces. In the darkened area between the camera and the glowing OMS pods and vertical stabilizer are two trays of test materials.

  2. Nonlinear optical imaging characteristics in rat tail tendon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, N. R.; Zhang, X. Z.; Qiu, Y. S.; Chen, R.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the characteristics of skeletal muscle fibers in tail tendons, explore the content of intrinsic components at different depths and ascertain the optimum excitation wavelength, which will help to establish a relationship between diagnosis and therapy and the tendon injury. A multiphoton microscopic imaging system was used to achieve the images and spectra via an imaging mode and a Lambda mode, respectively. This work demonstrates that the skeletal muscle fibers of the tail tendon are in good order. Second harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signals originating from certain intrinsic components are varied with depth, and the SHG/TPEF intensity ratios are varied at different excitation wavelengths. Below 800 nm is the optimum for cell TPEF, while above 800 nm is the optimum for SHG. With the development of imaging techniques, a nonlinear optical imaging system will be helpful to represent the functional behaviors of tissue related to tendon injury.

  3. Persistence of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) after oral or parenteral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Palmer, M V; Thacker, T C; Waters, W R; Robbe-Austerman, S; Lebepe-Mazur, S M; Harris, N B

    2010-12-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in cattle and a serious zoonotic pathogen, most commonly contracted through consumption of unpasteurized dairy products. To control this zoonosis, many countries have developed bovine tuberculosis eradication programmes. Although relatively successful, efforts are hindered in many regions by spillover from wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis to cattle. Such is the case in the United States where spillover of M. bovis from free-ranging white-tailed deer to cattle occurs. One approach to control such inter-species transmission is vaccination of wildlife. The live, attenuated human vaccine M. bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) has been shown to reduce disease severity in white-tailed deer; however, vaccine persistence within tissues has also been noted. Consumption of venison containing BCG by hunters may present a public health concern as BCG exposure, although unlikely to cause disease, could cause false positive tuberculin skin test results. To examine BCG persistence further, 42 white-tailed deer were vaccinated orally or subcutaneously (SC) with BCG Danish. Three deer from each group were killed and examined at periods ranging from 2 weeks to 11 months after vaccination. BCG was recovered from orally vaccinated deer as late as 3 months after vaccination, while BCG persisted in SC vaccinated deer for as long as 9 months. At no time was BCG isolated from meat; however, prolonged persistence was seen in lymphoid organs. Although vaccine persistence was noted, especially in SC vaccinated deer, the distribution of culture-positive tissues makes human exposure through consumption unlikely. PMID:20707863

  4. Farber's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a group of inherited metabolic disorders called lipid storage diseases, in which excess amounts of lipids (oils, ... Institutes of Health (NIH), conducts research about lipid storage diseases such as Farber’s disease in laboratories at ...

  5. Kidney Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Kidney Disease: What is Kidney Disease? In This Topic What is Kidney Disease? Risk Factors and Prevention ... for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Diabetes High Blood Pressure Heart Failure The information ...

  6. Kennedy's Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    NINDS Kennedy's Disease Information Page Synonym(s): Bulbospinal Muscular Atrophy, X-Linked Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Table of Contents ( ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Kennedy's Disease? Kennedy's disease is an inherited motor neuron ...

  7. Menkes Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... link in the menu on the left. Common Names Kinky hair disease Menkes disease Menkes syndrome Steely hair disease Medical or Scientific Names Congenital hypocupremia (pronounced kuhn-JEN-i-tl hahy- ...

  8. [Trematodes parasitizing the white-tailed eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla L.)].

    PubMed

    Okulewicz, J; Sitko, J; Mellin, M

    1993-01-01

    Five white-tailed eagles were dissected--3 from the Czech Republic and 2 from Poland. 4 specimens were infected with trematodes only: Strigea falconis, Neodiplostomum (Conodiplostomum) perlatum, and Paracoenogonimus ovatus. S. falconis was found for the first time in an eagle from the Czech Republic, whereas N. (C.) perlatum and P. ovatus were detected for the first time in eagle from Poland. Moreover, N. (C.) perlatum is a new species for the Polish parasite fauna. PMID:8122425

  9. Ruin probabilities under general investments and heavy-tailed claims

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henrik Hult; Filip Lindskog

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the asymptotic decay of finite time ruin probabilities is studied. An insurance company is considered that\\u000a faces heavy-tailed claims and makes investments in risky assets whose prices evolve according to quite general semimartingales.\\u000a In this setting, the ruin problem corresponds to determining hitting probabilities for the solution to a randomly perturbed\\u000a stochastic integral equation. A large deviation

  10. PREDATOR URINES AS CHEMICAL BARRIERS TO WHITE-TAILED DEER

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jerrold L. Belant; Thomas W. Seamans; Laura A. Tyson

    1998-01-01

    The authors assessed whether bobcat (Lynx rufus) or coyote (Canis latrans) urine could reduce white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) use of established feeding areas or trails. A four-week experiment evaluating deer use of eight feeding stations, four each with coyote or bobcat urine was conducted at a 2,200 ha fenced facility in northern Ohio with high deer densities (38\\/km2). At this

  11. STUDY OF HEAD-TAIL EFFECT CAUSED BY ELECTRON CLOUD

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Ohmi; F. Zimmermann

    2000-01-01

    In positron or proton storage rings with many closely spaced bunches, an electron cloud can build up in the vac- uum chamber due to photoemission or secondary emission. The electron cloud induces a transverse wake force during the beam passage. The medium range wake force (>ns) causes a multi-bunch instability, while the short range wake (<100ps) causes a head-tail effect.

  12. Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters

    SciTech Connect

    Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

    1995-12-31

    Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

  13. Contributions of the integrin ?1 tail to cell adhesive forces.

    PubMed

    Elloumi-Hannachi, Imen; García, José R; Shekeran, Asha; García, Andrés J

    2015-03-15

    Integrin receptors connect the extracellular matrix to the cell cytoskeleton to provide essential forces and signals. To examine the contributions of the ?1 integrin cytoplasmic tail to adhesive forces, we generated cell lines expressing wild-type and tail mutant ?1 integrins in ?1-null fibroblasts. Deletion of ?1 significantly reduced cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and adhesive forces, and expression of human ?1 (h?1) integrin in these cells restored adhesive functions. Cells expressing a truncated tail mutant had impaired spreading, fewer and smaller focal adhesions, reduced integrin binding to fibronectin, and lower adhesion strength and traction forces compared to h?1-expressing cells. All these metrics were equivalent to those for ?1-null cells, demonstrating that the ?1 tail is essential to these adhesive functions. Expression of the constitutively-active D759A h?1 mutant restored many of these adhesive functions in ?1-null cells, although with important differences when compared to wild-type ?1. Even though there were no differences in integrin-fibronectin binding and adhesion strength between h?1- and h?1-D759A-expressing cells, h?1-D759A-expressing cells assembled more but smaller adhesions than h?1-expressing cells. Importantly, h?1-D759A-expressing cells generated lower traction forces compared to h?1-expressing cells. These differences between h?1- and h?1-D759A-expressing cells suggest that regulation of integrin activation is important for fine-tuning cell spreading, focal adhesion assembly, and traction force generation. PMID:25460334

  14. ARTHROPATHY IN WHITE-TAILED DEER AND A MOOSE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. WOBESER; W. RUNGE

    A bstract: Degenerative lesions were found in the skeletal system of 20 of 128 white-tailed deer (Odocoi!eus virginianus) examined. Similar changes were found in an aged male moose (A ices alces). Arthropathy involving the stifle joint was present in 60% (15\\/25) of male deer 4 years of age or older, and in 16.7% (4\\/25) of females in the same age

  15. Functional morphology of the radialis muscle in shark tails.

    PubMed

    Flammang, Brooke E

    2010-03-01

    The functional morphology of intrinsic caudal musculature in sharks has not been studied previously, though the kinematics and function of body musculature have been the focus of a great deal of research. In the tail, ventral to the axial myomeres, there is a thin strip of red muscle with fibers angled dorsoposteriorly, known as the radialis. This research gives the first anatomical description of the radialis muscle in sharks, and addresses the hypothesis that the radialis muscle provides postural stiffening in the tail of live swimming sharks. The radialis muscle fibers insert onto the deepest layers of the stratum compactum, the more superior layers of which are orthogonally arrayed and connect to the epidermis. The two deepest layers of the stratum compactum insert onto the proximal ends of the ceratotrichia of the caudal fin. This anatomical arrangement exists in sharks and is modified in rays, but was not found in skates or chimaeras. Electromyography of the caudal muscles of dogfish swimming steadily at 0.25 and 0.5 body lengths per second (Ls(-1)) exhibited a pattern of anterior to posterior activation of the radialis muscle, followed by activation of red axial muscle in the more anteriorly located ipsilateral myomeres of the caudal peduncle; at 0.75 L s(-1), only the anterior portion of the radialis and white axial muscle of the contralateral peduncular myomeres were active. Activity of the radialis muscle occurred during periods of the greatest drag incurred by the tail during the tail beat and preceded the activity of more anteriorly located axial myomeres. This nonconformity to the typical anterior to posterior wave of muscle activation in fish swimming, in combination with anatomical positioning of the radialis muscles and stratum compactum, suggests that radialis activity may have a postural function to stiffen the fin, and does not function as a typical myotomal muscle. PMID:19827156

  16. Flocculation of lime-treated oil sands tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. A. Hamza; D. J. Stanonik; Michael A. Kessick

    1996-01-01

    Whole oil sands tailings resulting from water-based bitumen extraction processes can be co-flocculated, after treatment with slaked lime, with low dosages of a high molecular weight anionic polyacrylamide. The resulting composite sand-clay particles settle and dewater rapidly to a stackable product that can be hand-squeezed to 40–83 wt% solids. The final solids content depends on the initial bitumen extraction process

  17. Habitat Suitability Index Models: Black-Tailed Prairie Dog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clippinger, Norman W.

    1989-01-01

    A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) model for the black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomus ludovicianus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an index between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

  18. Recombination via tail states in polythiophene:fullerene solar cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas Kirchartz; Bart E. Pieters; James Kirkpatrick; Uwe Rau; Jenny Nelson

    2011-01-01

    State-of-the-art models used for drift-diffusion simulations of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells based on band transport are not capable of reproducing the voltage dependence of dark current density and carrier concentration of such devices, as determined by current-voltage and charge-extraction measurements. Here, we show how to correctly reproduce this experimental data by including an exponential tail of localized states into

  19. Accessible Tourism for the Disabled: Long Tail Theory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yen-chun Jim Wu; Ming Jen Cheng

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a completely barrier-less, or “accessible,” tourism platform and makes suggestions\\u000a to facilitate the current travel information for the disabled persons. It then applies Long Tail theory’s three forces and\\u000a nine “rules” in making assessments and creating an accessible tourism communication network to connect upstream and downstream\\u000a travel agency. After collating the opinions

  20. Diabetes mellitus in a red?tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Rogers; A. Epple

    1993-01-01

    An adult, free?living female red?tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with clinical signs of generalized weakness, polyuria, and polydipsia, was killed and necropsied. An ante mortem serum sample taken from the bird contained 54.3 mmole\\/1 glucose, and large amounts of glucose were found in the urine. At necropsy, the pancreas was small, pale pink with multiple, round, approximately 0.5 mm white foci.

  1. 24. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ON LEFT WITH ELEVATOR/CRUSHED ORE BIN TOWER TO RIGHT. MAIN MILL BUILDING IN CENTER WITH THICKENER ADDITION TO RIGHT. MACHINE SHOP ON CRUDE ORE BIN TERRACE ABOVE ROASTER. THE LOCATION OF THE 100,000 GALLON MILL WATER TANK CAN BE SEEN AT THE CENTER RIGHT NEAR THE TOP OF THE MOUNTAIN. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  2. 165. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    165. VIEW OF MILL FROM UPPER TAILINGS POND (NORTH). ROASTER ON LEFT WITH ELEVATOR/CRUSHED ORE BIN TOWER TO RIGHT. MAIN MILL BUILDING IN CENTER WITH THICKENER ADDITION TO RIGHT. MACHINE SHOP ON CRUDE ORE BIN TERRACE ABOVE ROASTER. THE LOCATION OF THE 100,000 GALLON MILL WATER TANK CAN BE SEEN AT THE CENTER RIGHT NEAR THE TOP OF THE MOUNTAIN - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  3. Transport from chaotic orbits in the geomagnetic tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, W.; Tajima, T.

    1991-01-01

    The rapid change in direction and magnitude of the magnetic field vector in crossing the quasi-neutral sheet in the geomagnetic tail leads to deterministic Hamiltonian chaos. The finite correlation times in the single particle orbits due to the continuum of orbital frequencies leads to well-defined collisionless transport coefficients. The transport coefficients are derived for plasma trapped in the quasi-neutral sheet.

  4. Interior drains for open pit disposal of uranium mill tailings

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Staub

    1978-01-01

    A conceptualized interior drainage system is presented for reducing the environmental impact on natural groundwater by disposal of uranium mill tailings in the mined-out open pit. The evaporation\\/seepage ratio can be increased through the use of interior drains, long-term monitoring of groundwater quality can be eliminated, and the open pit will not require an extensive liner. Other advantages not related

  5. Iterative min-sum decoding of tail-biting codes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Srinivas Aji; Gavin Horn; Robert McEliece; Meina Xu

    1998-01-01

    By invoking a form of the Perron-Frobenius theorem for the “min-sum” semi-ring, we obtain a union bound on the performance of iterative decoding of tail-biting codes. This bound shows that for the Gaussian channel, iterative decoding will be optimum, at least for high SNRs, if and only if the minimum “pseudo-distance” of the code is larger than the ordinary minimum

  6. HEAVY TAILS, IMPORTANCE SAMPLING AND CROSS–ENTROPY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Søren Asmussen; Dirk P. Kroese; Reuven Y. Rubinstein

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating P(Y1 + ··· + Yn > x) by importance sampling when the Yi are i.i.d. and heavy-tailed. The idea is to exploit the cross-entropy method as a tool for choosing good parameters in the importance sampling distribution; in doing so, we use the asymptotic description that given P(Y1 +··· +Yn > x), n 1

  7. Uranium mill tailings remedial action project real estate management plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    This plan summarizes the real estate requirements of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Action (UMTRA) Project, identifies the roles and responsibilities of project participants involved in real estate activities, and describes the approaches used for completing these requirements. This document is intended to serve as a practical guide for all project participants. It is intended to be consistent with all formal agreements, but if a conflict is identified, the formal agreements will take precedence.

  8. "Heads or tails?"--a reachability bias in binary choice.

    PubMed

    Bar-Hillel, Maya; Peer, Eyal; Acquisti, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    When asked to mentally simulate coin tosses, people generate sequences that differ systematically from those generated by fair coins. It has been rarely noted that this divergence is apparent already in the very 1st mental toss. Analysis of several existing data sets reveals that about 80% of respondents start their sequence with Heads. We attributed this to the linguistic convention describing coin toss outcomes as "Heads or Tails," not vice versa. However, our subsequent experiments found the "first-toss" bias reversible under minor changes in the experimental setup, such as mentioning Tails before Heads in the instructions. We offer a comprehensive account in terms of a novel response bias, which we call reachability. It is more general than the 1st-toss bias, and it reflects the relative ease of reaching 1 option compared to its alternative in any binary choice context. When faced with a choice between 2 options (e.g., Heads and Tails, when "tossing" mental coins), whichever of the 2 is presented first by the choice architecture (hence, is more reachable) will be favored. This bias has far-reaching implications extending well beyond the context of randomness cognition; in particular, to binary surveys (e.g., accept vs. reject) and tests (e.g., True-False). In binary choice, there is an advantage to what presents first. PMID:24773285

  9. Anatomy and evolution of heterocercal tail in lamniform sharks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun H; Shimada, Kenshu; Rigsby, Cynthia K

    2013-03-01

    Lamniformes is a small shark group consisting of 15 extant species with remarkably diverse lifestyles and a wide range in heterocercal tail morphology. The caudal fin morphology must be related to their lifestyle because the tail is a main locomotive structure in sharks, but such relationships have remained largely uninvestigated. Here, the morphology-lifestyle relationship in lamniforms is examined through phylogenetic mapping. This study suggests that, within Lamniformes, caudal fins with a more horizontally directed curvature of the vertebral column are plesiomorphic, whereas those with a large dorsally directed curvature of the vertebral column are apomorphic. It also shows that caudal fins with posteriorly directed hypochordal rays are plesiomorphic, and that those with ventrally directed hypochordal rays are apomorphic within Lamniformes. Four basic caudal fin types are recognized in lamniforms on the basis of these skeletal variables in which one corollary is that the evolution of external morphology of caudal fin does not necessarily correspond to the evolution of its skeletal anatomy. This study also demonstrates that specific lifestyles seen in different lamniforms are indeed correlative with different caudal fin types in which a less asymmetrical heterocercal tail is a derived feature in lamniforms that evolved for fast swimming to capture fast swimming prey. PMID:23381874

  10. Understanding the heavy-tailed dynamics in human behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Gordon J.; Jones, Tim

    2015-06-01

    The recent availability of electronic data sets containing large volumes of communication data has made it possible to study human behavior on a larger scale than ever before. From this, it has been discovered that across a diverse range of data sets, the interevent times between consecutive communication events obey heavy-tailed power law dynamics. Explaining this has proved controversial, and two distinct hypotheses have emerged. The first holds that these power laws are fundamental, and arise from the mechanisms such as priority queuing that humans use to schedule tasks. The second holds that they are statistical artifacts which only occur in aggregated data when features such as circadian rhythms and burstiness are ignored. We use a large social media data set to test these hypotheses, and find that although models that incorporate circadian rhythms and burstiness do explain part of the observed heavy tails, there is residual unexplained heavy-tail behavior which suggests a more fundamental cause. Based on this, we develop a quantitative model of human behavior which improves on existing approaches and gives insight into the mechanisms underlying human interactions.

  11. Radon attenuation handbook for uranium mill tailings cover design

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, V.C.; Nielson, K.K.; Kalkwarf, D.R.

    1984-04-01

    This handbook has been prepared to facilitate the design of earthen covers to control radon emission from uranium mill tailings. Radon emissions from bare and covered uranium mill tailings can be estimated from equations based on diffusion theory. Basic equations are presented for calculating surface radon fluxes from covered tailings, or alternately, the cover thicknesses required to satisfy a given radon flux criterion. Also described is a computer code, RAECOM, for calculating cover thicknesses and surface fluxes. Methods are also described for measuring diffusion coefficients for radon, or for estimating them from empirical correlations. Since long-term soil moisture content is a critical parameter in determining the value of the diffusion coefficient, methods are given for estimating the long-term moisture contents of soils. The effects of cover defects or advection are also discussed and guidelines are given for determining if they are significant. For most practical cases, advection and cover defect effects on radon flux can be neglected. Several examples are given to demonstrate cover design calculations, and an extensive list of references is included. 63 references, 18 figures, 6 tables.

  12. Speciation and characterization of arsenic in Ketza River mine tailings using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paktunc, D.; Foster, A.; Laflamme, G.

    2003-01-01

    Ketza River mine tailings deposited underwater and those exposed near the tailings impoundment contain approximately 4 wt % As. Column-leaching tests indicated the potential for high As releases from the tailings. The tailings are composed dominantly of iron oxyhydroxides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, muscovite, ferric arsenates, and calcium-iron arsenates. Arsenopyrite and pyrite are trace constituents. Chemical compositions of iron oxyhydroxide and arsenate minerals are highly variable. The XANES spectra indicate that arsenic occurs as As(V) in tailings, but air-drying prior to analysis may have oxidized lower-valent As. The EXAFS spectra indicate As-Fe distances of 3.35-3.36 A?? for the exposed tailings and 3.33-3.35 A?? for the saturated tailings with coordination numbers of 0.96-1.11 and 0.46-0.64, respectively. The As-Ca interatomic distances ranging from 4.15 to 4.18 A?? and the coordination numbers of 4.12-4.58 confirm the presence of calcium-iron arsenates in the tailings. These results suggest that ferric arsenates and inner-sphere corner sharing or bidentatebinuclear attachment of arsenate tetrahedra onto iron hydroxide octahedra are the dominant form of As in the tailings. EXAFS spectra indicate that the exposed tailings are richer in arsenate minerals whereas the saturated tailings are dominated by the iron oxyhydroxides, which could help explain the greater release of As from the exposed tailings during leaching tests. It is postulated that the dissolution of ferric arsenates during flow-through experiments caused the high As releases from both types of tailings. Arsenic tied to iron oxyhydroxides as adsorbed species are considered stable; however, iron oxyhydroxides having low Fe/As molar ratios may not be as stable. Continued As releases from the tailings are likely due to dissolution of both ferric and calcium-iron arsenates and desorption of As from high-As bearing iron oxyhydroxides during aging.

  13. Speciation and characterization of arsenic in Ketza River mine tailings using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paktunc, Dogan; Foster, Andrea; Laflamme, Gilles

    2003-05-15

    Ketza River mine tailings deposited underwater and those exposed near the tailings impoundment contain approximately 4 wt % As. Column-leaching tests indicated the potential for high As releases from the tailings. The tailings are composed dominantly of iron oxyhydroxides, quartz, calcite, dolomite, muscovite, ferric arsenates, and calcium-iron arsenates. Arsenopyrite and pyrite are trace constituents. Chemical compositions of iron oxyhydroxide and arsenate minerals are highly variable. The XANES spectra indicate that arsenic occurs as As(V) in tailings, but air-drying prior to analysis may have oxidized lower-valent As. The EXAFS spectra indicate As-Fe distances of 3.35-3.36 A for the exposed tailings and 3.33-3.35 A for the saturated tailings with coordination numbers of 0.96-1.11 and 0.46-0.64, respectively. The As-Ca interatomic distances ranging from 4.15 to 4.18 A and the coordination numbers of 4.12-4.58 confirm the presence of calcium-iron arsenates in the tailings. These results suggest that ferric arsenates and inner-sphere corner sharing or bidentate-binuclear attachment of arsenate tetrahedra onto iron hydroxide octahedra are the dominant form of As in the tailings. EXAFS spectra indicate that the exposed tailings are richer in arsenate minerals whereas the saturated tailings are dominated by the iron oxyhydroxides, which could help explain the greater release of As from the exposed tailings during leaching tests. It is postulated that the dissolution of ferric arsenates during flow-through experiments caused the high As releases from both types of tailings. Arsenic tied to iron oxyhydroxides as adsorbed species are considered stable; however, iron oxyhydroxides having low Fe/As molar ratios may not be as stable. Continued As releases from the tailings are likely due to dissolution of both ferric and calcium-iron arsenates and desorption of As from high-As bearing iron oxyhydroxides during aging. PMID:12785509

  14. Predicting Deer Hunter Harvest Behavior in Wisconsin's Chronic Wasting Disease Eradication Zone

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Holsman; Jordan Petchenik

    2006-01-01

    Attempts to eradicate chronic wasting disease from free-ranging white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in Wisconsin depend on gaining compliance of hunters to harvest deer at rates unprecedented in modern wildlife management. A mail questionnaire and hunter diaries were used to assess hunters' attitudes, effort, and harvest behavior in response to disease management strategies that have included an extended hunting season, removal

  15. AN UPDATE OF ADENOVIRAL HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE IN MULE DEER IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the summer and fall of 1993, a newly recognized disease, adenoviral hemorrhagic disease, caused widespread mortality in black-tailed (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) and California mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus californicus) in northern California. Greater than a thousand deer were estimated t...

  16. Immunization with synthetic peptide vaccine fails to protect mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) from chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of deer and elk. The disorder is characterized by accumulation of an abnormally folded isoform of the normal cellular prion protein. Disease prevalence in farmed herds of white tailed deer can exceed 80%. Attempts to control ...

  17. Genome Sequences of Beak and Feather Disease Virus in Urban Rainbow Lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus)

    PubMed Central

    Collings, David A.; Collings, Berwyn G.; Julian, Laurel; Kurenbach, Brigitta

    2015-01-01

    Beak and feather disease viral genomes were recovered from two deceased juvenile urban rainbow lorikeets (Trichoglossus haematodus) that lacked tail feathers. These genomes share ~95% pairwise identity with two beak and feather disease virus (BFDV) genomes identified in wild and captive Australian T. haematodus birds and ~92% identity to those in wild New Caledonian T. haematodus deplanchii birds. PMID:25908126

  18. Meningococcal Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Prestigious 2015 Awards Addressing the Challenges of Serogroup B Meningococcal Disease Outbreaks on Campuses The History of Vaccines: Vaccines for Teenagers 14 Adult Vaccine-Preventable Diseases ...

  19. BIOACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS BY ACACIA MANGIUM, HOPEA ODORATA, INTSIA PALEMBANICA AND SWIETENIA MACROPHYLLA GROWN ON SLIME TAILINGS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. H. Ang; L. K. Tang; T. F. Hui; W. M. Ho; G. W. Theisera

    Contamination of heavy metals in tin tailings has caused an interest in the scientific approach of their remediation. One of the approaches is through phytoremediation that case trees to extract the heavy metals from the contaminated soils. Tin tailings comprise slime and sand tailings. Both types of tailings were investigated under this study. This paper reports only on the findings

  20. The influence of municipal waste on uranium mill tailings: A hydrogeochemical study on a mixed tailings site

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Hellingl; O. Nitzsche; B. Ullrich; B. Merkel

    1998-01-01

    Mining and milling has taken place in Saxony and Thuringia, in eastern Germany, for over 800 years. Radioactive waste rock\\u000a was dumped without regard for the environment for centuries. The area is now rather densely populated, and some of the smaller\\u000a dumps and tailings have been used as municipal or industrial landfills after the uranium mine and mill closed. Ground