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1

33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area...consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of...

2012-07-01

2

33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.  

...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area...consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of...

2014-07-01

3

33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area...consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of...

2013-07-01

4

33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area...consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of...

2011-07-01

5

33 CFR 100.734 - Annual Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. 100.734 Section 100...Gasparilla Marine Parade; Hillsborough Bay, Tampa, FL. (a) Regulated Area...consisting of all waters of Hillsborough Bay and its tributaries north of...

2010-07-01

6

Heat Fluxes in Tampa Bay, FL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For the period of May 2002 to present, as part of the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment, an observational tower has been maintained in Middle Tampa Bay that is equipped with sensors measuring meteorological and air-water turbulent flux parameters. Data acquired from this tower include air temperature, humidity and horizontal wind velocity measured at two heights, precipitation, incoming radiation, and barometric pressure. A SeaGauge sensor monitors water temperature, salinity, and water level, and a sonic anemometer measures the three-dimensional wind speed and the turbulent flux of momentum and sensible heat. Using data gathered from the tower, sea surface albedo and upwelling and downwelling long- and shortwave radiation fluxes are determined. Heat flux due to precipitation is calculated and the directly measured sensible heat flux is compared with the sensible flux derived using bulk formula and gradient-flux methods. Latent heat flux is also computed via the latter two methods. Temporal and vertical variations, including trends connected with seasonal and shorter signal scale events, are examined. Components of the heat budget of Tampa Bay are determined through a variety of pathways in order to constrain the error associated with the calculation of these parameters.

Sopkin, K. L.; Luther, M. E.; Gilbert, S. A.; Subramanian, V.; Scudder, J.; Wetzell, L. M.

2003-12-01

7

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2011-07-01

8

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2013-07-01

9

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2014-07-01

10

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2012-07-01

11

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2010-07-01

12

76 FR 65378 - Safety Zone; The Florida Orchestra Pops in the Park Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Pops in the Park Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL AGENCY: Coast...temporary safety zone on the waters of Tampa Bay in the vicinity of Spa Beach in St...The fireworks will explode over Tampa Bay. The fireworks display is...

2011-10-21

13

Assessment of estuarine water-quality indicators using MODIS medium-resolution bands: Initial results from Tampa Bay, FL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using Tampa Bay, FL as an example, we explored the potential for using MODIS medium-resolution bands (250- and 500-m data at 469-, 555-, and 645-nm) for estuarine monitoring. Field surveys during 2122 October 2003 showed that Tampa Bay has Case-II waters, in that for the salinity range of 2432 psu, (a) chlorophyll concentration (11 to 23 mg m?3), (b) colored

Chuanmin Hu; Zhiqiang Chen; Tonya D. Clayton; Peter Swarzenski; John C. Brock

2004-01-01

14

76 FR 68098 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Chillounge Night St. Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL AGENCY: Coast...temporary safety zone on the waters of Tampa Bay in St. Petersburg, Florida during...Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL in the...

2011-11-03

15

Validating a Biogeochemical Watershed Disturbance and Climate Change Proxy: Tampa Bay. FL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tampa Bay estuary and watershed have been impacted in the past century by residential and industrial development activities that have resulted in pollutant release via runoff and wastewater discharges. Mangrove forest loss, mining activities, accidental spills and nutrient loading have also decreased water quality in this aquatic environment. The primary goal of this project is to provide historical water quality and climate information by determining biogeochemical properties of oyster shells and sediments collected from various locations throughout the Tampa Bay region including ancient Native American shell mounds. Biogeochemical properties of shells collected from these middens will provide insight regarding historical water quality of Tampa Bay. It is expected that a pristine, pre-Columbian baseline may be revealed from the midden shells, and changes in the biogeochemical record may be demonstrated over the recent past from the industrial age to modern day on a seasonal and yearly scale. In order to achieve the goal of this project, midden shells and sediments will be collected and compared from three stations in Tampa Bay that range from undisturbed to severely impacted; Emerson Point, Weedon Island, and Bayboro Harbor, respectively. Water and sediment samples have also been examined to provide additional information regarding radiogeochemical properties of the three study sites. Sediments will be dated using gamma spectrometry techniques (U/Th series). Standard ICP-OES methods are being utilized to determine concentrations of trace, minor and major elements in the oyster and sediment samples. This project is part of a larger on-going investigation. If successful, this investigation will ultimately yield a high-resolution tool for establishing the history of terrestrial land use and climate change.

Schwing, P. T.; Martinez, E.; Pyrtle, A. J.; Haynes, S.

2007-12-01

16

76 FR 44531 - Safety Zone; Fourth Annual Chillounge Night St. Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Petersburg Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL AGENCY: Coast...temporary safety zone on the waters of Tampa Bay in St. Petersburg, Florida during...will explode over the waters of Tampa Bay. The fireworks display is...

2011-07-26

17

CDOM Characterization of Surface Waters and Groundwater in Tampa Bay, FL: A Spectroscopic and Radioisotopic Approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbonate platforms surrounding subtropical estuaries allow water and chemical constituents to be easily transferred between subsurface aquifers and overlying surficial waters. During times of low rainfall, a significant portion of the water found in the rivers that supply these estuaries originates from springs within the streams themselves. This fluctuation in headwater source often results in variability in the chemistry of the organic material and therefore CDOM optical properties. In addition to the impact of groundwater on stream chemistry, an estuary can be influenced by waters rising directly from beneath the estuary. In the Tampa Bay region, CDOM concentration and optical properties within groundwater wells suggest unique sources and biogeochemical pathways of organic material. Shallow aquifers resemble surface runoff in concentration of DOC and CDOM, as well as in CDOM spectral properties. In contrast, the deep aquifers show higher fluorescence efficiencies and blueshifting of fluorescence. Overall, the depth dependency indicates that CDOM in shallow groundwater has terrestrial sources whereas deep groundwater (where water is estimated to be >10,000 years old) has properties more similar to marine humics. Discussed here will be the results from a March-April 2006 study coupling spectroscopic and radioisotopic techniques to better characterize sources of CDOM in a subtropical estuary. Naturally occurring isotopes of radium (used as a proxy for groundwater contribution) were measured along with CDOM fluorescence, absorption and DOC. Discerning the contribution of CDOM via groundwater, river water and marine water will prove useful in understanding carbon cycling within the Tampa Bay region.

Conmy, R. N.; Coble, P. G.; Pyrtle, A. J.

2007-12-01

18

Assessment of estuarine water-quality indicators using MODIS medium-resolution bands: initial results from Tampa Bay, FL  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Using Tampa Bay, FL as an example, we explored the potential for using MODIS medium-resolution bands (250- and 500-m data at 469-, 555-, and 645-nm) for estuarine monitoring. Field surveys during 2122 October 2003 showed that Tampa Bay has Case-II waters, in that for the salinity range of 2432 psu, (a) chlorophyll concentration (11 to 23 mg m?3), (b) colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) absorption coefficient at 400 nm (0.9 to 2.5 m?1), and (c) total suspended sediment concentration (TSS: 2 to 11 mg L?1) often do not co-vary. CDOM is the only constituent that showed a linear, inverse relationship with surface salinity, although the slope of the relationship changed with location within the bay. The MODIS medium-resolution bands, although designed for land use, are 45 times more sensitive than Landsat-7/ETM+ data and are comparable to or higher than those of CZCS. Several approaches were used to derive synoptic maps of water constituents from concurrent MODIS medium-resolution data. We found that application of various atmospheric-correction algorithms yielded no significant differences, due primarily to uncertainties in the sensor radiometric calibration and other sensor artifacts. However, where each scene could be groundtruthed, simple regressions between in situ observations of constituents and at-sensor radiances provided reasonable synoptic maps. We address the need for improvements of sensor calibration/characterization, atmospheric correction, and bio-optical algorithms to make operational and quantitative use of these medium-resolution bands.

Hu, Chuanmin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Clayton, Tonya D.; Swarzenski; Brock, John C.; Muller-Karger, Frank E.

2004-01-01

19

Tampa Bay: Chapter N  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay is Floridas largest open-water estuary and encompasses an area of approximately 1036 km2 (400 mi2) (Burgan and Engle, 2006; TBNEP, 2006). The Bays watershed drains 5,698 km2 (2,200 mi2) of land and includes freshwater from the Hillsborough River to the north east, the Alafia and Little Manatee rivers to the east, and the Manatee River to the south (Figure 1). Freshwater inflow also enters the bay from the Lake Tarpon Canal, from small tidal tributaries, and from watershed runoff. Outflow travels from the upper bay segments (Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay) into Middle and Lower Tampa Bay. Southwestern portions of the water shed flow through Boca Ciega Bay into the Intracoastal Waterway and through the Southwest Channel and Passage Key Inlet into the Gulf of Mexico. The average depth in most of Tampa Bay is only 3.4 m (11 ft); however, 129 km (80 mi) of shipping channels with a maximum depth of 13.1 m (43 ft) have been dredged over time and are regularly maintained. These channels help to support the three ports within the bay, as well as commercial and recreational boat traffic.

Handley, Larry; Spear, Kathryn; Cross, Lindsay; Baumstark, Ren; Moyer, Ryan; Thatcher, Cindy

2013-01-01

20

Effects of ghost shrimp on zinc and cadmium in sediments from Tampa Bay, FL  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study investigated the effects that ghost shrimp have on the distribution of metals in sediment. We measured levels of HNO3-extractable zinc and cadmium in surface sediment, in ghost shrimp burrow walls and in sediment ejected by the ghost shrimp from their burrows, at five sandy intertidal sites in Tampa Bay. Ghost shrimp densities and their rate of sediment ejection were also quantified, as were sediment organic content and silt + clay content. Densities of ghost shrimp (Sergio trilobata and Lepidophthalmus louisianensis) averaged 33/m2 at our sites, and they ejected sediment at an average rate of 28 g/burrow/day. Levels of both Zn and Cd were significantly higher in burrow walls than in surface sediments. Sediment ejected by the shrimp from their burrows had elevated levels of Zn (relative to surface sediments) at one of the sites. Sediment organic content and silt + clay content were higher in burrow-wall sediments than in ejected sediment, which in turn tended to have values above those of surface sediments. Differences in levels of HNO3-extractable Zn and Cd among sediment types may be a consequence of these sediments differing in other physiochemical characteristics, though the differences in metal levels remained statistically significant for some sites after correcting for differences in organic content and silt + clay content. We conclude that the presence of ghost shrimp burrows contributes to spatial heterogeneity of sedimentary metal levels, while the ghost shrimp bioturbation results in a significant flux of metals to the sediment surface and is expected to decrease heterogeneity of metal levels in sedimentary depth profiles.

Klerks, P.L.; Felder, D.L.; Strasser, K.; Swarzenski, P.W.

2007-01-01

21

Direct wet and dry deposition of ammonia, nitric acid, ammonium and nitrate to the Tampa Bay Estuary, FL, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The average total (wet plus dry) nitrogen deposition to the Tampa Bay Estuary was 7.3 (1.3)kg-Nha?1yr?1 or 760 (140)metric tons-Nyr?1 for August 1996July 1999, estimated as a direct deposition rate to the 104,000-ha water surface. This nitrogen flux estimate accounted for ammonia exchange at the airsea interface. The uncertainty estimate was based on measurement error. Wet deposition was 56% of

Noreen Poor; Ray Pribble; Holly Greening

2001-01-01

22

USGS Tampa Bay Pilot Study  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Providing a web-based digital information management system of information for scientists and the public, including a system that supports the work of those officials who must make decisions that affect the state of the bay. The Tampa Bay Study is in its sixth year and will continue through September 2007. This paper presents a non-inclusive summary of key findings associated with the six primary project components listed above. Component 4 (above) is described in detail in the following chapter 13. More information on the Tampa Bay Study is available from our on-line digital information system for the Tampa Bay Study at http://gulfsci.usgs.gov.

Yates, K.K.; Cronin, T. M.; Crane, M.; Hansen, M.; Nayeghandi, A.; Swarzenski, P.; Edgar, T.; Brooks, G.R.; Suthard, B.; Hine, A.; Locker, S.; Willard, D.A.; Hastings, D.; Flower, B.; Hollander, D.; Larson, R.A.; Smith, K.

2007-01-01

23

Tampa Bay environmental atlas  

SciTech Connect

Biological and water resource data for Tampa Bay were compiled and mapped at a scale of 1:24,000. This atlas consists of (1) composited information overlain on 18 biological and 20 water resource base maps and (2) an accompanying map narrative. Subjects mapped on the water resource maps are contours of the mean middepth specific conductivity which can be converted to salinity; bathymetry, sediments, tidal currents, the freshwater/saltwater interface, dredge spoil disposal sites; locations of industrial and municipal point source discharges, tide stations, and water quality sampling stations. The point source discharge locations show permitted capacity and the water quality sampling stations show 5-year averages for chlorophyll, conductivity, turbidity, temperature, and total nitrogen. The subjects shown on the biological resource maps are clam and oyster beds, shellfish harvest areas, colonial bird nesting sites, manatee habitat, seagrass beds and artificial reefs. Spawning seasons, nursery habitats, and adult habitats are identified for major fish species. The atlas will provide useful information for coastal planning and management in Tampa Bay.

Kunneke, J.T.; Palik, T.F.

1984-12-01

24

Hurricane Storm Surge Simulations for Tampa Bay Robert H. Weisberg1  

E-print Network

1 Hurricane Storm Surge Simulations for Tampa Bay by Robert H. Weisberg1 and Lianyuan Zheng College running head: R.H. Weisberg and L. Zheng Right running head: Tampa Bay Storm Surge Simulations 1 for the Tampa Bay, FL vicinity and their sensitivities to point of landfall, direction and speed of approach

Meyers, Steven D.

25

Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services webpage  

EPA Science Inventory

Public website describing research on the large-scale physical, chemical, and biological dynamics of coastal wetlands and estuaries, with emphasis on the Gulf of Mexico. Hyperlinks direct users to mapped ecosystem services of interest and value to Tampa Bay area residents, and i...

26

4202E.FowlerAve.,ALN151,Tampa,FL33620www.sa.usf.edu Emergency Contacts At-a-Glance  

E-print Network

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .(813) 974-2831 Crisis Center ofTampa Bay4202E.FowlerAve.,ALN151,Tampa,FL33620·www.sa.usf.edu Emergency Contacts At-a-Glance EMERGENCY

Meyers, Steven D.

27

Heat fluxes in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Meyers et al. (2007) Tampa Bay Model produces water level and three-dimensional current and salinity fields for Tampa Bay. It is capable of computing temperature but is presently run without active thermodynamics. Variations in water temperature are driven by heat exchange at the water-atmosphere boundary and advective heat flux at the mouth of the bay. The net heat exchange

Kristin L Sopkin

2008-01-01

28

TAMPA BAY TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR 3802 SPECTRUM BOULEVARD, SUITE 100  

E-print Network

TAMPA BAY TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR 3802 SPECTRUM BOULEVARD, SUITE 100 TAMPA, FLORIDA 33612 WWW.USFCONNECT.ORG Approved for use until 6/30/14 TAMPA BAY TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR SELECTION & ELIGBILITY CRITERIA The following are criteria that the Tampa Bay Technology Incubator evaluates before admitting a company. A forprofit

Arslan, Hüseyin

29

NUTRIENT FLUX FROM SEDIMENTS IN TAMPA BAY  

EPA Science Inventory

This study will measure the diffusive fluxes of nitrogen species (ammonia, nitrate+nitrite, and dissolved organic nitrogen) as well as phosphorus species (dissolved inorganic phosphorus and dissolved organic phosphorus) between sediments and water column in Tampa Bay. Two sites ...

30

Management case study: Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay, Florida,USA, is a shallow,subtropical estuary that experienced severe cultural eutrophication between the 1940s and 1980s, a period when the human population of its watershed quadrupled. In response, citizen action led to the formation of a public- and private-sector partnership (the Tampa Bay Estuary Program), which adopted a number of management objectives to support the restoration and protection of the bays living resources. These included numeric chlorophyll a and water-clarity targets, as well as long-term goals addressing the spatial extent of sea grasses and other selected habitat types, to support estuarine-dependent faunal guilds.

Morrison, G.; Greening, H.S.; Yates, K.K.

2012-01-01

31

TAMPA BAY: THE COMPREHENSIVE CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR TAMPA BAY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Bay National Estuary Program was established in 1991 to assist the community in developing a comprehensive plan to restore and protect Tampa Bay. The program is part of a national network of 28 estuary programs established under the Clean Water Act and administered nati...

32

TAMPA BAY ESTUARY PROGRAM, 2004 IMPLEMENTATION REVIEW  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Bay Estuary Program and its partners have made measurable progress toward implementation of the adopted CCMP goals. Progress has occurred in the following areas: bay habitats, with an increase in seagrass, estuarine habitat restoration and preservation; water and sedime...

33

33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tampa Bay, Fla. 110.193 Section 110...Anchorage Grounds 110.193 Tampa Bay, Fla. (a) The anchorage grounds...Mullet Key. A rectangular area in Tampa Bay, approximately 4,459 yards long and...

2011-07-01

34

33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tampa Bay, Fla. 110.193 Section 110...Anchorage Grounds 110.193 Tampa Bay, Fla. (a) The anchorage grounds...Mullet Key. A rectangular area in Tampa Bay, approximately 4,459 yards long and...

2014-07-01

35

33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.704 Section...District 165.704 Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) A floating...Sutton the safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut F Channel from Lighted Buoys 3F...

2013-07-01

36

33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tampa Bay, Fla. 110.193 Section 110...Anchorage Grounds 110.193 Tampa Bay, Fla. (a) The anchorage grounds...Mullet Key. A rectangular area in Tampa Bay, approximately 4,459 yards long and...

2012-07-01

37

33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.704 Section...District 165.704 Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) A floating...Sutton the safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut F Channel from Lighted Buoys 3F...

2012-07-01

38

33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tampa Bay, Fla. 110.193 Section 110...Anchorage Grounds 110.193 Tampa Bay, Fla. (a) The anchorage grounds...Mullet Key. A rectangular area in Tampa Bay, approximately 4,459 yards long and...

2010-07-01

39

33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.704 Section...District 165.704 Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) A floating...Sutton the safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut F Channel from Lighted Buoys 3F...

2011-07-01

40

33 CFR 110.193 - Tampa Bay, Fla.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tampa Bay, Fla. 110.193 Section 110...Anchorage Grounds 110.193 Tampa Bay, Fla. (a) The anchorage grounds...Mullet Key. A rectangular area in Tampa Bay, approximately 4,459 yards long and...

2013-07-01

41

33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

...2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.704 Section...District 165.704 Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) A floating...Sutton the safety zone starts at Tampa Bay Cut F Channel from Lighted Buoys 3F...

2014-07-01

42

Hurricane Storm Surge Simulations for Tampa Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a high resolution, three-dimensional, primitive equation, finite volume coastal ocean model with flooding and drying capabilities, supported by a merged bathymetric-topographic data set and driven by prototypical hurricane winds and atmospheric pressure fields, we investigated the storm surge responses for the Tampa Bay, Florida, vicinity and their sensitivities to point of landfall, direction and speed of approach, and intensity.

ROBERT H. WEISBERG; LIANYUAN ZHENG

2006-01-01

43

33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

...false Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.753 Section...753 Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) The following...RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old...

2014-07-01

44

33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.753 Section...753 Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) The following...RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old...

2013-07-01

45

33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.753 Section...753 Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a) The following...RNA): All the navigable waters of Tampa Bay, Hillsborough Bay and Old...

2012-07-01

46

Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study Overview  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey's Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study combines the expertise of federal, state, and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for integrated research projects in other coastal ecosystems in the nation. The Tampa Bay Study focuses on the scientific needs of the Bay, as identified by resource managers.

Yates, Kimberly

2004-01-01

47

Influence of Watershed Characteristics on Wetland Hydrology (Tampa, FL)  

EPA Science Inventory

The availability of oxygen in wetland soils is a major driver of rate changes for several important ecological functions (e.g. nutrient processing, carbon sequestration) that the Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Research Program (TB-ESRP) is quantifying to estimate ecosystem services...

48

Lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay area  

Microsoft Academic Search

A lightning locating system employing two wideband, gated magnetic direction finders was used to study the negative cloud-to-ground lightning in 111 storms that occurred on 8 days during August 1979 in Tampa Bay area of Florida. The storms were classified as (1) single-peak storms - spatially isolated groupings of lightning whose cloud-to-ground flashing rate vs. time curves exhibited a single

David W. Peckham; Martin A. Uman; Chester E. Wilcox

1984-01-01

49

Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Historical and Prehistorical Record of Tampa Bay Environments  

USGS Publications Warehouse

To study how Tampa Bay, Florida, has changed over time, the prehistorical conditions and natural variations in the bay environment are being evaluated. These variations can be tracked by examining the sediments that have accumulated in and around the bay. The prehistorical record, which pre-dates settlers' arrival in the Tampa Bay area around 1850, provides a baseline with which to compare and evaluate the magnitude and effects of sea-level, climate, biological, geochemical, and man-made changes. These data also are valuable for planning and conducting projects aimed at restoring wetlands and other estuarine habitats to their original state. In addition, the data provide a basis for judging efforts to improve the health of the bay.

Edgar, Terry

2005-01-01

50

Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Pilot Phase 2 web site  

EPA Science Inventory

The value of nature's benefits is difficult to consider in environmental decision-making since ecosystem goods and services are usually not well measured or quantified in economic terms. The Tampa Bay Estuary Program, Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council, the U.S. Environmental Pr...

51

33 CFR 165.704 - Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. 165.704...SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...Seventh Coast Guard District 165.704 Safety Zone; Tampa Bay, Florida. (a)...

2010-07-01

52

Prioritization of Ecosystem Services Research: Tampa Bay Demonstration Project.  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Project (TBESDP) is a component of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency?s Ecosystem Services Research Program. The principal objectives of TBESDP are (1) to quantify the ecosystem services of the Tampa Bay watershed, (2) to deter...

53

77 FR 65623 - Security Zones; USCGC WILLIAM FLORES Commissioning Ceremony, Ybor Channel; Tampa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...WILLIAM FLORES Commissioning Ceremony, Ybor Channel; Tampa, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS...temporary security zone on the waters of Ybor Channel in Tampa, Florida around the USCGC WILLIAM...2012, in the Port of Tampa, on Ybor Channel at Channelside Cruise Terminal 3,...

2012-10-30

54

Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TB-CCN): A Model for Reducing Health Disparities  

Cancer.gov

Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TB-CCN): A Model for Reducing Health Disparities Back to CRCHD Ongoing Research CNP Project Listing Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TB-CCN): A Model for Reducing Health Disparities CNP Pilot Projects Tampa

55

Summary of sediment resuspension monitoring activities, Old Tampa Bay and Hillsborough Bay, Florida, 1988-91  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sediment resuspension was studied in Old Tampa BaY, the northwestern subembayment of Tampa Bay, and in Hillsborough Bay, the northeastern subembayment of Tampa Bay located along the coast of west-central Florida. Electromagnetic current meters, optical backscatterance sensors, and water samples were used to collect sediment resuspension data at several study sites in the two bays. This report describes the data-collection methods and summaries sediment resuspension data collected intermittently from October 1988 through December 1990 in Old Tampa Bay and from March 1990 through September 1991 in Hillsborough Bay. Example data are presented for selected monitoring events.

Levesque, V.A.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

1995-01-01

56

Topobathymetric data for Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Topobathymetric data (topobathy) are a merged rendering of both topography (land elevation) and bathymetry (water depth) to provide a single product useful for inundation mapping and a variety of other applications. These data were developed using one topographic and two bathymetric datasets collected at different dates. Topography was obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) National Elevation Dataset (NED). Bathymetry was provided by NOAA's GEOphysical DAta System (GEODAS). For several nearshore areas within the bay GEODAS data were replaced with high resolution bathymetry acquired by NASA's Experimental Advanced Airborne Research Lidar (EAARL). These data and detailed metadata can be obtained from the USGS Web site: http://gisdata.usgs.gov/website/topobathy/. Data from EAARL and NED were collected under the auspices of the USGS Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science Tampa Bay Study (http://gulfsci.usgs.gov/).

Tyler, D.; Zawada, D.G.; Nayegandi, A.; Brock, J.C.; Crane, M.P.; Yates, K.K.; Smith, K.E.L.

2007-01-01

57

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): Peak Oil/Bay Drums Superfund Site, operable unit 4, Tampa, FL, June 28, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The decision document presents the selected remedial action for Operable Unit Four at the Peak Oil/Bay Drums site in Brandon, Hillsborough County, Florida. The selected remedy described in the document addresses the fourth and final operable unit, which consists of two wetlands, the Central Wetland and the South Wetland, located in the area of the Bay Drums and Peak Oil site. The selected remedy is a `no-action` remedy that will include ecological monitoring of the wetlands. The purpose of the selected remedy is to monitor the ecologic status of the Central and South wetlands as the Operable Units One, Two, and Three remedies are being implemented and to ensure that conditions in the wetlands are protective of human health and the environment.

NONE

1995-02-01

58

Integrating science and resource management in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay is recognized internationally for its remarkable progress towards recovery since it was pronounced "dead" in the late 1970s. Due to significant efforts by local governments, industries and private citizens throughout the watershed, water clarity in Tampa Bay is now equal to what it was in 1950, when population in the watershed was less than one-quarter of what it is today. Seagrass extent has increased by more than 8,000 acres since the mid-1980s, and fish and wildlife populations are increasing. Central to this successful turn-around has been the Tampa Bay resource management community's long-term commitment to development and implementation of strong science-based management strategies. Research institutions and agencies, including Eckerd College, the Florida Wildlife Commission Fish and Wildlife Research Institute, Mote Marine Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Southwest Florida Water Management District, University of South Florida, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Geological Survey, local and State governments, and private companies contribute significantly to the scientific basis of our understanding of Tampa Bay's structure and ecological function. Resource management agencies, including the Tampa Bay Regional Planning Council's Agency on Bay Management, the Southwest Florida Water Management District's Surface Water Improvement and Management Program, and the Tampa Bay Estuary Program, depend upon this scientific basis to develop and implement regional adaptive management programs. The importance of integrating science with management has become fully recognized by scientists and managers throughout the region, State and Nation. Scientific studies conducted in Tampa Bay over the past 1015 years are increasingly diverse and complex, and resource management programs reflect our increased knowledge of geology, hydrology and hydrodynamics, ecology and restoration techniques. However, a synthesis of this research and its integration into resource management has not been prepared for Tampa Bay since the mid-1980s. The need for an up-to-date synthesis of Tampa Bay science and management has resulted in the production of this document. The U.S. Geological Survey recently completed a 5-year Tampa Bay Integrated Science Study, and the Tampa Bay Estuary Program updated the Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan for Tampa Bay in 2006. These efforts build upon results of the many research and management studies and programs summarized here.

Yates, Kimberly K.; Greening, Holly; Morrison, Gerold

2011-01-01

59

Lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay Area  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A commercial lightning-locating system (LLS) was employed in the study of lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay area of Florida. The LLS output included the time, location, number of strokes per flash, and initial peak magnetic field value of first strokes for lightning ground flashes lowering negative charge. Attention is given to the design and the operation of the LLS, and the experimental results. Measured properties of each of 111 storms are given in a number of tables. It was observed that the apparent motion associated with the lightning activity in storm systems was not due to the motion of the individual single-peak and multiple-peak storms but rather to the successive growth of new storms near previously active storms.

Peckham, D. W.; Uman, M. A.; Wilcox, C. E., Jr.

1984-01-01

60

Hurricane Storm Surge Simulations for Tampa Bay ROBERT H. WEISBERG* and LIANYUAN ZHENG  

E-print Network

Hurricane Storm Surge Simulations for Tampa Bay ROBERT H. WEISBERG* and LIANYUAN ZHENG College for the Tampa Bay, Florida, vicinity and their sensitivities to point of landfall, direction and speed the upper reaches of the bay, Old Tampa Bay and Hillsborough Bay in particular. For point of landfall

Chen, Changsheng

61

Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Project Website: Phase II  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Bay Ecosystem Services Demonstration Project models the impact of human development and natural stressors on the economic, aesthetic and cultural value of local ecosystems. By linking ecological structures, functions, and condition to the ecosystem services valued by h...

62

77 FR 50926 - Security Zones; Certain Dangerous Cargo Vessels, Tampa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...nitrate. The security zones will start at buoys 3 and 4 in Tampa Bay ``F'' cut following the vessel to the pier, from pier to pier for berth shifts, and from the pier out to buoys 3 and 4 in Tampa Bay ``F'' cut. The security zones...

2012-08-23

63

Colored dissolved organic matter in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absorption and fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorophyll and total suspended solids in Tampa Bay and its adjacent rivers were examined in June and October of 2004. Except in Old Tampa Bay (OTB), the spatial distribution of CDOM showed a conservative relationship with salinity in June, 2004 (aCDOM(400)=?0.19salinity+6.78, R2=0.98, n=17, salinity

Zhiqiang Chen; Chuanmin Hu; Robyn N. Conmy; Frank Muller-Karger; Peter Swarzenski

2007-01-01

64

75 FR 35080 - Tampa Bay Refuges, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...endangered piping plovers and provides habitat and protection for endangered manatees and sea turtles. Egmont Key NWR has an unusually high population...and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection entrust daily management activities of...

2010-06-21

65

Water quality of Tampa Bay, Florida, June 1972-May 1976  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A comprehensive assessment of the water quality of Tampa Bay, Florida, was initiated in 1970 to provide background information to evaluate the effects of widening and deepening the ship channel to the port of Tampa. This report provides results of water-quality sampling in the bay from 1972 to 1976, prior to dredging. Measurements of temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance, biochemical oxygen demand, and total organic carbon were made as well as measurements for several nutrient, metal, and pesticide parameters. Many parameters were measured at as many as three points in the vertical. These data indicate that Tampa Bay is well-mixed vertically with little density stratification. Time histories of average temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance and nutrient values within four subareas of Tampa Bay are given to reveal seasonal or other trends during the period of record. Temperature, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, specific conductance, nutrient, biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and metal data are also presented as areal distributions. Nutrient concentrations were generally higher in Hillsborough Bay than in other sub-areas of Tampa Bay. Biochemical oxygen demand, total organic carbon, and total organic nitrogen distribution patterns show regions of highest concentrations to be along bay shorelines near population centers. Of the metals analyzed, all were present in concentrations of less than 1 milligram per liter. (USGS)

Goetz, Carole L.; Goodwin, Carl R.

1980-01-01

66

THE MEASURE OF RATES OF NUTRIENT FLUXES BETWEEN TAMPA BAY SEDIMENTS AND THE OVERLYING WATER COLUMN  

EPA Science Inventory

The project will measure rates of nutrient fluxes between Tampa Bay sediments and the ovrelying water column. This information has been lacking from previous nitrogen budgets for Tampa Bay, potentially hampering their accuracy and effectiveness. Refined nitrogen budgets based o...

67

Dynamic modeling of Tampa Bay urban development using parallel computing  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Urban land use and land cover has changed significantly in the environs of Tampa Bay, Florida, over the past 50 years. Extensive urbanization has created substantial change to the region's landscape and ecosystems. This paper uses a dynamic urban-growth model, SLEUTH, which applies six geospatial data themes (slope, land use, exclusion, urban extent, transportation, hillside), to study the process of urbanization and associated land use and land cover change in the Tampa Bay area. To reduce processing time and complete the modeling process within an acceptable period, the model is recoded and ported to a Beowulf cluster. The parallel-processing computer system accomplishes the massive amount of computation the modeling simulation requires. SLEUTH calibration process for the Tampa Bay urban growth simulation spends only 10 h CPU time. The model predicts future land use/cover change trends for Tampa Bay from 1992 to 2025. Urban extent is predicted to double in the Tampa Bay watershed between 1992 and 2025. Results show an upward trend of urbanization at the expense of a decline of 58% and 80% in agriculture and forested lands, respectively. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Steinwand, D.

2005-01-01

68

ENSO impacts on salinity in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Estuarine salinity distributions reflect a dynamic balance between the processes that control estuarine circulation. At seasonal\\u000a and longer time scales, freshwater inputs into estuaries represent the primary control on salinity distribution and estuarine\\u000a circulation. El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) conditions influence seasonal rainfall and stream discharge patterns in the\\u000a Tampa Bay, Florida region. The resulting variability in freshwater input to Tampa

Nancy Schmidt; Mark E. Luther

2002-01-01

69

Cultural Resources for USF Students from India Over 35,000 people of Indian origin call Tampa bay their home. It is one of the fastest  

E-print Network

origin call Tampa bay their home. It is one of the fastest growing demographic institutions in India. Federation of Indian Association of Tampa Bay (FIA of Tampa of Tampa Bay is an umbrella organization currently representing forty-one different

Meyers, Steven D.

70

AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE AND REACTIVE NITROGEN COMPOUNDS IN TAMPA, FLORIDA DURING THE BAY REGIONAL  

E-print Network

AIRBORNE MEASUREMENTS OF OZONE AND REACTIVE NITROGEN COMPOUNDS IN TAMPA, FLORIDA DURING THE BAY areas, over the centers of Tampa and St. Petersburg, and over Tampa Bay and the Gulf of Mexico measurements of trace gases and aerosols in the Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) using

71

FISHES, MACROINVERTEBRATES, AND HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF UPLAND CANALS IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA'  

E-print Network

FISHES, MACROINVERTEBRATES, AND HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF UPLAND CANALS IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA of providing water front property for homesites. One method, recently used in Tampa Bay, Fla was recently used in Tampa Bay in northeast St. Petersburg, Fla., to connect a housing development

72

OCCURRENCE OF MACROZOOPLANKTON IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA, AND THE ADJACENT GULF OF MEXIC0 1  

E-print Network

OCCURRENCE OF MACROZOOPLANKTON IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA, AND THE ADJACENT GULF OF MEXIC0 1 By JOHN A and spatial variations in the abundance of macro- zooplankton in the surface waters of Tampa Bay is limited. No reports deal with the seasonal composition of zooplank- ton throughout Tampa Bay, Published

73

Holocene Infilling History of Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tampa Bay is a shallow, sediment-starved estuary located along the central Florida Gulf coast. Based upon sedimentologic, biostratigraphic, and geochronologic analyses of 120 sediment cores and 190 surface sediment samples, karst-controlled basins located in the mid to upper estuary were found to contain a continuous sedimentary record documenting the Holocene sea-level rise and infilling history. The basal unit sampled in cores consists of organic-rich and/or carbonate-rich sediments containing freshwater fauna. Interpreted as lake deposits, the surficial sediments of these units were dated at approximately 8-9 ka suggesting that isolated sinkhole lakes occupied the region prior to being flooded by the Holocene sea-level rise. Overlying the lake deposits, dm-scale, organic-rich muds containing brackish water fauna, represent the transition from fresh to marine conditions as sea level flooded the region. The flooding surface itself is generally undefined, but sometimes represented by a mm-scale layer of shell fragments likely representing a lag deposit. Age dates bracketing this layer show that flooding occurred approximately 6-7 ka. Overlying sediments consist of 3-4 m of organic-rich, sandy muds with typical estuarine fauna. Age dates from the base of this unit indicate estuarine conditions became established approximately 5.5-6 ka. The modern expression of karst basins is a series of shallow, bathymetric depressions, likely reflecting the historically slow rate (0.030-0.065 cm/yr) of fine- grained sediment accumulation. These shallow depressions continue to function as fine-grained sediment sinks, but are now rapidly filling as the rate of accumulation has dramatically increased by approximately one order-of-magnitude (0.16-0.32 cm/yr) within the past 100 years, likely due to human activities.

Brooks, G. R.; Larson, R. A.; Cronin, T.; Willard, D.

2007-05-01

74

Diurnal variation of oxygen and carbonate system parameters in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oxygen and carbonate system parameters were measured, in situ, over diurnal cycles in Tampa Bay and Florida Bay, Florida. All system parameters showed distinct diurnal trends in Tampa Bay with an average range of diurnal variation of 39.1?mol kg?1 for total alkalinity, 165.1?mol kg?1 for total CO2, 0.22 for pH, 0.093mmol L?1 for dissolved oxygen, and 218.1?atm for pCO2. Average

Kimberly K. Yates; Chris Dufore; Nathan Smiley; Courtney Jackson; Robert B. Halley

2007-01-01

75

Changes in the Circulation of Tampa Bay Due to Hurricane Frances as Recorded by ADCP Measurements and Reproduced  

E-print Network

Changes in the Circulation of Tampa Bay Due to Hurricane Frances as Recorded by ADCP Measurements Tampa Bay, Florida, and the exchange of water with the Gulf of Mexico in both observational data and a realistic numerical circulation model of the Tampa Bay estuary. Hurricane Frances hit Tampa Bay on September

Meyers, Steven D.

76

Lightning phenomenology in the Tampa Bay area  

SciTech Connect

A lightning locating system employing two wideband, gated magnetic direction finders was used to study the negative cloud-to-ground lightning in 111 storms that occurred on 8 days during August 1979 in Tampa Bay area of Florida. The storms were classified as (1) single-peak storms - spatially isolated groupings of lightning whose cloud-to-ground flashing rate vs. time curves exhibited a single peak; (2) multiple-peak storms - spatially isolated groupings of lightning with multiple-peak flashing rates; and (3) storm systems - two or more related single-peak storms, and/or multiple-peak storms. The following parameters are given for single-peak storms, multiple-peak storms, and storm systems: duration, area, number of ground flashes, mean ground flash density, mean ground flashing rate, and maximum ground flashing rate averaged over a 5-min interval. Ground flash counts are corrected for the location system detection efficiency, which varied from about 75% at close range to about 55% at 100 to 150 km. The mean duration of single-peak storms, multiple-peak storms, and storm systems was 41, 77, and 130 min, respectively; the mean area 103, 256, and 900 km/sup 2/, respectively; and the mean number of lightning flashes to ground 73, 270, and 887, respectively. The mean ground flash density for single-peak storms, multiple-peak storms, and storm systems was 18 x 10/sup -3/, 15 x 10/sup -3/, and 9.7 x 10/sup -3/ km/sup -2/ min/sup -1/, respectively; and the mean ground flashing rate 1.7, 3.4, and 6.8 min/sup -1/, respectively. The highest maximum ground flashing rate averaged over a 5-min interval for all single-peak storms, multiple-peak storms, and storm systems was 17, 22, and 32 min/sup -1/, respectively, while the mean of the maximum flashing rates was 3.7, 7.3, and 14 min/sup -1/, respectively. 16 references, 16 figures, 10 tables.

Peckham, D.W.; Uman, M.A.; Wilcox, C.E. Jr.

1984-12-20

77

The ecology of Tampa Bay, Florida: An estuarine profile  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Bay is Florida's largest open-water estuary and one of the most highly urbanized. This report summarizes and synthesizes many years of scientific investigation into Tampa Bay's geology, hydrology and hydrography, water chemistry, and biotic components. The estuary is a phytoplankton-based system, with mangroves being the second most important primary producer. Benthic organisms are abundant and diverse, although in parts of the bay the benthos consists of a relatively few opportunistic and pollution indicator species. The estuary provides habitat for the juveniles and adults of a number of commercial and recreational fishery species. Significant changes occurring as a result of urbanization and industrialization include significant declines in intertidal wetlands and seagrass meadows, changes in circulation and flushing, and degradation of water quality. Important management issues include dredge and fill operations, restoration of fisheries, increasing freshwater flow to the bay, and eutrophication. 257 refs., 85 figs., 27 tabs.

Lewis, R.R. III; Estevez, E.D.

1988-09-01

78

Dynamic modeling of Tampa Bay urban development using parallel computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban land use and land cover has changed significantly in the environs of Tampa Bay, Florida, over the past 50 years. Extensive urbanization has created substantial change to the region's landscape and ecosystems. This paper uses a dynamic urban-growth model, SLEUTH, which applies six geospatial data themes (slope, land use, exclusion, urban extent, transportation, hillside), to study the process of

George Xian; Mike Crane; Dan Steinwand

2005-01-01

79

Water Quality and Eutrophication in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A water quality model, WASP, was applied to simulate and evaluate the mechanistic relationships between external nutrient loading and water quality of Tampa Bay, U.S.A. The model quantifies processes governing internal nutrient cycling and phytoplankton growth. It estimates the impact of nutrient loads on water clarity, a pivotal water quality parameter for seagrass meadows. The model estimates impacts over long

P. F Wang; J Martin; G Morrison

1999-01-01

80

Blending Bathymetry with Topography: The Tampa Bay Demonstration Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

NOAAs National Ocean Service and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have blended their bathymetric and topographic data sets (respectively) into a digital elevation model (DEM) for the Tampa Bay region. A newly developed Datum Transformation Tool, which allows easy transformation of elevations with respect to any of 26 orthometric, 3-D, or tidal datums, was used to transform all bathymetric and

Bruce Parker; Dennis Milbert; Robert Wilson; Jon Bailey

81

Sediment quality assessment studies of Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A survey of the toxicity of sediments throughout the Tampa Bay estuary was performed as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program. The objectives of the survey were to determine the spatial extent and severity of toxicity and to identify relationships between chemical contamination and toxicity. Three independent toxicity tests were performed: a 10-d

R. Scott Carr; D. C. Chapman; E. R. Long; H. L. Windom; Glen Thursby; Gail M. Sloane; Douglas A. Wolfe

1996-01-01

82

Risk Assessment of Hurricane Storm Surge for Tampa Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States and many other coastal areas around the world. Risk assessment of current and future hurricane storm surge provides the basis for risk mitigation and related decision making. This study investigates the hurricane surge risk for Tampa Bay, located on the central west coast of Florida. Although fewer storms have made landfall in the central west Florida than in regions farther west in the Gulf of Mexico and the east coast of U.S., Tampa Bay is highly vulnerable to storm surge due to its geophysical features. It is surrounded by low-lying lands, much of which may be inundated by a storm tide of 6 m. Also, edge waves trapped on the west Florida shelf can propagate along the coastline and affect the sea level outside the area of a forced storm surge; Tampa Bay may be affected by storms traversing some distance outside the Bay. Moreover, when the propagation speed of the edge wave is close to that of a storm moving parallel to the coast, resonance may occur and the water elevation in the Bay may be greatly enhanced. Therefore, Tampa Bay is vulnerable to storms with a broad spectrum of characteristics. We apply a model-based risk assessment method to carry out the investigation. To estimate the current surge risk, we apply a statistical/deterministic hurricane model to generate a set of 1500 storms for the Tampa area, under the observed current climate (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) estimated from the NCAR/NCEP reanalysis. To study the effect of climate change, we use four climate models, CNRM-CM3, ECHAM, GFDL-CM2.0, and MIROC3.2, respectively, to drive the hurricane model to generate four sets of 1500 Tampa storms under current climate conditions (represented by 1981-2000 statistics) and another four under future climate conditions of the IPCC-AR4 A1B emission scenario (represented by 2081-2100 statistics). Then, we apply two hydrodynamic models, the Advanced Circulation (ADCIRC) model and the Sea, Lake, and Overland Surges from Hurricanes (SLOSH) model with grids of various resolutions to simulate the surges induced by the synthetic storms. The surge risk under each of the climate scenarios is depicted by a surge return level curve (exceedance probability curve). For the city of Tampa, the heights of the 100-year, 500-year, and 1000-year surges under the current climate are estimated to be 3.85, 5.66, and 6.31 m, respectively. Two of the four climate models predict that surge return periods will be significantly shortened in the future climates due to the change of storm climatology; the current 100-year surge may happen every 50 years or less, the 500-year surge every 200 years or less, and the 1000-year surge every 300 years or less. The other two climate models predict that the surge return periods will become moderately shorter or remain almost unchanged in the future climates. Extreme surges up to 12 m at Tampa appear in our simulations. Although occurring with very small probabilities, these extreme surges would have a devastating impact on the Tampa Bay area. By examining the generated synthetic surge database, we study the characteristics of the extreme storms at Tampa Bay, especially for the storms that may interact with edge waves along the Florida west coast.

Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.

2011-12-01

83

Colored dissolved organic matter in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Absorption and fluorescence of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chlorophyll and total suspended solids in Tampa Bay and its adjacent rivers were examined in June and October of 2004. Except in Old Tampa Bay (OTB), the spatial distribution of CDOM showed a conservative relationship with salinity in June, 2004 (aCDOM(400) = ? 0.19 salinity + 6.78, R2 = 0.98, n = 17, salinity range = 1.132.5) with little variations in absorption spectral slope and fluorescence efficiency. This indicates that CDOM distribution was dominated by mixing. In October, 2004, CDOM distribution was nonconservative with an average absorption coefficient (aCDOM(400), ? 7.76 m-1) about seven times higher than that in June (? 1.11 m-1). The nonconservative behavior was caused largely by CDOM removal at intermediate salinities (e.g., aCDOM(400) removal > 15% at salinity ? 13.0), which likely resulted from photobleaching due to stronger stratification. The spatial and seasonal distributions of CDOM in Tampa Bay showed that the two largest rivers, the Alafia River (AR) and Hillsborough River (HR) were dominant CDOM sources to most of the bay. In OTB, however, CDOM showed distinctive differences: lower absorption coefficient, higher absorption spectral slopes, and lower ratios of CDOM absorption to DOC and higher fluorescence efficiency. These differences may have stemmed from (1) changes in CDOM composition by more intensive photobleaching due to the longer residence time of water mass in OTB; (2) other sources of CDOM than the HR/AR inputs, such as local creeks, streams, groundwater, and/or bottom re-suspension. Average CDOM absorption in Tampa Bay at 443 nm, aCDOM(443), was about five times higher in June and about ten times higher in October than phytoplankton pigment absorption, aph(443), indicating that blue light attenuation in the water column was dominated by CDOM rather than by phytoplankton absorption throughout the year.

Chen, Z.; Hu, C.; Conmy, R.N.; Muller-Karger, F.; Swarzenski, P.

2007-01-01

84

High resolution seismic stratigraphy of Tampa Bay, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Bay is one of two large embayments that interrupt the broad, regional nature of the carbonate ramp of the west coast of the Florida carbonate platform. It is believed to have formed as a result of preferential dissolution of the Cenozoic limestones beneath it. Highly reactive freshwater systems became hydrologically focused in the bay region as the surface and groundwater systems established themselves during sea-level lowstands. This weakening of the underlying limestone resulted in extensive karstification, including warping, subsidence, sinkhole and spring formation. Over 120 miles of high resolution seismic reflection data were collected within Tampa Bay. This record has been tied into 170 core borings taken from within the bay. This investigation has found three major seismic stratigraphic sequences beneath the bay. The lowermost sequence is probably of Miocene age. Its surface is highly irregular due to erosion and dissolution and exhibits a great deal of vertical relief as well as gentler undulations or warping. Much of the middle sequence consists of low angle clinoforms that gently downlap and fill in the underlying karst features. The uppermost sequence is a discontinuous unit comprised of horizontal to low angle clinoforms that are local in their extent. The recent drainage and sedimentation patterns within the bay area are related to the underlying structure controlled by the Miocene karst activity.

Tihansky, A.B.; Hine, A.C.; Locker, S.D.; Doyle, L.D. (Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States). Dept. of Marine Science)

1993-03-01

85

Monitoring program to assess environmental changes in Tampa Bay, Florida. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Tampa Bay National Estuary Program (TBNEP) is to prepare and implement a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) for the Tampa Bay estuary and its surrounding watershed. The objective of this project was to develop statistically robust and scientifically defensible designs for a variety of natural resource monitoring programs to be implemented in Tamap Bay.

Squires, A.; Janicki, A.; Heimbuch, D.; Wade, D.; Wilson, H.

1994-02-01

86

Remote sensing of water clarity in Tampa Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined the spatial and temporal variability of the Secchi Disk Depth (SDD) within Tampa Bay, Florida, using the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite imagery collected from September 1997 to December 2005. SDD was computed using a two-step process, first estimating the diffuse light attenuation coefficient at 490nm, Kd(490), using a semi-analytical algorithm and then SDD using an empirical

Zhiqiang Chen; Frank E. Muller-Karger; Chuanmin Hu

2007-01-01

87

Sediment Resuspension Mechanisms in Old Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The mechanisms that resuspend bottom sediments in Old Tampa Bay, a shallow, microtidal, subtropical estuary in west-central Florida, were determined by analysing data collected during several periods from 1988 to 1990. Hydrodynamic and suspended-solids concentration data were collected at a relatively deep (4m) site where a permanent platform was built and at a relatively shallow (15m) site where a submersible

David H. Schoellhamer

1995-01-01

88

Utility of hyperspectral imagery for seagrass mapping in Tampa Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tampa Bay has lost significant amounts of seagrass as the result of declines in water clarity. Of the 16,300 ha of seagrass present in 1950, only 8800 ha remained in 1982. However, since the mid 1980's, a concerted effort has been made to improve Tampa Bay water quality, and seagrass cover increased to 10500 ha in 2002. This project was undertaken to determine whether hyperspectral imagery can be used to 1) replace traditional seagrass mapping methods and 2) distinguish between seagrasses and macroalgae such as Caulerpa prolifera. Hyperspectral imagery of the shoreline of Tampa Bay was acquired in May 2005, using the AISA hyperspectral sensor flown on an aircraft at an altitude of 1500 m. For seagrass mapping tests, a study area near Apollo Beach, Florida was selected for analysis. The area was selected because it contains a number of features which make seagrass classification from natural color aerial photographs extremely difficult: variable water depth, CDOM, and mixed seagrass/algal species composition. Classification accuracy was assessed using confusion matrices based on a separate group of 155 data points selected haphazardly throughout the image. Unsupervised classification by the Isodata method using all 90 spectral bands between 394 and 803 nm resulted in poor classification accuracy. However, first derivative spectra identified six key wavelengths with potential for habitat classification (770, 759, 717, 688, 589, and 492 nm). Minimum distance classification based on these six wavelengths improved overall classification accuracy to 95 percent. The prospect of replacing manual interpretation of aerial photography with supervised classification of hyperspectral imagery seems very feasible. With some additional testing, the technique may become the operational standard for seagrass mapping in Tampa Bay.

Carlson, P. R.

2006-12-01

89

Design of a basinwide monitoring program for the Tampa Bay estuary. Final technical pub  

SciTech Connect

The Tampa Bay National Estuary Program (TBNEP) is developing a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) to recommend management actions for protecting the Tampa Bay estuary. The purpose of the document is to facilitate development of the monitoring program by assisting the TBNEP to define the objectives of a monitoring program for Tampa Bay identifying indicators and a sampling design that are appropriate to those objectives, and identifying how existing Tampa Bay monitoring programs can be incorporated and modified (if necessary) to meet the monitoring objectives.

Hochberg, R.J.; Weisberg, S.B.; Frithsen, J.B.

1992-10-30

90

Monitoring water quality in Tampa Bay: Coupling in situ and remote sensing.  

E-print Network

??Water quality in Tampa Bay was examined using concurrent in situ and satellite remote sensing observations. Chlorophyll and suspended sediment concentrations showed large short-term variability, (more)

Chen, Zhiqiang

2006-01-01

91

The culture of the southern bay scallop in Tampa Bay, an urban Florida estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bay scallop, Argopecten irradians concentricus (Say), stocks were collected from a Homosassa (Florida) population in 1991 and were kept in seawater from Bayboro Harbor on Tampa Bay, an urban Florida estuary. They were fed with Isochrysis galbana and Tetraselmis sp. Spawning was allowed to occur after the scallops became ripe. The hatching rate of the F1 eggs to D-shaped larvae

Yantian Lu; Norman J. Blake

1997-01-01

92

On the residual circulation in Tampa Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Residual circulation in estuaries usually display a characteristic estuarine circulation pattern with inflowing deep waters and outflowing surface waters. The strength being dependend on the tidal prism and the fresh water inflow to the estuary. In estuaries with a strong circulation this leads to formation of distinct water masses. However, in estuaries where vertical mixing is significant, at least part of the time, the importance of the residual circulation for transport of dissolved substances may be seriously reduced. The talk will draw upon recent work using the MIKE 3 unstructured mesh circulation models, set up as part of the USGS Tampa Integrated Science Project. The significance of the residual transport, the quantification of it in a typical Gulf Coast estuary and the relevance for estuarine management strategies will be discussed.

Petersen, O.; Hearn, C.

2007-12-01

93

Gulf of Mexico integrated science - Tampa Bay study, the impact of groundwater and contaminants on Tampa Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Despite the recreational and economic value of coastal bays and estuaries, these ecosystems are often among our most 'troubled' natural environments. Urbanization, agriculture, mining, and shipping are just a few activities that can have a profound and lasting impact on the coastal zone. In order to maintain a healthy coastal ecosystem, it is crucial to develop reasonable management practices around expert scientific information. We still have much to learn about the quantity and quality of groundwater being discharged into Tampa Bay, Florida. We also need to improve our knowledge of a wide range of contaminants entering the bay and must be able to determine where they accumulate in seafloor sediments. Such buried contaminants can potentially be harmful to biota if they are released to the water column. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists and research partners from the University of South Florida (USF), the University of Florida (UF), and the Florida Marine Research Institute (FMRI) are mapping sources of groundwater, measuring groundwater flow into Tampa Bay, and assessing the impact of contaminants and sediments on bay water quality and ecosystem health.

Swarzenski, Peter W.

2005-01-01

94

Synoptic volumetric variations and flushing of the Tampa Bay estuary  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of analyses are used to investigate the synoptic wind-driven flushing of Tampa Bay in response to the El Nio-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycle from 1950 to 2007. Hourly sea level elevations from the St. Petersburg tide gauge, and wind speed and direction from three different sites around Tampa Bay are used for the study. The zonal (u) and meridional (v) wind components are rotated clockwise by 40 to obtain axial and co-axial components according to the layout of the bay. First, we use the subtidal observed water level as a proxy for mean tidal height to estimate the rate of volumetric bay outflow. Second, we use wavelet analysis to bandpass sea level and wind data in the time-frequency domain to isolate the synoptic sea level and surface wind variance. For both analyses the long-term monthly climatology is removed and we focus on the volumetric and wavelet variance anomalies. The overall correlation between the Oceanic Nio Index and volumetric analysis is small due to the seasonal dependence of the ENSO response. The mean monthly climatology between the synoptic wavelet variance of elevation and axial winds are in close agreement. During the winter, El Nio (La Nia) increases (decreases) the synoptic variability, but decreases (increases) it during the summer. The difference in winter El Nio/La Nia wavelet variances is about 20 % of the climatological value, meaning that ENSO can swing the synoptic flushing of the bay by 0.22 bay volumes per month. These changes in circulation associated with synoptic variability have the potential to impact mixing and transport within the bay.

Wilson, M.; Meyers, S. D.; Luther, M. E.

2014-03-01

95

Sinkhole distribution in a rapidly developing urban environment: Hillsborough County, Tampa Bay area, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sinkhole formation in Florida is a common event. The Florida karst plain is significantly altered by human development and sinkholes cause considerable property damage throughout much of the state. We present in this paper a morphometric analysis of karst depressions in the Tampa Bay area, and the relation with the known distribution of sinkholes. We selected the Tampa Bay area

R. Brinkmann; M. Parise; D. Dye

2008-01-01

96

Review and synthesis of historical Tampa Bay water quality data. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The review and synthesis of historical water quality data was one of the first characterization projects administered by the Tampa Bay National Estuary Program (NEP). The objective of the project was to describe the physical, chemical and biological characteristics of Tampa Bay. The report examines the spatial and temporal trends from the acquired data for possible interrelationships and develops them statistically.

Vargo, G.; Weisberg, R.; Bendis, B.; Rutherford, E.H.

1992-11-01

97

Development of a benthic index to assess sediment quality in the Tampa Bay Estuary  

Microsoft Academic Search

The identification, remedial treatment, and monitoring of contaminated sediments are among the priorities for managers of the Tampa Bay Estuary. Tampa Bay, as an urbanized estuary, is subject to the input of watershed sources of chemical contaminants, including metals, pesticides, and organic chemicals. Although the use of biological indicators and their incorporation into multi-metric indices is not new, the refinement

Kate J. Malloy; David Wade; Anthony Janicki; Stephen A. Grabe; Ravic Nijbroek

2007-01-01

98

OCCURRENCE IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA, OF IMMATURE SPECIES DOMINANT IN GULF OF MEXICO COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

Populations of finfish, crabs, and shrimp were sam pled from August 1961 through November 1962 as part of Tampa Bay estuarine studies. Specimens collected were identified to species and classified as immature or adult. Twenty-three species of major importance in Gulf of Mexico commet;cial fisheries were found to inhabit Tampa Bay during immaturity. Seasonal and areal distribution is described for

JAMES E. SYKES; JOHN H. FINUCANE

99

33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone. 165.703 Section 165.703...SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... 165.703 Tampa Bay, FloridaSafety Zone. (a) A floating safety...

2010-07-01

100

The Circulation of Tampa Bay Driven by Buoyancy, Tides and Winds, as Simulated  

E-print Network

) that includes Tampa Bay, the intra-coastal waterway and the inner portion of the west Florida continental shelf, it is amongst the largest of the United States ports. Located on the west-central coast of Florida, Tampa Bay). Like most urban waterways it harbors dual usage by commercial shipping and recreational boaters while

Meyers, Steven D.

101

Circulation of Tampa Bay driven by buoyancy, tides, and winds, as simulated using a finite volume coastal ocean model  

E-print Network

Circulation of Tampa Bay driven by buoyancy, tides, and winds, as simulated using a finite volume November 2005; published 17 January 2006. [1] The circulation of Tampa Bay is investigated using a high-resolution, three- dimensional, density-dependent, finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) that includes Tampa Bay

Chen, Changsheng

102

Short-term variability of suspended sediment and phytoplankton in Tampa Bay, Florida: Observations from a coastal oceanographic tower  

E-print Network

Short-term variability of suspended sediment and phytoplankton in Tampa Bay, Florida: Observations-optic sensors U.S.A. Florida Tampa Bay a b s t r a c t We examined short-term phytoplankton and sediment dynamics in Tampa Bay with data collected between 8 December 2004 and 17 January 2005 from optical

Meyers, Steven D.

103

The USF College of Marine Science Integrated Model of Tampa Bay Mark E. Luther and Steven D. Meyers  

E-print Network

The USF College of Marine Science Integrated Model of Tampa Bay Mark E. Luther and Steven D. Meyers for Tampa Bay to produce three-dimensional fields of circulation, temperature, salinity, wave spectra quality model has become apparent in Tampa Bay management issues. The integrated model development is well

Meyers, Steven D.

104

Ra and Rn isotopes as natural tracers of submarine groundwater discharge in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U\\/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during wet and dry conditions in Tampa Bay, Florida, to evaluate their utility as groundwater discharge tracers, both within the bay proper and within the Alafia River\\/estuary a prominent free-flowing river that empties into the bay. In Tampa Bay, almost 30% of the combined

Peter W. Swarzenski; Chris Reich; Kevin D. Kroeger; Mark Baskaran

2007-01-01

105

Observation of sediment resuspension in Old Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Equipment and methodology have been developed to monitor sediment resuspension at two sites in Old Tampa Bay. Velocities are measured with electromagnetic current meters and suspended solids and turbidity are monitored with optical backscatterance sensors. In late November 1989, a vertical array of instrument pairs was deployed from a permanent platform at a deep-water site, and a submersible instrument package with a single pair of instruments was deployed at a shallow-water site. Wind waves caused resuspension at the shallow-water site, but not at the deeper platform site, and spring tidal currents did not cause resuspension at either site.

Schoellhamer, David H.

1990-01-01

106

Groundwater/surfacewater interactions in Tampa Bay. Implications for nutrient fluxes. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In developing a framework for bay charaterization the Tampa Bay National Estuary Program identified a priority area, which involves the collation and synthesis of existing information on groundwater/surface water interactions in the Tampa Bay Watershed. The primary objective was to establish a rough estimate of the flux rates of nitrogen and phosporus between these two reservoirs based upon available data and compare them to rates determined for other sources. The purpose was to determine if groundwater may be considered a major mechanism for nutrient input to Tampa Bay, which is critical for management purposes.

Brooks, G.R.; Dix, T.L.; Doyle, L.J.

1993-04-01

107

Lessons learned from the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) and implications for nitrogen management of Tampa Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Results from air quality modeling and field measurements made as part of the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) along with related scientific literature were reviewed to provide an improved estimate of atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) deposition to Tampa Bay, to apportion atmospheric N between local and remote sources, and to assess the impact of regulatory drivers on N deposition to Tampa Bay. Simulations using the Community Multiscale Air Quality model v4.4 modified with the University of California Davis aerosol module (CMAQ-UCD) provided a framework for this review. For 2002, CMAQ-UCD modeled atmospheric loading rates were 6910 metric tons N to the land surface of the watershed and 548 metric tons N to bay surface of the watershed, respectively. If an 18% transfer rate of atmospherically-deposited N from watershed to bay is assumed, then the corresponding atmospheric loading to Tampa Bay was 1790 metric tons N or 57% of the total N loading to the bay. From CMAQ-UCD modeling, oxidized N sources both within and outside Tampa Bay's watershed were important contributors to atmospheric N loading to the bay. Within the watershed, oxidized N emissions from mobile sources had a disproportionately larger impact than did power plant sources on atmospheric N loading. Predicted decreases in atmospheric N deposition to Tampa Bay by 2010 due to regulatory drivers were significant, and plausibly evident in recent declines in ambient air NOx concentrations in urban Tampa and St. Petersburg.

Poor, Noreen D.; Cross, Lindsay M.; Dennis, Robin L.

2013-05-01

108

Relaxed eddy accumulation measurements of ammonia, nitric acid, sulfur dioxide and particulate sulfate dry deposition near Tampa, FL, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method was utilized to measure fluxes of key atmospheric species, specifically ammonia (NH3), nitric acid (HNO3), sulfur dioxide (SO2) and particulate sulfate (SO42-) to vegetation that is characteristic throughout the Tampa Bay Watershed. Three annular denuder systems (ADS), each consisting of two annular denuders and a filter pack in series, were deployed to accumulate gaseous constituents and fine-fraction particulates (Dp<2.5 m) in updraft and downdraft eddies, as well as in the mid-draft velocity range. Relaxed eddy accumulation samples, which were analyzed by ion chromatography, and continuous meteorological data were collected during the May 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) near Sydney, FL. For the chemical species of current interest, concentrations were 1.64 0.23 for NH3, 2.06 0.24 for HNO3, 3.49 0.50 for SO2 and 4.64 0.31 g m-3 for SO42-, and the deposition velocity (Vd) estimates for NH3, HNO3, SO2 and SO42- were 1.27 3.65, 3.63 1.47, 0.45 0.98 and 0.42 1.00 cm s-1, respectively. The results obtained confirm the expectation that the deposition of ammonia, nitric acid and particulate sulfate was controlled by aerodynamic and quasi-laminar layer resistances and that sulfur dioxide is relatively dependent upon stomatal conditions.

Toya Myles, La; Meyers, Tilden P.; Robinson, Larry

2007-07-01

109

Tampa Bay area tornado, 31 March Although Florida has never witnessed the extreme effects  

E-print Network

Tampa Bay area tornado, 31 March 2011 Although Florida has never witnessed the extreme effects of nature's most destructive tornado, an EF-5, it has certainly experienced its fair share of tornado activity. Astonishingly

Meyers, Steven D.

110

DEMAND FOR RECREATIONAL FISHING IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA: A RANDOM UTILITY APPROACH  

Microsoft Academic Search

An estimation of demand for recreational fishing in Tampa Bay, Florida, can facilitate the environmental management of the bay. A nested random utility travel cost model is used to estimate access values. Results suggest that average annual values for the bay alone are $18.14 and $0.048 for participants and nonparticipants, respectively.

Gretchen Greene; Charles B. Moss; Thomas H. Spreen

1997-01-01

111

A numerical simulation of residual circulation in Tampa Bay. Part I: Low-frequency temporal variations  

Microsoft Academic Search

The residual (time-average) salinity and circulation in a numerical ocean model of the Tampa Bay estuary are shown to experience\\u000a significant temporal variation under realistic forcing conditions. A version of the Estuarine Coastal Ocean Model developed\\u000a for Tampa Bay with 70 by 100 horizontal grid points and 11 sigma levels is examined for the years 20012003. Model output\\u000a variables are

Steven D. Meyers; Mark E. Luther; Monica Wilson; Heather Havens; Amanda Linville; Kristin Sopkin

2007-01-01

112

Recent sedimentary development of Tampa Bay, Florida: A microtidal estuary incised into tertiary platform carbonates  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tampa Bay, a large, microtidal, clastic-filled estuary incised into Tertiary carbonate strata, is the largest estuary on Floridas\\u000a west coast. A total of 250 surface sediment samples and 17 cores were collected in Tampa Bay in order to determine the patterns\\u000a and controlling factors governing the recent infilling and modern sediment distribution, and to examine the results in terms\\u000a of

Gregg R. Brooks; Larry J. Doyle

1998-01-01

113

IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES AND ESTIMATION OF EMISSION PROFILES FROM HIGHLY TIME-RESOLVED POLLUTANT MEASUREMENTS IN TAMPA, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Aerosol slurry samples were collected at 30-min intervals for sequential 1-month periods at each of two sites (Sydney and "Dairy") in the Tampa Bay area during the 2002 Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment using the University of Maryland Semicontinuous Elements in Aeros...

114

Below-cloud ammonia scavenging in convective thunderstorms at a coastal research site in Tampa, FL, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sequential sampling of ammonium in wet deposition was conducted at a coastal research site in Tampa, Florida to determine and model the intra-storm variability of ammonium deposition to the Tampa Bay Estuary. Ammonium concentrations decreased with increasing precipitation depth according to an inverse power-law relationship of the form, CNH4=aD-b, where D is the cumulative rainfall and a and b are

Constance A. Mizak; Scott W. Campbell; Mark E. Luther; Robert P. Carnahan; Robert J. Murphy; Noreen D. Poor

2005-01-01

115

Holocene Climatic and Hydrologic Variability as Recorded in the Benthic Foraminifera Ammonia Beccarii From Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of this study is to reconstruct the climate history of Tampa Bay, Florida over the Holocene epoch using the benthic foraminifera Ammonia beccarii from five sediment cores. Here we present a reconstruction based on oxygen isotopic ratios and Mg/Ca data that provides critical information on the history of climate changes in southwest Florida. Oxygen isotopes and Mg/Ca data from samples of A. beccarii taken from a series of five sediment cores provide records of temperature and salinity changes in Tampa Bay over the last 10,000 years. Sample age was constrained using a total of 21 AMS radiocarbon dates, 11 measured on A. beccarii and 10 measured on other material in the sediment (shell, bulk organic sediment, mollusk, organic sediment, and plant). The temperature reconstruction we present provides evidence of significant variability in the climate of Tampa Bay throughout the Holocene epoch, as indicated by a relative temperature range of 6 C. The highest reconstructed temperatures within this record are found from 1000-700 yr BP, which correlates with the commonly accepted timing of the Medieval Warm Period. The lowest temperatures reflected in this record occur from 500-150 yr BP, correlating with the timing of the Little Ice Age. This record also shows that relative temperatures have increased by approximately 3-4 C from 500 yr BP to present. The signal for ?18Osw was determined from ?18Ocalcite and relative temperatures reconstructed from Mg/Ca; changes in both ?18Osw and temperature are relative since the temperature calibration is not species specific. The results would be improved if a Mg/Ca temperature calibration for the species A. beccarii was developed and used. Values of ?18Osw fall within a range of 2.0 permil VPDB over the last 10,000 years, indicating significant changes to the hydrology of Tampa Bay. These results support evidence from the Gulf of Mexico for substantial hydrologic variability on the sub-centennial-scale. These initial results provide the first reconstruction of Holocene climate in Tampa Bay, FL.

Hoover, K. J.; Hastings, D. W.; Flower, B. P.; Cronin, T. M.; Brooks, G. R.

2008-12-01

116

Sediment quality assessment studies of Tampa Bay, Florida  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the toxicity of sediments throughout the Tampa Bay estuary was performed as part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration`s National Status and Trends Program. The objectives of the survey were to determine the spatial extent and severity of toxicity and to identify relationships between chemical contamination and toxicity. Three independent toxicity tests were performed: a 10-d amphipod survival test of the whole sediments with Ampelisca abdita, a sea urchin fertilization test of sediment pore water with Arbacia punctulata, and a 5-min Microtox{reg_sign} bioluminescence test with solvent extracts of the sediments. Seventy-three percent of the 165 undiluted sediment pore-water samples were significantly toxic in the amphipod tests. The causes of toxicity were not determined. However, concentrations of numerous trace metals, pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and ammonia were highly correlated with pore-water toxicity. Concentrations of many substances, especially total dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs), endrin, total PCBs, certain PAHs, lead, and zinc, occurred at concentrations in the toxic samples that equaled or exceeded concentrations that have been previously associated with sediment toxicity.

Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C. [Texas A and M Univ., Corpus Christi, TX (United States); Long, E.R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Seattle, WA (United States). ORCA/Coastal Monitoring and Bioeffects Assessment Div.; Windom, H.L. [Skidaway Inst. of Oceanography, Savannah, GA (United States); Thursby, G. [Scientific Applications International Corp., Narragansett, RI (United States); Sloane, G.M. [Florida Dept. of Environmental Protection, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Wolfe, D.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States). ORCA/Coastal Monitoring and Bioeffects Assessment Div.

1996-07-01

117

Lessons Learned from the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) and Implications for Nitrogen Management of Tampa Bay  

EPA Science Inventory

Results from air quality modeling and field measurements made as part of the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) along with related scientific literature were reviewed to provide an improved estimate of atmospheric reactive nitrogen (N) deposition to Tampa Bay, to...

118

Tidal Mixing Box Submodel for Tampa Bay: Calibration of Tidal Exchange Flows with the Parameter Estimation Tool (PEST)  

EPA Science Inventory

In the mid-1990s the Tampa Bay Estuary Program proposed a nutrient reduction strategy focused on improving water clarity to promote seagrass expansion within Tampa Bay. A System Dynamics Model is being developed to evaluate spatially and temporally explicit impacts of nutrient r...

119

Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study: Watershed and Estuary Mapping  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay, Florida, and its environs have experienced phenomenal urban growth and significant changes in land-use practices over the past 50 years. This trend is expected to continue, with human activity intensifying and affecting a wider geographic region. Urbanization creates impervious surfaces, which increase stormwater runoff and contribute to greater amounts of chemicals flowing into coastal waters. Man-made structures including bridges, a gas pipeline, desalination plant, ports, navigation channels, and extensive sea walls have been built and will continue to be maintained and modified. This task of the Tampa Bay Study aims to provide a better understanding of these and other man-made impacts on the Tampa Bay region.

Hansen, Mark

2005-01-01

120

Tampa Bay coastal wetlands: nineteenth to twentieth century tidal marsh-to-mangrove conversion  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Currently, mangroves dominate the tidal wetlands of Tampa Bay, Florida, but an examination of historic navigation charts revealed dominance of tidal marshes with a mangrove fringe in the 1870s. This study's objective was to conduct a new assessment of wetland change in Tampa Bay by digitizing nineteenth century topographic and public land surveys and comparing these to modern coastal features at four locations. We differentiate between wetland loss, wetland gain through marine transgression, and a wetland conversion from marsh to mangrove. Wetland loss was greatest at study sites to the east and north. Expansion of the intertidal zone through marine transgression, across adjacent low-lying land, was documented primarily near the mouth of the bay. Generally, the bay-wide marsh-to-mangrove ratio reversed from 86:14 to 25:75 in 125 years. Conversion of marsh to mangrove wetlands averaged 72 % at the four sites, ranging from 52 % at Old Tampa Bay to 95 % at Feather Sound. In addition to latitudinal influences, intact wetlands and areas with greater freshwater influence exhibited a lower rate of marsh-to-mangrove conversion. Two sources for nineteenth century coastal landscape were in close agreement, providing an unprecedented view of historic conditions in Tampa Bay.

Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.

2012-01-01

121

Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Characterization of Tidal Wetlands  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tidal wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida, consist of mangrove forests and salt marshes. Wetlands buffer storm surges, provide fish and wildlife habitat, and enhance water quality through the removal of water-borne nutrients and contaminants. Substantial areas of both mangroves and salt marshes have been lost to agricultural, residential, and industrial development in this urban estuary. Wetlands researchers are characterizing the biological components of tidal wetlands and examining the physical factors such as salinity, tidal flushing, and sediment deposition that control the composition of tidal wetland habitats. Wetlands restoration is a priority of resource managers in Tampa Bay. Baseline studies such as these are needed for successful restoration planning and evaluation.

McIvor, Carole

2005-01-01

122

Data bases for use in fish and wildlife mitigation planning in Tampa Bay, Florida: Project summary  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the history, objectives, activities, and results of a 3-year cooperative project by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the Tampa Port Authority (TPA) to improve the data base available for making decisions regarding port development and wildlife habitat management in Tampa Bay. In addition, the report describes situations in which the study methods, results, and products might be used to improve management and development decisions regarding fish and wildlife resources in the bay. Individual projects which have generated separate products such as maps, booklets, and reports are described.

Fehring, W.K.

1986-09-01

123

Tidal-flow, circulation, and flushing changes caused by dredge and fill in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay, Florida, underwent extensive physical changes between 1880 and 1972 because of construction of causeways, islands, channels, and shoreline fills. These changes resulted in a progressive reduction in the quantity of tidal water that enters and leaves the bay. Dredging and filling also changed the magnitude and direction of tidal flows in large parts of the bay. A two-dimensional, finite-difference, hydrodynamic model was used to simulate flood, ebb, and residual transport of both water and a dissolved constituent for the physical conditions that existed in Tampa Bay during 1880 and 1972 and for the conditions that are likely to exist in 1985. The calibrated and verified model was used to hindcast water- and constituent-transport changes caused by construction in the bay between 1880 and 1972. The model was used also to forecast changes that can be expected to occur as a result of a major Federal dredging project scheduled for completion in 1985. The model forecasted transport changes caused by the Federal dredging project to be much less areally extensive than the corresponding transport changes caused by construction in Tampa Bay between 1880 and 1972. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in flood and ebb transport were computed to occur over only 8 or 9 square miles of the bay's 390-square-mile surface area between 1972 and 1985. The model computed that construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over 58 square miles of the bay. Dredging-caused changes of more than 50 percent in residual transport were computed to occur over 58 square miles of the bay between 1972 and 1985. According to the model simulation, construction between 1880 and 1972 caused changes of similar magnitude over 167 square miles. Computations reveal historical tide-induced circulation patterns. The patterns consist of a series of about 20 interconnected circulatory features that range in diameter from 1 to 6 miles. Dredging- and construction-caused changes in size, position, shape, and intensity of the circulatory features increase tide-induced circulation and flushing throughout most of the bay. As a result of past and projected physical changes, the bay can and will more rapidly transfer waterborne constituents that have landward sources to the Gulf of Mexico. Conversely, the bay can and will more rapidly transfer constituents that have their source in the Gulf into the upper parts of the bay. Model results show that the bay can be functionally subdivided into eight circulation zones. The zones near the entrances to Tampa Bay and the major bay subunits, Hillsborough Bay and Old Tampa Bay, have several times greater average circulation than do adjacent and more landward zones. Circulation generally decreases from the Gulf of Mexico to the head of Hillsborough and Old Tampa Bays, with a striking exception in zone 3 in mid-Tampa Bay. This 10-mile section of the bay has significantly lower average circulation than that of adjacent zones, particularly for conditions in 1880. The section is thought to be a circulation constriction that reduces the potential transport of dissolved and suspended constituents. Circulation in the constricted section was computed as having increased 6 percent because of dredge and fill construction between 1880 and 1972. An additional increase of 21 percent, due to the Federal dredging project, is calculated. With these increases, this zone acts as less of a constriction than it did in 1880. This and other circulation increases may have contributed to increased bay salinity and to more rapid flushing of constituents from the bay to the Gulf of Mexico.

Goodwin, Carl R.

1987-01-01

124

33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.  

...yards fore and aft of a loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in...inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut F Channel from Lighted Buoys...ii) For vessels bound for the anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port...

2014-07-01

125

33 CFR 165.703 - Tampa Bay, Florida-Safety Zone.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...yards fore and aft of a loaded anhydrous ammonia vessel and the width of the channel in...inbound tank vessels loaded with anhydrous ammonia, Tampa Bay Cut F Channel from Lighted Buoys...ii) For vessels bound for the anhydrous ammonia receiving terminals to Port...

2012-07-01

126

HARVEST AND REGROWTH OF TURTLE GRASS (THALASSIA TESTUDINUM) IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA'  

E-print Network

HARVEST AND REGROWTH OF TURTLE GRASS (THALASSIA TESTUDINUM) IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA' JOHN L. TAYLOR production in plots of cut and uncut turtle grass, Thalassia testudinum, indicated that plants suffered of turtle grass through dredge-fill opera- tions, other types of coastal engineering, and pollution in its

127

Postmetamorphic growth of the arms in Ophiophragmus filograneus (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea) from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Juveniles of the burrowing amphiurid Ophiophragmus filograneus from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA) exhibit a growth pattern unreported in the ophiuroid literature. Two nonadjacent arms grow at a greater rate than the other three arms. This phenomenon might be a developmental adaptation to avoid salinity and temperature fluctuations in surface waters of the shallow-water environment which O. filograneus inhabits. It is

R. L. Turner

1974-01-01

128

An analysis of urban development and its environmental impact on the Tampa Bay watershed  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urbanization has transformed natural landscapes into anthropogenic impervious surfaces. Urban land use has become a major driving force for land cover and land use change in the Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida. This study investigates urban land use change and its impact on the watershed. The spatial and temporal changes, as well as the development density of urban land

George Xian; Mike Crane; Junshan Su

2007-01-01

129

Submarine groundwater discharge to Tampa Bay: Nutrient fluxes and biogeochemistry of the coastal aquifer  

Microsoft Academic Search

To separately quantify the roles of fresh and saline submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), relative to that of rivers, in transporting nutrients to Tampa Bay, Florida, we used three approaches (Darcy's Law calculations, a watershed water budget, and a 222Rn mass-balance) to estimate rate of SGD from the Pinellas peninsula. Groundwater samples were collected in 69 locations in the coastal aquifer

Kevin D. Kroeger; Peter W. Swarzenski; Wm. Jason Greenwood; Christopher Reich

2007-01-01

130

Assessments of urban growth in the Tampa Bay watershed using remote sensing data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Urban development has expanded rapidly in the Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida over the past century. A major effect associated with this population trend is transformation of the landscape from natural cover types to increasingly impervious urban land. This research utilizes an innovative approach for mapping urban extent and its changes through determining impervious surfaces from Landsat satellite remote

George Xian; Mike Crane

2005-01-01

131

Automobiles, Air Toxics, and Adverse Health Risks: Environmental Inequities in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Few environmental justice studies of air pollution have examined the adverse health implications of exposure to transportation-related emissions or used statistical techniques that are appropriate for spatial data. This article addresses these gaps by examining the distribution of cancer and respiratory risks from inhalation exposure to vehicular emissions of hazardous air pollutants in the Tampa Bay Metropolitan Statistical Area, Florida.

Jayajit Chakraborty

2009-01-01

132

Potential Impacts and Management Implications of Climate Change on Tampa Bay Estuary Critical Coastal Habitats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Tampa Bay estuary is a unique and valued ecosystem that currently thrives between subtropical and temperate climates along Florida's west-central coast. The watershed is considered urbanized (42 % lands developed); however, a suite of critical coastal habitats still persists. Current management efforts are focused toward restoring the historic balance of these habitat types to a benchmark 1950s period. We have modeled the anticipated changes to a suite of habitats within the Tampa Bay estuary using the sea level affecting marshes model under various sea level rise (SLR) scenarios. Modeled changes to the distribution and coverage of mangrove habitats within the estuary are expected to dominate the overall proportions of future critical coastal habitats. Modeled losses in salt marsh, salt barren, and coastal freshwater wetlands by 2100 will significantly affect the progress achieved in "Restoring the Balance" of these habitat types over recent periods. Future land management and acquisition priorities within the Tampa Bay estuary should consider the impending effects of both continued urbanization within the watershed and climate change. This requires the recognition that: (1) the Tampa Bay estuary is trending towards a mangrove-dominated system; (2) the current management paradigm of "Restoring the Balance" may no longer provide realistic, attainable goals; (3) restoration that creates habitat mosaics will prove more resilient in the future; and (4) establishing subtidal and upslope "refugia" may be a future strategy in this urbanized estuary to allow sensitive habitat types (e.g., seagrass and salt barren) to persist under anticipated climate change and SLR impacts.

Sherwood, Edward T.; Greening, Holly S.

2014-02-01

133

Age and Growth of the Blacktip Shark, Carcharhinus limbatus, near Tampa Bay, Florida  

E-print Network

thresher shark, Alop-ias vuJpinu.s, the blue shark, Prionace gla-uca, and the short- fin mako, Isu shark stocks may effect lower trophic levels in the ecosystem, therefore sound life history inforAge and Growth of the Blacktip Shark, Carcharhinus limbatus, near Tampa Bay, Florida Kristie A

134

Chemical contaminant exposure and effects in four fish species from Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of selected anthropogenic chemical contaminants and levels of pollution-related biological effects were measured\\u000a during three consecutive years (19901992) in hardhead catfish (Arius felis), Gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis), longnose killifish (F. majalis), and red drum (Scieaenops ocellatus) from 12 subtidal and intertidal sites in Tampa Bay and nearby Sarasota Bay. Each species was collected from at least four\\u000a sites. Compared

Bruce B. McCain; Donald W. Brown; Tom Hom; Mark S. Myers; Susan M. Pierce; Tracy K. Collier; John E. Stein; Sin-Lam Chan; Usha Varanasi

1996-01-01

135

Appearance and water quality of turbidity plumes produced by dredging in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Turbidity plumes in Tampa Bay, Florida, produced during ship-channel dredging operations from February 1977 to August 1978, were monitored in order to document plume appearance and water quality, evaluate plume influence on the characteristics of Tampa Bay water, and provide a data base for comparison with other areas that have similar sediment, dredge, placement, containment, and tide conditions. The plumes investigated originated from the operation of one hopper dredge and three cutterhead-pipeline dredges. Composition of bottom sediment was found to vary from 85 percent sand and shell fragments to 60 percent silt and clay. Placement methods for dredged sediment included beach nourishment, stationary submerged discharge, oscillating surface discharge, and construction of emergent dikes. Tidal currents ranged from slack water to flow velocities of 0.60 meter per second. Plumes were monitored simultaneously by (1) oblique and vertical 35-millimeter aerial photography and (2) water-quality sampling to determine water clarity and concentrations of nutrients, metals, pesticides, and industrial compounds. Forty-nine photographs depict plumes ranging in length from a few tens of meters to several kilometers and ranging in turbidity level from <10 to 200,000 nephelometric turbidity units. The most visible turbidity plumes were produced by surface discharge of material with high sand content into unconfined placement areas during times of strong tidal currents. The least visible turbidity plumes were produced by discharge of material with high silt and clay content into areas enclosed by floating turbidity barriers during times of weak tidal currents. Beach nourishment from hopper-dredge unloading operations also produced plumes of low visibility. Primary turbidity plumes were produced directly by dredging and placement operations; secondary plumes were produced indirectly by resuspension of previously deposited material. Secondary plumes were formed both by erosion, in areas of high-velocity tidal currents, and by turbulence from vessels passing over fine material deposited in shallow areas. Where turbidity barriers were not used, turbidity plumes visible at the surface were good indicators of the location of turbid water at depth. Where turbidity barriers were used, turbid bottom water was found at locations having no visible surface plumes. A region of rapidly accelerating then decelerating flow near the mouth of Tampa Bay produced a two-part or separated plume. Flow acceleration contracted the width of the visible plume, and subsequent flow deceleration caused plume expansion. The two wide segments of the plume appeared to be separated from each other because of the intervening narrow part. Waters ambient to the plumes were tested for clarity in two sections of Tampa Bay. Ambient-water transparency in Tampa Bay was about three times greater near its mouth, in South Tampa Bay, than near its head, in Hillsborough Bay. Two other measures of water clarity, turbidity and suspended solids, showed no statistically significant difference between the two areas, however, indicating that transparency is a more sensitive measure of ambient water clarity than either turbidity or suspended solids. The nutrient and metal concentrations for samples of plume water and water ambient to the plumes in Tampa Bay were statistically equivalent, indicating no detectable changes due to dredging. The concentrations of dissolved copper, lead, mercury, and total mercury, however, were greater in plumes in Hillsborough Bay than in South Tampa Bay. In Hillsborough Bay, six occurrences of the herbicide 2,4-D at concentrations near the detection limit, 0.01 to 0.05 micrograms per liter, were unrelated to dredging activity. Data recorded for longer than the study period indicate that from 1976 through 1979 few average turbidity characteristics in South Tampa and Hillsborough Bays can be directly attributed to dredging operation

Goodwin, Carl R.; Michaelis, D.M.

1984-01-01

136

Ra and Rn isotopes as natural tracers of submarine groundwater discharge in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A suite of naturally occurring radionuclides in the U/Th decay series (222Rn, 223,224,226,228Ra) were studied during wet and dry conditions in Tampa Bay, Florida, to evaluate their utility as groundwater discharge tracers, both within the bay proper and within the Alafia River/estuary a prominent free-flowing river that empties into the bay. In Tampa Bay, almost 30% of the combined riverine inputs still remain ungauged. Consequently, groundwater/surface water (hyporheic) exchange in the discharging coastal rivers, as well as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) within the bay, are still unresolved components of this system's water and material budgets. Based on known inputs and sinks, there exists an excess of 226Ra in the water column of Tampa Bay, which can be evaluated in terms of a submarine groundwater contribution to the bay proper. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess 226Ra ranged from 2.2 to 14.5 L m? 2 day? 1, depending on whether the estuarine residence time was calculated using 224Ra/xs228Ra isotope ratios, or whether a long term, averaged model-derived estuarine residence time was used. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 1.6 to 10.3 m3 m? 1 day? 1. Activities of 222Rn were also elevated in surface water and shallow groundwater of the bay, as well as in the Alafia River estuary, where upstream activities as high as 250 dpm L? 1 indicate enhanced groundwater/surface water exchange, facilitated by an active spring vent. From average nutrient concentrations of 39 shallow, brackish, groundwater samples, rates of nutrient loading into Tampa Bay by SGD rates were estimated, and these ranged from 0.2 to 1.4 105 mol day? 1 (PO43?), 0.96.2 105 mol day? 1 (SiO4?), 0.75.0 105 mol day? 1 (dissolved organic nitrogen, DON), and 0.21.4 106 mol day? 1 (total dissolved nitrogen, TDN). Such nutrient loading estimates, when compared to average river discharge estimates (e.g., TDN = 6.9 105 mol day? 1), suggest that SGD-derived nutrient fluxes to Tampa Bay are indeed important components to the overall nutrient economy of these coastal waters.

Swarzenski, P.W.; Reich, C.; Kroeger, K.D.; Baskaran, M.

2007-01-01

137

Understanding a Century of Change in an Estuary: Tampa Bay. Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the 20th century, Tampa Bay on the west coast of Florida changed from a largely pristine subtropical estuary to a busy waterway with commercial ports and extensive coastal urbanization. The estuary has been physically altered through dredging and construction and its biogeochemical, sedimentary and hydrological balances have been changed. Environmental indicators show that the health of the estuary has been significantly impacted. Long-term restoration and conservation efforts in the next decades will need to be made in the presence of sustained population expansion, increased use of water resources, developments of ports, bay-wide dredging, construction of pipelines, and increased large ship traffic. The Tampa Bay integrated modeling program has helped rationalize, and organize our understanding of the ways that the ecosystem has changed and we have simulated the bay as it was at the ends of the 19th and 20th centuries. This involves submodels of hydrodynamics, hydrology, wave climate, sediment transport, and biogeochemical processes. A key element in this research is the recognition by the USGS Integrated Science Study that estuarine systems function as a dynamic interplay among biologic, geologic, hydrologic, atmospheric, and chemical processes. Integrated modeling also relies heavily on synthesis modeling of historical and modern data for the estuary and the Tampa Bay study has included a major collection program for physical data between 2004 and 2006. An important part of the integrated modeling program has been public outreach including training in the development of submodels by state agencies, universities and community groups. The present paper reviews the Tampa Bay Integrated Coastal Models with conclusions about some of the major anthropogenic impacts. Examples include restoration projects based on the predictions of submodels developed by local agencies for wetland habitats around the Bay and studies by port authorities using submodels of short episodic events such as ship wakes and contaminant spills. Planners have found major application of submodels in coastal hazard prediction especially from severe storms.

Hearn, C. J.; Yates, K. K.

2007-05-01

138

GIS mapping of boom locations and other information needed for Tampa Bay oil spill contingency plan. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this project was to create Geographic Information System (GIS) data layers out of all the spatially referenced information found in the Tampa Bay area Contingency Plan (ACP) issued in September 1994.

NONE

1996-10-01

139

Circulation of Tampa Bay driven by buoyancy, tides, and winds, as simulated using a finite volume coastal ocean model  

Microsoft Academic Search

The circulation of Tampa Bay is investigated using a high-resolution, three-dimensional, density-dependent, finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) that includes Tampa Bay, the intracoastal waterway, and the inner portion of the west Florida continental shelf. Model performance over the three-month interval, September to November 2001, is assessed against available tide gauge and velocity profiler data before using the model to

Robert H. Weisberg; Lianyuan Zheng

2006-01-01

140

Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study: Examining the Impact of Urbanization on Seafloor Habitats  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Seafloor habitats, such as seagrass beds, provide essential habitat for fish and marine mammals. For many years, the study of seagrass vitality has been a priority for scientists and resource managers working in Tampa Bay. Seafloor habitats are extremely sensitive to changes in water quality. Like a canary in a coal mine, seagrass can serve as an ecological indicator of estuary health. Between the 1940s and the 1970s, seagrass gradually died in Tampa Bay. This loss has been attributed to a rise in urbanization and an increase in nutrient loading into the bay. Better treatment of industrial wastewater and runoff beginning in the 1980s resulted in the continuous recovery of seagrass beds. However, in the mid-1990s, the recovery began to level off in areas where good water quality was expected to support continued seagrass recovery, demonstrating that nutrient loading may be only one factor impacting seagrass health. Researchers now are trying to determine what might be affecting the recovery of seagrass in these areas. Currently, little is understood about the effects that other aspects of urbanization and natural change, such as groundwater and sediment quality, might have on seagrass vitality. This segment of the Tampa Bay integrated science study is intended to identify, quantify, and develop models that illustrate the impact that urbanization may have on seafloor habitat distribution, health, and restoration.

Yates, Kimberly

2005-01-01

141

Inherent and apparent optical properties of the complex estuarine waters of Tampa Bay: What controls light?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inherent and apparent optical properties (IOPs and AOPs) of Tampa Bay (Florida, USA) were measured during fourteen cruises between February 1998 and October 2010 to understand how these properties relate to one another and what controls light absorption and diffuse attenuation in this moderately sized (1000 km2), shallow estuary (average depth 4 m). The IOPs and AOPs included: 1) absorption coefficients of three optically significant constituents: phytoplankton pigments, detrital particles, and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM); 2) particulate backscattering coefficients; 3) chlorophyll-a concentrations; 4) above-water remote sensing reflectance; 5) downwelling diffuse attenuation coefficients (Kd) at eight wavelengths and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Results showed substantial variability in all IOPs and AOPs in both space and time, with most IOPs spanning more than two orders of magnitude and showing strong co-variations. Of all four bay segments, Old Tampa Bay showed unique optical characteristics. During the wet season, the magnitude of blue-green-light absorption was dominated by CDOM, while during the dry season all three constituents contributed significantly. However, the variability in Kd (PAR, 490 nm, 555 nm) was driven mainly by the variability of detrital particles and phytoplankton as opposed to CDOM. This observation explained, at least to first order, why a nutrient reduction management strategy used by the Tampa Bay Estuary Program since the 1990s led to improved water clarity in most of Tampa Bay. The findings of this study provided the optical basis to fine tune existing or develop new algorithms to estimate the various optical water quality parameters from space.

Le, Chengfeng; Hu, Chuanmin; English, David; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Chen, Zhiqiang; Kovach, Charles; Anastasiou, Christopher J.; Zhao, Jun; Carder, Kendall L.

2013-01-01

142

Ecosystem responses to long-term nutrient management in an urban estuary: Tampa Bay, Florida, USA  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In subtropical Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, we evaluated restoration trajectories before and after nutrient management strategies were implemented using long-term trends in nutrient loading, water quality, primary production, and seagrass extent. Following citizen demands for action, reduction in wastewater nutrient loading of approximately 90% in the late 1970s lowered external total nitrogen (TN) loading by more than 50% within three years. Continuing nutrient management actions from public and private sectors were associated with a steadily declining TN load rate and with concomitant reduction in chlorophyll-a concentrations and ambient nutrient concentrations since the mid-1980s, despite an increase of more than 1M people living within the Tampa Bay metropolitan area. Water quality (chlorophyll-a concentration, water clarity as indicated by Secchi disk depth, total nitrogen concentration and dissolved oxygen) and seagrass coverage are approaching conditions observed in the 1950s, before the large increases in human population in the watershed. Following recovery from an extreme weather event in 1997-1998, water clarity increased significantly and seagrass is expanding at a rate significantly different than before the event, suggesting a feedback mechanism as observed in other systems. Key elements supporting the nutrient management strategy and concomitant ecosystem recovery in Tampa Bay include: 1) active community involvement, including agreement about quantifiable restoration goals; 2) regulatory and voluntary reduction in nutrient loadings from point, atmospheric, and nonpoint sources; 3) long-term water quality and seagrass extent monitoring; and 4) a commitment from public and private sectors to work together to attain restoration goals. A shift from a turbid, phytoplankton-based system to a clear water, seagrass-based system that began in the 1980s following comprehensive nutrient loading reductions has resulted in a present-day Tampa Bay which looks and functions much like it did in the relatively pre-disturbance 1950s period.

Greening, H.; Janicki, A.; Sherwood, E. T.; Pribble, R.; Johansson, J. O. R.

2014-12-01

143

Early life history of spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus (Pisces: Sciaenidae), in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

During two years of sampling, 747 larval and 1,379 juvenile spotted seatrout,Cynoscion nebulosus, were collected in Tampa Bay, Florida; 93% were less than 75 mm SL. Length-frequency distributions and otolith analysis showed\\u000a that spawning took place from early April until late October. Two seasonal spawning peaks (spring and summer) were made up\\u000a of many smaller peaks, apparently timed with moon

Robert H. McMichael; Kevin M. Peters

1989-01-01

144

Monitoring turbidity in Tampa Bay using MODIS\\/Aqua 250-m imagery  

Microsoft Academic Search

We developed an approach to map turbidity in estuaries using a time series (May 2003 to April 2006) of 250-m resolution images from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, using Tampa Bay as a case study. Cross-calibration of the MODIS 250-m data (originally designed for land use) with the well-calibrated MODIS 1-km ocean data showed that

Zhiqiang Chen; Chuanmin Hu; Frank Muller-Karger

2007-01-01

145

Atmospheric concentrations and dry deposition rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for Tampa Bay, Florida, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sampling of 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at the Gandy Bridge monitoring site between May and August 2002 provided preliminary ambient air concentrations and dry deposition rates for Tampa Bay. The HiC-IOGAPS dramatically improved the recovery of lower molecular weight gas and particle PAHs, as evidenced by the recoveries of PAHs in back-up denuders and filter packs. Total

Noreen Poor; Raphael Tremblay; Heidi Kay; Venkat Bhethanabotla; Erick Swartz; Mark Luther; Scott Campbell

2004-01-01

146

Early life history of the red drum, Sciaenops ocellatus (Pisces: Sciaenidae), in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The distribution, hatching dates, growth, and food habits of larval and juvenile red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) in Tampa Bay, Florida, are described. From September 1981 through November 1983, 800 larvae and 7,536 juveniles (98%<100\\u000a mm SL) were collected, primarily with plankton nets and bag seines. Analysis of otoliths and length-frequency distributions\\u000a indicate that spawning took place from mid-August through late

Kevin M. Peters; Robert H. McMichael

1987-01-01

147

A Numerical Simulation of Residual Circulation in Tampa Bay. Part II: Lagrangian Residence Time  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lagrangian retention and flushing are examined by advecting neutrally buoyant point particles within a circulation field generated\\u000a by a numerical ocean model of Tampa Bay. Large temporal variations in Lagrangian residence time are found under realistic\\u000a changes in boundary conditions. Two 90-day time periods are examined. The first (P1) is characterized by low freshwater inflow\\u000a and weak baroclinic circulation. The

Steven D. Meyers; Mark E. Luther

2008-01-01

148

Seasonal Variation in Lysogeny as Depicted by Prophage Induction in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A seasonal study of the distribution of lysogenic bacteria in Tampa Bay, Florida, was conducted over a 13- month period. Biweekly water samples were collected and either were left unaltered or had the viral population reduced by filtration (pore size, 0.2 m) and resuspension in filtered (pore size, 0.2 m) water. Virus-reduced and unaltered samples were then treated by adding

S. J. Williamson; L. A. Houchin; L. McDaniel; J. H. Paul

2002-01-01

149

Uranium distribution in the coastal waters and pore waters of Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The geochemical reactivity of uranium (238U) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Fe, Mn, Ba, and V was investigated in the water column, pore waters, and across a river\\/estuarine mixing zone in Tampa Bay, Florida. This large estuary is impacted both by diverse anthropogenic activity and by extensive U-rich phosphatic deposits. Thus, the estuarine behavior of uranium may be examined relative

Peter W. Swarzenski; Mark Baskaran

2007-01-01

150

Metagenomic Analysis of Lysogeny in Tampa Bay: Implications for Prophage Gene Expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phage integrase genes often play a role in the establishment of lysogeny in temperate phage by catalyzing the integration of the phage into one of the host's replicons. To investigate temperate phage gene expression, an induced viral metagenome from Tampa Bay was sequenced by 454\\/Pyrosequencing. The sequencing yielded 294,068 reads with 6.6% identifiable. One hundred-three sequences had significant similarity to

Lauren McDaniel; Mya Breitbart; Jennifer Mobberley; Amy Long; Matthew Haynes; Forest Rohwer; John H. Paul

2008-01-01

151

Tampa Bay as a model estuary for examining the impact of human activities on biogeochemical processes: an introduction  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay is a shallow, Y-shaped coastal embayment that is located along the center of the Florida Platform an expansive accumulation of CretaceousTertiary shallow-water carbonates and evaporites that were periodically exposed during glacioeustatic sea level fluctuations. As a consequence, extensive karstification likely had a controlling impact on the geologic evolution of Tampa Bay. Despite its large aerial size (? 1000 km2), Tampa Bay is relatively shallow (mean depth = 4 m) and its watershed (6700 km2) is among the smallest in the Gulf of Mexico. About 85% of all freshwater inflow (mean = 63 m3 s-1) to the bay is carried by four principal tributaries (Orlando et al., 1993). Groundwater makes up an important component of baseflow of these coastal streams and may also be important in delivering nutrients and other constituents to the bay proper by submarine groundwater discharge.

Swarzenski, Peter W.; Baskaran, Mark; Henderson, Carl S.; Yates, Kim

2007-01-01

152

Assessment of boundary layer variations in the Tampa Bay Area during the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL), using the NOAA Twin Otter aircraft, made meteorological and chemical measurements during 21 flights in May 2002 in and around the Tampa Bay, Florida area as part of the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE). One or more vertical profiles were flown during each flight both over land and over the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA's Environmental Technology Laboratory (ETL; now part of NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL)) deployed three surface-based 915-MHz radar wind profilers equipped with radio acoustic sounding systems (RASS) at Ruskin, Sydney, and St. Petersburg. The National Weather Service Office in Tampa (NWS/TBW) released rawinsondes twice daily from the Ruskin site. The measurements of temperature, dew point, potential temperature, ozone, and condensation nuclei acquired during the aircraft profiles are analyzed, and in combination with the profiler and sounding data, are used to determine the structure of the boundary layer over the Tampa Bay region and the temporal and spatial changes that occurred in that structure during representative flights.

Gunter, R. L.

153

Uranium distribution in the coastal waters and pore waters of Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The geochemical reactivity of uranium (238U) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Fe, Mn, Ba, and V was investigated in the water column, pore waters, and across a river/estuarine mixing zone in Tampa Bay, Florida. This large estuary is impacted both by diverse anthropogenic activity and by extensive U-rich phosphatic deposits. Thus, the estuarine behavior of uranium may be examined relative to such known U enrichments and anthropogenic perturbations. Dissolved (< 0.45??m) uranium exhibited both removal and enrichment processes across the Alafia River/estuarine mixing zone relative to conservative mixing. Such non-conservative U behavior may be attributed to: i) physical mixing processes within the river; ii) U carrier phase reactivity; and/or iii) fluid exchange processes across sediment/water interface. In the bay proper, U concentrations were ?????2 to 3 times greater than those reported for other estuarine systems and are likely a result of erosional inputs from the extensive, underlying U-rich phosphatic deposits. Whereas dissolved U concentrations generally did not approach seawater values (13.6??nM) along the Alafia River salinity transect, water column U concentrations exceeded 16??nM in select regions of the bay. Within the hydrogeological framework of the bay, such enriched U may also be derived from advective fluid transport processes across the sediment/water interface, such as submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) or hyporheic exchange within coastal rivers. Pore water profiles of U in Tampa Bay show both a flux into and out of bottom sediments, and average, diffusive U pore water fluxes (Jdiff) ranged from - 82.0 to 116.6??mol d- 1. It is likely that negative U fluxes imply seawater entrainment or infiltration (i.e., submarine groundwater recharge), which may contribute to the removal of water column uranium. For comparison, a bay-wide, Ra-derived submarine groundwater discharge estimate for Tampa Bay (8??L m- 2 d- 1) yielded an average, advective (JSGD) U flux of 112.9??mol d- 1. In Tampa Bay, the estuarine distribution of U indicates a strong natural, geologic control that may also be influenced by enhanced fluid transport processes across the sediment/water interface. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Swarzenski, P.W.; Baskaran, M.

2006-01-01

154

Development, Evaluation, and Application of Sediment Quality Targets for Assessing and Managing Contaminated Sediments in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tampa Bay is a large, urban estuary that is located in west central Florida. Although water quality conditions represent an important concern in this estuary, information from numerous sources indicates that sediment contamination also has the potential to adversely affect aquatic organisms, aquatic-dependent wildlife, and human health. As such, protecting relatively uncontaminated areas of the bay from contamination and reducing

D. D. MacDonald; R. S. Carr; D. Eckenrod; H. Greening; S. Grabe; C. G. Ingersoll; S. Janicki; T. Janicki; R. A. Lindskoog; E. R. Long; R. Pribble; G. Sloane; D. E. Smorong

2004-01-01

155

Fish and wildlife mitigation options for port development in Tampa Bay: results of a workshop  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This report records the results of a workshop held September 25-27, 1983, in Tampa, Florida. The organization of the report closely follows the organization of the workshop itself. The workshop began with a definition of objectives and several presentations providing general background. The context and objectives of the workshop are covered in the INTRODUCTION. A summary of the results of two group discussions is presented in the WORKSHOP RESULTS section. One group identified ways to conduct or locate port development activities in Tampa Bay so as to lessen their adverse impacts; the other group identified ways to compensate for unavoidable impacts by creating or improving important fish and wildlife habitats. Finally, the DISCUSSION section contains the authors' synthesis of more general comments made throughout the workshop, especially during the closing session.

Auble, Gregor T.; Andrews, Austin K.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.

1985-01-01

156

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2011-07-01

157

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2013-07-01

158

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2012-07-01

159

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2014-07-01

160

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2010-07-01

161

Tampa Bay Times Top Workplaces 2013 -Univ. of Florida GCREC http://www.topworkplaces.com/frontend.php/regional-list/company/tampabay/univ-of-florida-gcr[1/28/2014 8:22:22 AM  

E-print Network

Tampa Bay Times Top Workplaces 2013 - Univ. of Florida GCREC http://www.topworkplaces.com/frontend a lot from What employees say Related Articles What it takes to be among Tampa Bay's top workplaces How the survey Tampa Bay's Top 100 Workplaces was done Beyond perks of pizza and Ping-Pong, what really makes

Jawitz, James W.

162

A comprehensive study of Superfund program benefits in the Denver and Tampa Bay metropolitan areas  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the study is to evaluate the benefits of the Superfund program in selected geographic areas. The study demonstrates how the cleanup of Superfund sites has improved the overall quality of life of those in the affected communities. The study presents findings on the benefits of Superfund cleanup activity in the Denver, Colorado and Tampa Bay, Florida metropolitan areas. Denver and Tampa Bay were chosen from several areas that the EPA evaluated and screened during the initial phase of the study. These locations were chosen because of a substantial presence of Superfund activities, making it possible to assess the efficacy of the program. Several features make this study unique in terms of its overall goal. The study examines a broad range of benefit categories related to human health, environmental, and socioeconomic effects of Superfund cleanup activities. The study is also designed to assess benefits due to completed, current, and future planned activity at Superfund sites. This assessment covers Federal remedial activities at National Priorities List (NPL) sites, as well as relevant Federal removal actions in the study areas. These benefits are investigated from an area-wide perspective, as opposed to site-by-site, to determine Superfund`s overall effect on the communities in each area. The study consists of two major phases: Phase 1: Screening and ranking 16 prospective geographic areas and selecting Denver and Tampa Bay as the most appropriate areas for in-depth analysis; and Phase 2: Developing methodologies for assessing benefits, collecting relevant data, and analyzing the benefits from Superfund cleanup activity.

Held, K.; Casper, B.; Siddhanti, S.K. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Smith, E.R. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31

163

Numerical Simulation of Coastal Effects on Ozone Distributions in Tampa Bay, Florida.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the period July 22-24, 1987, the Tampa Bay area in Florida experienced the worst exceedance of the ozone ambient air quality standard (AAQS) since 1980. A mesoscale meteorological model (MM4) was used to simulate the complex meteorological conditions existing for the peninsula. The meteorological data obtained from the MM4 simulations were incorporated into a photochemical model (STEM-II) to simulate chemical variables. The model could predict the observed ozone concentrations at monitoring sites relatively well in terms of daytime ozone levels and peak ozone concentrations. The average peak prediction accuracy between daytime predicted and observed ozone levels during the episode for ozone data unpaired in time and site location (-13%), and the normalized bias (-14%) and error (26%) for data paired in time and space achieved the ozone model performance goals recommended by the California Air Research Board. Back trajectory analyses suggested that emissions from coastal urban areas in southeast and southwest Florida contributed to the ozone exceedances in the Tampa Bay area. On the basis of forward trajectory analyses, the air masses containing peak ozone concentrations on July 23, 1987, in Hillsborough and Pinellas counties each contributed to excessive ozone levels in adjacent counties as a result of transport processes. On 24th July, peak ozone concentrations in Hillsborough county were transported over Pinellas County to the Gulf. Results from these numerical model simulations suggested that VOC (Volatile Organic Compound) control alone is an appropriate strategy for meeting present and future O_3 compliance standards in the Tampa Bay area. Reduction in VOC emissions could have reduced maximum ozone levels to meet the ozone standard for the meteorological conditions existing on July 23, 1987, but could not have resolved the O_3 non-attainment problems existing on July 24, 1987. On the basis of emission reduction simulations, a statewide VOC reduction plan is recommended as a reasonable emission control strategy for the future.

Yeh, Junne-Yih Robert

164

Cease Fire Tampa Bay: a three-tiered approach to firearm injury prevention.  

PubMed

Cease Fire Tampa Bay is a multifaceted, broad-based community effort working to increase awareness of firearm injuries and provide an opportunity for the people of the southwest-central Florida region to eliminate unwanted firearms. Three approaches to develop this program were implemented; a six-county gun buy-back program, firearm safety education for school-aged children and community education programs. The program has been successful in removing 6,981 unwanted guns from the streets, and has reached thousands of children and families in the region. This article describes the development, implementation and evaluation of the program. PMID:16515152

Kallenborn, J Celeste; Gonzales, Kathie; Crane, Nancy B; Pesce, Karen; Swan, Sherry; Flint, Lewis; Shimberg, Robert

2004-01-01

165

Hydrologic data from urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrologic data are being collected in 10 urbanized watersheds located in the Tampa Bay area, Florida. The gaged watersheds have impervious areas that range from 19 percent for a residential watershed in north Tampa to nearly 100 percent for a downtown Tampa watershed. Land-use types, including roads, residential, commercial, industrial, institutional, recreational , and open space, have been determined for each watershed. Rainfall and storm runoff data collected since 1971 for one site and since 1975 for six other sites through September 1976, have been processed. These data are recorded at 5-minute intervals and are stored in the U. S. Geological Survey WATSTORE unit values file. Daily rainfall at 12 sites and daily pan evaporation at one site have been stored in the WATSTORE daily values file. Chemical and biological analyses of storm runoff for six sites, base flow for seven sites, and analyses of bottom material for seven sites are also stored in the WATSTORE water-quality files. Rainfall and storm runoff for selected storms, daily rainfall, and daily pan-evaporation data are summarized in this report. Water-quality analyses of all water-quality samples also are listed. (Woodard-USGS).

Lopez, Miguel A.; Michaelis, D.M.

1979-01-01

166

Wind generated wave resuspension of sediment in Old Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Vertical profiles of velocity and suspended-solids concentration were measured at a scientific instrumentation platform in Old Tampa Bay during the passage of a cold front in March 1990. Strong sustained winds behind the front increased wave activity in the bay, which resulted in resuspension of bottom sediments. The concentration of suspended solids, however, did not correlate with either wave height or mean velocity. A model of wave-current interaction was used to calculate the bottom shear stress, which proved to correlate well with suspended-solids concentration. This analysis shows the importance of considering wave-current interaction when studying sediment resuspension and near-bed transport processes in shallow estuaries.

Schoellhamer, David H.; Levesque, Victor A.

1991-01-01

167

Compendium of current monitoring programs in Tampa Bay and its watershed. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Bay is the subject of research and monitoring programs conducted by several federal, state, regional, and local agencies. In order to provide information on existing monitoring programs, an investigation was conducted to identify a set of ongoing, recently suspended, and proposed monitoring programs for Tampa Bay and its watershed. A summary of each program investigated was classified as either a water quality, habitat, or living resource study and listed alphabetically by agency within each class. The information was reviewed and summarized with respect to the status, objective, approach, sample selection method, and level of sampling effort for each monitoring program. The status and objectives were characterized by the staff contacted and the status was reported as either an ongoing effort, a proposed future effort or a recently suspended effort. The approach of each program was reported as a summary of the sampling design, methods used, and parameters analyzed. Sample selection criteria were presented in terms of sample selection methods and geographic sample coverage. The sampling effort was presented in terms of temporal sample coverage, sampling event frequency, and number of samples taken per sampling event.

Wade, D.L.; Janicki, A.J.

1992-05-01

168

Assessments of urban growth in the Tampa Bay watershed using remote sensing data  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Urban development has expanded rapidly in the Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida over the past century. A major effect associated with this population trend is transformation of the landscape from natural cover types to increasingly impervious urban land. This research utilizes an innovative approach for mapping urban extent and its changes through determining impervious surfaces from Landsat satellite remote sensing data. By 2002, areas with subpixel impervious surface greater than 10% accounted for approximately 1800 km2, or 27 percent of the total watershed area. The impervious surface area increases approximately three-fold from 1991 to 2002. The resulting imperviousness data are used with a defined suite of geospatial data sets to simulate historical urban development and predict future urban and suburban extent, density, and growth patterns using SLEUTH model. Also examined is the increasingly important influence that urbanization and its associated imperviousness extent have on the individual drainage basins of the Tampa Bay watershed. ?? 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Xian, G.; Crane, M.

2005-01-01

169

Improving water demand forecasts using retrospective forecast analogs in the Tampa Bay region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climatic variables have a great effect on municipal water demand. The objective of this study was to improve water demand forecasts using retrospective forecast (reforecast) analogs of several climatic variables including weekly total rainfall, number of rainy days, number of consecutive rainy days, and number of hot days. The reforecast of the Global Ensemble Forecast System (GEFS) was used with both forecast analog and K nearest neighbor (KNN) approaches to generate ensemble forecasts. Ensemble forecasts of water demand were generated using an Auto Regressive model with External Inputs (ARX) water demand model with the input of the analogs or KNN of the climatic variables. The probabilistic forecast skill for both climatic variables and water demand forecasts were evaluated using the rank probability skill score (RPSS) in different months over the Tampa Bay region. The analog approach generally showed higher skill than the KNN approach for forecasting both climatic variables and water demand at all lead days over the Tampa Bay region. The forecast skill for both climatic variables and water demand were generally positive up to lead day 7 throughout the year with the winter months showing longer skillful lead days than the summer months. The temperature-based climate variables showed higher skill than the rainfall-based climate variables.

Tian, D.; Martinez, C. J.

2013-12-01

170

A Siliciclastic-Infilled Sedimentary Basin Within a Large Carbonate Platform, Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A seismic stratigraphic framework based on over 800 km of seismic reflection data collected within the Tampa Bay estuary and approximately 200 boreholes in and around the estuary shows three separate subsurface regions. In the north-central portion of the bay there is an irregular east-west oriented subsurface trough in the Miocene limestone that reaches depths of 30 m below the seafloor (mbsf). This trough contains steeply dipping clinoforms that indicate it has been filled from the south and east and borehole data show that these clinoforms are siliciclastic sediments. South of the trough in the center of Tampa Bay there is a broad carbonate bedrock high. This area is characterized by less than two meters of siliciclastic sediment cover as well as small-scale shallow karst features (10's m in width and up to 10 m in relief). In the southern portion of the Bay the seismic reflection data shows the Miocene limestone has large-scale warping as well as larger-scale karst features (100's m in width and 30+ m in relief) creating another deep basin (up to 40 mbsf) that has been filled by siliciclastics from the south and the east. The sedimentary basin underlying the modern estuary reveals that accommodation space can form within the center of large carbonate platforms and that this accommodation space may be filled by remobilized siliciclastics. Based upon the age of the underlying limestones, and recent work in south Florida by others, we propose that the Tampa Basin was filled during multiple Late Neogene and Quaternary sea-level fluctuations. Additionally, we speculate that the observed multiple buried sinkholes, and sag-and-warp deformation indicate spatially selective subsurface collapse probably initiated by deep-seated dissolution produced by karst processes. Overlying stratigraphic units subsided as a result of solution collapse, creating a surficial topographic low. This surficial basin may have controlled subsequent non-marine, estuarine and even open marine sedimentation during the Late Neogene and Quaternary sea-level cycles.

Suthard, B. C.; Hine, A. C.; Locker, S. D.; Duncan, D. S.; Morton, R. A.; Hansen, M. E.; Edgar, N. T.

2002-12-01

171

Red Mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) Reproduction and Seedling Colonization after Hurricane Charley: Comparisons of Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Reproductive aspects of life history are known to be important in recovery following disturbance in many plant species although this has not been well studied in mangroves. Hurricane Charley devastated large areas of mangroves in Charlotte Harbor, Florida, in August 2004. We surveyed 6 forests in Charlotte Harbor (2002, 2003, and 2005) and 16 in Tampa Bay, Florida (2001, 2002,

C. EDWARD PROFFITT; ERIC C. MILBRANDT; STEVEN E. TRAVIS

2006-01-01

172

A survey of oysters Crassostrea virginica from Tampa Bay, Florida: associations of internal defense measurements with contaminant burdens  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oysters from 16 sites in Tampa Bay, Florida, were collected during a 6-week period in winter 1993 and analyzed for both biological characteristics and tissue chemical concentrations. Using previous sediment contamination and toxicity data, oyster tissues from the selected sites were expected to exhibit a wide range in both quantity and type of chemicals. Chemical analysis showed tissue concentrations at

William S Fisher; Leah M Oliver; James T Winstead; Edward R Long

2000-01-01

173

SURVEY OF OYSTERS CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA FROM TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA: ASSOCIATIONS OF INTERNAL DEFENSE MEASUREMENTS WITH CONTAMINANT BURDENS  

EPA Science Inventory

Oysters from 16 sites in Tampa Bay, Florida, were collected during a 6-week period in winter 1993 and analyzed for both biological characteristics and tissue chemical concentrations. Using previous sediment contamination and toxicity data, oyster tissues from the selected sites w...

174

The Rehabilitation of the Tampa Bay Estuary, Florida, USA, as an Example of Successful Integrated Coastal Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Tampa Bay Ecosystem is located in the state of Florida, USA. The 6739 km2 ecosystem has undergone major changes due to coastal development, including dredging for maintenance and expansion of the 10th largest port in the USA. Approximately 44% of the historic emergent coastal wetlands and 81% of the historic submergent seagrass meadows had been lost through 1981. Declines

R. R Lewis III; P. A. Clark; W. K. Fehring; H. S. Greening; R. O. Johansson; R. T. Paul

1999-01-01

175

Sediment Pore Water Ammonium Concentrations in Old Tampa Bay as Determined by the Diffusive Equilibration in Thin Films (DET) Technique  

EPA Science Inventory

Increased nitrogen loading, associated with rapid human population growth, was thought to be a major driver of Tampa Bay water quality degradation in the decades immediately after the Second World War. Improvements in wastewater treatment in the early 1980s led to marked reductio...

176

Modelling of wind wave-induced bottom processes during the slack water periods in Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Estuarine process-oriented modelling studies were undertaken to understand bottom boundary layer processes in Tampa Bay, Florida. A stationary shallow water wave model, SWAN, was applied to predict wind wave-induced rms bottom orbital currents in Tampa Bay on a 70 x 100 curvilinear grid. Simulations were performed by using two idealized wind forcing (i.e. northeasterly winds of 10 and 20 m s-1) and high-resolution bathymetry. Calculations of bed load and total load of fine sand were made by using the transport formulas of Van Rijn (J. Hydraulic Eng. 1984; 110:1431-1456) and Engelund-Hansen (A Monograph on Sediment Transport in Alluvial Streams. Copenhagen Technical Press: 1972), respectively. Simulations of wind wave induced currents reveal that they are important for fine sand transport along the shallow margins of the Tampa Bay. Modelled bottom orbital currents ranged from 0.05 to 0.39 m s-1. Total loads of fine sand ranged from 2.26x10-10 to 1.05x10-5kg m-1 s-1 for northeasterly winds of 10 m s-1 and from 2.46x10-5 to 3.21x10-5 kg m-1 s-1 for northeasterly winds of 20 m s-1. Wind wave-induced bottom resuspension is an important process affecting water quality in Tampa Bay.

Shi, John Z.; Luther, Mark E.; Meyers, Stephen

2006-12-01

177

Metagenomic analysis of lysogeny in Tampa Bay: implications for prophage gene expression.  

PubMed

Phage integrase genes often play a role in the establishment of lysogeny in temperate phage by catalyzing the integration of the phage into one of the host's replicons. To investigate temperate phage gene expression, an induced viral metagenome from Tampa Bay was sequenced by 454/Pyrosequencing. The sequencing yielded 294,068 reads with 6.6% identifiable. One hundred-three sequences had significant similarity to integrases by BLASTX analysis (e < or =0.001). Four sequences with strongest amino-acid level similarity to integrases were selected and real-time PCR primers and probes were designed. Initial testing with microbial fraction DNA from Tampa Bay revealed 1.9 x 10(7), and 1300 gene copies of Vibrio-like integrase and Oceanicola-like integrase L(-1) respectively. The other two integrases were not detected. The integrase assay was then tested on microbial fraction RNA extracted from 200 ml of Tampa Bay water sampled biweekly over a 12 month time series. Vibrio-like integrase gene expression was detected in three samples, with estimated copy numbers of 2.4-1280 L(-1). Clostridium-like integrase gene expression was detected in 6 samples, with estimated copy numbers of 37 to 265 L(-1). In all cases, detection of integrase gene expression corresponded to the occurrence of lysogeny as detected by prophage induction. Investigation of the environmental distribution of the two expressed integrases in the Global Ocean Survey Database found the Vibrio-like integrase was present in genome equivalents of 3.14% of microbial libraries and all four viral metagenomes. There were two similar genes in the library from British Columbia and one similar gene was detected in both the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea libraries. In contrast, in the Arctic library eleven similar genes were observed. The Clostridium-like integrase was less prevalent, being found in 0.58% of the microbial and none of the viral libraries. These results underscore the value of metagenomic data in discovering signature genes that play important roles in the environment through their expression, as demonstrated by integrases in lysogeny. PMID:18810270

McDaniel, Lauren; Breitbart, Mya; Mobberley, Jennifer; Long, Amy; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Paul, John H

2008-01-01

178

Metagenomic Analysis of Lysogeny in Tampa Bay: Implications for Prophage Gene Expression  

PubMed Central

Phage integrase genes often play a role in the establishment of lysogeny in temperate phage by catalyzing the integration of the phage into one of the host's replicons. To investigate temperate phage gene expression, an induced viral metagenome from Tampa Bay was sequenced by 454/Pyrosequencing. The sequencing yielded 294,068 reads with 6.6% identifiable. One hundred-three sequences had significant similarity to integrases by BLASTX analysis (e?0.001). Four sequences with strongest amino-acid level similarity to integrases were selected and real-time PCR primers and probes were designed. Initial testing with microbial fraction DNA from Tampa Bay revealed 1.9107, and 1300 gene copies of Vibrio-like integrase and Oceanicola-like integrase L?1 respectively. The other two integrases were not detected. The integrase assay was then tested on microbial fraction RNA extracted from 200 ml of Tampa Bay water sampled biweekly over a 12 month time series. Vibrio-like integrase gene expression was detected in three samples, with estimated copy numbers of 2.4-1280 L?1. Clostridium-like integrase gene expression was detected in 6 samples, with estimated copy numbers of 37 to 265 L?1. In all cases, detection of integrase gene expression corresponded to the occurrence of lysogeny as detected by prophage induction. Investigation of the environmental distribution of the two expressed integrases in the Global Ocean Survey Database found the Vibrio-like integrase was present in genome equivalents of 3.14% of microbial libraries and all four viral metagenomes. There were two similar genes in the library from British Columbia and one similar gene was detected in both the Gulf of Mexico and Sargasso Sea libraries. In contrast, in the Arctic library eleven similar genes were observed. The Clostridium-like integrase was less prevalent, being found in 0.58% of the microbial and none of the viral libraries. These results underscore the value of metagenomic data in discovering signature genes that play important roles in the environment through their expression, as demonstrated by integrases in lysogeny. PMID:18810270

McDaniel, Lauren; Breitbart, Mya; Mobberley, Jennifer; Long, Amy; Haynes, Matthew; Rohwer, Forest; Paul, John H.

2008-01-01

179

Orlando, FL, USA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This color infrared photo of the Orlando, FL area (28.5N,81.5W) shows the extensive citrus tree orchards as neat bright red field patterns. The extensive road and highway network in the central Florida region is clearly visible. Also, the recent urban growth caused by the opening of the Disney World amusement complex just southwest of Orlando is clearly evident. This view spans the width of the state from Tampa Bay to the Atlantic coast.

1973-01-01

180

Health assessment for Bay Drums, Tampa, Florida, Region 4. CERCLIS No. FLD088783865. Preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

The Bay Drum's Site (BDS) is listed on the National Priorities List. The 10-acre site, an inactive recycling operation, is located adjacent to two NPL sites in Tampa (Hillsborough County), Florida. Three unlined holding ponds on-site contained various organic solvents and pesticide residues. Preliminary on-site surface water sampling results have identified various volatile organic compounds. They include 1,2-dichloroethene, 4-methyl phenol, ethyl ether, acetone, and unspecific chromium. Groundwater sampling results identified toluene, vinyl chloride, and 1,1-dichloroethene. Sediment sampling results identified chlordane, vinyl chloride, chromium, lead, and cobalt. Soil sampling results identified polychlorinated biphenyls and ethyl ether. Based on available information, the site is considered to be of potential public health concern because of the risk to human health caused by the possibility of human exposure to hazardous substances.

Not Available

1989-07-17

181

Historical contamination of Mississippi River Delta, Tampa Bay, and Galveston Bay sediments. National status and trends program for marine environmental quality: Technical memo (Final)  

SciTech Connect

In order to obtain sediment which has accumulated over the past 100 years or so, 50--80 cm long sediment cores were collected from the submarine Mississippi River Delta, Galveston Bay, Texas and Tampa Bay, Florida. The cores were extruded and sliced into 1 cm thick sections which were then radiometrically age dated and analyzed for those organic compounds and trace metals suspected of being contaminants in the sampling areas.

Presley, B.J.; Wade, T.L.; Santschi, P.; Baskaran, M.

1998-03-01

182

Using Remote Sensing Data to Evaluate Habitat Loss in the Mobile, Galveston, and Tampa Bay Watersheds  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Gulf of Mexico has experienced dramatic wetland habitat area losses over the last two centuries. These losses not only damage species diversity, but contribute to water quality, flood control, and aspects of the Gulf coast economy. Overall wetland losses since the 1950s were examined using land cover/land use (LCLU) change analysis in three Gulf coast watershed regions: Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay, and Tampa Bay. Two primary causes of this loss, LCLU change and climate change, were then assessed using LCLU maps, U.S. census population data, and available current and historical climate data from NOAA. Sea level rise, precipitation, and temperature effects were addressed, with emphasis on analysis of the effects of sea level rise on salt marsh degradation. Ecological impacts of wetland loss, including fishery depletion, eutrophication, and hypoxia were addressed using existing literature and data available from NOAA. These ecological consequences in turn have had an affect on the Gulf coast economy, which was analyzed using fishery data and addressing public health impacts of changes in the environment caused by wetland habitat loss. While recent federal and state efforts to reduce wetland habitat loss have been relatively successful, this study implies a need for more aggressive action in the Gulf coast area, as the effects of wetland loss reach far beyond individual wetland systems themselves to the Gulf of Mexico as a whole.

Steffen, Morgan; Estes, Maurice G.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad

2010-01-01

183

Development of a seamless multisource topographic/bathymetric elevation model of Tampa Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Many applications of geospatial data in coastal environments require knowledge of the nearshore topography and bathymetry. However, because existing topographic and bathymetric data have been collected independently for different purposes, it has been difficult to use them together at the land/water interface owing to differences in format, projection, resolution, accuracy, and datums. As a first step toward solving the problems of integrating diverse coastal datasets, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) are collaborating on a joint demonstration project to merge their data for the Tampa Bay region of Florida. The best available topographic and bathymetric data were extracted from the USGS National Elevation Dataset and the NOAA hydrographic survey database, respectively. Before being merged, the topographic and bathymetric datasets were processed with standard geographic information system tools to place them in a common horizontal reference frame. Also, a key part of the preprocessing was transformation to a common vertical reference through the use of VDatum, a new tool created by NOAA's National Geodetic Survey for vertical datum conversions. The final merged product is a seamless topographic/bathymetric model covering the Tampa Bay region at a grid spacing of 1 arc-second. Topographic LIDAR data were processed and merged with the bathymetry to demonstrate the incorporation of recent third party data sources for several test areas. A primary application of a merged topographic/bathymetric elevation model is for user-defined shoreline delineation, in which the user decides on the tidal condition (for example, low or high water) to be superimposed on the elevation data to determine the spatial position of the water line. Such a use of merged topographic/bathymetric data could lead to the development of a shoreline zone, which could reduce redundant mapping efforts by federal, state, and local agencies by allowing them to customize their portrayals of the shoreline using a standard baseline elevation dataset.

Gesch, D.; Wilson, R.

2001-01-01

184

A landscape based, systems dynamic model for assessing impacts of urban development on water quality for sustainable seagrass growth in Tampa Bay, Florida  

EPA Science Inventory

We present an integrated assessment model to predict potential unintended consequences of urban development on the sustainability of seagrasses and preservation of ecosystem services, such as catchable fish, in Tampa Bay. Ecosystem services are those ecological functions and pro...

185

Eutrophication trend of lakes in the Tampa Bay watershed and the role of submerged aquatic vegetation in buffering lake water phosphorus concentration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twentieth century human settlement within the Tampa Bay watershed was linked to a dramatic mid-century decline in bay water quality and loss of seagrass acreage. Decades of direct and indirect nutrient discharges to the bay from phosphorus mining, fertilizer manufacturing, and wastewater treatment, as examples, impaired the estuary. In the past twenty years, regional stakeholders have worked to improve the

Max Jacobo Moreno Madrian

2008-01-01

186

Toward Reversal of Eutrophic Conditions in a Subtropical Estuary: Water Quality and Seagrass Response to Nitrogen Loading Reductions in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coastal waters have been significantly influenced by increased inputs of nutrients that have accompanied population growth\\u000a in adjacent drainage basins. In Tampa Bay, Florida, USA, the population has quadrupled since 1950. By the late 1970s, eutrophic\\u000a conditions including phytoplankton and macroalgal blooms and seagrass losses were evident. The focus of improving Tampa Bay\\u000a is centered on obtaining sufficient water quality

Holly Greening; Anthony Janicki

2006-01-01

187

Potential Relationships Between Urban Development and the Trophic Status of Tampa Bay Tributaries and Lake Thonotosassa, Further the Potential Effect on Public Health  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This slide presentation reviews the use of remote sensing to monitor the relationships between the urban development and water quality in Tampa Bay and the tributaries. It examines the changes in land cover/land use (LU/LC) and the affects that this change has on the water quality of Tampa Bay, Lake Thonotosassa and the tributaries, and that shows the ways that these changes can be estimated with remote sensing.

MorenoMadrinan, Max J.; Allhamdan, Mohammad; Rickman, Douglas L.; Estes, Maury

2010-01-01

188

Improved apportionment of ambient PM constituents to sources in Tampa, FL, with pseudo-deterministic receptor model-II.  

PubMed

In 2005, Park et al. developed a new Pseudo-Deterministic Receptor Model (PDRM) to apportion SO2 and ambient particulate matter (PM) constituents to local sources near Tampa Bay. Ambient pollutant measurements were fit to products of emission rates and dispersion factors constrained with a Gaussian Plume Model for individual sources. Although highly successful, ambient pollutant concentrations were affected by numerous contributing sources at a variety of distances and trajectories were complicated by shifting winds. In this work, we expanded the data set, modified the basic bilinear Gaussian filter equation to constrain solutions based on composition and temporal profiles of key marker species, and implemented a hierarchical approach to applying constraints in order of most-to-least stringent. To account for shifting winds and differing transport times for ground and elevated components of plumes from distant sources, a multiple-height trajectory method was implemented. These changes allowed the number of unknowns to be expanded, such that temporal profiles of the Gaussian dispersion terms could also be extracted from the data. Fits for all species were substantially improved, as was agreement with literature sources for both emission rates and source-particle compositions. PMID:22954420

Beachley, Gregory M; Ondov, John M

2013-03-15

189

78 FR 54585 - Safety Zone; Escape to Miami Triathlon, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Escape to Miami Triathlon, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL AGENCY: Coast...Florida during the Publix Escape to Miami Triathlon. The Publix Escape to Miami Triathlon is scheduled to take place on September...

2013-09-05

190

BENTHIC-PELAGIC PROCESSES IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON OXYGEN FLUXES  

EPA Science Inventory

Eutrophication caused by excess nutrients can exacerbate hypoxia by increasing bottom water and sediment respiration. However, in shallow sub-tropical estuaries, the euphotic zone often extends below the pycnocline allowing oxygen fluxes in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA. Measurements we...

191

BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL, USA: ROLE OF PHYTOPLANKTON AND DETRIAL CARBON SOURCES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bacterioplankton Dynamics in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA: Role of Phytoplankton and Detrital Carbon Sources (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ER...

192

Evaluation of organic geochemical and micropaleontological proxies for Holocene paleoclimate reconstructions in Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The exact consequences of human induced climate change are as yet not known. One of the current debates concerns the relation between rising sea surface temperatures (SST) and enhanced hurricane activity. It has also been suggested that the El Nio Southern Oscillation (ENSO) variability plays a major role in providing favorable circumstances for hurricane development. Paleo-climate reconstructions can help understanding long-term trends in hurricane activity. However, reliable climate reconstructions first require that suitable proxies are developed and tested. For this purpose, a pilot-study was performed using biomarkers, pollen, dinoflagellates and diatoms in a core from Tampa-Bay, Florida, covering the Holocene. The hydrological cycle in this part of Florida is strongly affected by both ENSO [1] and hurricanes. Biomarkers of both terrestrial and marine origin were abundant in the core sediments. High taraxerol concentrations were found which are characteristic for the close proximity of mangrove forests on the bays fringes. Other vascular plant derived biomarkers include friedelanone and ?-sitosterol. Marine biomarkers include amongst others dinosterol and long-chain C37 and C38 alkenones, indicative for dinoflagellates and haptophyte algae respectively. These biomarkers are absent in sediments older than 7 kyr BP, indicating a non-marine depositional environment. In sediments younger than 7 kyr BP, increasing amounts of marine biomarkers indicate a transition towards estuarine conditions. SST was reconstructed on the alkenones-based paleothermometer Uk'37 and indicates temperatures of ~ 26C for the past ~4 kyr. Between 7 and 4 kyr BP, concentrations of alkenones in the sediments are too low for reliable SST reconstructions. The shift towards estuarine conditions is a consequence of rising sea-levels following the last deglaciation and is in agreement with earlier findings by Cronin et al. [2], who recognized a change from lacustrine to marine sediments around 7 kyr BP in the same sediment core. Dinoflagellates and diatoms indicate increasing marine conditions from 7 kyr BP onwards, implying that sea level continued rising. Also the pollen-record shows a shift around 7 kyr BP, with a decrease in Cypress swamp vegetation and a slight increase in mangrove pollen, indicative of transgression. Organic geochemical and micropaleontological proxies are in agreement with each other and confirm earlier findings for Holocene Tampa Bay development. The excellent preservation of both terrestrial and marine biomarkers makes them a useful proxy for the reconstruction of SST, precipitation and runoff and eventually hurricanes, especially when read a multi-proxy approach.

van Soelen, E. E.; Brooks, G.; Lammertsma, E.; Donders, T.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Sangiorgi, F.; Cremer, H.; Sinninghe Damst, J. S.; Reichart, G. J.

2009-04-01

193

An analysis of urban thermal characteristics and associated land cover in Tampa Bay and Las Vegas using Landsat satellite data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remote sensing data from both Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 systems were utilized to assess urban area thermal characteristics in Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida, and the Las Vegas valley of southern Nevada. To quantitatively determine urban land use extents and development densities, sub-pixel impervious surface areas were mapped for both areas. The urbanrural boundaries and urban development densities

George Xian; Mike Crane

2006-01-01

194

Toxicological significance of non-, mono- and di-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls in oysters from Galveston and Tampa bays  

Microsoft Academic Search

Concentrations of non-ortho (77, 126, and 169), mono-ortho (105 and 118) and di-ortho (128 and 138)-substituted PCB congeners were measured in oysters from Galveston and Tampa bays, and reported toxic equivalent factors were used to assess their toxicity. Most of the relative toxicity encountered in the oysters analyzed during this study was due to the presence of planar non-ortho-PCBs, particularly

Jose L. Sericano; Stephen H. Safe; Terry L. Wade; James M. Brooks

1994-01-01

195

Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic infilling of a Neogene carbonate shelf-valley system: Tampa Bay, West-Central Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

The shelf-valley system underlying Tampa Bay, Floridas largest estuary, is situated in the middle of the Neogene carbonate Florida Platform. Compared to well-studied fluvially incised coastal plain valley systems, this shelf-valley system is unique in its karstic origin and its alternating carbonate-siliciclastic infill. A complex record of sea-level changes, paleo-fluvial variability and marine processes have controlled the timing and mechanisms

David S. Duncan; Stanley D. Locker; Gregg R. Brooks; Albert C. Hine; Larry J. Doyle

2003-01-01

196

Discharge, water-quality characteristics, and nutrient loads from McKay Bay, Delaney Creek, and East Bay, Tampa, Florida, 1991-1993  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Nutrient enrichment in Tampa Bay has caused a decline in water quality in the estuary. Efforts to reduce the nutrient loading to Tampa Bay have resulted in improvement in water quality from 1981 to 1991. However, Tampa Bay still is onsidered enriched with nutrients. Water quality in East Bay (located at the northeastern part of Hillsborough Bay, which is an embayment in Tampa Bay) is not improving at the same rate as the rest of the bay. East Bay is the center of shipping activity in Tampa Bay and the seventh largest port in the United States. One of the primary cargoes is phosphate ore and related products such as fertilizer. The potential for nutrient loading to East Bay from shipping activities is high and has not previously been measured. Nitrogen and phosphorus loads from East Bay to Hillsborough Bay were measured during selected time periods during June 1992 through May 1993; these data were used to estimate seasonal and annual loads. These loads were evaluated to determine whether the loss of fertilizer products from shipping activities resulted in increased nutrient loading to Hillsborough Bay. Discharge was measured, and water-quality samples were collected at the head of East Bay (exiting McKay Bay), and at the mouth of East Bay. Discharge and nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations for the period June 1992 through May 1993 were used to compute loads. Discharges from McKay Bay, Delaney Creek, and East Bay are highly variable because of the effect of tide. Flow patterns during discharge measurements generally were unidirectional in McKay Bay and Delaney Creek, but more complex, bidirectional patterns were observed at the mouth of East Bay. Tidally affected discharge data were digitally filtered with the Godin filter to remove the effects of tide so that residual, or net, discharge could be determined. Daily mean discharge from McKay Bay ranged from -1,900 to 2,420 cubic feet per second; from Delaney Creek, -3.8 to 162 cubic feet per second; and from East Bay, -437 to 3,780 cubic feet per second. Water quality in McKay Bay, Delaney Creek, and East Bay varies vertically, areally, and seasonally. Specific conductance and concentrations of phosphorus and ammonia nitrogen were greater near the bottom than near the surface at the head and mouth of East Bay. Concentrations of total nitrogen and ammonia plus organic nitrogen generally were greater at the head of East Bay than at the mouth, indicating that McKay Bay is the primary source of nitrogen to East Bay. Concentrations of total ammonia nitrogen, nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, phosphorus, orthophosphorus, and suspended solids and values of turbidity and specific conductance generally were greater at the mouth of East Bay than at the head. The greatest concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were measured in Delaney Creek. In East Bay and McKay Bay, the greatest concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and ammonia plus organic nitrogen occurred in summer, whereas turbidity, specific conductance, and concentrations of suspended solids were greater in winter. The greatest daily mean loads from McKay Bay and East Bay occurred in late June 1992 and April and May 1993 and coincided with periods of daily mean discharge greater than about 2,000 cubic feet per second. Although concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus were greater in Delaney Creek than in McKay Bay and East Bay, loads were minimal because of minimal discharges from Delaney Creek. Monthly loads of total nitrogen ranged from about 20 tons to about 83 tons at McKay Bay; from about 1 ton to 4.2 tons at Delaney Creek; and from about 17 tons to 76 tons at the mouth of East Bay. Monthly loads of phosphorus ranged from about 11 tons to about 45 tons at McKay Bay; from about 0.62 ton to 2.6 tons at Delaney Creek; and from about 10 tons to about 45 tons at the mouth of East Bay. The results of this study indicate that nitrogen and phosphorus loads from the basin draining directly to East Bay (excluding loads from the McKa

Stoker, Y.E.; Levesque, V.A.; Fritz, E.M.

1996-01-01

197

Combined geophysical and geochemical tracer techniques to assess rates and impact of submarine groundwater discharge into Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

It is now widely accepted that water and constituent transport by submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) can be ecologically important within some coastal environments. However, the nature of this discharge, which can exhibit tremendously temporal and spatial heterogeneity, renders SGD most often difficult to identify and quantify. U/Th series geochemical tracers and new geophysical tools have been developed that now can yield system-wide information on SGD rates and processes. The objective of this study was to apply naturally- occurring Ra and Rn isotopes to derive SGD rates bay wide, and then examine to the geologic controls on SGD in this system with streaming and time series resistivity measurements. Submarine groundwater discharge rates calculated using a mass balance of excess Ra-226 ranged from 2 to 14 L per square-m per d. When extrapolated to the total shoreline length of the bay, such SGD rates ranged from 2 to 10 cubic-m per d per m of shoreline. High-resolution time series and streaming resistivity measurements confirm that SGD within Tampa Bay can be separated into a near-shore and mid-bay component that involve different water masses and unique mixing processes. SGD-derived nutrient loading estimates in Tampa bay will be compared to similar riverine estimates.

Swarzenski, P. W.; Baskaran, M.; Reich, C.; Greenwood, J.

2006-12-01

198

Albino mutation rates in red mangroves (Rhizophora mangle L.) as a bioassay of contamination history in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We assessed the sensitivity of a viviparous estuarine tree species, Rhizophora mangle, to historic sublethal mutagenic stress across a fine spatial scale by comparing the frequency of trees producing albino propagules in historically contaminated (n=4) and uncontaminated (n=11) forests in Tampa Bay, Florida, USA. Data from uncontaminated forests were used to provide estimates of background mutation rates. We also determined whether other fitness parameters were negatively correlated with mutagenic stress (e.g., degree of outcrossing and numbers of reproducing trees km-1). Contaminated sites in Tampa Bay had significantly higher frequencies of trees that were heterozygous for albinism per 1000 total reproducing trees (FHT) than uncontaminated forests (mean ?? SE: 11.4 ?? 4.3 vs 4.3 ?? 0.73, P 25 yrs of subsequent recruitment and tree replacement may have allowed an initial elevation in the FHT to decay. Patterns of FHT were not explained by distance from the bay mouth or the degree of urbanization. However, there was a significant positive relationship between tree size and FHT (r=0.83, P<0.018), which suggests that forests with older or larger trees provide a more lasting record of cumulative mutagenic stress. No other fitness parameters correlated with FHT. There was a difference in FHT between two latitudes, as determined by comparing Tampa Bay with literature values for Puerto Rico. The sensitivity of this bioassay for the effects of mutagens will facilitate future monitoring of contamination events and comparisons of bay-wide recovery in future decades. Development of a database of FHT values for a range of subtropical and tropical estuaries is underway that will provide a baseline against which to compare mutational consequences of global change. ?? 2005, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

Proffitt, C.E.; Travis, S.E.

2005-01-01

199

A Trajectory Forecast Model as an Event Response Tool: Tracking an Anhydrous Ammonia Spill in Tampa Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Response time is critical following a hazardous spill in a marine environment and rapid assessment of circulation patterns can mitigate the damage. Tampa Bay Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (TB- PORTS) data are used to drive a numerical circulation model of the bay for the purpose of hazardous material spill response, monitoring of human health risks, and environmental protection and management. The model is capable of rapidly producing forecast simulations that, in the event of a human health or ecosystem threat, can alert authorities to areas in Tampa Bay with a high probability of being affected by the material. Responders to an anhydrous ammonia spill in November 2007 in Tampa Bay utilized the numerical model of circulation in the estuary to predict where the spill was likely to be transported. The model quickly generated a week-long simulation predicting how winds and currents might move the spill around the bay. The physical mechanisms transporting ammonium alternated from being tidally driven for the initial two days following the spill to a more classical two-layered circulation for the remainder of the simulation. Velocity profiles of Tampa Bay reveal a strong outward flowing current present at the time of the simulation which acted as a significant transport mechanism for ammonium within the bay. Probability distributions, calculated from the predicted model trajectories, guided sampling in the days after the spill resulting in the detection of a toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom that likely was initiated as a result of the anhydrous ammonia spill. The prediction system at present is only accessible to scientists in the Ocean Monitoring and Prediction Lab (OMPL) at the University of South Florida. The forecast simulations are compiled into an animation that is provided to end users at their request. In the future, decision makers will be allowed access to an online component of the coastal prediction system that can be used to manage response and mitigation efforts in order to reduce the risk from such disasters as a hazardous material spills or ship groundings.

Havens, H.; Luther, M. E.; Meyers, S. D.

2008-12-01

200

33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Southeast corner). (14) Big Bend Power Plant, FL. ...surface to bottom, adjacent to the Big Bend Power Facility, and within...W, closing off entrance to Big Bend Power Facility and the...entrance to the canal. (b) Definitions. As used in this...

2010-07-01

201

An analysis of urban development and its environmental impact on the Tampa Bay watershed  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Urbanization has transformed natural landscapes into anthropogenic impervious surfaces. Urban land use has become a major driving force for land cover and land use change in the Tampa Bay watershed of west-central Florida. This study investigates urban land use change and its impact on the watershed. The spatial and temporal changes, as well as the development density of urban land use are determined by analyzing the impervious surface distribution using Landsat satellite imagery. Population distribution and density are extracted from the 2000 census data. Non-point source pollution parameters used for measuring water quality are analyzed for the sub-drainage basins of Hillsborough County. The relationships between 2002 urban land use, population distribution and their environmental influences are explored using regression analysis against various non-point source pollutant loadings in these sub-drainage basins. The results suggest that strong associations existed between most pollutant loadings and the extent of impervious surface within each sub-drainage basin in 2002. Population density also exhibits apparent correlations with loading rates of several pollutants. Spatial variations of selected non-point source pollutant loadings are also assessed. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Xian, G.; Crane, M.; Su, J.

2007-01-01

202

Development, Evaluation, and Application of Sediment Quality Targets for Assessing and Managing Contaminated Sediments in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Tampa Bay is a large, urban estuary that is located in west central Florida. Although water quality conditions represent an important concern in this estuary, information from numerous sources indicates that sediment contamination also has the potential to adversely affect aquatic organisms, aquatic-dependent wildlife, and human health. As such, protecting relatively uncontaminated areas of the bay from contamination and reducing the amount of toxic chemicals in contaminated sediments have been identified as high-priority sediment management objectives for Tampa Bay. To address concerns related to sediment contamination in the bay, an ecosystem-based framework for assessing and managing sediment quality conditions was developed that included identification of sediment quality issues and concerns, development of ecosystem goals and objectives, selection of ecosystem health indicators, establishment of metrics and targets for key indicators, and incorporation of key indicators, metrics, and targets into watershed management plans and decision-making processes. This paper describes the process that was used to select and evaluate numerical sediment quality targets (SQTs) for assessing and managing contaminated sediments. These SQTs included measures of sediment chemistry, whole-sediment and pore-water toxicity, and benthic invertebrate community structure. In addition, the paper describes how the SQTs were used to develop site-specific concentration-response models that describe how the frequency of adverse biological effects changes with increasing concentrations of chemicals of potential concern. Finally, a key application of the SQTs for defining sediment management areas is discussed.

MacDonald, D.D.; Carr, R.S.; Eckenrod, D.; Greening, H.; Grabe, S.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Janicki, S.; Janicki, T.; Lindskoog, R.A.; Long, E.R.; Pribble, R.; Sloane, G.; Smorong, D.E.

2004-01-01

203

Influence of air mass origin on the wet deposition of nitrogen to Tampa Bay, FloridaAn eight-year study  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rainfall delivers on the average 10% of the total annual nitrogen load directly to Tampa Bay, based on precipitation monitoring at a National Atmospheric Deposition Program (NADP) Atmospheric Integrated Research Monitoring Network (AIRMoN) site located adjacent to Tampa Bay in urban Tampa. We coupled the chemical analyses for 606 daily precipitation samples collected from 1996 to 2004 with corresponding air mass trajectory information to investigate if wet-deposited nitrogen originated from near versus removed source regions. Air mass trajectories were obtained using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) HYbrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, and were classified into six trajectory categories by the direction of their approach to Tampa Bay. Rainfall nitrate and ammonium concentrations were significantly lower for over-water air mass trajectories than for over-land trajectories as expected, but contributed to 40% of the total wet-deposited nitrogen, a likely consequence of the higher frequency of rain events for these trajectories. Average rainfall nitrate concentrations were significantly higher for air masses that stagnated over the urbanized bay region. We estimated that local sources contributed 1kgNha-1yr-1 or 25% of the total inorganic nitrogen wet-deposited to Tampa Bay.

Strayer, Hillary; Smith, Ronald; Mizak, Connie; Poor, Noreen

204

The distribution and abundance of Sphaeroma terebrans, a wood-boring isopod of red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) habitat within Tampa Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This study was conducted to determine the distribution, abundance, and demography of a wood boring isopod, Sphaeroma terebrans Bate, 1866, within the prop roots of the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle L., in eight sites within Tampa Bay, Florida. Sphaeroma terebrans in Tampa Bay displayed reproductive activity year-round and bay-wide synchrony in their density pattern. On average approximately 60% (range: 25%-86%) of the intertidal aerial roots surveyed were occupied by S. terebrans. Although infestation levels by S. terebrans in Tampa Bay were similar to that of more tropical regions, the distribution of S. terebrans was not continuous throughout the study sites. A substantially higher occurrence and density of S. terebrans was found in the northern compared to more southern study sites within the Bay. Additionally, some seemingly suitable areas of the bay (i.e., Pinellas Point, Skyway, Fort Desoto) were actually unoccupied on some dates. Although sites differed in the frequency with which roots were attacked, the density of burrows and isopods in an occupied root was similar, with most attacked roots containing 3-5 burrows. The results of a transplantation experiment indicated that neither abiotic factors nor substrate quality limit the burrowing capabilities or survival of adult S. terebrans in the areas where they are absent. Instead, dispersal limitation, linked with differential juvenile survival, most likely controls isopod distribution and abundance within Tampa Bay.

Brooks, R.A.; Bell, S.S.

2005-01-01

205

1/23/12 4:51 PMVolunteer finds place in her heart for animals : Volunteer News Tampa Bay Newspapers Page 1 of 2http://www.tbnweekly.com/editorial/volunteer_news/content_articles/011912_vol-01.txt?archiveview&print  

E-print Network

1/23/12 4:51 PMVolunteer finds place in her heart for animals : Volunteer News Tampa Bay Newspapers and works with #12;1/23/12 4:51 PMVolunteer finds place in her heart for animals : Volunteer News Tampa Bay on Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012 Copyright © Tampa Bay Newspapers: All rights reserved. Printable Version Close Wind

Hardy, Christopher R.

206

MODIS-based spatiotemporal patterns of soil moisture and evapotranspiration interactions in Tampa Bay urban watershed  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET) is affected by both water and energy balances in the soilvegetation- atmosphere system, it involves many complex processes in the nexus of water and thermal cycles at the surface of the Earth. These impacts may affect the recharge of the upper Floridian aquifer. The advent of urban hydrology and remote sensing technologies opens new and innovative means to undertake eventbased assessment of ecohydrological effects in urban regions. For assessing these landfalls, the multispectral Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) remote sensing images can be used for the estimation of such soil moisture change in connection with two other MODIS products - Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), Land Surface Temperature (LST). Supervised classification for soil moisture retrieval was performed for Tampa Bay area on the 2 kmx2km grid with MODIS images. Machine learning with genetic programming model for soil moisture estimation shows advances in image processing, feature extraction, and change detection of soil moisture. ET data that were derived by Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) data and hydrologic models can be retrieved from the USGS web site directly. Overall, the derived soil moisture in comparison with ET time series changes on a seasonal basis shows that spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture and ET that are confined within a defined region for each type of surfaces, showing clustered patterns and featuring space scatter plot in association with the land use and cover map. These concomitant soil moisture patterns and ET fluctuations vary among patches, plant species, and, especially, location on the urban gradient. Time series plots of LST in association with ET, soil moisture and EVI reveals unique ecohydrological trends. Such ecohydrological assessment can be applied for supporting the urban landscape management in hurricane-stricken regions.

Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin; Wimberly, Brent

2011-09-01

207

Seasonal variation in lysogeny as depicted by prophage induction in Tampa Bay, Florida.  

PubMed

A seasonal study of the distribution of lysogenic bacteria in Tampa Bay, Florida, was conducted over a 13-month period. Biweekly water samples were collected and either were left unaltered or had the viral population reduced by filtration (pore size, 0.2 micro m) and resuspension in filtered (pore size, 0.2 micro m) water. Virus-reduced and unaltered samples were then treated by adding mitomycin C (0.5 micro g ml(-1)) to induce prophage or were left untreated. In order to test the hypothesis that prophage induction was phosphate limited, additional induction experiments were performed in the presence and absence of phosphate. Induction was assessed as an increase in viral direct counts, relative to those obtained in controls, as detected by epifluorescence microscopy. Induction of prophage was observed in 5 of 25 (20%) unaltered samples which were obtained during or after the month of February, paralleling the results from a previous seasonal study. Induction of prophage was observed in 9 of 25 (36%) of the virus-reduced samples, primarily those obtained in the winter months, which was not observed in a prior seasonal study (P. K. Cochran and J. H. Paul, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 64:2308-2312, 1998). Induction was noted in the months of lowest bacterial and primary production, suggesting that lysogeny was favored under conditions of poor host growth. Phosphate addition enabled prophage induction in two of nine (22%) experiments. These results indicate that prophage induction may occasionally be phosphate limited or respond to increases in phosphate concentration, suggesting that phosphate concentration may modulate the lysogenic response of natural populations. PMID:12200280

Williamson, S J; Houchin, L A; McDaniel, L; Paul, J H

2002-09-01

208

Subtropical Glacial, Deglacial and Holocene Millennial Climate Variability From Tampa Bay, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Although millennial-scale intervals of cooler, drier climate have been documented in Holocene and Quaternary marine and terrestrial records of the extratropics, well-resolved subtropical records of millennial-scale variability are needed to assess the timing, amplitude, and possible modes of origin of such events. Recent coring in Tampa Bay, Florida by the R/V Marion-Dufresne (core MD02-2579) recovered 11.3 m of Quaternary marine, lacustrine and estuarine sediments containing a record of climate in a subtropical region during the last glacial maximum (LGM), deglacial and Holocene. Evidence from stratigraphy, radiocarbon chronology and micropaleontology suggests that the interval from 11.3 m to 7.4 m consists of marine sediments containing interglacial marine faunas and palynomorph assemblages deposited during marine isotope stages 11, 7 and/or 5. These are unconformably overlain by a non-marine, lacustrine unit between 7.4 m and 2.9 m deposited between about 21 ka and 11.5 ka. The glacial-deglacial interval between about 21 and 11.5 ka is characterized by a pine minimum during the LGM and herbaceous pollen during the deglaciation. The uppermost 2.9 m of estuarine sediments, deposited after the final stage of Holocene sea-level rise (3.5 ka - present), contain pollen assemblages dominated by pine, with oak and herbaceous taxa subdominant. The MD02-2579 pollen and environmental record suggests millennial climate variability related to precipitation during the LGM-deglacial transition and will be discussed in terms of broader tropical-subtropical climate patterns in the North Atlantic region.

Willard, D. A.; Bernhardt, C. E.; Cronin, T. M.

2002-12-01

209

Red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) reproduction and seedling colonization after Hurricane Charley: Comparisons of Charlotte Harbor and Tampa Bay  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Reproductive aspects of life history are known to be important in recovery following disturbance in many plant species although this has not been well studied in mangroves. Hurricane Charley devastated large areas of mangroves in Charlotte Harbor, Florida, in August 2004. We surveyed 6 forests in Charlotte Harbor (2002, 2003, and 2005) and 16 in Tampa Bay, Florida (2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005) for total numbers of reproducing trees and trees heterozygotic for albinism that produce both normal and albino propagules. Tree size (estimated height and diameter at breast height) was also recorded for sentinel heterozygotic trees. Total number of reproducing trees km-1 was used as an index of reproductive output of the population, and deviation from the 3:1 (normal:albino propagules) ratio on heterozygotic trees expected with 100% selfing was used to estimate outcrossing. Numbers of Rhizophora mangle reproducing trees km-1 of shoreline in Charlotte Harbor were reduced by an order of magnitude following Hurricane Charley, while numbers of reproducing trees in Tampa Bay were similar to those of previous years. Reduced reproduction in Charlotte Harbor was accompanied by fewer new recruits in plots on Sanibel and Captiva Islands. Numbers of new recruits after the storm also tended to be fewer in plots where canopy loss was greater. More new recruits occurred in sites that had higher densities of pre-storm Rhizophora seedlings and greater relative dominance by Rhizophora. Outcrossing of sentinel trees was 2.5 times greater in Charlotte Harbor (mean site-1 = 33.6 ?? 6.7%; with 17% of forest sites completely selfing) than in Tampa Bay (mean site-1 = 13.4 ?? 4.7%; with 40% of sites completely selfing), although the implications for seedling recruitment of this difference are not known. ?? 2006 Estuarine Research Federation.

Proffitt, C.E.; Milbrandt, E.C.; Travis, S.E.

2006-01-01

210

Exploring the nutrient inputs and cycles in Tampa Bay and coastal watersheds using MODIS images and data mining  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excessive nutrients, which may be represented as Total Nitrogen (TN) and Total Phosphorus (TP) levels, in natural water systems have proven to cause high levels of algae production. The process of phytoplankton growth which consumes the excess TN and TP in a water body can also be related to the changing water quality levels, such as Dissolved Oxygen (DO), chlorophyll-a, and turbidity, associated with their changes in absorbance of natural radiation. This paper explores spatiotemporal nutrient patterns in Tampa Bay, Florida with the aid of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS images and Genetic Programming (GP) models that are deigned to link those relevant water quality parameters in aquatic environments.

Chang, Ni-Bin; Xuan, Zhemin

2011-09-01

211

Validation of MODIS FLH and In Situ Chlorophyll a from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a (chla) is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chl-a inaccurate. Measurement of suninduced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum may, provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms or compared their accuracy against bluegreen ratio algorithms . In an unprecedented analysis using a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data set from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer against a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout this large optically complex estuarine system. . Overall, the results show a 106% increase in the validity of chla concentration estimation using FLH over the standard chla estimate from the blue-green OC3M algorithm. Additionally, a systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the FLH product responds to varying conditions in the estuary and correlations are conducted to see how the relationships between satellite FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a change with depth, distance from shore, from structures like bridges, and nutrient concentrations and turbidity. Such analysis illustrates that the correlations between FLH and in situ chla measurements increases with increasing distance between monitoring sites and structures like bridges and shore. Due probably to confounding factors, expected improvement in the FLH- chla relationship was not clearly noted when increasing depth and distance from shore alone (not including bridges). Correlations between turbidity and nutrient concentrations are discussed further and principle component analyses are employed to address the relationships between the multivariate data sets. A thorough understanding of how satellite FLH algorithms relate to in situ water quality parameters will enhance our understanding of how MODIS s global FLH algorithm can be used empirically to monitor coastal waters worldwide.

Fischer, Andrew; MorenoMadrinan, Max J.

2012-01-01

212

78 FR 19195 - RH International, LLC, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa, FL 33629, Respondent, Mohammad Reza (a/k...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Respondent, Mohammad Reza (a/k/a Ray) Hajian, 2531 West Maryland Avenue, Tampa...denial order. Mohammad Reza (a/k/a ``Ray'') Hajian (``Hajian'') is the owner...Regulations: Mohammad Reza (a/k/a ``Ray'') Hajian (``Hajian''), with...

2013-03-29

213

DROUGHT-INDUCED DECLINE OF SUBMERGED AQUATIC VEGETATION IN ESCAMBIA BAY, FL.  

EPA Science Inventory

Locally, the recent decline of SAV was first noticed in Blackwater Bay, FL by N. Craft of Northwest Florida Aquatic Preserves (personal communication). High salinity persisted throughout the summer and fall of 2000 due to a severe drought that has affected much of the southeast ...

214

77 FR 63720 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL AGENCY: Coast...in Miami, Florida during the 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place on Sunday,...

2012-10-17

215

76 FR 53824 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL AGENCY: Coast...Miami, Florida during the 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place on Sunday,...

2011-08-30

216

77 FR 44522 - Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL AGENCY: Coast...in Miami, Florida during the 2012 Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Ironman 70.3 Miami is scheduled to take place on Sunday,...

2012-07-30

217

76 FR 24840 - Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Register Volume 76, Number 85 (Tuesday, May 3, 2011)] [Proposed Rules] [Pages 24840-24843...1625-AA00 Safety Zone; 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL AGENCY...Florida during the 2011 Rohto Ironman 70.3 Miami, a triathlon. The Rohto Ironman...

2011-05-03

218

78 FR 40079 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2013-0180] RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL AGENCY...of Bayfront Park, in Miami, Florida, during the Red Bull Flugtag event. The Red Bull Flugtag is scheduled to take place on...

2013-07-03

219

78 FR 57061 - Special Local Regulation; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2013-0180] RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL AGENCY...east of Bayfront Park, in Miami, Florida, during the Red Bull Flugtag. The Red Bull Flugtag is scheduled to take place on...

2013-09-17

220

77 FR 60302 - Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2012-0728] RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; Red Bull Flugtag Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL AGENCY...east of Bayfront Park, in Miami, Florida during the Red Bull Flugtag. The Red Bull Flugtag is scheduled to take place on...

2012-10-03

221

77 FR 62437 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...1625-AA11 Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL AGENCY...The Coast Guard is amending the Columbus Day weekend regulated navigation area on Biscayne...necessary to protect the public during Columbus Day weekend; a period that has...

2012-10-15

222

Toxicological significance of non-, mono- and di-ortho-substituted polychlorinated biphenyls in oysters from Galveston and Tampa bays  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of non-ortho (77, 126, and 169), mono-ortho (105 and 118) and di-ortho (128 and 138)-substituted PCB congeners were measured in oysters from Galveston and Tampa bays, and reported toxic equivalent factors were used to assess their toxicity. Most of the relative toxicity encountered in the oysters analyzed during this study was due to the presence of planar non-ortho-PCBs, particularly congener 126. In contrast, the contribution of di-ortho-substituted PCB congeners to the total relative toxicity of the samples was negligible. On average, the contribution of each of these non-, mono-, and di-ortho-substituted PCB congeners to the total toxicity encountered in oysters from Galveston and Tampa bays were 126 > 118 [ge] 169 [ge] 105 > 77 [much gt] 138 > 128 and 126 > 118 > 169 [ge] 77 > 105 [much gt] 138 > 128, respectively. Based on the reported lower clearance rates of non-ortho- and mono-ortho-substituted PCB congeners compared to other congeners within the same chlorination level, contaminated oysters that are depurated in clean environments will lower their total PCB concentrations, but their original toxicity may not be proportionally reduced.

Sericano, J.L.; Safe, S.H.; Wade, T.L.; Brooks, J.M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States))

1994-11-01

223

AVIRIS calibration and application in coastal oceanic environments - Tracers of soluble and particulate constituents of the Tampa Bay coastal plume  

SciTech Connect

AVIRIS is a testbed for future spacecraft sensors (such as HIRIS and MODIS) planned for the Earth Observing System. Model-derived absorption coefficients at 415 nm, a(415), and back-scattering coefficients at 671 nm, b[sub b] (671) for Tampa Bay waters were used to create images from AVIRIS data of the dissolved component of a(415) due to gelbstoff, a[sub g] (415), and salinity. Images of a[sub g] (415), salinity, and b[sub b] (671) were used to depict the distribution of dissolved and particulate constituents, respectively, for Tampa Bay plume during late, ebb-tidal conditions. Salinity covaried with a[sub g] (415), which provided a means of mapping salinity from the a[sub g] (415) imagery. The concentration of suspended particles, as inferred from b[sub g] (671), was extremely variable in the shallow regions where waves and currents interacted. Pollutants covarying with fresh water or suspended sediments can be mapped from a[sub g] (415) and b[sub b] (671) images, respectively. 22 refs.

Carder, K.L.; Steward, R.G.; Chen, R.F.; Hawes, S.; Lee, Z.; Davis, C.O. (Marine Spill Response Corp., Washington, DC (United States) Michigan Environmental Research Inst., Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

1993-03-01

224

Mitigation options for fish and wildlife resources affected by port and other water-dependent developments in Tampa Bay, Florida  

SciTech Connect

Ten past restoration projects in Tampa Bay were evaluated. Habitats included Spartina marsh, mangrove forests, Juncus marsh, and subtidal habitat. Success was difficult to determine because goals for each project had not been defined. In-kind losses of habitat occurred in all but one project. Permanent losses occurred in at least three projects. Restoration of Spartina and Juncus marshes was recommended. Mangroves will recruit into Spartina marshes, provided a seed source is available; planting of mangroves alone is not recommended. Seagrass restoration is not recommended at this time. Twelve sites, most less than 50 ha, were identified as potential restoration sites to give 344 ha of subtidal habitat to be made shallower and 176 ha of uplands to be scraped down. The current management program's legal and policy needs for improving environmental management, the role of mitigation, and the information needed to develop mitigation plans are discussed. This report will be useful to decisionmakers concerned with wetland habitat loss and restoration in Tampa Bay, Florida, and other areas with similar habitats.

Dial, R.S.; Deis, D.R.

1986-06-01

225

33 CFR 80.810 - Cape San Blas, FL to Perdido Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES...to St. Andrews sound in the middle of Crooked Island. (c...to the shoreline across the east entrance to St. Andrews Bay...Entrance Jetties. (g) An east-west line drawn from Fort...

2010-07-01

226

Association of non-marine sulfate aerosol with sea breeze circulation in Tampa bay  

SciTech Connect

Peak concentrations of aerosol sulfur in Tampa, Florida may be the result of either regional-scale transformation and transport processes or local-scale transport from nearby air pollution sources. The existence of the latter has been demonstrated in Tampa through correspondence of sulfur with sea breeze circulation patterns and the resulting chloride concentration maxima (which serve as indicators of the marine aerosol), vanadium concentration maxima (which indicate times of high concentrations of certain plume constituents), and the locations of sources favorable for high concentrations of air pollution-derived sulfate during occurrences of the sea breeze. The analysis indicates that locally derived sulfate in the Tampa atmosphere, which may be less abundant than sulfate due to regional-scale processes, can be identified by the use of combined meteorological and chemical tracer interpretation.

Young, G.S.; Winchester, J.W.

1980-04-01

227

The effects of Orimulsion and Fuel Oil #6 on the hatching success of copepod resting eggs in the seabed of Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 3-month microcosm study was conducted to observe the potential effects of two fuels, Orimulsion and Fuel Oil #6, on the hatching success of copepod resting eggs in the seabed of Tampa Bay, Florida. Microcosms were dosed with one of five hydrocarbon treatments via hydrocarbon-coated sand and compared with controls. Acartia tonsa eggs were nonviable in all treatments after only

Barbara L. Suderman; Nancy H. Marcus

2002-01-01

228

Magnitude and frequency of flooding on small urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area, west-central Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydrologic data collected on nine small urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida and a method for estimating peak discharges in the study area are described. The watersheds have mixed land use and range in size from 0.34 to 3.45 square miles. Watershed soils, land use, and storm-drainage system data are described. Urban development ranged from a sparsely populated area with open-ditch storm sewers and 19% impervious area to a completely sewered watershed with 61% impervious cover. The U.S. Geological Survey natural-basin and urban-watershed models were calibrated for the nine watersheds using 5-minute interval rainfall data from the Tampa, Florida, National Weather Service rain gage to simulate annual peak discharge for the period 1906-52. A log-Pearson Type III frequency analysis of the simulated annual maximum discharge was used to determine the 2-, 5-, 10-, 25-, 50-, and 100-year flood discharges for each watershed. Flood discharges were related in a multiple-linear regression to drainage area, channel slope, detention storage area, and an urban-development factor determined by the extent of curb and gutter street drainage and storm-sewer system. The average standard error for the regional relations ranged from + or - 32 to + or - 42%. (USGS)

Lopez, M.A.; Woodham, W.M.

1983-01-01

229

Digital recovery of 19th century surveys in Tampa Bay, Florida: Topographic charts and Public Land Surveys  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Recovery of historic data to a digital setting adresses the need for data integration through time, bridging technical gaps and differences. The goal of this study was to evaluate a marsh-to-mangrove conversion spanning 125 years and the implications for present coastal-resource management (Yates and others, 2011; Raabe and others, 2012). The U.S. Geological Survey in St. Petersburg, Fla., georectified and digitized 1870s T-sheets at four Tampa Bay locations that still supported coastal wetlands in 2000 (table 1). Nineteenth century Public Land Surveys of Township and Range lines were also digitized for each site, as a secondary data source to verify historic landscape features (table 2).

Raabe, Ellen A.; Roy, Laura C.; McIvor, Carole C.; Gleim, Andrew D.

2012-01-01

230

77 FR 50929 - Security Zones; 2012 RNC Bridge Security Zones, Captain of the Port St. Petersburg Zone, Tampa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Welch Causeway (Tom Stuart Causeway/150th Ave); Seminole Bridge (Bay Pines Blvd./19/595...Blvd./699); Treasure Island Causeway (Central Ave); Corey Causeway (Pasadena Ave); Blind Pass Bridge (699); and Pinellas...

2012-08-23

231

ANNUAL CYCLE OF PERIPHYTON, ZOOPLANKTON, AND WATER QUALITY PARAMETERS ALONG A 5 STATION TRANSECT OF ESCAMBIA BAY, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Phytoplankton, zooplankton and water quality parameters were monitored monthly along a 5-station transect in Escambia Bay (Pensacola, FL) from fall 1999 to fall 2000. To provide insight into nutrient processing in Escambia Bay and effects of grazers on phytoplankton community st...

232

Atmospheric production of oxalic acid/oxalate and nitric acid/nitrate in the Tampa Bay airshed: Parallel pathways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Oxalic acid is the dominant dicarboxylic acid (DCA), and it constitutes up to 50% of total atmospheric DCAs, especially in non-urban and marine atmospheres. A significant amount of particulate H 2Ox/oxalate (Ox) occurred in the coarse particle fraction of a dichotomous sampler, the ratio of oxalate concentrations in the PM 10 to PM 2.5 fractions ranged from 1 to 2, with meansd being 1.40.2. These results suggest that oxalate does not solely originate in the gas phase and condense into particles. Gaseous H 2Ox concentrations are much lower than particulate Ox concentrations and are well correlated with HNO 3, HCHO, and O 3, supporting a photochemical origin. Of special relevance to the Bay Region Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) is the extent of nitrogen deposition in the Tampa Bay estuary. Hydroxyl radical is primarily responsible for the conversion of NO 2 to HNO 3, the latter being much more easily deposited. Hydroxyl radical is also responsible for the aqueous phase formation of oxalic acid from alkenes. Hence, we propose that an estimate of rad OH can be obtained from H 2Ox/Ox production rate and we accordingly show that the product of total oxalate concentration and NO 2 concentration approximately predicts the total nitrate concentration during the same period.

Martinelango, P. Kalyani; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Al-Horr, Rida S.

233

Effect of sea salt and calcium carbonate interactions with nitric acid on the direct dry deposition of nitrogen to Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Equilibrium modeling predicts that atmospheric sea salt and CaCO3 can partition gas-phase HNO3 to solid or aqueous-phase NaNO3 and Ca(NO3)2. We hypothesized that this partitioning reduces the direct dry deposition of nitrogen to Tampa Bay, as the average deposition velocities of the aerosol species are typically less than that of the gas. As a corollary to this, we investigated whether

Melissa C. Evans; Scott W. Campbell; Venkat Bhethanabotla; Noreen D. Poor

2004-01-01

234

Hurricane storm surge simulations comparing three-dimensional with two-dimensional formulations based on an Ivan-like storm over the Tampa Bay, Florida region  

Microsoft Academic Search

We provide a dynamics-based comparison on the results from three-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of hurricane storm surge. We begin with the question, What may have occurred in the Tampa Bay, Florida vicinity had Hurricane Ivan made landfall there instead of at the border between Alabama and Florida? This question is explored using a three-dimensional, primitive equation, finite volume coastal ocean

Robert H. Weisberg; Lianyuan Zheng

2008-01-01

235

Late Holocene estuarine-inner shelf interactions; is there evidence of an estuarine retreat path for Tampa Bay, Florida?  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The purpose of this study was to determine if and how a large, modern estuarine system, situated in the middle of an ancient carbonate platform, has affected its adjacent inner shelf both in the past during the last, post-glacial sea-level rise and during the present. An additional purpose was to determine if and how this inner shelf seaward of a major estuary differed from the inner shelves located just to the north and south but seaward of barrier-island shorelines. Through side-scan sonar mosaicking, bathymetric studies, and ground-truthing using surface grab samples as well as diver observations, two large submarine sand plains were mapped - one being the modern ebb-tidal delta and the other interpreted to be a relict ebb-tidal delta formed earlier in the Holocene. The most seaward portion of the inner shelf studied consists of a field of lobate, bathymetrically elevated, fine-sand accumulations, which were interpreted to be sediment-starved 3D dunes surrounded by small 2D dunes composed of coarse molluscan shell gravel. Additionally, exposed limestone hardbottoms supporting living benthic communities were found as well. This modern shelf sedimentary environment is situated on a large, buried shelf valley, which extends eastward beneath the modern Tampa Bay estuary. These observations plus the absence of an incised shelf valley having surficial bathymetric expression, and the absence of sand bodies normally associated with back-tracking estuarine systems indicate that there was no cross-shelf estuarine retreat path formed during the last rise in sea level. Instead, the modern Tampa Bay formed within a mid-platform, low-relief depression, which was flooded by rising marine waters late in the Holocene. With continued sea-level rise in the late Holocene, this early embayment was translated eastward or landward to its present position, whereby a larger ebb-tidal delta prograded out onto the inner shelf. Extensive linear sand ridges, common to the inner shelves to the north and south, did not form in this shelf province because it was a low-energy, open embayment lacking the wave climate and nearshore zone necessary to create such sand bodies. The distribution of bedforms on the inner shelf and the absence of seaward-oriented 2D dunes on the modern ebb-tidal delta indicate that the modern estuarine system has had little effect on its adjacent inner shelf. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Donahue, B.T.; Hine, A.C.; Tebbens, S.; Locker, S.D.; Twichell, D.C.

2003-01-01

236

Coupling of surge and waves for an Ivan-like hurricane impacting the Tampa Bay, Florida region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The interactions between waves and storm surge are investigated using an unstructured grid, coupled wave-surge model forced by a hypothetical Ivan-like hurricane impacting the Tampa Bay, Florida region. The waves derived from the unstructured version of the third-generation wave model simulating waves nearshore. The surge derives from the unstructured Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model, to which wave-induced forces (based on radiation stress theory) are added to the traditional forces by winds and atmospheric pressure. Dependent upon complex bathymetry and geometry, the wave-induced forces result in an additional 0.30.5 m of surge relative to an uncoupled, surge-only simulation, and the increase in coastal sea level by the storm surge adds some 1.01.5 m to the significant wave heights nearshore. Such strong interactions through coupling suggest that waves should not be omitted in hurricane storm surge simulations, especially because the forces by waves on coastal structures are perhaps the most damaging of the hurricane related forces.

Huang, Yong; Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan

2010-12-01

237

Hurricane storm surge simulations comparing three-dimensional with two-dimensional formulations based on an Ivan-like storm over the Tampa Bay, Florida region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We provide a dynamics-based comparison on the results from three-dimensional and two-dimensional simulations of hurricane storm surge. We begin with the question, What may have occurred in the Tampa Bay, Florida vicinity had Hurricane Ivan made landfall there instead of at the border between Alabama and Florida? This question is explored using a three-dimensional, primitive equation, finite volume coastal ocean model. The results show that storm surges are potentially disastrous for the Tampa Bay area, especially for landfalls located to the north of the bay mouth. The worst case among the simulations considered is for landfall at Tarpon Springs, such that the maximum wind is positioned at the bay mouth. Along with such regional aspects of storm surge, we then consider the dynamical balances to assess the importance of using a three-dimensional model instead of the usual, vertically integrated, two-dimensional approach to hurricane storm surge simulation. With hurricane storm surge deriving from the vertically integrated pressure gradient force tending to balance the difference between the surface and bottom stresses, we show that three-dimensional structure is intrinsically important. Two-dimensional models may overestimate (or underestimate) bottom stress, necessitating physically unrealistic parameterizations of surface stress or other techniques for model calibration. Our examination of the dynamical balances inherent to storm surges over complex coastal topography suggests that three-dimensional models are preferable over two-dimensional models for simulating storm surges.

Weisberg, Robert H.; Zheng, Lianyuan

2008-12-01

238

Patient Navigation and Time to Diagnostic Resolution: Results for a Cluster Randomized Trial Evaluating the Efficacy of Patient Navigation among Patients with Breast Cancer Screening Abnormalities, Tampa, FL  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate a patient navigation (PN) program that attempts to reduce the time between a breast cancer screening abnormality and definitive diagnosis among medically underserved populations of Tampa Bay, Florida. Methods The Moffitt Patient Navigation Research Program conducted a cluster randomized design with 10 primary care clinics. Patients were navigated from time of a breast screening abnormality to diagnostic resolution. This paper examined the length of time between breast abnormality and definitive diagnosis, using a shared frailty Cox proportional hazard model to assess PN program effect. Results 1,039 patients were eligible for the study because of an abnormal breast cancer screening/clinical abnormality (494 navigated; 545 control). Analysis of PN effect by two time periods of resolution (0-3 months and > 3 months) showed a lagged effect of PN. For patients resolving in the first three months, the adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) was 0.85 (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 0.64-1.13) suggesting that PN had no effect on resolution time during this period. Beyond three months, however, navigated patients resolved more quickly to diagnostic resolution compared with the control group (aHR 2.8, 95%CI: 1.30-6.13). The predicted aHR at 3 months was 1.2, which was not statistically significant, while PN had a significant positive effect beyond 4.7 months. Conclusions PN programs may increase the timeliness of diagnostic resolution for patients with a breast cancer-related abnormality. PN did not speed diagnostic resolution during the initial three months of follow up but started to reduce time to diagnostic resolution after three months and showed a significant effect after 4.7 months. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00375024 PMID:24066145

Lee, Ji-Hyun; Fulp, William; Wells, Kristen J.; Meade, Cathy D.; Calcano, Ercilia; Roetzheim, Richard

2013-01-01

239

Assessment of Mesoscale Dynamical Downscaling Model (MM5) for Regional Climate Simulation in the Tampa Bay region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This research analyzes the temporal and spatial variability of historic precipitation in Tampa Bay region and evaluates the ability of the mesoscale downscaling model (MM5, Grell et al., 1994), to reproduce this variability. The long term goal of this effort is to evaluate the utility of using MM5 to downscale GCM forecasts and climate change scenarios for improving water management decisions in the Tampa Bay region. Cumulative probability distributions were constructed using observed daily and monthly rainfall at each station, and the spatial correlations between the 53 stations were analyzed for each month using covariance and variogram analysis for both observed data and MM5 predictions. MM5 was run to predict precipitation at 9x9 and 27x27 km2 spatial resolutions and 6-hour temporal resolution over the 23 year period from 1986 to 2008 using the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data set as initial and boundary conditions. The raw precipitation predictions were then bias-corrected at each observation station using the cumulative probability distribution mapping approach (Wood et al., 2002). Daily and monthly precipitation totals were estimated over the Alafia and Hillsborough River watersheds using the bias-corrected point precipitation and observed variogram functions. MM5 performance was assessed by cross-validating predicted daily and monthly point and total watershed precipitation for each month. Variograms from the bias-corrected daily precipitation predictions in general indicated that MM5 overestimates the strength of the spatial correlation and underestimates the variance of precipitation compared to the observed data, especially in the summer months when convective storms dominate. The simulations for each month reproduced the daily mean point precipitation values with an average error of -0.0641 in (Jul.) to 0.0214 in (Oct.) with an average RMSE of 0.6834 in (Mar.) to 0.9449 in (Sep.) over the 53 rain stations. Monthly mean point precipitation values were reproduced with an average error of -0.7110 in (Jun.) to 0.2732 in (Aug.) with an average RMSE of 1.8154 in (Mar.) to 5.1194 in (Sep.) over the 53 stations stations. Point kriging the bias-corrected daily precipitation fields over the watersheds reproduced the observed rainfall with an average RMSE of 0.3550 in (Jan.) to 0.6977 in (Sep.) over the 53 stations. Block kriging the bias-corrected daily precipitation fields over the watersheds reproduced the observed block kriged rainfall with an average RMSE of 0.3104 in (Feb.) to 0.5932 in (Sep.) over the 23 years. In all cases actual kriging errors were well predicted by the kriging standard deviation estimate. In the next phase of this research the methodology developed here will be used to produce spatially distributed bias-corrected precipitation estimates from downscaled MM5 predictions that use GCM forecasts and IPCC scenarios as boundary conditions. These precipitation fields will be subsequently be used in a hydrologic model to predict streamflow response to climate fluctuations and climate change scenarios in order to improve the operation of water supply reservoirs in the region.

Hwang, S.; Graham, W. D.; Hernandez, J.; Martinez, C. J.; Jones, J. W.

2009-12-01

240

Modeling Photosynthetically Active Radiation in Water of Tampa Bay, Florida, with Emphasis on the Geometry of Incident Irradiance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Field studies that compare the spatial and temporal variation in light attenuation often neglect effects of solar elevation angle, yet these effects can be significant. To approximately correct for these angular effects, we developed a model that uses a simplified geometric description of incident direct solar beam and diffuse skylight. The model incorporates effects of solar elevation angle and cloudiness on the amount of in-air photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) that passes through the air-water interface and on K0in waters of relatively low turbidity. The model was calibrated with 3266 5-min averages of scalar PAR measured in air and at two depths in water and permits the value of K0to be adjusted approximately for the effects of time of day, season and cloudiness. The model was then used with 255 days of in-air PAR data (15-min averages) to evaluate irradiance that entered the water and attenuation in the water. On an annual basis, 49% of the incident scalar irradiance, or 380 ?mol m -2s -1, was estimated to enter the water of Tampa Bay. The value of K0was estimated to vary as much as 41% on a clear summer day due to changes in solar elevation angle. The model was used to make estimates of the depth to which sea-grasses might receive adequate light for survival for a range of values of K0. This approach should be useful for projecting the effect of changes in water clarity on the depth of sea-grass survival and for comparing values of K0collected at different times of day and in different seasons.

Miller, Ronald L.; McPherson, Benjamin F.

1995-04-01

241

Analysis of six groups of zooplankton in samples taken in 1978/79 at the proposed OTEC site in the eastern Gulf of Mexico off Tampa Bay  

SciTech Connect

Continued analysis has been made of the 33 zooplankton collections made at the proposed OTEC site in the Gulf of Mexico off Tampa Bay. Six groups of zooplankton - siphonophores (Calycophora), pteropods (Thecosomata), chaetognaths, thaliaceans, euphausiids and amphipods were quantitatively investigated. Numbers and biomass were determined for all taxa and diurnal, seasonal and depth trends were discussed. Considering the present study and the previous investigation of the copepod population, this proposed OTEC site is probably one of the faunistically better known locales in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.

Flock, M.E.; Hopkins, T.L.

1981-05-01

242

Water-quality characteristics of urban runoff and estimates of annual loads in the Tampa Bay area, Florida, 1975-80  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Rainfall, runoff, and water quality data were collected at nine urban watersheds in the Tampa Bay area from 1975 to 1980. Watershed drainage area ranged from 0.34 to 0.45 sq mi. Land use was mixed. Development ranged from a mostly residential watershed with a 19% impervious surface, to a commercial-residential watershed with a 61% impervious surface. Average biochemical oxygen demand concentrations of base flow at two sites and of stormwater runoff at five sites exceeded treated sewage effluent standards. Average coliform concentrations of stormwater runoff at all sites were several orders of magnitude greater than standards for Florida Class III receiving water (for recreation or propagation and management of fish and wildlife). Average concentrations of lead and zinc in stormwater runoff were consistently higher than Class III standards. Stormwater-runoff loads and base-flow concentrations of biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, total organic nitrogen, total phosphorus, and lead were related to runoff volume, land use, urban development, and antecedent daily rainfall by multiple linear regression. Stormwater-runoff volume was related to pervious area, hydraulically connected impervious surfaces, storm rainfall, and soil-infiltration index. Base-flow daily discharge was related to drainage area and antecedent daily rainfall. The flow regression equations of this report were used to compute 1979 water-year loads of biochemical oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, total nitrogen, total organic nitrogen, total phosphorus , and total lead for the nine Tampa Bay area urban watersheds. (Lantz-PTT)

Lopez, M.A.; Giovannelli, R.F.

1984-01-01

243

Mangrove soil and vegetation change after tidal wetland creation: a 20-year chronosequence in Tampa Bay, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Mangrove restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as mechanisms to compensate for mangrove loss (which has been high in recent decades: ~30-50% global loss). However, ecosystem development and functionality following mangrove restoration and creation is poorly u...

244

High-resolution Land Cover Datasets, Composite Curve Numbers, and Storm Water Retention in the Tampa Bay, FL region  

EPA Science Inventory

Policy makers need to understand how land cover change alters storm water regimes, yet existing methods do not fully utilize newly available datasets to quantify storm water changes at a landscape-scale. Here, we use high-resolution, remotely-sensed land cover, imperviousness, an...

245

77 FR 14471 - Safety Zone; Festival of States 2012 Night Parade Fireworks Display, Tampa Bay, St. Petersburg, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Petersburg, Florida during Festival of States 2012 Night Parade...Thursday, March 22, 2012, the Festival of States 2012 Night Parade...T07-0110 Safety Zone; Festival of States 2012 Night Parade...All coordinates are North American Datum 1983. (b)...

2012-03-12

246

Ecosystem development after mangrove creation: plant-soil change across a twenty-year chronosequence in Tampa Bay, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

On a global scale, the loss of mangroves has been high (~1-2% loss per year in recent decades). Recognizing the important ecosystem services supported by mangroves, restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as mechanisms to replace those services lost after mangr...

247

Bathymetry and vegetation in isolated marsh and cypress wetlands in the northern Tampa Bay Area, 2000-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Wetland bathymetry and vegetation mapping are two commonly used lines of evidence for assessing the hydrologic and ecologic status of expansive coastal and riverine wetlands. For small isolated freshwater wetlands, however, bathymetric data coupled with vegetation assessments are generally scarce, despite the prevalence of isolated wetlands in many regions of the United States and the recognized importance of topography as a control on inundation patterns and vegetation distribution. In the northern Tampa Bay area of west-central Florida, bathymetry was mapped and vegetation was assessed in five marsh and five cypress wetlands. These 10 isolated wetlands were grouped into three categories based on the effects of ground-water withdrawals from regional municipal well fields: natural (no effect), impaired (drier than natural), and augmented (wetlands with artificially augmented water levels). Delineation of the wetland perimeter was a critical component for estimating wetland-surface area and stored water volume. The wetland perimeter was delineated by the presence of Serenoa repens (the 'palmetto fringe') at 9 of the 10 sites. At the 10th site, where the palmetto fringe was absent, hydric-soils indicators were used to delineate the perimeter. Bathymetric data were collected using one or more techniques, depending on the physical characteristics of each wetland. Wetland stage was measured hourly using continuous stage recorders. Wetland vegetation was assessed semiannually for 2 1/2 years in fixed plots located at three distinct elevations. Vegetation assessments were used to determine the community composition and the relative abundance of obligate, facultative wet, and facultative species at each elevation. Bathymetry maps were generated, and stage-area and stage-volume relations were developed for all 10 wetlands. Bathymetric data sets containing a high density of data points collected at frequent and regular spatial intervals provided the most useful stage-area and stage-volume relations. Bathymetric maps of several wetlands also were generated using a low density of data points collected along transect lines or contour lines. In a comparative analysis of the three mapping approaches, stage-area and stage-volume relations based on transect data alone underestimated (by 50-100 percent over certain ranges of stage) the wetland area and volume compared to results using a high density of data points. Adding data points collected along one elevation contour below the wetland perimeter to the transect data set greatly improved the agreement of the resulting stage-area and stage-volume relations to the high-density mapping approach. Stage-area relations and routinely monitored stage data were used to compare and contrast the average flooded area in a natural marsh and an impaired marsh over a 2-year period. Vegetation assessments used together with flooded-area information provided the potential for extrapolating vegetation results from points or transects to wetlands as a whole. A comparison of the frequency of flooding of different areas of the wetland and the species composition in vegetation plots at different elevations indicated the dependence of vegetation on inundation frequency. Because of the broad tolerances of many wetlands plants to a range of inundation conditions, however, vegetation assessments alone provided less definitive evidence of the hydrologic differences between the two sites, and hydrologic changes occurring during the 2 years, than the flooded-area frequencies. Combining flooded-area frequencies with vegetation assessments could provide a more versatile and insightful approach for determining the ecological status of wetlands than using vegetation and stage data alone. Flooded-area frequencies may further provide a useful approach for assessing the ecological status of wetlands where historical vegetation surveys and stage data are lacking. Comparing the contemporary flooded-area frequencies a

Haag, Kim H.; Lee, Terrie M.; Herndon, Donald C.

2005-01-01

248

The effects of Orimulsion and Fuel Oil #6 on the hatching success of copepod resting eggs in the seabed of Tampa Bay, Florida.  

PubMed

A 3-month microcosm study was conducted to observe the potential effects of two fuels, Orimulsion and Fuel Oil #6, on the hatching success of copepod resting eggs in the seabed of Tampa Bay, Florida. Microcosms were dosed with one of five hydrocarbon treatments via hydrocarbon-coated sand and compared with controls. Acartia tonsa eggs were nonviable in all treatments after only a few weeks of incubation, as evidenced by a marked decline in the abundance of nauplii. However, there was no evidence that exposure to simulated spills of 700 or 7000 ppm of either fuel led to significant increases in resting egg mortality as compared with controls. The results further indicate that, regardless of environmental conditions, resting eggs of A. tonsa do not remain viable in the sediment for extended periods of time. PMID:12442802

Suderman, Barbara L; Marcus, Nancy H

2002-01-01

249

A hybrid approach to estimate chromophoric dissolved organic matter in turbid estuaries from satellite measurements: a case study for Tampa Bay.  

PubMed

Remote sensing of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) from satellite measurements for estuaries has been problematic due to optical complexity of estuarine waters and uncertainties in satellite-derived remote sensing reflectance (Rrs, sr(-1)). Here we demonstrate a hybrid approach to combine empirical and semi-analytical algorithms to derive CDOM absorption coefficient at 443 nm (a(g)(443), m(-1)) in a turbid estuary (Tampa Bay) from MODIS Aqua (MODISA) and SeaWiFS measurements. The approach first used a validated empirical algorithm and a modified quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) to derive chlorophyll-a concentration (Chla, mg m(-3)) and particulate backscattering coefficient at 443 nm (b(bp)(443), m(-1)), respectively, from which phytoplankton pigment and non-algal particulate absorption coefficient at 443 nm (a(ph)(443) and a(d)(443), m(-1)) were derived with pre-determined bio-optical relationships. Then, the modified QAA was used to estimate the total absorption coefficient at 443 nm (a(t)(443), m(-1)). Finally, a(g)(443) was estimated as (a(t)(443) - a(ph)(443) - a(d)(443) - a(w)(443)) where a(w)(443) is the absorption coefficient of pure water (a constant). Using data collected from 71 field stations and 33 near-concurrent satellite-field matchup data pairs covering a large dynamic range (0.3 - 8 m(-1)), the approach showed ~23% RMS uncertainties in retrieving a(g)(443) when in situ Rrs data (N = 71) were used. The same approach applied to satellite Rrs yielded much higher uncertainties of a(g)(443) (~85%) due to large errors in the satellite-retrieved Rrs(443). When the Rrs(443) was derived from the satellite-retrieved Rrs(550) and then used in the hybrid approach, uncertainties in the retrieved a(g)(443) reduced to ~30% (N = 33). Application of the approach to MODISA and SeaWiFS data led to a 15-year time series of monthly mean a(g)(443) distributions in Tampa Bay between 1998 and 2012. This time series showed significant seasonal and annual variations regulated mainly by river discharge. Testing of the approach over another turbid estuary (Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the U.S.) demonstrated the potential (~25% uncertainties for a limited a(g)(443) range) of using this approach to establish long-term environmental data records (EDRs) of CDOM distributions in other estuaries with similar optical complexity. PMID:23938799

Le, Chengfeng; Hu, Chuanmin

2013-08-12

250

Late Holocene sea-level rise in Tampa Bay: Integrated reconstruction using biomarkers, pollen, organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts, and diatoms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A suite of organic geochemical, micropaleontological and palynological proxies was applied to sediments from Southwest Florida, to study the Holocene environmental changes associated with sea-level rise. Sediments were recovered from Hillsborough Bay, part of Tampa Bay, and studied using biomarkers, pollen, organic-walled dinoflagellate cysts and diatoms. Analyses show that the site flooded around 7.5 ka as a consequence of Holocene transgression, progressively turning a fresh/brackish marl-marsh into a shallow, restricted marine environment. Immediately after the marine transgression started, limited water circulation and high amounts of runoff caused stratification of the water column. A shift in dinocysts and diatom assemblages to more marine species, increasing concentrations of marine biomarkers and a shift in the Diol Index indicate increasing salinity between 7.5 ka and the present, which is likely a consequence of progressing sea-level rise. Reconstructed sea surface temperatures for the past 4 kyrs are between 25 and 26 C, and indicate stable temperatures during the Late Holocene. A sharp increase in sedimentation rate in the top 50 cm of the core is attributed to human impact. The results are in agreement with parallel studies from the area, but this study further refines the environmental reconstructions having the advantage of simultaneously investigating changes in the terrestrial and marine environment.

van Soelen, E. E.; Lammertsma, E. I.; Cremer, H.; Donders, T. H.; Sangiorgi, F.; Brooks, G. R.; Larson, R. A.; Sinninghe Damst, J. S.; Wagner-Cremer, F.; Reichart, G. J.

2010-01-01

251

Seasonal variations on the residence times and partitioning of short-lived radionuclides ( 234Th, 7Be and 210Pb) and depositional fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, Tampa Bay has been impacted heavily by a wide range of anthropogenic perturbations that may include, agricultural-, shipping-, phosphate mining\\/distribution-related activities, as well as a burgeoning coastal population. Due to the presence of U-rich underlying sediments, elevated activities of U- and Th-series daughter products may be naturally released into this system. This region is also known for summer thunderstorms

M. Baskaran; P. W. Swarzenski

2007-01-01

252

Evaluation of indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene topical spot-on formulations to control flea populations in naturally infested dogs and cats in private residences in Tampa FL. USA  

PubMed Central

Background A study was conducted to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of two different spot-on topical flea products to control flea infestations on naturally infested dogs and cats in Tampa, FL USA. Methods Thirty-two dogs and 3 cats with natural flea infestations living in 18 homes were treated topically with a 19.53% w/w spot-on formulation of indoxacarb. Another thirty dogs and 2 cats living in 19 different homes were treated topically with either fipronil (9.8% w/w)/(s)-methoprene (8.89% w/w) or fipronil (9.8% w/w)/(s)-methoprene (11.8% w/w), respectively. All products were applied according to label directions by study investigators on day 0 and again between days 28 and 30. Flea populations on pets were assessed using visual area counts and premise flea infestations were assessed using intermittent-light flea traps on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 2830, 4045, and 5460. Results A single application of the indoxacarb or fipronil (s)-methoprene formulations reduced flea populations on pets by 97.8% and 85.5%, respectively within 7 days. One month (2830 days) after treatment the indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene formulations reduced on-animal flea burdens by 95.0% and 49.5%, respectively. Following two monthly applications of either the indoxacarb or fipronil (s)-methoprene formulations, pet flea burdens were reduced by 99.1% and 54.8%, respectively, by days 54 60. At the end of the two month study, 77.1% and 15.6% of the dogs and cats in the indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene treatment groups, respectively were flea free. Flea numbers in the indoor-premises were markedly reduced in both treatment groups by days 5460, with 97.7% and 84.6% reductions in intermittent-light flea trap counts in the indoxacarb and fipronil (s)-methoprene treatment groups, respectively. Conclusions This in-home investigation conducted during the summer of 2013 in subtropical Tampa, FL, is the first published U.S field investigation of the indoxacarb topical formulation. The indoxacarb formulation was able to effectively control flea populations in heavily flea infested pets and homes. The efficacy achieved by the fipronil (s)-methoprene formulation against flea infestations on these pets was lower than in previous investigations using the same study design. PMID:24373508

2013-01-01

253

The Validity CHLOROPHYLL-? Estimation by Sun Induced Fluorescence in Estuarine Waters: AN Analysis of Long-Term (2003-2011) Water Data from Tampa Bay, Florida (usa)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a inaccurate. Measurement of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, may provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite baseline algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms using a comprehensive long term in situ data set. In an unprecedented analysis of a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) against chlorophyll-a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions within the estuary including water depth, distance from shore and structures and eight water quality parameters. From the 39 station for which data was derived, 22 stations showed significant correlations when the FLH product was matched with in situ chlorophyll-? data. The correlations (r2) for indvudual stations within Tampa Bay ranged between 0.67 (n=28, p<0.01) and -0.457 (n=12, p=.016), indicating that for some areas within the Bay, FLH can be a good predictor of chlorophyll-? concentration and hence a useful tool for the analysis of water quality. Overall, the results show a 106% increase in the validity of chlorophyll-a concentration estimates using FLH over the standard the blue-green OC3M algorithm. This analysis also illustrates that the correlations between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a measurements increases with increasing distance of the monitoring sites from structures. Due to confounding factors related to the complexity of the estuarine system, a improvement in the FLH to chlorophyll-a relationship was not clearly noted with increasing depth and distance from shore alone. Correlations of FLH with important water quality parameters were also analysed. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the MODIS FLH product and in situ water quality parameters will enhance our understanding of the accuracy MODIS's global FLH algorithm and assist in optimizing its calibration for use in monitoring the quality of estuarine and coastal waters worldwide.

Moreno Madrin, M. J.; Fischer, A.

2012-12-01

254

Salinity characteristics and distribution and effects of alternative plans for freshwater withdrawal, Little Manatee River estuary and adjacent areas of Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Little Manatee River, a coastal stream that empties into Tampa Bay, Florida, may be used as a source of freshwater. Reduction of streamflow will result in upstream movement of saltwater in the stream. Data on streamflow, tide stage, and specific conductance describe the salinity distribution of the estuary. Vertical conductivity profiles indicate that the river is vertically homogeneous during low flow. The maximum upstream location of the saltwater-freshwater interface (800 micromhos) in the river was described by multiple regression analysis involving mean daily streamflow and high-high tide. The coefficient of determination is 0.94 with a root mean square error of + or - 0.4 mile. The location on the river where the estuarine system ends and the riverine system begins is at about 9.9 miles above the reference station at Shell Point. Duration analysis of conductivity indicates that the maximum upstream location of the interface exceeded 9.7 miles about 17 percent of the days for the period of study. Reduction by 50 percent of streamflow for the 90day, 2-year and 20-year recurrence-interval low flow would relocate the maximum intrusion of the interface at the 2-year and 20-year flows upstream by 0.7 and 0.2 mile, respectively. (USGS)

Fernandez, Mario

1985-01-01

255

Fresh Water Inflow and Oyster Productivity in Apalachicola Bay, FL (USA)  

EPA Science Inventory

Apalachicola Bay lies at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, where seasonally variable freshwater inflows and shifting winds support an unusually productive and commercially important oyster fishery. While there is concern that upstream water withdrawals may impact the fishery,...

256

Short-term variability of suspended sediment and phytoplankton in Tampa Bay, Florida: Observations from a coastal oceanographic tower and ocean color satellites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We examined short-term phytoplankton and sediment dynamics in Tampa Bay with data collected between 8 December 2004 and 17 January 2005 from optical, oceanographic, and meteorological sensors mounted on a coastal oceanographic tower and from satellite remote sensing. Baseline phytoplankton (chlorophyll- a, Chl) and sediment concentrations (particle backscattering coefficient at 532 nm, bbp(532)) were of the order of 3.7 mg m -3 and 0.07 m -1, respectively, during the study period. Both showed large fluctuations dominated by semidiurnal and diurnal frequencies associated with tidal forcing. Three strong wind events (hourly averaged wind speed >8.0 m s -1) generated critical bottom shear stress of >0.2 Pa and suspended bottom sediments that were clearly observed in concurrent MODIS satellite imagery. In addition, strong tidal current or swells could also suspend sediments in the lower Bay. Sediments remained suspended in the water column for 2-3 days after the wind events. Moderate Chl increases were observed after sediment resuspension with a lag time of 1-2 days, probably due to release of bottom nutrients and optimal light conditions associated with sediment resuspension and settling. Two large increases in Chl with one Chl > 12.0 mg m -3 over 2 days, were observed at neap tides. For the study site and period, because of the high temporal variability in phytoplankton and sediment concentrations, a monthly snapshot can be different by -50% to 200% from the monthly "mean" chlorophyll and sediment conditions. The combination of high-frequency observations from automated sensors and synoptic satellite imagery, when available, is an excellent complement to limited field surveys to study and monitor water quality parameters in estuarine environments.

Chen, Zhiqiang; Hu, Chuanmin; Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Luther, Mark E.

2010-09-01

257

Near Shore Distribution of Silt and Clay, Organic Carbon, Select Trace Elements, and Seagrass in Bottom Sediments of a 0.5 kilometer Near-shore Corridor of Tampa Bay, July 2003  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study was designed to support a synthesis model that identifies correlations among near shore (depth less than 2 meters) bottom sediment properties (silt/clay, organic carbon, select trace elements) and sea grass distribution. In July 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey collected 330 surface sediment samples from stratified random sampling sites on the sea floor: half of these were located in sea grass beds most of which occur within 0.5km of the shoreline. For data analysis, Tampa Bay was divided into six sub-bays (Lower, Middle, Hillsborough, Riviera, Old, and Upper Old Tampa Bay). Average background organic carbon for the entire shoreline was 0.3 % (dry wt.). Each sub bays' shoreline ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 % (dry wt.). Silt/clay for sediments along the shoreline ranged from 0 to 100 % (dry wt.) with a mean of 16%. Selected samples (115) with the highest silt/clay percentage were used for trace element analyses including aluminum. Due to the conservative nature of aluminum, metal concentrations were normalized to aluminum. Results indicate enrichment of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc. Some samples with metals (arsenic, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead) within normal background concentrations were above Threshold Effect Level (upper limit of sediment contaminant concentrations which do not represent significant hazards to aquatic organisms). Percent silt/clay was approximately the same for samples inside and outside of sea grass beds. Organic carbon concentrations were less where sea grass was present.

Fernandez, M.; Stout, C.

2006-12-01

258

The effect of discharge and water quality of the Alafia River, Hillsborough River, and the Tampa Bypass Canal on nutrient loading to Hillsborough Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Techniques to measure discharge and nutrient loads in the tidally affected portions of two major rivers tributary to Tampa Bay, the Alafia River and the Hillsborough River, were developed and tested. Discharge, water quality, and total phosphorus and total nitrogen loads for the period April 1, 1991, through March 31, 1992, were evaluated and compared with discharge,water quality, and loads at long-term, nontidal gages in the basins. Long-term discharge and water-quality characteristics at selected sites in the Alafia river and Hillsborough River basins were evaluated. A long-term, decreasing trend in annual-mean discharge was observed for discharges at the Alafia River, Sulphur Springs, and Hillsborough River. Low-flow and high-flow characteristics in the Alafia River and Hillsborough River have changed as well. The decreasing trend in the Alafia River discharges is not due to deficient rainfall but probably is due to decreased ground-water inflow to the river because of long-term declines in the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer. Daily-mean discharges at the mouth of the Alafia River were more variable than discharges at the long-term gage upstream. Daily-mean discharge near the mouth of the river was negative at times, indicating a net loss of water from the river. Daily-mean discharge from the Hillsborough River was minimal from Apil to May 1991, and from late September 1991 to March 1992. During these periods, discharge from Sulphur Springs was a major source of freshwater to the tidally affected reach of the river. Concentrations of total phosphorus and orthophosphorus in the Alafia River above Lithia Springs were the greatest in the 1960's and have generally declined since then. Total nitrogen concentrations have been declining since about 1981. However, increases in nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen concentrations are occurring in Lithia Springs, a second-magnitude spring that flows into the Alafia River. Specific conductance of water discharging from Sulphur Springs to the Hillsborough River has increased from about 124 to more than 2,000 microsiemens per centimeter since 1945. Water quality at the mouth of the Alafia River and Hillsborough River is the result of mixing of freshwater and estuarine water from Hillsborough Bay. Large daily variations in water quality occur at these site because of tidal currents, and vertical stratification of specific conductance is a common feature. Concentrations of phosphorus, nitrate plus nitrite nitrogen, organic carbon, and silica are inversely related to specific conductance at the mouth of the Alafia River. Constituent concentration and discharge data were used to compute loads during the study period. Average daily phosphorus loads were 2.4 tons per day at the mouth of the Alafia River; 0.35 ton per day at the mouth of the Hillsborough River; and 0.06 ton per day at the Tampa Bypass Canal. Average daily nitrogen loads were 1.7 tons per day at the mouth of the Alafia River; 0.86 ton per day at the mouth of the Hillsborough River; and 0.26 ton per day at the Tampa Bypass Canal. The greatest annual loads of phosphorus and nitrogen from the major tributaries to Hillsborough Bay are from the Alafia River, with the greatest loads at the river mouth. Total phosphorus load from the Alafia River was about 894 tons during April 1991 through March 1992, more than six times greater than phosphorus loads form the Hillsborough River. Annual total nitrogen load at the mouth of the Alafia River was about 630 tons, two times greater than at the mouth of the Hillsborough River and more than six times greater than loads from the Tampa Bypass Canal. Basinwide yields of total phosphorus during April 1991 through March 1992 were about 2 tons per square mile at the mouth of the Alafia river basin and were about 0.2 ton per square mile at the mouth of the Hillsborough River. Total nitrogen yield was about 1.5 tons per square mile at the mouth of the Alafia River and about 0.5 ton per s

Stoker, Y.E.; Levesque, V.A.; Woodham, W.M.

1996-01-01

259

76 FR 76044 - Safety Zone; Power Line Replacement, West Bay, Panama City, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2011-0983] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Power Line Replacement, West Bay, Panama City...waters during the replacement of overhead power lines. Entry into, transiting or anchoring...Coast Guard held a meeting with Gulf Coast Power Company on October 13, 2011 to...

2011-12-06

260

EFFECTS OF ZOOPLANKTON GRAZING ON PHYTOPLANKTON COMMUNITIES IN ESCAMBIA BAY, FL  

EPA Science Inventory

Studies of microheterotroph and meso-zooplankton grazing in nutrient enriched natural waters of Escambia Bay have been conducted for the past two years. These studies include experimental scale (1 l, 8 l, and 80 l) and lab/field comparisons. Sites for these studies include oligoh...

261

BENTHIC SUSPENSION FEEDERS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: PRELIMINARY STUDIES CONCERNING IMPACTS ON PHYTOPLANKTON THROUGH GRAZING (ABSTRACT)  

EPA Science Inventory

Cultural eutrophication in coastal habitats has become a crucial problem for resource managers and policymakers and a critical area of research in ecological science. Models of eutrophication have been developed for some coastal habitats (e.g., Chesapeake Bay), but research on ma...

262

BENTHIC SUSPENSION FEEDERS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL: PRELIMINARY STUDIES CONCERNING IMPACTS ON PHYTOPLANKTON THROUGH GRAZING  

EPA Science Inventory

Cultural eutrophication in coastal habitats has become a crucial problem for resource managers and policymakers and a critical area of research in ecological science. Models of eutrophication have been developed for some coastal habitats (e.g., Chesapeake Bay), but research on ma...

263

33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Regulated area. The regulated navigation area encompasses all waters of Biscayne Bay between Rickenbacker Causeway Bridge and Coon Point, Elliot Key contained within an imaginary line connecting the following points: beginning at Point 1 in position 2544?49? N,...

2013-07-01

264

33 CFR 165.779 - Regulated Navigation Area; Columbus Day Weekend, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL.  

...Regulated area. The regulated navigation area encompasses all waters of Biscayne Bay between Rickenbacker Causeway Bridge and Coon Point, Elliot Key contained within an imaginary line connecting the following points: beginning at Point 1 in position 2544?49? N,...

2014-07-01

265

77 FR 40541 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2012-0518] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa...the construction of a subaqueous water main. Entry into or transiting in this...Basis and Purpose A 36'' subaqueous water main is being constructed across the...

2012-07-10

266

77 FR 56772 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2012-0518] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa...the construction of a subaqueous water main. Entry into or transiting in this...the construction of a subaqueous water main that begun in June 2012. It...

2012-09-14

267

77 FR 69388 - Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa Rosa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2012-0518] RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Water Main Crossing; Choctawhatchee Bay; Santa...the construction of a subaqueous water main. Entry into or transiting in this...the construction of a subaqueous water main that begun in June 2012. It...

2012-11-19

268

EFFECTS OF HURRICANE IVAN ON WATER QUALITY IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL USA  

EPA Science Inventory

Pensacola Bay was in the strong NE quadrant of Hurricane Ivan when it made landfall on September 16, 2004 as a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson scale. We present data describing the timeline and maximum height of the storm surge, the extent of flooding of coastal land, ...

269

If approved, USF's Morsani College of Medicine and the USF Heart Institute would be part of a proposed redevelopment for downtown Tampa. Graphic: USF Health.  

E-print Network

an innovative and economically powerful urban core that will serve the entire Tampa Bay Region. With today that has been offered by Tampa Bay Lightning owner Mr. Jeff Vinik. This generous donation would place USF north of Amalie Arena and the Tampa Bay History Center. Undoubtedly, this will be one of largest single

Meyers, Steven D.

270

Fresh Water Inflow and Oyster Productivity in Apalachicola Bay, FL (USA)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Apalachicola Bay lies at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, where seasonally variable freshwater inflows and shifting winds\\u000a have long been thought to contribute to the support of an unusually productive and commercially important oyster fishery.\\u000a Links between the river and productivity have been shown to lie in salinity-induced reductions in oyster predators and oyster\\u000a disease as well as organic

Autumn J. Oczkowski; F. Graham Lewis; Scott W. Nixon; H. Lee Edmiston; Rebecca S. Robinson; Jeffrey P. Chanton

2011-01-01

271

76 FR 54287 - Notice of Intent To Release Federally-Obligated Airport Properties, Tampa International Airport...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...agreement between the FAA and the City of Tampa, dated November 5, 1947. The release...grant a utility easment to the City of Tampa. The property is located on the southwest corner of Dale Mabry Highway and Tampa Bay Boulevard in Hillsborough...

2011-08-31

272

Burgert Brothers Collection of Tampa Photographs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Photo studios are often great repositories of information about local history, and the Burgert Brothers firm is no exception. Founded in 1918 by brothers Al and Jean Burgert, their studio focused primarily on photographing the Tampa Bay area, including Ybor City, Port Tampa, Temple Terrace, and Ballast Point. The University of South Florida has the archives of the Burgert Brothers firm, and interested parties can look through over 850 of their prints here. The collection is quite impressive, and it contains images of cigar rollers in Ybor City, Italian street festivals, and the Moorish majesty that was (and is) the Tampa Bay Hotel. Finally, the archive also contains excellent images from the city's famed Gasparilla celebration. [KMG

273

Creating a monthly time series of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Floridan aquifer, Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida, January 2000-December 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In Floridas karst terrain, where groundwater and surface waters interact, a mapping time series of the potentiometric surface in the Upper Floridan aquifer offers a versatile metric for assessing the hydrologic condition of both the aquifer and overlying streams and wetlands. Long-term groundwater monitoring data were used to generate a monthly time series of potentiometric surfaces in the Upper Floridan aquifer over a 573-square-mile area of west-central Florida between January 2000 and December 2009. Recorded groundwater elevations were collated for 260 groundwater monitoring wells in the Northern Tampa Bay area, and a continuous time series of daily observations was created for 197 of the wells by estimating missing daily values through regression relations with other monitoring wells. Kriging was used to interpolate the monthly average potentiometric-surface elevation in the Upper Floridan aquifer over a decade. The mapping time series gives spatial and temporal coherence to groundwater monitoring data collected continuously over the decade by three different organizations, but at various frequencies. Further, the mapping time series describes the potentiometric surface beneath parts of six regionally important stream watersheds and 11 municipal well fields that collectively withdraw about 90 million gallons per day from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Monthly semivariogram models were developed using monthly average groundwater levels at wells. Kriging was used to interpolate the monthly average potentiometric-surface elevations and to quantify the uncertainty in the interpolated elevations. Drawdown of the potentiometric surface within well fields was likely the cause of a characteristic decrease and then increase in the observed semivariance with increasing lag distance. This characteristic made use of the hole effect model appropriate for describing the monthly semivariograms and the interpolated surfaces. Spatial variance reflected in the monthly semivariograms decreased markedly between 2002 and 2003, timing that coincided with decreases in well-field pumping. Cross-validation results suggest that the kriging interpolation may smooth over the drawdown of the potentiometric surface near production wells. The groundwater monitoring network of 197 wells yielded an average kriging error in the potentiometric-surface elevations of 2 feet or less over approximately 70 percent of the map area. Additional data collection within the existing monitoring network of 260 wells and near selected well fields could reduce the error in individual months. Reducing the kriging error in other areas would require adding new monitoring wells. Potentiometric-surface elevations fluctuated by as much as 30 feet over the study period, and the spatially averaged elevation for the entire surface rose by about 2 feet over the decade. Monthly potentiometric-surface elevations describe the lateral groundwater flow patterns in the aquifer and are usable at a variety of spatial scales to describe vertical groundwater recharge and discharge conditions for overlying surface-water features.

Lee, Terrie M.; Fouad, Geoffrey G.

2014-01-01

274

Linking land use change to recreational fishery valuation with a spatially explicit behavior model: A case study from Tampa Bay, FL USA  

EPA Science Inventory

Drawing a link between habitat change and production and delivery of ecosystem services is a priority in coastal estuarine ecosystems. This link is needed to fully understand how human communities can influence ecosystem sustainability. Mechanistic modeling tools are highly fun...

275

Nature and Magnitude of Atmospheric Fluxes of Total Inorganic Nitrogen and Other Inorganic Species to the Tampa Bay Watershed, FL, USA  

Microsoft Academic Search

We estimated the total inorganic fluxes of nitrogen (N), sulfur (S), chloride (Cl?, sodium (Na+, calcium (Ca2+, magnesium (Mg2+, potassium (K+ and hydronium (H+. The resistance deposition algorithm that is programmed as part of the CALMET\\/CALPUFF modeling system was used to generate\\u000a spatially-distributed deposition velocities, which were then combined with measurements of urban and rural concentrations\\u000a of gas and particle

Noreen Poor; Curtis Pollman; Paul Tate; Mubeena Begum; Melissa Evans; Scott Campbell

2006-01-01

276

View of Building No. 41 from Florida Keys Avenue, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 41 from Florida Keys Avenue, facing northeast - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

277

View of Building No. 42 (at the left) facing southwest ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 42 (at the left) facing southwest on Hangar Loop Drive - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

278

View of Building No. 405 from Staff Circle, facing north ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 405 from Staff Circle, facing north - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

279

View facing southwest on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 31 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing southwest on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 31 is to the left - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

280

View facing east on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 311 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing east on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 311 is to the left - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

281

BAY REGION ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY EXPERIMENT (BRACE)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Bay Estuary Program (TBEP) was formed in 1991 to assist the community in developing a comprehensive plan to restore and protect Tampa Bay. The ecological indicator of the health of the Bay is the coverage of seagrasses, historically in decline, which are important to...

282

IPCC AR4 " ~ ~ ~ ... fl" ... fl~ ~ ~ ... fl/ ,,  

E-print Network

level pressure be2 tween 2060 - 2089 and 1970 - 1999 also shows decreased values in the two polar ¡"2099 ~OE,~ ...« ¶fl" ­­...« ¶fl , ° ø ° --l ° ,­­...« ¶fl, ° / ´ ¨ ¡£ ¶ 1970 ¡"1999 ~OE¡¢2060 ¡"2089

283

The Validity Chlorophyll-a Estimation by Sun Induced Fluorescence in Estuarine Waters: An Analysis of Long-term (2003-2011) Water Quality Data from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Satellite observation of phytoplankton concentration or chlorophyll-a is an important characteristic, critically integral to monitoring coastal water quality. However, the optical properties of estuarine and coastal waters are highly variable and complex and pose a great challenge for accurate analysis. Constituents such as suspended solids and dissolved organic matter and the overlapping and uncorrelated absorptions in the blue region of the spectrum renders the blue-green ratio algorithms for estimating chlorophyll-a inaccurate. Measurement of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence, on the other hand, which utilizes the near infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, may provide a better estimate of phytoplankton concentrations. While modelling and laboratory studies have illustrated both the utility and limitations of satellite baseline algorithms based on the sun induced chlorophyll fluorescence signal, few have examined the empirical validity of these algorithms using a comprehensive long term in situ data set. In an unprecedented analysis of a long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), we assess the validity of the FLH product from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) against chlorophyll ]a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions within the estuary including water depth, distance from shore and structures and eight water quality parameters. From the 39 station for which data was derived, 22 stations showed significant correlations when the FLH product was matched with in situ chlorophyll-alpha data. The correlations (r2) for individual stations within Tampa Bay ranged between 0.67 (n=28, pless than 0.01) and-0.457 (n=12, p=.016), indicating that for some areas within the Bay, FLH can be a good predictor of chlorophyll-alpha concentration and hence a useful tool for the analysis of water quality. Overall, the results show a 106% increase in the validity of chlorophyll -a concentration estimates using FLH over the standard the blue-green OC3M algorithm. This analysis also illustrates that the correlations between FLH and in situ chlorophyll -a measurements increases with increasing water depth and distance of the monitoring sites from both the shore and structures. However, due to confounding factors related to the complexity of the estuarine system, a linear improvement in the FLH to chlorophyll ]a relationship was not clearly noted with increasing depth and distance from shore alone. Correlations of FLH with turbidity, nutrients (total nitrogen and total phosphorous) biological oxygen demand, salinity, sea surface temperature correlated positively with FLH concentrations, while dissolved oxygen and pH showed negative correlations. Principle component analyses are employed to further describe the relationships between the multivariate water quality parameters and the FLH product. The majority of sites with higher and very significant correlations (pless than 0.01) also showed high correlation values for nutrients, turbidity and biological oxygen demand. These sites were on average in greater than seven meters of water and over five kilometers from shore. A thorough understanding of the relationship between the MODIS FLH product and in situ water quality parameters will enhance our understanding of the accuracy MODIS fs global FLH algorithm and assist in optimizing its calibration for use in monitoring the quality of estuarine and coastal waters worldwide.

Moreno-Madrinan, Max Jacobo; Fischer, Andrew

2012-01-01

284

Changes in hurricane activity in northeastern Gulf of Mexico during last 8500 yrs. - A hurricane record from Choctawhatchee Bay, Destin FL  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sedimentological and geochemical data provides evidence for storm activity and changes in coastal dynamics in Choctawhatchee Bay, Destin, FL during last 8500 yrs. Barrier overtopping and breaching by storm surges can deposit sand layers in the bay. This study was carried out to develop the hurricane record for the area by identifying such sand layers and associated environmental changes. Based on CHIRP seismic reflectance surveys, four sediment cores ranging in length from 4 to 8.5 m were extracted along a shore-parallel transect from Choctawhatchee Bay. X radiograph images were used to study the stratigraphy of sediment cores. Chemical composition was measured at 1 mm resolution using a XRF core scanner and grain size was measured at 0.5-2.0 cm resolution using a laser particle size analyzer. Chronology of events was determined by AMS radiocarbon dating of mollusk shells and wood. Sediment grain size and number of abrupt sand layers increase during the periods of 7300-7600, 4900-7000, 3700-4500, ~1000-3000, cal yrs. BP. indicating a dynamic, high-energy environment prevailed during these periods. Geochemical Proxies such as Ca/Ti and Sr/Ti indicate higher marine influence during active periods. Frequent barrier breaching and overtopping by increased hurricane activity likely deposited the sand layers while maintaining the direct hydrological connection between the ocean via an inlet. About 2 km wide strong reflector in the CHIRP image and grain size plots show a prominent erosional unconformity that dates to ~1000 cal yrs BP and was likely formed by an extreme hurricane. Periods of decreased hurricane activity (eg. After 1000, 3000-3700, 4500-5300 cal yrs BP) are closely related to El Nino active periods and low tropical African precipitation periods.

Ranasinghage, P. N.; Donnelly, J. P.; Evans, R. L.; van Hengstum, P. J.; Ashton, A. D.

2012-12-01

285

Seasonal variations on the residence times and partitioning of short-lived radionuclides (234Th, 7Be and 210Pb) and depositional fluxes of 7Be and 210Pb in Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Historically, Tampa Bay has been impacted heavily by a wide range of anthropogenic perturbations that may include, agricultural-, shipping-, phosphate mining/distribution-related activities, as well as a burgeoning coastal population. Due to the presence of U-rich underlying sediments, elevated activities of U- and Th-series daughter products may be naturally released into this system. This region is also known for summer thunderstorms and corresponding increases in precipitation and surface water runoff. Only limited work has been conducted on the partitioning of particle-reactive radionuclides (such as 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th) in such a dynamic coastal system. We investigated both the removal residence time and partitioning of these radionuclides between filter-retained particulate matter (? 0.5 ?m) and the filtrate ( Our results indicate that the partitioning of 7Be, 210Pb, and 234Th between filtrate and filter-retained phase is controlled foremost by enhanced bottom resuspension events during summer thunderstorms. As a consequence, no significant relationship exists between the distribution coefficients (Kd values) of these isotopes and the concentration of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Relatively faster recycling rates of atmospheric water vapor derived from the ocean results in lower atmospheric depositional fluxes of 210Pb to the study site than predicted. The relationship between 7Be and 210Pb in bulk (wet + dry) deposition is compared to their respective water column activities. The residence times of particulate and dissolved 234Th, 7Be and 210Pb, as well the distribution coefficients of these radionuclides, are then compared to values reported in other coastal systems.

Baskaran, M.; Swarzenski, P.W.

2007-01-01

286

78 FR 33069 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Public Meetings...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Friday, May 24, 2013 in Tampa, FL. The Assessment Workshop...Workshop will be held at the Tampa Westshore Marriott, 1001 Westshore Plaza Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33607; (813) 287-2555...Hilton Grande Hotel Biscayne Bay, 1717 N. Bayshore...

2013-06-03

287

Sea Level Rise in Tampa Bay  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Understanding relative sea level (RSL) rise during periods of rapid climatic change is critical for evaluating modern sea level rise given the vulnerability of Antarctic ice shelves to collapse, the retreat of the world's glaciers, and mass balance trends of the Greenland ice sheet. The first-order pattern of global sea level rise following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ~21,000 years ago) is well established from coral, continental shelf, and other records and has been integrated into a global ICE-5G model of glacio-isostatic adjustment (GIA). However, uncertainty introduced by paleo water depth of sea level indicators, radiocarbon chronology (i.e., reservoir corrections for marine shell dates), postglacial isostatic adjustment, and other processes affecting vertical position of former shorelines produces scatter in RSL curves, limiting our knowledge of sea level rise during periods of rapid glacial decay.

Cronin, Thomas; Edgar, N. Terence; Brooks, Gregg; Hastings, David; Larson, Rebekka; Hine, Albert; Locker, Stanley; Suthard, Beau; Flower, Benjamin; Hollander, David; Wehmiller, John; Willard, Debra; Smith, Shannon

2007-03-01

288

TAMPA BAY MODEL EVALUATION AND ASSESSMENT  

EPA Science Inventory

A long term goal of multimedia environmental management is to achieve sustainable ecological resources. Progress towards this goal rests on a foundation of science-based methods and data integrated into predictive multimedia, multi-stressor open architecture modeling systems. The...

289

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; site plan dated December, 1942) BASE LAYOUT, DECEMBER 1942 - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

290

View of Building No. 344 from intersection of Florida Keys ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 344 from intersection of Florida Keys Avenue and Tampa Boulevard, facing east - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

291

View of Building No. 527 (at the right) from intersection ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 527 (at the right) from intersection of Hangar Loop Drive and Tampa Boulevard, facing west - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

292

Sediment distribution patterns and the development of the marsh system rimming a shallow-water shelf embayment: Waccasassa Bay, Levy Co. , FL  

SciTech Connect

Waccasassa Bay is a wide-mouthed, open basin located at the head of a 35 km wide coastal reentrant along Florida's west-central marsh coast. It is an ideal shallow-water shelf embayment, being characterized as a microtidal, low-wave energy, freshwater-influenced, shallow-water depositional basin. The embayment is rimmed by a contiguous, open-marine Juncus roemerianus marsh, typical of the wetlands along this coast. A series of large, relict, subtidal oyster bioherms traverse the central channel of the embayment, a site at which there are also submarine freshwater springs. Approximately 100 km of high resolution seismic reflection data and side scan sonar data were collected across the embayment. Ground-truthing was performed using probe rod transects and surface sediment grab samples. These data show a high diversity and zonal distribution of bottom sediments, ranging from coarse, shelly sands to detrital coralline algae. However, unlike the nearshore zones north and south of Waccasassa Bay, sediment cover over 90% of the basin is less than 1 m in thickness, and exposed bedrock is common. The Waccasassa Bay basin is largely an exposed shallow limestone shelf. This contrasts with Crystal Bay, a shelf embayment to the south, which contains several distinct coastal facies averaging 3 m in thickness. Initial research onshore shows that the sediment veneer of the coastal marshes along the embayment is thin, on the order of 1-2 m, suggesting long term instability of the system. The marsh sediments also appear to have little siliciclastic content. Vibracore and probe rod transects provide a stratigraphic framework from which to reconstruct the geologic history of these wetlands. The results will allow the Waccasassa Bay marsh/shelf embayment system to be compared with other systems along this coast and elsewhere.

Goodbred, S.L.; Hine, A.C. (Univ. of South Florida, St. Petersburg, FL (United States). Dept. Marine Science); Stumpf, R. (Geological Survey, St. Petersburg, FL (United States). Center for Coastal Geology)

1993-03-01

293

Commercial Farm Production of the Southern Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians concentricus), an Alternative  

E-print Network

of Norm Blake, who reared bay scallops in Tampa Bay in 1996 (Lu and Blake, 1996). This work detailedCommercial Farm Production of the Southern Bay Scallop (Argopecten irradians concentricus Hemmel Bay Shellfish Co. September 14th 2009 #12;Objectives The main objective of this project

Florida, University of

294

USF System USF USFSP USFSM Number: USF4.0011  

E-print Network

Avenue, Room PSB 101, Tampa, FL 33620 USFSP 140 USFSP Harborwalk Ave. S, BAY 132, St. Petersburg, FL) Motorists shall yield the right-of-way to pedestrians within a crosswalk. (d) The Tampa campus speed limit

Meyers, Steven D.

295

View facing north on Hillsborough Loop Drive. Base of Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing north on Hillsborough Loop Drive. Base of Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is visible to the left. Building No. 30 is in center background - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

296

View facing south on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 111 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing south on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 111 is in the center, and Building No. 12 is in right center background - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

297

View from Hangar Loop Road facing east on Florida Keys ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View from Hangar Loop Road facing east on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is to the left - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

298

View facing northwest of Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 26 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing northwest of Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 26 is to the left, and part of Building No. 25 is to the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

299

View of Building No. 11 (to the left) and Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 11 (to the left) and Building No. 29 (to the right) from Hillsborough Loop Drive, facing north - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

300

View of Staff Officers' Quarters Area from Staff Circle. Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Staff Officers' Quarters Area from Staff Circle. Building No. 403 is to the right, Building No. 404 is to the left, and Building No. 405 is in far left in background. Facing west - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

301

View of Staff Officers' Quarters Area from Access Road. Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Staff Officers' Quarters Area from Access Road. Building No. 401 is to the left, Building No. 405 is to the right, and Building No. 403 is in center background. Facing northeast - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

302

View of Building No. 347 (to the right) and Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 347 (to the right) and Building No. 30 (to the left) from Hillsborough Loop Drive, facing west - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

303

View facing southwest on Hillsborough Loop Drive. Part of Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing southwest on Hillsborough Loop Drive. Part of Building No. 30 is visible to the right. Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is in right background - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

304

View facing west on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 240 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing west on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 240 is to the left and Building No. 205 is to the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

305

View of Building No. 26 from Hillsborough Loop Road, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 26 from Hillsborough Loop Road, facing northwest. Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is to the left. Part of Building No. 27 is visible to the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

306

View of Officers' Club (Officers' Mess) from Florida Keys Avenue ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Officers' Club (Officers' Mess) from Florida Keys Avenue and Bayshore Boulevard intersection. Facing south - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

307

View facing west on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 205 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing west on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 205 is to the left and Building No. 240 is to the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

308

View of N.C.O. Duplex Buildings from Hangar Loop Drive. Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of N.C.O. Duplex Buildings from Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 523 is at the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

309

View facing southeast on Hangar Loop Drive. Part of Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing southeast on Hangar Loop Drive. Part of Building No. 241 is visible in the center far background - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

310

View facing south of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing south of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 28 is to the left - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

311

View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Part ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Part of Building No. 28 is visible to the right. Building No. 249 is to the left of Building No. 28 - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

312

View of Building No. 347 (to the left) and Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 347 (to the left) and Building No. 11 (to the right) from Hillsborough Loop Drive, facing north - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

313

View facing northwest on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 25 ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing northwest on Florida Keys Avenue. Building No. 25 is to the right, Building No. 26 is in right background, and Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is in center background - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

314

View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View facing north of hangars on Hangar Loop Drive. Building No. 28 is small structure in center background. Part of Building No. 37 (Water Tower) is visible to the right - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

315

View of Building No. 12 from Hangar Loop Road, facing ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of Building No. 12 from Hangar Loop Road, facing east. Top of Building No. 30 is visible in background - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

316

EVIDENCE THAT PHOSPHORUS LIMITS PHYTOPLANKTON GROWTH IN A GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY: PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Nutrient limitation bioassays were conducted on six dates from November 1998 to September 1999 at two sites, including oligohaline (Upper Bay) and mesohaline regions (Lower Bay), in Pensacola Bay, FL. Phytoplankton growth responses (measured as changes in chlorophyll a concentra...

317

Experts are partnering in Tampa, the Lightning Capital of the U.S., to provide safety information about the dangers of lightning and promote  

E-print Network

about the dangers of lightning and promote risk reduction and lightning protection education. Attend this free event to learn more about the national Lightning Safety Awareness Campaign to protect your family Protection Institute's Kim Loehr · Lightning Safety Alliance's Jennifer Morgan · Tampa Bay Lightning's Dave

318

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Photocopy of drawing (original drawing of MacDill Field in possession of MacDill Air Force Base, Civil Engineering, Tampa, Florida; 1952 architectural drawings by Strategic Air Command, MacDill Air Force Base) BASE LAYOUT, 1952 - MacDill Air Force Base, Bounded by City of Tampa North, Tampa Bay South, Old Tampa Bay West, & Hillsborough Bay East, Tampa, Hillsborough County, FL

319

MOLLUSKS AND BENTHIC ENVIRONMENTS IN HILLSBOROUGH BAY, BY JOHN L. TAYLOR, JOHN R. HALL, AND CARL H. SALOMAN, FISHERY BIOLOGISTS  

E-print Network

of Tampa Bay, east of Interbay Peninsula and north of a line between Gadsden Point and Newman Branc.h (figMOLLUSKS AND BENTHIC ENVIRONMENTS IN HILLSBOROUGH BAY, FLORIDAl BY JOHN L. TAYLOR, JOHN R. HALL.tom conditions in Hillsborough Bay, Fla., where dredging and pollu- tion from domest.ic and indnstl'ial s

320

Unmixing of spectral components affecting AVIRIS imagery of Tampa Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

According to Kirk's as well as Morel and Gentili's Monte Carlo simulations, the popular simple expression, R approximately equals 0.33 bb\\/a, relating subsurface irradiance reflectance (R) to the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (bb) to absorption coefficient (a), is not valid for bb\\/a > 0.25. This means that it may no longer be valid for values of remote-sensing reflectance (above-surface

Kendall L. Carder; Z. P. Lee; Robert F. Chen; Curtiss O. Davis

1993-01-01

321

Sediment resuspension mechanisms in Old Tampa Bay, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The primary sediment resuspension mechanism at both sites was wind waves, which were generated by strong and sustained winds associated with winter storms and tropical storms. At the platform, waves were depth-transitional, and estimated bottom shear stresses were most sensitive to wave period and water depth. Concentrations of suspended solids at this site corresponded well with wave motion, and non-linear wave-current interaction was small. Maximum tidal currents at the study sites are usually less than 15 cm s-1 and did not increase observed concentrations of suspended solids. -Author

Schoellhamer, D.H.

1995-01-01

322

ENSO IMPACTS ON SALINITY IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA. (R825197)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

323

TAMPA BAY TECHNOLOGY INCUBATOR 3802 Spectrum Blvd., Suite 100  

E-print Network

management Interview topics may include: Company's technology Market potential Business Model their updated business model during this process. The process includes: Company Management: (10 minute.USFCONNECT.org Approved for use until 6/30/14 Companies that are technology based and innovation focused are eligible

Arslan, Hüseyin

324

Estimating benefits in a recovering estuary: Tampa Bay, Florida  

EPA Science Inventory

Restoration and preservation of riparian forests and coastal marshes provides nutrient removal and other biochemical and physical functions which may preclude, reduce, or delay the need for additional water treatment, while also protecting human health. We examined the ecosystem ...

325

Landsat 7 Fly Over of Tampa, Florida  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Viewing Earth from space, the Landsat 7 satellite takes images of the Earth, which allows us to look at land changes such as; urban growth, deforestation, and overall changes in the Earth itself. Here is a Landsat 7 image of Tampa, Florida

Stuart Snodgrass

2000-01-01

326

SAVE THE DATES! JULY 21-24, 2013  

E-print Network

Paul, M.S. at capaul@usf.edu Host Hotel: Grand Hyatt Tampa Bay 2900 Bayport Drive Tampa, FL 33607 #12; TAMPA, FLORIDA For the first time since 1995, this prestigious organization will meet in the USA-sponsored by the University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida. For information, contact: Ruth Bahr, PhD at rbahr@usf.edu Cheryl

Meyers, Steven D.

327

A METHOD FOR INCREASING PRECISION AND RELIABILITY OF ELASTICITY ANALYSIS IN  

E-print Network

}@csee.usf.edu PAULINE S. POWERS Department of Psychiatry/Tampa Bay Regional Burn Center University of South Florida Science and Engineering University of South Florida Tampa, FL 33620, USA E-mail: {goldgof, sarkar Tampa, FL 33620, USA In this paper we propose a method for increasing precision and reliability

Sarkar, Sudeep

328

University of South Florida Direct Support Organizations and Component Units  

E-print Network

Tampa Bay region and beyond. The Board directs the receipt and administration of private funds Avenue, ALC 100 Tampa, FL 33620 Web Site: http://giving.usf.edu Email Address: USFFoundation. Fowler Avenue, ALC 100 Tampa, FL 33620 Web Site: http://usfalumni.org Email Address: alumni

Meyers, Steven D.

329

University of South Florida Direct Support Organizations and Component Units  

E-print Network

in the greater Tampa Bay region and beyond. The Board directs the receipt and administration of private funds Avenue, ALC 100 Tampa, FL 33620 Web Site: http://giving.usf.edu Email Address: USFFoundation 100 Tampa, FL 33620 Web Site: http://usfalumni.net Email Address: Alumni@admin.usf.edu Numbers: Phone

Meyers, Steven D.

330

620 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 17, NO. 4, AUGUST 1998 A Vision-Based Technique for Objective  

E-print Network

. Powers is with the Department of Psychiatry/Tampa Bay Regional Burn Center, University of South Florida of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA (e-mail: tsap@csee.usf.edu). D. B. Goldgof and S. Sarkar are with the Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620 USA. P. S

Sarkar, Sudeep

331

FL-ATE Publications  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page presents the publications of the Florida Advanced Technological Education Center for Manufacturing (FL-ATE), including journal articles, online resources, and curriculum resources from 2006 to the present. Visitors will find materials on Best Practices for Student Robotics Camps, Manufacturing Career Pathways, and Florida-specific manufacturing resources.

332

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-print Network

a moderately sized, turbid estuary, Tampa Bay (Florida, USA), we developed and validated a new algorithm frequencies. The algorithm was implemented to establish a 10-year Chla data record for Tampa Bay in order Commission of Hillsborough County, Tampa, FL, USA d Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Temple

Meyers, Steven D.

333

Confucius Institute University of South Florida  

E-print Network

our selection of USF credit and non-credit courses · Expand outreach to the Tampa Bay community language and culture courses for USF employees and Tampa Bay community members Organize public lectures East Fowler Avenue, CGS 101 Tampa, FL 33620 (813) 974-5305 Chinese@usf.edu Chinese Cultural Center 4202

Meyers, Steven D.

334

Dye trace and bacteriological testing of sinkholes: Sulphur Springs, Tampa, Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper summarizes over four years of studies and testing of a sinkhole/spring system in north Tampa. Sulphur Springs Pool delivers an average of 95 million l/d to the Hillsborough River, which is tributary to Tampa Bay. In 1986, owing to increasingly erratic bacterial levels at the natural bathing area adjacent to Sulphur Springs, the Hillsborough County Health Department closed the pool for swimming. The City of Tampa, Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD), Hillsborough County Environmental Protection Commission, and the United States Geological Survey have gathered data in an attempt to better understand the system and possible sources of contamination. The Sulphur Springs Action League is a civic group in the area, which has an objective of reopening the pool for recreational purposes. Environmental Engineering Consultants, Inc. provided pro bono technical assistance and expertise in assisting the Action League with its goal. The Action League obtained a grant from SWFWMD to outfit underwater divers for sinkhole exploration as well as water quality and dye trace analysis. The main suspects for bacterial contamination of the pool were two significant sinkholes located 1950 and 2300 m north of the spring. A series of dye tests and water-quality tests were performed. It was estimated that the underground velocity of water was between 90 100 m/h. Using a dye trace, bacteria testing, and travel time estimating, a new source of contamination was found in a Department of Transportation (DOT) stormwater retention basin in which a sinkhole had opened up and was receiving stormwater. The two significant sinkholes received stormwater from commercial and residential areas, and this stormwater brings a large amount of bacteria into the sinkhole, which funnels into the underground system and induces a bacteria spike at Sulphur Springs pool that exceeds the bathing water standards. The City of Tampa has constructed an experimental initial flush capture basin that will sand-filter stormwater to see if this will favorably affect bacteria levels. A mayor's task force in Tampa has recommended ultraviolet disinfection as an interim solution to the contamination problem.

Wallace, R. E.

1993-12-01

335

Tampa's Lafayette Street bridge: Building a New South city  

Microsoft Academic Search

The late nineteenth and early twentieth century was a time of dynamic social and political change for Tampa, a growing city on Florida's west coast. These changes led Tampa's commercial-civic elite to look beyond the law, the militia, and the church for ways to maintain their sense of order. This thesis illustrates non-violent enforcement of the status quo via public

Lucy D Jones

2006-01-01

336

78 FR 14649 - Amendment of Class B Airspace Description; Tampa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...the ``airport surveillance radar (ASR) antenna'' to ``Point of Origin.'' In addition...the latitude/longitude position of the ASR antenna as the centerpoint. In 2012, the ASR antenna was moved to another location on the...

2013-03-07

337

International Conference on Multiphase Flow, ICMF 2010, Tampa, FL, May 30 June 4, 2010  

E-print Network

/water mixtures with void fractions up to one percent. Stress waves in the tube material are measured and used coordinate (m) Greek symbols Void fraction (-) Stiffness of a liquid (-) Hoop strain (-) Polytropic index speed that accounts for the compressibility of both the liquid and the structure. The Korteweg

Dabiri, John O.

338

DETAIL, NORTHERNMOST SHOP BAY DOORS, WEST FACADE, LOOKING EAST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DETAIL, NORTHERNMOST SHOP BAY DOORS, WEST FACADE, LOOKING EAST - Eglin Air Force Base, Motor Repair Shop, Northwest of Flager Road, Chisk Lane & southern edge of Weekly Bayou, Valparaiso, Okaloosa County, FL

339

VIEW OF WORKBENCH IN THE SECOND INTERIOR BAY, LOOKING NORTHWEST ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF WORKBENCH IN THE SECOND INTERIOR BAY, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Eglin Air Force Base, Motor Repair Shop, Northwest of Flager Road, Chisk Lane & southern edge of Weekly Bayou, Valparaiso, Okaloosa County, FL

340

Detailed Bathymetric Surveys Offshore Santa Rosa Island, FL: Before and After Hurricane Ivan (September 16, 2004)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two weeks before Hurricane Ivan reworked the shores and nearshore seafloor of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, swath bathymetry surveys were conducted with high-frequency (300 and 455 kHz) multibeam echosounders in three areas offshore Santa Rosa Island, FL, an 80-km barrier island extending west from Destin to Pensacola Bay, FL. These surveys were repeated in late October 2004, six weeks

Barbara J. Kraft; Christian de Moustier

2010-01-01

341

Tampa General Hospital "blows the whistle on violence".  

PubMed

At Tampa General Hospital, the professionals in the marketing and media relations department know how to stage a press conference and to get the attention of the media. It goes to the adage when you're buying real estate: location, location, location. Once the journalists were assembled, Tampa General launched its campaign to fight street violence: "Blow the Whistle on Violence." Their timing was aided by the release of the FBI's annual Preliminary Crime Report citing Tampa as the second most dangerous city in which to live. Tampa General's news media specialist Stacey Winn reported that "the day went together just like a puzzle with all the pieces coming together." Those pieces and more are detailed in this issue's cover story on community involvement. Street crime and violence are not unique to Tampa, of course. But with so many victims ending up in Tampa General's emergency room, Winn noted that physicians and nurses felt personally responsible for contributing toward the prevention of cases ending up there. One important element in the hospital's press conference was an appearance by one of the victims of the violence they're striving to prevent. Her appearance and statement to the assembled media representatives significantly enhanced the presentation. "Blow the Whistle on Violence" was a low-cost program with a high return. The potential benefits are enormous. PMID:10152841

1995-01-01

342

Celite-activated thrombelastography in children 5 4 Thrombelastograph R disposables were supplied by Haemoscope Corp., Skokie, IL 5 5 Portions of this data were presented in abstract form at the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia Annual Meeting, Tampa Bay, FL, February, 1996, and the American Society of Anesthesiologists Annual Meeting, Orlando, FL, October, 1998. Abstract published in Anesthesiology 1998;89:A1280  

Microsoft Academic Search

Study Objective: To quantify global coagulation and establish normal ranges for the celite-activated thrombelastographR(TEG) in healthy pediatric patients.Design: Prospective observational study.Setting: Operating suite of a university-based hospital.Patients: 110 healthy pediatric patients in four age groups and 25 healthy adult patients.Interventions: Blood sampling for the celite-activated TEG was carried out after anesthetic induction.Measurements: TEG indices: R time (reflecting time to fibrin

Evan G Pivalizza; Penelope J Pivalizza; Lewis I Gottschalk; Spencer Kee; Peter Szmuk; David C Abramson

2001-01-01

343

Characterization of an urban heat island (UHI) in the Tampa region of Florida  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous research studies have been conducted on the modification of weather and local climate by the urban environment. In studying the urban environment effects, researchers have investigated the urban heat island (UHI), anthropogenic cloud condensation nuclei, anthropogenic heat emissions and other factors. Many of these studies used data sampling networks, while other studies relied solely on computer modeling. This research has taken an approach between the sampling network studies (which were often limited in spatial density) and the pure computer model studies (which lacked the benefits of observational data) to investigate the Tampa Bay Region UHI. The research utilized inexpensive commercially available temperature logging sensors within a 525 km2 study area. One hundred temperature logging sensors, deployed within the study area, generated in excess of 250,000 time and temperature data points for analysis. The large number of temperature sensors enabled the generation of detailed spatiotemporal maps of the Tampa Bay Region UHI. Analysis of the data revealed a significant relationship between the percentage of impervious surface in the study area and the intensity of the local UHI delta temperatures. In addition, the analysis identified the existence of micro UHIs within residential areas. These micro UHIs affected readings within the residential areas. In conjunction with the investigation of the relationship between the percentage of impervious surface and the generation of a UHI, wind speed's role as a moderating factor was also investigated. It was found that increases in wind speed are correlated with a lessoning of the observed UHI. Wind speeds above approximately 2 ms-1 exhibit a significant negative relationship to the development of a UHI. The results of this study add to the field of UHI research in subtropical environments.

Sullivan, Joann

344

Narragansett Bay  

EPA Science Inventory

Narragansett Bay, situated on the eastern side of Rhode Island, comprises about 15% of the State?s total area. Ninety-five percent of the Bay?s surface area is in Rhode Island with the remainder in southeastern Massachusetts; 60% of the Bay?s watershed is in Massachusetts. At the...

345

33 CFR 165.760 - Security Zones; Tampa Bay, Port of Tampa, Port of Saint Petersburg, Port Manatee, Rattlesnake...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...security zone closest to the vessel. (5) Piers, seawalls, and facilities, Port of...50 yards from the shore, seawall, and piers around facilities in Port Sutton within the Port of...48? N, 08225.70? W. (6) Piers, seawalls, and facilities, Port...

2011-07-01

346

University of South Florida Department of Integrative Biology  

E-print Network

(FIT), and industry in the greater Tampa Bay area. #12;University of South Florida Department Hospital, the James A. Haley Veteran's Hospital, the University of Tampa, Florida Institute of Technology-974-2676 USF Department of Integrative Biology MAIL ADDRESS SCA 110 4202 East Fowler Ave, Tampa, FL 33620 8

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

347

Hydrogeology of the Sulphur Springs area, Tampa, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Sulfur Springs area includes about 56 square miles in west-central Hillsborough County, Florida. The north-central part of the city of Tampa is highly urbanized; the north-west part of the area is rural or undeveloped. The area has numerous sinkholes, two of which are used as retention basins for urban storm runoff. An intermittent stream discharges into a sinkhole that is hydraulically connected with the Floridian aquifer. A well-developed cavity system occurs in the upper part of the aquifer in the southwestern and southeastern parts of the area. Groundwater velocities of 4,200 to 9,200 feet per day were determined from dye tests conducted in a sinkhole area north of Sulfur Springs. Sulfur Springs provides the city of Tampa a supplemental water supply of 20 million gallons per day. Periodically, the spring pool is closed to swimming because of the high bacteria counts in the water. The source of bacteria appears to be an internally drained sinkhole area north of the spring. In 1980, groundwater use in the study area, excluding withdrawals from Sulphur Springs, was 7.2 million gallons per day, largely for public water supplies. The city of Tampa pumped an average of 48.5 million gallons per day from the Tampa Dam Reservoir on the Hillsborough River. (USGS)

Stewart, J.W.; Mills, L.R.

1984-01-01

348

EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY (TACS)  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

349

PRELIMINARY EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FINDINGS FROM THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was a pilot study that focused on developing and evaluating air pollution exposure assessment methods and participant recruiting tools. The four-week study was performed in October and November, 2003. The study involved repeated daily...

350

USF Tampa Graduate Catalog 20132014: USF in Lakeland Addendum  

E-print Network

operations in Lakeland will continue through summer 2015. #12;USF Tampa Graduate Catalog: June 1 Dept. Code: DEA Spring: No Admit Program (Major/College): BUS TT Summer Association of College and Schools (SACS); AACSB International ­ The Association to Advance Collegiate

Meyers, Steven D.

351

75 FR 28643 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges, Lee and...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service [FWS-R4-R-2010-N051...Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges, Lee and Charlotte Counties, FL AGENCY: Fish and...

2010-05-21

352

Algae 2011, 26(2): 181-192 DOI: 10.4490/algae.2011.26.2.181  

E-print Network

and analysis of marine microalgae in ship ballast tanks: a case study from Tampa Bay, Florida, USA Matthew J of South Florida, 830 1st Street S, St. Petersburg, FL 33701, USA Ballasting and deballasting of shipping years, we surveyed ballast water and sediment of ships docked in two ports of Tampa Bay, Florida, USA

Meyers, Steven D.

353

33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80... COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District 80.805 Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A...

2011-07-01

354

33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. 80.760 Section 80...Coast 80.760 Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside...and rivers from Horseshoe Point to the Rock Islands. (b) A north-south...

2011-07-01

355

33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80... COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District 80.805 Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A...

2010-07-01

356

33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80... COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District 80.805 Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A...

2012-07-01

357

33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80... COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District 80.805 Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A...

2013-07-01

358

33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.  

...2014-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. 80.760 Section 80...Coast 80.760 Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside...and rivers from Horseshoe Point to the Rock Islands. (b) A north-south...

2014-07-01

359

33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. 80.760 Section 80...Coast 80.760 Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside...and rivers from Horseshoe Point to the Rock Islands. (b) A north-south...

2010-07-01

360

33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. 80.760 Section 80...Coast 80.760 Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside...and rivers from Horseshoe Point to the Rock Islands. (b) A north-south...

2013-07-01

361

33 CFR 80.760 - Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. 80.760 Section 80...Coast 80.760 Horeshoe Point, FL to Rock Island, FL. (a) Except inside...and rivers from Horseshoe Point to the Rock Islands. (b) A north-south...

2012-07-01

362

33 CFR 80.805 - Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL.  

...Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. 80.805 Section 80... COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Eighth District 80.805 Rock Island, FL to Cape San Blas, FL. (a) A...

2014-07-01

363

Mr Bayes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

MrBayes is a program for the Bayesian estimation of phylogeny. Bayesian inference of phylogeny is based upon a quantity called the posterior probability distribution of trees, which is the probability of a tree conditioned on the observations. The conditioning is accomplished using Bayes's theorem. The posterior probability distribution of trees is impossible to calculate analytically; instead, MrBayes uses a simulation technique called Markov chain Monte Carlo (or MCMC) to approximate the posterior probabilities of trees.

364

77 FR 19001 - Foreign-Trade Zone 79-Tampa, FL; Application for Reorganization/Expansion Under Alternative Site...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...5, 6, 7, and 8 would become ``magnet'' sites. The applicant is also requesting approval of a new ``magnet'' site and an initial ``usage-driven...allows for the possible exemption of one magnet site from the ``sunset'' time...

2012-03-29

365

James Bay  

article title: Green Summer and Icy Winter in James Bay ... views of the same area illuminate stark contrasts between summer and winter. The left-hand image was acquired on August 9, 2000 (Terra ... JPL August 9, 2000 and January 16, 2001 - Summer and winter contrasts over the James Bay. project: ...

2013-04-17

366

33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation...Guard District 165.752 Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Floridaregulated navigation...vessels from limited water depth in Sparkman Channel caused by an underwater pipeline....

2011-07-01

367

33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.  

...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation...Guard District 165.752 Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Floridaregulated navigation...vessels from limited water depth in Sparkman Channel caused by an underwater pipeline....

2014-07-01

368

33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation...Guard District 165.752 Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Floridaregulated navigation...vessels from limited water depth in Sparkman Channel caused by an underwater pipeline....

2010-07-01

369

33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation...Guard District 165.752 Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Floridaregulated navigation...vessels from limited water depth in Sparkman Channel caused by an underwater pipeline....

2012-07-01

370

33 CFR 165.752 - Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Florida-regulated navigation...Guard District 165.752 Sparkman Channel, Tampa, Floridaregulated navigation...vessels from limited water depth in Sparkman Channel caused by an underwater pipeline....

2013-07-01

371

75 FR 57373 - Amendment to Class D Airspace; Miami Opa Locka Airport, FL, and Hollywood, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. 10-ASO-30] Amendment to Class D Airspace; Miami Opa Locka Airport, FL...SUMMARY: This action amends Class D airspace at Opa Locka Airport, Miami, FL...coordinates for Opa Locka Airport in the Class D airspace for Miami and Hollywood, FL....

2010-09-21

372

. , 2008, 44, < 4, . 483493 fl () ,,-  

E-print Network

Í?Ï????????,,? ??,? (H2SO4/HNO3/H2O), ?·?Í ??? Ia ­ ?Á ·???? Í???°i Í??????,,?- ??, Á????? Í?????° (nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) ??? nitric acid dihydrate (NAD)). è??·??? ~??- ?????? Ï?????,??? èëé ??,????¸ , fl? ·?? (?Ï

373

AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF PENSACOLA BAY, FLORIDA  

EPA Science Inventory

Assessment of the Ecological Condition of Pensacola Bay, Florida (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ERL,GB R848). We conducted surve...

374

BREEDING AND ANNUAL CYCLE OF LAUGHING GULLS IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Laughing Gull (Larus atric&) is one of the most familiar species of the coasts of the eastern United States. Although the behavior of this gull has been intensively studied (e.g. Beer, 1970a, 1970b; Impekoven, 1973)) many aspects of the breeding biology are little or poorly known. Our study was designed to gather data on reproduction in this species in

JAMES J. DINSMORE; RALPH W. SCHREIBER

375

Factors that influence the hydrologic recovery of wetlands in the Northern Tampa Bay area, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Low permeability sediments and the absence of karst features underlying the wetlands had a positive influence on the wetland recovery following the reductions in groundwater withdrawals. In these settings, intact low permeability subsurface layers help maintain water within and beneath the wetland, and limit the downward leakage potential to the Upper Floridan aquifer. For wetlands in these settings

Metz, P.A.

2011-01-01

376

OIL SPILL MODELING IN TAMPA BAY, FLORIDA: AN INTEGRATED APPROACH. (R825197)  

EPA Science Inventory

The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

377

Observations on the 1971 Summer Red Tide in Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 3 month summer red tide (Florida west coast) caused by the unarmored dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium breve, is described and discussed. Observations support the following: 1) estuaries normally present a low salinity barrier to this neritic species, 2) heavy cell concentrations are aided by physical factors rather than increased cell division, 3) inshore and near-shore reef fisheries are the only ones

K. A. Steidinger; R. M. Ingle

1972-01-01

378

33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...required by this section shall be made in the English language and will contain the following information: (1) The words Hello all vessels, a Navigational Advisory follows; (2) Name of vessel; (3) If engaged in towing, the nature of...

2011-07-01

379

33 CFR 165.753 - Regulated navigation area; Tampa Bay, Florida.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...required by this section shall be made in the English language and will contain the following information: (1) The words Hello all vessels, a Navigational Advisory follows; (2) Name of vessel; (3) If engaged in towing, the nature of...

2010-07-01

380

Tampa Bay Community Cancer Network (TB-CCN): A Model for Reducing Health Disparities  

Cancer.gov

Project evaluation includes both process and outcome measures according to each phase. The overall success of the TB-CCN will be evaluated by the achievement of a sustainable network for education; research on and diffusion of information as assessed by the creation of a solid, sustainable infrastructure; development of relevant education and training activities; increased access to and utilization of screening services; and generation of research proposals and other unique applications of knowledge.

381

Surface Elevation Change And Vertical Accretion In Created Mangroves In Tampa Bay, Florida, Usa  

EPA Science Inventory

Mangroves protect coastlines, provide faunal habitat, and store large quantities of carbon (C). In South Florida and other parts of the Gulf of Mexico, large wetland areas, including mangrove forests, have been removed, degraded, or damaged. Wetland creation efforts have been use...

382

Historical contamination of PAHs, PCBs, DDTs, and heavy metals in Mississippi River Delta, Galveston Bay and Tampa Bay sediment cores  

Microsoft Academic Search

Profiles of trace contaminant concentrations in sediment columns can be a natural archive from which pollutant inputs into coastal areas can be reconstructed. Reconstruction of historical inputs of anthropogenic chemicals is important for improving management strategies and evaluating the success of recent pollution controls measures. Here we report a reconstruction of historical contamination into three coastal sites along the US

P. H Santschi; B. J Presley; T. L Wade; B Garcia-Romero; M Baskaran

2001-01-01

383

GALVESTON BAY CCMP  

EPA Science Inventory

Galveston Bay ranks high among the nation's great bay systems, providing huge economic benefits to the region and state. Remarkably, the bay's natural resources are self-renewing as long as the bay remains healthy and productive. However, Galveston Bay, like many other U.S. bays,...

384

CHESAPEAKE BAY  

EPA Science Inventory

What is the environmental future of Chesapeake Bay. EPA's Office of Research and Development, in conjunction with the Agency's Regional Office in Philadelphia, is sponsoring a cooperative effort among the concerned public, private institutions, and state and federal agencies to d...

385

James Bay  

article title: First Light over James Bay View Larger Image MISR "First light", 16:40 UTC, 24 February 2000 . This is the first image of Earth's ... the line of flight. At the top of the image, the dark-to-light transition captures the opening of the MISR cover. Progressing southward, ...

2013-04-17

386

United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, COllunissioner  

E-print Network

. . ; . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Field chemistry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Hydrology of Tampa Bay and adjacent shrimps . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Copper in Tampa Bay waters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Brown shrimp

387

California: San Francisco Bay  

article title: Northern California and San Francisco Bay ... 17, 2000 (MISR) and August 25, 1997 (AirMISR) - Northern California and the San Francisco Bay. project: MISR ... date: Aug 17, 2000 Images: California San Francisco Bay location: United States ...

2014-05-15

388

Panoramic of Biscayne Bay  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Facing east, a panoramic view of Biscayne Bay. The mainland is seen at far right. Biscayne Bay is an estuary, a place where freshwater and salt water meet. Freshwater flow from the land supplies the bay with nutrients....

389

Life and fl What is Life?  

E-print Network

Life and fl #12;What is Life? And will you know it when you see it? #12;Properties of Life* *as we to the Environment ·Adapts and Evolves #12;Definitions of Life ·Thermodynamic: Produces order. Temporarily overcomes ·You can not get out of the game. #12;Entropy Does life, by creating order, violate the second law

Walter, Frederick M.

390

5353 Parkside Dr. Jupiter, FL 33458  

E-print Network

5353 Parkside Dr. Jupiter, FL 33458 www.llsjupiter.com Phone: (561) 799 8547 Fax: (561) 799 8563 E to your left. Via Florida'sTurnpike, from the north: 1. Take Exit 116 (Jupiter). 2. Turn left and go east

Fernandez, Eduardo

391

Rethinking "Turner v. Keefe": The Parallel Mobilization of African-American and White Teachers in Tampa, Florida, 1936-1946  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 1941, members of the local unit of the Florida State Teachers Association (FSTA) met in Tampa to plan a lawsuit against Hillsborough County's school board for paying African-American teachers less than white teachers. Hilda Turner, who taught history and economics at Tampa's historically black high school, agreed to serve as plaintiff; she was

Shircliffe, Barbara J.

2012-01-01

392

CONCENTRATIONS OF PARTICULATE ORGANIC SPECIES MEASURED IN INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTS DURING THE TAMPA ASTHMATIC CHILDREN'S STUDY ( TACS )  

EPA Science Inventory

The Tampa Asthmatic Children's Study (TACS) was completed to assess environmental exposures for a group of asthmatic children (n = 9) under the age of six and living in Tampa, Florida. Concentrations of particulate organic species are reported from residential indoor, residential...

393

77 FR 34209 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Tallahassee, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tallahassee, FL area. Tallahassee Commercial Airport has been abandoned and controlled airspace is no longer needed. Airspace reconfiguration...Tallahassee, FL area. Tallahassee Commercial Airport has been abandoned and controlled airspace serving the airport removed....

2012-06-11

394

CHESAPEAKE BAY MONITORING PROGRAM  

EPA Science Inventory

The Chesapeake Bay Program is the unique regional partnership which has been directing and conducting the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay since the signing of the historic 1983 Chesapeake Bay Agreement. The Chesapeake Bay Program partners include the states of Maryland, Pennsyl...

395

Green Crab - Maquoit Bay  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Maquoit Bay is a shallow estuary that forms the northwestern arm of Casco Bay, ME. In 2001, the ME Department of Marine Resources eelgrass maps showed 570 ha of eelgrass in the bay. In 2012-2013, however, eelgrass area in Maquoit Bay declined dramatically; as of July 2013 there was almost no eelgra...

396

77 FR 71734 - Proposed Modification of the Miami, FL, Class B Airspace Area; and the Ft Lauderdale, FL, Class C...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FL, Class B Airspace Area; and the Ft Lauderdale, FL, Class C Airspace Area; Public Meetings...information from airspace users and others, concerning a proposal...Class B airspace at Miami, FL, and the Class C airspace at Ft Lauderdale,...

2012-12-04

397

Life and fl N* = 4 x 1011  

E-print Network

Life and fl #12;Recap N = N* fs · N* = 4 x 1011 · fs = 0.2 N = 8 x 1010 #12;Solar System · 8 fp Nh = 2.4 x 1011 #12;#12;What is Life? And will you know it when you see it? #12;Properties of Life ·Responds to the Environment ·Adapts and Evolves #12;Definitions of Life ·Thermodynamic: Produces order

Walter, Frederick M.

398

VIEW OF HB1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

VIEW OF HB-1 (VAB HIGH BAY) WITH MOBILE LAUNCHER PLATFORM (VEHICLE ACCESS PLATFORMS ARE VISIBLE IN THE CENTER), FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Vehicle Assembly Building, VAB Road, East of Kennedy Parkway North, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

399

Chesapeake and Coastal Bay Life  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This guide to organisms and environmental issues of the Chesapeake Bay and Mid-Atlantic Coast addresses restoration and protection of bay habitats, bay grasses, harmful algae, bay monitoring efforts, and organisms that live in the bay. There is also education section that features materials for teachers, students and volunteers, frequently asked questions about the bay, and a set of links to related topics.

2004-01-01

400

33 CFR 165.1197 - Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. 165.1197 Section 165.1197 Navigation and Navigable...Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. (a) Locations. The following areas are security...

2012-07-01

401

33 CFR 165.1197 - Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. 165.1197 Section 165.1197 Navigation and Navigable...Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. (a) Locations. The following areas are security...

2013-07-01

402

33 CFR 165.1197 - Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California.  

...Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. 165.1197 Section 165.1197 Navigation and Navigable...Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, Carquinez Strait, Suisun Bay, California. (a) Locations. The following areas are security...

2014-07-01

403

Lutzow-Holm Bay  

... title: Lutzow-Holm Bay and the Shirase Glacier, Antarctica View Larger Image ... portray the Lutzow-Holm Bay region of Queen Maud Land, East Antarctica, on September 5, 2002. Although Queen Maud Land remains one of the ...

2013-04-16

404

Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, preliminary public design report  

SciTech Connect

This preliminary Public Design Report (PDR) provides design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. This project is partially funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under Round III of its Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program under the provisions of Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Tampa Electric Company, novated on March 5,1992. The project is highlighted by the inclusion of a new hot gas cleanup system. DOE`s project management is based at its Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in West Virginia. This report is preliminary, and the information contained herein is subject to revision. Definitive information will be available in the final PDR, which will be published at the completion of detailed engineering.

NONE

1994-06-01

405

Advances in Record-Linkage Methodology as Applied to Matching the 1985 Census of Tampa, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

A test census of Tampa, Florida and an independent postenumeration survey (PES) were conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau in 1985. The PES was a stratified block sample with heavy emphasis placed on hard-to-count population groups. Matching the individuals in the census to the individuals in the PES is an important aspect of census coverage evaluation and consequently a very

Matthew A. Jaro

1989-01-01

406

78 FR 17085 - Amendment of Multiple Restricted Areas; Eglin AFB, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...is amended as follows: 1. R-2914A Valparaiso, FL [Amended] By removing the words...Wing, Eglin AFB, FL'' 2. R-2914B Valparaiso, FL [Amended] By removing the words...Wing, Eglin AFB, FL'' 6. R-2918 Valparaiso, FL [Amended] By removing the...

2013-03-20

407

Project # 1109 September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL  

E-print Network

Project # 1109 #12;#12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL i Welcome to our 51st Annual-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach, FL iii Table of Contents Welcome Letter ...................................................................................... 24 #12;The International Citrus & Beverage Conference iv #12;September 13-16, 2011 Clearwater Beach

Florida, University of

408

76 FR 35966 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...from the 6.3-mile radius to 7 miles northwest of the airport; excluding that airspace within the Titusville, FL, and Melbourne, FL, Class E airspace areas. Issued in College Park, Georgia, on June 2, 2011. Mark D. Ward, Manager,...

2011-06-21

409

Computation of fl ow through the oesophagogastric junction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whilst methods exist to indirectly measure the effects of increased flow or gastro-oesophageal refluxing, they cannot quantitatively measure the amount of acid travelling back up into the oesophagus during refl ux, nor can they indicate the fl ow rate through the oesophago- gastric junction (OGJ). Since OGJ dysfunction affects fl ow it seems most appropriate to describe the geometry of

Barry P McMahon; Karl D Odie; Kenneth W Moloney; Hans Gregersen; McMahon BP; Odie KD; Moloney KW

410

77 FR 50085 - Rookery Bay, FL and Kachemak Bay, AK National Estuarine Research Reserve Management Plan Revisions  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Reserves Division, Office of Ocean and Coastal Resource Management, National Ocean Service, National Oceanic...high priority issues including climate change and harvested species...563-1158 of NOAA's National Ocean Service, Estuarine...

2012-08-20

411

Teachers' Role, Learners' Gender Differences, and FL Anxiety among Seventh-Grade Students Studying English as a FL  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study investigated the relationship between foreign language (FL) anxiety and achievement in that language. The role of the FL teacher as perceived by the learners was also tested. Participants were 67 seventh-grade students. They were administered an anxiety questionnaire, a Hebrew reading comprehension test, an English reading comprehension

Abu-Rabia, Salim

2004-01-01

412

Chesapeake Bay Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A unique group that encompasses federal and state governments and local agencies, CBP offers information about the Bay, its flora and fauna, habitats, water quality, environmental concerns, and restoration efforts, plus provides access to scientific data. Site features all the latest Bay news, as well as State of the Bay information. Also includes the Critter of the Month, where a different species is profiled complete with glossary of important terms.

413

78 FR 6258 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Amendment of Class E Airspace; West Palm Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation...IFR) operations within the West Palm Beach, FL airspace area. This action...feet above the surface in the West Palm Beach, FL area. New Standard...

2013-01-30

414

Modeling photosynthetically active radiation in water of Tampa Bay, Florida, with emphasis on the geometry of incident irradiance  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A model is developed that uses a simplified geometric description of incident direct solar beam and diffuse skylight. The model incorporates effects of solar elevation angle and cloudiness on the amount of in-air photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) that passes through the air-water interface and on K0 in waters of relatively low turbidity. The value of K0 was estimated to vary as much as 41% on a clear summer day due to changes in solar elevation angle. The model was used to make estimates of the depth to which sea-grasses might receive adequate light for survival for a range of values of K0. -from Authors

Miller, R.L.; McPherson, B.F.

1995-01-01

415

Late Holocene estuarineinner shelf interactions; is there evidence of an estuarine retreat path for Tampa Bay, Florida?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if and how a large, modern estuarine system, situated in the middle of an ancient carbonate platform, has affected its adjacent inner shelf both in the past during the last, post-glacial sea-level rise and during the present. An additional purpose was to determine if and how this inner shelf seaward of a

B. T. Donahue; A. C. Hine; S. Tebbens; S. D. Locker; D. C. Twichell

2003-01-01

416

Post-Miocene stratigraphy and depositional environments of valley-fill sequences at the mouth of Tampa Bay, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

Post-Miocene sea-level low stands allowed rivers and karst processes to incise the exposed carbonate platform along the Gulf Coast of Florida. Few Miocene to mid-Pleistocene deposits survived erosion along the present coast except within incised valleys. Since their formation, these valleys have been filled and incised multiple times in response to sea-level changes. The thick sedimentary sequences underlying the mouth

Thomas W. Ferguson; Richard A. Davis

2003-01-01

417

Modeling Photosynthetically Active Radiation in Water of Tampa Bay, Florida, with Emphasis on the Geometry of Incident Irradiance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Field studies that compare the spatial and temporal variation in light attenuation often neglect effects of solar elevation angle, yet these effects can be significant. To approximately correct for these angular effects, we developed a model that uses a simplified geometric description of incident direct solar beam and diffuse skylight. The model incorporates effects of solar elevation angle and cloudiness

Ronald L. Miller; Benjamin F. McPherson

1995-01-01

418

Hydrogeology, estimated impact, and regional well monitoring of effects of subsurface wastewater injection, Tampa Bay area, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Six proposed injection sites are located in Pinellas County, Fla., and the city of St. Petersburg. Projected maximum injection rate, if all sites become operational, will be about 40 million gallons per day. The injection zone at the proposed sites is in a consistently dolomitized section of the Avon Park Limestone in the lower part of the Floridan aquifer. The injection zone contains saline ground water that has a chloride concentration of 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Pressure and velocity changes were computed at selected regional locations in the upper and lower parts of the Floridan aquifer. Results of the model computations suggest that the regional impact after 20 years of injection will be small. Three locations are proposed for regional monitoring of subsurface injection. They are in the vicinity of the intersection of highways U.S. 19 and U.S. 60 in Pinellas County, Sun City in Hillsborough County, and the intersection of Sheldon Road and Gunn Highway in Hillsborough County. (USGS)

Hickey, John J.

1981-01-01

419

Bioinvasion in a Brazilian Bay: Filling Gaps in the Knowledge of Southwestern Atlantic Biota  

PubMed Central

Background Biological invasions are a major cause of global species change. Nevertheless, knowledge about the distribution and ecology of introduced species is regionally biased, and many gaps in knowledge exist for most developing countries. Methodology/Principal Findings To study the zoobenthos on the hard substratum of the Ilha Grande Bay, a survey was conducted on both natural and artificial substrata at three depths and seven sites. The species recorded were classified as native, cryptogenic or introduced. Multivariate analyses were conducted to assess the prevalence of introduced species in these communities and to compare the distribution of species on natural and artificial substrata of this bay to identify possible discrepancies in habitat use. Of the 61 species, 25 were cryptogenic, 10 were introduced and 26 were native. Similar numbers of introduced species were found on both natural and artificial substrata, though the community composition was significantly different between them. We also compared the species composition of the Ilha Grande Bay survey to other inventories taken around the world. The highest similarities were found between the Ilha Grande Bay inventory and the Atlantic coastal region (Tampa Bay, USA and the Gulf of Mexico), American Samoa and Pearl Harbor (USA) inventories. Conclusions/Significance This study presents the first published comprehensive list of hard substratum sessile marine invertebrate species in a Brazilian bay. The high percentage of cryptogenic species reveals gaps in both zoological records and information on introduced species for the Brazilian coast. The introduced species successfully colonized different sites in the Ilha Grande Bay, including both natural and artificial substrata. In addition, we find that artificial structures may not be good surrogates for natural rocky shores and may represent an ecological threat. Comparisons with other inventories suggest a history of broad-scale invasion, though more evidence is needed to support this conclusion. PMID:20927375

Ignacio, Barbara L.; Julio, Luciana M.; Junqueira, Andrea O. R.; Ferreira-Silva, Maria A. G.

2010-01-01

420

76 FR 16636 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee NWRs, Lee County, FL; Final...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Caloosahatchee NWR is 40 acres. As part of the largest undeveloped mangrove ecosystem in the United States, these four closed refuges...and habitat diversity through a mix of habitats, including mangrove islands and shorelines, saltwater marshes and ponds,...

2011-03-24

421

78 FR 54599 - Safety Zone; 2013 Ironman 70.3 Miami, Biscayne Bay; Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...www.regulations.gov, type the [[Page...docket number USCG-2013-0548 in the...www.regulations.gov, type the docket number USCG-2013-0548 in the...Miami. [FR Doc. 2013-21624 Filed 9-4-13; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE...

2013-09-05

422

76 FR 73996 - Special Local Regulations; Orange Bowl International Youth Regatta, Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...direct effect on State or local governments and would either preempt State...the expenditure by a State, local, or Tribal government, in the aggregate, or by...provide notice of the regulated areas by Local Notice to Mariners,...

2011-11-30

423

Biostatistics and Bayes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attitudes of biostatisticians toward implementation of the Bayesian paradigm have changed during the past decade due to the increased availability of computational tools for realistic problems. Empirical Bayes' methods, already widely used in the analysis of longitudinal data, promise to improve cancer incidence maps by accounting for overdispersion and spatial correlation. Hierarchical Bayes' methods offer a natural framework in which

Norman Breslow

1990-01-01

424

CASCO BAY PLAN  

EPA Science Inventory

Casco Bay lies at the heart of Maine's most populated area. The health of its waters, wetlands, and wildlife depend in large part on the activities of the quarter-million residents who live in its watershed. Less than 30 years ago, portions of Casco Bay were off-limits to recr...

425

SRELWetlands Series Carolina Bays  

E-print Network

such as sumac, button bush, gallberry and red bay. Also common in Carolina bays are water lilies, sedges 1. Flood control and water availability. 2. Water quality -- they purify water by processing in size from less than an acre to many acres. Water levels are normally lowest in autumn and highest

Georgia, University of

426

Prudhoe Bay COLVILLE RIVER  

E-print Network

Fairbanks Juneau Tok Nome Circle Barrow Prudhoe Bay TANANA RIVER LOWER YUKON KOYUKUK RIVER COPPER RIVER COLVILLE RIVER SUSITNA RIVER BARROW ALASKA CENTRAL YUKON NORTON SOUND UPPER YUKON RIVER PORCUPINE RIVER UPPER KUSKOKWIM RIVER NUSHAGAK RIVER LOWER KUSKOKWIM RIVER PRUDHOE BAY CANADA KOBUK- SELAWIK

427

The Chesapeake Bay Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Web site is the online presence of the Chesapeake Bay Program, "a unique regional partnership that has led and directed the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay." The site offers a wealth of information regarding the region's flora and fauna, habitats and ecosystem processes, restoration efforts, current events, and much more. For instance, click on Animals and Plants to access pages and pages of well-organized information about the area's shellfish, reptiles, mammals, insects, bay grasses, invasive species, and others too numerous to list. Each page contains a convenient glossary for important terms and links to related resources. Chesapeake Bay Program publications are also provided, although only some are available for immediate download. In all, this is an informative and easy-to-use Web site that even those not familiar with Chesapeake Bay should find interesting.

428

78 FR 38828 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Captiva, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...June 6, 2013, establishing controlled airspace at Upper Captiva Island Heliport, Captiva, FL, to allow additional time for en route charting. DATES: Effective date: 0901 UTC. The effective date of the final rule published on June 6, 2013 is...

2013-06-28

429

78 FR 25384 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Immokalee, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...SUMMARY: This action establishes Class E Airspace at Immokalee, FL, to accommodate the Area Navigation (RNAV) Global Positioning System (GPS) Standard Instrument Approach Procedures at Big Cypress Airfield. This action enhances the safety...

2013-05-01

430

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY STETSON UNIVERSITY Phoenix, AZ Deland, FL  

E-print Network

Humanities Liberal Studies Library Science & Info Studies Management Rhetoric & Composition MIDDLE TENNESSEE Technology Syracuse, NY Popular Culture Information Management CENTRAL MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY Jacksonville, FL Management English PENN STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF PARIS II University Park, PA SORBONNE

Wu, Shin-Tson

431

77 FR 10960 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Snake Creek, Islamorada, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...USCG-2012-0047] Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Snake Creek, Islamorada, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard...from the regulation governing the operation of Snake Creek Bridge, mile 0.5, across Snake Creek, in Islamorada, Florida. The...

2012-02-24

432

Impacts of the Tampa Bypass Canal system on the areal hydrology, Hillsborough County, Florida  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Construction of the Tampa Bypass Canal, Florida has resulted in an increase in streamflow from the canal area. Base-flow discharge is more than twice preconstruction amounts. Discharge from springs has decreased by one half or more. Ground-water levels show an increase of up to 4 feet near structure S-160 due to impoundment of water. Elsewhere, levels have generally decreased by 2 to 4 feet. Some minor changes in water quality have occurred. Some of the changes, however, may be attributed to factors other than canal construction. (USGS)

Knutilla, R.L.; Corral, M.A.

1984-01-01

433

RICHMOND BAY CAMPUS RICHMOND BAY CAMPUS  

E-print Network

-specific emergency response plan for the Richmond Bay Campus. · Biological research work would be conducted the grasslands and north of the marsh. · Manage weeds to reduce threat to marsh and grasslands. · Local endemic, biological, and radiological). · Coordinate with state and local authorities to develop a site

Lee, Jason R.

434

Transfer or Threshold: The Relationship between L1 and FL Comprehension Monitoring  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A crucial area in FL reading research is the transfer of reading skills from L1 to FL. Among all the reading skills, comprehension monitoring plays an important role. This study examines relationship between comprehension monitoring outcomes in L1 and FL reading among Chinese learners of English as a foreign language (EFL) with different FL

Han, Feifei

2012-01-01

435

Reduced mast cell and basophil numbers and function in Cpa3-Cre; Mcl-1fl/fl mice  

PubMed Central

It has been reported that the intracellular antiapoptotic factor myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 (Mcl-1) is required for mast cell survival in vitro, and that genetic manipulation of Mcl-1 can be used to delete individual hematopoietic cell populations in vivo. In the present study, we report the generation of C57BL/6 mice in which Cre recombinase is expressed under the control of a segment of the carboxypeptidase A3 (Cpa3) promoter. C57BL/6-Cpa3-Cre; Mcl-1fl/fl mice are severely deficient in mast cells (92%-100% reduced in various tissues analyzed) and also have a marked deficiency in basophils (58%-78% reduced in the compartments analyzed), whereas the numbers of other hematopoietic cell populations exhibit little or no changes. Moreover, Cpa3-Cre; Mcl-1fl/fl mice exhibited marked reductions in the tissue swelling and leukocyte infiltration that are associated with both mast cell- and IgE-dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis (except at sites engrafted with in vitroderived mast cells) and a basophil- and IgE-dependent model of chronic allergic inflammation, and do not develop IgE-dependent passive systemic anaphylaxis. Our findings support the conclusion that Mcl-1 is required for normal mast cell and basophil development/survival in vivo in mice, and also suggest that Cpa3-Cre; Mcl-1fl/fl mice may be useful in analyzing the roles of mast cells and basophils in health and disease. PMID:22001390

Lilla, Jennifer N.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Mukai, Kaori; BenBarak, Maya J.; Franco, Christopher B.; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Yu, Mang; Tsai, Mindy; Piliponsky, Adrian M.

2011-01-01

436

Diversity reception of COMSTAR SHF beacons with the Tampa triad, 1978 - 1981  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The results of 19 GHz downlink rain attenuation diversity measurements in Tampa over a 29 month period (1978-1980), and the results of a 20 GHz diversity study during the summer of 1981, using the remaining COMSTAR beacon are presented. At 19 GHz, site separations of 11, 16, and 20 km were used, with reception at high elevation angle (about 57 deg). At 29 GHz, only the 16 km baseline was employed, with elevation angle about 32 deg. Almost identical long term performance of the two longer baselines indicates that for separations above about 15 km diversity improvement was not sensitive to baseline length or direction. Diversity improvement at 29 GHz with the 16 km baseline was similar to that predicted by scaling the 19 GHz results of the previous seasons. Also discussed are the type of attenuation distributions and typical fade durations to be found under persistent convective conditions. For rain climates like Tampa's, site diversity in some form will be required for high reliability SHF satellite links. The diversity data may be helpful in designing schemes for resource sharing among numbers of links.

Davidson, D.; Tang, D. D.

1982-01-01

437

Preparing for a New Century of Learning: Technology, Education, and the Internet. ICTE Tampa 1999: International Conference on Technology and Education Proceedings (17th, Tampa, Florida, October 10-13, 1999).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The overarching focus of the International Conference on Technology and Education (ICTE) Tampa 1999 conference was "Preparing for a New Century of Learning: Technology, Education, and the Internet." Twelve themes supported this focus: "Implementation in the Classroom"; "Educational Tools"; "Information Technology and Educational Policy";

1999

438

Nutrients In Chesapeake Bay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the US. Eleven rivers empty into the bay creating the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. From urban areas and cultivated fields in which wetlands were not preserved, runoff can run into the rivers unfiltered. This runoff can include nutrients that can cause uncontrolled growth of an abundance of algae which can eventually increase the turbidity of the river, not allowing light to reach the bottom of the river. This will result in the loss of sub-aquatic vegetation (SAV) as well as the organisms which rely on it for food and habitat. There are a variety of tests that can be conducted to determine the presence of algae in the rivers. Two of these tests include pH and turbidity. In this lesson which includes field work, students will measure water quality and use authentic satellite data to explore the effects of nutrients in the Chesapeake Bay and the rivers of its watershed.

439

Mel Bay's Creative Keyboard  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

If you started to play the guitar anytime after the late 1940s, you probably encountered the guitar instruction books of the late Mel Bay. Bay started his life in the tiny town of Bunker, Missouri and over the next eight decades he created a vast music instruction empire that included hundreds of publications. This particular website happens to lead to Mel Bay's Creative Keyboard, which is a monthly online magazine that explores various aspects of piano music. Of course, the site is used to promote various Mel Bay products, but there's a great deal of free content here, including articles titled "How to Compose a New Song" and "African Roots of Jazz". The articles are all authored by accomplished musicians, and visitors can also browse through the Creative Keyboard archive, which goes back to September 1999.

440

MANGANESE IN NARRAGANSETT BAY  

EPA Science Inventory

Concentrations of dissolved manganese and particulate manganese and aluminum were determined in samples from Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, and its surrounding rivers. Total manganese is approximately conservative, but dissolved and particulate manganese are not. Desorption may ...

441

Living Bay Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Learning resources about oysters and current issues in Chesapeake Bay. Students learn about oyster anatomy, ballast water, invasive species and more through online puzzles. Teachers can download 10 multidisciplinary lesson plans about oyster biology and fishery issues. Links to web resources on the Bay, oysters, plankton and biofilms. Also available: day programs with hands-on and shipboard activities for at-risk students and others at Living Classrooms Foundation facilities in Maryland and New Jersey.

442

Legacy of the Ancient World: An Educational Guide. Understanding Ancient Culture through Art at the Tampa Museum of Art.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Among the many contributions made by Ancient Greeks and Romans to contemporary life, are those which influence art, architecture, literature, philosophy, mathematics and science, theater, athletics, religion, and the founding of democracy. The Tampa Museum of Art's classical collection offers a unique opportunity to learn about Ancient Greeks and

Whitelaw, R. Lynn

443

Geropsychology Post-Doctoral Training in Public Sector Service Delivery: The USF/Tampa VA Fellowship Model  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

There is a growing need for geropsychologists who are specialists in practice, research, education, and advocacy for older adults. The combined USF/Tampa VA geropsychology fellowship program focuses on the training of three post-doctoral Fellows each year in public sector service delivery across diverse long term care (LTC) and primary care

Molinari, Victor; Chiriboga, David A.; Schonfeld, Lawrence; Haley, William E.; Schinka, John A.; Hyer, Kathy; Dupree, Larry W.

2005-01-01

444

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA-88-311-0000, Office of Disability Determination, The Howard Building, Tampa, Florida  

Microsoft Academic Search

In response to a request from the Area Manager of the Office of Disability Determination, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Howard Building, Tampa, Florida. Particular concern was voiced with regard to eye irritation, headaches, and fatigue with a possible connection to water leakage into the offices and pigeon nesting areas above suspended ceilings. Studies

P. Roper; B. Lushniak

1989-01-01

445

DYNAMICS OF A SUBTIDAL SEAGRASS LANDSCAPE: SEASONAL AND ANNUAL CHANGE IN RELATION TO WATER DEPTH  

EPA Science Inventory

The spatial heterogeneity of a subtidal marine landscape and the areal extent of both monospecific and mixed patches of seagrass species were studied in Tampa Bay, FL. Specifically, we examined the temporal dynamics of seagrass distribution and its relationship to water depth an...

446

Faunal response to fragmentation in seagrass habitats: implications for seagrass conservation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fragmentation in seagrass systems results in changes to landscape features that may have implications for fauna. We examine published studies to identify whether faunal abundance shows any relationship with patch size of seagrass beds, suggesting preferential use of the edge or interior by seagrass associated taxa. In a series of studies in Tampa Bay, FL, we also examined: (1) the

Susan S Bell; Robert A Brooks; Bradley D Robbins; Mark S Fonseca; Margaret O Hall

2001-01-01

447

Acoustic characteristics of bay bottom sediments in Lavaca Bay, TX  

E-print Network

The purpose of this study is to examine the sediment stratigraphy and oyster reefs of Lavaca Bay. There has been little previous research on the bay??s stratigraphy, and information from this study is important for industry and resources management...

Patch, Mary Catherine

2005-08-29

448

Rehabilitation outcomes for veterans with polytrauma treated at the Tampa VA.  

PubMed

Returning soldiers from Iraq and Afghanistan who have sustained polytrauma have a combination of complex physical and mental morbidities that require extensive therapy and rehabilitation. This study examined the effect of rehabilitation on 116 polytrauma patients with service-connected injuries treated at the Tampa VA; improvements in functional and cognitive abilities were measured using the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores and healthcare costs for rehabilitation treatment were also assessed. Intensive rehabilitation therapy increased functional ability in this cohort with an average improvement in total FIM scores of 23 points. Total inpatient costs for these patients exceeded $4 million in approximately 3 years. Rehabilitation nurses face challenges providing quality care to this target patient population, including characterizing war-related polytrauma, providing surveillance, coordinating care, synchronizing care for patients with multiple injuries, and conducting evidence-based pain management. PMID:18767404

Siddharthan, Kris; Scott, Steven; Bass, Elizabeth; Nelson, Audrey

2008-01-01

449

About the Chesapeake Bay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Visitors can access a variety of information about the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States. They can explore the physical and biological processes that drive Chesapeake Bay ecosystems by using an interactive map that is provided. A large selection of links provides access to additional information such as fun facts, frequently asked questions, historical and cultural material, and environmental indicators. A section on the Bay's ecosystems provides information on geology, water and sediments, habitats, resources, and others. For educators, there are free downloadable presentation materials such as Powerpoint shows and maps, as well as a teachers' homepage with links to additional resources. There is also a students' homepage with links to resources, tools, and publications.

450

Chesapeake Bay Program: Watersheds  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site describes the Chesapeake Bay watershed, which stretches across six states including New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, Virginia and West Virginia and also the District of Columbia. Also included in the Bay watershed are several subwatersheds, smaller systems that drain into the streams and rivers that flow into the Chesapeake. More than 64,000 square miles of land drain into the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. This site includes links to the subject of watershed management, which is a method for maintaining, protecting and restoring the natural resources within a watershed while also enhancing the quality of life in our communities. Students can learn what watershed management planning is and why it is important.

451

78 FR 55241 - Foreign-Trade Zone 79-Tampa, Florida, Foreign-Trade Subzone 79C-Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tampa, Florida, Foreign-Trade Subzone 79C--Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc., Approval of Additional Subzone Sites...the existing activation limit of FTZ 79, on behalf of Cutrale Citrus Juices USA, Inc. The application was processed in...

2013-09-10

452

Cedar Bay overview  

SciTech Connect

The Cedar Bay Cogeneration Facility is located on the north side of Jacksonville, Florida adjacent to the Broward River and Eastport Road. The facility is co-located on a site with the Seminole Kraft Paper Mill. The facility is owned by Cedar Bay Generating Company (CBGC) Limited Partnership, managed by US Generating Company and Operated by US Operating Services Company. The engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) of the facility was contracted through Multipower Associates. Multipower is a joint venture comprised of Pyropower Corporation, National Power Development, Inc. (NPDI) and the Pritchard Corporation. Black & Veatch provided turnkey construction management services and the prime contractor was H.B. Zachry.

Garvey, J.F.

1994-12-31

453

Mobile Bay turbidity study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The termination of studies carried on for almost three years in the Mobile Bay area and adjacent continental shelf are reported. The initial results concentrating on the shelf and lower bay were presented in the interim report. The continued scope of work was designed to attempt a refinement of the mathematical model, assess the effectiveness of optical measurement of suspended particulate material and disseminate the acquired information. The optical characteristics of particulate solutions are affected by density gradients within the medium, density of the suspended particles, particle size, particle shape, particle quality, albedo, and the angle of refracted light. Several of these are discussed in detail.

Crozier, G. F.; Schroeder, W. W.

1978-01-01

454

Job Description Research Assistant Chromatin Sorghum Breeding Team Gainesville, FL  

E-print Network

Job Description Research Assistant ­ Chromatin Sorghum Breeding Team Gainesville, FL Description The Research Assistant/field technician position will support day-to-day activities for the sorghum breeding will include providing support and assistance to sorghum breeders and research associates with all aspects

Mazzotti, Frank

455

SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240  

E-print Network

SALT-flSH INPUSTRIES FISHERY LEAFLET 240 FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT, Albert M. Day, Director #12;THE VENEZUKLAN SALT-FISH INDUSTRIES CONTE^fTS Part II Potential Productive and Craft 29 Development of Unused or Underutilized Species 29 Development of New Areas 35 Salt 35 Studies

456

24. SATURN V Fl ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

24. SATURN V F-l ENGINE TEST FIRING ON TEST STAND 1A. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

457

FL statutes 1004.22 DSR FLORIDA STATUTES  

E-print Network

FL statutes 1004.22 DSR 1 FLORIDA STATUTES 1004.22 Divisions of sponsored research at state for the educational programs and maximum service to the state. To this end, materials that relate to methods of manufacture or production, potential trade secrets, potentially patentable material, actual trade secrets

Weston, Ken

458

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

2012-07-01

459

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

2011-07-01

460

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

2010-07-01

461

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

2013-07-01

462

33 CFR 165.1195 - Regulated Navigation Area; Humboldt Bay Bar Channel and Humboldt Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt...  

...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. 165.1195 Section 165.1195...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (a) Location. The Regulated...Bay Entrance Channel, Humboldt Bay, California. (b) Definitions. As used in...

2014-07-01

463

77 FR 21508 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Tallahassee, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Tallahassee, FL area. Tallahassee Commercial Airport has been abandoned and controlled airspace is no longer needed. Airspace reconfiguration...Tallahassee, FL area. Tallahassee Commercial Airport has been abandoned making it necessary to remove controlled airspace...

2012-04-10

464

Bayes' Theorem: Conditional Probabilities  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

To perform calculations using Bayes' theorem, enter the probability for one or the other of the items in each of the following pairs (the remaining item in each pair will be calculated automatically). A probability value can be entered as either a decimal fraction such as .25 or a common fraction such as 1/4

Lowry, Richard

2009-10-30

465

Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides  

E-print Network

Yaquina Bay Weather & Tides Clay Creech Phil Barbour #12;HMSC Weather Station #12;Temp-Humidity Sensor at Library #12;http://weather.hmsc.oregonstate.edu #12;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;Archived Data is Available every 15 mins. #12;#12;A pyranometer measures solar radiation #12;#12;National Weather Service

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

466

Yaquina Bay Topobathy DEM  

EPA Science Inventory

The U.S.EPA contracted with the U.S.ACE to obtain intertidal and subtidal bathymetric soundings of Yaquina Bay between Poole Slough and the South Beach Marina in 2002. These data were compiled with U.S.ACE subtidal soundings from 1999, 1998, 2000 and National Ocean Service soundi...

467

PECONIC BAY SYSTEM AQUACULTURE  

EPA Science Inventory

PECONIC BAY SYSTEM AQUACULTURE This reference document serves as the aquaculture sub-section for Phase II of a four-phase series of economic studies being conducted by Economic Analysis, Inc., for the Peconic Estuary Program. It provides an evaluation of the history, current stat...

468

Convex Bayes decision theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic concepts of Levi's epistemic utility theory and credal convexity are presented. Epistemic utility, in addition to penalizing error as is done with traditional Bayesian decision methodology, permits a unit of informational value to be distributed among the hypotheses of a decision problem. Convex Bayes decision theory retains the conditioning structure of probability-based inference, but addresses many of the

W. C. Stirling; D. R. Morrell

1991-01-01

469

Plankton in the Bay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute website provides background information about plankton, especially as they relate to the Chesapeake Bay. It includes a discussion of key nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorous) used by plankton for growth purposes. It also features an explanation of how plankton is sampled.

Program, University O.

470

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF MARK E. LUTHER Education: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, A.B., Mathematics and Physics, 1976;  

E-print Network

-1998; Greater Tampa Bay Marine Advisory Council, Member, 1993-present; Tampa Bay Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System (GTBMAC-PORTS, Inc.) Chief Operating Officer, 1995-present; Tampa Bay Regional Council Agency on Bay Management, Member, 1996-present; Tampa Bay National Estuary Program Technical Advisory Committee

Meyers, Steven D.

471

77 FR 21662 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL, by correcting the geographic...descriptor of Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL. Also, the geographic...

2012-04-11

472

76 FR 30298 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Cocoa, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Cocoa, FL, as the Merritt Island Non-Directional...procedures developed at Merritt Island Airport, Cocoa, FL. Airspace reconfiguration is...

2011-05-25

473

77 FR 28243 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...12-ASO-11] Amendment of Class D Airspace; Cocoa Beach, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...2012 that amends Class D airspace at Cocoa Beach, FL. DATES: Effective 0901 UTC...airspace at Cape Canaveral Skid Strip, Cocoa Beach, FL. A typographical error...

2012-05-14

474

77 FR 34208 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Leesburg, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Docket No. 12-ASO-27] Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Leesburg, FL AGENCY...SUMMARY: This action amends Class D and Class E airspace at Leesburg, FL, changing...Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 amends Class D and Class E airspace at Leesburg, FL....

2012-06-11

475

78 FR 25227 - Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Live Oak, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Proposed Amendment of Class E Airspace; Live Oak, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...proposes to amend Class E Airspace in the Live Oak, FL area, as new Standard Instrument Approach...IFR) operations for SIAPs within the Live Oak, FL, airspace area. This action...

2013-04-30

476

78 FR 38554 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Live Oak, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...12-ASO-45] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Live Oak, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...action amends Class E Airspace in the Live Oak, FL area, as new Standard Instrument Approach...rules (IFR) operations within the Live Oak, FL, airspace area. This action...

2013-06-27

477

Monterey Bay Aquarium  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Introduction to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, an institution dedicated to inspiring the conservation of the oceans. Links provide extensive information on the history of the establishment, calendar of events, visitor information, news, description of the exhibits, conservation, research, live web casts, and membership information. Resources for teachers and kids include classroom activities and workshops. A link to information in Spanish is also provided. Located in Monterey, California.

478

Bay Bridge 360  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website was created by the various California transportation agencies that are involved in the enormous job of retrofitting the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge to protect it from being damaged by seismic activity. It is an extremely well thought out website, with an interactive aerial graphic of the Bridge on its homepage that introduces visitors to their work. If you click on the colored circles on the bridge, you can see a slideshow of the construction on that section of the Bridge, and some of the Bridge sections include a time-lapse video of the construction. Additionally, there is a short film visitors can watch to get an overview of the project, by clicking on the blue circle above "Bay Bridge Overview" in the right-hand corner of the homepage. Clicking on the arrow in the left-hand corner of the homepage takes you inside the website where you can find links to "Closures and Detours", "Environmental Issues", for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, detailed explanations of the construction methods under the "Information Center" link, and even "Construction Cams". If you just can't get enough of traffic where you live, just click on "Construction Cams" and see Bay Bridge traffic.

2009-06-08

479

The UVA Bay Game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Chesapeake Bay watershed extends over six states, and all told, some 27 million residents live in the area covered by the watershed. The University of Virginia has a keen interest in the watershed area, and this website provides information about their sustainability simulation project which is designed to look at the long and short term future of this particular ecosystem. The simulation allows players "to take the roles of stakeholders, such as farmers, local policy-makers, watermen, and developers, make decisions about their livelihoods and professional expertise, and see the impacts of these decisions on the watershed and on each other over a twenty-year period." The website provides information about the simulation, along with materials on the different simulation events and the participating groups. Users can get started by reading the "About the Game" area, and then look over the "Bay Resources" area. Here they will find links to organizations such as The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and interactive maps of the Chesapeake. The site is rounded out by a collection of links to news and media coverage of the simulation.

480

Alliance for the Chesapeake Bay  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Get involved with this non-profit organization dedicated to the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay. Site contains descriptions of its programs plus an online version of their newsletter, Bay Journal. Also features information on upcoming events, the latest news, workshops, and the Alliance's flag ship project, River Sojourns. These week long paddling and camping trips celebrate the rich history and ecology of the rivers that make the Bay unique.

481

[Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. 1996 DOE annual technical report, January--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit 1 (PPS-1) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) demonstration project uses a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasifier to convert approximately 2,000 tons per day of coal to syngas. The gasification plant is coupled with a combined cycle power block to produce a net 250 MW electrical power output. Coal is slurried in water, combined with 95% pure oxygen from an air separation unit, and sent to the gasifier to produce a high temperature, high pressure, medium-Btu syngas with a heat content of about 250 BTUs/cf (HHV). The syngas then flows through a high temperature heat recovery unit which cools the syngas prior to its entering the cleanup systems. Molten coal ash flows from the bottom of the high temperature heat recovery unit into a water-filled quench chamber where it solidifies into a marketable slag by-product. Approximately 10% of the raw, hot syngas at 900 F is designed to pass through an intermittently moving bed of metal-oxide sorbent which removes sulfur-bearing compounds from the syngas. PPS-1 will be the first unit in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology on a commercial unit. The emphasis during 1996 centered around start-up activities.

NONE

1997-12-31

482

Norming of the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia across pain diagnoses and various countries.  

PubMed

The present study aimed to develop norms for the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (TSK), a frequently used measure of fear of movement/(re)injury. Norms were assessed for the TSK total score as well as for scores on the previously proposed TSK activity avoidance and TSK somatic focus scales. Data from Dutch, Canadian, and Swedish pain samples were used (N=3082). Norms were established using multiple regression to obtain more valid and reliable norms than can be obtained by subgroup analyses based on age or gender. In the Dutch samples (N=2236), pain diagnosis was predictive of all TSK scales. More specifically, chronic low back pain displayed the highest scores on the TSK scores followed by upper extremity disorder, fibromyalgia, and osteoarthritis. Gender was predictive of TSK somatic focus scores and age of TSK activity avoidance scores, with male patients having somewhat higher scores than female patients and older patients having higher scores compared with younger patients. In the Canadian (N=510) and Swedish (N=336) samples, gender was predictive of all TSK scales, with male patients having somewhat higher scores than female patients. These norm data may assist the clinician and researcher in the process of decision making and treatment evaluation. PMID:21444153

Roelofs, Jeffrey; van Breukelen, Gerard; Sluiter, Judith; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; Goossens, Marille; Thibault, Pascal; Boersma, Katja; Vlaeyen, Johan W S

2011-05-01

483

75 FR 11837 - Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Commodity Credit Corporation Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative AGENCY: Commodity Credit...program funds for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative...FY) 2010 through the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative for agricultural...

2010-03-12

484

Minimum Bayes risk image correlation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

Minter, T. C., Jr.

1980-01-01

485

78 FR 39964 - Amendment of Restricted Areas R-2907A and R-2907B, Lake George, FL; and R-2910, Pinecastle, FL  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...FAA-2010-1146; Airspace Docket No. 10-ASO-25] RIN 2120-AA66 Amendment of Restricted Areas R-2907A and R-2907B, Lake George, FL; and R-2910, Pinecastle, FL AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final...

2013-07-03

486

ID3, SEQUENTIAL BAYES, NAIVE BAYES AND BAYESIAN NEURAL NETWORKS  

E-print Network

a fixed number of possible values. Sequential Bayes (Michie 1989, Michie & Attar 1989) is a reformulation of view, by replac­ ing probability ration (odds) with probability. Assuming the independence of attributes (which is of­ ten unrealistic in real world problems), the 'naive' odds Bayes (Michie 1989

Kononenko, Igor

487

Learning on the Big Bay  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Anne Arundel Community College uses the Chesapeake Bay for a flexible ocean engineering technology program which includes mechanical, electrical, and environmental options for transfer and/or vocational students, and adult education programs covering such subjects as sailing, Bay history, boat building, scuba-diving, and marine biology. (RT)

Philp, Michael J.

1978-01-01

488

Graduate Studies University of South Florida -click to  

E-print Network

Rated Almanac," Tampa Bay is the fourth best area to live in the country when rated by cost of living.topbeaches.com. Tampa Bay's moderate, comfortable climate has attracted some 2.5 million residents to the area, a 10 such as the NFL Tampa Bay Buccaneers and Major League Baseball's Tampa Bay Devil Rays. USF's Contemporary Art

Meyers, Steven D.

489

The Bayes Inference Engine  

SciTech Connect

The authors are developing a computer application, called the Bayes Inference Engine, to provide the means to make inferences about models of physical reality within a Bayesian framework. The construction of complex nonlinear models is achieved by a fully object-oriented design. The models are represented by a data-flow diagram that may be manipulated by the analyst through a graphical programming environment. Maximum a posteriori solutions are achieved using a general, gradient-based optimization algorithm. The application incorporates a new technique of estimating and visualizing the uncertainties in specific aspects of the model.

Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.

1996-04-01

490

CALFED Bay-Delta Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The CALFED Bay-Delta Program is a collaborative effort of public, state, and federal agencies, working to "restore ecological health and improve water management" of the Bay-Delta system. A complex network of waterways that meet at the intersection of the San Francisco Bay (salt water), Sacramento River, and San Joaquin River (fresh water), the natural health of the Bay-Delta system has deteriorated due to water management and environmental problems. The CALFED Bay-Delta Program Website provides background information on the program's research foci (ecosystem restoration, storage programs, water use efficiency, etc.) and access to publications and reports, upcoming events (including a scientific conference), related news, and a useful collection of links.

491

Tampa Electric Company, Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. Annual report, January--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Tampa Electric Polk Power Unit No. 1, a Texaco pressurized, oxygen-blown entrained-flow coal gasifier will convert approximately 2300 tons per day of coal (dry basis) into a medium-BTU fuel gas with a heat content of about 250 BTU/scf (LHV). Syngas produced in the gasifier flows through a high-temperature heat recovery unit which cools the gases prior to entering two parallel clean-up areas. A portion (up to 50%) of the hot syngas is cooled to 1000{degrees}F and passed through a moving bed of zinc titanate sorbent which removed sulfur containing components of the fuel gas. The project will be the first in the world to demonstrate this advanced metal oxide hot gas desulfurization technology at a commercial scale. The remaining portion of the syngas is cooled to 400{degrees}F for conventional acid gas removal. This portion of the plant is capable of processing between 50% and 100% of the dirty syngas. The cleaned low-BTU syngas is then routed to the combined cycle power generation system where it is mixed with air and burned in the gas turbine combustor. Heat is extracted from the expanded exhaust gases by a heat recovery steam generator to produce high pressure steam. This steam, along with the steam generated in the gasification process, drives a steam turbine to generate an additional 132MW of power. Internal process power consumption is approximately 62MW, and includes power for coal grinding, air separation, and feed pumps. Net output from the IGCC demonstration plant will be 260MW.

none,

1993-10-01

492

33 CFR 162.125 - Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc.  

... false Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc. 162.125 Section 162.125...162.125 Sturgeon Bay and the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal, Wisc. (a) In the Sturgeon Bay Ship Canal: (1) No vessel may exceed 5...

2014-07-01

493

Chesapeake Bay: Introduction to an Ecosystem.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the contiguous United States. The Bay and its tidal tributaries make up the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. This document, which focuses of various aspects of this ecosystem, is divided into four major parts. The first part traces the geologic history of the Bay, describes the overall physical structure of

Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

494

Bay of Fundy  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The highest tides on Earth occur in the Minas Basin, the eastern extremity of the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia, Canada, where the tide range can reach 16 meters when the various factors affecting the tides are in phase. The primary cause of the immense tides of Fundy is a resonance of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine system. The system is effectively bounded at this outer end by the edge of the continental shelf with its approximately 40:1 increase in depth. The system has a natural period of approximately 13 hours, which is close to the 12h25m period of the dominant lunar tide of the Atlantic Ocean. Like a father pushing his daughter on a swing, the gentle Atlantic tidal pulse pushes the waters of the Bay of Fundy-Gulf of Maine basin at nearly the optimum frequency to cause a large to-and-fro oscillation. The greatest slosh occurs at the head (northeast end) of the system. The high tide image (top) was acquired April 20, 2001, and the low tide image (bottom) was acquired September 30, 2002. The images cover an area of 16.5 by 21 km, and are centered near 64 degrees west longitude and 45.5 degrees north latitude.

With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

Size: 16.5 by 21 kilometers (10.2 by 13 miles) Location: 45.4 degrees North latitude, 64 degrees West longitude Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: September 30, 2002

2006-01-01

495

Bayes multiple decision functions.  

PubMed

This paper deals with the problem of simultaneously making many (M) binary decisions based on one realization of a random data matrix X. M is typically large and X will usually have M rows associated with each of the M decisions to make, but for each row the data may be low dimensional. Such problems arise in many practical areas such as the biological and medical sciences, where the available dataset is from microarrays or other high-throughput technology and with the goal being to decide which among of many genes are relevant with respect to some phenotype of interest; in the engineering and reliability sciences; in astronomy; in education; and in business. A Bayesian decision-theoretic approach to this problem is implemented with the overall loss function being a cost-weighted linear combination of Type I and Type II loss functions. The class of loss functions considered allows for use of the false discovery rate (FDR), false nondiscovery rate (FNR), and missed discovery rate (MDR) in assessing the quality of decision. Through this Bayesian paradigm, the Bayes multiple decision function (BMDF) is derived and an efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal Bayes action is described. In contrast to many works in the literature where the rows of the matrix X are assumed to be stochastically independent, we allow a dependent data structure with the associations obtained through a class of frailty-induced Archimedean copulas. In particular, non-Gaussian dependent data structure, which is typical with failure-time data, can be entertained. The numerical implementation of the determination of the Bayes optimal action is facilitated through sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The theory developed could also be extended to the problem of multiple hypotheses testing, multiple classification and prediction, and high-dimensional variable selection. The proposed procedure is illustrated for the simple versus simple hypotheses setting and for the composite hypotheses setting through simulation studies. The procedure is also applied to a subset of a microarray data set from a colon cancer study. PMID:25414762

Wu, Wensong; Pea, Edsel A

2013-01-01

496

Chesapeake Bay Impact Effects  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This PowerPoint show depicts the effects (blast, heat, etc.) of the Chesapeake Bay impact. To emphasize the human consequences of asteroid and comet impacts, the slides show what would happen to East Coast communities if an identical object hit the same place today. (The impact actually happened roughly 35 million years ago.) Impact effects were estimated with the Earth Impact Effects Program (www.lpl.arizona.edu/impacteffects/). Effects shown on these slides are at best very approximate, and, consequently, these slides should only be used to stimulate discussions about impact hazards. Satellite images were obtained through the NASA Earth Observing System Higher Education Alliance (GeoBrain) which provided funding for this work. Graphics were created with the Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) family of geographic information system (GIS) products.

Abolins, Mark; Univiversity, Middle T.

497

75 FR 8297 - Tongass National Forest, Thorne Bay Ranger District, Thorne Bay, AK  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Thorne Bay Ranger District, Thorne Bay, AK AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION...Forest, P.O. Box 19001, Thorne Bay, AK 99919, telephone: 907-828-3250. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The 47,007-acre Kosciusko Project Area is...

2010-02-24

498

Humboldt Bay Cooperative Eelgrass Project  

E-print Network

1992. The ecology of Humboldt Bay, California: an estuarineEstuarine Research Reserve, State of Washington Department of Ecology),ecological benefits. In most places, both species are afforded protection through estuary

Schlosser, Susan

2007-01-01

499

COMMENCEMENT BAY AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Commencement Bay is a large Washington Superfund site with widespread sediment contamination. Under the ESA, all federal agencies are directed to utilize their authorities to support the conservation and recovery of endangered or threatened species. EPA uses a comprehensive an...

500

NUTRIENT FLUX AT THE SEDIMENT-WATER INTERFACE IN ESCAMBIA BAY, FL, A NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY INVITED SEMINAR  

EPA Science Inventory

(Abstract). Presented at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, 30 April 2001, Port Aransas, TX. 1 p. (ERL,GB R841). Nutrient flux at the sediment-water interface is an integral component of estuarine dynamics, and the benthos may represent a significant source ...