Science.gov

Sample records for tar decoy serves

  1. RNA decoys

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Isaac R.; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B. Elizabeth; Heck, Greg R.; Ivashuta, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    The role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), both short and long ncRNAs, in the regulation of gene expression has become evident in recent years. Non-coding RNA-based regulation is achieved through a variety of mechanisms; some are relatively well-characterized, while others are much less understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of endogenous small RNAs, function as master regulators of gene expression in eukaryotic organisms. A notable, recently discovered role for long ncRNAs is that of miRNA decoys, also referred to as target mimics or sponges, in which long ncRNAs carry a short stretch of sequence sharing homology to miRNA-binding sites in endogenous targets. As a consequence, miRNA decoys are able to sequester and inactivate miRNA function. Engineered miRNA decoys are also efficacious and useful tools for studying gene function. We recently demonstrated that the potential of miRNA decoys to inactivate miRNAs in the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana is dependent on the level of sequence complementarity to miRNAs of interest. The flexibility of the miRNA decoy approach in sequence-dependent miRNA inactivation, backbone choice, ability to simultaneously inactivate multiple miRNAs, and more importantly, to achieve a desirable level of miRNA inactivation, makes it a potentially useful tool for crop improvement. This research addendum reports the functional extension of miRNA decoys from model plants to crops. Furthermore, endogenous miRNA decoys, first described in plants, have been proposed to play a significant role in regulating the transcriptome in eukaryotes. Using computational analysis, we have identified numerous endogenous sequences with potential miRNA decoy activity for conserved miRNAs in several plant species. Our data suggest that endogenous miRNA decoys can be widespread in plants and may be a component of the global gene expression regulatory network in plants. PMID:22899065

  2. TAR SPOT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tar spot of grasses, also known as black leaf spot, is found on most members of the Poaceae. Tar spot appears principally on perennial grasses in moist, shaded areas and is rare on wheat and other annuals. It is found primarily in temperate regions. The disease is readily recognized by its glossy...

  3. Coal Tar and Coal-Tar Pitch

    Cancer.gov

    Coal tar is derived from coal. It is a byproduct of the production of coke, a solid fuel that contains mostly carbon, and coal gas. Coal tar is used primarily for the production of refined chemicals and coal-tar products, such as creosote and coal-tar pitch. Certain preparations of coal tar have long been used to treat various skin conditions, such as eczema, psoriasis, and dandruff.

  4. Tar sand

    SciTech Connect

    McLendon, T.R.; Bartke, T.C.

    1990-01-01

    Research on tar sand is briefly discussed. The research program supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE) includes a variety of surface extraction schemes. The University of Utah has process development units (PDU) employing fluidized bed, hot, water-assisted, and fluidized-bed/heat-pipe, coupled combustor technology. Considerable process variable test data have been gathered on these systems: (1) a rotary kiln unit has been built recently; (2) solvent extraction processing is being examined; and (3) an advanced hydrogenation upgrading scheme (hydropyrolysis) has been developed. The University of Arkansas, in collaboration with Diversified Petroleum, Inc., has been working on a fatty acid, solvent extraction process. Oleic acid is the solvent/surfactant. Solvent is recovered by adjusting processing fluid concentrations to separate without expensive operations. Western Research Institute has a PDU-scale scheme called the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) process, which combines solvent (hot recycle bitumen) and pyrolytic extraction. 14 refs., 19 figs.

  5. Experimental comparison between one-decoy and two-decoy implementations of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 quantum cryptography protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Youn-Chang; Kim, Yong-Su; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The decoy-state method allows the use of weak coherent pulses in quantum cryptography, and to date, various strategies for the decoy state have been proposed. Here, we experimentally compare the secret key generation rates between the one-decoy and two-decoy implementations of the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol through a 3.1-km optical fiber at 780 nm. Once the parameters of the experimental setup are optimized for the maximal secret key generation rate for each implementation, it is found that the two-decoy implementation outperforms the one-decoy implementation.

  6. Decoy Database Improvement for Protein Folding.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Hsin-Yi Cindy; Lindsey, Aaron; Wu, Chih-Peng; Thomas, Shawna; Amato, Nancy M

    2015-09-01

    Predicting protein structures and simulating protein folding are two of the most important problems in computational biology today. Simulation methods rely on a scoring function to distinguish the native structure (the most energetically stable) from non-native structures. Decoy databases are collections of non-native structures used to test and verify these functions. We present a method to evaluate and improve the quality of decoy databases by adding novel structures and removing redundant structures. We test our approach on 20 different decoy databases of varying size and type and show significant improvement across a variety of metrics. We also test our improved databases on two popular modern scoring functions and show that for most cases they contain a greater or equal number of native-like structures than the original databases, thereby producing a more rigorous database for testing scoring functions. PMID:26258648

  7. Nonorthogonal Decoy-State Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing-Bo; Fang, Xi-Ming

    2006-04-01

    In practical quantum key distribution (QKD), weak coherent states as the photon source have a limit in the secure key rate and transmission distance because of the existence of multi-photon pulses and heavy loss in transmission line. The decoy-state method and the nonorthogonal encoding protocol are two important methods to combat these effects. Here, we combine both the methods and propose an efficient method that can substantially improve the performance of QKD. We find a 78-km increase over the prior record using the decoy-state method and a 123-km increase over the result of the SARG04 protocol in transmission distance.

  8. Calibur: a tool for clustering large numbers of protein decoys

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Ab initio protein structure prediction methods generate numerous structural candidates, which are referred to as decoys. The decoy with the most number of neighbors of up to a threshold distance is typically identified as the most representative decoy. However, the clustering of decoys needed for this criterion involves computations with runtimes that are at best quadratic in the number of decoys. As a result currently there is no tool that is designed to exactly cluster very large numbers of decoys, thus creating a bottleneck in the analysis. Results Using three strategies aimed at enhancing performance (proximate decoys organization, preliminary screening via lower and upper bounds, outliers filtering) we designed and implemented a software tool for clustering decoys called Calibur. We show empirical results indicating the effectiveness of each of the strategies employed. The strategies are further fine-tuned according to their effectiveness. Calibur demonstrated the ability to scale well with respect to increases in the number of decoys. For a sample size of approximately 30 thousand decoys, Calibur completed the analysis in one third of the time required when the strategies are not used. For practical use Calibur is able to automatically discover from the input decoys a suitable threshold distance for clustering. Several methods for this discovery are implemented in Calibur, where by default a very fast one is used. Using the default method Calibur reported relatively good decoys in our tests. Conclusions Calibur's ability to handle very large protein decoy sets makes it a useful tool for clustering decoys in ab initio protein structure prediction. As the number of decoys generated in these methods increases, we believe Calibur will come in important for progress in the field. PMID:20070892

  9. Directory of Useful Decoys, Enhanced (DUD-E): Better Ligands and Decoys for Better Benchmarking

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A key metric to assess molecular docking remains ligand enrichment against challenging decoys. Whereas the directory of useful decoys (DUD) has been widely used, clear areas for optimization have emerged. Here we describe an improved benchmarking set that includes more diverse targets such as GPCRs and ion channels, totaling 102 proteins with 22886 clustered ligands drawn from ChEMBL, each with 50 property-matched decoys drawn from ZINC. To ensure chemotype diversity, we cluster each targets ligands by their BemisMurcko atomic frameworks. We add net charge to the matched physicochemical properties and include only the most dissimilar decoys, by topology, from the ligands. An online automated tool (http://decoys.docking.org) generates these improved matched decoys for user-supplied ligands. We test this data set by docking all 102 targets, using the results to improve the balance between ligand desolvation and electrostatics in DOCK 3.6. The complete DUD-E benchmarking set is freely available at http://dude.docking.org. PMID:22716043

  10. Processing of tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.O.

    1984-01-03

    The present invention relates to an improved process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands comprising first heating the raw tar sands with steam at a temperature sufficient to visbreak a portion of the bitumen without significant thermal cracking thereby producing a vaporous distillate product mixed with steam and lowering the viscosity and specific gravity of the residual bitumen on the heat treated tar sands. The distillate product and steam are cooled and condensed and mixed the heat treated tar sands containing residual beneficiated bitumen to form a slurry. Bitumen is then recovered from the slurry by a hot-water separation process.

  11. Immunomodulation of cystic fibrosis epithelial cells via NF-?B decoy oligonucleotide-coated polysaccharide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wardwell, Patricia R; Bader, Rebecca A

    2015-05-01

    Activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B) signaling pathway is associated with enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory mediators and is thought to play a critical role in diseases hallmarked by inflammation, including cystic fibrosis (CF). Small nucleic acids that interfere with gene expression have been proposed as promising therapeutics for a number of diseases. However, applications have been limited by low cellular penetration and a lack of stability. Nano-sized carrier systems have been suggested as a means of improving the effectiveness of nucleic acid-based treatments. In this study, we successfully coated polysialic acid-N-trimethyl chitosan (PSA-TMC) nanoparticles with NF-?? decoy oligonucleotides (ODNs). To demonstrate anti-inflammatory activity, the decoy ODN-coated PSA-TMC nanoparticles were administered to an in vitro model of CF generated via interleukin-1? or P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharides stimulation of IB3-1 bronchial epithelial cells. While free ODN and PSA-TMC nanoparticles coated with scrambled ODNs did not have substantial impacts on the inflammatory response, the decoy ODN-coated PSA-TMC nanoparticles were able to reduce the secretion of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8, pro-inflammatory mediators of CF, by the epithelial cells, particularly at longer time points. In general, the results suggest that NF-?B decoy ODN-coated TMC-PSA nanoparticles may serve as an effective method of altering the pro-inflammatory environment associated with CF. PMID:25087735

  12. Lies and deception in bacterial gene regulation: the roles of nucleic acid decoys.

    PubMed

    Göpel, Yvonne; Görke, Boris

    2014-05-01

    Bacteria use intricately interconnected mechanisms acting at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level to adjust gene expression to their needs. An intriguing example found in the chitosugar utilization systems of Escherichia coli and Salmonella is uncovered in a study by Plumbridge and colleagues. Three transcription factors (TFs), a small regulatory RNA (sRNA) and a sRNA trap cooperate to set thresholds and dynamics in regulation of chitosugar utilization. Specifically, under inducing conditions a decoy site on the polycistronic chitobiose (chbBCARFG) mRNA sequesters sRNA ChiX, which represses synthesis of the separately encoded chitoporin ChiP. Base-pairing of ChiX with its decoy has no role for the chb genes themselves when the mRNA is in excess. In the absence of substrate, however, this base-pairing tightly represses chbC encoding a subunit of the chitosugar transporter. Thus, one and the same sRNA/mRNA interaction serves different regulatory functions under different environmental conditions. The employment of RNA decoys to control the activities of post-transcriptional regulators themselves is an increasingly recognized mechanism in gene regulation. Another observation in the current study highlights the possibility that decoy sites might even exist on the DNA controlling the availability of TFs for their target promoters. PMID:24707963

  13. Fuels from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, L.M.

    1986-03-01

    A general discussion of the tar sand resource in the US in presented. The difficulties and uncertainties associated with the development of synfuels are discussed. Predictions are made concerning the development of the tar sands resource in the US and Canada during the next 15 years.

  14. Durandal: fast exact clustering of protein decoys.

    PubMed

    Berenger, Francois; Shrestha, Rojan; Zhou, Yong; Simoncini, David; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2012-02-01

    In protein folding, clustering is commonly used as one way to identify the best decoy produced. Initializing the pairwise distance matrix for a large decoy set is computationally expensive. We have proposed a fast method that works even on large decoy sets. This method is implemented in a software called Durandal. Durandal has been shown to be consistently faster than other software performing fast exact clustering. In some cases, Durandal can even outperform the speed of an approximate method. Durandal uses the triangular inequality to accelerate exact clustering, without compromising the distance function. Recently, we have further enhanced the performance of Durandal by incorporating a Quaternion-based characteristic polynomial method that has increased the speed of Durandal between 13% and 27% compared with the previous version. Durandal source code is available under the GNU General Public License at http://www.riken.jp/zhangiru/software/durandal_released_qcp.tgz. Alternatively, a compiled version of Durandal is also distributed with the nightly builds of the Phenix (http://www.phenix-online.org/) crystallographic software suite (Adams et al., Acta Crystallogr Sect D 2010, 66, 213). PMID:22120171

  15. Tar sands` asphaltic mixes

    SciTech Connect

    Akinrogunde, E.A.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results obtained from the laboratory investigation aimed at determining the possibility of making asphaltic mixes of acceptable quality for road surfacing, from raw tar sands (as they occur in nature). The tar sand samples consist mainly of fine sand, water, and bitumen. Five different types of asphaltic mixes were produced from tar sands and superheated aggregates. On the basis of Marshall and indirect tensile (Brazilian) tests carried out on the produced asphaltic mixes, the investigation revealed that raw tar sands are good material for the production of asphaltic mixes. The results of the investigation also suggest that for a given mix set, there may be correlation between maximum value of Marshall stability and maximum indirect tensile strength.

  16. Delay discounting of hypothetical monetary rewards with decoys.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Benjamin P; Faulkner, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    The current research attempted to decrease individuals' rates of delay discounting by introducing decoys that are similar but inferior to delayed rewards. Two experiments in the current study compared patterns of delay discounting generated by repeated choices between two hypothetical monetary rewards in the absence or presence of a decoy. Binary questionnaires (i.e., decoy absent) included questions with two options: a smaller-sooner (SS) reward and a larger-later (LL) reward. Trinary questionnaires (i.e., decoy present) included questions with three options: an SS reward, an LL reward, and a decoy. If an option is at least as rewarding on every dimension of value as an alternative and the option is more rewarding than an alternative on at least one dimension, then the option is considered to dominate the alternative (Wedell, 1991). The first experiment assessed the influence of decoys dominated by LL rewards (LL(-) decoys), which were constructed to be similar (on the dimension of amount) but inferior (on the dimension of delay) to LL rewards. The second experiment examined the effects of counterbalancing the order of binary and trinary questionnaires. In the first experiment, participants discounted to a lesser degree when LL(-) decoys were present as compared to when they were absent. In the second experiment, participants only discounted to a lesser degree on trinary questionnaires with LL(-) decoys when they had not previously completed binary questionnaires. Patterns of discounting generated by binary questionnaires were similar to those generated by trinary questionnaires when decoys are present; however, the degree to which individuals discounted delayed rewards was affected by the number of and type of options that were available. The current results join previous evidence suggesting that rates of delay discounting are sensitive to a variety of contextual influences. PMID:26521171

  17. Improved protein structure selection using decoy-dependent discriminatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Fain, Boris; Levitt, Michael; Samudrala, Ram

    2004-01-01

    Background A key component in protein structure prediction is a scoring or discriminatory function that can distinguish near-native conformations from misfolded ones. Various types of scoring functions have been developed to accomplish this goal, but their performance is not adequate to solve the structure selection problem. In addition, there is poor correlation between the scores and the accuracy of the generated conformations. Results We present a simple and nonparametric formula to estimate the accuracy of predicted conformations (or decoys). This scoring function, called the density score function, evaluates decoy conformations by performing an all-against-all C? RMSD (Root Mean Square Deviation) calculation in a given decoy set. We tested the density score function on 83 decoy sets grouped by their generation methods (4state_reduced, fisa, fisa_casp3, lmds, lattice_ssfit, semfold and Rosetta). The density scores have correlations as high as 0.9 with the C? RMSDs of the decoy conformations, measured relative to the experimental conformation for each decoy. We previously developed a residue-specific all-atom probability discriminatory function (RAPDF), which compiles statistics from a database of experimentally determined conformations, to aid in structure selection. Here, we present a decoy-dependent discriminatory function called self-RAPDF, where we compiled the atom-atom contact probabilities from all the conformations in a decoy set instead of using an ensemble of native conformations, with a weighting scheme based on the density scores. The self-RAPDF has a higher correlation with C? RMSD than RAPDF for 76/83 decoy sets, and selects better near-native conformations for 62/83 decoy sets. Self-RAPDF may be useful not only for selecting near-native conformations from decoy sets, but also for fold simulations and protein structure refinement. Conclusions Both the density score and the self-RAPDF functions are decoy-dependent scoring functions for improved protein structure selection. Their success indicates that information from the ensemble of decoy conformations can be used to derive statistical probabilities and facilitate the identification of near-native structures. PMID:15207004

  18. Decoy Plasminogen Receptor Containing a Selective Kunitz-Inhibitory Domain

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Kunitz domain 1 (KD1) of tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 in which P2? residue Leu17 (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor numbering) is mutated to Arg selectively inhibits the active site of plasmin with ?5-fold improved affinity. Thrombin cleavage (24 h extended incubation at a 1:50 enzyme-to-substrate ratio) of the KD1 mutant (Leu17Arg) yielded a smaller molecule containing the intact Kunitz domain with no detectable change in the active-site inhibitory function. The N-terminal sequencing and MALDI-TOF/ESI data revealed that the starting molecule has a C-terminal valine (KD1L17R-VT), whereas the smaller molecule has a C-terminal lysine (KD1L17R-KT). Because KD1L17R-KT has C-terminal lysine, we examined whether it could serve as a decoy receptor for plasminogen/plasmin. Such a molecule might inhibit plasminogen activation as well as the active site of generated plasmin. In surface plasmon resonance experiments, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and Glu-plasminogen bound to KD1L17R-KT (Kd ? 0.2 to 0.3 ?M) but not to KD1L17R-VT. Furthermore, KD1L17R-KT inhibited tPA-induced plasma clot fibrinolysis more efficiently than KD1L17R-VT. Additionally, compared to ?-aminocaproic acid KD1L17R-KT was more effective in reducing blood loss in a mouse liver-laceration injury model, where the fibrinolytic system is activated. In further experiments, the micro(?)-plasminKD1L17R-KT complex inhibited urokinase-induced plasminogen activation on phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-stimulated U937 monocyte-like cells, whereas the ?-plasminKD1L17R-VT complex failed to inhibit this process. In conclusion, KD1L17R-KT inhibits the active site of plasmin as well as acts as a decoy receptor for the kringle domain(s) of plasminogen/plasmin; hence, it limits both plasmin generation and activity. With its dual function, KD1L17R-KT could serve as a preferred agent for controlling plasminogen activation in pathological processes. PMID:24383758

  19. The neural correlates of the decoy effect in decisions

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianping; Yu, Rongjun

    2014-01-01

    Human choices are remarkably susceptible to the context in which options are presented. The introduction of an inferior option (a decoy) into the choice set can make one of the original options (the target) more attractive than and the other original option (the competitor). This so called decoy effect represents a striking violation of the context-invariant axiom, yet its underlying neural mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we used a novel gambling task in conjunction with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to elucidate its neural basis. At both the stimulus and decision phases, choice sets with decoys activated the occipital gyrus and deactivated the inferior parietal gyrus. At the decision phase, choosing the targets vs. the competitors elicited stronger anterior insula activation, suggesting that perceptual salience drives heuristic decision making in the decoy effect. Moreover, across participants, activity in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) predicted a reduced susceptibility to the decoy effect, indicating that resisting the tendency to make heuristic decisions is taxing. Our findings highlight the power of the decoy effect in laboratory settings and document the neural mechanisms underlying the decoy effect. PMID:25147516

  20. Exosomes from HIV-1-infected Cells Stimulate Production of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines through Trans-activating Response (TAR) RNA.

    PubMed

    Sampey, Gavin C; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Schwab, Angela; Barclay, Robert; Punya, Shreya; Chung, Myung-Chul; Hakami, Ramin M; Asad Zadeh, Mohammad; Lepene, Benjamin; Klase, Zachary A; El-Hage, Nazira; Young, Mary; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2016-01-15

    HIV-1 infection results in a chronic illness because long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy can lower viral titers to an undetectable level. However, discontinuation of therapy rapidly increases virus burden. Moreover, patients under highly active antiretroviral therapy frequently develop various metabolic disorders, neurocognitive abnormalities, and cardiovascular diseases. We have previously shown that exosomes containing trans-activating response (TAR) element RNA enhance susceptibility of undifferentiated naive cells to HIV-1 infection. This study indicates that exosomes from HIV-1-infected primary cells are highly abundant with TAR RNA as detected by RT-real time PCR. Interestingly, up to a million copies of TAR RNA/?l were also detected in the serum from HIV-1-infected humanized mice suggesting that TAR RNA may be stable in vivo. Incubation of exosomes from HIV-1-infected cells with primary macrophages resulted in a dramatic increase of proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-?, indicating that exosomes containing TAR RNA could play a direct role in control of cytokine gene expression. The intact TAR molecule was able to bind to PKR and TLR3 effectively, whereas the 5' and 3' stems (TAR microRNAs) bound best to TLR7 and -8 and none to PKR. Binding of TAR to PKR did not result in its phosphorylation, and therefore, TAR may be a dominant negative decoy molecule in cells. The TLR binding through either TAR RNA or TAR microRNA potentially can activate the NF-?B pathway and regulate cytokine expression. Collectively, these results imply that exosomes containing TAR RNA could directly affect the proinflammatory cytokine gene expression and may explain a possible mechanism of inflammation observed in HIV-1-infected patients under cART. PMID:26553869

  1. Extracting Oil From Tar Sands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ford, L. B.; Daly, D.

    1984-01-01

    Recovery of oil from tar sands possible by batch process, using steam produced by solar heater. In extraction process, solar heater provides steam for heating solvent boiler. Boiling solvent removes oil from tar sands in Soxhlet extractor.

  2. Numerical analysis of decoy state quantum key distribution protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Jim W; Rice, Patrick R

    2008-01-01

    Decoy state protocols are a useful tool for many quantum key distribution systems implemented with weak coherent pulses, allowing significantly better secret bit rates and longer maximum distances. In this paper we present a method to numerically find optimal three-level protocols, and we examine how the secret bit rate and the optimized parameters are dependent on various system properties, such as session length, transmission loss, and visibility. Additionally, we show how to modify the decoy state analysis to handle partially distinguishable decoy states as well as uncertainty in the prepared intensities.

  3. Treatment of coal tar emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Cukier, S.

    1983-07-26

    The present invention relates to a process for the treatment of stable emulsions of water and quinoline insolubles in coal tar comprising thoroughly mixing the coal tar with at least one of a specific class of surface-active compositions, followed by a separation of water and quinoline insoluble components from the mixture. The invention also relates to a method of eliminating or minimizing the build-up of coal tar-derived deposits on surfaces in contact with the coal tar.

  4. Placental expression of D6 decoy receptor in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Geum Joon; Lee, Eun Sung; Jin, Hye Mi; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Yeun Sun; Seol, Hyun-Joo; Hong, Soon-Cheol; Kim, Hai-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of the D6 decoy receptor that can bind chemokines and target them for degradation, resulting in inhibition of inflammation in placentas from preeclamptic and normal pregnancies. Methods The current study was carried out in 35 pregnant women (23 patients with preeclampsia and 12 healthy, normotensive pregnant women) during the third trimester of pregnancy. The expressions of D6 decoy receptor in the placenta were determined with real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Results The mRNA and protein of D6 decoy receptor were detected in all of placentas from preeclamptic and normal pregnancies. Placental D6 decoy receptor mRNA expression was significantly lower in patients with preeclampsia than in patients with normal pregnancies. Western blot analyses revealed decreased protein expression in cases of preeclampsia. Conclusion The expression of the D6 decoy receptor in preeclamptic placentas was significantly lower than in normal placentas. Further studies are needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms that link decreased expression of placental D6 decoy receptor and preeclampsia. PMID:26430656

  5. Characterization of acid tars.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sunday A; Stegemann, Julia A; Roy, Amitava

    2010-03-15

    Acid tars from the processing of petroleum and petrochemicals using sulfuric acid were characterized by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), inductively coupled plasma/optical emission spectrometry (ICP/OES), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry, and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray (SEM/EDX) micro-analysis. Leaching of contaminants from the acid tars in 48 h batch tests with distilled water at a liquid-to-solid ratio 10:1 was also studied. GC/MS results show that the samples contained aliphatic hydrocarbons, cyclic hydrocarbons, up to 12 of the 16 USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and numerous other organic groups, including organic acids (sulfonic acids, carboxylic acids and aromatic acids), phenyl, nitrile, amide, furans, thiophenes, pyrroles, and phthalates, many of which are toxic. Metals analysis shows that Pb was present in significant concentration. DSC results show different transition peaks in the studied samples, demonstrating their complexity and variability. FTIR analysis further confirmed the presence of the organic groups detected by GC/MS. The SEM/EDX micro-analysis results provided insight on the surface characteristics of the samples and show that contaminants distribution was heterogeneous. The results provide useful data on the composition, complexity, and variability of acid tars; information which hitherto have been scarce in public domain. PMID:19857924

  6. Infrared decoy and obscurant modelling and simulation for ship protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butters, Brian; Nicholls, Edgar; Walmsley, Roy; Ayling, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Imaging seekers used in modern Anti Ship Missiles (ASMs) use a variety of counter countermeasure (CCM) techniques including guard gates and aspect ratio assessment in order to counter the use of IR decoys. In order to improve the performance of EO/IR countermeasures it is necessary to accurately configure and place the decoys using a launcher that is trainable in azimuth and elevation. Control of the launcher, decoy firing times and burst sequences requires the development of algorithms based on multi-dimensional solvers. The modelling and simulation used to derive the launcher algorithms is described including the countermeasure, threat, launcher and ship models. The launcher model incorporates realistic azimuth and elevation rates with limits on azimuth and elevation arcs of fire. A Navier Stokes based model of the IR decoy includes thermal buoyancy, cooling of the IR smoke and its extinction properties. All of these factors affect the developing size, shape and radiance of the decoy. The hot smoke also influences the performance of any co-located chaff or other obscurant material. Typical simulations are described against generic imaging ASM seekers using shape discrimination or a guard gate.

  7. Airborne target tracking algorithm against oppressive decoys in infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiechang; Zhang, Tianxu

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an approach for tracking airborne target against oppressive infrared decoys. Oppressive decoy lures infrared guided missile by its high infrared radiation. Traditional tracking algorithms have degraded stability even come to tracking failure when airborne target continuously throw out many decoys. The proposed approach first determines an adaptive tracking window. The center of the tracking window is set at a predicted target position which is computed based on uniform motion model. Different strategies are applied for determination of tracking window size according to target state. The image within tracking window is segmented and multi features of candidate targets are extracted. The most similar candidate target is associated to the tracking target by using a decision function, which calculates a weighted sum of normalized feature differences between two comparable targets. Integrated intensity ratio of association target and tracking target, and target centroid are examined to estimate target state in the presence of decoys. The tracking ability and robustness of proposed approach has been validated by processing available real-world and simulated infrared image sequences containing airborne targets and oppressive decoys.

  8. Bitumen recovery from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D.; Hupka, J.

    1984-09-11

    A process for recovering bitumen from tar sands wherein the tar sands are pretreated with a diluent, such as kerosene in the preferred embodiment, to lower the viscosity of the bitumen such that it is in the range of about 5 to about 20 poise at the digestion temperature. The tar sands are then digested at a temperature in the range of about 45/sup 0/ C. to about 60/sup 0/ C. and at a pH of about 7.8 to about 8.6. The tar sands are then transferred to a flotation cell where the bitumen-rich concentrate is separated from the sand.

  9. Juniper tar poisoning.

    PubMed

    Koruk, Suda Tekin; Ozyilkan, Esin; Kaya, Pinar; Colak, Dilsen; Donderici, Omer; Cesaretli, Yildirim

    2005-01-01

    Juniper tar (cade oil) is distilled from the branches and wood of Juniperus oxycedrus. It contains etheric oils, triterpene and phenols, and is used for many purposes in folk medicine. A case is reported of a previously healthy man who ingested a spoonful of home-made extract of Juniperus oxycedrus. The poisoning caused fever, severe hypotension, renal failure, hepatotoxicity, and severe cutaneous burns on the face. After supportive and symptomatic treatment, the patient improved and was discharged in a good condition on the eleventh day. PMID:15732446

  10. Pitch from thermal processing of tar

    SciTech Connect

    Stepanenko, M.A.; Privalov, V.E.; Glushchenko, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Data are presented on the comparative characteristics of pitch obtained from untreated tar and tar after maintenance at a high temperature. Advantages are shown for use of pitch from thermally processed tar in the manufacture of electrode products.

  11. Effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys varies among dabbling duck species and locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, J.T.; Eadie, J.M.; Szymanski, M.L.; Caswell, J.H.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Raedeke, Andrew H.; Checkett, J.M.; Afton, A.D.; Moore, T.G.; Caswell, F.D.; Walters, R.A.; Humburg, D.D.; Yee, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Spinning-wing decoys are strong attractants to ducks and inc rease kill rates over traditional decoying methods. However, it is unknown whether all duck species are attracted similarly to spinning-wing decoys and whether the effectiveness of these decoys changes with latitude. We examined the effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys for 9 species of dabbling ducks during 545 experimental hunts in California (1999-2000), Minnesota (2002), Manitoba (2001-2002), Nebraska (2000-2002), Missouri (2000-2001), and Arkansas (2001-2003). During each experimental hunt, we systematically alternated between 2 paired decoy treatments every 15-30 min (depending on study site): traditional decoys only and traditional decoys with a spinning-wing decoy. Overall, 70.2% (n=1,925) of dabbling ducks were harvested (shot and retrieved) when spinning-wing decoys were turned on, ranging from 63.6% (n=187) in Missouri to 76.4% (n=356) in Minnesota. Effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys increased with latitude of study sites. Proportions of ducks shot when spinning-wing decoys were turned on differed among species, from a low of 50.0% (n=8) for cinnamon teal (Anas cyanoptera) to a high of 79.0% (n=119) for American wigeon (A. americana). The probability of being shot when spinning-wing decoys were turned on increased with annual survival rates among species; for example, spinning-wing decoys were more effective for American wigeon and mallard (A. platyrhynchos) than they were for cinnamon teal and American green-winged teal (A. crecca). Effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys did not differ consistently by age or sex of harvested ducks. Our results indicate that the effectiveness of spinning-wing decoys differs among duck species and changes with latitude; thus, consideration of these effects may be warranted when setting harvest regulations and methods of take.

  12. Cultivation of yeast on light-oil fractions of hard-coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Kucher, R.V.; Dzumeozei, N.V.; Pavlyuk, M.I.; Tyrovskii, A.A.

    1982-01-01

    The results are given of experiments on the cultivation of the yeast Candida tropicalis on light-oil fractions of coal-tar. It has been shown that a light fraction can serve as the sole source of carbon and energy. Surface active agents stimulate the growth of the yeast on the light-oil fractions of hard-coal tar.

  13. Decoy-state quantum key distribution using homodyne detection

    SciTech Connect

    Shams Mousavi, S. H.; Gallion, P.

    2009-07-15

    In this paper, we propose to use the decoy-state technique to improve the security of the quantum key distribution (QKD) systems based on homodyne detection against the photon number splitting attack. The decoy-state technique is a powerful tool that can significantly boost the secure transmission range of the QKD systems. However, it has not yet been applied to the systems that use homodyne detection. After adapting this theory to the systems based on homodyne detection, we quantify the secure performance and transmission range of the resulting system.

  14. Treatment of hot tar burns

    PubMed Central

    Bose, B.; Tredget, T.

    1982-01-01

    Hot tar burns, although rare, usually occur in workers in the paving and roofing industries. When tar is heated to high temperatures it can cause deep burns, and its removal often causes further damage. However, the use of one of the polysorbates (surface-active agents) makes removal easy and painless. ImagesFIG. 1 PMID:7083105

  15. Centrifuge treatment of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    L.A. Kazak; V.Z. Kaidalov; L.F. Syrova; O.S. Miroshnichenko; A.S. Minakov

    2009-07-15

    New technology is required for the removal of water and heavy fractions from regular coal tar. Centrifuges offer the best option. Purification of coal tar by means of centrifuges at OAO NLMK permits the production of pitch coke or electrode pitch that complies with current standards.

  16. Decoy Strategies: The Structure of TL1A:DcR3 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    C Zhan; Y Patskovsky; Q Yan; Z Li; U Ramagopal; H Cheng; M Brenowitz; X Hui; S Nathenson; S Almo

    2011-12-31

    Decoy Receptor 3 (DcR3), a secreted member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) receptor superfamily, neutralizes three different TNF ligands: FasL, LIGHT, and TL1A. Each of these ligands engages unique signaling receptors which direct distinct and critical immune responses. We report the crystal structures of the unliganded DcR3 ectodomain and its complex with TL1A, as well as complementary mutagenesis and biochemical studies. These analyses demonstrate that DcR3 interacts with invariant backbone and side-chain atoms in the membrane-proximal half of TL1A which supports recognition of its three distinct TNF ligands. Additional features serve as antideterminants that preclude interaction with other members of the TNF superfamily. This mode of interaction is unique among characterized TNF:TNFR family members and provides a mechanistic basis for the broadened specificity required to support the decoy function of DcR3, as well as for the rational manipulation of specificity and affinity of DcR3 and its ligands.

  17. Aqueous rubberized coal tar emulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Ladish, D.J.

    1985-10-01

    An aqueous rubberized coal tar emulsion composition especially suitable for coating and sealing bituminous substrates containing asphalt such as asphalt pavement and the like, the coal tar emulsion composition comprising a major portion of commercial coal tar emulsion and water admixed with a small amount of a carboxylated butadiene/styrene/acid copolymer latex having a particular particle size. The emulsion composition may additionally include a fine aggregate filler material such as sand. The coal tar emulsion composition according to the invention is of a thixotropic nature and has the ability to maintain the fine aggregate when added and mixed therein in a homogeneous-like suspension. The emulsion composition when spread on an asphalt surface exhibits a high degree of spreadability and provides a sealing coating that has a long life.

  18. Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study are to develop an improved understanding of the process of coal tar evolution, its relationship to the structural characteristics of the parent coal, and the dependence of the chemical and physical properties of the tar products on the conditions of devolatilization. Data from this study are expected to allow hypothesis testing and refinements of coal devolatilization models relevant to the pulverized coal combustion process. A range of coal ranks, from a Texas lignite to a Pennsylvania anthracite, are employed in the investigation. In addition, a high temperature polymer, a polyimide, is utilized as an additional reference case. The polyimide serves as a truly polymeric reference material for examining the nitrogen evolution behavior of coal. The samples are subjected to elemental composition determination, infrared absorbance characterization, calorific value measurement, high temperature ash analysis, and maceral composition. Potential tar yields are determined by long hold time heated grid investigations of each coal at a final temperature and heating rate observed to maximize tar yields for the reference coal. Relative tar evolution kinetic behavior is determined by zero hold time heated grid investigations of each coal. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Topical tar: Back to the future

    SciTech Connect

    Paghdal, K.V.; Schwartz, R.A.

    2009-08-15

    The use of medicinal tar for dermatologic disorders dates back to the ancient times. Although coal tar is utilized more frequently in modern dermatology, wood tars have also been widely employed. Tar is used mainly in the treatment of chronic stable plaque psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis, either alone or in combination therapy with other medications, phototherapy, or both. Many modifications have been made to tar preparations to increase their acceptability, as some dislike its odor, messy application, and staining of clothing. One should consider a tried and true treatment with tar that has led to clearing of lesions and prolonged remission times. Occupational studies have demonstrated the carcinogenicity of tar; however, epidemiologic studies do not confirm similar outcomes when used topically. This article will review the pharmacology, formulations, efficacy, and adverse effects of crude coal tar and other tars in the treatment of selected dermatologic conditions.

  20. Coal tar phototherapy for psoriasis reevaluated: erythemogenic versus suberythemogenic ultraviolet with a tar extract in oil and crude coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, N.J.; Wortzman, M.S.; Breeding, J.; Koudsi, H.; Taylor, L.

    1983-06-01

    Recent studies have questioned the therapeutic value of coal tar versus ultraviolet (UV) radiation and their relative necessity in phototherapy for psoriasis. In this investigation, different aspects of tar phototherapy have been studied in single-blind bilateral paired comparison studies. The effects of 1% crude coal tar were compared with those of petrolatum in conjunction with erythemogenic and suberythemogenic doses of ultraviolet light (UVB) using a FS72 sunlamp tubed cabinet. Crude coal tar was clinically superior to petrolatum with suberythemogenic ultraviolet. With the erythemogenic UVB, petrolatum was equal in efficacy to crude coal tar. Suberythemogenic UVB was also used adjunctively to compare the effects of a 5% concentration of a tar extract in an oil base to 5% crude coal tar in petrolatum or the oil base without tar. The tar extract in oil plus suberythemogenic UVB produced significantly more rapid improvement than the oil base plus UVB. The direct bilateral comparison of equal concentrations of tar extract in oil base versus crude coal tar in petrolatum in a suberythemogenic UV photo regimen revealed no statistical differences between treatments. In a study comparing tar extract in oil and the oil base without ultraviolet radiation, the tar extract in oil side responded more rapidly.

  1. Tight finite-key analysis for passive decoy-state quantum key distribution under general attacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chun; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yang; Li, Yuan; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-05-01

    For quantum key distribution (QKD) using spontaneous parametric-down-conversion sources (SPDCSs), the passive decoy-state protocol has been proved to be efficiently close to the theoretical limit of an infinite decoy-state protocol. In this paper, we apply a tight finite-key analysis for the passive decoy-state QKD using SPDCSs. Combining the security bound based on the uncertainty principle with the passive decoy-state protocol, a concise and stringent formula for calculating the key generation rate for QKD using SPDCSs is presented. The simulation shows that the secure distance under our formula can reach up to 182 km when the number of sifted data is 1010. Our results also indicate that, under the same deviation of statistical fluctuation due to finite-size effects, the passive decoy-state QKD with SPDCSs can perform as well as the active decoy-state QKD with a weak coherent source.

  2. Modified coal-tar pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Cukier, S.; Kremer, H.A.F.L.

    1986-08-05

    A coal-tar pitch material is described which is obtained by the process which consists in mixing an undistilled coaltar material with a solvent which consists of at least one of the following n-methyl-2-pyrollidone and the fraction of a coal-tar distillate which boils between 100/sup 0/ and 350/sup 0/C. The mixing is carried out at a temperature such as to form a solvent-dissolved fraction and a solvent-undissolved fraction, separating and removing the solvent-undissolved fraction of the undistilled coal-tar material, the undissolved fraction containing Q.I. having a high content of ash-forming impurities and using the solvent-dissolved fraction to produce coal-tar material with a decreased Q.I. and lower impurities by distilling the solvent-dissolved fraction of the undistilled coal-tar material to obtain from the solvent-dissolved product a pitch material having a toluene insoluble content of over 20%, a beta resin content of over 15%, a quinoline insoluble content of less than 5% and ash content of less than 0.1%.

  3. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific

  4. Serving Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Les, Ed.

    This book contains 15 articles about various aspects of community further education (FE) programs in Great Britain, including program rationales/benefits, administration, and delivery. The following articles are included: "Foreword" (Bradshaw); "Commitment to Community Is Good Business and Practical Politics" (Brook); "Can We Serve Communities in

  5. A decoy trap for breeding-season mallards in North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharp, D.E.; Lokemoen, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    A modified decoy trap was effective for capturing wild adult male and female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) during the 1980-81 breeding seasons in North Dakota. Key features contributing to the trap's success included a central decoy cylinder, large capture compartments with spring-door openings, an adjustable trigger mechanism with a balanced door attachment that was resistant to trap movement, and the use of F1, wild-stock or game-farm female decoys.

  6. Influence of decoys on the noise and dynamics of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, Anat; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2012-10-01

    Many transcription factors bind to DNA with a remarkable lack of specificity, so that regulatory binding sites compete with an enormous number of nonregulatory decoy sites. For an autoregulated gene, we show decoy sites decrease noise in the number of unbound proteins to a Poisson limit that results from binding and unbinding. This noise buffering is optimized for a given protein concentration when decoys have a 1/2 probability of being occupied. Decoys linearly increase the time to approach steady state and exponentially increase the time to switch epigenetically between bistable states.

  7. Approaching the ideal quantum key distribution with two-intensity decoy states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chun-Hui; Luo, Sun-Long; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2015-08-01

    We present a scheme for the practical decoy-state quantum key distribution with heralded single-photon source. In this scheme, only two-intensity decoy states are employed. However, its performance can approach the asymptotic case of using infinite decoy states. We compare it with the standard three-intensity decoy-state method, and through numerical simulations, we demonstrate its significant improvement over the three-intensity method in both the final key rate and the secure transmission distance. Furthermore, when taking statistical fluctuations into account, a very high key generation rate can still be obtained even at a long transmission distance.

  8. Dravo tar sand extraction process and its applicability to Kentucky tar sand

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, L.B.; Tis, D.J.

    1985-02-01

    A process for solvent extraction of oil from tar sands has been developed. The process concept has been successfully tested on Kentucky tar sand in a pilot plant capable of processing 200 tons per day of tar sand. The Dravo process is described. Some of the elements which distinguish it from other solvent extraction processes for tar sand are detailed.

  9. Treating tar sands formations with karsted zones

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-03-09

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may have one or more karsted zones. Methods may include providing heat from one or more heaters to one or more karsted zones of the tar sands formation to mobilize fluids in the formation. At least some of the mobilized fluids may be produced from the formation.

  10. Detector-decoy quantum key distribution without monitoring signal disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-02-01

    The round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution protocol provides a secure way to exchange private information without monitoring conventional disturbances and still maintains a high tolerance of noise, making it desirable for practical implementations of quantum key distribution. However, photon number resolving detectors are required to ensure that the detected signals are single photons in the original protocol. Here, we adopt the detector-decoy method and give the bounds to the fraction of detected events from single photons. Utilizing the advantages of the protocol, we provide a practical method of performing the protocol with desirable performances requiring only threshold single-photon detectors.

  11. Analysis of the use of decoys in defense against a massed attack

    SciTech Connect

    Lybrand, J.P.

    1984-10-01

    Computer simulation of combat is used to compare outcomes of massed and nonmassed red attacks on blue defenses which varied in firepower and in number of decoys. The comparisons indicate employment of decoys can offset much of the advantage an attack gains from massing. Recommendations are made for three further studies.

  12. An improved scheme on decoy-state method for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dong; Li, Mo; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum key distribution involving decoy-states is a significant application of quantum information. By using three-intensity decoy-states of single-photon-added coherent sources, we propose a practically realizable scheme on quantum key distribution which approaches very closely the ideal asymptotic case of an infinite number of decoy-states. We make a comparative study between this scheme and two other existing ones, i.e., two-intensity decoy-states with single-photon-added coherent sources, and three-intensity decoy-states with weak coherent sources. Through numerical analysis, we demonstrate the advantages of our scheme in secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate. PMID:26463580

  13. Decoy-state quantum key distribution with two-way classical postprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiongfeng; Fung, C.-H.F.; Chen Kai; Lo, H.-K.; Dupuis, Frederic; Tamaki, Kiyoshi

    2006-09-15

    Decoy states have recently been proposed as a useful method for substantially improving the performance of quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols when a coherent-state source is used. Previously, data postprocessing schemes based on one-way classical communications were considered for use with decoy states. In this paper, we develop two data postprocessing schemes for the decoy-state method using two-way classical communications. Our numerical simulation (using parameters from a specific QKD experiment as an example) results show that our scheme is able to extend the maximal secure distance from 142 km (using only one-way classical communications with decoy states) to 181 km. The second scheme is able to achieve a 10% greater key generation rate in the whole regime of distances. We conclude that decoy-state QKD with two-way classical postprocessing is of practical interest.

  14. An improved scheme on decoy-state method for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong; Li, Mo; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2015-10-01

    Quantum key distribution involving decoy-states is a significant application of quantum information. By using three-intensity decoy-states of single-photon-added coherent sources, we propose a practically realizable scheme on quantum key distribution which approaches very closely the ideal asymptotic case of an infinite number of decoy-states. We make a comparative study between this scheme and two other existing ones, i.e., two-intensity decoy-states with single-photon-added coherent sources, and three-intensity decoy-states with weak coherent sources. Through numerical analysis, we demonstrate the advantages of our scheme in secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate.

  15. An improved scheme on decoy-state method for measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Li, Mo; Guo, Guang-Can; Wang, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum key distribution involving decoy-states is a significant application of quantum information. By using three-intensity decoy-states of single-photon-added coherent sources, we propose a practically realizable scheme on quantum key distribution which approaches very closely the ideal asymptotic case of an infinite number of decoy-states. We make a comparative study between this scheme and two other existing ones, i.e., two-intensity decoy-states with single-photon-added coherent sources, and three-intensity decoy-states with weak coherent sources. Through numerical analysis, we demonstrate the advantages of our scheme in secure transmission distance and the final key generation rate. PMID:26463580

  16. Process and apparatus for separating tar from a tar sand mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Reale, L.V.

    1981-02-10

    A process and apparatus are described for separating tar from a tar sand mixture. The separating step is by a novel mechanical process avoiding the complication of heating, freezing and the use of solvents. In the process a suitable suspension liquid is added to a tar sand mixture which is then struck with a plurality of striker arms to separate tar from said particles and agglomerate tar into droplets. After the striking step, the sand particles are allowed to settle to the bottom and tar droplets rise and float, the tar droplets are skimmed off the mixture, and the tar droplets are also scraped off the striker arms. The resulting tar droplets are washed at least once to remove remaining sand particles.

  17. An evaluation of the potential end uses of a Utah tar sand bitumen. [Tar sand distillate

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.P.; Harnsberger, P.M.; Guffey, F.D.

    1986-09-01

    To date the commercial application of tar sand deposits in the United States has been limited to their use as paving materials for county roads, parking lots, and driveways because the material, as obtained from the quarries, does not meet federal highway specifications. The bitumen in these deposits has also been the subject of upgrading and refining studies to produce transportation fuels, but the results have not been encouraging from an economic standpoint. The conversion of tar sand bitumen to transportation fuels cannot compete with crude oil refining. The purposes of this study were two-fold. The first was to produce vacuum distillation residues and determine if their properties met ASTM asphalt specifications. The second was to determine if the distillates could serve as potential feedstocks for the production of aviation turbine fuels. The bitumen used for this study was the oil produced during an in situ steamflood project at the Northwest Asphalt Ridge (Utah) tar sand deposit. Two distillation residues were produced, one at +316/sup 0/C and one at +399/sup 0/C. However, only the lower boiling residue met ASTM specifications, in this case as an AC-30 asphalt. The original oil sample met specifications as an AC-5 asphalt. These residue samples showed some unique properties in the area of aging; however, these properties need to be investigated further to determine the implications. It was also suggested that the low aging indexes and high flow properties of the asphalts may be beneficial for pavements that require good low-temperature performance. Two distillate samples were produced, one at IBP-316/sup 0/C and one at IBP-399/sup 0/C. The chemical and physical properties of these samples were determined, and it was concluded that both samples appear to be potential feedstocks for the production of aviation turbine fuels. However, hydrogenation studies need to be conducted and the properties of the finished fuels determined to verify the prediction. 14 refs., 12 tabs.

  18. Fine-scale features on bioreplicated decoys of the emerald ash borer provide necessary visual verisimilitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingue, Michael J.; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Narkhede, Mahesh S.; Engel, Leland G.; Martn-Palma, Ral J.; Kumar, Jayant; Baker, Thomas C.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2014-03-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive tree-killing pest in North America. Like other buprestid beetles, it has an iridescent coloring, produced by a periodically layered cuticle whose reflectance peaks at 540 nm wavelength. The males perform a visually mediated ritualistic mating flight directly onto females poised on sunlit leaves. We attempted to evoke this behavior using artificial visual decoys of three types. To fabricate decoys of the first type, a polymer sheet coated with a Bragg-stack reflector was loosely stamped by a bioreplicating die. For decoys of the second type, a polymer sheet coated with a Bragg-stack reflector was heavily stamped by the same die and then painted green. Every decoy of these two types had an underlying black absorber layer. Decoys of the third type were produced by a rapid prototyping machine and painted green. Fine-scale features were absent on the third type. Experiments were performed in an American ash forest infested with EAB, and a European oak forest home to a similar pest, the two-spotted oak borer (TSOB), Agrilus biguttatus. When pinned to leaves, dead EAB females, dead TSOB females, and bioreplicated decoys of both types often evoked the complete ritualized flight behavior. Males also initiated approaches to the rapidly prototyped decoy, but would divert elsewhere without making contact. The attraction of the bioreplicated decoys was also demonstrated by providing a high dc voltage across the decoys that stunned and killed approaching beetles. Thus, true bioreplication with fine-scale features is necessary to fully evoke ritualized visual responses in insects, and provides an opportunity for developing insecttrapping technologies.

  19. Molecular decoys: ligand-binding recombinant proteins protect mice from curarimimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Gershoni, J M; Aronheim, A

    1988-01-01

    Mimic ligand-binding sites of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor bind d-tubocurarine and alpha-bungarotoxin in vitro. Injection of such binding sites into mice could act as molecular decoys in vivo, providing protection against toxic ligands. This hypothesis of molecular "decoyance" has been tested in greater than 250 mice. Bacterially produced cholinergic binding sites provided a 2-fold increase in the survival rate of animals challenged with curarimimetic neurotoxins. Possible considerations for decoy designs and their applications are discussed. Images PMID:3375254

  20. Process for modifying coal-tar materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cukier, S.; Kremer, H.A.F.L.

    1985-05-14

    The present invention relates to a process for decreasing and modifying the quinoline-insoluble content (Q.I.) of coal-tar materials; and comprises extracting the coal-tar material with a solvent, where the solvent contains at least one of n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone and the wash oil fraction of coal-tar distillate. Pitches with a diminished Q.I. content, lower viscosity and lower average Q.I. particle size, may be prepared from coal-tar materials which have been so treated.

  1. TARS-HT1 and TARS-HT2 heat-tolerant dry bean germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TARS-HT1 (Reg no. __, PI ___) and TARS-HT2 (Reg no. __, PI ___) are heat tolerant dark red and light red, respectively, kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) developed cooperatively by the USDA-ARS Tropical Agriculture Research Station (TARS), the University of Puerto Rico, Cornell University, and th...

  2. SVR_CAF: an integrated score function for detecting native protein structures among decoys.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianhong; Yan, Wenying; Hu, Guang; Shen, Bairong

    2014-04-01

    An accurate score function for detecting the most native-like models among a huge number of decoy sets is essential to the protein structure prediction. In this work, we developed a novel integrated score function (SVR_CAF) to discriminate native structures from decoys, as well as to rank near-native structures and select best decoys when native structures are absent. SVR_CAF is a machine learning score, which incorporates the contact energy based score (CE_score), amino acid network based score (AAN_score), and the fast Fourier transform based score (FFT_score). The score function was evaluated with four decoy sets for its discriminative ability and it shows higher overall performance than the state-of-the-art score functions. PMID:24115148

  3. Effects of NF-kappaB oligonucleotide "decoys" on gene expression in P7 rat hippocampus after hypoxia/ischemia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jingxin; Hu, Xiaoming; Nesic, Olivera; Grafe, Marjorie R; Rassin, David K; Wood, Thomas G; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2004-07-01

    "Decoy" oligonucleotides can be used as gene-specific nuclear factor (NF-kappaB) inhibitors to regulate gene expression. We applied two different decoy oligonucleotides that contained the NF-kappaB binding consensus sequences present in the immunoglobulin G (IgG)-kappaB and Bcl-x promoter into 7-day-old (P7) rat lateral ventricles before hypoxia/ischemia (HI) and compared their effects on gene expression in hippocampi to saline-treated, scrambled decoy-treated, or untreated hippocampi exposed to HI. Left hippocampi were collected at 12 hr after HI. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) showed that the two decoy treatments had different effects on NF-kappaB binding to the IgG-kappaB and Bcl-x promoter-specific consensus sequences, respectively. We assessed the decoys' effects on gene expression 12 hr after HI using ribonuclease protection assays (RPAs) and Affymetrix DNA microarrays. RPAs showed that both decoys significantly decreased interleukin (IL)-1alpha mRNA levels but had no impact on IL-1beta, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA levels. IgG-kappaB decoys significantly decreased tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and TNF-beta mRNA levels compared to minimal changes after treatment with Bcl-x decoys. DNA microarray analyses showed that Bcl-x decoy treatment significantly decreased Bcl-x(L) mRNA levels. The decreased Bcl-x(L) mRNA levels after Bcl-x decoy treatment was confirmed by RPA analysis. DNA microarray data also indicated that several other genes were affected by both decoys. Our results suggest that different NF-kappaB decoy treatments could differentially regulate transcriptional responses to central nervous system trauma. Careful design of decoy sequences, however, is essential to acquire selective effects on cell death outcome. PMID:15197744

  4. Continuous hydrogenation of flash pyrolysis coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Wailes, P.C.; Faux, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    High melting tars from the flash pyrolysis of Millmerran coal have been upgraded to mobile liquid products by continuous hydrogenation over a fluidized nickel molybdate catalyst. The hydrogenation unit developed specifically for this purpose is described and changes in properties of the tar during hydrogenation are discussed.

  5. Sydney Tar Ponds Remediation: Experience to China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Fan; Bryson, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    The infamous "Sydney Tar Ponds" are well known as one of the largest toxic waste sites of Canada, due to almost 100 years of steelmaking in Sydney, a once beautiful and peaceful city located on the east side of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This article begins with a contextual overview of the Tar Ponds issue including a brief introduction and

  6. Sydney Tar Ponds Remediation: Experience to China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Fan; Bryson, Ken A.

    2009-01-01

    The infamous "Sydney Tar Ponds" are well known as one of the largest toxic waste sites of Canada, due to almost 100 years of steelmaking in Sydney, a once beautiful and peaceful city located on the east side of Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia. This article begins with a contextual overview of the Tar Ponds issue including a brief introduction and…

  7. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution using weak coherent pulses with modulator attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Chun; Wang, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution is more desirable than the active one in some scenarios. It is also affected by the imperfections of the devices. In this paper, the influence of modulator attenuation on the passive decoy-state method is considered. We introduce and analyze the unbalanced MachZehnder interferometer, briefly, and combining with the virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation, we characterize the passive decoy-state method using a weak coherent photon source with modulator attenuation. According to the attenuation parameter ?, the pass efficiencies are given. Then, the key generation rate can be acquired. From numerical simulations, it can be seen that modulator attenuation has a nonnegligible influence on the performance of passive-state QKD protocol. Based on the research, the analysis method of virtual source and imaginary unitary transformation are preferred in analyzing passive decoy state protocol, and the passive decoy-state method is better than the active one and is close to the active vacuum + weak decoy state under the condition of having the same modulator attenuation. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11304397).

  8. NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotide enhanced osteogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells exposed to polyethylene particle.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Hua; Sato, Taishi; Barcay, Katherine R; Waters, Heather; Loi, Florence; Zhang, Ruth; Pajarinen, Jukka; Egashira, Kensuke; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B

    2015-03-01

    Excessive generation of wear particles after total joint replacement may lead to local inflammation and periprosthetic osteolysis. Modulation of the key transcription factor NF-?B in immune cells could potentially mitigate the osteolytic process. We previously showed that local delivery of ultrahigh-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) particles recruited osteoprogenitor cells and reduced osteolysis. However, the biological effects of modulating the NF-?B signaling pathway on osteoprogenitor/mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) remain unclear. Here we showed that decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) increased cell viability when primary murine MSCs were exposed to UHMWPE particles, but had no effects on cellular apoptosis. Decoy ODN increased transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-?1) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) in MSCs exposed to UHMWPE particles. Mechanistic studies showed that decoy ODN upregulated OPG expression through a TGF-?1-dependent pathway. By measuring the alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin levels, Runx2 and osteopontin expression, and performing a bone mineralization assay, we found that decoy ODN increased MSC osteogenic ability when the cells were exposed to UHMWPE particles. Furthermore, the cellular response to decoy ODN and UHMWPE particles with regard to cell phenotype, cell viability, and osteogenic ability was confirmed using primary human MSCs. Our results suggest that modulation of wear particle-induced inflammation by NF-?B decoy ODN had no adverse effects on MSCs and may potentially further mitigate periprosthetic osteolysis by protecting MSC viability and osteogenic ability. PMID:25518013

  9. The development of the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect in young children

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shanshan; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    One classic example of context-independent violations is the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect, in which adding a decoy option (inferior option) to a set of original options often increases the individual’s preference for one option over the other original option. Despite the prevalence of this effect, little is known about its developmental origins. Moreover, it remains contentious whether the decoy effect is a result of biological evolution or is learned from social experience. Here, we investigated the decoy effect in 3- to 7-year-old children (n = 175) and young adults (n = 52) using a simple perceptual task. Results showed that older children (5-year-olds and 7-year-olds), but not younger children (3-year-olds), exhibited a decoy effect. Nevertheless, children as young as age 5 exhibited a decoy effect that was not significantly different from that shown by young adults. These findings suggest that humans start to appreciate the relative values of options at around age 5. PMID:26935899

  10. The development of the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect in young children.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Shanshan; Yu, Rongjun

    2016-01-01

    One classic example of context-independent violations is the asymmetrically dominated decoy effect, in which adding a decoy option (inferior option) to a set of original options often increases the individual's preference for one option over the other original option. Despite the prevalence of this effect, little is known about its developmental origins. Moreover, it remains contentious whether the decoy effect is a result of biological evolution or is learned from social experience. Here, we investigated the decoy effect in 3- to 7-year-old children (n?=?175) and young adults (n?=?52) using a simple perceptual task. Results showed that older children (5-year-olds and 7-year-olds), but not younger children (3-year-olds), exhibited a decoy effect. Nevertheless, children as young as age 5 exhibited a decoy effect that was not significantly different from that shown by young adults. These findings suggest that humans start to appreciate the relative values of options at around age 5. PMID:26935899

  11. Using decoy effects to influence an online brand choice: the role of price-quality trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Huei-Chen; Liu, Wen-Liang

    2011-04-01

    This research aims to investigate decoy effects on online brand choices. To assess the influence of decoys, we test decoy effects on three constructs-product involvement, judgment conditions, and decoy conditions-within an online experiment. A survey of 635 Internet users and a 2??2??3 ANOVA between-subjects experimental design is used to guide the research design and the systematic analysis procedure. A major finding of this study is that a standard decoy seems to have a significant effect on an advertised (target) brand for high-involvement products; from the survey, it is also apparent that competitors can also use inferior decoys to increase brand preference for low-involvement products. PMID:21039134

  12. [Research on Spectrum Radiation Characteristics of a New Type Infrared/ Ultraviolet Dual Color Decoy].

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-sheng; Dai, Meng-yan; Liu, Hai-feng; Xie, Chang-you; Zhang, Tong; Fang, Guo-feng

    2015-07-01

    The advantage of traditional MTV infrared decoys which are mainly consist of magnesium, Teflon and VITON is that it emits high radiant energy, so it is an effective countermeasure to traditional seekers which seek the target by heat source. The spectral radiant intensity which generated from high temperature combustion of MTV infrared decoys in near infrared region and ultraviolet band is very high, and that in Mid-IR region is relative lower, however the radiant intensity of real jet fighter in ultraviolet band is low and the infrared radiant intensity ratio of Mid-IR to near IR band is greater than 1. Thus, the traditional MTV infrared decoys are hardly able to counter the seekers equipped with dual color combined guidance system. Based on the spectral matching principle, we designed and prepared a new infrared/ultraviolet dual color decoy which is mainly consist of oxidant (wt% 45-75), fuel (wt% 10-25), energetic binder (wt% 25-50) and additives. We conducted theoretical calculations on combustion products of the reagent combinations using CEA (Chemic equilibrium & Application) software and initially determined the content of each component of the decoy formulation on the basis of the calculations results, then investigated the infrared radiation characteristics of decoys employing SR5000 spectrum radiometer and remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 and analyzed the possible reasons for test results difference of the two systems separately from the test principle and calculation method, the testing environment, stability of testing results and other aspects. We studied the ultraviolet radiation characteristics of decoys using S2000 fiber optical spectrometer and the test results were consistent with the fighter ultraviolet radiant intensity which gained from theoretical calculation. We researched on the temperature characteristics of decoys by Imager IR 8325 mid-infrared thermal imager and it turned out that the dual color decoy is similar to the real fighter target in temperature characteristics. The results indicates that the infrared radiant intensity ratio of Mid-IR to near IR band is from 1 to 3 (1< I(3-5 microm) : I(1-3 microm) <3). The infrared radiant intensity in 3-5 pLm band is tunable from 0.9 to 2.5 kW x sr(-1) while the ultraviolet radiant intensity in 0.3-0.5 microm is about (20 +/- 5)W x sr(-1). The flame temperature is between 850-1100 degrees C. It is proved that the dual color decoy as-designed has excellent characteristics. PMID:26717733

  13. Partially sequenced organisms, decoy searches and false discovery rates.

    PubMed

    Victor, Bjorn; Gabril, Sarah; Kanobana, Kirezi; Mostovenko, Ekaterina; Polman, Katja; Dorny, Pierre; Deelder, Andr M; Palmblad, Magnus

    2012-03-01

    Tandem mass spectrometry is commonly used to identify peptides, typically by comparing their product ion spectra with those predicted from a protein sequence database and scoring these matches. The most reported quality metric for a set of peptide identifications is the false discovery rate (FDR), the fraction of expected false identifications in the set. This metric has so far only been used for completely sequenced organisms or known protein mixtures. We have investigated whether FDR estimations are also applicable in the case of partially sequenced organisms, where many high-quality spectra fail to identify the correct peptides because the latter are not present in the searched sequence database. Using real data from human plasma and simulated partial sequence databases derived from two complete human sequence databases with different levels of redundancy, we could demonstrate that the mixture model approach in PeptideProphet is robust for partial databases, particularly if used in combination with decoy sequences. We therefore recommend using this method when estimating the FDR and reporting peptide identifications from incompletely sequenced organisms. PMID:22339108

  14. Thermal chemistry of a Utah tar sand

    SciTech Connect

    Rudnick, L.R.; Audeh, C.A.

    1988-08-01

    A study of the thermal chemistry of a Utah tar sand is described. The coking behavior of the intact Utah tar sand is compared with that of the bitumen after extraction from the sand. The yield structure and oil properties are compared. Study of the free radicals present in the samples was made by using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Radical generation and termination reactions during coking at two heating rates (12 and 120/sup 0/C/min) of the intact tar sand and the extracted bitumen were studied directly in the ESR spectrometer.

  15. Coal liquefaction with coal tar solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Gir, S.; Rhodes, D.E.

    1986-12-16

    A method is described of liquefying coal, comprising: mixing solid coal with a process solvent comprising coal tar material which has been at least partially hydrogenated under conditions which selectively hydrogenate aromatic coal tar components to hydroaromatics and which preserve the integrity of organonitrogen coal tar components, to produce a coal-solvent slurry; treating the coal-solvent slurry under coal-liquefying conditions in a liquefaction zone to produce a solution containing coal liquefaction products; and recovering coal liquefaction products from the solution.

  16. Bioreplicated visual features of nanofabricated buprestid beetle decoys evoke stereotypical male mating flights.

    PubMed

    Domingue, Michael J; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Pulsifer, Drew P; Hall, Loyal P; Badding, John V; Bischof, Jesse L; Martn-Palma, Ral J; Imrei, Zoltn; Janik, Gergely; Mastro, Victor C; Hazen, Missy; Baker, Thomas C

    2014-09-30

    Recent advances in nanoscale bioreplication processes present the potential for novel basic and applied research into organismal behavioral processes. Insect behavior potentially could be affected by physical features existing at the nanoscale level. We used nano-bioreplicated visual decoys of female emerald ash borer beetles (Agrilus planipennis) to evoke stereotypical mate-finding behavior, whereby males fly to and alight on the decoys as they would on real females. Using an industrially scalable nanomolding process, we replicated and evaluated the importance of two features of the outer cuticular surface of the beetle's wings: structural interference coloration of the elytra by multilayering of the epicuticle and fine-scale surface features consisting of spicules and spines that scatter light into intense strands. Two types of decoys that lacked one or both of these elements were fabricated, one type nano-bioreplicated and the other 3D-printed with no bioreplicated surface nanostructural elements. Both types were colored with green paint. The light-scattering properties of the nano-bioreplicated surfaces were verified by shining a white laser on the decoys in a dark room and projecting the scattering pattern onto a white surface. Regardless of the coloration mechanism, the nano-bioreplicated decoys evoked the complete attraction and landing sequence of Agrilus males. In contrast, males made brief flying approaches toward the decoys without nanostructured features, but diverted away before alighting on them. The nano-bioreplicated decoys were also electroconductive, a feature used on traps such that beetles alighting onto them were stunned, killed, and collected. PMID:25225359

  17. Bioreplicated visual features of nanofabricated buprestid beetle decoys evoke stereotypical male mating flights

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Michael J.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Pulsifer, Drew P.; Hall, Loyal P.; Badding, John V.; Bischof, Jesse L.; Martín-Palma, Raúl J.; Imrei, Zoltán; Janik, Gergely; Mastro, Victor C.; Hazen, Missy; Baker, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscale bioreplication processes present the potential for novel basic and applied research into organismal behavioral processes. Insect behavior potentially could be affected by physical features existing at the nanoscale level. We used nano-bioreplicated visual decoys of female emerald ash borer beetles (Agrilus planipennis) to evoke stereotypical mate-finding behavior, whereby males fly to and alight on the decoys as they would on real females. Using an industrially scalable nanomolding process, we replicated and evaluated the importance of two features of the outer cuticular surface of the beetle’s wings: structural interference coloration of the elytra by multilayering of the epicuticle and fine-scale surface features consisting of spicules and spines that scatter light into intense strands. Two types of decoys that lacked one or both of these elements were fabricated, one type nano-bioreplicated and the other 3D-printed with no bioreplicated surface nanostructural elements. Both types were colored with green paint. The light-scattering properties of the nano-bioreplicated surfaces were verified by shining a white laser on the decoys in a dark room and projecting the scattering pattern onto a white surface. Regardless of the coloration mechanism, the nano-bioreplicated decoys evoked the complete attraction and landing sequence of Agrilus males. In contrast, males made brief flying approaches toward the decoys without nanostructured features, but diverted away before alighting on them. The nano-bioreplicated decoys were also electroconductive, a feature used on traps such that beetles alighting onto them were stunned, killed, and collected. PMID:25225359

  18. Bonding energies of bitumen to tar sand mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Ensley, E.K.; Scott, M.A.

    1986-03-01

    The bonding energy of bitumen in a tar sand was found by algebraically adding the heat of dissolution of bitumen on tar sand, heat of dissolution of recovered bitumen and the heat of wetting of extracted tar sand mineral. The value for an Asphalt Ridge tar sand was found to be 270 cal/mole. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Human NgR-Fc Decoy Protein via Lumbar Intrathecal Bolus Administration Enhances Recovery from Rat Spinal Cord Contusion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Yigitkanli, Kazim; Kim, Chang-Yeon; Sekine-Komo, Tomoko; Wirak, Dana; Frieden, Eric; Bhargava, Ajay; Maynard, George; Cafferty, William B.J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Axonal growth and neurological recovery after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited by the presence of inhibitory proteins in myelin, several of which act via the NgR1 protein in neurons. A truncated soluble ligand-binding fragment of NgR1 serves as a decoy and promotes recovery in acute and chronic rodent SCI models. To develop the translational potential of these observations, we created a human sequence-derived NgR1(310)-Fc protein. This protein is active in vitro. When the human NgR1 decoy is administered by continuous intracerebroventricular infusion to rats with a spinal contusion injury at doses of 0.090.53?mg/kg/d, neurological recovery is improved. Effective doses double the percentage of rats able to bear weight on their hindlimbs. Next, we considered the half-life and distribution of NgR1(310)-Fc after bolus delivery to the lumbar intrathecal space. The protein is found throughout the neuraxis and has a tissue half-life of approximately 2 days in the rat, and 5 days in the nonhuman primate. At an intermittent, once every 4 day, lumbar bolus dosing schedule of 0.14?mg/kg/d, NgR1(310)-Fc promoted locomotor rat recovery from spinal cord contusion at least as effectively as continuous infusion in open field and grid walking tasks. Moreover, the intermittent lumbar NgR1(310)-Fc treatment increased the growth of raphespinal axons into the lumbar spinal cord after injury. Thus, human NgR1(310)-Fc provides effective treatment for recovery from traumatic SCI in this preclinical model with a simplified administration regimen that facilitates clinical testing. PMID:24964223

  20. Hydrothermal Tar Mounds in Escanaba Trough, Southern Gorda Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Rosenbauer, R. A.; Hostettler, F. D.; Kvenvolden, K. A.; Lamothe, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    Mounds of asphaltic petroleum were located and sampled by the submersible ROV Tiburon at two sites on the 3300-m-deep, sediment-covered floor of Escanaba Trough, southern Gorda Ridge. The northern site (41.01°N) consists of several individual mounds up to 1 m across and 25 cm high that occur within 100 m of active hydrothermal vents and polymetallic sulfide deposits. These mounds are not covered by sediment and serve as solid substrates for anemones and sponges. Fragments of a partly-buried tar mound at the southern site (40.69°N) were recovered near a field of inactive sulfide deposits. The mounds have a lobate morphology in which younger lobes with lustrous surfaces drape over older lobes encrusted by mud and faunal debris. In cross section, individual lobes have dense rinds, softer inner walls, and hollow cores. Coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses of tar samples show the presence of a mixture of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The aliphatic fractions have homologous n-alkane distributions from n-C12 to n-C36 with Cmax = n-C28, and a distinctive even-over-odd C-number predominance. Epimer ratios for hopanes and steranes indicate hydrocarbons that are relatively immature. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are dominated by high-molecular-weight parent molecules such as pyrene and phenanthrene; alkylated derivatives are minor constituents. The aromatic fractions also contain a large unresolved complex mixture (UCM). The presence of high-molecular-weight PAH (e.g., benzo-pyrene, indeno-pyrene) reflects formation at high temperatures compared to conventional petroleum. Microwave digestion followed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analyses of the soluble organic fraction from three tar samples reveal the following concentrations: 0.1 to 0.2 wt% S, 1 to 10 ppm Mg, Al, P, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, and Ba, 1 to 100 ppb Pd and Pt, and 1 to 10 ppb Au. The insoluble residues separated from these samples, analyzed by scanning-electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, contain particles of talc, barite, Fe sulfide, and Fe oxide. Physical characteristics of the Escanaba Trough tar mounds indicate that viscous petroleum flowed onto the sea floor and condensed into solid deposits that accreted by eruption of flow lobes through breakout points on mound surfaces. The occurrence and composition of the tar mounds further indicate a hydrothermal origin for the petroleum, contemporaneous formation with sulfide deposits, and generation by rapid pyrolysis of organic matter in the sediment.

  1. Treating tar sands formations with dolomite

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. The tar sands formation may include dolomite and hydrocarbons. Methods may include providing heat at less than the decomposition temperature of dolomite from one or more heaters to at least a portion of the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids are mobilized in the formation. At least some of the hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  2. When Target:Decoy False Discovery Rate Estimations are Inaccurate and How to Spot Instances

    PubMed Central

    Chalkley, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    To address problems with estimating the reliability of proteomic search engine results from mass spectrometry fragmentation data the use of target-decoy database searching has become the de facto approach for estimating a false discovery rate. Several articles have been written about the effects of different ways of creating the decoy database, effects of the search engine scoring or effects of search parameters on whether this approach provides an accurate estimate; not all agreeing with each other’s conclusions. Hence, there may be some confusion about how effective this approach is and how broadly it can be applied. Although it is generally very effective, in this article I will try to emphasize some of the pitfalls and dangers of using the target-decoy approach, and will indicate tell-tale signs that something may be amiss. This information will hopefully help researchers become more astute in their assessment of search results. PMID:23298186

  3. Sialylneolacto-N-tetraose c (LSTc)-bearing Liposomal Decoys Capture Influenza A Virus*

    PubMed Central

    Hendricks, Gabriel L.; Weirich, Kim L.; Viswanathan, Karthik; Li, Jing; Shriver, Zachary H.; Ashour, Joseph; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Fygenson, Deborah K.; Finberg, Robert W.; Comolli, James C.; Wang, Jennifer P.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a severe disease in humans and animals with few effective therapies available. All strains of influenza virus are prone to developing drug resistance due to the high mutation rate in the viral genome. A therapeutic agent that targets a highly conserved region of the virus could bypass resistance and also be effective against multiple strains of influenza. Influenza uses many individually weak ligand binding interactions for a high avidity multivalent attachment to sialic acid-bearing cells. Polymerized sialic acid analogs can form multivalent interactions with influenza but are not ideal therapeutics due to solubility and toxicity issues. We used liposomes as a novel means for delivery of the glycan sialylneolacto-N-tetraose c (LSTc). LSTc-bearing decoy liposomes form multivalent, polymer-like interactions with influenza virus. Decoy liposomes competitively bind influenza virus in hemagglutination inhibition assays and inhibit infection of target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition is specific for influenza virus, as inhibition of Sendai virus and respiratory syncytial virus is not observed. In contrast, monovalent LSTc does not bind influenza virus or inhibit infectivity. LSTc decoy liposomes prevent the spread of influenza virus during multiple rounds of replication in vitro and extend survival of mice challenged with a lethal dose of virus. LSTc decoy liposomes co-localize with fluorescently tagged influenza virus, whereas control liposomes do not. Considering the conservation of the hemagglutinin binding pocket and the ability of decoy liposomes to form high avidity interactions with influenza hemagglutinin, our decoy liposomes have potential as a new therapeutic agent against emerging influenza strains. PMID:23362274

  4. Closure of a coal tar lagoon

    SciTech Connect

    Fochtman, E.G.; Cartwright, R.T.

    1987-01-01

    In 1982 it was estimated that there were over 1000 of these coal tar lagoons; some of them were impacting the environment and were on the Super Fund list. In the 1940's and 1950's most of the town gas plants were dismantled. In some cases the succeeding utility continued to own the land, in others the property changed hands, the lagoons were partially filled and in a few cases remedial action taken. This is a report of one such remedial action undertaken by a subsequent landowner. During early operation of town gas plants the coal tar was totally a waste, however, later it was found that an ''oil'' distillate consisting of aromatic solvents, benzene, toluene and xylene, could be produced from the coal. This distillate was washed with concentrated sulfuric acid in lead lined tanks to remove water, coal tars and thiophene. Approximately one half pound of acid was used to wash each gallon of distillate. The spent acid was disposed to the coal tar pit. After acid wash the distillate was washed with caustic to neutralize any remaining acid and the caustic disposed to the coal tar pit. In 1982 SCA-Chemical Services undertook the closure of one such lagoon. This is a report of this operation.

  5. Tar Management and Recycling in Biomass Gasification and Syngas Purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCaffrey, Zach

    Removal of tars is critical to the design and operation of biomass gasification systems as most syngas utilization processing equipment (e.g. internal combustion engines, gas turbines, fuel cells, and liquid fuel synthesis reactors) have a low tolerance for tar. Capturing and disposal of tar is expensive due to equipment costs, high hazardous waste disposal costs where direct uses cannot be found, and system energy losses incurred. Water scrubbing is an existing technique commonly used in gasification plants to remove contaminants and tar; however using water as the absorbent is non-ideal as tar compounds have low or no water solubility. Hydrophobic solvents can improve scrubber performance and this study evaluated tar solubility in selected solvents using slip-streams of untreated syngas from a laboratory fluidized bed reactor operated on almond composite feedstock using both air and steam gasification. Tar solubility was compared with Hansen's solubility theory to examine the extent to which the tar removal can be predicted. As collection of tar without utilization leads to a hazardous waste problem, the study investigated the effects of recycling tars back into the gasifier for destruction. Prior to experiments conducted on tar capture and recycle, characterizations of the air and steam gasification of the almond composite mix were made. This work aims to provide a better understanding of tar collection and solvent selection for wet scrubbers, and to provide information for designing improved tar management systems for biomass gasification.

  6. Higher temperature coal tar enamel fights corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.R.; Henegar, S.; Roder, B.

    1996-10-01

    High temperatures create new challenges for pipeline coatings. Cracking, adhesion breakdown and electrochemical corrosion are accelerated by higher service temperatures. A new epoxy primer/coal tar pipeline coating system utilizes the latent heat of the coal tar application to fully cure the newly developed primer to achieve outstanding bonding integrity and high temperature cathodic disbondment resistance. A key reason for this overall high performance is the marriage of a newly developed epoxy primer that provides outstanding adhesion with coal tar enamel, which provides excellent long-term water resistance. The paper describes experimental studies, pilot plant application, cathodic disbondment testing, and results from hot water soak tests and the low temperature cracking test.

  7. Refining similarity scoring to enable decoy-free validation in spectral library searching.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wenguang; Zhu, Kan; Lam, Henry

    2013-11-01

    Spectral library searching is a maturing approach for peptide identification from MS/MS, offering an alternative to traditional sequence database searching. Spectral library searching relies on direct spectrum-to-spectrum matching between the query data and the spectral library, which affords better discrimination of true and false matches, leading to improved sensitivity. However, due to the inherent diversity of the peak location and intensity profiles of real spectra, the resulting similarity score distributions often take on unpredictable shapes. This makes it difficult to model the scores of the false matches accurately, necessitating the use of decoy searching to sample the score distribution of the false matches. Here, we refined the similarity scoring in spectral library searching to enable the validation of spectral search results without the use of decoys. We rank-transformed the peak intensities to standardize all spectra, making it possible to fit a parametric distribution to the scores of the nontop-scoring spectral matches. The statistical significance of the top-scoring match can then be estimated in a rigorous manner according to Extreme Value Theory. The overall result is a more robust and interpretable measure of the quality of the spectral match, which can be obtained without decoys. We tested this refined similarity scoring function on real datasets and demonstrated its effectiveness. This approach reduces search time, increases sensitivity, and extends spectral library searching to situations where decoy spectra cannot be readily generated, such as in searching unidentified and nonpeptide spectral libraries. PMID:24115759

  8. The problem with peptide presumption and the downfall of target-decoy false discovery rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In proteomics, peptide-tandem mass spectrum match scores and target-decoy database derived false discovery rates (FDR) are confidence indicators describing the quality of individual and sets of tandem mass spectrum matches. A user can impose a standard by prescribing a limit to these values, equival...

  9. Decoy-state protocol for quantum cryptography with four different intensities of coherent light

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiangbin

    2005-07-15

    We propose an efficient decoy-state protocol for practical quantum key distribution using coherent states. The protocol uses four intensities of different coherent light. A good final key rate is achieved by our protocol with typical parameters of existing practical setups, even with a very low channel transmittance.

  10. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution with practical light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Curty, Marcos; Ma, Xiongfeng; Qi, Bing; Moroder, Tobias

    2010-02-15

    Decoy states have been proven to be a very useful method for significantly enhancing the performance of quantum key distribution systems with practical light sources. Although active modulation of the intensity of the laser pulses is an effective way of preparing decoy states in principle, in practice passive preparation might be desirable in some scenarios. Typical passive schemes involve parametric down-conversion. More recently, it has been shown that phase-randomized weak coherent pulses (WCP) can also be used for the same purpose [M. Curty et al., Opt. Lett. 34, 3238 (2009).] This proposal requires only linear optics together with a simple threshold photon detector, which shows the practical feasibility of the method. Most importantly, the resulting secret key rate is comparable to the one delivered by an active decoy-state setup with an infinite number of decoy settings. In this article we extend these results, now showing specifically the analysis for other practical scenarios with different light sources and photodetectors. In particular, we consider sources emitting thermal states, phase-randomized WCP, and strong coherent light in combination with several types of photodetectors, like, for instance, threshold photon detectors, photon number resolving detectors, and classical photodetectors. Our analysis includes as well the effect that detection inefficiencies and noise in the form of dark counts shown by current threshold detectors might have on the final secret key rate. Moreover, we provide estimations on the effects that statistical fluctuations due to a finite data size can have in practical implementations.

  11. Reexamination of decoy-state quantum key distribution with biased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zong-Wen; Zhou, Yi-Heng; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve the key rate of the decoy-state method, we need to jointly study yields of different bases. Given the delicate fact that pulses of the same preparation state can have different counting rates if they are measured in different bases, for example, those vacuum pulses and those single-photon pulses, existing results of decoy-state quantum key distribution using biased bases are actually flawed by assuming that they are equal. We fix this flaw through using the idea that yields of pulses prepared in different bases are the same provided that they are prepared in the same state and also measured in the same basis, for example, those single-photon pulses prepared in different bases but measured in the same basis. Based on this, we present correct formulas for the decoy-state method using biased bases. Taking the effects of statistical fluctuations into account, we then numerically study the key rates of different protocols with all parameters being fully optimized. Our result confirms the prior conclusion that the decoy-state method using biased bases can have an advantage over the symmetric protocol with unbiased bases. We obtain high key rates of our four-intensity protocol without using any vacuum source.

  12. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-06-08

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  13. Creating fluid injectivity in tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2012-06-05

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods for treating a tar sands may include heating a portion of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the portion. The heat may be controlled to increase the permeability of at least part of the portion to create an injection zone in the portion with an average permeability sufficient to allow injection of a fluid through the injection zone. A drive fluid and/or an oxidizing fluid may be provided into the injection zone. At least some hydrocarbons including mobilized hydrocarbons are produced from the portion.

  14. Decoy methods for assessing false positives and false discovery rates in shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanghui; Wu, Wells W; Zhang, Zheng; Masilamani, Shyama; Shen, Rong-Fong

    2009-01-01

    The potential of getting a significant number of false positives (FPs) in peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) obtained by proteomic database search has been well-recognized. Among the attempts to assess FPs, the concomitant use of target and decoy databases is widely practiced. By adjusting filtering criteria, FPs and false discovery rate (FDR) can be controlled at a desired level. Although the target-decoy approach is gaining in popularity, subtle differences in decoy construction (e.g., reversing vs stochastic methods), rate calculation (e.g., total vs unique PSMs), or searching (separate vs composite) do exist among various implementations. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of these differences on FP and FDR estimations using a rat kidney protein sample and the SEQUEST search engine as an example. On the effects of decoy construction, we found that, when a single scoring filter (XCorr) was used, stochastic methods generated a higher estimation of FPs and FDR than sequence reversing methods, likely due to an increase in unique peptides. This higher estimation could largely be attenuated by creating decoy databases similar in effective size but not by a simple normalization with a unique-peptide coefficient. When multiple filters were applied, the differences seen between reversing and stochastic methods significantly diminished, suggesting multiple filterings reduce the dependency on how a decoy is constructed. For a fixed set of filtering criteria, FDR and FPs estimated by using unique PSMs were almost twice those using total PSMs. The higher estimation seemed to be dependent on data acquisition setup. As to the differences between performing separate or composite searches, in general, FDR estimated from the separate search was about three times that from the composite search. The degree of difference gradually decreased as the filtering criteria became more stringent. Paradoxically, the estimated true positives in separate search were higher when multiple filters were used. By analyzing a standard protein mixture, we demonstrated that the higher estimation of FDR and FPs in the separate search likely reflected an overestimation, which could be corrected with a simple merging procedure. Our study illustrates the relative merits of different implementations of the target-decoy strategy, which should be worth contemplating when large-scale proteomic biomarker discovery is to be attempted. PMID:19061407

  15. Characterization of tar from Kentucky tar sands: trace element work. Open file report

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, T.T.; Margolis, M.J.

    1984-10-01

    The Institute for Mining and Minerals Research has an on-going tar sand research program (Project Number 25-2300) in support of synthetic-liquids technology involving Kentucky tar sands. The major goal of this program is to obtain detailed information concerning the properties of the tar so upgrading to a useful fuel can be optimized and the worth of this resource enhanced. This interim report outlines progress to date (October 15, 1984) and discusses possible research directions for future work based on their trace-element analyses and investigations into the heteroatom chemistry.

  16. Prolongation of liver allograft survival by dendritic cells modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming-Qing; Suo, Yu-Ping; Gong, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Ming-Man; Yan, Lü-Nan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To induce the tolerance of rat liver allograft by dendritic cells (DCs) modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs). METHODS: Bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs from SD rats were propagated in the presence of GM-CSF or GM-CSF + IL-4 to obtain immature DCs or mature DCs. GM-CSF+IL-4-propagated DCs were treated with double-strand NF-κB decoy ODNs containing two NF-κB binding sites or scrambled ODNs to ascertain whether NF-κB decoy ODNs might prevent DC maturation. GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GM-CSF + NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs were treated with LPS for 18 h to determine whether NF-κB decoy ODNs could prevent LPS-induced IL-12 production in DCs. NF-κB binding activities, costimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, IL-12 protein expression and allostimulatory capacity of DCs were measured with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), flow cytometry, Western blotting, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR), respectively. GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GM-CSF + IL-4 -propagated DCs, and GM-CSF + NF-κB decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs were injected intravenously into recipient LEW rats 7 d prior to liver transplantation and immediately after liver transplantation. Histological grading of liver graft rejection was determined 7 d after liver transplantation. Expression of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-γ mRNA in liver graft and in recipient spleen was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Apoptosis of liver allograft-infiltrating cells was measured with TUNEL staining. RESULTS: GM-CSF-propagated DCs, GM-CSF+NF-κB decoy ODNs-propagated DCs and GM-CSF+ scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs exhibited features of immature DCs, with similar low level of costimulatory molecule(CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, absence of NF-κB activation, and few allocostimulatory activities. GM-CSF + IL-4-propagated DCs displayed features of mature DCs, with high levels of costimulatory molecule (CD40, CD80, CD86) surface expression, marked NF-κB activation, and significant allocostimulatory activity. NF-κB decoy ODNs completely abrogated IL-4-induced DC maturation and allocostimulatory activity as well as LPS-induced NF-κB activation and IL-12 protein expression in DCs. GM-CSF + NF-κB decoy ODNs-propagated DCs promoted apoptosis of liver allograft-infiltrating cells within portal areas, and significantly decreased the expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA but markedly elevated IL-4 mRNA expression both in liver allograft and in recipient spleen, and consequently suppressed liver allograft rejection, and promoted liver allograft survival. CONCLUSION: NF-κB decoy ODNs-modified DCs can prolong liver allograft survival by promoting apoptosis of graft-infiltrating cells within portal areas as well as down-regulating IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA and up-regulating IL-4 mRNA expression both in liver graft and in recipient spleen. PMID:15285020

  17. STAT3 Decoy Oligodeoxynucleotides-Loaded Solid Lipid Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death and Inhibit Invasion in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yanhui; Zhang, Xiaolei; Xu, Xiaoxuan; Shen, Liang; Yao, Yao; Yang, Ziyan; Liu, Peishu

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of multi-functional nanoparticles have opened up tremendous opportunities for the targeted delivery of genes of interest. Cationic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) can efficiently bind nucleic acid molecules and transfect genes in vitro. Few reports have combined SLN with therapy using decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). In the present study, we prepared SLN to encapsulate STAT3 decoy ODN; then, the properties and in vitro behavior of SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes were investigated. SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes were efficiently taken up by human ovarian cancer cells and significantly suppressed cell growth. Blockage of the STAT3 pathway by SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes resulted in an evident induction of cell death, including apoptotic and autophagic death. The mechanism involved the increased expression of cleaved caspase 3, Bax, Beclin-1 and LC3-II and reduced expression of Bcl-2, pro-caspase 3, Survivin, p-Akt and p-mTOR. In addition, SLN-STAT3 decoy ODN complexes inhibited cell invasion by up-regulating E-cadherin expression and down-regulating Snail and MMP-9 expression. These findings confirmed that SLN as STAT3 decoy ODN carriers can induce cell death and inhibit invasion of ovarian cancer cells. We propose that SLN represent a potential approach for targeted gene delivery in cancer therapy. PMID:25923701

  18. E2F decoy oligodeoxynucleotides on neointimal hyperplasia in canine vein graft.

    PubMed

    Cho, W H; Lee, S O; Kim, H T; Ahn, J D; Lee, I K

    2005-01-01

    Double-stranded DNA with high affinity to E2F as a decoy cis-element blocks the activation of genes mediating the cell cycle, resulting in effective suppression of the smooth muscle cell proliferation that causes intimal hyperplasia. To evaluate the effect of the E2F decoy to suppress neointimal hyperplasia autogenous venous bypass grafts were performed in dogs after incubation with heparin (group 1), with E2F decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) (groups 2 and 3), or with a random ODN (group 4) using a Japan-liposomeal method based on a hemagglutinating virus. The intimal and medial cross-sectional surface area of the anastomotic site was measured at 4 months after bypass surgery in groups 1, 3, and 4 by computerized planimetry and at 4 weeks in group 2 to compare the intimal/medial (I/M) area ratios. Autogenous vein grafts treated with E2F decoy showed a significant reduction in I/M area ratio (0.26 +/- 0.11) compared with the heparin-treated control group (1.49 +/- 0.29) or the mismatched ODN-treated group (1.61 +/- 0.28; P = .000). There was no difference in the I/M area ratio according to experimental periods (groups 2 vs 3: 0.26 +/- 0.11 vs 0.37 +/- 0.32; P = .446) or the anastomotic sites (proximal vs distal; P = .934). In conclusion, an E2F decoy can suppress neointimal hyperplasia in autogenous vein grafts, which may prolong patency by reducing graft stenosis. PMID:15808553

  19. Suppression of cell proliferation and collagen production in cultured human hypertrophic scar fibroblasts by Sp1 decoy oligodeoxynucleotide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chenliang; Zheng, Jianghong; Wan, Weidong; Zhang, Shixin; Ding, Zhi; Mao, Guangyu; Yang, Songlin

    2013-03-01

    Hypertrophic scars are characterized by the abnormal proliferation of fibroblasts and an overproduction of collagen. The Sp1 transcription factor is involved in the stimulation of collagen synthesis. A decoy oligonucleotide (ODN) targeting Sp1 was designed and transfected into hypertrophic scar fibroblasts (HSFs) cells using cationic liposomes. The transfection efficiency was determined by flow cytometry and was observed to be 857% (n=5). Specific binding of the Sp1 decoy ODN was monitored with an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Following transfection with the decoy ODN to Sp1, cell viability and cell proliferation, which were examined by the cell counting kit WST?8, were decreased by 80% compared with untreated cells. Transforming growth factor?? (TGF??) mRNA and collagen mRNA expression were also reduced by 48% in the transfection decoy ODN group. The cell viability of HSFs after 48h of transfection with 25, 50, 100 and 150nM Sp1 decoy ODN was 0.93310.0203, 0.74790.0868, 0.5770.0347 and 0.47030.0147, respectively. The 100nM dose of the Sp1 decoy ODN inhibited the expression of typesI and III collagen by 32 and 28%, respectively (both P<0.01). TGF?? mRNA expression was also effectively suppressed by the 100nM Sp1 decoy ODN (P<0.01). The Sp1 decoy ODN inhibited cell proliferation and the expression of typesI and III collagen. Therefore, Sp1 decoy ODNs may be a promising tool for developing and testing novel therapeutic applications for treating hypertrophic scars. PMID:23338822

  20. Tar sands. (Latest citations from the COMPENDEX database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning mining of tar sands and the recovery of bitumen and other materials from tar sands. The physical and chemical properties of tar sands are discussed, and the economics of their use are considered. Processes include alkaline extraction, water cracking, catalytic cracking, and in situ combustion. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. 7 CFR 3201.76 - Asphalt and tar removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Asphalt and tar removers. 3201.76 Section 3201.76... Designated Items 3201.76 Asphalt and tar removers. (a) Definition. Cleaning agents designed to remove asphalt or tar from equipment, roads, or other surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The...

  2. 7 CFR 3201.76 - Asphalt and tar removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Asphalt and tar removers. 3201.76 Section 3201.76... Designated Items 3201.76 Asphalt and tar removers. (a) Definition. Cleaning agents designed to remove asphalt or tar from equipment, roads, or other surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10532 - Tar, brown coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tar, brown coal. 721.10532 Section 721... Tar, brown coal. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as tar, brown coal (PMN P-12-167, CAS No. 101316-83-0) is subject...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10532 - Tar, brown coal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tar, brown coal. 721.10532 Section 721... Tar, brown coal. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as tar, brown coal (PMN P-12-167, CAS No. 101316-83-0) is subject...

  5. Introducing the Teachers as Readers (TAR) Project: An Elementary Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, Mildred R.

    The Teachers as Readers (TAR) Project is a national program which helps teachers encourage children to become lifelong readers. TAR began as a pilot program in the state of Virginia in Spring 1992 as the Reading Initiative sponsored by the American Association of Publishers and the Virginia State Reading Association. The first TAR Project in

  6. Method for treatment of tar-bearing fuel gas

    SciTech Connect

    Frauen, L.L.; Kasper, S.

    1986-01-07

    A process is described of producing a fuel gas which contains condensable tar vapor when it leaves a gasifier, the improvement wherein the tar-bearing gases are treated to remove tar therefrom. The process consists of: (a) continuously conducting hot fuel gas from a gasifier to and discharging it into a spray chamber where the hot tar-bearing gas is contacted with a fine spray of water thereby cooling the tar vapor and evaporating the water to produce a fog-like dispersion of tar in an atmosphere of fuel gas with the temperature in the spray chamber maintained above the dew point of water; (b) continuously transferring the fuel gas and the dispersion of tar and water to an electrostatic precipitator and precipitating therein at least most of the condensed tar as a liquid; (c) removing the liquid tar so precipitated and conducting at least most of it to a tar burner; (d) burning the tar with no more than the stoichiometric supply of oxygen provided by air to produce oxygen-free and tar-free hot combustion gases; (e) conducting the hot combustion gases directly into a mixer into which the fuel gas and water vapor flows from the precipitator, thereby adding to the fuel gas the sensible heat of the combustion gases; and (f) conducting the mixture so produced to a place of use as a hot fuel gas mixture.

  7. Solvent extraction of southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-05-01

    The socioeconomic aspects of the tar sands recovery were investigated by Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. Mineral Resources Institute at the University of Alabama conducted characterization and beneficiation studies on Alabama tar sands. Two sources in the state were identified, namely, Black Wax Hill and Spring Creek. Samples were obtained, beneficiated, then shared with the University of Arkansas. The University of Arkansas conducted research in three areas, namely, solvation and characterization of the tar sands phase equilibria as well as the design and operation of a bench-scale batch model. In the solvation studies, the results indicate that grinding the tar sands too fine results in downstream processing problems. Also, preliminary indications are that the beneficiation step may not be necessary in the solvation of the bitumen. The phase equilibria of the heptane/brine/isopropyl alcohol/XTOL{trademark} system is very complex. The salt concentration of the brine is significant in the partitioning of the isopropanol and heptane. Equilibrium data for some of the various combinations of chemical constituents have been obtained. Also included are appendices: statistical data on highways; petrography; Dean-Starke technique; FTIR and NMR spectra; FORTRAN computer program for GC; simulation of flash behavior for IPA/brine/fatty acid/N-C{sub 7} mixture; and previous progress reports. 32 figs., 28 tabs.

  8. Process for extracting oil from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, J.B.; Russo, A.

    1990-10-30

    This patent describes a process for the extraction of oil and bitumen fractions from tar sands. It comprises: heating the tar sands within the range of about seventy degrees Fahrenheit (70{degrees} F.) to about one hundred fifty five degrees Fahrenheit (155{degrees} F.); mixing the mined tar sands with an aqueous solution of water soluble separation chemicals that induce separation of the oil and bitumen from the sand under such temperature conditions, the chemicals being such that they also induce separation of the oil and bitumen from the water and separation chemicals. The separation chemicals comprise an aqueous solution of an effective amount of water conditioner, wetting agents and a coupling agent selected from the group consisting of sulfonated fatty acid salts; holding the mined tar sands and the separation chemicals for a sufficient period of time under sufficient quiescent conditions that the oil and bitumen become substantially separated from the sands, the separated oil and bitumen floating on the water and the sand sinking in the water; segregation of the oil or bitumen fractions from the water and separation chemicals and retention of the fractions for use as a chemical resource.

  9. Coal tar analysis by LC/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Herod, A.A.; Ladner, W.R.; Stokes, B.J.; Berry, A.J.; Games, D.E.

    1986-04-01

    The application of LC/MS to the analysis of an aromatic fraction of a hydropyrolysis tar is described. The results are compared with those obtained by GC/MS, low eV probe mass spectrometry and field desorption mass spectrometry.

  10. Comparative anti-dandruff efficacy between a tar and a non-tar shampoo.

    PubMed

    Pirard-Franchimont, C; Pirard, G E; Vroome, V; Lin, G C; Appa, Y

    2000-01-01

    A randomized double-blind clinical study was conducted on two groups of 30 volunteers using either a non-tar shampoo (2% salicylic acid, 0.75% piroctone olamine and 0.5% elubiol) or a 0.5% coal tar shampoo. Subjects were diagnosed as having moderate to marked dandruff. The study consisted of a 3-week washout, followed by a 4-week treatment and a 4-week posttreatment regression phase. The clinical evaluations and subject self-assessments showed that the non-tar shampoo was as effective as the tar shampoo. Both received high approval ratings (> or =70%). Biometrological methods proved to be more sensitive than clinical evaluations to assess the efficacy of the shampoos. The non-tar shampoo yielded a significantly better reduction of Malassezia spp. counts (p<0.02) during the treatment phase and reduced the spontaneous increase in squamometry values (p< 0.01) during the posttreatment phase. It is concluded that a formulation associating salicylic acid, piroctone olamine and elubiol exhibited increased beneficial effects compared to the coal tar shampoo. PMID:10773717

  11. Environmental survey - tar sands in situ processing research program (Vernal, Uintah County, Utah). [Reverse-forward combustion; steam injection

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Q.

    1980-03-01

    Research will be done on the reverse-forward combustion and steam injection for the in-situ recovery of oil from tar sands. This environmental survey will serve as a guideline for the consideration of environmental consequences of such research. It covers the construction phase, operational phase, description of the environment, potential impacts and mitigations, coordination, and alternatives. (DLC)

  12. Investigation of coal tar mobility at a former MGP site

    SciTech Connect

    Moo-Young, H.K.; Mo, X.H.; Waterman, R.; Coleman, A.; Saroff, S.

    2009-11-15

    The presence of coal tar in the subsurface of former manufactured gas plant sites poses an environmental hazard and a potential threat to public health. Coal tar can release various chemical compounds that are transported into the groundwater. Before any efforts can be made to remove coal tar from contaminated subsurface soils, it is recommended to characterize coal tar properties and composition and to delineate the residual saturation point between mobile and immobile coal tar. This paper presents a new innovative field device, the Res-SAT field tool, and laboratory procedures that can be used to determine the saturation-capillary pressure relationship for a soil-water coal-tar system and the critical pressure for coal tar mobility.

  13. Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction-Mediated Delivery of a Transcription Factor Decoy Inhibits STAT3 Signaling and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Carson, Andrew R.; McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Hasjim, Bima; Lavery, Linda; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in many cancers where it acts to promote tumor progression. A STAT3-specific transcription factor decoy has been developed to suppress STAT3 downstream signaling, but a delivery strategy is needed to improve clinical translation. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has been shown to enhance image-guided local delivery of molecular therapeutics to a target site. The objective of this study was to deliver STAT3 decoy to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors using UTMD to disrupt STAT3 signaling and inhibit tumor growth. Studies performed demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles inhibited STAT3 signaling in SCC cells in vitro. Studies performed in vivo demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles induced significant tumor growth inhibition (31-51% reduced tumor volume vs. controls, p < 0.05) in mice bearing SCC tumors. Furthermore, expression of STAT3 downstream target genes (Bcl-xL and cyclin D1) was significantly reduced (34-39%, p < 0.05) in tumors receiving UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles compared to controls. In addition, the quantity of radiolabeled STAT3 decoy detected in tumors eight hours after treatment was significantly higher with UTMD treatment compared to controls (70-150%, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that UTMD can increase delivery of a transcription factor decoy to tumors in vivo and that the decoy can inhibit STAT3 signaling and tumor growth. These results suggest that UTMD treatment holds potential for clinical use to increase the concentration of a transcription factor signaling inhibitor in the tumor. PMID:26681983

  14. Integration of decoy domains derived from protein targets of pathogen effectors into plant immune receptors is widespread.

    PubMed

    Kroj, Thomas; Chanclud, Emilie; Michel-Romiti, Corinne; Grand, Xavier; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2016-04-01

    Plant immune receptors of the class of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat domain (NLR) proteins can contain additional domains besides canonical NB-ARC (nucleotide-binding adaptor shared by APAF-1, R proteins, and CED-4 (NB-ARC)) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. Recent research suggests that these additional domains act as integrated decoys recognizing effectors from pathogens. Proteins homologous to integrated decoys are suspected to be effector targets and involved in disease or resistance. Here, we scrutinized 31 entire plant genomes to identify putative integrated decoy domains in NLR proteins using the Interpro search. The involvement of the Zinc Finger-BED type (ZBED) protein containing a putative decoy domain, called BED, in rice (Oryza sativa) resistance was investigated by evaluating susceptibility to the blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae in rice over-expression and knock-out mutants. This analysis showed that all plants tested had integrated various atypical protein domains into their NLR proteins (on average 3.5% of all NLR proteins). We also demonstrated that modifying the expression of the ZBED gene modified disease susceptibility. This study suggests that integration of decoy domains in NLR immune receptors is widespread and frequent in plants. The integrated decoy model is therefore a powerful concept to identify new proteins involved in disease resistance. Further in-depth examination of additional domains in NLR proteins promises to unravel many new proteins of the plant immune system. PMID:26848538

  15. A simple reference state makes a significant improvement in near-native selections from structurally refined docking decoys

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Shide; Liu, Song; Zhang, Chi; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2007-01-01

    Near-native selections from docking decoys have proved challenging especially when unbound proteins are used in the molecular docking. One reason is that significant atomic clashes in docking decoys lead to poor predictions of binding affinities of near native decoys. Atomic clashes can be removed by structural refinement through energy minimization. Such an energy minimization, however, will lead to an unrealistic bias toward docked structures with large interfaces. Here, we extend an empirical energy function developed for protein design to proteinprotein docking selection by introducing a simple reference state that removes the unrealistic dependence of binding affinity of docking decoys on the buried solvent accessible surface area of interface. The energy function called EMPIRE (EMpirical Protein-InteRaction Energy), when coupled with a refinement strategy, is found to provide a significantly improved success rate in near native selections when applied to RosettaDock and refined ZDOCK docking decoys. Our work underlines the importance of removing nonspecific interactions from specific ones in near native selections from docking decoys. PMID:17623864

  16. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources.

    PubMed

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation. PMID:26471947

  17. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-10-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation.

  18. Finite-key security analyses on passive decoy-state QKD protocols with different unstable sources

    PubMed Central

    Song, Ting-Ting; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Yu-Kun; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2015-01-01

    In quantum communication, passive decoy-state QKD protocols can eliminate many side channels, but the protocols without any finite-key analyses are not suitable for in practice. The finite-key securities of passive decoy-state (PDS) QKD protocols with two different unstable sources, type-II parametric down-convention (PDC) and phase randomized weak coherent pulses (WCPs), are analyzed in our paper. According to the PDS QKD protocols, we establish an optimizing programming respectively and obtain the lower bounds of finite-key rates. Under some reasonable values of quantum setup parameters, the lower bounds of finite-key rates are simulated. The simulation results show that at different transmission distances, the affections of different fluctuations on key rates are different. Moreover, the PDS QKD protocol with an unstable PDC source can resist more intensity fluctuations and more statistical fluctuation. PMID:26471947

  19. Dual GPCR and GAG mimicry by the M3 chemokine decoy receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander-Brett, Jennifer M.; Fremont, Daved H.

    2008-09-23

    Viruses have evolved a myriad of evasion strategies focused on undermining chemokine-mediated immune surveillance, exemplified by the mouse {gamma}-herpesvirus 68 M3 decoy receptor. Crystal structures of M3 in complex with C chemokine ligand 1/lymphotactin and CC chemokine ligand 2/monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 reveal that invariant chemokine features associated with G protein-coupled receptor binding are primarily recognized by the decoy C-terminal domain, whereas the N-terminal domain (NTD) reconfigures to engage divergent basic residue clusters on the surface of chemokines. Favorable electrostatic forces dramatically enhance the association kinetics of chemokine binding by M3, with a primary role ascribed to acidic NTD regions that effectively mimic glycosaminoglycan interactions. Thus, M3 employs two distinct mechanisms of chemical imitation to potently sequester chemokines, thereby inhibiting chemokine receptor binding events as well as the formation of chemotactic gradients necessary for directed leukocyte trafficking.

  20. Toward pest control via mass production of realistic decoys of insects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulsifer, Drew P.; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Kumar, Jayant; Baker, Thomas C.; Martn-Palma, Ral J.

    2012-04-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive species of beetles threatening the ash trees of North America. The species exhibits a mating behavior in which a flying male will first spot a stationary female at rest and then execute a pouncing maneuver to dive sharply onto her. The pouncing behavior appears to be cued by some visual signal from the top surface of the female's body. We have adopted bioreplication techniques to fabricate artificial visual decoys that could be used to detect, monitor, and slow the spread of EAB populations across North America. Using a negative die made of nickel and a positive die made of a hard polymer, we have stamped a polymer sheet to produce these decoys. Our bioreplication procedure is industrially scalable.

  1. Surveillance of Influenza Viruses in Waterfowl Used As Decoys in Andalusia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Jurado-Tarifa, Estefana; Napp, Sebastian; Gmez-Pacheco, Juan Manuel; Fernndez-Morente, Manuel; Jan-Tllez, Juan Antonio; Arenas, Antonio; Garca-Bocanegra, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in waterfowl used as decoys in Andalusia, southern Spain. A total of 2319 aquatic birds from 193 flocks were analyzed before and after the hunting season 20112012. In the first sampling, 403 out of 2319 (18.0%, CI95%: 15.819.0) decoys showed antibodies against AIVs by ELISA. The AI seroprevalence was significantly higher in geese (21.0%) than in ducks (11.7%) (P<0.001). Besides, the spatial distribution of AIVs was not homogeneous as significant differences among regions were observed. The prevalence of antibodies against AIVs subtypes H5 and H7 were 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively, using hemagglutination inhibition test (HI). The overall and H5 seroprevalences slightly increased after the hunting period (to 19.2% and 1.4%, respectively), while the H7 seroprevalence remained at the same level (0.3%). The proportion of flocks infected by AIVs was 65.3%, while 11.2% and 4.9% of flocks were positive for H5 and H7, respectively. Viral shedding was not detected in any of the 47 samples positive by both ELISA and HI, tested by RRT-PCR. The individual incidence after the hunting season was 3.4%. The fact that 57 animals seroconverted, 15 of which were confirmed by HI (12 H5 and 3 H7), was indication of contact with AIVs during the hunting period. The results indicate that waterfowl used as decoys are frequently exposed to AIVs and may be potentially useful as sentinels for AIVs monitoring. The seroprevalence detected and the seropositivity against AIVs H5 and H7, suggest that decoys can act as reservoirs of AIVs, which may be of animal and public health concern. PMID:24901946

  2. Surveillance of influenza viruses in waterfowl used as decoys in Andalusia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Tarifa, Estefana; Napp, Sebastian; Gmez-Pacheco, Juan Manuel; Fernndez-Morente, Manuel; Jan-Tllez, Juan Antonio; Arenas, Antonio; Garca-Bocanegra, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    A longitudinal study was carried out to determine the seroprevalence of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in waterfowl used as decoys in Andalusia, southern Spain. A total of 2319 aquatic birds from 193 flocks were analyzed before and after the hunting season 2011-2012. In the first sampling, 403 out of 2319 (18.0%, CI95%: 15.8-19.0) decoys showed antibodies against AIVs by ELISA. The AI seroprevalence was significantly higher in geese (21.0%) than in ducks (11.7%) (P<0.001). Besides, the spatial distribution of AIVs was not homogeneous as significant differences among regions were observed. The prevalence of antibodies against AIVs subtypes H5 and H7 were 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively, using hemagglutination inhibition test (HI). The overall and H5 seroprevalences slightly increased after the hunting period (to 19.2% and 1.4%, respectively), while the H7 seroprevalence remained at the same level (0.3%). The proportion of flocks infected by AIVs was 65.3%, while 11.2% and 4.9% of flocks were positive for H5 and H7, respectively. Viral shedding was not detected in any of the 47 samples positive by both ELISA and HI, tested by RRT-PCR. The individual incidence after the hunting season was 3.4%. The fact that 57 animals seroconverted, 15 of which were confirmed by HI (12 H5 and 3 H7), was indication of contact with AIVs during the hunting period. The results indicate that waterfowl used as decoys are frequently exposed to AIVs and may be potentially useful as sentinels for AIVs monitoring. The seroprevalence detected and the seropositivity against AIVs H5 and H7, suggest that decoys can act as reservoirs of AIVs, which may be of animal and public health concern. PMID:24901946

  3. Effects of Smad decoy ODN on shear stress-induced atherosclerotic ApoE-/-mouse

    PubMed Central

    An, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Woo-Ram; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Kim, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Woon-Hae; Park, Kwan-Kyu; Youn, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex disease which involves both genetic and environmental factors in its development and progression. Shear stress is the drag force per unit area acting on the endothelium as a result of blood flow, and it plays a critical role in plaque location and progression. TGF-β1 is often regarded to have pro-atherosclerotic effect on vascular disease. TGF-β1 downstream targets Smad, for regulating a set of genes associated with atherosclerosis. Therefore, modulation of TGF-β1 and Smad expression may be the important targets for the prevention and treatment of shear stress-induced vascular disease. However, the precise mechanism of the anti-atherosclerotic effects of novel therapeutic approach has not been elucidated by using animal models regarding the shear stress-induced vascular disease. Therefore, we designed to test whether Smad decoy ODN would prevent the development of atherosclerosis in the shear stress-induced ApoE-/-mice on a western diet. We examined the effect of cast placement on the development of atherosclerosis, and the carotid artery was harvested at the sacrifice to observe histological changes. Also, we evaluated the impact of Smad decoy ODN in the regulation of genes expression related to atherosclerosis, including TGF-β1, PAI-1, and α-SMA. Our results showed that western diet with cast placement developed atherosclerosis in ApoE-/-mouse. Also, administration of Smad decoy ODN decreases the expression of TGF-β1, PAI-1, and α-SMA. These results demonstrate the potential of Smad decoy ODN to prevent the progression of atherosclerosis in ApoE-/-mouse model with western diet and shear stress. PMID:26097583

  4. Nigeria to step up tar sands activity

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    The Nigerian government has directed its Ministry of Mines, Power and Steel to assume responsibility for the exploration and exploitation of tar sands deposits in Bendel, Ondo and Oyo States. The directive resulted from a survey report by the University of Ife's geological consultancy unit on bituminous sand deposits in the area. The statement said the government was satisfied that there were large commercial quantities of the sands in the three states. The survey had reported that Nigeria could recover between 31 and 40 billion barrels of heavy crude from the tar sand deposits. Exploration for hydrocarbons is currently going on in Anambra and Lake Chad basins as well as the Benue Trough. Apart from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Shell Petroleum and Gulf Oil have begun exploration activities in the Ondo area. Meanwhile, Nigeria has had to import heavy crude from Venezuela, for processing at the Kaduna refinery.

  5. Aspects of tar sands development in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Adewusi, V.A. )

    1992-07-01

    Development of Nigerian massive reserves of crude bitumen and associated heavy oil is imminent in view of the impacts that the huge importation of these materials and their products have on the nation's economy, coupled with the depleting reserves of Nigeria and highlights the appropriate production technology options and their environmental implications. The utilization potentials of these resources are also enumerated, as well as the government's role in achieving accelerated, long-term tar sands development in the country.

  6. Double-stranded RNA transcribed from vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide acts as transcription factor decoy

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xiao; Gang, Yi; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Jiayin; Zhao, Lina; Xu, Li; Liu, Zhiguo

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • A shRNA vector based transcription factor decoy, VB-ODN, was designed. • VB-ODN for NF-κB inhibited cell viability in HEK293 cells. • VB-ODN inhibited expression of downstream genes of target transcription factors. • VB-ODN may enhance nuclear entry ratio for its feasibility of virus production. - Abstract: In this study, we designed a short hairpin RNA vector-based oligodeoxynucleotide (VB-ODN) carrying transcription factor (TF) consensus sequence which could function as a decoy to block TF activity. Specifically, VB-ODN for Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) could inhibit cell viability and decrease downstream gene expression in HEK293 cells without affecting expression of NF-κB itself. The specific binding between VB-ODN produced double-stranded RNA and NF-κB was evidenced by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Moreover, similar VB-ODNs designed for three other TFs also inhibit their downstream gene expression but not that of themselves. Our study provides a new design of decoy for blocking TF activity.

  7. Decoy Receptor CXCR7 Modulates Adrenomedullin-Mediated Cardiac and Lymphatic Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Klara R.; Karpinich, Natalie O.; Espenschied, Scott T.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Dunworth, William P.; Hoopes, Samantha L.; Kushner, Erich J.; Bautch, Victoria L.; Caron, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Atypical 7-transmembrane receptors, often called decoy receptors, act promiscuously as molecular sinks to regulate ligand bioavailability and consequently temper the signaling of canonical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways. Loss of mammalian CXCR7, the most recently described decoy receptor, results in postnatal lethality due to aberrant cardiac development and myocyte hyperplasia. Here, we provide the molecular underpinning for this proliferative phenotype by demonstrating that the dosage and signaling of adrenomedullin (Adm = gene, AM = protein)a mitogenic peptide-hormone required for normal cardiovascular developmentis tightly controlled by CXCR7. To this end, Cxcr7?/? mice exhibit gain-of-function cardiac and lymphatic vascular phenotypes which can be reversed upon genetic depletion of adrenomedullin ligand. In addition to identifying a biological ligand accountable for the phenotypes of Cxcr7?/? mice, these results reveal a previously underappreciated role for decoy receptors as molecular rheostats in controlling the timing and extent of GPCR-mediated cardiac and vascular development. PMID:25203207

  8. Decoy receptor CXCR7 modulates adrenomedullin-mediated cardiac and lymphatic vascular development.

    PubMed

    Klein, Klara R; Karpinich, Natalie O; Espenschied, Scott T; Willcockson, Helen H; Dunworth, William P; Hoopes, Samantha L; Kushner, Erich J; Bautch, Victoria L; Caron, Kathleen M

    2014-09-01

    Atypical 7-transmembrane receptors, often called decoy receptors, act promiscuously as molecular sinks to regulate ligand bioavailability and consequently temper the signaling of canonical G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) pathways. Loss of mammalian CXCR7, the most recently described decoy receptor, results in postnatal lethality due to aberrant cardiac development and myocyte hyperplasia. Here, we provide the molecular underpinning for this proliferative phenotype by demonstrating that the dosage and signaling of adrenomedullin (Adm, gene; AM, protein)-a mitogenic peptide hormone required for normal cardiovascular development-is tightly controlled by CXCR7. To this end, Cxcr7(-/-) mice exhibit gain-of-function cardiac and lymphatic vascular phenotypes that can be reversed upon genetic depletion of adrenomedullin ligand. In addition to identifying a biological ligand accountable for the phenotypes of Cxcr7(-/-) mice, these results reveal a previously underappreciated role for decoy receptors as molecular rheostats in controlling the timing and extent of GPCR-mediated cardiac and vascular development. PMID:25203207

  9. An engineered Axl ‘decoy receptor’ effectively silences the Gas6/Axl signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Kariolis, Mihalis S.; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Jones, Douglas S.; Kapur, Shiven; Mathews, Irimpan I.; Giaccia, Amato J.; Cochran, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through the Axl receptor tyrosine kinase has been associated with a myriad of human diseases, most notably metastatic cancer, identifying Axl and its ligand Gas6 as important therapeutic targets. Using rational and combinatorial approaches, we engineered an Axl ‘decoy receptor’ that binds Gas6 with high affinity and inhibits its function, offering an alternative approach from drug discovery efforts that directly target Axl. Four mutations within this high affinity Axl variant caused structural alterations in side chains across the Gas6/Axl binding interface, stabilizing a conformational change on Gas6. When reformatted as an Fc-fusion, the engineered decoy receptor bound to Gas6 with femtomolar affinity, an 80-fold improvement compared to the wild-type Axl receptor, allowing effective sequestration of Gas6 and specific abrogation of Axl signaling. Moreover, increased Gas6 binding affinity was critical and correlative with the ability of decoy receptors to potently inhibit metastasis and disease progression in vivo. PMID:25242553

  10. Stabilization/solidification of acid tars.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sunday A; Stegemann, Julia A

    2010-01-01

    This work involve a systematic treatability study of the treatment of acid tars (AT), a waste generated during the processing of petroleum and petrochemical, by stabilization/solidification with Portland cement (CEM I), with the addition of high carbon fly ash (HCFA), an industrial by-product, as a novel sorbent for organic contaminants. A factorial design experiment was adopted to investigate the effects of organic content, HCFA:AT ratio, percentage CEM I addition, and curing time on response variables including unconfined compressive strength (UCS), hydraulic conductivity, porosity, and leachability-related properties of the stabilized/solidified (s/s) products, and to assess management options for the s/s products based on performance criteria adapted from regulatory and other guidance. Results show that all studied factors had significant effects on the tested properties of the s/s products. Acid tar reduced UCS, but strength increase was observed with increased curing time. Increased HCFA addition led to an improvement in hydraulic conductivity. Assessment of management options indicates that the treated acid tars could find application as controlled low-strength materials, landfill liner, and landfill daily cover. The work demonstrates how a systematic treatability study can be used to develop a S/S operating window for management of a particular waste type. PMID:20473807

  11. Tar mobilization studies for a carbonate reservoir in Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Sarbar, M.; Alqam, M.

    1995-12-31

    The presence of tar material in some parts of a Saudi Arabian carbonate reservoir affects somewhat both production of light oil, as well as hindering water injection used for pressure maintenance. Therefore, mobilization of some of this tar material will enhance reservoir permeability, especially around the wellbores, and will have a positive impact on oil production. Application of non-thermal methods is the most desirable way to achieve this. Lab analyses indicate that the viscosity of this tar material is much higher than any heavy tar currently being produced (such as Athabasca tar). Moreover, the weight % of strong aromatic solvent-insoluble tar material is 3 to 45 wt% of the total organic matter which varies between 1.0 to 5.5 wt% of the total weight of various rock samples tested. In addition Results of core flood tests indicate that: (a) injection of 1 wt% NaOH in water displayed an optimum effect on mobilizing both soluble and insoluble tar material from the core samples and enhancing the permeability significantly; (b) additional permeability enhancement was observed by injection of an aromatic solvent such as toluene or a diluted surfactant solution (more than 1000-fold increase in permeability was observed); (c) acidizing core samples which contain large quantities of tar material did not improve the permeability as this caused migration of some tar material which was released by the dissolution of the rock matrix. This then acted as a pore-blocking material, since tar is not soluble in injected acid solution.

  12. Final safety assessment of Coal Tar as used in cosmetics.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Coal Tar is a semisolid by-product obtained in the destructive distillation of bituminous coal, which functions in cosmetic products as a cosmetic biocide and denaturant--antidandruff agent is also listed as a function, but this is considered an over-the-counter (OTC) drug use. Coal Tar is a nearly black, viscous liquid, heavier than water, with a naphthalene-like odor and a sharp burning taste, produced in cooking ovens as a by-product in the manufacture of coke. Crude Coal Tar is composed of 48% hydrocarbons, 42% carbon, and 10% water. In 2002, Coal Tar was reported to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to be used in four formulations, all of which appear to be OTC drug products. Coal Tar is monographed by the FDA as Category I (safe and effective) OTC drug ingredient for use in the treatment of dandruff, seborrhoea, and psoriasis. Coal Tar is absorbed through the skin of animals and humans and is systemically distributed. In short-term studies, mice fed a diet containing Coal Tar found it unpalatable, but no adverse effects were reported other than weight loss; rats injected with Coal Tar experienced malaise in one study and decreased water intake and increased liver weights in another; rabbits injected with Coal Tar residue experienced eating avoidance, respiratory difficulty, sneezing, and weight loss. In a subchronic neurotoxicity study using mice, a mixture of phenols, cresols, and xylenols at concentrations approximately equal to those expected in Coal Tar extracts produced regionally selective effects, with a rank order of corpus striatum > cerebellum > cerebral cortex. Coal Tar applied to the backs of guinea pigs increases epidermal thickness. Painting female rabbits with tar decreases the absolute and relative weights of the ovaries and decreased the number of interstitial cells in the ovary. Four therapeutic Coal Tar preparations used in the treatment of psoriasis were mutagenic in the Ames assay. Urine and blood from patients treated with Coal Tar were genotoxic in bacterial assays. Coal Tar was genotoxic in a mammalian genotoxicity assay and induced DNA adducts in various tissue types. Chronic exposure of mice to Coal Tar significantly decreased survival and liver neoplasms were seen in a significant dose-related trend; in other studies using mice lung tumors and perianal skin cancers were found. Coal Tar was comedogenic in three small clinical studies. Folliculitis is associated with the prolonged use of some tars. Several published reports describe cases of contact sensitivity to Coal Tar. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which make up Coal Tar, are photosensitizers and cause phototoxicity by an oxygen-dependent mechanism. A retrospective study of the reproductive toxicity of Coal Tar in humans compared exposed women to controls and found little difference in spontaneous abortion and congenital disorders. Cancer epidemiology studies of patients who have received Coal Tar therapy of one form or other have failed to link treatment with an increase in the risk of cancer. Although the Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel believes that Coal Tar use as an antidandruff ingredient in OTC drug preparations is adequately addressed by the FDA regulations, the Panel also believes that the appropriate concentration of use of Coal Tar in cosmetic formulations should be that level that does not have a biological effect in the user. Additional data needed to make a safety assessment include product types in which Coal Tar is used (other than as an OTC drug ingredient), use concentrations, and the maximum concentration that does not induce a biological effect in users. PMID:18830861

  13. A Helpful Serving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockower, David

    2006-01-01

    This article briefly describes how a fifth-grade class collaborated with a downtown diner for several months and then actually ran the restaurant for four hours. Through the Chatters Cafe, a local high school cafe that serves as a culinary arts training ground for high school students, fifth graders had the opportunity to prepare and serve dinner…

  14. A Helpful Serving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockower, David

    2006-01-01

    This article briefly describes how a fifth-grade class collaborated with a downtown diner for several months and then actually ran the restaurant for four hours. Through the Chatters Cafe, a local high school cafe that serves as a culinary arts training ground for high school students, fifth graders had the opportunity to prepare and serve dinner

  15. Nuclear factor-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotides attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat liver graft

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming-Qing; Shuai, Xiu-Rong; Yan, Mao-Lin; Zhang, Ming-Man; Yan, Lu-Nan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the protective effect of NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in rat liver graft. METHODS: Orthotopic syngeneic rat liver transplantation was performed with 3 h of cold preservation of liver graft in University of Wisconsin solution containing phosphorothioated double-stranded NF-?B decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs. NF-?B decoy ODNs or scrambled ODNs were injected intravenously into donor and recipient rats 6 and 1 h before operation, respectively. Recipients were killed 0 to 16 h after liver graft reperfusion. NF-?B activity in the liver graft was analyzed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Hepatic mRNA expression of TNF-?, IFN-? and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) were determined by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Serum levels of TNF-? and IFN-? were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Serum level of alanine transaminase (ALT) was measured using a diagnostic kit. Liver graft myeloperoxidase (MPO) content was assessed. RESULTS: NF-?B activation in liver graft was induced in a time-dependent manner, and NF-?B remained activated for 16 h after graft reperfusion. NF-?B activation in liver graft was significant at 2 to 8 h and slightly decreased at 16 h after graft reperfusion. Administration of NF-?B decoy ODNs significantly suppressed NF-?B activation as well as mRNA expression of TNF-?, IFN-? and ICAM-1 in the liver graft. The hepatic NF-?B DNA binding activity [presented as integral optical density (IOD) value] in the NF-?B decoy ODNs treatment group rat was significantly lower than that of the I/R group rat (2.160.78 vs 36.786.35 and 3.060.84 vs 47.62 8.71 for IOD value after 4 and 8 h of reperfusion, respectively, P<0.001). The hepatic mRNA expression level of TNF-?, IFN-? and ICAM-1 [presented as percent of ?-actin mRNA (%)] in the NF-?B decoy ODNs treatment group rat was significantly lower than that of the I/R group rat (8.313.48 vs 46.3710.65 and 7.46 3.72 vs 74.8212.25 for hepatic TNF-? mRNA, 5.582.16 vs 50.469.35 and 6.472.53 vs 69.7213.41 for hepatic IFN-? mRNA, 6.792.83 vs 46.238.74 and 5.282.46 vs 67.4410.12 for hepatic ICAM-1 mRNA expression after 4 and 8 h of reperfusion, respectively, P<0.001). Administration of NF-?B decoy ODNs almost completely abolished the increase of serum level of TNF-? and IFN-? induced by hepatic ischemia/reperfusion, the serum level (pg/mL) of TNF-? and IFN-? in the NF-?B decoy ODNs treatment group rat was significantly lower than that of the I/R group rat (42.713.6 vs 176.715.8 and 48.415.1 vs 216.817.6 for TNF-? level, 31.512.1 vs 102.114.5 and 40.213.5 vs 118.616.7 for IFN-? level after 4 and 8 h of reperfusion, respectively, P<0.001). Liver graft neutrophil recruitment indicated by MPO content and hepatocellular injury indicated by serum ALT level were significantly reduced by NF-?B decoy ODNs, the hepatic MPO content (A655) and serum ALT level (IU/L) in the NF-?B decoy ODNs treatment group rat was significantly lower than that of the I/R group rat (0.170.07 vs 1.120.25 and 0.460.17 vs 1.460.32 for hepatic MPO content, 71.733.2 vs 286.149.6 and 84.339.7 vs 467.862.3 for ALT level after 4 and 8 h of reperfusion, respectively, P<0.001). CONCLUSION: The data suggest that NF-?B decoy ODNs protects against I/R injury in liver graft by suppressing NF-?B activation and subsequent expression of proinflammatory mediators. PMID:16437600

  16. Carcinogenic effects in A/J mice of particulate of a coal-tar paint used in potable water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, M.; Laurie, R.D.; Bull, R.J.; Stober, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Coal-tar paints are among the products used as inside coatings for water pipes and storage tanks to retard corrosion in potable water-supply systems. Four different formulations of these paints were tested in earlier work by this laboratory in the Ames mutagenesis and the mouse skin carcinogenesis bioassays(6). The paint most active in these assays was then tested in a particulate form in the lung adenoma assay with A/J mice. The paint was applied to clean glass plates, cured, collected and homogenized in 2% Emulphor. Doses of this coal-tar suspension were administered by gavage at 1.0, 10.0, and 55.0 mg in 0.2 ml per mouse 3 x weekly for 8 weeks. The total doses of coal-tar paint were 24, 240, and 1320 mg/mouse. Benzo(a)pyrene, administered in a parallel schedule to a total dose of 6 mg/mouse, served as positive control. A negative control group received an equivalent volume of 2% Emulphor. Animals were sacrificed at 9 months of age (8 months after first dose) and lung adenomas counted. A dose-related response, in the average number of lung tumors per mouse, was observed with the coal-tar particulate. There were also squamous-cell tumors of the forestomach in 42% of the mice receiving 55.0 mg coal tar paint per application.

  17. The potential use of tar sand bitumen as paving asphalt

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of several tar sand asphalts prepared in past studies by several different investigators were compared with each other and with the properties of petroleum asphalts. These results were reviewed and discussed with regard to the potential use of tar sand bitumen in pavement applications. The data show that tar sand bitumen has good potential for use in highway pavements that meet today's performance specifications. No deficiencies in the tar sand asphalts were found that would be expected to seriously affect performance. On the other hand, the data indicate that some tar sand asphalts may have superior aging characteristics, being relatively resistant to oxidative age hardening compared with typical petroleum asphalts. Asphalt-aggregate mixtures prepared using two tar sand asphalts also showed acceptable strength properties and excellent resistance to moisture-induced damage.

  18. Manufacture of road paving asphalt using coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, T.Y.

    1986-09-01

    Coal tar is a ready source of asphaltenes needed in asphalt production. Coal tar pitch itself, however, is unsuitable for making road-paving asphalt, since the resulting material has low ductility, high temperature sensitivity, and low resistance to wear. For this reason, in England, where replacing imported petroleum with local products was important 10 to 20 years ago, it was required that no more than 10 to 20 percent coal tar pitch be incorporated in road pavement. At higher concentrations, the pitch separates from the petroleum-derived asphalt, causing brittleness and cracking. To make a good asphalt from coal tar pitch, chemical modification or blending with additives appears necessary. In this study, the potentials are for producing road-paving asphalt from coal tar and available inexpensive petroleum fractions are explored. The objective of the study is to develop new uses of coal tar for asphalt production and to free the petroleum residue for upgrading to gasoline and diesel fuels.

  19. Absorptive removal of biomass tar using water and oily materials.

    PubMed

    Phuphuakrat, Thana; Namioka, Tomoaki; Yoshikawa, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common choice of absorption medium selected in many gasification systems. Because of poor solubility of tar in water, hydrophobic absorbents (diesel fuel, biodiesel fuel, vegetable oil, and engine oil) were studied on their absorption efficiency of biomass tar and compared with water. The results showed that only 31.8% of gravimetric tar was removed by the water scrubber, whereas the highest removal of gravimetric tar was obtained by a vegetable oil scrubber with a removal efficiency of 60.4%. When focusing on light PAH tar removal, the absorption efficiency can be ranked in the following order; diesel fuel>vegetable oil>biodiesel fuel>engine oil>water. On the other hand, an increase in gravimetric tar was observed for diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel scrubbers because of their easy evaporation. Therefore, the vegetable oil is recommended as the best absorbent to be used in gasification systems. PMID:20801021

  20. Intracellular distribution of NFkappaB decoy and its inhibitory effect on TNFalpha production by LPS stimulated RAW 264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Yuriko; Kawakami, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Makiya; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2005-10-01

    Nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) is a transcriptional factor for the expression of many cytokines that are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Unstimulated NFkappaB sequestered in the cytoplasm bound to inhibitory proteins is called IkappaBs. Many activators of NFkappaB cause degradation of IkappaB proteins and free NFkappaB can enter the nucleus and induce gene expression. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between the intracellular distribution and pharmacological effect of NFkappaB decoy in RAW 264.7 cells. Most of the fluorescent labeled NFkappaB decoy was observed in the cytoplasm both with or without cationic transfection without LPS stimulation. Furthermore, under LPS stimulation, most of NFkappaB decoy was also observed in the cytoplasm. However, NFkappaB decoy effectively inhibited the production of TNFalpha in RAW 264.7 cells. The inhibitory effect of TNFalpha production by NFkappaB decoy transfected by cationic liposomes was much stronger than that by naked NFkappaB decoy, because the amount of cellular association of NFkappaB transfected by cationic liposome decoy was 7 times higher than that of naked NFkappaB decoy. This information is of great value for the design of NFkappaB decoy carrier systems. PMID:16125268

  1. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) and hopanes in stranded tar-balls on the coasts of Peninsular Malaysia: applications of biomarkers for identifying sources of oil pollution.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, M P; Okuda, T; Takada, H

    2001-12-01

    Malaysian coasts are subjected to various threats of petroleum pollution including routine and accidental oil spill from tankers, spillage of crude oils from inland and off-shore oil fields, and run-off from land-based human activities. Due to its strategic location, the Straits of Malacca serves as a major shipping lane. This paper expands the utility of biomarker compounds, hopanes, in identifying the source of tar-balls stranded on Malaysian coasts. 20 tar-ball samples collected from the east and west coast were analyzed for hopanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Four of the 13 tar-ball samples collected from the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia were identified as the Middle East crude oil (MECO) based on their biomarker signatures, suggesting tanker-derived sources significantly contributing the petroleum pollution in the Straits of Malacca. The tar-balls found on the east coast seem to originate from the offshore oil platforms in the South China Sea. The presence of South East Asian crude oil (SEACO) tar-balls on the west coast carry several plausible explanations. Some of the tar-balls could have been transported via sea currents from the east coast. The tankers carrying SEACO to other countries could have accidentally spilt the oil as well. Furthermore, discharge of tank washings and ballast water from the tankers were suggested based on the abundance in higher molecular weight n-alkanes and the absence of unresolved complex mixture (UCM) in the tar-ball samples. The other possibilities are that the tar-balls may have been originated from the Sumatran oil fields and spillage of domestic oil from oil refineries in Port Dickson and Malacca. The results of PAHs analysis suggest that all the tar-ball samples have undergone various extent of weathering through evaporation, dissolution and photooxidation. PMID:11827123

  2. Filamentous carbon catalytic deposition of coal-tar pitch fraction on corundum

    SciTech Connect

    Martynkova, G.S.; Supova, M.

    2007-01-15

    Our work was focused on deposition of volatile hydrocarbons of carbonaceous precursor on corundum wafer, taking advantage of a metallic catalyst incorporated in precursor. Coal tar-pitch, namely a fraction soluble in toluene, served as precursor material for deposition of filamentous material. The toluene-soluble fraction of tar-pitch originally contained metallic particles of iron and nickel. During heat treatment up to 1000{sup o}C, metallic particles accompanied the volatile hydrocarbons conducive to forming a filamentous deposit. The deposit obtained demonstrates a semicrystalline material that has an irregular filamentous structure with an average filament diameter of 30 {mu}m. The presence of catalysts after the deposition process was proved in the deposit but catalysts were not found in the residuum.

  3. Production of aromatics through current-enhanced catalytic conversion of bio-oil tar.

    PubMed

    Bi, Peiyan; Yuan, Yanni; Fan, Minghui; Jiang, Peiwen; Zhai, Qi; Li, Quanxin

    2013-05-01

    Biomass conversion into benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) can provide basic feedstocks for the petrochemical industry, which also serve as the most important aromatic platform molecules for development of high-end chemicals. Present work explored a new route for transformation of bio-oil tar into BTX through current-enhanced catalytic conversion (CECC), involving the synergistic effect between the zeolite catalyst and current to promote the deoxygenation and cracking reactions. The proposed transformation shows an excellent BTX aromatics selectivity of 92.9 C-mol% with 25.1 wt.% yield at 400 C over usual HZSM-5 catalyst. The study of the model compounds revealed that the groups such as methoxy, hydroxyl and methyl in aromatics can be effectively removed in the CECC process. Present transformation potentially provides an important approach for production of the key petrochemicals of BTX and the overall use of bio-oil tar derived from bio-oil or biomass. PMID:23567684

  4. Bioremediation potential of coal-tar-oil-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Lajoie, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The bioremediation of coal tar oil contaminated soil was investigated in 90 day laboratory simulation experiments. The effect of soil moisture, humic acid amendment, and coal tar oil concentration on the rate of disappearance of individual coal tar oil constituents (PAHs and related compounds) was determined by methylene chloride extraction and gas chromatography. Mass balance experiments determined the fate of both the individual [sup 14]C-labeled PAHs phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene, and the total coal tar oil carbon. Mineralization, volatilization, incorporation into microbial biomass, disappearance of individual coal tar oil constitutents, and the distribution of residual [sup 14]C-activity in different soil fractions were measured. The rate of disappearance of coal tar oil constituents increased with increasing soil moisture over the experimental range. Humic acid amendment initially enhanced the rate of disappearance, but decreased the extent of disappearance. The amount of contamination removed decreased at higher coal tar oil concentrations. The practical limit for biodegradation in the system tested appeared to be between 1.0 and 2.5% coal tar oil. Mineralization accounted for 40 to 50% of the applied coal tar oil. Volatilization was a minor pathway of disappearance.

  5. Study on characteristics of several Chinese tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianqiu; Li Shuyuan; Tan Huaping

    1995-12-31

    The characteristics of tar sands from Karamay and Erlian, China, have been investigated, and the effects of various factors on bitumen recovery have been assessed. These two tar sands contain about 8-10% bitumen. Bitumen recovered from Karamay tar sands has a lower content of resin, asphaltene, and sulfur than bitumen from Erlian. Hot water extraction is effective for the former, but ineffective for the latter. Furthermore, pyrolysis of tar sands has been carried out using Rock-Eval apparatus. Pyrolysis models have been developed which give a satisfactory fit to experimental data.

  6. Evaluation of surfactant flushing for remediating EDC-tar contamination.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chenju; Hsieh, Cheng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene dichloride tar (EDC-tar) is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) waste originated from the process of vinyl chloride production, with major constituents including chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. This study investigated the feasibility of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) for treating EDC-tar contaminated aquifers. Initial experiments explored the potential to enhance the apparent solubility of EDC-tar using single or mixed surfactants. The results showed that an aqueous solution mixed anionic and non-ionic surfactants (i.e., SDS/Tween 80) exhibited higher EDC-tar apparent solubility and lower surface tension than other surfactant systems tested. Additionally, alkaline pH aids in increasing the EDC-tar apparent solubility. In column flushing experiments, it was seen that the alkaline mixed SDS/Tween 80 solution showed better removal of pure EDC-tar from silica sand porous media. Furthermore, separation of EDC-tar in the surfactant solution was conducted employing a salting-out effect. Significant separation of DNAPL was observed when 13 wt.% or more NaCl was added to the solution. Overall, this study evaluates the feasibility of using SEAR for remediating EDC-tar contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater. PMID:25941757

  7. Centralized treatment of a wide fraction of coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Markus, G.A.; Gurzhii, N.I.

    1984-01-01

    A plan is proposed for centralizing treatment of coal tar and raw benzene in certain areas of Russia to ensure the increasing effectiveness of recovery of valuable materials from the coal tar and raw benzene. The treatment of tar in the Donetsk and Pridneprovsk regions is proposed to be carried out at a plant in Fenol. The plan proposed for the Fenol plant is outlined and discussed briefly. The centralized treatment ensures an increase in the production of naphthalene, phenols, pyridine and quinoline bases, indenecoumarone tars, and benzine hydrocarbons.

  8. Combined surface and in-situ tar sand bitumen production

    SciTech Connect

    Audeh, C.A.

    1985-02-19

    In-situ combustion of tar sand formations is improved by introducing into an unminable tar sand formation prior to initiation of in-situ combustion hydrogen sulfide produced from upgrading tar sands from a minable tar sand formation in an area proximate the area of the unminable formation. The stream of hydrogen sulfide may contain a small proportion of hydrocarbons condensible at temperature and pressure conditions of the unminable formation. The improvement is applicable to both forward and reverse in-situ combustion processes.

  9. Mobilization of Manufactured Gas Plant Tar with Alkaline Flushing Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Hauswirth, Scott C.; Birak, Pamela Schultz; Rylander, Seth C.; Miller, Cass T.

    2011-01-01

    This experimental study investigates the use of alkaline and alkaline-polymer solutions for the mobilization of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars. Tar-aqueous interfacial tensions (IFTs) and contact angles were measured, and column flushing experiments were conducted. NaOH solutions (0.01–1 wt.%) were found to significantly reduce tar-aqueous IFT. Contact angles indicated a shift to strongly water-wet, then to tar-wet conditions as NaOH concentration increased. Column experiments were conducted with flushing solutions containing 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5% NaOH, both with and without xanthan gum (XG). Between 10 and 44% of the residual tar was removed by solutions containing only NaOH, while solutions containing both NaOH and XG removed 81–93% of the tar with final tar saturations as low as 0.018. The mechanism responsible for the tar removal is likely a combination of reduced IFT, a favorable viscosity ratio, and tar bank formation. Such an approach may have practical applications and would be significantly less expensive than surfactant-based methods. PMID:22091957

  10. Evaluation of surfactant flushing for remediating EDC-tar contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chenju; Hsieh, Cheng-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Ethylene dichloride tar (EDC-tar) is a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) waste originated from the process of vinyl chloride production, with major constituents including chlorinated aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. This study investigated the feasibility of Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation (SEAR) for treating EDC-tar contaminated aquifers. Initial experiments explored the potential to enhance the apparent solubility of EDC-tar using single or mixed surfactants. The results showed that an aqueous solution mixed anionic and non-ionic surfactants (i.e., SDS/Tween 80) exhibited higher EDC-tar apparent solubility and lower surface tension than other surfactant systems tested. Additionally, alkaline pH aids in increasing the EDC-tar apparent solubility. In column flushing experiments, it was seen that the alkaline mixed SDS/Tween 80 solution showed better removal of pure EDC-tar from silica sand porous media. Furthermore, separation of EDC-tar in the surfactant solution was conducted employing a salting-out effect. Significant separation of DNAPL was observed when 13 wt.% or more NaCl was added to the solution. Overall, this study evaluates the feasibility of using SEAR for remediating EDC-tar contaminated subsurface soil and groundwater.

  11. VAPOR PRESSURES AND HEATS OF VAPORIZATION OF PRIMARY COAL TARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eric M. Suuberg; Vahur Oja

    1997-07-01

    This project had as its main focus the determination of vapor pressures of coal pyrolysis tars. It involved performing measurements of these vapor pressures and from them, developing vapor pressure correlations suitable for use in advanced pyrolysis models (those models which explicitly account for mass transport limitations). This report is divided into five main chapters. Each chapter is a relatively stand-alone section. Chapter A reviews the general nature of coal tars and gives a summary of existing vapor pressure correlations for coal tars and model compounds. Chapter B summarizes the main experimental approaches for coal tar preparation and characterization which have been used throughout the project. Chapter C is concerned with the selection of the model compounds for coal pyrolysis tars and reviews the data available to us on the vapor pressures of high boiling point aromatic compounds. This chapter also deals with the question of identifying factors that govern the vapor pressures of coal tar model materials and their mixtures. Chapter D covers the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary cellulose tars. Chapter E discusses the results of the main focus of this study. In summary, this work provides improved understanding of the volatility of coal and cellulose pyrolysis tars. It has resulted in new experimentally verified vapor pressure correlations for use in pyrolysis models. Further research on this topic should aim at developing general vapor pressure correlations for all coal tars, based on their molecular weight together with certain specific chemical characteristics i.e. hydroxyl group content.

  12. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  13. Tar sands emulsion-breaking process

    SciTech Connect

    Bialek, R.F.

    1981-11-24

    Disclosed is a process for breaking an oil-in-water emulsion, in particular a raw emulsion produced in in situ tar sand plants, by first contacting with a polyethylene polymeric resin having a molecular weight in the range of 100,000 and 7,000,000 the raw emulsions; allowing to stand for two to four hours; adding a hydrocarbon diluent, optionally containing a larger amount of resin and then removing a mixture of diluent and oil floating on the water surface.

  14. Heating tar sands formations to visbreaking temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Karanikas, John Michael; Colmenares, Tulio Rafael; Zhang, Etuan; Marino, Marian; Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Ryan, Robert Charles; Beer, Gary Lee; Dombrowski, Robert James; Jaiswal, Namit

    2009-12-22

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat may be controlled so that at least a majority of the section reaches an average temperature of between 200.degree. C. and 240.degree. C., which results in visbreaking of at least some hydrocarbons in the section. At least some visbroken hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  15. Heating tar sands formations while controlling pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Stegemeier, George Leo; Beer, Gary Lee; Zhang, Etuan

    2010-01-12

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are described herein. Methods may include heating at least a section of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. A pressure in the majority of the section may be maintained below a fracture pressure of the formation. The pressure in the majority of the section may be reduced to a selected pressure after the average temperature reaches a temperature that is above 240.degree. C. and is at or below pyrolysis temperatures of hydrocarbons in the section. At least some hydrocarbon fluids may be produced from the formation.

  16. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas 3141.2 Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas....

  17. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas 3141.2 Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas....

  18. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas 3141.2 Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas....

  19. 43 CFR 3141.2 - Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Sand Areas. 3141.2 Section 3141.2 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... SPECIAL TAR SAND AREAS Leasing in Special Tar Sand Areas 3141.2 Prelease exploration within Special Tar Sand Areas....

  20. HopDock: a probabilistic search algorithm for decoy sampling in protein-protein docking

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Elucidating the three-dimensional structure of a higher-order molecular assembly formed by interacting molecular units, a problem commonly known as docking, is central to unraveling the molecular basis of cellular activities. Though protein assemblies are ubiquitous in the cell, it is currently challenging to predict the native structure of a protein assembly in silico. Methods This work proposes HopDock, a novel search algorithm for protein-protein docking. HopDock efficiently obtains an ensemble of low-energy dimeric configurations, also known as decoys, that can be effectively used by ab-initio docking protocols. HopDock is based on the Basin Hopping (BH) framework which perturbs the structure of a dimeric configuration and then follows it up with an energy minimization to explicitly sample a local minimum of a chosen energy function. This process is repeated in order to sample consecutive energy minima in a trajectory-like fashion. HopDock employs both geometry and evolutionary conservation analysis to narrow down the interaction search space of interest for the purpose of efficiently obtaining a diverse decoy ensemble. Results and conclusions A detailed analysis and a comparative study on seventeen different dimers shows HopDock obtains a broad view of the energy surface near the native dimeric structure and samples many near-native configurations. The results show that HopDock has high sampling capability and can be employed to effectively obtain a large and diverse ensemble of decoy configurations that can then be further refined in greater structural detail in ab-initio docking protocols. PMID:24564839

  1. Designing CXCL8-based decoy proteins with strong anti-inflammatory activity invivo

    PubMed Central

    Falsone, Angelika; Wabitsch, Veronica; Geretti, Elena; Potzinger, Heide; Gerlza, Tanja; Robinson, James; Adage, Tiziana; Teixeira, MauroM.; Kungl, AndreasJ.

    2013-01-01

    IL (interleukin)-8 [CXCL8 (CXC chemokine ligand 8)] exerts its role in inflammation by triggering neutrophils via its specific GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), CXCR1 (CXC chemokine receptor 1) and CXCR2, for which additional binding to endothelial HS-GAGs (heparan sulphate-glycosaminoglycans) is required. We present here a novel approach for blocking the CXCL8-related inflammatory cascade by generating dominant-negative CXCL8 mutants with improved GAG-binding affinity and knocked-out CXCR1/CXCR2 activity. These non-signalling CXCL8 decoy proteins are able to displace WT (wild-type) CXCL8 and to prevent CXCR1/CXCR2 signalling thereby interfering with the inflammatory response. We have designed 14 CXCL8 mutants that we subdivided into three classes according to number and site of mutations. The decoys were characterized by IFTs (isothermal fluorescence titrations) and SPR (surface plasmon resonance) to determine GAG affinity. Protein stability and structural changes were evaluated by far-UV CD spectroscopy and knocked-out GPCR response was shown by Boyden chamber and Ca2+ release assays. From these experiments, CXCL8(?6F17KF21KE70KN71K) emerged with the most promising invitro characteristics. This mutant was therefore further investigated in a murine model of mBSA (methylated BSA)-induced arthritis in mice where it showed strong anti-inflammatory activity. Based on these results, we propose that dominant-negative CXCL8 decoy proteins are a promising class of novel biopharmaceuticals with high therapeutic potential in inflammatory diseases. PMID:23919527

  2. Textural characteristics of the Nigerian tar sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enu, E. I.

    1985-05-01

    Extensive tar sands with reserves of about 41 billion barrels of oil are known to occur in Cretaceous terrigenous sediments in Ondo and Ogun States of Nigeria. The hydrocarbon occurs in two predominantly sandy zones separated by an 8 m thick oil shale. The lower (Horizon Y) is mostly quartz sand, 3-26 m thick. It shows an upward fining of grains and increased consolidation updip. The upper Horizon X is 10-22 m of sandstone with interbedded shales and siltstones. The sands are loosely consolidated. Cementing material is lacking, the grains being held together largely by the tarry oil. Porosity is about 30% and mean oil saturation in both zones is 12%. The recorded clay content (2-7%) is considerably lower than the average for Athabasca, Canada (10-25%) and may enhance the settling properties of the tailing ponds. The sands are water-wet, fine- to medium-grained, moderately well sorted, mesokurtic and positively skewed to near symmetrical. The Nigerian tar sands compare closely with the Athabasca sands in all the above textural parameters. They would thus be expected to show identical response to mining processing, except for the influence of higher ground-water table and the high humidity and ambient temperatures in Nigeria.

  3. Solvent extraction of bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Hoon, A.Y.; Thomas, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper reports on the measurement of mass transfer rates for the extraction of bitumen from tar sands using organic solvents. The experiment was carried out in an agitated vessel using a six-blade turbine mixer on a laboratory scale. To facilitate the determination of absolute mass transfer coefficients, tar sands were specially prepared in the form of spherical particles so that mass transfer area can be computed. The variables investigated in the study included: (1) solvent type (kerosene, toluene, benzene), (2) stirrer speed, 25 rpm to 1000 rpm, and (3) particle diameter, 0.4 cm to 1.2 cm. The results indicated that solvency power varied markedly with the various solvents used and that high aromatic content promoted rapid dissolution when compared with paraffinic solvents. The mass transfer rates increased with increasing stirrer speed in accordance with the relationship: k {alpha} N{sup 0.56} where k is the mass transfer coefficient and N the stirrer speed. Increasing particle diameter also resulted in decreased mass transfer rates. The results were satisfactorily correlated in terms of a Frossling type equation, Sh {alpha} Re{sub p}{sup a}Sc{sup b}.

  4. Decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with mismatched-basis statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ChunMei; Li, Mo; Yin, ZhenQiang; Li, HongWei; Chen, Wei; Han, ZhengFu

    2015-09-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) is aimed at removing all detector side channel attacks, while its security relies on the assumption that the encoding systems including sources are fully characterized by the two legitimate parties. By exploiting the mismatched-basis statistics in the security analysis, MDI-QKD even with uncharacterized qubits can generate secret keys. In this paper, considering the finite size effect, we study the decoy-state MDI-QKD protocol with mismatched-basis events statistics by performing full parameter optimization, and the simulation result shows that this scheme is very practical.

  5. Approach jamming effectiveness evaluation for surface-type infrared decoy in network centric warship formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Mingshan

    2015-10-01

    The passive and photoelectrical jamming to anti-ship missile in the condition of network centric warship formation is an important research issue of fleet EW operation. An approach jamming method of shipborne surface-type infrared decoy countering the infrared image guided anti-ship missile is put forward. By analyzing the countering process the jamming effectiveness evaluation model is constructed. By simulation the method is proved t reasonable and effective. This method breaks through the traditional restrict that the passive and photoelectricity jamming measure can only be used in the end self-defence and provides a new method for network centric worship formation to support each other.

  6. Decoys and Regulatory "Receptors" of the IL-1/Toll-Like Receptor Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Garlanda, Cecilia; Riva, Federica; Bonavita, Eduardo; Gentile, Stefania; Mantovani, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Members of the IL-1 family play a key role in innate and adaptive immunity and in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases. Members of IL-1R like receptor (ILR) family include signaling molecules and negative regulators. The latter include decoy receptors (IL-1RII; IL-18BP) and "receptors" with regulatory function (TIR8/SIGIRR; IL-1RAcPb; DIGIRR). Structural considerations suggest that also TIGIRR-1 and IL-1RAPL may have regulatory function. The presence of multiple pathways of negative regulation of members of the IL-1/IL-1R family emphasizes the need for a tight control of members of this fundamental system. PMID:23847621

  7. Decoys and Regulatory Receptors of the IL-1/Toll-Like Receptor Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Garlanda, Cecilia; Riva, Federica; Bonavita, Eduardo; Gentile, Stefania; Mantovani, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Members of the IL-1 family play a key role in innate and adaptive immunity and in the pathogenesis of diverse diseases. Members of IL-1R like receptor (ILR) family include signaling molecules and negative regulators. The latter include decoy receptors (IL-1RII; IL-18BP) and receptors with regulatory function (TIR8/SIGIRR; IL-1RAcPb; DIGIRR). Structural considerations suggest that also TIGIRR-1 and IL-1RAPL may have regulatory function. The presence of multiple pathways of negative regulation of members of the IL-1/IL-1R family emphasizes the need for a tight control of members of this fundamental system. PMID:23847621

  8. Biomass Gasifier Tars : Their Nature, Formation, and Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    T.A. Milne, N. Abatzaglou, and R.J. Evans.

    1998-11-01

    The main purpose of this review is to update the information on gasification tar, the most cumbersome and problematic parameter in any gasification commercialization effort. The work aims to present to the community the scientific and practical aspects of tar formation and conversion (removal) during gasification as a function of the various technological and technical parameters and variables.

  9. Biomass Gasifier ''Tars'': Their Nature, Formation, and Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Milne, T. A.; Evans, R. J.; Abatzaglou, N.

    1998-11-01

    The main purpose of this review is to update the information on gasification tar, the most cumbersome and problematic parameter in any gasification commercialization effort. The work aims to present to the community the scientific and practical aspects of tar formation and conversion (removal) during gasification as a function of the various technological and technical parameters and variables.

  10. Tar Barreler's Hump: An Unusual Presentation of a Posttraumatic Pseudolipoma.

    PubMed

    Olubaniyi, Babajide Olusola; Sidhu, Harbir; Long, Alex; de-Sousa, Nigel; Redfern, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    This is an interesting paper of a 4 cm posttraumatic pseudolipoma on the back of the neck of an adult man who has participated in "tar barrel rolling" since adolescence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a pseudolipoma to be reported in the literature in association with tar barreling. PMID:22953150

  11. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix...

  12. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix...

  13. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix...

  14. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix...

  15. Nicotine or tar titration in cigarette smoking behavior?

    PubMed

    Hasenfratz, M; Baldinger, B; Bttig, K

    1993-01-01

    A significant problem in assessing the relative relevance of nicotine and tar yield for compensatory smoking after switching from high to low yield cigarettes is that nicotine and tar yield are highly intercorrelated across conventional cigarettes and that the tar/nicotine ratios vary only within a modest range. A better differentiation between the impacts of nicotine and tar yield was expected by comparing in a laboratory experiment a new low nicotine/medium tar cigarette ("Next") with conventional low nicotine/low tar (ultra-light) cigarettes and with medium nicotine/medium tar cigarettes with respect to nicotine absorption and physiological effects. Twelve females, habitually smoking medium type cigarettes (> or = 0.7 mg nicotine) participated in the study. Neither the number of cigarettes smoked under field conditions nor the puffing behavior during the laboratory experiment differed between the three types of cigarettes. In the laboratory, Next produced only very small increases in plasma nicotine and changes in cardiovascular or EEG measures, whereas the effects of the medium cigarettes were in the expected range and those of the ultra-light cigarettes about halfway in between. The nicotine absorption/nicotine yield and the CO absorption/CO yield ratios were similar for Next and the habitual cigarettes, but about twofold higher for the ultra-light cigarettes. This suggests that gustatory and olfactory sensations, which are supposed to be more dependent on tar than on nicotine yield, may play a greater role for the regulation of smoking behavior than hitherto believed. PMID:7871028

  16. 48 CFR Appendix to Part 1252 - Tar Matrix

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tar Matrix Appendix to Part 1252 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Pt. 1252, App. Appendix to Part 1252—Tar Matrix...

  17. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  18. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1990-07-01

    Topics discussed include: characterization of bitumen impregnated sandstone, water based tar sand separation technology, electrophoretic characterization of bitumen and fine mineral particles, bitumen and tar sand slurry viscosity, the hot water digestion-flotation process, electric field use on breaking water-in-oil emulsions, upgrading of bitumens and bitumen-derived liquids, solvent extraction.

  19. Aptamer-Mediated Codelivery of Doxorubicin and NF-κB Decoy Enhances Chemosensitivity of Pancreatic Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porciani, David; Tedeschi, Lorena; Marchetti, Laura; Citti, Lorenzo; Piazza, Vincenzo; Beltram, Fabio; Signore, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers able to bind efficiently cell-surface receptors differentially expressed in tumor and in healthy cells are emerging as powerful tools to perform targeted anticancer therapy. Here, we present a novel oligonucleotide chimera, composed by an RNA aptamer and a DNA decoy. Our assembly is able to (i) target tumor cells via an antitransferrin receptor RNA aptamer and (ii) perform selective codelivery of a chemotherapeutic drug (Doxorubicin) and of an inhibitor of a cell-survival factor, the nuclear factor κB decoy oligonucleotide. Both payloads are released under conditions found in endolysosomal compartments (low pH and reductive environment). Targeting and cytotoxicity of the oligonucleotidic chimera were assessed by confocal microscopy, cell viability, and Western blot analysis. These data indicated that the nuclear factor κB decoy does inhibit nuclear factor κB activity and ultimately leads to an increased therapeutic efficacy of Doxorubicin selectively in tumor cells. PMID:25919089

  20. Improved oxidation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons using rate enhancing variants of P450Bm3 in combination with decoy molecules.

    PubMed

    Munday, Samuel D; Shoji, Osami; Watanabe, Yoshihito; Wong, Luet-Lok; Bell, Stephen G

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme performance can be improved using decoy molecules or engineered variants to accelerate the activity without affecting selectivity. Here we combine a rate accelerator variant of cytochrome P450Bm3 with decoy molecules to enhance the oxidation activity of a range of small organic molecules. This combined approach offers superior biocatalytic efficiency without modifying the product distribution. PMID:26593228

  1. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1989-11-14

    A method and apparatus or utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000{degrees}F in a burner to remove residual char nd produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capital and operating costs.

  2. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOEpatents

    Westhoff, James D. (Laramie, WY); Harak, Arnold E. (Laramie, WY)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000.degree. F. in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs.

  3. Bioremediation of coal tar PAH in soils using biodiesel.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L T; Jones, D M

    2001-08-01

    The addition of biodiesel together with nitrate and phosphate to soil containing coal tar, in laboratory and field experiments, resulted in degradation of coal tar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) that was not apparent when the nutrients alone were added. The addition of motor diesel fuel instead of biodiesel was also tested. Over the 55 days of the field and laboratory experiments, the biodiesel resulted in an increased degradation of naphthalene in the coal tar by 52% and 85%, respectively, and motor diesel resulted in increased depletions of 85% and 96%, respectively. Other PAH containing up to four rings were depleted to lesser extents. The increases in PAH biodegradation by the diesel treatments were ascribed to tar solubilisation and dispersion thereby increasing the PAH bioavailability. The ready biodegradability and low phytotoxicity of biodiesel suggest that it may be suitable as a novel treatment for the bioremediation of coal tar contaminated soils. PMID:11513400

  4. Method and apparatus for hydrocarbon recovery from tar sands

    DOEpatents

    Westhoff, J.D.; Harak, A.E.

    1988-05-04

    A method and apparatus for utilizing tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content is disclosed. More particularly, tar sands are pyrolyzed in a cyclone retort with high temperature gases recycled from the cyclone retort to produce oil and hydrocarbon products. The spent tar sands are then burned at 2000/degree/F in a burner to remove residual char and produce a solid waste that is easily disposable. The process and apparatus have the advantages of being able to utilize tar sands having a broad range of bitumen content and the advantage of producing product gases that are free from combustion gases and thereby have a higher heating value. Another important advantage is rapid pyrolysis of the tar sands in the cyclone so as to effectively utilize smaller sized reactor vessels for reducing capitol and operating costs. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Serving the Undocumented

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2007-01-01

    Undocumented immigrant students in California are eligible to receive only private scholarships that "[aren't] enough to support a very expensive education," says CCLC CEO Scott Lay. Dr. Gerardo E. de los Santos, CEO of the League for Innovation in the Community College, calls "serving the undocumented" one of the major challenges community

  6. Steam-Reforming Characteristics of Heavy and Light Tars Derived from Cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirotatsu; Morinaga, Yosuke; Okazaki, Ken

    In this study, tar formation and steam-reforming mechanisms are discussed by separating the tars into heavy, middle, and light tars. Cellulose was heated in a drop-tube furnace under an Ar or Ar/steam atmosphere. After the tars were passed through the furnace for thermal cracking and polymerization, they were trapped by filters set at different temperatures (573, 393, and 273 K), and were respectively defined as heavy, middle, and light tars. Incondensable volatiles and gaseous products were measured using gas chromatography with thermal conductivity (GC-TCD), and flame ionization (GC-FID) detectors. The middle and light tars obtained under an Ar atmosphere were first characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). The analysis showed that the middle tar did not contain any low-boiling-point light tar components, while the light tar did contain them. It was also found that complex species in the tars were separated to a certain degree by changing the trap temperature. Moreover, the formation of heavy tar was quite different from that of the light tar. With increasing temperature, the formation of heavy tar was inhibited, while that of the light tar was enhanced during pyrolysis. The steam-reforming characteristics of these tars were also different. The heavy tar was barely reformed at a low temperature of 873 K, even with a long residence time, while the middle tar was well reformed by steam. While it was difficult to describe the tar formation and steam-reforming characteristics when the tar was considered as a single condensable matter, the tar formation and steam-reforming characteristics were clarified by separating the tars. This study shows that, to prevent tar emissions, the formation of heavy tar, which barely reacts with steam, should be inhibited during pyrolysis by controlling the heating.

  7. A novel decoy receptor fusion protein for FGF-2 potently inhibits tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, D; Wei, X; Xie, K; Chen, K; Li, J; Fang, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antiangiogenic therapies have been proven effective in cancer treatment. Fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) has been functionally implicated in tumour angiogenesis and is an important target of antiangiogenic therapies. The aim of this work was to develop a novel FGF-2 inhibitor for cancer therapy. Methods: Eleven fusion proteins were developed by fusing various truncated extracellular regions of FGFR1 with the Fc region of IgG1. The optimal decoy receptor fusion protein with the highest binding affinity for FGF-2 was identified by an FGF-2-binding assay and its potential antitumour effects were investigated. Results: We obtained a soluble decoy receptor fusion protein with the highest binding activity for FGF-2, named FGF-Trap. Fibroblast growth factor-Trap significantly abolished FGF-2-stimulated activation of FGF signalling as demonstrated by its suppression of FGF-2-mediated phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt, upregulation of cyclins D1 and E and the increase in mRNA levels of vascular endothelial growth factor R1 and R2 (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2). Furthermore, FGF-Trap effectively suppressed FGF-2-induced proliferation and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Most importantly, FGF-Trap potently inhibited tumour growth and angiogenesis in Caki-1 and A549 xenograft models in vivo. Conclusions: Fibroblast growth factor-Trap potently inhibits tumour growth by blocking FGF-2 signalling pathways and could be an effective therapeutic agent for cancer patients. PMID:24874473

  8. Diversity, decoys and the dilution effect: how ecological communities affect disease risk.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P T J; Thieltges, D W

    2010-03-15

    Growing interest in ecology has recently focused on the hypothesis that community diversity can mediate infection levels and disease ('dilution effect'). In turn, biodiversity loss--a widespread consequence of environmental change--can indirectly promote increases in disease, including those of medical and veterinary importance. While this work has focused primarily on correlational studies involving vector-borne microparasite diseases (e.g. Lyme disease, West Nile virus), we argue that parasites with complex life cycles (e.g. helminths, protists, myxosporeans and many fungi) offer an excellent additional model in which to experimentally address mechanistic questions underlying the dilution effect. Here, we unite recent ecological research on the dilution effect in microparasites with decades of parasitological research on the decoy effect in macroparasites to explore key questions surrounding the relationship between community structure and disease. We find consistent evidence that community diversity significantly alters parasite transmission and pathology under laboratory as well as natural conditions. Empirical examples and simple transmission models highlight the diversity of mechanisms through which such changes occur, typically involving predators, parasite decoys, low competency hosts or other parasites. However, the degree of transmission reduction varies among diluting species, parasite stage, and across spatial scales, challenging efforts to make quantitative, taxon-specific predictions about disease. Taken together, this synthesis highlights the broad link between community structure and disease while underscoring the importance of mitigating ongoing changes in biological communities owing to species introductions and extirpations. PMID:20190121

  9. NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotide inhibits wear particle-induced inflammation in a murine calvarial model.

    PubMed

    Sato, Taishi; Pajarinen, Jukka; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Tamaki, Yasunobu; Loi, Florence; Egashira, Kensuke; Yao, Zhenyu; Goodman, Stuart B

    2015-12-01

    Wear particles induce periprosthetic inflammation and osteolysis through activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-?B), which up-regulates the downstream target gene expression for proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages. It was hypothesized that direct suppression of NF-?B activity in the early phases of this disorder could be a therapeutic strategy for preventing the inflammatory response to wear particles, potentially mitigating osteolysis. NF-?B activity can be suppressed via competitive binding with double stranded NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that blocks this transcription factor from binding to the promoter regions of targeted genes. In this murine calvarial study, clinically relevant polyethylene particles (PEs) with/without ODN were subcutaneously injected over the calvarial bone. In the presence of PE particles, macrophages migrated to the inflammatory site and induced tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) expression, resulting in an increase in the number of osteoclasts. Local injections of ODN mitigated the expression of TNF-?, RANKL, and induced the expression of two anti-inflammatory, antiresorptive cytokines: interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and osteoprotegerin. Local intervention with NF-?B decoy ODN in early cases of particle-induced inflammation in which the prosthesis is still salvageable may potentially preserve periprosthetic bone stock. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 103A: 3872-3878, 2015. PMID:26123702

  10. Atmospheric tar balls: aged primary droplets from biomass burning?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tth, A.; Hoffer, A.; Nyir?-Ksa, I.; Psfai, M.; Gelencsr, A.

    2014-07-01

    Atmospheric tar balls are particles of special morphology and composition that are fairly abundant in the plumes of biomass smoke. These particles form a specific subset of brown carbon (BrC) which has been shown to play a significant role in atmospheric shortwave absorption and, by extension, climate forcing. Here we suggest that tar balls are produced by the direct emission of liquid tar droplets followed by heat transformation upon biomass burning. For the first time in atmospheric chemistry we generated tar-ball particles from liquid tar obtained previously by dry distillation of wood in an all-glass apparatus in the laboratory with the total exclusion of flame processes. The particles were perfectly spherical with a mean optical diameter of 300 nm, refractory, externally mixed, and homogeneous in the contrast of the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. They lacked any graphene-like microstructure and exhibited a mean carbon-to-oxygen ratio of 10. All of the observed characteristics of laboratory-generated particles were very similar to those reported for atmospheric tar-ball particles in the literature, strongly supporting our hypothesis regarding the formation mechanism of atmospheric tar-ball particles.

  11. Leafcutter bee nests and pupae from the Rancho La Brea Tar Pits of southern California: Implications for understanding the paleoenvironment of the Late Pleistocene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Rancho La Brea Tar Pits is the worlds richest and most important Late Pleistocene fossil locality and best renowned for numerous fossil mammals and birds excavated over the past century. Less researched are insects, even though these specimens frequently serve as the most valuable paleoenvironm...

  12. Whole coal tar shampoo: a therapeutic hair repair system.

    PubMed

    Olansky, S

    1980-01-01

    An alkaline whole coal tar shampoo has been clinically re-evaluated for its therapeutic and cosmetic properties. Its efficacy, as anticipated, is confirmed in psoriasis, dandruff, seborrheic dermatitis, and pruritus. Scanning electron microscopy reveals the whole coal tar shampoo's ability to repair hair similar to protein cosmetic shampoos. Body, luster, and manageability improved throughout this eight week study. A new shampoo action was recorded, described as "corrective;" both oily-haired and dry-haired persons simultaneously exhibit substantial improvement towards the norm. It is postulated that the alkaline-whole coal tar shampoo stimulates natural corrective mechanisms. PMID:7353401

  13. Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution for the weak coherent photon source with finite-length key

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Li; Wansu, Bao; Hongwei, Li; Chun, Zhou; Yang, Wang

    2016-01-01

    Passive decoy-state quantum key distribution systems, proven to be more desirable than active ones in some scenarios, also have the problem of device imperfections like finite-length keys. In this paper, based on the WCP source which can be used for the passive decoy-state method, we obtain the expressions of single-photon error rates, single-photon counts, and phase error rates. According to the information of smooth min-entropy, we calculate the key generation rate under the condition of finite-length key. Key generation rates with different numbers of pulses are compared by numerical simulations. From the results, it can be seen that the passive decoy-state method can have good results if the total number of pulses reaches 1010. We also simulate the passive decoy-state method with different probabilities of choosing a pulse for parameter estimation when the number of pulses is fixed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No.11304397).

  14. Discriminating of ATP competitive Src kinase inhibitors and decoys using self-organizing map and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Yan, Aixia; Hu, Xiaoying; Wang, Kai; Sun, Jing

    2013-02-01

    A data set containing 686 Src kinase inhibitors and 1,941 Src kinase non-binding decoys was collected and used to build two classification models to distinguish inhibitors from decoys. The data set was randomly split into a training set (458 inhibitors and 972 decoys) and a test set (228 inhibitors and 969 decoys). Each molecule was represented by five global molecular descriptors and 18 2D property autocorrelation descriptors calculated using the program ADRIANA.Code. Two machine learning methods, a Kohonen's self-organizing map (SOM) and a support vector machine (SVM), were utilized for the training and classification. For the test set, classification accuracy (ACC) of 99.92% and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.98 were achieved for the SOM model; ACC of 99.33% and MCC of 0.98 were obtained for the SVM model. Some molecular properties, such as molecular weight, number of atoms in a molecule, hydrogen bond properties, polarizabilities, electronegativities, and hydrophobicities, were found to be important for the inhibition of Src kinase. PMID:23117252

  15. Transcription factor decoy against stem cells master regulators, Nanog and Oct-4: a possible approach for differentiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Rad, Seyed Mohammad Ali Hosseini; Bamdad, Taravat; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Arefian, Ehsan; Lotfinia, Majid; Ghanipour, Milad

    2015-04-01

    Transcription factor decoys (TFDs) are exogenous oligonucleotides which can compete by cis-elements in promoters or enhancers for binding to TFs and downregulating gene expression in a specific manner. It is believed that tumor mass originates from cancer stem cells (CSCs) which the same with embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the properties of both pluripotency and self-renewal (stemness). Many transcription factors such as Nanog, Oct-4, Sox2, Klf4, and Sall4 act as master regulators in the maintenance of stemness in both cell types. Differentiation therapy is based on this theory that by differentiation of CSCs, tumor mass can be eliminated with common cancer therapy methods. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report of a TFD approach against master regulator of stemness, Nanog, Oct-4, and Klf4, for downregulation purposes in P19 embryonic carcinoma stem cell. Different simple and complex decoys against Nanog, OCT-4, Sox2, and Klf4 were designed and used for this purpose. The results showed that the applied decoys especially Nanog-specific decoy decreased the expression of downstream genes. PMID:25464862

  16. First report of gastrocotylinean post-oncomiracidia (Platyhelminthes: Monogenoidea: Heteronchoinea) on gills of flyingfish (Exocoetidae), snapper (Lutjanidae), dolphinfish (Coryphaenidae), and amberjack (Carangidae) from the Gulf of Mexico: decoy hosts and the dilution effect.

    PubMed

    Kritsky, Delane C; Bullard, Stephen A; Bakenhaster, Micah D

    2011-09-01

    Larvae, identified as post-oncomiracidia of the suborder Gastrocotylinea (Monogenoidea), were collected from formalin-fixed gills excised from six species of marine fishes captured from the Gulf of Mexico off Mississippi and Florida: common dolphinfish, Coryphaena hippurus and pompano dolphinfish, Coryphaena equiselis (both Perciformes, Coryphaenidae); gray snapper, Lutjanus griseus (Perciformes, Lutjanidae); greater amberjack, Seriola dumerili (Perciformes, Carangidae); and Atlantic flyingfish, Cheilopogon melanurus and sailfin flyingfish, Parexocoetus hillianus (both Beloniformes and Exocoetidae). Based on a combination of diagnostic morphological features, the specimens were divided into two basic forms, each of which was further subdivided into two morphotypes. No gastrocotylinean post-oncomiracidium had been reported previously from these hosts. Of the six host species, only C. hippurus serves as a host (unconfirmed) for the adult of a gastrocotylinean species, suggesting that the recorded fishes from the Gulf of Mexico comprise dead-end hosts acting as decoys for the oncomiracidia. These comparatively non-susceptible "decoy hosts" apparently dilute the susceptible fish-host population and by intercepting infective larvae (oncomiracidia) decrease the abundance of parasites on their typical hosts. PMID:21497672

  17. New treatment of periodontal diseases by using NF-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides via prevention of bone resorption and promotion of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hideo; Nakagami, Hironori; Morita, Shosuke; Tsukamoto, Ikuyo; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Nakagami, Futoshi; Shimosato, Takashi; Minobe, Noriko; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2009-09-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is involved in osteoclast differentiation and activation. Thus, the blockade of the NF-kappaB pathway might be a novel therapeutic strategy for treating bone metabolic diseases. Periodontitis is subgingival inflammation caused by bacterial infection; this disease also is thought to be a chronic focal point responsible for systemic diseases. In this study, NF-kappaB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) were topically applied for experimental periodontitis in a debris-accumulation model and wound healing in a bone-defect model of beagle dogs to investigate the effect of decoy ODN on bone metabolism. Application of NF-kappaB decoy ODN significantly reduced interleukin-6 activity in crevicular fluid and improved alveolar bone loss in the analysis of dental radiographs and DEXA. Direct measurement of exposed root that lost alveolar bone support revealed that NF-kappaB decoy treatment dramatically protected bone from loss. In a bone-defect model, NF-kappaB decoy ODN promoted the healing process as compared with control scrambled decoy in micro-CT analysis. Overall, inhibition of NF-kappaB by decoy strategy prevented the progression of bone loss in periodontitis and promoted the wound healing in bone defects through the inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption. Targeting of NF-kappaB might be a potential therapy in various bone metabolic diseases. PMID:19186992

  18. Potential use of fucose-appended dendrimer/?-cyclodextrin conjugates as NF-?B decoy carriers for the treatment of lipopolysaccharide-induced fulminant hepatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Akao, Chiho; Tanaka, Takahiro; Onodera, Risako; Ohyama, Ayumu; Sato, Nana; Motoyama, Keiichi; Higashi, Taishi; Arima, Hidetoshi

    2014-11-10

    The purpose of the present study is to treat lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fulminant hepatitis by NF-?B decoy complex with fucose-appended dendrimer (generation 2; G2) conjugate with ?-cyclodextrin (Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2)). Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2, average degree of substitution of fucose (DSF2))/NF-?B decoy complex significantly suppressed nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) production from LPS-stimulated NR8383 cells, a rat alveolar macrophage cell line, by adequate physicochemical properties and fucose receptor-mediated cellular uptake. Intravenous injection of Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-?B decoy complex extended the survival of LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis model mice. In addition, Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-?B decoy complex administered intravenously highly accumulated in the liver, compared to naked NF-?B decoy alone. Furthermore, the liver accumulation of Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-?B decoy complex was inhibited by the pretreatment with GdCl3, a specific inhibitor of Kupffer cell uptake. Also, the serum aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and TNF-? levels in LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis model mice were significantly attenuated by the treatment with Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2, DSF2)/NF-?B decoy complex, compared with naked NF-?B decoy alone. Taken together, these results suggest that Fuc-S-?-CDE (G2, DSF2) has the potential for a novel Kupffer cell-selective NF-?B decoy carrier for the treatment of LPS-induced fulminant hepatitis in mice. PMID:25020038

  19. New glycoproteomics software, GlycoPep Evaluator, generates decoy glycopeptides de novo and enables accurate false discovery rate analysis for small data sets.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhikai; Su, Xiaomeng; Go, Eden P; Desaire, Heather

    2014-09-16

    Glycoproteins are biologically significant large molecules that participate in numerous cellular activities. In order to obtain site-specific protein glycosylation information, intact glycopeptides, with the glycan attached to the peptide sequence, are characterized by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) methods such as collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD). While several emerging automated tools are developed, no consensus is present in the field about the best way to determine the reliability of the tools and/or provide the false discovery rate (FDR). A common approach to calculate FDRs for glycopeptide analysis, adopted from the target-decoy strategy in proteomics, employs a decoy database that is created based on the target protein sequence database. Nonetheless, this approach is not optimal in measuring the confidence of N-linked glycopeptide matches, because the glycopeptide data set is considerably smaller compared to that of peptides, and the requirement of a consensus sequence for N-glycosylation further limits the number of possible decoy glycopeptides tested in a database search. To address the need to accurately determine FDRs for automated glycopeptide assignments, we developed GlycoPep Evaluator (GPE), a tool that helps to measure FDRs in identifying glycopeptides without using a decoy database. GPE generates decoy glycopeptides de novo for every target glycopeptide, in a 1:20 target-to-decoy ratio. The decoys, along with target glycopeptides, are scored against the ETD data, from which FDRs can be calculated accurately based on the number of decoy matches and the ratio of the number of targets to decoys, for small data sets. GPE is freely accessible for download and can work with any search engine that interprets ETD data of N-linked glycopeptides. The software is provided at https://desairegroup.ku.edu/research. PMID:25137014

  20. Parking Lot With Coal-Tar-Based Sealcoat

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Sealcoat particles abraded from a parking lot with coal-tar-based sealcoat collect by the curbside.  Also shown is a storm drain, half coated with sealcoat, down which the loose particles will be washed by runoff....

  1. Preparation of meso-carbon microbeads from coal tars

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, L.C.; Liu, L.; Zhang, B.J.; Wu, D.

    1997-12-31

    Coal tar (CT0) with 3.7wt% primary pyridine insoluble fraction (PI) was chosen as the raw material to prepare mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB). The tar was filtered to remove PI, obtaining PI-free coal tar (CT1). CT0, CT1 and their mixtures with different proportions were carbonized under pressure for 2 hours respectively. The polymerizates were filtered, and the residues were extracted with pyridine, and thus MCMB was obtained as a pyridine insoluble fraction. Both the yield and the size of resultant MCMB increased with the decreasing of primary PI content in raw coal tars. No clear evidence was observed that the primary PI particles exhibited active sites during the formation of MCMB, while it`s certain that they restricted coalescence between mesophase spheres.

  2. The contribution of low tar cigarettes to environmental tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Chortyk, O.T.; Schlotzhauer, W.S. )

    1989-05-01

    A series of low tar cigarettes (LTC) were smoked and the quantities of condensable mainstream (inhaled) and sidestream (between puffs) smoke compounds were determined and compared to those produced by a high tar, nonfilter cigarette. It was found that the LTC produced large quantities of sidestream smoke condensates, about equal to the high tar cigarette, and contained very high levels of toxic or cocarcinogenic phenols. On an equal weight basis, the LTC emitted more of these hazardous compounds into sidestream and environmental tobacco smoke. Higher smoke yields of a flavor additive and a sugar degradation product indicated addition of such compounds during the manufacture of LTC. It was concluded that, compared to a high tar cigarette, smoking LTC may be better for the smoker, but not for the nearby nonsmoker. Information should be developed to allow smokers to choose LTC that produce lower levels of hazardous compounds in their environmentally emitted sidestream smoke.

  3. Producing coal tar with a low content of quinoline insolubles

    SciTech Connect

    Markov, V.V.; Petropol'skaya, V.M.; Batyeva, T.S.; Semenenko, L.E.; Dedikov, S.I.; Sibirko, V.P.; Storozhenko, O.T.

    1984-08-01

    The quality of coal tar has deteriorated recently due to lack of oven capacity and investment, changes in the raw material base, and the adoption of smokeless charging which has greatly increased the proportion of ash in the tar. At the same time, customer requirements have become more stringent, particularly with regard to quinoline insolubles. Plants operating tar centrifuges have shown that water and ash can be removed by as much as 70% and 40% respectively. A study of tar centrifuging rheology has shown that diluents such as toluene and anthracene fractions are essential; toluene is preferred as it operates at a lower temperature. Addition of 30% toluene with 3 min. centrifuging reduces the toluene insolubles, and a longer centrifuging period reduces the quinoline insolubles to admissible levels.

  4. Hacking on decoy-state quantum key distribution system with partial phase randomization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides means for unconditional secure key transmission between two distant parties. However, in practical implementations, it suffers from quantum hacking due to device imperfections. Here we propose a hybrid measurement attack, with only linear optics, homodyne detection, and single photon detection, to the widely used vacuum + weak decoy state QKD system when the phase of source is partially randomized. Our analysis shows that, in some parameter regimes, the proposed attack would result in an entanglement breaking channel but still be able to trick the legitimate users to believe they have transmitted secure keys. That is, the eavesdropper is able to steal all the key information without discovered by the users. Thus, our proposal reveals that partial phase randomization is not sufficient to guarantee the security of phase-encoding QKD systems with weak coherent states. PMID:24755767

  5. Parallel Evolution of Chemokine Binding by Structurally Related Herpesvirus Decoy Receptors.

    PubMed

    Lubman, Olga Y; Fremont, Daved H

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of pathogens targets chemokine signaling networks in order to disrupt host immune surveillance and defense. Here, we report a structural and mutational analysis of rodent herpesvirus Peru encoded R17, a potent chemokine inhibitor that sequesters CC and C chemokines with high affinity. R17 consists of a pair of ?-sandwich domains linked together by a bridging sheet, which form an acidic binding cleft for the chemokine CCL3 on the opposite face of a basic surface cluster that binds glycosaminoglycans. R17 promiscuously engages chemokines primarily through the same N-loop determinants used for host receptor recognition while residues located in the chemokine 40s loop drive kinetically stable complex formation. The core fold adopted by R17 is unexpectedly similar to that of the M3 chemokine decoy receptor encoded by MHV-68, although, strikingly, neither the location of ligand engagement nor the stoichiometry of binding is conserved, suggesting that their functions evolved independently. PMID:26671708

  6. Hacking on decoy-state quantum key distribution system with partial phase randomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2014-04-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides means for unconditional secure key transmission between two distant parties. However, in practical implementations, it suffers from quantum hacking due to device imperfections. Here we propose a hybrid measurement attack, with only linear optics, homodyne detection, and single photon detection, to the widely used vacuum + weak decoy state QKD system when the phase of source is partially randomized. Our analysis shows that, in some parameter regimes, the proposed attack would result in an entanglement breaking channel but still be able to trick the legitimate users to believe they have transmitted secure keys. That is, the eavesdropper is able to steal all the key information without discovered by the users. Thus, our proposal reveals that partial phase randomization is not sufficient to guarantee the security of phase-encoding QKD systems with weak coherent states.

  7. Hacking on decoy-state quantum key distribution system with partial phase randomization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shi-Hai; Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides means for unconditional secure key transmission between two distant parties. However, in practical implementations, it suffers from quantum hacking due to device imperfections. Here we propose a hybrid measurement attack, with only linear optics, homodyne detection, and single photon detection, to the widely used vacuum + weak decoy state QKD system when the phase of source is partially randomized. Our analysis shows that, in some parameter regimes, the proposed attack would result in an entanglement breaking channel but still be able to trick the legitimate users to believe they have transmitted secure keys. That is, the eavesdropper is able to steal all the key information without discovered by the users. Thus, our proposal reveals that partial phase randomization is not sufficient to guarantee the security of phase-encoding QKD systems with weak coherent states. PMID:24755767

  8. Using decoys to expand the recognition specificity of a plant disease resistance protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Hee; Qi, Dong; Ashfield, Tom; Helm, Matthew; Innes, Roger W

    2016-02-12

    Maintaining high crop yields in an environmentally sustainable manner requires the development of disease-resistant crop varieties. We describe a method to engineer disease resistance in plants by means of an endogenous disease resistance gene from Arabidopsis thaliana named RPS5, which encodes a nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR) protein. RPS5 is normally activated when a second host protein, PBS1, is cleaved by the pathogen-secreted protease AvrPphB. We show that the AvrPphB cleavage site within PBS1 can be substituted with cleavage sites for other pathogen proteases, which then enables RPS5 to be activated by these proteases, thereby conferring resistance to new pathogens. This "decoy" approach may be applicable to other NLR proteins and should enable engineering of resistance in plants to diseases for which we currently lack robust genetic resistance. PMID:26912853

  9. Reduction of Ammonia and Tar in Pressurized Biomass Gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W.; Olofsson, G.

    2002-09-19

    The present paper intended to present the results of parametric study of the formation of ammonia and tar under pressurized gasification conditions. By the use of multivariate data analysis, the effects of operating parameters were determined and their influences could be quantified. In order to deal with cases in which high levels of ammonia and tar were produced, study of catalytic hot gas cleaning was performed, aiming to discuss the removal efficiency and test catalysts.

  10. Creating and maintaining a gas cap in tar sands formations

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Karanikas, John Michael; Dinkoruk, Deniz Sumnu; Wellington, Scott Lee

    2010-03-16

    Methods for treating a tar sands formation are disclosed herein. Methods for treating a tar sands formation may include providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from one or more heaters located in the formation. Pressure may be allowed to increase in an upper portion of the formation to provide a gas cap in the upper portion. At least some hydrocarbons are produced from a lower portion of the formation.

  11. Comparative Biochemical and Functional Analysis of Viral and Human Secreted Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Decoy Receptors.

    PubMed

    Pontejo, Sergio M; Alejo, Ali; Alcami, Antonio

    2015-06-26

    The blockade of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by etanercept, a soluble version of the human TNF receptor 2 (hTNFR2), is a well established strategy to inhibit adverse TNF-mediated inflammatory responses in the clinic. A similar strategy is employed by poxviruses, encoding four viral TNF decoy receptor homologues (vTNFRs) named cytokine response modifier B (CrmB), CrmC, CrmD, and CrmE. These vTNFRs are differentially expressed by poxviral species, suggesting distinct immunomodulatory properties. Whereas the human variola virus and mouse ectromelia virus encode one vTNFR, the broad host range cowpox virus encodes all vTNFRs. We report the first comprehensive study of the functional and binding properties of these four vTNFRs, providing an explanation for their expression profile among different poxviruses. In addition, the vTNFRs activities were compared with the hTNFR2 used in the clinic. Interestingly, CrmB from variola virus, the causative agent of smallpox, is the most potent TNFR of those tested here including hTNFR2. Furthermore, we demonstrate a new immunomodulatory activity of vTNFRs, showing that CrmB and CrmD also inhibit the activity of lymphotoxin β. Similarly, we report for the first time that the hTNFR2 blocks the biological activity of lymphotoxin β. The characterization of vTNFRs optimized during virus-host evolution to modulate the host immune response provides relevant information about their potential role in pathogenesis and may be used to improve anti-inflammatory therapies based on soluble decoy TNFRs. PMID:25940088

  12. Atmospheric Tar Balls: Particles from Biomass and Biofuel Burning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posfai, Mihaly; Gelencser, Andras; Simonics, Renata; Arato, Krisztina; Li, Jia; Hobbs, Peter V.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    Tar balls are amorphous, carbonaceous spherules that occur in the tropospheric aerosol as a result of biomass and biofuel burning. They form a distinct group of particles with diameters typically between 30 and 500 nm and readily identifiable with electron microscopy. Their lack of a turbostratic microstructure distinguishes them from soot, and their morphology and composition (approximately 90 mol% carbon) renders them distinct from other carbonaceous particles. Tar balls are particularly abundant in slightly aged (minutes to hours old) biomass smoke, indicating that they likely form by gas-to-particle conversion within smoke plumes. The material of tar balls is initially hygroscopic; however, the particles become largely insoluble as a result of free radical polymerization of their organic molecules. Consequently, tar balls are primarily externally mixed with other particle types, and they do not appreciably increase in size during aging. When tar balls coagulate with water-bearing particles, their material may partly dissolve and no longer be recognizable as distinct particles. Tar balls may contain organic compounds that absorb sunlight. They are an important, previously unrecognized type of carbonaceous (organic) atmospheric particle.

  13. Potential hydrologic impacts of a tar-sand industry in 11 special tar sand areas in eastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lindskov, K.L.

    1983-01-01

    About 93 percent of the Nation 's estimated 30 billion barrels of crude oil in tar sand deposits is in 11 tar-sand deposits in eastern Utah that were chosen for leasing by the Federal government. The Tar Sand Triangle area, which contains about 15 billion barrels of oil, is the largest. This area and the Sunnyside and P R Springs areas contain more than three-fourths of the Utah reserves. About 88,000 acre-feet of water per year would be required for a commercial tar-sand industry producing about 365,000 barrels per day. At this rate, most of the recoverable oil would be mined within 30 years. About 22,000 acre-feet of water per year would be required for a commercial tar-sand industry producing about 83,000 barrels per day. Impacts on local hydrology would be greatest in the Tar Sand Triangle, Sunnyside, and P R Springs areas. Impacts could be minimized with proper construction of surface facilities to decrease erosion, sediment transport, and impoundment of mining and retort water. Increases in salinity of the Colorado River at Imperial Dam, Ariz.-Calif., could be about 3 milligrams per liter, with a peak of 9 milligrams per liter, for a 365 ,000-barrel-per-day industry and less than 1 milligram per liter , with a peak of 2 milligrams per liter, for an 83 ,000-barrel-per-day industry. (USGS)

  14. Atmospheric tar balls from biomass burning in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    2009-12-01

    Tar balls are spherical, organic aerosol particles that result from biofuel or biomass burning. They absorb sunlight and cause warming of the atmosphere. Although distinctive when viewed with a transmission electron microscope (TEM) because of their spherical shape, much remains to be determined about details of their compositions, occurrences, and generation. Here we aim to characterize the occurrences of tar balls using individual-particle analyses with a TEM and to study their formation in young biomass-burning smoke. The samples were collected using the U.S. Forest Service Twin Otter aircraft during the MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) campaign conducted in March 2006. We analyzed 84 TEM grid samples from ~30 biomass-burning events near Mexico City and over Yucatan. Sixty samples were from young smoke (less than an hour old), and others were from haze that mainly occurred from biomass burning. Tar balls have neither an evident nucleus nor are they normally attached to other particles. They are almost perfectly spherical on TEM grids, indicating that they were solid when collected. It appears as if tar balls consist of lower volatility organic matter than many other organic aerosol particles. On average, 9% by number of biomass-burning aerosol particles were tar balls in samples collected between a few minutes to an hour after emission. On the other hand, samples collected within a few minutes after emission included few or no tar balls. The occurrences and abundances of atmospheric tar balls are important when evaluating the effects of smoke on local and regional climate.

  15. Serving Bowl Selection Biases the Amount of Food Served

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Kleef, Ellen; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Wansink, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine how common serving bowls containing food for multiple persons influence serving behavior and consumption and whether they do so independently of satiation and food evaluation. Methods: In this between-subjects experiment, 68 participants were randomly assigned to either a group serving pasta from a large-sized bowl (6.9-L

  16. Biodegradation of naphthalene from coal tar. Research progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, S.; Ramaswami, A.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-02-07

    Biodegradation experiments were conducted to evaluate the mineralization of naphthalene released from coal tar entrapped in microporous silica media. Tests were performed with two coal tars recovered from former manufactured gas plant sites. Results from these tests showed that the degradation end point for naphthalene was significantly lower than the total amount of naphthalene present in coal tar. The role of physico-chemical and biological processes on the rate of biotransformation of naphthalene was evaluated. Mass transfer rates for dissolution of naphthalene from entrapped coal tar were measured in batch, flow-through systems. The rate of naphthalene mass transfer from the coal tar was found to be significantly greater than the rate of naphthalene biomineralization in batch slurry reactors. This implied that the rate acting factor for the biodegradation process was related to biokinetic phenomena rather than mass transfer processes. Further tests indicated that conditions inhibitory to bacteria limited the biodegradation of naphthalene, and in some cases the inhibition was reversible upon dilution of the reactor contents.

  17. Assessment of tar pollution on the United Arab emirates beaches

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Hilal, A.H.; Khordagui, H.K. )

    1993-01-01

    In light of the inadequate information concerning stranded tar on the southwest beaches of the Arabian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman, particularly following the massive oil releases during the Gulf War, the present investigation was designed to provide reference-integrated information on the nature, location, and levels of stranded tar balls on the beaches of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The recorded levels appeared to be higher than expected or previously reported. The tar distribution pattern, in addition to the degree of weathering, indicates that the massive oil release during the Gulf War did not reach the UAE shorelines. The highest reported levels of stranded tar ever recorded in the Arabian Gulf at Jabal Dhannah apparently originated from oil spills and tankers' ballast water at the main oil terminal at the Al-Ruwaiss oil refinery some 10 km to the east. The surprising, relatively high levels of stranded tar on the beaches of the Gulf of Oman were solely attributed to the heavy navigation traffic close to the shorelines. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Coal-tar based pavement sealant toxicity to freshwater macroinvertebrates.

    PubMed

    Bryer, Pamela J; Scoggins, Mateo; McClintock, Nancy L

    2010-05-01

    Non-point-source pollution is a major source of ecological impairment in urban stream systems. Recent work suggests that coal-tar pavement sealants, used extensively to protect parking areas, may be contributing a large portion of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) loading seen in urban stream sediments. The hypothesis that dried coal-tar pavement sealant flake could alter the macroinvertebrate communities native to streams in Austin, TX was tested using a controlled outdoor laboratory type approach. The treatment groups were: control, low, medium, and high with total PAH concentrations (TPAH = sum of 16 EPA priority pollutant PAHs) of 0.1, 7.5, 18.4, & 300 mg/kg respectively. The low, medium, and high treatments were created via the addition of dried coal-tar pavement sealant to a sterile soil. At the start of the 24-day exposure, sediment from a minimally impacted local reference site containing a community of live sediment-dwelling benthic macroinvertebrates was added to each replicate. An exposure-dependent response was found for several stream health measures and for several individual taxa. There were community differences in abundance (P = 0.0004) and richness (P < 0.0001) between treatments in addition to specific taxa responses, displaying a clear negative relationship with the amount of coal-tar sealant flake. These results support the hypothesis that coal-tar pavement sealants contain bioavailable PAHs that may harm aquatic environments. PMID:19913343

  19. Target-specific native/decoy pose classifier improves the accuracy of ligand ranking in the CSAR 2013 benchmark.

    PubMed

    Fourches, Denis; Politi, Regina; Tropsha, Alexander

    2015-01-26

    As part of the CSAR 2013 benchmark exercise, we have implemented a hybrid docking and scoring workflow to rank 10 steroid ligands of an engineered digoxigenin-binding protein. Schrdinger's Glide docking software was used to generate poses for each steroid ligand and rank them according to both standard docking precision (SP) and extra docking precision (XP) scoring functions. The unique component of our approach was the use of a target-specific pose classifier trained to discriminate nativelike from decoy poses. To build the classifier, a single cognate ligand with a known native pose (PDB code 4J8T) was docked multiple times into its target protein, and the generated poses were divided into two classes (nativelike and decoy) using a root-mean-square deviation threshold of 2 . All of the poses were characterized by the MCT-Tess descriptors of the protein-ligand interface, and random forest (RF) models were trained to discriminate the two classes of poses on the basis of their descriptors. The consensus pose classifier was then applied to the Glide-generated poses of each CSAR ligand in order to filter out those poses predicted as decoys and rerank the remaining ones using both XP and SP scoring functions. The best-scoring pose for each ligand following this filtering step was used for final ligand ranking. Overall, the ranking accuracy for the 10 ligands evaluated by the Spearman correlation coefficient was 0.64 for SP and 0.52 for XP but reached 0.75 for SP/RF consensus scoring (ranked third in the CSAR 2013 benchmark exercise). This study reconfirms that target-specific pose scoring models are capable of enhancing the reliability of structure-based molecular docking by discarding decoy poses. PMID:25521713

  20. Vectors expressing efficient RNA decoys achieve the long-term suppression of specific microRNA activity in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Takeshi; Ozaki, Yuka; Iba, Hideo

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the strong and stable suppression of specific microRNA activity would be essential for the functional analysis of these molecules, and also for the development of therapeutic applications, effective inhibitory methods to achieve this have not yet been fully established. In our current study, we tested various RNA decoys which were designed to efficiently expose indigestible complementary RNAs to a specific miRNA molecule. These inhibitory RNAs were at the same time designed to be expressed in lentiviral vectors and to be transported into the cytoplasm after transcription by RNA polymerase III. We report the optimal conditions that we have established for the design of such RNA decoys (we term these molecules TuD RNAs; tough decoy RNAs). We finally demonstrate that TuD RNAs induce specific and strong biological effects and also show that TuD RNAs achieve the efficient and long-term-suppression of specific miRNAs for over 1 month in mammalian cells. PMID:19223327

  1. Jupiter Formed with More Tar than Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodders, Katharina

    2004-08-01

    Elemental abundances in Jupiter determined from Galileo probe measurements are compared to recently revised solar system abundances. When normalized to the abundance of sulfur, the most abundant refractory rock-forming element reliably determined in Jupiter's atmosphere by the Galileo probe, abundances of argon, krypton, and xenon are 1 times solar, the observed oxygen is depleted by a factor of 4, and carbon is enriched 1.7 times. The fairly uncertain nitrogen abundance ranges from 1 to 3 times solar. The oxygen abundance in Jupiter derived from the observed atmospheric water abundance is only a lower limit to the total planetary oxygen because oxygen is also bound to rock-forming elements such as magnesium or silicon sequestered deep in the planet. The sulfur abundance constrains the amount of rock-forming elements on Jupiter. Considering the amount of oxygen bound to silicate rock, the total oxygen abundance on Jupiter of 0.47 times solar system indicates an overall oxygen depletion by about a factor of 2. The hydrogen and helium abundances in the Jovian atmosphere are depleted (0.48 and 0.39 times solar system, respectively). These relative depletions may indicate the extent of hydrogen and helium partitioning from the molecular envelope into Jupiter's metallic layer. A formation scenario for Jupiter is proposed to explain the relative oxygen depletion and, at the same time, the relative carbon enrichment. In essence, the model assumes that at the time of Jupiter's formation, abundant carbonaceous matter was present near 5.2 AU rather than abundant water ice, increasing the surface mass density of solids in the solar nebula accretion disk. Carbonaceous matter, which has high sticking probabilities, was the agent that sped up accumulation of solid matter of proto-Jupiter. This led to runaway accretion of the planet. Major consequences of this scenario are that the water ice condensation front (the snow line) typically placed near 5.2 AU in solar nebula models must be replaced by a carbonaceous condensation/evaporation front (the ``tar line'') and that the snow line is located farther out in the solar nebula.

  2. Feasibility of coal tar biodegradation by land treatment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fogel, S.

    1987-09-01

    Coal tar, a by-product of coal gasification, contains monoaromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) which have been identified as carcinogens. Billions of gallons of this waste have been disposed of at numerous gas manufacturing facilities in the United States. The treatment of tar-contaminated soil by bacterial degradation has shown great promise, since one-, two-, and three-ring PAH can be readily degraded by bacteria. Research was carried out to establish whether 4- and 5-ring PAH could also be degraded by bacteria. The data indicated that 4-ring PAH could degrade when dissolved in a hydrocarbon carrier or when applied to soil as a component of coal tar. Experiments to stimulate the bacterial degradation of benzo(a)pyrene, a 5-ring PAH, were unsuccessful.

  3. Coal tar phototoxicity: characteristics of the smarting reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Diette, K.M.; Gange, R.W.; Stern, R.S.; Arndt, K.A.; Parrish, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    The properties and ultraviolet exposure parameters of tar smarts were examined in an effort to elucidate the mechanisms involved. It was show that irradiation with 1 minimal smarting dose (MSD) of UVA immediately following tar removal lowered the MSD for 6 h, demonstrated by subsequent challenge with UVA. Following 3 MSDs this memory effect was demonstrable for 24 h. The smarting reaction was area dependent--smaller areas of exposure require higher doses of UVA to induce smarting. Smarting followed reciprocity over a 6-fold range of irradiances (2-12.5 mW/cm2) but higher irradiances required higher doses of UVA, perhaps due to a delay in the recognition and reporting of smarting. The smarting reaction and delayed erythema due to UVA and tar were equally blocked by sunscreen.

  4. Remediation of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars Using Alkaline Flushing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Rylander, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2010-12-01

    The remediation of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars in the subsurface is particularly difficult due to the wetting behavior and high viscosities of these dense non-aqueous liquids (DNAPLs). Alkaline flooding is a technique which has proven effective in improving the recovery of crude oils, which share some characteristics with FMGP tars. For this study, we measured the effect of NaOH solutions on interfacial tension and conducted column experiments to investigate the feasibility of applying this technique to FMGP tars. The pendant drop technique was used to measure interfacial tensions for solutions ranging from 0-1% NaOH. Column experiments were conducted by contaminating sands with tars recovered from a FMGP then flushing the columns with NaOH solutions. A final, 70% v/v ethanol cosolvent flush was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of a two-stage remediation approach. The mass removal of tar, as well as 26 individual PAHs, was measured, along with the aqueous phase mass flux of PAHs after each flushing stage. The interfacial tension was reduced from about 20 mN/m with pure water to a minimum of 0.05 mN/m at a concentration of 0.1% NaOH. In the column experiments, alkaline flushing resulted in a 50% reduction of the residual saturation. Aqueous phase PAH concentrations, however, were similar before and after the alkaline flushing stage. The combination of alkaline and cosolvent flushing resulted in an overall reduction of 95% of the total mass of the 16 EPA PAHs. Final aqueous phase concentrations were reduced significantly for lower molecular weight PAHs, but increased slightly for the higher molecular weight compounds, likely due to their increased mole fraction within the remaining tar. Additional work is being conducted to improve the effectiveness of the alkaline flushing through the use of surfactants and polymers.

  5. Coal-tar-based sealcoated pavement: a major PAH source to urban stream sediments.

    PubMed

    Witter, Amy E; Nguyen, Minh H; Baidar, Sunil; Sak, Peter B

    2014-02-01

    We used land-use analysis, PAH concentrations and assemblages, and multivariate statistics to identify sediment PAH sources in a small (~1303 km(2)) urbanizing watershed located in South-Central, Pennsylvania, USA. A geographic information system (GIS) was employed to quantify land-use features that may serve as PAH sources. Urban PAH concentrations were three times higher than rural levels, and were significantly and highly correlated with combined residential/commercial/industrial land use. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to group sediments with similar PAH assemblages, and correlation analysis compared PAH sediment assemblages to common PAH sources. The strongest correlations were observed between rural sediments (n = 7) and coke-oven emissions sources (r = 0.69-0.78, n = 5), and between urban sediments (n = 22) and coal-tar-based sealcoat dust (r = 0.94, n = 47) suggesting that coal-tar-based sealcoat is an important urban PAH source in this watershed linked to residential and commercial/industrial land use. PMID:24215941

  6. Biomass waste gasification - Can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?

    SciTech Connect

    Sulc, Jindrich; Stojdl, Jiri; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan; Svoboda, Karel; Smetana, Jiri; Vacek, Jiri; Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison of one stage (co-current) and two stage gasification of wood pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Original arrangement with grate-less reactor and upward moving bed of the pellets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two stage gasification leads to drastic reduction of tar content in gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer One stage gasification produces gas with higher LHV at lower overall ER. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Content of ammonia in gas is lower in two stage moving bed gasification. - Abstract: A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW{sub th}. The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950 Degree-Sign C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER = 0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV = 3.15 MJ/Nm{sup 3}), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950 Degree-Sign C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream.

  7. Vehicular fuels and oxychemicals from biomass thermochemical tars

    SciTech Connect

    Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.

    1983-01-01

    Catalytic hydroprocessing (hydrotreating and hydrocracking) of biomass thermochemical tars can yield mixtures of liquid hydrocarbons and alkyl aromatics of chemical compositions similar to those presently used in diesel and gasoline engine fuels. Phenolics can be coproduced. Compositions of hydroprocessed tars are similar regardless of biomass feedstock used, suggesting that the two-stage process of pyrolysis and hydroprocessing may afford a somewhat universal route to the generation of useful hydrocarbons and oxychemicals from a variety of agricultural and forestry residues. 26 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  8. Integrated decoys and effector traps: how to catch a plant pathogen.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Jeffrey G

    2016-01-01

    Plant immune receptors involved in disease resistance and crop protection are related to the animal Nod-like receptor (NLR) class, and recognise the virulence effectors of plant pathogens, whereby they arm the plant's defensive response. Although plant NLRs mainly contain three protein domains, about 10% of these receptors identified by extensive cross-plant species data base searches have now been shown to include novel and highly variable integrated domains, some of which have been shown to detect pathogen effectors by direct interaction. Sarris et al. have identified a large number of integrated domains that can be used to detect effector targets in host plant proteomes and identify unknown pathogen effectors.Please see related Research article: Comparative analysis of plant immune receptor architectures uncovers host proteins likely targeted by pathogens, http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12915-016-0228-7 Since the time of writing, a closely related paper has been released: Kroj T, Chanclud E, Michel-Romiti C, Grand X, Morel J-B. Integration of decoy domains derived from protein targets of pathogen effectors into plant immune receptors is widespread. New Phytol. 2016 (ahead of print). PMID:26896088

  9. A novel conserved mechanism for plant NLR protein pairs: the integrated decoy hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Stella; Bernoux, Maud; Moncuquet, Philippe; Kroj, Thomas; Dodds, Peter N.

    2014-01-01

    Plant immunity is often triggered by the specific recognition of pathogen effectors by intracellular nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLR). Plant NLRs contain an N-terminal signaling domain that is mostly represented by either a Toll-interleukin1 receptor (TIR) domain or a coiled coil (CC) domain. In many cases, single NLR proteins are sufficient for both effector recognition and signaling activation. However, many paired NLRs have now been identified where both proteins are required to confer resistance to pathogens. Recent detailed studies on the Arabidopsis thaliana TIR-NLR pair RRS1 and RPS4 and on the rice CC-NLR pair RGA4 and RGA5 have revealed for the first time how such protein pairs function together. In both cases, the paired partners interact physically to form a hetero-complex receptor in which each partner plays distinct roles in effector recognition or signaling activation, highlighting a conserved mode of action of NLR pairs across both monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. We also describe an integrated decoy model for the function of these receptor complexes. In this model, a plant protein targeted by an effector has been duplicated and fused to one member of the NLR pair, where it acts as a bait to trigger defense signaling by the second NLR upon effector binding. This mechanism may be common to many other plant NLR pairs. PMID:25506347

  10. Reconstructing Protein Structures by Neural Network Pairwise Interaction Fields and Iterative Decoy Set Construction

    PubMed Central

    Mirabello, Claudio; Adelfio, Alessandro; Pollastri, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the fold of a protein from its amino acid sequence is one of the grand problems in computational biology. While there has been progress towards a solution, especially when a protein can be modelled based on one or more known structures (templates), in the absence of templates, even the best predictions are generally much less reliable. In this paper, we present an approach for predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein from the sequence alone, when templates of known structure are not available. This approach relies on a simple reconstruction procedure guided by a novel knowledge-based evaluation function implemented as a class of artificial neural networks that we have designed: Neural Network Pairwise Interaction Fields (NNPIF). This evaluation function takes into account the contextual information for each residue and is trained to identify native-like conformations from non-native-like ones by using large sets of decoys as a training set. The training set is generated and then iteratively expanded during successive folding simulations. As NNPIF are fast at evaluating conformations, thousands of models can be processed in a short amount of time, and clustering techniques can be adopted for model selection. Although the results we present here are very preliminary, we consider them to be promising, with predictions being generated at state-of-the-art levels in some of the cases. PMID:24970210

  11. Expression of decoy receptor 3 in kidneys is associated with allograft survival after kidney transplant rejection

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Shuo-Chun; Shu, Kuo-Hsiung; Wu, Ming-Ju; Wen, Mei-Chin; Hsieh, Shie-Liang; Chen, Nien-Jung; Tarng, Der-Cherng

    2015-01-01

    Decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) expression in kidneys has been shown to predict progression of chronic kidney disease. We prospectively investigated a cohort comprising 96 renal transplant recipients (RTRs) undergoing graft kidney biopsies. Computer-assisted quantitative immunohistochemical staining value of DcR3 in renal tubular epithelial cells (RTECs) was used to determine the predictive role of DcR3 in kidney disease progression. The primary end point was doubling of serum creatinine and/or graft failure. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risk of DcR3 expression in rejected kidney grafts toward the renal end point. In total, RTRs with kidney allograft rejection were evaluated and the median follow-up was 30.9 months. The greater expression of DcR3 immunoreactivity in RTECs was correlated with a higher rate of the histopathological concordance of acute T cell-mediated rejection. Compared with 65 non-progressors, 31 progressors had higher DcR3 expression (HDE) regardless of the traditional risk factors. Cox regression analysis showed HDE was significantly associated with the risk of renal end point with a hazard ratio of 3.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.40 to 7.27; P?=?0.006) after adjusting for other variables. In repetitive biopsies, HDE in tissue showed rapid kidney disease progression due to persistent inflammation. PMID:26335204

  12. Allosteric competitive inactivation of hematopoietic CSF-1 signaling by the viral decoy receptor BARF1.

    PubMed

    Elegheert, Jonathan; Bracke, Nathalie; Pouliot, Philippe; Gutsche, Irina; Shkumatov, Alexander V; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Verstraete, Kenneth; Bekaert, Anas; Burmeister, Wim P; Svergun, Dmitri I; Lambrecht, Bart N; Vergauwen, Bjorn; Savvides, Savvas N

    2012-09-01

    Hematopoietic human colony-stimulating factor 1 (hCSF-1) is essential for innate and adaptive immunity against viral and microbial infections and cancer. The human pathogen Epstein-Barr virus secretes the lytic-cycle protein BARF1 that neutralizes hCSF-1 to achieve immunomodulation. Here we show that BARF1 binds the dimer interface of hCSF-1 with picomolar affinity, away from the cognate receptor-binding site, to establish a long-lived complex featuring three hCSF-1 at the periphery of the BARF1 toroid. BARF1 locks dimeric hCSF-1 into an inactive conformation, rendering it unable to signal via its cognate receptor on human monocytes. This reveals a new functional role for hCSF-1 cooperativity in signaling. We propose a new viral strategy paradigm featuring an allosteric decoy receptor of the competitive type, which couples efficient sequestration and inactivation of the host growth factor to abrogate cooperative assembly of the cognate signaling complex. PMID:22902366

  13. A strategy to discover decoy chemokine ligands with an anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Dayana; Daubeuf, Franois; Do, Quoc Tuan; Utard, Valrie; Villa, Pascal; Haiech, Jacques; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel; Bernard, Philippe; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Excessive signaling by chemokines has been associated with chronic inflammation or cancer, thus attracting substantial attention as promising therapeutic targets. Inspired by chemokine-clearing molecules shaped by pathogens to escape the immune system, we designed a generic screening assay to discover chemokine neutralizing molecules (neutraligands) and unambiguously distinguish them from molecules that block the receptor (receptor antagonists). This assay, called TRIC-r, combines time-resolved intracellular calcium recordings with pre-incubation of bioactive compounds either with the chemokine or the receptor-expressing cells. We describe here the identification of high affinity neutraligands of CCL17 and CCL22, two chemokines involved in the Th2-type of lung inflammation. The decoy molecules inhibit in vitro CCL17- or CCL22-induced intracellular calcium responses, CCR4 endocytosis and human T cell migration. In vivo, they inhibit inflammation in a murine model of asthma, in particular the recruitment of eosinophils, dendritic cells and CD4(+)T cells. Altogether, we developed a successful strategy to discover as new class of pharmacological tools to potently control cell chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26442456

  14. A strategy to discover decoy chemokine ligands with an anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Dayana; Daubeuf, Franois; Do, Quoc Tuan; Utard, Valrie; Villa, Pascal; Haiech, Jacques; Bonnet, Dominique; Hibert, Marcel; Bernard, Philippe; Galzi, Jean-Luc; Frossard, Nelly

    2015-01-01

    Excessive signaling by chemokines has been associated with chronic inflammation or cancer, thus attracting substantial attention as promising therapeutic targets. Inspired by chemokine-clearing molecules shaped by pathogens to escape the immune system, we designed a generic screening assay to discover chemokine neutralizing molecules (neutraligands) and unambiguously distinguish them from molecules that block the receptor (receptor antagonists). This assay, called TRIC-r, combines time-resolved intracellular calcium recordings with pre-incubation of bioactive compounds either with the chemokine or the receptor-expressing cells. We describe here the identification of high affinity neutraligands of CCL17 and CCL22, two chemokines involved in the Th2-type of lung inflammation. The decoy molecules inhibit in vitro CCL17- or CCL22-induced intracellular calcium responses, CCR4 endocytosis and human T cell migration. In vivo, they inhibit inflammation in a murine model of asthma, in particular the recruitment of eosinophils, dendritic cells and CD4+T cells. Altogether, we developed a successful strategy to discover as new class of pharmacological tools to potently control cell chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26442456

  15. A decoy receptor 3 analogue reduces localised defects in phagocyte function in pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Daigneault, Marc; Thompson, Alfred A R; Walmsley, Sarah R; Gill, Sharonjit K; Witcher, Derrick R; Wroblewski, Victor J; Hellewell, Paul G; Whyte, Moira K B; Dockrell, David H

    2012-01-01

    Background Therapeutic strategies to modulate the host response to bacterial pneumonia are needed to improve outcomes during community-acquired pneumonia. This study used mice with impaired Fas signalling to examine susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and decoy receptor 3 analogue (DcR3-a) to correct factors associated with increased susceptibility. Methods Wild-type mice and those with varying degrees of impairment of Fas (lpr) or Fas ligand signalling (gld) were challenged with Streptococcus pneumoniae and microbiological and immunological outcomes measured in the presence or absence of DcR3-a. Results During established pneumonia, neutrophils became the predominant cell in the airway and gld mice were less able to clear bacteria from the lungs, demonstrating localised impairment of pulmonary neutrophil function in comparison to lpr or wild-type mice. T-cells from gld mice had enhanced activation and reduced apoptosis in comparison to wild-type and lpr mice during established pneumonia. Treatment with DcR3-a reduced T-cell activation and corrected the defect in pulmonary bacterial clearance in gld mice. Conclusions The results suggest that imbalance in tumour necrosis factor superfamily signalling and excessive T-cell activation can impair bacterial clearance in the lung but that DcR3-a treatment can reduce T-cell activation, restore optimal pulmonary neutrophil function and enhance bacterial clearance during S pneumoniae infection. PMID:22735687

  16. In situ recovery of oil from Utah tar sand: a summary of tar sand research at the Laramie Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, L.C.; Westhoff, J.D.

    1985-10-01

    This report describes work done by the United States Department of Energy's Laramie Energy Technology Center from 1971 through 1982 to develop technology for future recovery of oil from US tar sands. Work was concentrated on major US tar sand deposits that are found in Utah. Major objectives of the program were as follows: determine the feasibility of in situ recovery methods applied to tar sand deposits; and establish a system for classifying tar sand deposits relative to those characteristics that would affect the design and operation of various in situ recovery processes. Contents of this report include: (1) characterization of Utah tar sand; (2) laboratory extraction studies relative to Utah tar sand in situ methods; (3) geological site evaluation; (4) environmental assessments and water availability; (5) reverse combustion field experiment, TS-1C; (6) a reverse combustion followed by forward combustion field experiment, TS-2C; (7) tar sand permeability enhancement studies; (8) two-well steam injection experiment; (9) in situ steam-flood experiment, TS-1S; (10) design of a tar sand field experiment for air-stream co-injection, TS-4; (11) wastewater treatment and oil analyses; (12) economic evaluation of an in situ tar sand recovery process; and (13) appendix I (extraction studies involving Utah tar sands, surface methods). 70 figs., 68 tabs.

  17. Ebullition-facilitated transport of manufactured gas plant tar from contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    McLinn, Eugene L; Stolzenburg, Thomas R

    2009-11-01

    Manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar and wastewater solids historically were discharged into the Penobscot River, Maine,USA, via a sewer at the Bangor Landing site. The tar and wastewater solids accumulated in riverbed sediment over a 5-hectare area downstream from the sewer outfall. Much of the tarry sediment is a hardened mass at the bottom of the river, but in part of the tar deposit (the active zone), the tar remains unhardened. In the active zone, anaerobic biodegradation of organic matter generates methane and carbon dioxide; as gas accumulates and migrates upward, it entrains tar, eventually dragging the tar from the sediment to surface water. Understanding the migration mechanisms in different portions of the tar deposit is critical for modeling the risk posed by the tar at the Bangor Landing site, because during gas-facilitated tar migration, the tar is brought to the water surface, instead of remaining in the sediment. Tar migration from sediment poses a potential human health risk because of the high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the tar. Migration from sediment to the water surface greatly increases the potential exposure of human and ecological receptors to tar that reaches the water surface. In order for tar to migrate from sediment to surface water, three conditions are necessary: the sediment must contain liquid tar, the sediment must produce gas bubbles, and the gas must come into contact with the tarry sediment. Failure to consider facilitated transport of MGP tar from sediment can cause underestimation of site risk and can lead to failure of remedial measures. PMID:19604030

  18. Systemic Administration of a Cyclic Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) Decoy Oligonucleotide Inhibits Tumor Growth without Inducing Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Malabika; Paul, Kathleen; Freilino, Maria L; Li, Hua; Li, Changyou; Johnson, Daniel E; Wang, Lin; Eiseman, Julie; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    Hyperactivation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) has been linked to tumorigenesis in most malignancies, including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Intravenous delivery of a chemically modified cyclic STAT3 decoy oligonucleotide with improved serum and thermal stability demonstrated antitumor efficacy in conjunction with downmodulation of STAT3 target gene expression such as cyclin D1 and Bcl-XL in a mouse model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The purpose of the present study was to determine the toxicity and dose-dependent antitumor efficacy of the cyclic STAT3 decoy after multiple intravenous doses in Foxn1 nu mice in anticipation of clinical translation. The two doses (5 and 10 mg/kg) of cyclic STAT3 decoy demonstrated a significant decrease in tumor volume compared with the control groups (mutant cyclic STAT3 decoy or saline) in conjunction with downmodulation of STAT3 target gene expression. There was no dose-dependent effect of cyclic STAT3 decoy on tumor volume or STAT3 target gene expression. There were no significant changes in body weights between the groups during the dosing period, after the dosing interval or on the day of euthanasia. No hematology or clinical chemistry parameters suggested toxicity of the cyclic STAT3 decoy compared with saline control. No gross or histological pathological abnormalities were noted at necropsy in any of the animals. These findings suggest a lack of toxicity of intravenous administration of a cyclic STAT3 decoy oligonucleotide. In addition, comparable antitumor effects indicate a lack of dose response at the two dose levels investigated. PMID:24395569

  19. Antitumor effect of nuclear factor-?B decoy transfer by mannose-modified bubble lipoplex into macrophages in mouse malignant ascites

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Yusuke; Kawakami, Shigeru; Higuchi, Yuriko; Maruyama, Kazuo; Yamashita, Fumiyoshi; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    Patients with malignant ascites (MAs) display several symptoms, such as dyspnea, nausea, pain, and abdominal tenderness, resulting in a significant reduction in their quality of life. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a crucial role in MA progression. Because TAMs have a tumor-promoting M2 phenotype, conversion of the M2 phenotypic function of TAMs would be promising for MA treatment. Nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B) is a master regulator of macrophage polarization. Here, we developed targeted transfer of a NF-?B decoy into TAMs by ultrasound (US)-responsive, mannose-modified liposome/NF-?B decoy complexes (Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes) in a mouse peritoneal dissemination model of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma. In addition, we investigated the effects of NF-?B decoy transfection into TAMs on MA progression and mouse survival rates. Intraperitoneal injection of Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes and US exposure transferred the NF-?B decoy into TAMs effectively. When the NF-?B decoy was delivered into TAMs by this method in the mouse peritoneal dissemination model, mRNA expression of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 in TAMs was decreased significantly. In contrast, mRNA levels of Th1 cytokines (IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-?, and IL-6) were increased significantly. Moreover, the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor in ascites was suppressed significantly, and peritoneal angiogenesis showed a reduction. Furthermore, NF-?B decoy transfer into TAMs significantly decreased the ascitic volume and number of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells in ascites, and prolonged mouse survival. In conclusion, we transferred a NF-?B decoy efficiently by Man-PEG bubble lipoplexes with US exposure into TAMs, which may be a novel approach for MA treatment. PMID:24850474

  20. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  1. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  2. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  3. Coal tar technology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning coal tar production and applications. Topics examine production from coal gasification, synthesis of chemicals from coal tar, and chemical analyses of coal tar products. Toxicology pollution studies, and commercial uses of the product are also discussed. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR... Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. (a) Changes to the regulation may be the result of recommendations...., Washington, DC 20590: (1) Problem: Succinctly state the problems created by current (TAR) 48 CFR chapter...

  5. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR... Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. (a) Changes to the regulation may be the result of recommendations...., Washington, DC 20590: (1) Problem: Succinctly state the problems created by current (TAR) 48 CFR chapter...

  6. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR... Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. (a) Changes to the regulation may be the result of recommendations...., Washington, DC 20590: (1) Problem: Succinctly state the problems created by current (TAR) 48 CFR chapter...

  7. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR... Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. (a) Changes to the regulation may be the result of recommendations...., Washington, DC 20590: (1) Problem: Succinctly state the problems created by current (TAR) 48 CFR chapter...

  8. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  9. 29 CFR 1910.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1910.1002... Hazardous Substances § 1910.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. As used in § 1910.1000 (Table Z-1), coal tar pitch volatiles include the fused polycyclic hydrocarbons which volatilize from...

  10. Improving the quality of prepared tar for production of refractory materials

    SciTech Connect

    Musychuk, V.D.; Zharkova, N.A.; Vasyuchkov, E.I.; Taskaev, V.K.; Kurkin, V.V.

    1983-01-01

    The production of refractory materials from calcined dolomite and using tar as a binder material is discussed. The characteristics of the tar required for the refractory materials is of particular interest. Various methods of improving the tar are outlined. Equipment used in the production of the refractory material is also discussed.

  11. Emerging Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs): Serving Latino Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santiago, Deborah A.; Andrade, Sally J.

    2010-01-01

    In this fifth brief in "Excelencia" in Education's series on Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) the focus is on the methods and strategies that are producing successful results in a growing sector of colleges and universities we call, "Emerging" Hispanic-Serving Institutions. These Emerging HSIs are institutions that currently do not meet the

  12. Supercritical-Fluid Extraction of Oil From Tar Sands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    New supercritical solvent mixtures have been laboratory-tested for extraction of oil from tar sands. Mixture is circulated through sand at high pressure and at a temperature above critical point, dissolving organic matter into the compressed gas. Extract is recovered from sand residues. Low-temperature super-critical solvents reduce energy consumption and waste-disposal problems.

  13. Coal tar-containing asphalt - resource or hazardous waste?

    SciTech Connect

    Andersson-Skold, Y.; Andersson, K.; Lind, B.; Claesson, A.; Larsson, L.; Suer, P.; Jacobson, T.

    2007-09-30

    Coal tar was used in Sweden for the production of asphalt and for the drenching of stabilization gravel until 1973. The tar has high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), some of which may be strongly carcinogenic. Approximately 20 million tonnes of tar-containing asphalt is present in the public roads in Sweden. Used asphalt from rebuilding can be classified as hazardous waste according to the Swedish Waste Act. The cost of treating the material removed as hazardous waste can be very high due to the large amount that has to be treated, and the total environmental benefit is unclear. The transport of used asphalt to landfill or combustion will affect other environmental targets. The present project, based on three case studies of road projects in Sweden, evaluates the consequences of four scenarios for handling the material: reuse, landfill, biological treatment, and incineration. The results show that reuse of the coal tar-containing materials in new road construction is the most favorable alternative in terms of cost, material use, land use, energy consumption, and air emissions.

  14. SULFUR TOLERANT CATALYSTS FOR BIOMASS TAR REMOVAL - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) project, NexTech Materials proposes a catalytic reforming approach to remove waste tar from gasified biomass on nickel-based catalysts. Biomass gasification is a potential renewable route to producing electricity, liquid fue...

  15. Phytotoxicity and Plant Productivity Analysis of Tar-Enriched Biochars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, M. L.; Masiello, C. A.; Dugan, B.; Rudgers, J. A.; Capareda, S. C.

    2008-12-01

    Biochar is one of the three by-products obtained by the pyrolysis of organic material, the other two being syngas and bio-oil. The pyrolysis of biomass has generated a great amount of interest in recent years as all three by-products can be put toward beneficial uses. As part of a larger project designed to evaluate the hydrologic impact of biochar soil amendment, we generated a biochar through fast pyrolysis (less than 2 minutes) of sorghum stock at 600C. In the initial biochar production run, the char bin was not purged with nitrogen. This inadvertent change in pyrolysis conditions produced a fast-pyrolysis biochar enriched with tars. We chose not to discard this batch, however, and instead used it to test the impact of tar-enriched biochars on plants. A suite of phytotoxicity tests were run to assess the effects of tar-rich biochar on plant germination and plant productivity. We designed the experiment to test for negative effects, using an organic carbon and nutrient-rich, greenhouse- optimized potting medium instead of soil. We used Black Seeded Simpson lettuce (Lactuca sativa) as the test organism. We found that even when tars are present within biochar, biochar amendment up to 10% by weight caused increased lettuce germination rates and increased biomass productivity. In this presentation, we will report the statistical significance of our germination and biomass data, as well as present preliminary data on how biochar amendment affects soil hydrologic properties.

  16. CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR PARTICULATE AND TAR EMISSIONS FROM COAL CONVERTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a characterization of solid and tar particulate emissions in raw product gases from several types of coal gasifiers, in terms of their total quantities, chemical composition, and size distribution. Fixed-bed gasifiers produce the smallest particulate l...

  17. Wet scrubbing of biomass producer gas tars using vegetable oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhoi, Prakashbhai Ramabhai

    The overall aims of this research study were to generate novel design data and to develop an equilibrium stage-based thermodynamic model of a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system for the removal of model tar compounds (benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene) found in biomass producer gas. The specific objectives were to design, fabricate and evaluate a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system and to optimize the design and operating variables; i.e., packed bed height, vegetable oil type, solvent temperature, and solvent flow rate. The experimental wet packed bed scrubbing system includes a liquid distributor specifically designed to distribute a high viscous vegetable oil uniformly and a mixing section, which was designed to generate a desired concentration of tar compounds in a simulated air stream. A method and calibration protocol of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was developed to quantify tar compounds. Experimental data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedure. Statistical analysis showed that both soybean and canola oils are potential solvents, providing comparable removal efficiency of tar compounds. The experimental height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) was determined as 0.11 m for vegetable oil based scrubbing system. Packed bed height and solvent temperature had highly significant effect (p0.05) effect on the removal of model tar compounds. The packing specific constants, Ch and CP,0, for the Billet and Schultes pressure drop correlation were determined as 2.52 and 2.93, respectively. The equilibrium stage based thermodynamic model predicted the removal efficiency of model tar compounds in the range of 1-6%, 1-4% and 1-2% of experimental data for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, respectively, for the solvent temperature of 30° C. The NRTL-PR property model and UNIFAC for estimating binary interaction parameters are recommended for modeling absorption of tar compounds in vegetable oils. Bench scale experimental data from the wet scrubbing system would be useful in the design and operation of a pilot scale vegetable oil based system. The process model, validated using experimental data, would be a key design tool for the design and optimization of a pilot scale vegetable oil based system.

  18. Designing the IShTAR antenna: Physics and engineering aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louche, F.; Jacquot, J.; Crombé, K.; Van Eester, D.; D'Inca, R.; Devaux, S.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fünfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Morgal, I.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a magnetised plasma test facility installed at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik in Garching, Germany. The main purpose of this device is the study of RF sheaths generated in front of ICRF (Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency) antennas in magnetically confined plasmas. The plasma is generated by a helical RF antenna potentially able to reach a helicon mode. We present in this work recent modelling activities dedicated to IShTAR. On the one hand a parameterized magnetostatic model of the magnetic configuration was created with the finite element solver COMSOL Multiphysics [3]. The model considers two non-axial sets of coils and notably reproduces the magnetic field lines deviation at the center of the main vessel and the ripples observed during experiments. From this model we can infer that kA are required in the 2 main large coils of IShTAR for 1 kA in the 4 small coils to generate a "smooth" magnetic field along field lines. On the other hand an ICRF antenna has been designed for IShTAR. A tridimensional model of the IShTAR vessel was developed with the electromagnetic code MicroWave Studio (MWS [4]) for this purpose and a first antenna model made of a single strap inside a box was included. The strap is fed through the upper port located at the helicon source side. The antenna is fully immersed into the loading medium (plasma or homogeneous dielectric) and the curved strap front face is aligned with the magnetic surfaces to simplify the modelling. The initial design of this antenna has been studied with MWS in the presence of homogeneous dielectric. The presence of a back wall will be discussed.

  19. Is promise of Alberta's tar sands nearing reality

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, T.

    1993-10-15

    Alberta's far north shares a vital element with Saudi Arabia: Many hundreds of billions of barrels of oil. The Energy Resources and Conservation Board counts one trillion barrels, four to five times above Saudi Arabia's reserves. To date, though, it has not been economic to tap these reserves, which are in the form of tar sands. Now, however, a new process, proven at the pilot stage, finally may transform these resources into a possible competitor to OPEC. Its unpronounceable acronym, SAGD, stands for steam-assisted gravity drainage. The SAGD technique involves a couple of major innovations. First, it reverses the traditional approach. Instead of mining the sands from the surface downward, the systems developed and proven by the Alberta Oil Sands Technology and Research Authority (AOSTRA) starts from the bottom up. The oil is produced from underneath the bedded tar sands. Second, the system is intrinsically small scale. It does not rely upon megaprojects to try to realize economies of scale. The earlier surface-mining projects were sized at 100,000-200,000 barrels per day (b/d). In contrast, the optimum economic scale of the SAGD system is roughly 30,000 b/d, making it a more manageable and less risky technology. SAGD involves the marriage of conventional shaft and tunnel mining with the new precision possible in horizontal drilling. The cost savings are dramatic, and the environmental insult from the operation is greatly reduced. Instead of stripping overburden and then strip-mining the tarry sands, the SAGD technique starts underground with tunnels drilled beneath the tar sands strata. From the tunnels, pairs of horizontal wells are drilled up into the beds. Steam injected into the upper well fluidizes the tar, creating a void, from which the liquid tar flows down into the lower producing well.

  20. A gene therapy strategy using a transcription factor decoy of the E2F binding site inhibits smooth muscle proliferation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, R; Gibbons, G H; Horiuchi, M; Ellison, K E; Nakama, M; Zhang, L; Kaneda, Y; Ogihara, T; Dzau, V J

    1995-01-01

    The application of DNA technology to regulate the transcription of disease-related genes in vivo has important therapeutic potentials. The transcription factor E2F plays a pivotal role in the coordinated transactivation of cell cycle-regulatory genes such as c-myc, cdc2, and the gene encoding proliferating-cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) that are involved in lesion formation after vascular injury. We hypothesized that double-stranded DNA with high affinity for E2F may be introduced in vivo as a decoy to bind E2F and block the activation of genes mediating cell cycle progression and intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury. Gel mobility-shift assays showed complete competition for E2F binding protein by the E2F decoy. Transfection with E2F decoy inhibited expression of c-myc, cdc2, and the PCNA gene as well as vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation both in vitro and in the in vivo model of rat carotid injury. Furthermore, 2 weeks after in vivo transfection, neointimal formation was significantly prevented by the E2F decoy, and this inhibition continued up to 8 weeks after a single transfection in a dose-dependent manner. Transfer of an E2F decoy can therefore modulate gene expression and inhibit smooth muscle proliferation and vascular lesion formation in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7597041

  1. Host genotype and tumor phenotype of chemokine decoy receptors integrally affect breast cancer relapse

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chemokines may play vital roles in breast cancer progression and metastasis. The primary members of chemokine decoy receptors (CDR), DARC and D6, are expressed in breast tumors and lymphatic/hematogenous vessels. CDRs sequestrate the pro-malignant chemokines. We hypothesized that breast cancer patients carrying different levels of CDR expression in tumor and/or in host might have differing clinical outcomes. Methods This prospective observational study measured both expression and germline genotype of DARC and D6 in 463 primary breast cancer patients enrolled between 2004 and 2006. The endpoint was breast cancer relapse-free survival (RFS). Results There was a significant association between the co-expression of CDR (immunohistochemical expression of both DARC and D6) with RFS (hazard ratio [HR] of 0.32, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19 to 0.54). Furthermore, the co-genotype of two non-synonymous polymorphisms (with two major alleles of DARC-rs12075 and D6-rs2228468 versus the others) significantly related to relapse. Mechanistically, the variant-alleles of these two polymorphisms significantly decreased by 20–30% of CCL2/CCL5 (CDR ligands) levels relative to their major counterparts. Multivariate analysis highlighted that the co-expression and co-genotype of CDR were independent predictors of RFS, with HR of 0.46 (95% CI 0.27 to 0.80) and 0.56 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.85), respectively. The addition of host CDR genetic information to tumor-based factors (including co-expression of CDR) improved the relapse prediction ability (P = 0.02 of AUC comparison). Conclusion The host genotype and tumor phenotype of CDR integrally affect breast cancer relapse. Host-related factors should be considered for individualized prediction of prognosis. PMID:26314842

  2. The expression of death decoy receptor 3 was increased in the patients with primary Sjgren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinlin; Zhao, Zhao; Zou, Yuqiong; Zhang, Mei; Zhou, Yonglie; Li, Yasong; Pang, Zhenzhen; Jin, Weidong

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies suggested a pathological role for the death decoy receptor 3 (DcR3) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatic arthritis (RA). Herein, the expression of DcR3 in primary Sjgren's syndrome (pSS) and the relationship with clinical characteristics were investigated. The serum DcR3 levels of pSS patients and healthy controls were measured by ELISA. Pearson's correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationship between the DcR3 levels with the clinical characterstics of pSS patients. Additionally, the DcR3 expression in salivary glands of pSS patients was investigated by the immunohistochemistry method. The serum DcR3 expression in pSS patients was significantly higher than healthy controls (p?

  3. Human Milk Contains Novel Glycans That Are Potential Decoy Receptors for Neonatal Rotaviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Lasanajak, Yi; Song, Xuezheng; Hu, Liya; Ramani, Sasirekha; Mickum, Megan L.; Ashline, David J.; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Estes, Mary K.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Cummings, Richard D.; Smith, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Human milk contains a rich set of soluble, reducing glycans whose functions and bioactivities are not well understood. Because human milk glycans (HMGs) have been implicated as receptors for various pathogens, we explored the functional glycome of human milk using shotgun glycomics. The free glycans from pooled milk samples of donors with mixed Lewis and Secretor phenotypes were labeled with a fluorescent tag and separated via multidimensional HPLC to generate a tagged glycan library containing 247 HMG targets that were printed to generate the HMG shotgun glycan microarray (SGM). To investigate the potential role of HMGs as decoy receptors for rotavirus (RV), a leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in children, we interrogated the HMG SGM with recombinant forms of VP8* domains of the RV outer capsid spike protein VP4 from human neonatal strains N155(G10P[11]) and RV3(G3P[6]) and a bovine strain, B223(G10P[11]). Glycans that were bound by RV attachment proteins were selected for detailed structural analyses using metadata-assisted glycan sequencing, which compiles data on each glycan based on its binding by antibodies and lectins before and after exo- and endo-glycosidase digestion of the SGM, coupled with independent MSn analyses. These complementary structural approaches resulted in the identification of 32 glycans based on RV VP8* binding, many of which are novel HMGs, whose detailed structural assignments by MSn are described in a companion report. Although sialic acid has been thought to be important as a surface receptor for RVs, our studies indicated that sialic acid is not required for binding of glycans to individual VP8* domains. Remarkably, each VP8* recognized specific glycan determinants within a unique subset of related glycan structures where specificity differences arise from subtle differences in glycan structures. PMID:25048705

  4. Augmented regeneration of partial liver allograft induced by nuclear factor-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotides-modified dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming-Qing; Suo, Yu-Ping; Gong, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Ming-Man; Yan, L-Nan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynuleotides (ODNs)-modified dendritic cells (DCs) on regeneration of partial liver allograft. METHODS: Bone marrow (BM)-derived DCs from SD rats were propagated in the presence of GM-CSF or GM-CSF + IL-4 to obtain immature DCs or mature DCs, respectively. GM-CSF-propagated DCs were treated with double-strand NF-?B decoy ODNs containing two NF-?B binding sites or scrambled ODNs. Allogeneic (SD rat to LEW rat) 50% partial liver transplantation was performed. Normal saline (group A), GM-CSF-propagated DCs (group B), GM-CSF + IL-4-propagated DCs (group C), and GM-CSF + NF-?B decoy ODNs (group D) or scrambled ODNs-propagated DCs (group E) were injected intravenously into recipient LEW rats 7 days prior to liver transplantation and immediately after transplantation. DNA synthesis (BrdU labeling) and apoptosis of hepatocytes were detected with immunostaining and TUNEL staining postoperative 24 h, 48 h, 72 h and 84 h, respectively. Liver graft-resident NK cell activity, hepatic IFN-? mRNA expression and recipient serum IFN-? level at the time of the maximal liver allograft regeneration were measured with 51Cr release assay, semiquantitative RT-PCR and ELISA, respectively. RESULTS: Regeneration of liver allograft was markedly promoted by NF-?B decoy ODNs-modified immature DCs but was significantly suppressed by mature DCs, the DNA synthesis of hepatocytes peaked at postoperative 72 h in group A, group B and group E rats, whereas the DNA synthesis of hepatocytes peaked at postoperative 84 h in group C rats and 48 h in group D rats, respectively. The maximal BrdU labeling index of hepatocytes in group D rats was significantly higher than that in the other groups rats. NF-?B decoy ODNs-modified immature DCs markedly suppressed but mature DCs markedly promoted apoptosis of hepatocytes, liver-resident NK cell activity, hepatic IFN-? mRNA expression and recipient serum IFN-? production. At the time of the maximal regeneration of liver allograft, the minimal apoptosis of hepatocytes, the minimal activity of liver-resident NK cells, the minimal hepatic IFN-? mRNA expression and serum IFN-? production were detected in group D rats. The apoptotic index of hepatocytes, the activity of liver-resident NK cells, the hepatic IFN-? mRNA expression level and the serum IFN-? level in group D rats were significantly lower than that in the other groups rats at the time of the maximal regeneration of liver allograft. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that the augmented regeneration of partial liver allograft induced by NF-?B decoy ODNs-modified DCs may be attributable to the reduced apoptotic hepatocytes, the suppressed activity of liver-resident NK cells and the reduced IFN-? production. PMID:14966919

  5. Alcohol flushing for enhanced removal of coal tar from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, N.J.; Van der Hoven, E.J.

    1996-11-01

    Alcohol flushing for enhancing the removal of coal tar from contaminated soils and reducing coal tar concentrations in the aqueous-phase leachate was investigated. Four soil columns were packed with relatively undisturbed coal tar contaminated soils collected from a former coal gasification site. These columns were leached with water and then flushed with isopropyl alcohol (IPA) solutions. Initially, total coal tar concentrations in water leachate ranged from = 0.1 to 150 mg/L for the four columns. Coal tar concentrations in the column effluent generally increased three to five orders of magnitude during the initial IPA flush. Each column was flushed with 1-3 pore volumes of an IPA solution. Reduction of coal tar concentrations in water leachate, attributed to the alcohol flushing, was noted in three of the four columns. The total coal tar removed from the soil columns during the IPA flushes constituted from 54 to 97% of the total coal tar removed during both water leaching (240-800 pore volumes) and alcohol flushing (1-3 pore volumes). The alcohol flushing removed from 3 to 19 % of the total coal tar in the various soil columns. Results indicated that alcohol flushing can enhance the removal of coal tar from contaminated soils and can reduce the aqueous-phase coal tar concentrations in the leachate. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Source Zone Remediation of Tars at Former Manufactured Gas Plants Using Phyiscochemical Methods to Promote Mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birak, P. S.; Hauswirth, S.; Miller, C. T.

    2009-12-01

    Tars are a byproduct from gas manufacturing that are present in the subsurface at many former manufactured gas plants (FMGPs). These dense non-aqueous phase liquids are largely composed of polycyclic aromatic compounds, including several known carcinogens. Once below the water table, tars are particularly difficult to remediate due to their viscous nature and ability to alter system wettability. For this study, we investigate the feasibility of mobilizing tars as a means of source zone remediation. Tar samples were obtained from two FMGPs. We measured tar viscosity as a function of temperature using a rotational viscometer. Viscosity was found to be very sensitive to temperature and decreased by orders of magnitude from 5 to 80 degrees C. In one-dimensional column experiments, we examined the removal efficiency of tar by thermal methods and alkaline flushing, as well as, using a combination of methods. Sodium hydroxide solutions effectively mobilized the majority of the tar mass as a continuous phase.

  7. Selective Targeting of a TNFR Decoy Receptor Pharmaceutical to the Primate Brain as a Receptor-Specific IgG Fusion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Boado, Ruben J.; Hui, Eric Ka-Wai; Lu, Jeff Zhiqiang; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Pardridge, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Decoy receptors, such as the human tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), are potential new therapies for brain disorders. However, decoy receptors are large molecule drugs that are not transported across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). To enable BBB transport of a TNFR decoy receptor, the human TNFR-II extracellular domain was re-engineered as a fusion protein with a chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the human insulin receptor (HIR). The HIRMAb acts as a molecular Trojan horse to ferry the TNFR therapeutic decoy receptor across the BBB. The HIRMAb-TNFR fusion protein was expressed in stably transfected CHO cells, and was analyzed with electrophoresis, Western blotting, size exclusion chromatography, and binding assays for the HIR and TNF?. The HIRMAb-TNFR fusion protein was radiolabeled by trititation, in parallel with the radio-iodination of recombinant TNFR:Fc fusion protein, and the proteins were co-injected in the adult Rhesus monkey. The TNFR:Fc fusion protein did not cross the primate BBB in vivo, but the uptake of the HIRMAb-TNFR fusion protein was high and 3% of the injected dose was taken up by the primate brain. The TNFR was selectively targeted to brain, relative to peripheral organs, following fusion to the HIRMAb. This study demonstrates that decoy receptors may be re-engineered as IgG fusion proteins with a BBB molecular Trojan horse that selectively targets the brain, and enables penetration of the BBB in vivo. IgG-decoy receptor fusion proteins represent a new class of human neurotherapeutics. PMID:20100527

  8. Low solids content, coal tar based impregnating pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, A.S.; Bart, E.F.; Cook, G.R.; Horbachewski, D.M.

    1987-05-12

    A method is described of obtaining a coal tar based impregnant pitch characterized by having a sulfur content of less than 0.5 weight percent and a quinoline insoluble, QI, content of less than about 0.5 percent and enhanced impregnation property. This method comprises: selecting coal tar oil feedstock having: (1) a distillation residue at 355/sup 0/C > 30 weight percent; and (2) a QI < 0.5 weight percent; heating the feedstock to a temperature of between about 150/sup 0/C and 390/sup 0/C; and oxidizing and stripping the feedstock until: an ASTM D-3104-77 softening point between about 90/sup 0/C and 150/sup 0/C; a coking value of at least 45 weight percent according to ASTM D-2416-73; and a flashpoint of at least 200/sup 0/C according to ASTM D92-72 are obtained.

  9. Geology and resources of the Tar Sand Triangle, southeastern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dana, G. F.; Oliver, R. L.; Elliott, J. R.

    1984-05-01

    The Tar Sand Triangle is located in southeastern Utah between the Dirty Devil and Colorado Rivers and covers an area of about 200 square miles. The geology of the area consists of gently northwest dipping strata exposed in the box canyons and slopes of the canyolands morphology. Strata in the area range in age from Jurassic to Permian. The majority of tar sand saturation is found in the Permian White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation. The White Rim Sandstone Member consists of a clean, well sorted sandstone which was deposited in a shallow marine environment. The total in place resources, are 6.3 billion barrels. Previous estimates ranged from 2.9 to 16 million barrels. More coring and analyses is necessary before a more accurate determination of resources is attempted.

  10. Process and apparatus for recovery of oil from tar sands

    SciTech Connect

    Brewer, J.C.

    1982-11-30

    A crude oil product is extracted from a tar sand by first crushing the tar sand as mined and then fine grinding the crushed material in a grinding mill in the presence of a cleansing liquid, such as an aqueous solution of a caustic. The resulting slurry is passed into suitable extractor-classifier equipment, such as that shown in U.S. Pat. No. 3,814,336, in which a body of cleansing liquid is maintained. Agitation of the slurry in such maintained body of cleansing liquid substantially completes removal of the bituminous matter from the sand, and the resulting crude oil and cleansing liquid phase is discharged separately from the sand solid phase. The liquid phase is treated for the removal of residual sand particles and for the separation of residual cleansing liquid from the crude oil. The cleansing liquid so recovered is recycled and the crude oil is passed to further processing or for use as such.

  11. Simultaneous upgrading of tar sand bitumen and coal by corefining

    SciTech Connect

    Hsich, C.R.; Donaldson, W.I.

    1988-08-16

    A continuous process is described for simultaneously corefining a mixture of comminuted coal and tar sand bitumen to form a liquid refinery feed stock, having improved hydrocarbon content and viscosity and reduced organo-metallic and metal components, which process comprises: (a) combining bitumen substantially separated from tar sands with comminuted raw coal at a coal to liquid weight ratio of from about 1:2 to about 1 to 50 to form a slurry mixture; (b) subjecting the slurry mixture resulting from step (a) to hydrocracking conditions in the absence of added catalyst to produce off-gases and a mixture of co-refined bitumen and coal liquid and coal ash residues; and (c) recovering the corefined improve coal-bitumen liquid as a refinery feedstock.

  12. Comparison and analysis on test methods of infrared radiant intensity of infrared decoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chunsheng; Dai, Mengyan; Liu, Haifeng; Fang, Guofeng; Xie, Changyou; Zhang, Tong

    2014-11-01

    The research on infrared radiant characteristics of typical target is important for the detection and recognition of target, infrared simulation calculation and design of electro-optical countermeasures. Thus it is essential to select appropriate test method and optimal calculation method to improve the test accuracy and reliability of infrared radiant intensity. In this paper, three instruments including SR5000 spectroradiometer (CI, MigdalHaEmek, Israel), remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 (Bruker, Germany) and Image IR8325 (InfraTec Ltd, Germany) mid-infrared thermal imager were applied to test the infrared radiant (1μm-3μm - 3μm-5μm) intensity of decoy samples. Three methods were designed based on two operational principles including direct test and indirect test. The SR5000 spectroradiometer which is able to obtain the value of radian intensity immediately is regard as direct test. The other two instruments which deduce and calculate infrared radiant intensity according to Planck's law and Lambert's cosine law with some preliminary tested parameters such as the response voltage - the distribution of infrared radiant temperature of flaming samples and calibrated data by blackbody, however, are regard as indirect test. Reasons for the diversity of experiment results were provided through analysis on the concrete measurement theory and detailed calculation methods. Moreover, some rules and suggestions were put forward to improve the test accuracy and reliability of infrared radiant intensity when different methods were adopted. It is shown from experiment results that the average mid-infrared radiant intensity obtained from SR5000 was about 903W/Sr in near-infrared band - whereas Tensor 37 and Image IR8325 was about 834W/Sr and 547 W/Sr respectively. It was proved that maximum relative of calculated results from remote sensing interferometer spectrometer Tensor37 and results measured with SR5000 spectroradiometer is below 13%, which meet the general accuracy requirements. Although rigorous reasoning applied, results gained by Image IR8325 mid-infrared thermal imager varied so much from above-mentioned two instruments and the relative error is about 25%~40%. It is analyzed that complexity of the measurement procedure and similarity hypothesis is the main reason for the errors generated.

  13. Effects of spinning-wing decoys on flock behavior and hunting vulnerability of mallards in Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szymanski, M.L.; Afton, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    Waterfowl managers in Minnesota and other states are concerned that increased kill rates associated with the use of spinning-wing decoys (SWDs) may negatively affect local breeding populations of mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Accordingly, we conducted 219 experimental hunts to evaluate hunting vulnerability of mallards to SWDs during the 2002 duck season in Minnesota. During each hunt, we tested 2 SWD treatments: 1) SWDs turned OFF (control), and 2) SWDs turned ON (experimental) during alternate 15-minute sampling periods that were separated by 5-minute buffer periods. We found that mallard flocks (???1 duck) were 2.91 times more likely to respond (i.e., approach within 40 m of hunters), and sizes of responding mallard flocks were 1.25 times larger, on average, when SWDs were turned ON than OFF. Mallards killed/hour/hunter/hunt averaged 4.71 times higher (P < 0.001) when SWDs were turned ON than OFF. More hatch-year (HY) and after-hatch-year (AHY) mallards were killed when SWDs were turned ON than OFF; however, AHYs were relatively less likely than were HYs to be killed with SWDs turned ON. We found no evidence that SWDs reduced crippling or allowed hunters to harvest relatively more drakes than hens. Using a worst-case scenario model, we predicted that if 47% and 79% of Minnesota hunters had used SWDs in 2000 and 2002, respectively, Minnesota mallard harvests would have increased by a factor of 2. However, increasing use of SWDs by northern hunters may result in a partial redistribution of annual mallard harvests if nai??ve ducks are harvested upon initial exposures to SWDs, and those ducks that survive become habituated to SWDs, as suggested by our results. Our study was confined to a single hunting season in Minnesota and thus did not assess whether vulnerability of mallards to hunters using SWDs varied among years or geographically. A multi-year, flyway-wide study is needed to make stronger and more rigorous inferences regarding potential changes in harvest distribution and annual harvest rates of mallards due to increasing use of SWDs by hunters in North America.

  14. CSAR data set release 2012: ligands, affinities, complexes, and docking decoys.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, James B; Smith, Richard D; Damm-Ganamet, Kelly L; Ahmed, Aqeel; Esposito, Emilio Xavier; Delproposto, James; Chinnaswamy, Krishnapriya; Kang, You-Na; Kubish, Ginger; Gestwicki, Jason E; Stuckey, Jeanne A; Carlson, Heather A

    2013-08-26

    A major goal in drug design is the improvement of computational methods for docking and scoring. The Community Structure Activity Resource (CSAR) has collected several data sets from industry and added in-house data sets that may be used for this purpose ( www.csardock.org). CSAR has currently obtained data from Abbott, GlaxoSmithKline, and Vertex and is working on obtaining data from several others. Combined with our in-house projects, we are providing a data set consisting of 6 protein targets, 647 compounds with biological affinities, and 82 crystal structures. Multiple congeneric series are available for several targets with a few representative crystal structures of each of the series. These series generally contain a few inactive compounds, usually not available in the literature, to provide an upper bound to the affinity range. The affinity ranges are typically 3-4 orders of magnitude per series. For our in-house projects, we have had compounds synthesized for biological testing. Affinities were measured by Thermofluor, Octet RED, and isothermal titration calorimetry for the most soluble. This allows the direct comparison of the biological affinities for those compounds, providing a measure of the variance in the experimental affinity. It appears that there can be considerable variance in the absolute value of the affinity, making the prediction of the absolute value ill-defined. However, the relative rankings within the methods are much better, and this fits with the observation that predicting relative ranking is a more tractable problem computationally. For those in-house compounds, we also have measured the following physical properties: logD, logP, thermodynamic solubility, and pK(a). This data set also provides a substantial decoy set for each target consisting of diverse conformations covering the entire active site for all of the 58 CSAR-quality crystal structures. The CSAR data sets (CSAR-NRC HiQ and the 2012 release) provide substantial, publically available, curated data sets for use in parametrizing and validating docking and scoring methods. PMID:23617227

  15. Characterization of two commercial tar sand process waters

    SciTech Connect

    Kocornik, D.J.

    1985-09-01

    Process waters from two commercial-scale steamflood tar sand extraction operations have been characterized for chemical, physical, and toxicological properties. The characterization effort included wet chemical analyses, elemental analyses, particle-size analysis, and MICROTOX assays. The results of these tests indicate that both waters require treatment before reuse or discharge into the environment. Depending on the intended use, reductions of hardness, silica, oil and grease, suspended solids, iron, chloride, and dissolved solids may be required. 13 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Role of the chemokine decoy receptor D6 in balancing inflammation, immune activation, and antimicrobial resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Di Liberto, Diana; Locati, Massimo; Caccamo, Nadia; Vecchi, Annunciata; Meraviglia, Serena; Salerno, Alfredo; Sireci, Guido; Nebuloni, Manuela; Caceres, Neus; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Dieli, Francesco; Mantovani, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    D6 is a decoy and scavenger receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines. D6-deficient mice were rapidly killed by intranasal administration of low doses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The death of D6?/? mice was associated with a dramatic local and systemic inflammatory response with levels of M. tuberculosis colony-forming units similar to control D6-proficient mice. D6-deficient mice showed an increased numbers of mononuclear cells (macrophages, dendritic cells, and CD4 and CD8 T lymphocytes) infiltrating inflamed tissues and lymph nodes, as well as abnormal increased concentrations of CC chemokines (CCL2, CCL3, CCL4, and CCL5) and proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor ?, interleukin 1?, and interferon ?) in bronchoalveolar lavage and serum. High levels of inflammatory cytokines in D6?/? infected mice were associated with liver and kidney damage, resulting in both liver and renal failure. Blocking inflammatory CC chemokines with a cocktail of antibodies reversed the inflammatory phenotype of D6?/? mice but led to less controlled growth of M. tuberculosis. Thus, the D6 decoy receptor plays a key role in setting the balance between antimicrobial resistance, immune activation, and inflammation in M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:18695004

  17. A PCR-Based Method to Construct Lentiviral Vector Expressing Double Tough Decoy for miRNA Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Lan; Liu, Nian; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Peng, Wenda; Gou, Deming

    2015-01-01

    DNA vector-encoded Tough Decoy (TuD) miRNA inhibitor is attracting increased attention due to its high efficiency in miRNA suppression. The current methods used to construct TuD vectors are based on synthesizing long oligonucleotides (~90 mer), which have been costly and problematic because of mutations during synthesis. In this study, we report a PCR-based method for the generation of double Tough Decoy (dTuD) vector in which only two sets of shorter oligonucleotides (< 60 mer) were used. Different approaches were employed to test the inhibitory potency of dTuDs. We demonstrated that dTuD is the most efficient method in miRNA inhibition in vitro and in vivo. Using this method, a mini dTuD library against 88 human miRNAs was constructed and used for a high-throughput screening (HTS) of AP-1 pathway-related miRNAs. Seven miRNAs (miR-18b-5p, -101-3p, -148b-3p, -130b-3p, -186-3p, -187-3p and -1324) were identified as candidates involved in AP-1 pathway regulation. This novel method allows for an accurate and cost-effective generation of dTuD miRNA inhibitor, providing a powerful tool for efficient miRNA suppression in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26624995

  18. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Serk In; Park, Sung-Jun; Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won; Park, Yun Gyu

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to ?-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to ?-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to ?-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from ?-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. PMID:26655813

  19. TRAM-Derived Decoy Peptides inhibits the inflammatory response in mouse mammary epithelial cells and a mastitis model in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyu; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tiancheng; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Wei; Gao, Xuejiao; Qu, Shihui; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-10-01

    It has been proved that TRAM-Derived Decoy peptides have anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we synthesized a TRAM-Derived decoy peptide (TM6), belongs to TRAM TIR domain, of which sequence is "N"-RQIKIWFQNRRMKWK, KENFLRDTWCNFQFY-"C" and evaluated the effects of TM6 on lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice. In vivo, LPS-induced mice mastitis model was established by injection of LPS through the duct of mammary gland. TM6 was injected 1h before or after LPS treatment. In vitro, primary mouse mammary epithelial cells were used to investigate the effects of TM6 on LPS-induced inflammatory responses. The results showed that TM6 inhibited LPS-induced mammary gland histopathologic changes, MPO activity, and TNF-?, IL-1? and IL-6 production in mice. In vitro, TM6 significantly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-? and IL-6 production, as well as NF-?B and MAPKs activation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that TM6 had protective effects on LPS-mastitis and may be a promising therapeutic reagent for mastitis treatment. PMID:26101068

  20. Biomass waste gasification - can be the two stage process suitable for tar reduction and power generation?

    PubMed

    Sulc, Jind?ich; Stojdl, Ji?; Richter, Miroslav; Popelka, Jan; Svoboda, Karel; Smetana, Ji?; Vacek, Ji?; Skoblja, Siarhei; Buryan, Petr

    2012-04-01

    A pilot scale gasification unit with novel co-current, updraft arrangement in the first stage and counter-current downdraft in the second stage was developed and exploited for studying effects of two stage gasification in comparison with one stage gasification of biomass (wood pellets) on fuel gas composition and attainable gas purity. Significant producer gas parameters (gas composition, heating value, content of tar compounds, content of inorganic gas impurities) were compared for the two stage and the one stage method of the gasification arrangement with only the upward moving bed (co-current updraft). The main novel features of the gasifier conception include grate-less reactor, upward moving bed of biomass particles (e.g. pellets) by means of a screw elevator with changeable rotational speed and gradual expanding diameter of the cylindrical reactor in the part above the upper end of the screw. The gasifier concept and arrangement are considered convenient for thermal power range 100-350 kW(th). The second stage of the gasifier served mainly for tar compounds destruction/reforming by increased temperature (around 950C) and for gasification reaction of the fuel gas with char. The second stage used additional combustion of the fuel gas by preheated secondary air for attaining higher temperature and faster gasification of the remaining char from the first stage. The measurements of gas composition and tar compound contents confirmed superiority of the two stage gasification system, drastic decrease of aromatic compounds with two and higher number of benzene rings by 1-2 orders. On the other hand the two stage gasification (with overall ER=0.71) led to substantial reduction of gas heating value (LHV=3.15 MJ/Nm(3)), elevation of gas volume and increase of nitrogen content in fuel gas. The increased temperature (>950C) at the entrance to the char bed caused also substantial decrease of ammonia content in fuel gas. The char with higher content of ash leaving the second stage presented only few mass% of the inlet biomass stream. PMID:21925858

  1. Phenol-formaldehyde resin substitutes from biomass tars

    SciTech Connect

    Himmelblau, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    Approximately 320,000 tonnes of phenol and formaldehyde are currently used annually in North America to make adhesive resins that are used to make exterior-grade structural panels. The demand for phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resins is growing faster than the demand for panels, because more adhesive is required to join/coat the surface of wood flakes (for oriented strand board - OSB) than is required to join veneer; OSB is replacing plywood as logs large enough for veneer become scarcer. Also, competitive uses for phenol and methanol (for making formaldehyde) have increased raw materials cost and threatened availability. Production of adhesive resins from biomass to reduce reliance on raw materials derived from commodity petrochemicals and to lower resin cost looks attractive. A simple fluidized-bed reactor system can be used to produce tars that can substitute for a major portion of the phenol and formaldehyde in PF resin adhesives. This can be done in an air-fluidized, single-bed reactor; no inert gas or dual-bed system is required. The key is recognizing that optimum phenolic character in the tar is not produced at the maximum tar yield, but at reactor temperatures around 600{degrees}C and short gas-phase residence times that produce a yield of about 25 to 30 weight percent. A wide range of phenols, aldehydes and other compounds capable of polymerization are produced. Feedstock can be any wood waste larger than sander dust; low cost agricultural wastes such as bagasse are also suitable. Adhesive resin is produced from the entire tar product by shifting the pH from acidic to basic with NaOH, and combining and heating the resulting resole with phenol and formaldehyde, similarly to conventional resins. Approximately half of the phenol and formaldehyde by weight can be replaced with tar. A plant producing 13,865,000 kg (30,566,000 lb) annually from 308 tonnes (340 tons) per day of green wood chips would cost approximately $8,400,000.

  2. Metal catalysts for steam reforming of tar derived from the gasification of lignocellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Dalin; Tamura, Masazumi; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2015-02-01

    Biomass gasification is one of the most important technologies for the conversion of biomass to electricity, fuels, and chemicals. The main obstacle preventing the commercial application of this technology is the presence of tar in the product gas. Catalytic reforming of tar appears a promising approach to remove tar and supported metal catalysts are among the most effective catalysts. Nevertheless, improvement of catalytic performances including activity, stability, resistance to coke deposition and aggregation of metal particles, as well as catalyst regenerability is greatly needed. This review focuses on the design and catalysis of supported metal catalysts for the removal of tar in the gasification of biomass. The recent development of metal catalysts including Rh, Ni, Co, and their alloys for steam reforming of biomass tar and tar model compounds is introduced. The role of metal species, support materials, promoters, and their interfaces is described. PMID:25455089

  3. Offer Versus Serve. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Health and Drug Education and Services.

    A growing awareness about food supplies, food shortages, and conservation of natural resources has resulted in public concern over food waste within the National School Lunch Program. Prior to 1976, all participating students were required to take all five items offered on a planned menu. In October 1975, the Offer v. Serve Provision was enacted

  4. Technology To Serve Our Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quint, Barbara; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Eight articles serve as an introduction to the growing presence of technology in libraries. Topics covered include going online with microcomputers, a selection guide to database management software, sensible groundrules for circulating software, selection of software for microcomputer centers, and setting standards for microcomputers in

  5. Meals Served in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vivigal, Lisa

    The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) contacted public school districts around the United States to determine if they offered low-fat, healthful meals. The PCRM ranked the schools according to whether they served low-fat and vegetarian meals daily, whether these meals varied through the week, and whether children needed to

  6. Offer Versus Serve. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Health and Drug Education and Services.

    A growing awareness about food supplies, food shortages, and conservation of natural resources has resulted in public concern over food waste within the National School Lunch Program. Prior to 1976, all participating students were required to take all five items offered on a planned menu. In October 1975, the Offer v. Serve Provision was enacted…

  7. Notch Decoys that Selectively Block Dll/Notch or Jagged/Notch Disrupt Angiogenesis by Unique Mechanisms to Inhibit Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kangsamaksin, Thaned; Murtomaki, Aino; Kofler, Natalie M.; Cuervo, Henar; Chaudhri, Reyhaan A.; Tattersall, Ian W.; Rosenstiel, Paul E.; Shawber, Carrie J.; Kitajewski, Jan

    2015-01-01

    A pro-angiogenic role for Jagged-dependent activation of Notch signaling in the endothelium has yet to be described. Using proteins that encoded different NOTCH1 EGF-like repeats, we identified unique regions of DLL-class and JAG-class ligand/receptor interactions, and developed Notch decoys that function as ligand-specific Notch inhibitors. N110-24 decoy blocked JAG1/JAG2-mediated NOTCH1 signaling, angiogenic sprouting in vitro and retinal angiogenesis, demonstrating JAG-dependent Notch signal activation promotes angiogenesis. In tumors, N110-24 decoy reduced angiogenic sprouting, vessel perfusion, pericyte coverage, and tumor growth. JAG/NOTCH signaling uniquely inhibited expression of anti-angiogenic sVEFGFR-1/sFlt-1. N11-13 decoy interfered with DLL1/DLL4-mediated NOTCH1 signaling and caused endothelial hypersprouting in vitro, in retinal angiogenesis and in tumors. Thus, blockade of JAG- or DLL-mediated Notch signaling inhibits angiogenesis by distinct mechanisms. JAG/Notch signaling positively regulates angiogenesis by suppressing sVEGFR-1/sFlt-1 and promoting mural/endothelial cell interactions. Blockade of JAG-class ligands represents a novel, viable therapeutic approach to block tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:25387766

  8. Study on Tar Generated from Downdraft Gasification of Oil Palm Fronds

    PubMed Central

    Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Kueh, Soo Chuan; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues concerning the gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF) is the presence of tar and particulates formed during the process considering its high volatile matter content. In this study, a tar sampling train custom built based on standard tar sampling protocols was used to quantify the gravimetric concentration of tar (g/Nm3) in syngas produced from downdraft gasification of OPF. The amount of char, ash, and solid tar produced from the gasification process was measured in order to account for the mass and carbon conversion efficiency. Elemental analysis of the char and solid tar samples was done using ultimate analysis machine, while the relative concentration of the different compounds in the liquid tar was determined making use of a liquid gas chromatography (GC) unit. Average tar concentration of 4.928 g/Nm3 and 1.923 g/Nm3 was obtained for raw gas and cleaned gas samples, respectively. Tar concentration in the raw gas sample was found to be higher compared to results for other biomass materials, which could be attributed to the higher volatile matter percentage of OPF. Average cleaning efficiency of 61% which is comparable to that of sand bed filter and venturi scrubber cleaning systems reported in the literature was obtained for the cleaning system proposed in the current study. PMID:24526899

  9. Study on tar generated from downdraft gasification of oil palm fronds.

    PubMed

    Atnaw, Samson Mekbib; Kueh, Soo Chuan; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar

    2014-01-01

    One of the most challenging issues concerning the gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF) is the presence of tar and particulates formed during the process considering its high volatile matter content. In this study, a tar sampling train custom built based on standard tar sampling protocols was used to quantify the gravimetric concentration of tar (g/Nm3) in syngas produced from downdraft gasification of OPF. The amount of char, ash, and solid tar produced from the gasification process was measured in order to account for the mass and carbon conversion efficiency. Elemental analysis of the char and solid tar samples was done using ultimate analysis machine, while the relative concentration of the different compounds in the liquid tar was determined making use of a liquid gas chromatography (GC) unit. Average tar concentration of 4.928 g/Nm3 and 1.923 g/Nm3 was obtained for raw gas and cleaned gas samples, respectively. Tar concentration in the raw gas sample was found to be higher compared to results for other biomass materials, which could be attributed to the higher volatile matter percentage of OPF. Average cleaning efficiency of 61% which is comparable to that of sand bed filter and venturi scrubber cleaning systems reported in the literature was obtained for the cleaning system proposed in the current study. PMID:24526899

  10. Beneficiation of froth obtained from tar sands sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Elanchenny, V.; Seitzer, W.H.

    1983-08-30

    An improvement is disclosed in the treatment of sludge recovered from a pond containing tailings from a water extraction process of tar sands characterized in that the froth produced from a treatment of the sludge is diluted with water which is at an ambient temperature, and the diluted froth is agitated and aerated vigorously for a short time to obtain an upper froth layer which contains most of the bitumen and substantially reduced amounts of mineral and water. The upper froth layer is obtained by, e.g., skimming it from the froth produced by the agitation and aeration.

  11. Deodarone Isomers in Cedrus atlantica Essential Oils and Tar Oils.

    PubMed

    Nama, Anne Marie; Bighelli, Ange; Ghanmi, Mohamed; Satrani, Badr; Casanova, Joseph; Tomi, Félix

    2015-11-01

    Deodarone [2,2,6-trimethyl-6-(4-methylcyclohex-3-enyl)-tetrahydro-4-pyrone] is a sesquiterpene tetrahydro-γ-pyrone related to bisabolene and atlantone, first isolated from Cedrus deodora essential oil. With respect to the stereochemistry of the asymmetric carbons C4 and C8, two diastereoisomers may be distinguished. Identification and quantification of both diastereoisomers in wood and tar oils from C. atlantica has been achieved using 13C NMR spectroscopy, in combination with GC (polar column). The contents of (4R,8R)- and (4R,8S)-deodarone varied between 1.1-2.8% and 1.0-3.0%, respectively. PMID:26749821

  12. Systems and methods for producing hydrocarbons from tar sands formations

    DOEpatents

    Li, Ruijian (Katy, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX)

    2009-07-21

    A system for treating a tar sands formation is disclosed. A plurality of heaters are located in the formation. The heaters include at least partially horizontal heating sections at least partially in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The heating sections are at least partially arranged in a pattern in the hydrocarbon layer. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the hydrocarbon layer. The provided heat creates a plurality of drainage paths for mobilized fluids. At least two of the drainage paths converge. A production well is located to collect and produce mobilized fluids from at least one of the converged drainage paths in the hydrocarbon layer.

  13. Use of benzene-separation polymers to prepare coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Shabovta, S.I.; Muzychuk, V.D.; Kurkin, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-five percent of all wastes from coking plants and some other chemical industries are formed in benzene separation operations. Among these wastes are polymers found upon the regeneration of absorbent oil. These polymers were found to be useful in the preparation of anthracene oil for use as a wood preservative. After the bench-scale tests of the process proved to be successful, a polymer supply pipe was installed in the coal tar reservoir, and the quality of anthracene oil unloaded when 20% polymers were introduced met technical standards.

  14. Industrial emissions of the tar-treatment shop

    SciTech Connect

    Dar'yan, G.Z.; Reznikov, I.E.

    1984-01-01

    In order to determine what environmentally pollution substances were contained in the emissions of the coke by-product industry, an investigation of the emissions of the tar-treatment plant of the Dneprodzerzhinsk Coking Plant was carried out. The principal emissions were found to originate in the section for crystallizing naphthalene and anthracene and the ventilated water-cooling tower. Up to 99.8% of the naphthalene and 88.4% of the phenols being emitted by the shop was found to escape into the atmosphere.

  15. Production from multiple zones of a tar sands formation

    SciTech Connect

    Karanikas, John Michael; Vinegar, Harold J

    2013-02-26

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing heat to at least part of a hydrocarbon layer in the formation from a plurality of heaters located in the formation. The heat is allowed to transfer from the heaters to at least a portion of the formation. Fluids are produced from the formation through at least one production well that is located in at least two zones in the formation. The first zone has an initial permeability of at least 1 darcy. The second zone has an initial of at most 0.1 darcy. The two zones are separated by a substantially impermeable barrier.

  16. Transverse Aeolian Ridges (TARs) on Mars II: Distributions, orientations, and ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berman, Daniel C.; Balme, Matthew R.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.; Zimbelman, James R.

    2011-05-01

    Transverse Aeolian Ridges (TARs), 10 m scale, ripple-like aeolian bedforms with simple morphology, are widespread on Mars but it is unknown what role they play in Mars' wider sediment cycle. We present the results of a survey of all Mars Global Surveyor Narrow angle images in a pole-to-pole study area, 45° longitude wide. Following on from the classification scheme and preliminary surveys of Balme et al. (Balme, M.R., Berman, D.C., Bourke, M.C., Zimbelman, J.R. [2008a]. Geomorphology 101, 703-720) and Wilson and Zimbelman (Wilson, S.A., Zimbelman, J.R. [2004]. J. Geophys. Res. 109 (E10). doi: 10.1029/2004JE002247) we searched more than 10,000 images, and found that over 2000 reveal at least 5% areal cover by TARs. The mean TAR areal cover in the study area is about 7% (3% in the northern hemisphere and 11% in the southern hemisphere) but TARs are not homogenously distributed - they are concentrated in the mid-low latitudes and almost absent poleward of 35°N and 55°S. We found no clear correlation between TAR distribution and any of thermal inertia, kilometer-scale roughness, or elevation. We did find that TARs are less common at extremes of elevation. We found that TARs are most common near the equator (especially in the vicinity of Meridiani Planum, in which area they have a distinctive "barchan-like" morphology) and in large southern-hemisphere impact craters. TARs in the equatorial band are usually associated with outcrops of layered terrain or steep slopes, hence their relative absence in the northern hemisphere. TARs in the southern hemisphere are most commonly associated with low albedo, intercrater dune fields. We speculate that the mid-latitude mantling terrain (e.g., Mustard, J.F., Cooper, C.D., Rifkin, M.K. [2001]. Nature 412, 411-414; Kreslavsky, M.A., Head, J.W. [2002]. J. Geophys. Res. 29 (15). doi: 10.1029/2002GL015392) could also play a role in covering TARs or inhibiting saltation. We compared TAR distribution with general circulation model (GCM) climate data for both surface wind shear stress and wind direction. We performed GCM runs at various obliquity values to simulate the effects of changing obliquity on recent Mars climate. We found good general agreement between TAR orientation and GCM wind directions from present day obliquity conditions in many cases, but found no good correlation between wind shear stress and TAR distribution. We performed preliminary high resolution crater count studies of TARs in both equatorial and southern intracrater dunefield settings and compared these to superposition relationships between TARs and large dark dunes. Our results show that TARs near dunefield appear to be younger than TARs in the equatorial regions. We infer that active saltation from the large dunes keeps TARs active, but that TARs are not active under present day condition when distal to large dunes - perhaps supporting the interpretation that TARs are granule ripples. We conclude that local geology, rather than wind strength, controls TAR distribution, but that their orientation matches present-day regional wind patterns in most cases. We suggest that TARs are likely most (perhaps only) active today when they are proximal to large dark dune fields.

  17. Effect of wastewater treatment processes on the pyrolysis properties of the pyrolysis tars from sewage sludges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xia; Xie, Li-Ping; Li, Xin-Yu; Dai, Xiao-Hong; Fei, Xue-Ning; Jiang, Yuan-Guang

    2011-06-01

    The pyrolysis properties of five different pyrolysis tars, which the tars from 1# to 5# are obtained by pyrolyzing the sewage sludges of anaerobic digestion and indigestion from the A2/O wastewater treatment process, those from the activated sludge process and the indigested sludge from the continuous SBR process respectively, were studied by thermal gravimetric analysis at a heating rate of 10 C/min in the nitrogen atmosphere. The results show that the pyrolysis processes of the pyrolysis tars of 1#, 2#, 3# and 5# all can be divided into four stages: the stages of light organic compounds releasing, heavy polar organic compounds decomposition, heavy organic compounds decomposition and the residual organic compounds decomposition. However, the process of 4# pyrolysis tar is only divided into three stages: the stages of light organic compounds releasing, decomposition of heavy polar organic compounds and the residual heavy organic compounds respectively. Both the sludge anaerobic digestion and the "anaerobic" process in wastewater treatment processes make the content of light organic compounds in tars decrease, but make that of heavy organic compounds with complex structure increase. Besides, both make the pyrolysis properties of the tars become worse. The pyrolysis reaction mechanisms of the five pyrolysis tars have been studied with Coats-Redfern equation. It shows that there are the same mechanism functions in the first stage for the five tars and in the second and third stage for the tars of 1#, 2#, 3# and 5#, which is different with the function in the second stage for 4# tar. The five tars are easy to volatile.

  18. [Compositions and structure characterizations of coal tar refined soft pitch].

    PubMed

    Gao, Li-Juan; Zhao, Xue-Fei; Lai, Shi-Quan; Cheng, Jun-Xia; Lu, Yi-Qiang

    2009-08-01

    High temperature coal tar was used as raw materials, and was distilled to 280 degrees C for getting coal tar soft pitch. Then refined soft pitch was obtained by solvent extracting and subsequent settlement method. Its soft point was 32 degrees C; the group compositions consisted of 53.67% heptane soluble, 39.47% heptane insoluble but toluene soluble, 6.86% toluene insoluble and 0.06% quinoline insoluble. The relative average molecular weight was about 292. Its average molecular formula was C22.22 H16.32 N0.12 S0.06 O0.33; the total content of heteroatom was less than 1. IR analytic results showed that its heteroatom O existed in the R-O-R and Ar-O-R structure; its heteroatom N existed in the R-NH-R and -N=, with the latter being primary. Its average structure was obtained by improved Brown-Lander model: five-membered condensed rings. UV analysis indicated that the majority was linear arrangement, and the minority was surface arrangement; namely, the chemical structure of the samples was mainly the cata-condensed structure, while the minority was peri-condensation. PMID:19839328

  19. Geology and resources of the Tar Sand Triangle, southeastern Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Dana, G.F.; Oliver, R.L.; Elliott, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    The Tar Sand Triangle is located in southeastern Utah between the Dirty Devil and Colorado Rivers and covers an area of about 200 square miles. The geology of the area consists of gently northwest dipping strata exposed in the box canyons and slopes of the canyonlands morphology. Strata in the area range in age from Jurassic to Permian. The majority of tar sand saturation is found in the Permian White Rim Sandstone Member of the Cutler Formation. The White Rim Sandstone Member consists of a clean, well-sorted sandstone which was deposited in a shallow marine environment. Resources were calculated from analytical data from the three coreholes drilled by the Laramie Energy Technology Center and other available data. The total in-place resources, determined from this study, are 6.3 billion barels. Previous estimates ranged from 2.9 to 16 million barrels. More coring and analyses will be necessary before a more accurate determination of resources can be attempted. 8 references, 11 figures, 7 tables.

  20. Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

    1990-01-01

    Despite its high nitrogen concentration levels relative to the parent coal samples, 7.2% vs. 1.4 - 2.0%, little volatile nitrogen evolution is observed until decomposition temperatures of 600[degree]C or greater are obtained. Due to the lack of decomposition via tar evolution and as contrasted to parent coals, no significant bound nitrogen is evolved with heavy hydrocarbons at particle temperatures less than 600[degree]C. Similar to virgin'' chars and tars formed during rapid devolatilization, the polyimide samples begin to evolve significant fractions of bound nitrogen as IR-active light gases at particle temperatures between 650 and 750[degree]C. Unlike coal samples, however, relatively large fractions of the light gases are observed to be ammonia. The IR-active, nitrogen-containing light gas evolution rapidly declines at polyimide char temperatures greater than 750[degree]C, again in contrast to observed behavior in virgin coal char samples. It is not certain if the nitrogen evolution kinetics changes from selectively forming ammonia and hydrogen cyanide to benzonitriles or free nitrogen at these temperatures. The light gas evolution pattern with decomposition temperature of polymide could contribute to our understanding of the low conversion efficiencies observed for bound nitrogen to NO[sub x] conversion in the char combustion phase of pfc combustion.

  1. Trace metals in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.G.

    1990-11-28

    Fe, Ni, and V are considered trace impurities in heavy crude oils and tar sand bitumens. In order to understand the importance of these metals, we have examined several properties: (1) bulk metals levels, (2) distribution in separated fractions, (3) size behavior in feeds and during processing, (4) speciation as a function of size, and (5) correlations with rheological properties. Some of the results of these studies show: (1) V and Ni have roughly bimodal size distributions, (2) groupings were seen based on location, size distribution, and Ni/V ratio of the sample, (3) Fe profiles are distinctively different, having a unimodal distribution with a maximum at relatively large molecular size, (4) Fe concentrations in the tar sand bitumens suggest possible fines solubilization in some cases, (5) SARA separated fractions show possible correlations of metals with asphaltene properties suggesting secondary and tertiary structure interactions, and (6) ICP-MS examination for soluble ultra-trace metal impurities show the possibility of unexpected elements such as U, Th, Mo, and others at concentrations in the ppB to ppM range. 39 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Catalytic Steam Reforming of Gasifier Tars: On-Line Monitoring of Tars with a Transportable Molecular-Beam Mass Spectrometer; Milestone Completion Report

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.; Ratcliff, M.; Dayton, D.

    2002-05-01

    A method for evaluating catalytic tar decomposition in real time is presented. The effectiveness of two catalysts are compared. A key technical and economic barrier to commercialization of biomass gasification technologies is the removal of tars that are unavoidably formed in this thermochemical process. Tars contain fuel value; however, they are problematic in gas engines (both reciprocating and turbine) because they condense in the fuel delivery system, forming deposits that negatively affect operation and efficiency. These tars also combust with high luminosity, potentially forming soot particles. The conventional technology for tar removal is wet scrubbing. Although this approach has shown some success, there are significant equipment and operating costs associated with it. In order to prevent the generation of toxic wastewater, the tars must be separated and either disposed as hazardous waste or, preferably, combusted in the gasification plant. A conceptually better approach is catalytic steam reforming of the tars to hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO), effectively increasing the gasification efficiency and eliminating the problems mentioned above. In FY2000, Battelle Columbus Laboratories attempted to demonstrate integrated gasification-gas turbine operation using catalytic steam reforming of tars. NREL participated in those tests using the transportable molecular-beam mass spectrometer (TMBMS) to monitor the catalytic reactor's performance on-line [10]. Unfortunately, the pilot plant tests encountered operational problems that prevented conclusive determination of the efficacy of the selected catalyst (Battelle's DN34). In FY2001, NREL performed on-site tar steam reforming tests using a slip-stream of hot pyrolysis gas from the Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), which was directed to a bench-scale fluidized bed reactor system designed expressly for this purpose. Supporting this effort, the TMBMS was employed to provide on-line analysis of the tar conversion. The gas composition changes were monitored by two identical gas chromatographs (GCs), and modified method 5 sampling was performed to obtain gravimetric conversion data. The combination of these analytical techniques provided definitive catalyst performance data, as well as linkage to previous and on-going work elsewhere. Two catalysts were tested: nickel (Ni) on potassium promoted alumina (Sued-Chemie C11-NK), used commercially for naphtha steam reforming, and alumina (Battelle's DN34) claimed to be effective for gasifier tar decomposition. In addition, sand was tested as an inert reference material.

  3. 5 CFR 1203.14 - Serving documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Serving documents. (a) Parties. In every case, the person requesting regulation review must serve a copy... copy of all other pleadings must be served, by the person submitting the pleading, on each other party to the proceeding. (b) Method of serving documents. Pleadings may be served on parties by mail,...

  4. 5 CFR 1203.14 - Serving documents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Serving documents. (a) Parties. In every case, the person requesting regulation review must serve a copy... copy of all other pleadings must be served, by the person submitting the pleading, on each other party to the proceeding. (b) Method of serving documents. Pleadings may be served on parties by mail,...

  5. Relationship Between the Composition and Interfacial Tension of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Birak, P. S.; Miller, C. T.

    2011-12-01

    Former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars pose significant environmental hazards and present a challenge to regulators and industry professionals. The tars, which were produced as a byproduct of the gas manufacturing process, were frequently released into the environment through improper disposal or leaks in plant infrastructure. The interfacial tension (IFT) is a primary factor controlling the mobility of tars in porous media, and is therefore important to understand for both predicting the migration of tars and designing remediation strategies. In this study, we characterized nine field-collected FMGP tars and a commercially available coal tar by means of chemical extractions (asphaltenes, resins, acids, and bases), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Additionally, the IFT and contact angle of each tar was determined for a pH range of 3-11. The IFT was found to be similar for all tars at pH 5 and 7 regardless of composition. Slight decreases in IFT at lower pH were correlated with higher concentrations of extractable bases, which consisted primarily of nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatic compounds. Much greater reductions of IFT were observed at high pH. These reductions were found to be associated with the presence of carbonyl or carboxyl groups in the asphaltenes. It is likely that the larger size of the asphaltene molecules (as compared to the extractable compounds) resulted in species with greater surface activity when ionized.

  6. 29 CFR 1915.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1915.1002 Section 1915.1002 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note:...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.1102 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1926.1102 Section 1926.1102 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Hazardous Substances § 1926.1102 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note: The...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.1102 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1926.1102 Section 1926.1102 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Hazardous Substances § 1926.1102 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note: The...

  9. 29 CFR 1915.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1915.1002 Section 1915.1002 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note:...

  10. 29 CFR 1915.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1915.1002 Section 1915.1002 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note:...

  11. 48 CFR 1201.301-70 - Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12. 1201.301-70 Section 1201.301-70 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Agency Acquisition Regulations 1201.301-70 Amendment of (TAR) 48 CFR chapter 12....

  12. 29 CFR 1915.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1915.1002 Section 1915.1002 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note:...

  13. 29 CFR 1926.1102 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1926.1102 Section 1926.1102 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Hazardous Substances § 1926.1102 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note: The...

  14. 29 CFR 1915.1002 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1915.1002 Section 1915.1002 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1915.1002 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note:...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1102 - Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. 1926.1102 Section 1926.1102 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH... Hazardous Substances § 1926.1102 Coal tar pitch volatiles; interpretation of term. Note: The...

  16. Lewin estimates 2 billion barrels of US tar sand recoverable at mid $20/bbl

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    In 1983, Lewin and Associates prepared a report which established that the US tar sands resource amounts to over 60 billion barrels of bitumen in-place. However, no estimate was made of the technically or economically recoverable portion of this resource. More recent work carried out by Lewin for the US Department of Energy presents an appraisal of technically and economically recoverable tar sands. The paper describes the tar sand resource in-place, tar sand recovery models used in the study, engineering cost models, the economics of the steam soak prospect, and the economics of a surface mining prospect. The results of the Lewin study show that 5.7 billion barrels of domestic tar sand are technically recoverable, using cyclic steam injection and surface extractive mining. Of this, 4.9 billion barrels are technically recoverable from surface mining methods, with 0.8 billion recoverable from steam soak applications. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  17. Task 3.9 -- Catalytic tar cracking. Semi-annual report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Young, B.C.; Timpe, R.C.

    1995-12-31

    Tar produced in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas stream cleanup filters, and pressure swing adsorption systems. Catalytic cracking of tars to smaller hydrocarbons can be an effective means to remove these tars from gas streams and, in the process, generate useful products, e.g., methane gas, which is crucial to the operation of molten carbonate fuel cells. The objectives of this project are to investigate whether gasification tars can be cracked by synthetic nickel-substituted micamontmorillonite, zeolite, or dolomite material; and whether the tars can be cracked selectively by these catalysts to produce a desired liquid and/or gas stream. Results to date are presented in the cited papers.

  18. Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal: Task 3.9 catalytic tar cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Timpe, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    Tar produced in the gasification of coal is deleterious to the operation of downstream equipment, including fuel cells, gas turbines, hot-gas stream cleanup filters, and pressure-swing absorption systems. Catalytic cracking of tars to smaller hydrocarbons can be an effective means of removing these tars from gas streams and, in the process, generating useful products, such as methane gas, which is crucial to operation of molten carbonate fuel cells. Aerosol tars are not readily removed from gas streams by conventional means and, as a consequence, often end up plugging filters or fouling fuel cells, turbines, or sorbents. Catalytic cracking of these tars to molecular moieties of C{sub 10} or smaller would prevent the problems commonly attributed to the tars. As an example, the moving Bourdon fixed-bed gasifier, by virtue of its efficient countercurrent heat exchange and widespread commercial use, may offer the lowest-cost integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) system if tar generation and wastewater contamination can be minimized. We evaluate the potential of selected catalysts to minimize tar accumulation and maximize char conversion to useful liquid and/or gaseous products. Owing to the potential for production of extremely toxic nickel carbonyl gas, care must be exercised in the use of a NISMM catalyst for cracking tars at high temperatures in reducing atmospheres such as those produced by coal gasification. We observed a fifty percent or more of tar produced during steam gasification of Beulah lignite at temperatures of 400{degrees}-800+{degrees}C when cracked by either dolomite or zeolite maintained at a temperature of 50{degrees}C-100{degrees}C below that of the reactor.

  19. Coal tar technology. January 1970-June 1989 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-June 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning various aspects of coal tar. Topics include production from coal gasification, synthesis of chemicals from coal tar, and chemical analyses of coal tar products. Toxicology, pollution studies, and commercial uses of the product are also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 271 citations, 21 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  20. Coal Tar Technology. January 1970-May 1988 (Citations from the NTIS data base). Report for January 1970-May 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning various aspects of coal tar. Topics include production from coal gasification, synthesis of chemicals from coal tar, and chemical analyses of coal-tar products. Toxicology, pollution studies, and commercial uses of the product are also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 269 citations, 22 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  1. Enhanced biodegradation of phenanthrene in oil tar-contaminated soils supplemented with Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed Central

    Brodkorb, T S; Legge, R L

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has shown promise as an organism suitable for the breakdown of a broad spectrum of environmental pollutants, including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The focus of this study was to determine whether P. chrysosporium could effectively operate in an actual field sample of oil tar-contaminated soil. The soil was loaded with [14C]phenanthrene to serve as a model compound representative of the PAHs. Soil with the native flora present under static, aerobic conditions with buffering (pH 5.0 to 5.5) displayed full mineralization on the order of 20% in 21 days. The addition of P. chrysosporium was synergistic, with full mineralization on the order of 38% in 21 days. In addition to full mineralization, there was an increase in the proportion of radiolabelled polar extractives, both soluble and bound, in the presence of P. chrysosporium. From this study, it is apparent that the native soil microflora can be prompted into full mineralization of PAHs in some contaminated soils and that this mineralization can be enhanced when supplemented with the white rot fungus P. chrysosporium. With further refinement, this system may prove an effective bioremediation technology for soils contaminated with PAHs. PMID:1444426

  2. Accumulation of TAR DNA Binding Protein-43 (TDP-43) in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Cyntia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Schneider, Julie; Bennett, David A.; Calon, Frdric

    2011-01-01

    TAR DNA binding protein-43 (TDP-43) plays a central role in the neuropathology of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-TDP) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, but the relationship between TDP-43 abnormalities and Alzheimer disease (AD) remains unclear. To determine whether TDP-43 can serve as a neuropathological marker of AD, we performed biochemical characterization and quantification of TDP-43 in homogenates from parietal neocortex of subjects with a clinical diagnosis of no cognitive impairment (NCI, n = 12), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n = 12), or AD (n = 12). Immunoblots revealed increased detergent-insoluble TDP-43 in the cortex of 0/12, 3/12 and 6/12 individuals with NCI, MCI or AD, respectively. Detergent-insoluble TDP-43 was positively correlated with the accumulation of soluble A?42, amyloid plaques and paired helical filament tau. In contrast, phospho-TDP-43 was decreased in the cytosolic fraction and detergent-soluble membrane/nuclear fraction from AD patients and correlated with antemortem cognitive function. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed that the frequencies of individuals with TPD-43 or phospo-TDP-43 cytoplasmic inclusions were higher in AD than in NCI, with MCI at an intermediate level. These data indicate that abnormalities of TDP-43 occur in an important subset of MCI and AD patients and that they correlate with the clinical and neuropathological features of AD. PMID:21865887

  3. Enhanced biodegradation of phenanthrene in oil tar-contaminated soils supplemented with Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    SciTech Connect

    Brodkorb, T.S.; Legge, R.L. )

    1992-09-01

    In recent years, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has shown promise as an organism suitable for the breakdown of a broad spectrum of environmental pollutants, including polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The focus of this study was to determine whether P. chrysosporium could effectively operate in an actual field sample of oil tar-contaminated soil. The soil was loaded with [14C]phenanthrene to serve as a model compound representative of the PAHs. Soil with the native flora present under static, aerobic conditions with buffering (pH 5.0 to 5.5) displayed full mineralization on the order of 20% in 21 days. The addition of P. chrysosporium was synergistic, with full mineralization on the order of 38% in 21 days. In addition to full mineralization, there was an increase in the proportion of radiolabelled polar extractives, both soluble and bound, in the presence of P. chrysosporium. From this study, it is apparent that the native soil microflora can be prompted into full mineralization of PAHs in some contaminated soils and that this mineralization can be enhanced when supplemented with the white rot fungus P. chrysosporium. With further refinement, this system may prove an effective bioremediation technology for soils contaminated with PAHs.

  4. Mexican doctors serve rural areas.

    PubMed

    Grossi, J

    1991-02-01

    The Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) worked to solve the unemployment problems of physicians and to increase health services to underserved rural areas. In Mexico, 75% of practicing physicians were located in 16 urban areas. Mexico had a large population of 83 million, of whom many in rural areas have been deprived of family planning and medical services. MEXFAM initiated the Community Doctors Project in 1986. The aim was to help Mexican doctors set up a medical practice in marginal urban towns and small towns with low income residents. Funding to physicians was provided for conducting a market survey of the proposed region and for advertising the new medical services. Loans of furniture and medical supplies were provided, and options were provided for purchase of equipment at a later date. During the promotion, services for maternal and child health care were provided for a small fee, while family planning was provided for free. Doctors usually become self-sufficient after about two years. The MEXFAM project established 170 community doctor's offices in 30 out of 32 states. Services were provided for at least 2500 families per office. In 1990, 13 offices were opened to serve an estimated 182,000 clients. A new effort is being directed to owners of Mexican factories. MEXFAM will set up a medical and family planning clinic very close to factories for a company contribution of only $12,000. The clinic promotion is being marketed through videos. MEXFAM found two companies that agreed to support a clinic. PMID:12288711

  5. Signal Peptide Cleavage from GP5 of PRRSV: A Minor Fraction of Molecules Retains the Decoy Epitope, a Presumed Molecular Cause for Viral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Thaa, Bastian; Sinhadri, Balaji Chandrasekhar; Tielesch, Claudia; Krause, Eberhard; Veit, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the major pathogen in the pig industry. Variability of the antigens and persistence are the biggest challenges for successful control and elimination of the disease. GP5, the major glycoprotein of PRRSV, is considered an important target of neutralizing antibodies, which however appear only late in infection. This was attributed to the presence of a decoy epitope located near a hypervariable region of GP5. This region also harbors the predicted signal peptide cleavage sites and (dependent on the virus strain) a variable number of potential N-glycosylation sites. Molecular processing of GP5 has not been addressed experimentally so far: whether and where the signal peptide is cleaved and (as a consequence) whether the decoy epitope is present in virus particles. We show that the signal peptide of GP5 from the American type 2 reference strain VR-2332 is cleaved, both during in vitro translation in the presence of microsomes and in transfected cells. This was found to be independent of neighboring glycosylation sites and occurred in a variety of porcine cells for GP5 sequences derived from various type 2 strains. The exact signal peptide cleavage site was elucidated by mass spectrometry of virus-derived and recombinant GP5. The results revealed that the signal peptide of GP5 is cleaved at two sites. As a result, a mixture of GP5 proteins exists in virus particles, some of which still contain the decoy epitope sequence. Heterogeneity was also observed for the use of glycosylation sites in the hypervariable region. Lastly, GP5 mutants were engineered where one of the signal peptide cleavage sites was blocked. Wildtype GP5 exhibited exactly the same SDS-PAGE mobility as the mutant that is cleavable at site 2 only. This indicates that the overwhelming majority of all GP5 molecules does not contain the decoy epitope. PMID:23755249

  6. Physical-chemical treatment of tar-sand processing wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    King, P.H.

    1982-07-01

    This final report for Phase I summarizes work done to determine the ability of several coagulants to contribute significantly in the treatment of selected tar sand wastewaters. The coagulation process must be considered as one possible step in a treatment scheme to reduce pollutants in these wastewaters and lead to a water quality acceptable for reuse or disposal. Two wastewaters were provided by the Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC). The primary emphasis in this study was focused on a representative steam flooding wastewater designated in the report as TARSAND 1S. The coagulation study in which treatment of this wastewater was the prime goal is described in full detail in the thesis entitled Chemical Coagulation of Steam Flooding Tar Sand Wastewaters. This thesis, written by Mr. Omar Akad, is included as Appendix A in this report. A representative combustion wastewater, designated as TARSAND 2C, was also provided by LETC. This wastewater was characteristically low in suspended solids and after initial screening experiments were conducted, it was concluded that coagulation was relatively ineffective in the treatment of TARSAND 2C. Hence, efforts were concentrated on the parametric evaluation of coagulation of TARSAND 1S. The objectives for the research conducted under Phase I were: (1) to compare the effectiveness of lime, alum, ferric chloride and representative synthetic organic polymers in reducing suspended solids and total organic carbon (TOC) from TARSAND 1S wastewater; (2) to determine the effects of pH, coagulant aids, and mixing conditions on the coagulation process; (3) to determine the relative volume of sludge produced from each selected coagulation process.

  7. Free-space measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol using decoy states with orbital angular momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Le; Zhao, Sheng-Mei; Gong, Long-Yan; Cheng, Wei-Wen

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution (MDI-QKD) protocol using orbital angular momentum (OAM) in free space links, named the OAM-MDI-QKD protocol. In the proposed protocol, the OAM states of photons, instead of polarization states, are used as the information carriers to avoid the reference frame alignment, the decoy-state is adopted to overcome the security loophole caused by the weak coherent pulse source, and the high efficient OAM-sorter is adopted as the measurement tool for Charlie to obtain the output OAM state. Here, Charlie may be an untrusted third party. The results show that the authorized users, Alice and Bob, could distill a secret key with Charlie’s successful measurements, and the key generation performance is slightly better than that of the polarization-based MDI-QKD protocol in the two-dimensional OAM cases. Simultaneously, Alice and Bob can reduce the number of flipping the bits in the secure key distillation. It is indicated that a higher key generation rate performance could be obtained by a high dimensional OAM-MDI-QKD protocol because of the unlimited degree of freedom on OAM states. Moreover, the results show that the key generation rate and the transmission distance will decrease as the growth of the strength of atmospheric turbulence (AT) and the link attenuation. In addition, the decoy states used in the proposed protocol can get a considerable good performance without the need for an ideal source. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61271238 and 61475075), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20123223110003), the Natural Science Research Foundation for Universities of Jiangsu Province of China (Grant No. 11KJA510002), the Open Research Fund of Key Laboratory of Broadband Wireless Communication and Sensor Network Technology, Ministry of Education, China (Grant No. NYKL2015011), and the Innovation Program of Graduate Education of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX0810). Gong Long-Yan is partially supported by Qinglan Project of Jiangsu Province, China.

  8. Suppression of wear-particle-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in macrophages via NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotide: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Hua; Yao, Zhenyu; Sato, Taishi; Keeney, Michael; Li, Chenguang; Pajarinen, Jukka; Yang, Fan; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart B

    2014-08-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) is very cost-effective surgery for end-stage arthritis. One important goal is to decrease the revision rate, mainly because TJR has been extended to younger patients. Continuous production of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles induces macrophage infiltration and chronic inflammation, which can lead to periprosthetic osteolysis. Targeting individual pro-inflammatory cytokines directly has not reversed the osteolytic process in clinical trials, owing to compensatory up-regulation of other pro-inflammatory factors. It is hypothesized that targeting the important transcription factor NF-?B could mitigate the inflammatory response to wear particles, potentially diminishing osteolysis. In the current study, NF-?B activity in mouse RAW 264.7 and human THP1 macrophage cell lines, as well as primary mouse and human macrophages, was suppressed via competitive binding with double strand decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing an NF-?B binding element. It was found that macrophage exposure to UHMWPE particles induced multiple pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, including TNF-?, MCP1, MIP1? and others. Importantly, the decoy ODN significantly suppressed the induced cytokine and chemokine expression in both murine and human macrophages, and resulted in suppression of macrophage recruitment. The strategic use of decoy NF-?B ODN, delivered locally, could potentially diminish particle-induced periprosthetic osteolysis. PMID:24814879

  9. Suppression of wear particle induced pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production in macrophages via NF-?B decoy oligodeoxynucleotide: A preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-hua; Yao, Zhenyu; Sato, Taishi; Keeney, Michael; Li, Chenguang; Pajarinen, Jukka; Yang, Fan; Egashira, Kensuke; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2014-01-01

    Total joint replacement (TJR) is a very cost-effective surgery for end-stage arthritis. One important goal is to decrease the revision rate especially because TJR has been extended to younger patients. Continuous production of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) wear particles induces macrophage infiltration and chronic inflammation, which can lead to peri-prosthetic osteolysis. Targeting individual pro-inflammatory cytokines directly has not reversed the osteolytic process in clinical trials, due to compensatory upregulation of other pro-inflammatory factors. We hypothesized that targeting the important transcription factor NF-?B could mitigate the inflammatory response to wear particles, potentially diminishing osteolysis. In the current study, we suppressed NF-?B activity in mouse RAW264.7 and human THP1 macrophage cell lines, as well as primary mouse and human macrophages, via competitive binding with double strand decoy oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) containing an NF-?B binding element. We found that macrophage exposure to UHMWPE particles induced multiple pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression including TNF-?, MCP1, MIP1? and others. Importantly, the decoy ODN significantly suppressed the induced cytokine and chemokine expression in both murine and human macrophages, and resulted in suppression of macrophage recruitment. The strategic use of decoy NF-?B ODN, delivered locally, could potentially diminish particle-induced peri-prosthetic osteolysis. PMID:24814879

  10. A beta-complex statistical four body contact potential combined with a hydrogen bond statistical potential recognizes the correct native structure from protein decoy sets.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Gonzlez, Gilberto; Kim, Jae-Kwan; Kim, Deok-Soo; Garduo-Jurez, Ramn

    2013-08-01

    We present a new four-body knowledge-based potential for recognizing the native state of proteins from their misfolded states. This potential was extracted from a large set of protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography using BetaMol, a software based on the recent theory of the beta-complex (?-complex) and quasi-triangulation of the Voronoi diagram of spheres. This geometric construct reflects the size difference among atoms in their full Euclidean metric; property not accounted for in a typical 3D Delaunay triangulation. The ability of this potential to identify the native conformation over a large set of decoys was evaluated. Experiments show that this potential outperforms a potential constructed with a classical Delaunay triangulation in decoy discrimination tests. The addition of a statistical hydrogen bond potential to our four-body potential allows a significant improvement in the decoy discrimination, in such a way that we are able to predict successfully the native structure in 90% of cases. PMID:23568277

  11. Catalytic Tar Reduction for Assistance in Thermal Conversion of Space Waste for Energy Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccio, Anne Joan; Devor, Robert William; Hintze, Paul E.; Muscatello, Anthony C.; Nur, Mononita

    2014-01-01

    The Trash to Gas (TtG) project investigates technologies for converting waste generated during spaceflight into various resources. One of these technologies was gasification, which employed a downdraft reactor designed and manufactured at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) for the conversion of simulated space trash to carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide would then be converted to methane for propulsion and water for life support systems. A minor byproduct of gasification includes large hydrocarbons, also known as tars. Tars are unwanted byproducts that add contamination to the product stream, clog the reactor and cause complications in analysis instrumentation. The objective of this research was to perform reduction studies of a mock tar using select catalysts and choose the most effective for primary treatment within the KSC downdraft gasification reactor. Because the KSC reactor is operated at temperatures below typical gasification reactors, this study evaluates catalyst performance below recommended catalytic operating temperatures. The tar reduction experimentation was observed by passing a model tar vapor stream over the catalysts at similar conditions to that of the KSC reactor. Reduction in tar was determined using gas chromatography. Tar reduction efficiency and catalyst performances were evaluated at different temperatures.

  12. Impact of Asphaltenes and Resins on the Wetting Characteristics of Tars at Former Manufactured Gas Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S. C.; Birak, P. S.; Rylander, S.; Pedit, J. A.; Miller, C. T.

    2008-12-01

    Tars produced as a byproduct of coal and oil gasification at manufactured gas plants (MGPs) during the 19th and early 20th centuries were often released into the environment through poor disposal practices or leaks in holding tanks and piping. These tars are persistent contaminants, leaching polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into groundwater and posing a significant risk to human and ecological health. MGP tars also have several properties that make them notoriously difficult to remediate. They are denser than water, so they can migrate to depths which make direct removal difficult or impossible, and their relatively high viscosities and ability to alter the wetting characteristics of porous media result in inefficient removal by traditional pump-and-treat methods. In this study, we investigate the last of these properties. Previous studies have linked wetting changes to asphaltenes---polar, high molecular weight compounds present in the tars. However, we have conducted qualitative bottle tests for tar samples collected from two former MGPs which indicate that there is no direct correlation between asphaltene concentration and the tendency to alter wetting characteristics of porous media. To better understand the factors controlling wetting behavior, we isolate asphaltenes and resins, another class of polar compounds, from a tar sample and recombine them with the remaining PAH mixture to create a series of tars of varying composition. We assess the relative impact of each of the fractions on wettability through contact angle measurements conducted at three different pHs.

  13. Structure and mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus TarM, the wall teichoic acid ?-glycosyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Sobhanifar, Solmaz; Worrall, Liam James; Gruninger, Robert J.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Blaukopf, Markus; Baumann, Lars; Lameignere, Emilie; Solomonson, Matthew; Brown, Eric D.; Withers, Stephen G.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Unique to Gram-positive bacteria, wall teichoic acids are anionic glycopolymers cross-stitched to a thick layer of peptidoglycan. The polyol phosphate subunits of these glycopolymers are decorated with GlcNAc sugars that are involved in phage binding, genetic exchange, host antibody response, resistance, and virulence. The search for the enzymes responsible for GlcNAcylation in Staphylococcus aureus has recently identified TarM and TarS with respective ?- and ?-(14) glycosyltransferase activities. The stereochemistry of the GlcNAc attachment is important in balancing biological processes, such that the interplay of TarM and TarS is likely important for bacterial pathogenicity and survival. Here we present the crystal structure of TarM in an unusual ternary-like complex consisting of a polymeric acceptor substrate analog, UDP from a hydrolyzed donor, and an ?-glyceryl-GlcNAc product formed in situ. These structures support an internal nucleophilic substitution-like mechanism, lend new mechanistic insight into the glycosylation of glycopolymers, and reveal a trimerization domain with a likely role in acceptor substrate scaffolding. PMID:25624472

  14. Application of organic geochemistry to coastal tar residues from Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Hostettler, F.D.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Tar residues are common on the coastline of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. These coastal tar residues have been washed ashore and usually occur on headlands near the high-tide line. In this study, 18 coastal tar residues were collected and analyzed to determine their carbon isotopic compositions and the values of selected biomarker ratios. All of the residues have very heavy (13C-enriched) carbon isotopic compositions spanning a narrow range (??13C = -22.2 to -23.4???), and 28,30-bisnorhopane is present in all samples. These same geochemical characteristics are found in Monterey Formation oils from which the coastal tar residues were likely derived. These coastal residues could result from natural seeps or from accidental spills. Statistically the coastal tar residues can be organized into three groups, each of which may represent different spill or seep events. Seven samples of potential local representative sources for the tar residues were examined, but none could account for the coastal tars.

  15. Application of organic geochemistry to coastal tar residues from central California

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Hostettler, F.D.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2000-01-01

    Tar residues are common on the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. These coastal tar residues have been washed ashore and usually occur on headlands near the high-tide line. In this study, 18 coastal tar residues were collected and analyzed to determine their carbon isotopic compositions and values of selected biomarker ratios. All of the residues have very heavy ({sup 13}C-enriched) carbon isotopic compositions spanning a narrow range ({delta}{sup 13}C = {minus}22.2 to {minus}23.4{per{underscore}thousand}), and 28,30-bisnorhopane is present in all samples. These same geochemical characteristics are found in Monterey Formation oils from which the coastal tar residues were likely derived. These coastal residues could result from natural seeps or from accidental spills. Statistically the coastal tar residues can be organized into three groups, each of which may represent different spill or seep events. Seven samples of potential local representative sources for the tar residues were examined, but none could account for the coastal tars.

  16. Numerical simulation of the wet forward combustion of California tar sand in a tube reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, P.

    1988-10-01

    The Tar Sand Reservoir Simulator (TSRS) is used to model the wet forward combustion of California tar sand from the Arroyo Grande deposit. The model's options and input data are selected to numerically duplicate the recent set of experiments conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) in which the California tar sand was processed in a one-dimensional tube reactor. The experiments and their numerical simulation counterparts are conducted to evaluate the wet forward combustion process for the California tar sand and to evaluate the effects of differing injection gas steam-to-oxygen ratios on recovery performance. Simulation results indicate that the combustion front can be successfully propagated through the Arroyo Grande deposit. The injection pressure required to maintain flow is significantly lower for the processing of Arroyo Grande tar sand than for the processing of Asphalt Ridge or Sunnyside tar sand. The numerical simulations show the same general trends of reduced fuel deposition, increased oil yield, increased frontal velocity, and decreased temperature with increasing steam-to-oxygen ratio as were observed in the experimental tests conducted on both the Arroyo Grande and Asphalt Ridge tar sands. 15 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Tar removal in a hot gas desulfurization process. Final report, October 1984-March 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Mudge, L.K.

    1986-04-01

    Results of studies from a project sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), are reported. The primary objective of these studies was to develop a catalyst which converts sulfur in coal tars to a form (such as H/sub 2/S) which can be removed by a hot gas desulfurization process being developed by DOE/METC and also converts the tars to compounds that cannot crack and deposit coke on the electrodes of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The system for tar destruction would operate in conjunction with the desulfurization process. Results of a literature search and experimental tests are presented. Fifteen different catalysts were evaluated in the experimental tests. The effects of temperature, pressure, and residence time on tar conversion were evaluated. Acid cracking catalysts, in a particular low-sodium type Y zeolite (LZ-Y82) and hydrocracking catalysts based on Y-zeolite, were superior to other catalysts tested. In four hour screening tests, average tar conversions with these catalysts for four different tar samples ranged from 65 to 75% based on total tar. Average sulfur conversion ranged from 86 to 90%. Results of regeneration tests are presented. These tests show that LZ-Y82 is regenerable under mild regeneration conditions. The rate of permanent loss of catalyst activity was too low to identify in the regeneration tests. Catalyst makeup rates based on literature values are presented for estimation of catalyst costs. 30 refs., 14 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. Skin disease after occupational dermal exposure to coal tar: a review of the scientific literature.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Riza, Elena; Linos, Athena

    2015-08-01

    For about a century, coal tar has been used in industry and has been applied in the therapeutic management of several skin diseases. However, in the last decades the benefits of coal tar exploitation for humans could not outweigh its harmful effects on health. The aim of this study is to present the main adverse effects of coal tar on skin, with the emphasis on occupational exposure. The scientific literature indicates that dermal exposure to coal tar and coal tar pitches can be the cause of phototoxic reactions, irritation and burn, allergic dermatitis, folliculitis, occupational acne, atrophy of the epidermis, and hyperpigmentation. Moreover coal tar has been implicated in tumorigenesis, a relationship shown in numerous studies but not confirmed yet as the mechanism has not been fully clarified. A common finding in most studies is that exposure over a long period is the main risk factor for malignancy development, even in low exposure levels. Additional prospective, well-designed studies need to be performed to confirm the validity of the carcinogenic, mutagenic, and cytotoxic potential of coal tar on skin. PMID:26183242

  19. Coal tar induces AHR-dependent skin barrier repair in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, Ellen H.; Bergboer, Judith G.M.; Vonk-Bergers, Mieke; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M.J.J.; Hato, Stanleyson V.; van der Valk, Pieter G.M.; Schrder, Jens Michael; Joosten, Irma; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, Joost

    2013-01-01

    Topical application of coal tar is one of the oldest therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD), a T helper 2 (Th2) lymphocytemediated skin disease associated with loss-of-function mutations in the skin barrier gene, filaggrin (FLG). Despite its longstanding clinical use and efficacy, the molecular mechanism of coal tar therapy is unknown. Using organotypic skin models with primary keratinocytes from AD patients and controls, we found that coal tar activated the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), resulting in induction of epidermal differentiation. AHR knockdown by siRNA completely abrogated this effect. Coal tar restored filaggrin expression in FLG-haploinsufficient keratinocytes to wild-type levels, and counteracted Th2 cytokinemediated downregulation of skin barrier proteins. In AD patients, coal tar completely restored expression of major skin barrier proteins, including filaggrin. Using organotypic skin models stimulated with Th2 cytokines IL-4 and IL-13, we found coal tar to diminish spongiosis, apoptosis, and CCL26 expression, all AD hallmarks. Coal tar interfered with Th2 cytokine signaling via dephosphorylation of STAT6, most likely due to AHR-regulated activation of the NRF2 antioxidative stress pathway. The therapeutic effect of AHR activation herein described opens a new avenue to reconsider AHR as a pharmacological target and could lead to the development of mechanism-based drugs for AD. PMID:23348739

  20. Structure and mechanism of Staphylococcus aureus TarM, the wall teichoic acid ?-glycosyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Sobhanifar, Solmaz; Worrall, Liam James; Gruninger, Robert J; Wasney, Gregory A; Blaukopf, Markus; Baumann, Lars; Lameignere, Emilie; Solomonson, Matthew; Brown, Eric D; Withers, Stephen G; Strynadka, Natalie C J

    2015-02-10

    Unique to Gram-positive bacteria, wall teichoic acids are anionic glycopolymers cross-stitched to a thick layer of peptidoglycan. The polyol phosphate subunits of these glycopolymers are decorated with GlcNAc sugars that are involved in phage binding, genetic exchange, host antibody response, resistance, and virulence. The search for the enzymes responsible for GlcNAcylation in Staphylococcus aureus has recently identified TarM and TarS with respective ?- and ?-(1-4) glycosyltransferase activities. The stereochemistry of the GlcNAc attachment is important in balancing biological processes, such that the interplay of TarM and TarS is likely important for bacterial pathogenicity and survival. Here we present the crystal structure of TarM in an unusual ternary-like complex consisting of a polymeric acceptor substrate analog, UDP from a hydrolyzed donor, and an ?-glyceryl-GlcNAc product formed in situ. These structures support an internal nucleophilic substitution-like mechanism, lend new mechanistic insight into the glycosylation of glycopolymers, and reveal a trimerization domain with a likely role in acceptor substrate scaffolding. PMID:25624472

  1. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    PubMed

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets. PMID:12227146

  2. Characterization of Waste Tar Associated with Abandoned Wood Chemical Plant Sites in Northwest Pennsylvania, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Edendorn, H.M.; Severson, D.

    2007-07-01

    Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania between ca. 1890 and 1950, all located within 72 km of the New York state border. Their original purpose was to salvage the small unwanted hardwood trees left behind by the lumber mills, and to make charcoal, calcium acetate and methanol for a number of industrial uses via destructive distillation. At many old wood chemical plant sites, unknown quantities of wood tar remain as a residual contaminant and pose a pollution threat to aquatic life in nearby streams. Research on the composition and properties of residual wood tars from five abandoned industrial sites in Pennsylvania are described. Weathered wood tars were more viscous and contained fewer volatile and semivolatile organic compounds than did soil-buried tars. Phenol, 2-methylphenol (o-cresol), 4-methylphenol (p-cresol), and 2, 4-dimethylphenol were found in all sampled tars. These water-soluble phenolic compounds were released quasi-instantaneously in aqueous solution, followed by a slower rate of release, consistent with the behavior of similar compounds in other dense non-aqueous liquids. Air-exposed wood tar deposits developed a hard crust, which contained fewer volatiles and semivolatiles and had a higher softening point than other samples. These tars eroded to form a powdered soil colonized by lichens and mosses. Residual wood tar material found at one site was shown to be thermally altered, likely during the historical destruction of the chemical plant by fire. Recovered wood tar wastes have a relatively high heating value and may have use as a potential, but limited, alternate energy source.

  3. Carbazole is a naturally occurring inhibitor of angiogenesis and inflammation isolated from antipsoriatic coal tar

    SciTech Connect

    Jack L. Arbiser; Baskaran Govindarajan; Traci E. Battle; Rebecca Lynch; David A. Frank; Masuko Ushio-Fukai; Betsy N. Perry; David F. Stern; G. Tim Bowden; Anquan Liu; Eva Klein; Pawel J. Kolodziejski; N. Tony Eissa; Chowdhury F. Hossain; Dale G. Nagle

    2006-06-15

    Coal tar is one of the oldest and an effective treatment for psoriasis. Coal tar has been directly applied to the skin, or used in combination with UV light as part of the Goeckerman treatment. The use of coal tar has caused long-term remissions in psoriasis, but has fallen out of favor because the treatment requires hospitalization and coal tar is poorly acceptable aesthetically to patients. Thus, determining the active antipsoriatic component of coal tar is of considerable therapeutic interest. We fractionated coal tar into its components, and tested them using the SVR angiogenesis inhibitor assay. Treatment of SVR endothelial cells with coal tar fractions resulted in the isolation of a single fraction with antiangiogenic activity. The active antiangiogenic compound in coal tar is carbazole. In addition to antiangiogenic activity, carbazole inhibited the production of inflammatory IL-15 by human mononuclear cells. IL-15 is elevated in psoriasis and is thought to contribute to psoriatic inflammation. Carbazole treatment also reduced activity of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is proinflammatory and elevated in psoriasis. The effect of carbazole on upstream pathways in human psoriasis was determined, and carbazole was shown to inhibit signal transducer and activator of transcription (stat)3-mediated transcription, which has been shown to be relevant in human psoriasis. IL-15, iNOS, and stat3 activation require the activation of the small GTPase rac for optimal activity. Carbazole was found to inhibit rac activation as a mechanism for its inhibition of downstream inflammatory and angiogenic pathways. Given its antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory activities, carbazole is likely a major component of the antipsoriatic activity of coal tar. Carbazole and derivatives may be useful in the therapy of human psoriasis.

  4. Bacterial mutagenicity of pyrolysis tars produced from chloro-organic fuels.

    PubMed Central

    Mulholland, J A; Sarofim, A F; Longwell, J P; Lafleur, A L; Thilly, W G

    1994-01-01

    Droplets of toluene and three chlorinated organics, ortho-dichlorobenzene, 1,2-dichloroethane, and trichloroethylene, were pyrolyzed in pure nitrogen. The composition and bacterial mutagenicity of the product tars were measured. The presence of organic chlorine was found to affect both pyrolysis product tar composition and total tar mutagenicity. Pyrolysis in the absence of chlorine produced tars whose bacterial mutagenicity was found to be largely due to the presence of cyclopenta[cd]pyrene, fluoranthene, and benzo[a]pyrene. Small amounts of chlorine in the fuel (i.e., Cl/H molar ratios of less than 0.3) enhanced the formation of highly condensed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (including cyclopenta[cd]pyrene) and increased tar mutagenicity. Larger amounts of organic chlorine (Cl/H ratios of between 0.3 and 0.6) resulted in significant yields of mono- and dichlorinated aromatics and higher levels of tar mutagenicity, which could not be accounted for by the presence of mutagens produced by pyrolysis in the absence of chlorine. Furthermore, unlike tars containing little or no chlorine, tars containing aryl chlorine were more mutagenic in the absence of added enzymes (intended to mimic in vivo mammalian metabolism) than in their presence. We hypothesize that at least one of the chlorinated aromatic products is strongly mutagenic. Two specific conditions that gave notably different results were a) the low-temperature (i.e., below 1400 K) pyrolysis of ortho-dichlorobenzene, which produced tri- and tetrachlorinated biphenyls almost exclusively; and b) the chlorine-rich pyrolysis of trichloroethylene, during which mostly perchloroaromatics were formed. Neither of these tars was found to mutate bacteria. PMID:8187720

  5. Characterization of chronic sources and impacts of tar along the Louisiana coast

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, C.B.; Roberts, P.O.; Overton, E.B.

    1993-10-01

    Along the southern coast of Louisiana, nine beach stations, covering an approximate distance of 200 miles between the farthest east and west stations, were selected for collection of deposited pelagic tar and oil during 1992. There existed an extreme difference in petroleum distribution, with 9.6 tar balls per 50 meter station in the east compared to 40 tar balls per station for the west. The samples collected from these stations were analyzed by detailed GC/MS and compared for similarities using a source-fingerprinting data synthesis process. The data indicate a wide range of petroleum sources with unweathered high paraffin and bimodal wax oils being the most abundant.

  6. Prediction of borehole stability in tar sands with the use of a rheological model

    SciTech Connect

    Rahman, S.S.; Kagar, M. ); Marx, C. )

    1992-07-01

    The convergence characteristics of the borehole in tar sand are described by means of a nonlinear equation of state. The geometrical model of a cylindrical cavity was taken as a basis. The viscoelastic behavior of tar sand was investigated with the use of Burger's rheological model. The rheological constants were determined by means of creep tests on original tar sand. The model thus developed was used to investigate the contraction of wellbore under different bottomhole conditions. The most unfavorable case thereby observed does not pose a serious problem from the point of practical consideration.

  7. The extraction of bitumen from western tar sands. Annual report, July 1990--July 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Oblad, A.G.; Bunger, J.W.; Deo, M.D.; Hanson, F.V.; Miller, J.D.; Seader, J.D.

    1992-04-01

    Contents of this report include the following: executive summary; characterization of the native bitumen from the Whiterocks oil sand deposit; influence of carboxylic acid content on bitumen viscosity; water based oil sand separation technology; extraction of bitumen from western oil sands by an energy-efficient thermal method; large- diameter fluidized bed reactor studies; rotary kiln pyrolysis of oil sand; catalytic upgrading of bitumen and bitumen derived liquids; ebullieted bed hydrotreating and hydrocracking; super critical fluid extraction; bitumen upgrading; 232 references; Appendix A--Whiterocks tar sand deposit bibliography; Appendix B--Asphalt Ridge tar sand deposit bibliography; and Appendix C--University of Utah tar sands bibliography.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of a coal tar in a fixed-bed reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, W.Y.; Cain, E.

    1984-10-01

    The product yields from cracking a bituminous coal tar in a fixed-bed reactor were determined at various temperatures in the presence and absence of various packing materials. Some synthetic and natural zeolites showed strong catalytic activity, but those with small pore diameters were much less active. Linde zeolite LZ-Y82 was very effective in converting tar to chars and gases in the temperature range 400-500 C. Among the factors involved for catalytic effectiveness are: an effective pore size >0.7 nm; a large internal surface accessible to the tar vapor; and a large number of strongly acidic sites.

  9. Similarity Mapplet: Interactive Visualization of the Directory of Useful Decoys and ChEMBL in High Dimensional Chemical Spaces.

    PubMed

    Awale, Mahendra; Reymond, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-24

    An Internet portal accessible at www.gdb.unibe.ch has been set up to automatically generate color-coded similarity maps of the ChEMBL database in relation to up to two sets of active compounds taken from the enhanced Directory of Useful Decoys (eDUD), a random set of molecules, or up to two sets of user-defined reference molecules. These maps visualize the relationships between the selected compounds and ChEMBL in six different high dimensional chemical spaces, namely MQN (42-D molecular quantum numbers), SMIfp (34-D SMILES fingerprint), APfp (20-D shape fingerprint), Xfp (55-D pharmacophore fingerprint), Sfp (1024-bit substructure fingerprint), and ECfp4 (1024-bit extended connectivity fingerprint). The maps are supplied in form of Java based desktop applications called "similarity mapplets" allowing interactive content browsing and linked to a "Multifingerprint Browser for ChEMBL" (also accessible directly at www.gdb.unibe.ch ) to perform nearest neighbor searches. One can obtain six similarity mapplets of ChEMBL relative to random reference compounds, 606 similarity mapplets relative to single eDUD active sets, 30,300 similarity mapplets relative to pairs of eDUD active sets, and any number of similarity mapplets relative to user-defined reference sets to help visualize the structural diversity of compound series in drug optimization projects and their relationship to other known bioactive compounds. PMID:26207526

  10. A new hydrogen-bonding potential for the design of proteinRNA interactions predicts specific contacts and discriminates decoys

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Kortemme, Tanja; Robertson, Tim; Baker, David; Varani, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins play many essential roles in the regulation of gene expression in the cell. Despite the significant increase in the number of structures for RNAprotein complexes in the last few years, the molecular basis of specificity remains unclear even for the best-studied protein families. We have developed a distance and orientation-dependent hydrogen-bonding potential based on the statistical analysis of hydrogen-bonding geometries that are observed in high-resolution crystal structures of proteinDNA and proteinRNA complexes. We observe very strong geometrical preferences that reflect significant energetic constraints on the relative placement of hydrogen-bonding atom pairs at proteinnucleic acid interfaces. A scoring function based on the hydrogen-bonding potential discriminates native proteinRNA structures from incorrectly docked decoys with remarkable predictive power. By incorporating the new hydrogen-bonding potential into a physical model of proteinRNA interfaces with full atom representation, we were able to recover native amino acids at proteinRNA interfaces. PMID:15459285

  11. How to implement decoy-state quantum key distribution for a satellite uplink with 50-dB channel loss

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer-Scott, Evan; Yan, Zhizhong; MacDonald, Allison; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Huebel, Hannes; Jennewein, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) takes advantage of fundamental properties of quantum physics to allow two distant parties to share a secret key; however, QKD is hampered by a distance limitation of a few hundred kilometers on Earth. The most immediate solution for global coverage is to use a satellite, which can receive separate QKD transmissions from two or more ground stations and act as a trusted node to link these ground stations. In this article we report on a system capable of performing QKD in the high loss regime expected in an uplink to a satellite using weak coherent pulses and decoy states. Such a scenario profits from the simplicity of its receiver payload, but has so far been considered to be infeasible due to very high transmission losses (40-50 dB). The high loss is overcome by implementing an innovative photon source and advanced timing analysis. Our system handles up to 57 dB photon loss in the infinite key limit, confirming the viability of the satellite uplink scenario. We emphasize that while this system was designed with a satellite uplink in mind, it could just as easily overcome high losses on any free space QKD link.

  12. Fragment based search for small molecule inhibitors of HIV-1 Tat-TAR.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, Mirco; Stark, Sebastian; Kalden, Elisabeth; Ackermann, Bettina; Ferner, Jan; Scheffer, Ute; Shoja-Bazargani, Fatemeh; Erdel, Veysel; Schwalbe, Harald; Gbel, Michael W

    2014-12-15

    Basic molecular building blocks such as benzene rings, amidines, guanidines, and amino groups have been combined in a systematic way to generate ligand candidates for HIV-1 TAR RNA. Ranking of the resulting compounds was achieved in a fluorimetric Tat-TAR competition assay. Although simple molecules such as phenylguanidine are inactive, few iteration steps led to a set of ligands with IC50 values ranging from 40 to 150 ?M. 1,7-Diaminoisoquinoline 17 and 2,4,6-triaminoquinazoline 22 have been further characterized by NMR titrations with TAR RNA. Compound 22 is bound to TAR at two high affinity sites and shows slow exchange between the free ligand and the RNA complex. These results encourage investigations of dimeric ligands built from two copies of compound 22 or related heterocycles. PMID:25466178

  13. Identification of sources of tar balls deposited along the Goa coast, India, using fingerprinting techniques.

    PubMed

    Suneel, V; Vethamony, P; Zakaria, M P; Naik, B G; Prasad, K V S R

    2013-05-15

    Deposition of tar balls along the coast of Goa, India is a common phenomenon during the southwest monsoon. Representative tar ball samples collected from various beaches of Goa and one Bombay High (BH) crude oil sample were subjected to fingerprint analysis based on diagnostic ratios of n-alkane, biomarkers of pentacyclic tri-terpanes and compound specific stable carbon isotope (?C) analysis to confirm the source. The results were compared with the published data of Middle East Crude Oil (MECO) and South East Asian Crude Oil (SEACO). The results revealed that the tar balls were from tanker-wash derived spills. The study also confirmed that the source is not the BH, but SEACO. The present study suggests that the biomarkers of alkanes and hopanes coupled with stable carbon isotope analysis act as a powerful tool for tracing the source of tar balls, particularly when the source specific biomarkers fail to distinguish the source. PMID:23522683

  14. Coal tar, material used in soil improvement for use in road engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa Díaz, R.; Montañez, A.; Cuentas, J.

    2016-02-01

    Coal tar is a by-product of coal distillation in the absence of oxygen to obtain metallurgical coke; its colour varies from dark coffee to black, slightly viscous and its density is greater than that of water. Taking into account the previous characteristics, this document presents a study of the feasibility of using coal tar for the improvement of physical properties, mechanics and dynamics of materials used in road engineering. In this way, the origin, characteristics, and properties of tar are first described. Next, its combination with which granular-based material is evaluated through the CBR test procedure to determine its resistance and to compare it with the non-stabilized material. Finally, the behaviour of the material when subjected to dead loads by means of resistant modules found with the NAT (Nottingham Asphalt Tester) is explored. As a result, the option of using coal tar as a stabilizer was identified due to its use under specific conditions.

  15. Upgrading producer gas quality from rubber wood gasification in a radio frequency tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor.

    PubMed

    Anis, Samsudin; Zainal, Z A

    2013-12-01

    This study focused on improving the producer gas quality using radio frequency (RF) tar thermocatalytic treatment reactor. The producer gas containing tar, particles and water was directly passed at a particular flow rate into the RF reactor at various temperatures for catalytic and thermal treatments. Thermal treatment generates higher heating value of 5.76 MJ Nm(-3) at 1200C. Catalytic treatments using both dolomite and Y-zeolite provide high tar and particles conversion efficiencies of about 97% on average. The result also showed that light poly-aromatic hydrocarbons especially naphthalene and aromatic compounds particularly benzene and toluene were still found even at higher reaction temperatures. Low energy intensive RF tar thermocatalytic treatment was found to be effective for upgrading the producer gas quality to meet the end user requirements and increasing its energy content. PMID:24185417

  16. Light absorption properties of laboratory-generated tar ball particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2016-01-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type that is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC), which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g., organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study, we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up, which generate pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as the size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory-generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84 - 0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum, these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have substantial influence on the understanding of global radiative energy fluxes.

  17. Light absorption properties of laboratory generated tar ball particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffer, A.; Tóth, A.; Nyirő-Kósa, I.; Pósfai, M.; Gelencsér, A.

    2015-06-01

    Tar balls (TBs) are a specific particle type which is abundant in the global troposphere, in particular in biomass smoke plumes. These particles belong to the family of atmospheric brown carbon (BrC) which can absorb light in the visible range of the solar spectrum. Albeit TBs are typically present as individual particles in biomass smoke plumes, their absorption properties have been only indirectly inferred from field observations or calculations based on their electron energy-loss spectra. This is because in biomass smoke TBs coexist with various other particle types (e.g. organic particles with inorganic inclusions and soot, the latter is emitted mainly during flaming conditions) from which they cannot be physically separated; thus, a direct experimental determination of their absorption properties is not feasible. Very recently we have demonstrated that TBs can be generated in the laboratory from droplets of wood tar that resemble atmospheric TBs in all of their observed properties. As a follow-up study we have installed on-line instruments to our laboratory set-up generating pure TB particles to measure the absorption and scattering, as well as size distribution of the particles. In addition, samples were collected for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and total carbon (TC) analysis. The effects of experimental parameters were also studied. The mass absorption coefficients of the laboratory generated TBs were found to be in the range of 0.8-3.0 m2 g-1 at 550 nm, with absorption Ångström exponents (AAE) between 2.7 and 3.4 (average 2.9) in the wavelength range 467-652 nm. The refractive index of TBs as derived from Mie calculations was about 1.84-0.21i at 550 nm. In the brown carbon continuum these values fall closer to those of soot than to other light-absorbing species such as humic-like substances (HULIS). Considering the abundance of TBs in biomass smoke and the global magnitude of biomass burning emissions, these findings may have substantial influence on the understanding of global radiative energy fluxes.

  18. Healthy Foods under $1 Per Serving

    MedlinePLUS

    ... foods under $1 into your weekly menu planning. Apples (raw with skin) Great for: Snacks, green salads, ... and fruit salads What's a serving? 1 large apple Nutrition Info per serving: About 116 calories, 5. ...

  19. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    Biomass gasification is a flexible and efficient way of utilizing widely available domestic renewable resources. Syngas from biomass has the potential for biofuels production, which will enhance energy security and environmental benefits. Additionally, with the successful development of low Btu fuel engines (e.g. GE Jenbacher engines), syngas from biomass can be efficiently used for power/heat co-generation. However, biomass gasification has not been widely commercialized because of a number of technical/economic issues related to gasifier design and syngas cleanup. Biomass gasification, due to its scale limitation, cannot afford to use pure oxygen as the gasification agent that used in coal gasification. Because, it uses air instead of oxygen, the biomass gasification temperature is much lower than well-understood coal gasification. The low temperature leads to a lot of tar formation and the tar can gum up the downstream equipment. Thus, the biomass gasification tar removal is a critical technology challenge for all types of biomass gasifiers. This USDA/DOE funded program (award number: DE-FG36-O8GO18085) aims to develop an advanced catalytic tar conversion system that can economically and efficiently convert tar into useful light gases (such as syngas) for downstream fuel synthesis or power generation. This program has been executed by GE Global Research in Irvine, CA, in collaboration with Professor Lanny Schmidt's group at the University of Minnesota (UoMn). Biomass gasification produces a raw syngas stream containing H2, CO, CO2, H2O, CH4 and other hydrocarbons, tars, char, and ash. Tars are defined as organic compounds that are condensable at room temperature and are assumed to be largely aromatic. Downstream units in biomass gasification such as gas engine, turbine or fuel synthesis reactors require stringent control in syngas quality, especially tar content to avoid plugging (gum) of downstream equipment. Tar- and ash-free syngas streams are a critical requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis. Major milestones include identification of syngas cleaning requirements for proposed system design, identification and selection of tar compounds and 2 mixtures for use in CPO tests, and preparation of CPO catalysts for validation. (Q3 2009 ~ Q4 2009) - Task C: Test CPO with biomass gasification product gas. Optimize CPO performance with selected tar compounds. Optimize CPO performance with multi-component mixtures. Milestones include optimizing CPO catalysts design, collecting CPO experimental data for next stage kinetic modeling and understanding the effect of relative reactivities on ultimate tar conversion and syngas yields. (Q1 2010 ~ Q3 2010) - Task D: Develop tar CPO kinetic model with CPO kinetic model and modeling results as deliverables. (Q3 2010 ~ Q2 2011) - Task E: Project management and reporting. Milestone: Quarterly reports and presentations, final report, work presented at national technical conferences (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2011) At the beginning of the program, IP landscaping was conducted to understand the operation of various types of biomass gasifiers, their unique syngas/tar compositions and potential tar mitigation options using the catalytic partial oxidation technology. A process simulation model was developed to quantify the system performance and economics impact of CPO tar removal technology. Biomass gasification product compositions used for performance evaluation tests were identified after literature review and system modeling. A reaction system for tar conversion tests was designed, constructed, with each individual component shaken-down in 2009. In parallel, University of Minnesota built a lab-scale unit and evaluated the tar removal performance using catalytic reforming. Benzene was used as the surrogate compound. The biomass gasification raw syngas composition was provided by GE through system studies. In 2010, GE selected different tar compounds and evaluated the tar removal effectiveness of the CPO catalyst. The catalytic performance was evaluated under different operating conditions, including catalyst geometry, S/C ratio, O/C ratio, GHSV, and N2 dilution. An understanding of how to optimize catalytic tar removal efficiency by varying operating conditions has been developed. GE collaborated with UoMn in examining inorganic impurities effects. Catalysts were pre-impregnated with inorganic impurities commonly present in biomass gasification syngas, including Si, Ca, Mg, Na, K, P and S. UoMn performed catalyst characterization and has acquired fundamental understandings of impurities effect on catalytic tar removal. Based on experimental data and the proposed reaction pathway, GE constructed a model to predict kinetic performance for biomass gasification tar cleanup process. Experimental data (eg. tar conversion, reactor inlet and outlet temperatures, product distribution) at different operating conditions were used to validate the model. A good fit between model predictions and experimental data was found. This model will be a valuable tool in designing the tar removal reactor and identifying appropriate operating conditions. We attended the 2011 DOE Biomass Program Thermochemical Platform Review held in Denver, CO from February 16 to 18 and received very positive comments from the review panel. Further, syngas utility and biomass to power/fuel companies expressed strong interest in our tar removal technology.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Dimorphic Prosthecate Bacterium Brevundimonas abyssalis TAR-001T

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Shinro; Usui, Keiko; Shimane, Yasuhiro; Takaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Tadashi; Hatada, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    We report the 3.0-Mb draft genome sequence of Brevundimonas abyssalis strain TAR-001T, isolated from deep-sea floor sediment. The draft genome sequence of strain TAR-001T consists of 2,979,700bp in 128 contigs, with a G+C content of 68.2%, 2,946 potential coding sequences (CDS), 3 rRNAs, and 41 tRNAs. PMID:24136847

  1. Paleontological overview of oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming.

    SciTech Connect

    Murphey, P. C.; Daitch, D.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-11

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the ''Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005,'' Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. In addition, Congress declared that both research- and commercial-scale development of oil shale and tar sands should (1) be conducted in an environmentally sound manner using management practices that will minimize potential impacts, (2) occur with an emphasis on sustainability, and (3) benefit the United States while taking into account concerns of the affected states and communities. To support this declaration of policy, Congress directed the Secretary of the Interior to undertake a series of steps, several of which are directly related to the development of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands. One of these steps was the completion of a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) to analyze the impacts of a commercial leasing program for oil shale and tar sands resources on public lands, with an emphasis on the most geologically prospective lands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. For oil shale, the scope of the PEIS analysis includes public lands within the Green River, Washakie, Uinta, and Piceance Creek Basins. For tar sands, the scope includes Special Tar Sand Areas (STSAs) located in Utah. This paleontological resources overview report was prepared in support of the Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and PEIS, and it is intended to be used by Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regional paleontologists and field office staff to support future projectspecific analyses. Additional information about the PEIS can be found at http://ostseis.anl.gov.

  2. Relation Between PAHs and Coal-Tar-Based Pavement Sealant in Urban Environments (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, B. J.; van Metre, P. C.

    2010-12-01

    Since 2003, coal-tar-based sealant products have come under increased scrutiny as a source of PAHs in urban environments. Sealant (or sealcoat) is the black, shiny substance often applied to asphalt pavement, in particular parking lots and driveways, for esthetic and maintenance purposes. Coal-tar-based sealant, one of the two primary pavement sealant types on the market, typically is 20-35 percent coal-tar pitch, a known carcinogen that is more than 50 percent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The PAH content of the coal-tar-based sealant product is about 1,000 times that of a similar, asphalt-based product, on average. This difference is reflected in regional differences in sealant use and PAH concentrations in pavement dust. In the central and eastern U.S., where the coal-tar-based formulation is prevalent, ΣPAH in mobile particles from sealed pavement have been shown to be about 1,000 times higher than in the western U.S., where the asphalt-based formulation is prevalent (the median ΣPAH concentrations are 2,200 mg/kg in the central and eastern U.S. and 2.1 mg/kg in the western U.S.). Source apportionment modeling indicates that, in the central and eastern U.S., particles from sealed pavement are contributing the majority of the PAHs in recently deposited (post-1990) lake sediment, with implications for ecological health, and that coal-tar-based sealant is the primary cause of upward trends in PAHs in U.S. urban lakes. From the standpoint of human health, research indicates that mobile particles from parking lots with coal-tar-based sealant are tracked indoors, resulting in elevated PAH concentrations in house dust. Coal-tar-based sealcoat being applied to an asphalt parking lot at the University of Texas Pickle Research Center.

  3. Targeted binding of nucleocapsid protein transforms the folding landscape of HIV-1 TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    McCauley, Micah J; Rouzina, Ioulia; Manthei, Kelly A; Gorelick, Robert J; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Williams, Mark C

    2015-11-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are nucleic acid chaperones that play a key role in the viral life cycle. During reverse transcription, HIV-1 NC facilitates the rearrangement of nucleic acid secondary structure, allowing the transactivation response (TAR) RNA hairpin to be transiently destabilized and annealed to a cDNA hairpin. It is not clear how NC specifically destabilizes TAR RNA but does not strongly destabilize the resulting annealed RNA-DNA hybrid structure, which must be formed for reverse transcription to continue. By combining single-molecule optical tweezers measurements with a quantitative mfold-based model, we characterize the equilibrium TAR stability and unfolding barrier for TAR RNA. Experiments show that adding NC lowers the transition state barrier height while also dramatically shifting the barrier location. Incorporating TAR destabilization by NC into the mfold-based model reveals that a subset of preferential protein binding sites is responsible for the observed changes in the unfolding landscape, including the unusual shift in the transition state. We measure the destabilization induced at these NC binding sites and find that NC preferentially targets TAR RNA by binding to specific sequence contexts that are not present on the final annealed RNA-DNA hybrid structure. Thus, specific binding alters the entire RNA unfolding landscape, resulting in the dramatic destabilization of this specific structure that is required for reverse transcription. PMID:26483503

  4. A feasibility study to use coal tar contaminated soil in asphalt cement mixture production

    SciTech Connect

    Dulam, C.S.; Hoag, G.E.; Dahmani, A.; Nadim, F.

    1996-11-01

    Coal tars are the residues produced during the gasification of coal. Traditionally, coal tars were buried onsite at the power plants or left as residuals in the bottom of gas holders. Currently, there are more than 1,500 such historic sites which will undergo site assessment in the near future. The use of coal tar residuals in asphalt-based products could result in greatly reduced disposal costs, in comparison to current methods of disposal. Present disposal practice of coal tar contaminated residuals includes disposal in hazardous waste landfills or incineration. Treatment and disposal costs are reported to be as much as $1,000/ton for current coal tar contaminated residuals disposal options. This feasibility study was performed to determine the use of coal tar contaminated soil (CTCS) in bituminous materials to produce hot asphalt mix. Mixtures of varying composition of CTCS and bituminous material were produced to perform TCLP. The air emissions during the mixing process were captured and analyzed. In this study, a bench scale investigation was performed to identify and quantify the emissions from heating the CTCS at the mixer temperature. The pilot scale investigations were performed by replacing reclaimable asphalt pavement (RAP) with CTCS during the hot asphalt mix production. The investigations were performed on two types of mixtures; using CTCS as the direct additive in the first type, and using SS-1 (slow setting asphalt emulsion) stabilized CTCS as an additive in the second type.

  5. Porous Carbon Nanofibers from Electrospun Biomass Tar/Polyacrylonitrile/Silver Hybrids as Antimicrobial Materials.

    PubMed

    Song, Kunlin; Wu, Qinglin; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou; Negulescu, Ioan I; Zhang, Quanguo

    2015-07-15

    A novel route to fabricate low-cost porous carbon nanofibers (CNFs) using biomass tar, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and silver nanoparticles has been demonstrated through electrospinning and subsequent stabilization and carbonization processes. The continuous electrospun nanofibers had average diameters ranging from 392 to 903 nm. The addition of biomass tar resulted in increased fiber diameters, reduced thermal stabilities, and slowed cyclization reactions of PAN in the as-spun nanofibers. After stabilization and carbonization, the resultant CNFs showed more uniformly sized and reduced average diameters (226-507 nm) compared to as-spun nanofibers. The CNFs exhibited high specific surface area (>400 m(2)/g) and microporosity, attributed to the combined effects of phase separations of the tar and PAN and thermal decompositions of tar components. These pore characteristics increased the exposures and contacts of silver nanoparticles to the bacteria including Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli, leading to excellent antimicrobial performances of as-spun nanofibers and CNFs. A new strategy is thus provided for utilizing biomass tar as a low-cost precursor to prepare functional CNFs and reduce environmental pollutions associated with direct disposal of tar as an industrial waste. PMID:26110209

  6. Reduced tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide exposure while smoking ultralow- but not low-yield cigarettes

    SciTech Connect

    Benowitz, N.L.; Jacob, P. III; Yu, L.; Talcott, R.; Hall, S.; Jones, R.T.

    1986-07-11

    An unresolved public health issue is whether some modern cigarettes are less hazardous than other and whether patients who cannot stop smoking should be advised to switch to lower-yield cigarettes. The authors studied tar (estimated by urine mutagenicity), nicotine, and carbon monoxide exposure in habitual smokers switched from their usual brand to high- (15 mg of tar), low- (5 mg of tar), or ultralow-yield (1 mg of tar) cigarettes. There were no differences in exposure comparing high- or low-yield cigarettes, but tar and nicotine exposures were reduced by 49% and 56%, respectively, and carbon monoxide exposure by 36% while smoking ultralow-yield cigarettes. Similarly, in 248 subjects smoking their self-selected brand, nicotine intake, estimated by blood concentrations of its metabolite continine, was 40% lower in those who smoked ultralow but no different in those smoking higher yields of cigarettes. The data indicate that ultralow-yield cigarettes do deliver substantial doses of tar, nicotine, and carbon monoxide, but that exposure are considerably less than for other cigarettes.

  7. Optical, Physical and Chemical Properties of Tar Balls Observed During the Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, Jenny L.; Malm, W. C.; Laskin, Alexander; Day, D. E.; Lee, Tae-bum; Wang, Chong M.; Carrico, C. E.; Carrillo, John R.; Cowin, James P.; Collett, J. G.; Iedema, Martin J.

    2005-11-09

    The Yosemite Aerosol Characterization Study of summer 2002 (YACS) occurred during an active fire season in the western U. S., and provided an opportunity to investigate many unresolved issues related to the radiative effects of biomass burning aerosols. Single particle analysis was performed on field collected aerosol samples using an array of electron microscopy techniques. Amorphous carbon spheres, or tar balls, were present in samples collected during episodes of high particle light scattering coefficients that occurred during the peak of a smoke/haze event. The highest concentrations of light-absorbing carbon from a dual-wavelength aethalometer (? = 370 and 880 nm) occurred during periods when the particles were predominantly tar balls, indicating they do absorb light in the UV and near-IR range of the solar spectrum. Closure experiments of mass concentrations and light scattering coefficients during periods dominated by tar balls did not require any distinct assumptions of organic carbon molecular weight correction factors, density, or refractive index compared to periods dominated by other types of organic carbon aerosols. Measurements of the hygroscopic behavior of tar balls using an environmental SEM indicate that tar balls do not exhibit deliquescence, but do uptake some water at high (~83 %) relative humidity. The ability of tar balls to efficiently scatter and absorb light, and to absorb water has important implications for their role in regional haze and climate fence.

  8. Comparison of tar sands and phosphatic clay tailings properties, disposal, and reclamation options

    SciTech Connect

    Ericson, W.A.; Carrier, W.D. III; Burns, R.

    1995-12-31

    The tar sands industry of northern Alberta, much like the phosphate mining industry of Florida, is having to deal with the long term management of a fine-grained tailings waste. The production of synthetic crude from surface deposits of tar sands results in a combined tailings mixture of sand, bitumen, and clay. The phosphate industry bonification process separates the clay and sand waste streams at the plant and these materials are generally deposited in separate disposal areas. Both the tar sands fine tailings and the waste phosphatic clays exhibit engineering characteristics associated with highly plastic clays. This behavior is typically characterized by large changes in void ratio and permeability with changes in effective stress. Recent technology exchanges between the phosphate and tar sands industries reveal some encouraging opportunities for waste disposal and reclamation planning in the tar sands industry. Studies involving the mixing of mature fine oil sands tailings and sand (with and without chemical additives) have provided some improvements in the tar sands tailings material consolidation and permeability properties.

  9. Mg2+-induced Variations in the Conformation and Dynamics of HIV-1 TAR RNA Probed Using NMR Residual Dipolar Couplings

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.; Pitt, Stephen W.; Majumdar, Ananya; Xu, Weijun; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of divalent Mg2+ on the conformation and dynamics of the stem-loop transactivation response element (TAR) RNA from HIV-1 have been characterized using NMR residual dipolar couplings (RDCs). Order matrix analysis of one bond 13C1H RDCs measured in TAR at [Mg2+]:[TAR] stoichiometric ratios of ~3:1 (TAR(3.0 Mg)) and ~4.5:1 (TAR(4.5 Mg)) revealed that Mg2+ reduces the average inter-helical angle from 47(5) in TAR(free) to 5(7) in TAR(4.5 Mg). In contrast to the TAR(free) state, the generalized degree of order for the two stems in TAR(4.5 Mg) is found to be identical within experimental uncertainty, indicating that binding of Mg2+ leads to an arrest of inter-helical motions in TAR(free). Results demonstrate that RDC-NMR methodology can provide new insight into the effects of Mg2+ on both the conformation and dynamics of RNA. PMID:12798678

  10. Kinetics of co-pyrolysis of sawdust, coal and tar.

    PubMed

    Montiano, M G; Díaz-Faes, E; Barriocanal, C

    2016-04-01

    Two coals, sawdust and coal tar were selected to prepare briquettes. Thermogravimetric analyses at three heating rates (i.e. 10, 20 and 30°C/min) and up to 1000°C were carried out with the briquette components. Four blends were prepared and the experimental decomposition profiles were compared with the calculated data taking into account the amount of each component in the blend. No interaction was found when comparing the experimental and calculated decomposition profiles of the blends. Isoconversional models OFW (Ozawa-Flynn-Wall) and KAS (Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose) were used to obtain the activation energies of the blend components. The activation energies obtained were introduced in the Coats-Redfern (CR) model to derive the pre-exponential factors. The thermal decomposition profiles calculated using the kinetic parameters were in good agreement with the experimental results in the case of the briquette components, but worse results were obtained in the case of the blends due to their greater complexity. PMID:26829530

  11. Studies of RF sheaths and diagnostics on IShTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromb, K.; Devaux, S.; D'Inca, R.; Faudot, E.; Faugel, H.; Fnfgelder, H.; Heuraux, S.; Jacquot, J.; Louche, F.; Moritz, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Tripsky, M.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetised plasma test facility for RF sheaths studies at the Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik in Garching. In contrast to a tokamak, a test stand provides more liberty to impose the parameters and gives better access for the instrumentation and antennas. The project will support the development of diagnostic methods for characterising RF sheaths and validate and improve theoretical predictions. The cylindrical vacuum vessel has a diameter of 1 m and is 1.1 m long. The plasma is created by an external cylindrical plasma source equipped with a helical antenna that has been designed to excite the m=1 helicon mode. In inductive mode, plasma densities and electron temperatures have been characterised with a planar Langmuir probe as a function of gas pressure and input RF power. A 2D array of RF compensated Langmuir probes and a spectrometer are planned. A single strap RF antenna has been designed; the plasma-facing surface is aligned to the cylindrical plasma to ease the modelling. The probes will allow direct measurements of plasma density profiles in front of the RF antenna, and thus a detailed study of the density modifications induced by RF sheaths, which influences the coupling. The RF antenna frequency has been chosen to study different plasma wave interactions: the accessible plasma density range includes an evanescent and propagative behaviour of slow or fast waves, and allows the study of the effect of the lower hybrid resonance layer.

  12. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D.; Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E.; Fnfgelder, H.; Faugel, H.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2015-12-01

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  13. Alleviation of off-target effects from vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivered RNA decoys

    PubMed Central

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Grosse, Stefanie; Rupp, Daniel; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Grimm, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Exogenous RNAi triggers such as shRNAs ideally exert their activities exclusively via the antisense strand that binds and silences designated target mRNAs. However, in principle, the sense strand also possesses silencing capacity that may contribute to adverse RNAi side effects including off-target gene regulation. Here, we address this concern with a novel strategy that reduces sense strand activity of vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivery of inhibitory tough decoy (TuD) RNAs. Using various shRNAs for proof of concept, we validate that coexpression of TuDs can sequester and inactivate shRNA sense strands in human cells selectively without affecting desired antisense activities from the same shRNAs. Moreover, we show how coexpressed TuDs can alleviate shRNA-mediated perturbation of global gene expression by specifically de-repressing off-target transcripts carrying seed matches to the shRNA sense strand. Our combination of shRNA and TuD in a single bicistronic gene transfer vector derived from Adeno-associated virus (AAV) enables a wide range of applications, including gene therapies. To this end, we engineered our constructs in a modular fashion and identified simple hairpin design rules permitting adaptation to preexisting or new shRNAs. Finally, we demonstrate the power of our vectors for combinatorial RNAi strategies by showing robust suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an AAV expressing a bifunctional TuD against an anti-HCV shRNA sense strand and an HCV-related cellular miRNA. The data and tools reported here represent an important step toward the next generation of RNAi triggers with increased specificity and thus ultimately safety in humans. PMID:26170322

  14. Alleviation of off-target effects from vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivered RNA decoys.

    PubMed

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Grosse, Stefanie; Rupp, Daniel; Bartenschlager, Ralf; Grimm, Dirk

    2015-07-28

    Exogenous RNAi triggers such as shRNAs ideally exert their activities exclusively via the antisense strand that binds and silences designated target mRNAs. However, in principle, the sense strand also possesses silencing capacity that may contribute to adverse RNAi side effects including off-target gene regulation. Here, we address this concern with a novel strategy that reduces sense strand activity of vector-encoded shRNAs via codelivery of inhibitory tough decoy (TuD) RNAs. Using various shRNAs for proof of concept, we validate that coexpression of TuDs can sequester and inactivate shRNA sense strands in human cells selectively without affecting desired antisense activities from the same shRNAs. Moreover, we show how coexpressed TuDs can alleviate shRNA-mediated perturbation of global gene expression by specifically de-repressing off-target transcripts carrying seed matches to the shRNA sense strand. Our combination of shRNA and TuD in a single bicistronic gene transfer vector derived from Adeno-associated virus (AAV) enables a wide range of applications, including gene therapies. To this end, we engineered our constructs in a modular fashion and identified simple hairpin design rules permitting adaptation to preexisting or new shRNAs. Finally, we demonstrate the power of our vectors for combinatorial RNAi strategies by showing robust suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV) with an AAV expressing a bifunctional TuD against an anti-HCV shRNA sense strand and an HCV-related cellular miRNA. The data and tools reported here represent an important step toward the next generation of RNAi triggers with increased specificity and thus ultimately safety in humans. PMID:26170322

  15. Effect of genetic variants in two chemokine decoy receptor genes, DARC and CCBP2, on metastatic potential of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chen; Yu, Ke-Da; Xu, Wen-Huan; Chen, Ao-Xiang; Fan, Lei; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of two chemokine decoy receptors (CDRs), DARC and D6, on breast cancer metastasis is mainly due to their ability to sequester pro-malignant chemokines. We hypothesized that genetic variants in the DARC and CCBP2 (encoding D6) genes may be associated with breast cancer progression. In the present study, we evaluated the genetic contributions of DARC and CCBP2 to metastatic potential, indicated by lymph node metastasis (LNM). Ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (potentially functional SNPs and block-based tagging SNPs) in DARC and CCBP2 were genotyped in 785 breast cancer patients who had negative lymph nodes and 678 patients with positive lymph nodes. Two non-synonymous SNPs, rs12075 (G42D) in DARC and rs2228468 (S373Y) in CCBP2, were observed to be associated with LNM in univariate analysis and remained significant after adjustment for conventional clinical risk factors, with odds ratios (ORs) of 0.54 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37 to 0.79) and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.62 to 0.98), respectively. Additional functional experiments revealed that both of these significant SNPs could affect metastasis of breast cancer in xenograft models by differentially altering the chemokine sequestration ability of their corresponding proteins. Furthermore, heterozygous GD genotype of G42D on human erythrocytes had a significantly stronger chemokine sequestration ability than homozygous GG of G42D ex vivo. Our data suggest that the genetic variants in the CDR genes are probably associated with the varied metastatic potential of breast cancer. The underlying mechanism, though it needs to be further investigated, may be that CDR variants could affect the chemokine sequestration ability of CDR proteins. PMID:24260134

  16. β-Arrestin Recruitment and G Protein Signaling by the Atypical Human Chemokine Decoy Receptor CCX-CKR*

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Anne O.; Verkaar, Folkert; van der Lee, Miranda M. C.; Timmerman, Claudia A. W.; Kuijer, Martien; van Offenbeek, Jody; van Lith, Lambertus H. C. J.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Zaman, Guido J. R.; Vischer, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Chemokine receptors form a large subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors that predominantly activate heterotrimeric Gi proteins and are involved in immune cell migration. CCX-CKR is an atypical chemokine receptor with high affinity for CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 chemokines, but is not known to activate intracellular signaling pathways. However, CCX-CKR acts as decoy receptor and efficiently internalizes these chemokines, thereby preventing their interaction with other chemokine receptors, like CCR7 and CCR9. Internalization of fluorescently labeled CCL19 correlated with β-arrestin2-GFP translocation. Moreover, recruitment of β-arrestins to CCX-CKR in response to CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 was demonstrated using enzyme-fragment complementation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methods. To unravel why CCX-CKR is unable to activate Gi signaling, CCX-CKR chimeras were constructed by substituting its intracellular loops with the corresponding CCR7 or CCR9 domains. The signaling properties of chimeric CCX-CKR receptors were characterized using a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-driven reporter gene assay. Unexpectedly, wild type CCX-CKR and a subset of the chimeras induced an increase in CRE activity in response to CCL19, CCL21, and CCL25 in the presence of the Gi inhibitor pertussis toxin. CCX-CKR signaling to CRE required an intact DRY motif. These data suggest that inactive Gi proteins impair CCX-CKR signaling most likely by hindering the interaction of this receptor with pertussis toxin-insensitive G proteins that transduce signaling to CRE. On the other hand, recruitment of the putative signaling scaffold β-arrestin to CCX-CKR in response to chemokines might allow activation of yet to be identified signal transduction pathways. PMID:23341447

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of human IL-22 bound to its soluble decoy receptor IL-22BP

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Leandra; de Moura, Patricia Ribeiro; Nascimento, Alessandro Silva; Colau, Didier; Dumoutier, Laure; Renauld, Jean-Christophe; Polikarpov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Interleukin-22 (IL-22) is a pleiotropic cytokine that is involved in inflammatory responses. Human IL-22 was incubated with its soluble decoy receptor IL-22BP (IL-22 binding protein) and the IL-22IL-22BP complex was crystallized in hanging drops using the vapour-diffusion method. Suitable crystals were obtained from polyethylene glycol solutions and diffraction data were collected to 2.75? resolution. The crystal belonged to the tetragonal space group P41, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 67.9, c = 172.5?, and contained two IL-22IL-22BP complexes per asymmetric unit. PMID:19193995

  18. Vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary coal tars. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.

    1995-12-31

    There is significant current interest in general area of coal pyrolysis, particularly because of the central role of pyrolysis in all thermally driven coal conversion processes-gasification, combustion, liquefaction, mild gasification, or thermal beneficiation. There remain several key data needs in these application areas. Among them is a need for more reliable correlation for prediction of vapor pressure of heavy, primary coal tars. The vapor pressure correlations that exist at present for coal tars are very crude and they are not considered reliable to even an order of magnitude when applied to tars. The present project seeks to address this important gap in the near term by direct measurement of vapor pressures of coal tar fractions, by application of well-established techniques and modifications thereof. The principal objectives of the program are to: (1) obtain data on the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of tars from a range of ranks of coal, (2) develop correlations based on a minimum set of conveniently measurable characteristics of the tars, (3) develop equipment that would allow performing such measurements in a reliable, straightforward fashion. A significant amount of time has been devoted during this quarter to extending the work on measurements of vapor pressures of tars. For this purpose, cellulose tar and cellulose tar related compounds have been selected as model systems. Cellulose tar has a much narrower distribution of molecular weight than does coal tar, and it is much more homogeneous. Thus it is better to develop the methods to be used for coal tars on this simpler model system first.

  19. A comparison of physicochemical methods for the remediation of porous medium systems contaminated with tar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, Scott C.; Miller, Cass T.

    2014-10-01

    The remediation of former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) sites contaminated with tar DNAPLs (dense non-aqueous phase liquids) presents a significant challenge. The tars are viscous mixtures of thousands of individual compounds, including known and suspected carcinogens. This work investigates the use of combinations of mobilization, solubilization, and chemical oxidation approaches to remove and degrade tars and tar components in porous medium systems. Column experiments were conducted using several flushing solutions, including an alkaline-polymer (AP) solution containing NaOH and xanthan gum (XG), a surfactant-polymer (SP) solution containing Triton X-100 surfactant (TX100) and XG, an alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) solution containing NaOH, TX100, and XG, and base-activated sodium persulfate both with and without added TX100. The effectiveness of the flushing solutions was assessed based on both removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) mass and on the reduction of dissolved-phase PAH concentrations. SP flushes of 6.6 to 20.9 PV removed over 99% of residual PAH mass and reduced dissolved-phase concentrations by up to two orders of magnitude. ASP flushing efficiently removed 95-96% of residual PAH mass within about 2 PV, and significantly reduced dissolved-phase concentrations of several low molar mass compounds, including naphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, and phenanthrene. AP flushing removed a large portion of the residual tar (77%), but was considerably less effective than SP and ASP in terms of the effect on dissolved PAH concentrations. Persulfate was shown to oxidize tar components, primarily those with low molar mass, however, the overall degradation was relatively low (30-50% in columns with low initial tar saturations), and the impact on dissolved-phase concentrations was minimal.

  20. Cancer risk estimation for mixtures of coal tars and benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Gaylor, D.W.; Culp, S.J.; Goldstein, L.S.; Beland, F.A.

    2000-02-01

    Two-year chronic bioassays were conducted by using B6C3F1 female mice fed several concentrations of two different mixtures of coal tars from manufactured gas waste sites or benzo(a)pyrene (BaP). The purpose of the study was to obtain estimates of cancer potency of coal tar mixtures, by using conventional regulatory methods, for use in manufactured gas waste site remediation. A secondary purpose was to investigate the validity of using the concentration of a single potent carcinogen, in this case benzo(a)pyrene, to estimate the relative risk for a coal tar mixture. The study has shown that BaP dominates the cancer risk when its concentration is greater than 6,300 ppm in the coal tar mixture. In this case the most sensitive tissue site is the forestomach. Using low-dose linear extrapolation, the lifetime cancer risk for humans is estimated to be: Risk < 1.03 x 10{sup {minus}4} (ppm coal tar in total diet) + 240 x 10{sup {minus}4} (ppm BaP in total diet), based on forestomach tumors. If the BaP concentration in the coal tar mixture is less than 6,300 ppm, the more likely case, then lung tumors provide the largest estimated upper limit of risk, Risk < 2.55 x 10{sup {minus}4} (ppm coal tar in total diet), with no contribution of BaP to lung tumors. The upper limit of the cancer potency (slope factor) for lifetime oral exposure to benzo(a)pyrene is 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}3} per {micro}g per kg body weight per day from this Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) study compared with the current value of 7.3 x 10{sup {minus}3} per {micro}g per kg body weight per day listed in the US EPA Integrated Risk Information System.

  1. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the periplasmic domain of the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar and its complex with aspartate

    SciTech Connect

    Mise, Takeshi; Matsunami, Hideyuki; Samatey, Fadel A.; Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-08-27

    The periplasmic domain of the E. coli aspartate receptor Tar was cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized with and without bound ligand. The crystals obtained diffracted to resolutions of 1.58 and 1.95 Å, respectively. The cell-surface receptor Tar mediates bacterial chemotaxis toward an attractant, aspartate (Asp), and away from a repellent, Ni{sup 2+}. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of Tar activity by its ligands, the Escherichia coli Tar periplasmic domain with and without bound aspartate (Asp-Tar and apo-Tar, respectively) were each crystallized in two different forms. Using ammonium sulfate as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 2.10 and 2.40 Å, respectively. Alternatively, using sodium chloride as a precipitant, crystals of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 were grown and diffracted to resolutions of 1.95 and 1.58 Å, respectively. Crystals of apo-Tar1 and Asp-Tar1 adopted space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, while those of apo-Tar2 and Asp-Tar2 adopted space groups P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} and C2, respectively.

  2. Extraction of vanadium from athabasca tar sands fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Bueno, C. O.; Spink, D. R.; Rempel, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    The production of refinery grade oil from the Alberta tar sands deposits as currently practiced by Suncor (formally Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd.—GCOS) generates a substantial amount of petroleum coke fly ash which contains appreciable amounts of valuable metals such as vanadium, nickel and titanium. Although the recovery of vanadium from petroleum ash is a well established commercial practice, it is shown in the present work that such processes are not suitable for recovery of vanadium from the GCOS fly ash. The fact that the GCOS fly ash behaves so differently when compared to other petroleum fly ash is attributed to its high silicon and aluminum contents which tie up the metal values in a silica-alumina matrix. Results of experiments carried out in this investigation indicate that such matrices can be broken down by application of a sodium chloride/water roast of the carbon-free fly ash. Based on results from a series of preliminary studies, a detailed investigation was undertaken in order to define optimum conditions for a vanadium extraction process. The process developed involves a high temperature (875 to 950 °C) roasting of the fly ash in the presence of sodium chloride and water vapor carried out in a rotary screw kiln, followed by dilute sodium hydroxide atmosphereic leaching (98 °C) to solublize about 85 pet of the vanadium originally present in the fly ash. It was found that the salt roasting operation, besides enhancing vanadium recovery, also inhibits silicon dissolution during the subsequent leaching step. The salt roasting treatment is found to improve vanadium recovery significantly when the fly ash is fully oxidized. This is easily achieved by burning off the carbon present in the “as received” fly ash under excess air. The basic leaching used in the new process selectively dissolves vanadium from the roasted ash, leaving nickel and titanium untouched.

  3. New perspective for the development of Bemolanga Tar Sand Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rakoto-Andriantsilavo, M.D.; Lalaharisaina, J.V.; Spariharijaona, A.

    1995-12-31

    As known, Madagascar has available tar sand deposit which is estimated at 3 billions tons. During the past ten years, OMNIS, a stage agency for hydrocarbons exploration, performed studies (prefeasibility and feasibility) the aim of which was to produce a 15,000 BPD of synthetic crude to satisfy domestic petroleum needs this potential resource. In the framework of this project, some bitumen extraction processes were tested at the scales of laboratory and/or pilot-unit (CLARK HOT WATER process, TOSCO process, L.R. process, RTR process, and AOSTRA/Taciuk process). In addition, mining and upgrading engineering evaluations were carried out. The results of these investigations display that an ore open-pit mining exploitation, bitumen extraction and upgrading are technically feasible. Nevertheless, some problems arise for the economy of the whole project which is capital intensive and marginal. In the actual petroleum industry environment, where crude prices continue to drop and no perspective price increase is anticipated in the near future, it is difficult or even impossible to promote the project and attract petroleum companies. This unfavourable situation leads to review and consideration of alternatives for the development of this huge resource which could assist the Malagasy Republic with its economy. After the presentation of the main results issued from Bemolanga syncrude production project, this paper deals with such alternative and attempts to elaborate an outline for a new concept of the development of Bemolanga resource. This preliminary outline, considered in the actual Malagasy economic framework where private national and/or international investment is encouraged, tries to overcome the requirement of a high initial investment cost for an industrial scale plant by an approach via a demonstration unit which produces a road bitumen and could further finance the extension to an industrial syncrude production plant.

  4. Biogeochemical characterisation of a coal tar distillate plume.

    PubMed

    Williams, G M; Pickup, R W; Thornton, S F; Lerner, D N; Mallinson, H E; Moore, Y; White, C

    2001-12-15

    The distillation of acidified coal tars for up to 50 years has given rise to a phenol plume approximately 500 m long, 50 m deep and containing up to 15 g l(-1) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the Triassic Sandstones aquifer. A conceptual biogeochemical model based on chemical and microbiological analysis of groundwater samples has been developed as a preliminary to more detailed studies of the controls on natural attenuation. While the development of redox zones and the production of methane and carbon dioxide provide evidence of natural attenuation, it appears that degradation is slow. The existence of sulphate in the plume indicates that this electron acceptor has not been depleted and that consequently methanogenesis is probably limited. Based on a simple estimate of sulphate input concentration, a half-life of about 15 years has been estimated for sulphate reduction. Geochemical modelling predicts that increased alkalinity within the plume has not led to carbonate precipitation, and thus within the limits of accuracy of the measurement, alkalinity may reflect the degree of biodegradation. This implies a loss of around 18% of the DOC over a 30-year period. Despite limited degradation, microbial studies show that there are diverse microbial communities in the aquifer with the potential for both anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation. Microbial activity was found to be greatest at the leading edge of the plume where DOC concentrations are 60 mg l(-1) or less, but activity could still be observed in more contaminated samples even though cells could not be cultured. The study suggests that degradation may be limited by the high phenol concentrations within the core of the plume, but that once diluted by dispersion, natural attenuation may proceed. More detailed studies to confirm these initial findings are identified and form the basis of associated papers. PMID:11820470

  5. A photographic method for estimating wear of coal tar sealcoat from parking lots.

    PubMed

    Scoggins, Mateo; Ennis, Tom; Parker, Nathan; Herrington, Chris

    2009-07-01

    Coal-tar-based sealcoat has been recognized as an important source of PAHs to the environment through wear and transport via stormwater runoff. Sealcoat removal rates have not been measured or even estimated in the literature due to the complex array of physical and chemical process involved. A photographic study was conducted that incorporates all sources of wear using 10 coal tar-sealed parking lots in Austin, Texas, with sealcoat age ranging from 0 to 5 years. Randomly located photographs from each parking lot were analyzed digitally to quantify black sealed areas vs lighter colored unsealed areas at the pixel level. The results indicate that coal tar sealcoat wears off of the driving areas of parking lots at a rate of approximately 4.7% per year, and from the parking areas of the lots at a rate of approximately 1.4% per year. The overall annual loss of sealcoat was calculated at 2.4%. This results in an annual delivery to the environment of 0.51 g of PAHs per m2 of coal tar-sealed parking lot. These values provide a more robust and much higher estimate of loading of PAHs from coal tar sealcoated parking lots when compared to other available measures. PMID:19673284

  6. Effects of model coal tar components on adhesion strength of polyurethane coating on steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, N.; Fujino, K.

    2005-04-15

    In order to study the effects of coal tar components on the adhesion strength of a heavy duty anticorrosive coating formed with tar-urethane resin oil on a steel plate, polyurethane coatings that were compounded with 15 kinds of polycyclic aromatic compounds as model coal tar components were prepared. In the model coal tar, components, naphthalene, quinoline, 2-naphthol, and phenanthrene showed good compatibility with polyurethane. To test their heavy duty anticorrosive properties, tensile adhesion strength of the cured coatings prepared with the compatible model coal tar components was measured, and the change in tensile adhesion strength as a function of time during salt-water spray treatment was measured. We found that the systems compounded with naphthalene, 2-naphthol, and phenanthrene showed good properties in an ordinary state for adhesion strength. However, only the system with 2-naphthol was found to have good properties in the change of tensile adhesion strength as a function or time during salt-water spray treatment. The curing time of the system with 2-naphthol was slower than that or the others, i.e., we found an inverse proportion between curing speed and adhesion durability. We also measured the dynamic viscoelasticity of cured coatings.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of tar reforming through auto-thermal reforming process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurhadi, N.; Diniyati, Dahlia; Efendi, M. Ade Andriansyah; Istadi, I.

    2015-12-01

    Fixed bed gasification is a simple and suitable technology for small scale power generation. One of the disadvantages of this technology is producing tar. So far, tar is not utilized yet and being waste that should be treated into a more useful product. This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of tar conversion into gas producer through non-catalytic auto-thermal reforming technology. Tar was converted into components, C, H, O, N and S, and then reacted with oxidant such as mixture of air or pure oxygen. Thus, this reaction occurred auto-thermally and reached chemical equilibrium. The sensitivity analysis resulted that the most promising process performance occurred at flow rate of air was reached 43% of stoichiometry while temperature of process is 1100C, the addition of pure oxygen is 40% and preheating of oxidant flow is 250C. The yield of the most promising process performance between 11.15-11.17 kmol/h and cold gas efficiency was between 73.8-73.9%.The results of this study indicated that thermodynamically the conversion of tar into producer gas through non-catalytic auto-thermal reformingis more promising.

  8. The "low-tar" strategy and the changing construction of Australian cigarettes.

    PubMed

    King, Bill; Borland, Ron

    2004-02-01

    This article documents design changes in Australian cigarettes since the adoption of a "low-tar" harm reduction strategy in 1966. It also determines the relative contributions of specific technologies to machine-tested tar and nicotine yields in 1980 and 1994, using data from tobacco industry documents. Our findings are consistent with a first generation of low-tar cigarettes, which relied primarily on filtration efficiency, being displaced by a second generation, which relied heavily on filter ventilation and were more attractive to consumers. In 1980, both tar and nicotine yields correlated most strongly with filter density (r=-.66, p<.01, and r=-.70, p<.01), whereas in 1994 both tar and nicotine yields correlated most strongly with percentage filter ventilation (r=-.97, p<.01, and r=-.95, p<.01). We also found that median percentage alkaloid content of tobacco rods rose from 2.16% in 1980 to 2.4% in 1994, despite median nicotine yield declining from 1.0 mg to.58 mg. These changes can be expected to reduce the utility of the FTC/ISO yield testing system. PMID:14982692

  9. The linear relationship between cigarette tar and nicotine yields: regulatory implications for smoke constituent ratios.

    PubMed

    St Charles, F K; Cook, C J; Clayton, P M

    2011-02-01

    Cigarette smoke analyte yields are often expressed as ratios relative to tar or nicotine yields, usually to compare different products or to estimate human uptake of smoke in relation to nicotine uptake measurements. The method, however, can lead to distorted interpretations, especially in the case of ratios from ultra-low tar yield cigarettes. In brief, as tar yields decrease below the 56 mg per cigarette range, the tar-to-nicotine ratio (TNR) decreases rapidly in a non-linear fashion. If, however, the nicotine yield, rather than the ratio, is plotted versus the tar yield, the non-linearity disappears and a straight line is obtained, with a slight positive intercept for nicotine on the ordinate. Unlike the ratio, the slope appears to depend only on the concentration of the nicotine in the blend and does not appear to vary with smoking parameters such as puff volume, puff interval or length smoked or with cigarette design parameters such as length, circumference or the amount of filtration or filter ventilation. Therefore, such a slope is analogous to the TNR although, unlike that ratio, it is invariant. Even more simply, the concentration of the nicotine in the blend, at least for American blend-style cigarettes, provides a similar index. PMID:21216263

  10. Syngas production from tar reforming by microwave plasma jet at atmospheric pressure: power supplied influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Medeiros, Henrique; Justiniano, Lucas S.; Gomes, Marcelo P.; Soares da Silva Sobrinho, Argemiro; Petraconi Filho, Gilberto

    2013-09-01

    Now a day, scientific community is searching for new fuels able to replace fossil fuels with economic and environment gains and biofuel play a relevant rule, mainly for the transport sector. A major process to obtaining such type of renewable resource is biomass gasification. This process has as product a gas mixture containing CO, CH4, and H2 which is named synthesis gas (syngas). However, an undesirable high molecular organic species denominated tar are also produced in this process which must be removed. In this work, results of syngas production via tar reforming in the atmospheric pressure microwave discharge having as parameter the power supply. Argon, (argon + ethanol), and (argon + tar solution) plasma jet were produced by different values of power supplied (from 0.5 KW to 1.5 KW). The plasma compounds were investigated by optical spectroscopy to each power and gas composition. The main species observed in the spectrum are Ar, CN, OII, OIV, OH, H2, H(beta), CO2, CO, and SIII. This last one came from tar. The best value of the power applied to syngas production from tar reforming was verified between 1.0 KW and 1.2 KW. We thank the following institutions for financial support: CNPq, CAPES, and FAPESP.

  11. Feasibility for the use of coal tar as a new material for road surfaces (pavement) construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Farfán, M. A.; Murillo Vega, H. E.; Trujillo Pinto, F. A.

    2016-02-01

    The stabilization products often used to improve the support of granular layers in the construction of road surfaces may be expensive and difficult to get. Therefore, it is necessary to test different materials, which are cheap and easy to obtain, and which will enhance the physical and mechanical properties of pavement layers. This document evaluates the use of coal tar, as a stabilizer for granular subbase. Initially, with a description of tar properties, determining the optimal conditions for the granular subbase material compaction, by means of modified proctor tests and the calculation of the resistance of the unaltered material by using CBR lab tests (California Bearing Ratio). Afterwards, with the design and development of granular material mixes with different percentages of coal tar and determining its CBR as comparative parameter with that of the unaltered material. Finally, by calculating the optimal coal tar percentage in order to stabilize the subbase granular, the results showed an improvement in the resistance of the granular material and a decrease in its expansion due to the use of coal tar.

  12. A photographic method for estimating wear of coal tar sealcoat from parking lots

    SciTech Connect

    Mateo Scoggins; Tom Ennis; Nathan Parker; Chris Herrington

    2009-07-01

    Coal-tar-based sealcoat has been recognized as an important source of PAHs to the environment through wear and transport via stormwater runoff. Sealcoat removal rates have not been measured or even estimated in the literature due to the complex array of physical and chemical process involved. A photographic study was conducted that incorporates all sources of wear using 10 coal tar-sealed parking lots in Austin, Texas, with sealcoat age ranging from 0 to 5 years. Randomly located photographs from each parking lot were analyzed digitally to quantify black sealed areas versus lighter colored unsealed areas at the pixel level. The results indicate that coal tar sealcoat wears off of the driving areas of parking lots at a rate of approximately 4.7% per year, and from the parking areas of the lots at a rate of approximately 1.4% per year. The overall annual loss of sealcoat was calculated at 2.4%. This results in an annual delivery to the environment of 0.51 g of PAHs per m{sup 2} of coal tar-sealed parking lot. These values provide a more robust and much higher estimate of loading of PAHs from coal tar sealcoated parking lots when compared to other available measures. 20 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Groundwater contamination by organic bases derived from coal-tar wastes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Garbarino, J.R.; Hult, M.F.

    1983-01-01

    A fluid sample from a shallow aquifer contaminated by coal-tar wastes was analyzed for organic bases. The sample consisted of a mixture of aqueous and oily-tar phases. The phases were separated by centrifugation and filtration. Organic bases were isolated from each phase by pH adjustment and solvent extraction. Organic bases in the oily-tar phase were further purified by neutral-alumina, micro-column adsorption chromatography. Separation and identification of the organic bases in each phase were achieved by using capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-computer (GC-MS-COM) and probe distillation-high resolution mass spectrometry (PD-HRMS) techniques. Organic bases present in the aqueous phase included primary aromatic amines (such as aniline, alkylated anilines, and naphthylamines) as well as azaarenes (such as alkylated pyridines, quinolines, acridine, and benzoquinolines). The oily-tar phase contained acridine, benzacridines, dibenzacridines, and numerous other azaarenes, the elemental compositions of which were determined by PD-HRMS. Azaarenes in the oily-tar phase, varying in size from 6 to 12 rings, are reported for the first time. The origin and environmental significance of these compounds are discussed. ?? 1983.

  14. Selection of Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Elements against Exotoxin A Using a Novel Decoy-SELEX Method and Sensitive Detection of Exotoxin A in Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ka Lok; Yancey, Kailey; Battistella, Luisa; Williams, Ryan M; Hickey, Katherine M; Bostick, Chris D; Gannett, Peter M; Sooter, Letha J

    2015-01-01

    Exotoxin A is one of the virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can cause infections resulting in adverse health outcomes and increased burden to health care systems. Current methods of diagnosing P. aeruginosa infections are time consuming and can require significant preparation of patient samples. This study utilized a novel variation of the Systematic Evolution of Ligand by Exponential Enrichment, Decoy-SELEX, to identify an Exotoxin A specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition element (MRE). Its emphasis is on increasing stringency in directing binding toward free target of interest and at the same time decreasing binding toward negative targets. A ssDNA MRE with specificity and affinity was identified after fourteen rounds of Decoy-SELEX. Utilizing surface plasmon resonance measurements, the determined equilibrium dissociation constant (K d ) of the MRE is between 4.2?M and 4.5?M, and is highly selective for Exotoxin A over negative targets. A ssDNA MRE modified sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed and achieved sensitive detection of Exotoxin A at nanomolar concentrations in human serum. This study has demonstrated the proof-of-principle of using a ssDNA MRE as a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:26636098

  15. Selection of Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Elements against Exotoxin A Using a Novel Decoy-SELEX Method and Sensitive Detection of Exotoxin A in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ka Lok; Yancey, Kailey; Battistella, Luisa; Williams, Ryan M.; Hickey, Katherine M.; Bostick, Chris D.; Gannett, Peter M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Exotoxin A is one of the virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium that can cause infections resulting in adverse health outcomes and increased burden to health care systems. Current methods of diagnosing P. aeruginosa infections are time consuming and can require significant preparation of patient samples. This study utilized a novel variation of the Systematic Evolution of Ligand by Exponential Enrichment, Decoy-SELEX, to identify an Exotoxin A specific single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecular recognition element (MRE). Its emphasis is on increasing stringency in directing binding toward free target of interest and at the same time decreasing binding toward negative targets. A ssDNA MRE with specificity and affinity was identified after fourteen rounds of Decoy-SELEX. Utilizing surface plasmon resonance measurements, the determined equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of the MRE is between 4.2 µM and 4.5 µM, and is highly selective for Exotoxin A over negative targets. A ssDNA MRE modified sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed and achieved sensitive detection of Exotoxin A at nanomolar concentrations in human serum. This study has demonstrated the proof-of-principle of using a ssDNA MRE as a clinical diagnostic tool. PMID:26636098

  16. The Decoy Substrate of a Pathogen Effector and a Pseudokinase Specify Pathogen-Induced Modified-Self Recognition and Immunity in Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoxun; Roux, Brice; Feng, Feng; Guy, Endrick; Li, Lin; Li, Nannan; Zhang, Xiaojuan; Lautier, Martine; Jardinaud, Marie-Françoise; Chabannes, Matthieu; Arlat, Matthieu; Chen, She; He, Chaozu; Noël, Laurent D; Zhou, Jian-Min

    2015-09-01

    In plants, host response to pathogenic microbes is driven both by microbial perception and detection of modified-self. The Xanthomonas campestris effector protein AvrAC/XopAC uridylylates the Arabidopsis BIK1 kinase to dampen basal resistance and thereby promotes bacterial virulence. Here we show that PBL2, a paralog of BIK1, is similarly uridylylated by AvrAC. However, in contrast to BIK1, PBL2 uridylylation is specifically required for host recognition of AvrAC to trigger immunity, but not AvrAC virulence. PBL2 thus acts as a decoy and enables AvrAC detection. AvrAC recognition also requires the RKS1 pseudokinase of the ZRK family and the NOD-like receptor ZAR1, which is known to recognize the Pseudomonas syringae effector HopZ1a. ZAR1 forms a stable complex with RKS1, which specifically recruits PBL2 when the latter is uridylylated by AvrAC, triggering ZAR1-mediated immunity. The results illustrate how decoy substrates and pseudokinases can specify and expand the capacity of the plant immune system. PMID:26355215

  17. Interruption of intrachromosomal looping by CCCTC binding factor decoy proteins abrogates genomic imprinting of human insulin-like growth factor II

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, He; Niu, Beibei; Ge, Shengfang; Wang, Haibo; Li, Tao; Ling, Jianqun; Steelman, Brandon N.; Qian, Guanxiang

    2011-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of IGF2 is regulated by CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) binding to the imprinting control region (ICR) on the maternal allele, with subsequent formation of an intrachromosomal loop to the promoter region. The N-terminal domain of CTCF interacts with SUZ12, part of the polycomb repressive complex-2 (PRC2), to silence the maternal allele. We synthesized decoy CTCF proteins, fusing the CTCF deoxyribonucleic acidbinding zinc finger domain to CpG methyltransferase Sss1 or to enhanced green fluorescent protein. In normal human fibroblasts and breast cancer MCF7 cell lines, the CTCF decoy proteins bound to the unmethylated ICR and to the IGF2 promoter region but did not interact with SUZ12. EZH2, another part of PRC2, was unable to methylate histone H3-K27 in the IGF2 promoter region, resulting in reactivation of the imprinted allele. The intrachromosomal loop between the maternal ICR and the IGF2 promoters was not observed when IGF2 imprinting was lost. CTCF epigenetically governs allelic gene expression of IGF2 by orchestrating chromatin loop structures involving PRC2. PMID:21536749

  18. Analytical study on mesocarbon microbeads derived from coal tar pitch

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Murata, S.; Nomura, M.

    1999-07-01

    Pitches have been recognized as excellent precursors for carbon materials and their properties are considered to be influential on the properties and function of carbon material. For this reason, their detailed characterization is being required. Successful pitch characterization must satisfy the following points: (1) very complicated pitches can be clearly distinguished; (2) the performance of the final carbon product can be predicted by characterizing the precursor pitch at its molecular level; and (3) a satisfactory explanation can be provided for chemical and physical behavior of pitches for a given utilization process based on their structural differences. Successful pitch characterization is quite difficult to be attained because pitches are very complex mixtures containing several hundred compounds with different functionalities. Thus, the methods for their characterization are limited to the measurements of average structural parameters, such as softening point (SP), H/C atomic ratio, quinoline- and toluene-insoluble (QI and TI) fractions, aromaticity, carbon yield, etc.. Although these parameters can give a fairly good evaluation about pitch quality, they can not always explain why pitches with similar characteristics on traditional characterization techniques display a significantly different behavior. This fact provides a challenging subject in the field of pitch characterization. At the same time, there is a possibility that in a given case satisfactory important factors remain undetected due to the limitation of analytical techniques, thus leading to serious problems in the pitch utilization. Therefore, it seems to be essential to know, for a given utilization of pitches, which of the pitch properties normally measured is important and how this affects the behavior of pitch. Another serious difficulty in pitch characterization is the fact that pitches are normally not completely soluble in solvents. There is no single analytical technique which can provide complete information about structures of pitches. Thus, the combination of different analytical techniques seems to be best for the characterization of such materials. The first objective of this paper is to give an insight into structural features of two kinds of mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) derived from different coal tar pitches, by conducting butylation of MCMB with butyl iodide catalyzed by dibutylzinc and characterizing their butylated products according to conventional techniques. The second one is to differentiate two MCMB in terms of chemical structure based on IR, SEM and Raman spectroscopy. Most of this information is extracted from the authors' earlier and just completed papers, cited in the references.

  19. A baseline assessment of beach debris and tar contamination in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Debrot, Adolphe O; van Rijn, Jimmy; Bron, Patrick S; de Len, Ramon

    2013-06-15

    Data on beach debris and tar contamination is provided for 21 natural beach sites in Bonaire, Southeastern Caribbean. Transects amounting to a combined length of 991 m were sampled March-May 2011 and a total of 8960 debris items were collected. Highest debris and tar contamination were found on the beaches of the windward east-coast of the island where geometric mean debris concentrations ( approx. 70% confidence limits) were 11558 items m(-1) and 34081704 g m(-1) of beach front. These levels are high compared to data collected almost 20 years earlier on the nearby island of Curaao. Tar contamination levels averaged 223 g m(-1) on windward beaches. Contamination levels for leeward west-coast beaches were generally two orders of magnitude less than windward beaches. PMID:23497789

  20. Technology for the production of Zero Q.I pitch from coal tar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, K.; Kumar, K. Rajesh; Rao, C. V. Nageswara; Kumar, B. Vinod; Murty, J. V. S.

    2013-06-01

    Zero Quinoline Insolubles (Q.I) pitch is a special type of pitch obtained from pre-treatment of coal tar, which is converted into pitch. This is used for impregnation of electrodes for improving the strength, electrical properties and also used as a pre-cursor for Mesophase pitch for producing Mesophase pitch based carbon fibers, carbon foam, and Meso carbon micro beads. This paper discusses the technology of Q.I separation from Coal Tar by using decantation of Coal Tar mixed with Heavy Creosote Oil (HC Oil) at different temperatures. By this method we were able to produce the Zero Q.I pitch with a Q.I value of 0.1%.

  1. Coal tar creosote abuse by vapour inhalation presenting with renal impairment and neurotoxicity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Thomas F; Bellamy, Christopher OC; Hughes, Jeremy H

    2007-01-01

    A 56 year old aromatherapist presented with advanced renal failure following chronic coal tar creosote vapour inhalation, and a chronic tubulo-interstitial nephritis was identified on renal biopsy. Following dialysis dependence occult inhalation continued, resulting in seizures, ataxia, cognitive impairment and marked generalised cerebral atrophy. We describe for the first time a case of creosote abuse by chronic vapour inhalation, resulting in significant morbidity. Use of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-containing wood preservative coal tar creosote is restricted by many countries due to concerns over environmental contamination and carcinogenicity. This case demonstrates additional toxicities not previously reported with coal tar creosote, and emphasizes the health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure. PMID:17892538

  2. Thrombocytopenia with Unilateral Dysplastic Radius- Is it Thrombocytopenia - Absent Radius (TAR) Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Indradeo Prasad; Ranjan, Ram Bilas; Kumar, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia - absent radii (TAR) syndrome is an autosomal recessive genetic rare disorder with hypomegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia and bilateral absent radius that may have additional anomalies. This disorder is characterized by thrombocytopenia resulting in potentially severe bleeding episodes primarily during infancy. We report the case of a 7-day-old term appropriate for gestational age (AGA) male baby, product of non consanguineous marriage presented with bloody loose stool, right sided upper limb deformity and paleness of the body, was diagnosed as TAR syndrome with some atypical presentation. Such type of atypical presentation has not been previously reported in a case with TAR Syndrome.Patient was managed in our hospital with packed cell transfusion and two units platelets concentrates transfusion, Intra-venous antimicrobials, and other supportive treatment. He gradually improved and was discharged after seven days of hospital stay with advice to consult orthopedic surgeon for opinion regarding limb reconstruction. PMID:25954675

  3. A correlation of United States tar sand bitumen viscosities with NMR spectroscopic parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Turner, T.F. )

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed whereby the viscosity of a tar sand bitumen at any temperature can be calculated from nuclear magnetic resonance parameters. The method is semi empirical but is based upon some fundamental theoretical concepts for molecular mobility and intermolecular interactions. Using this method, the viscosities of three United States tar sand bitumens have been correlated to the weighted average spin-spin, relaxation rates for the semiliquid, solidlike mobile, and solidlike rigid phases of the bitumens. The results indicate that bitumens with a high viscosity have a greater amount of solidlike rigid phase and lesser amounts of solidlike mobile and semiliquid phases than do the bitumens with low viscosity. It is also shown that the viscosity of a tar sand bitumen over a 100 degree temperature range can be determined from a single NMR experiment conducted near room temperature.

  4. Catalyst specificities in high pressure hydroprocessing of pyrolysis and gasification tars

    SciTech Connect

    Soltes, E.J.; Lin, S.C.K.; Sheu, Y.H.E.

    1987-04-01

    Over a period of several years, the Department of Forest Science at Texas A and M University has been conducting studies in the hydroprocessing (catalytic high pressure hydrotreating or hydrodeoxygenation accompanied by hydrocracking) of pyrolytic tars produced in biomass pyrolysis and gasification. Upgrading through hydroprocessing results in good yields of volatile hydrocarbon and phenolic products. This paper compares the performance of twenty different catalysts selected for hydroprocessing of a pine pyrolysis oil, describes the use of noble metal catalysts with tars produced from nine different biomass feedstocks (oil from pine pyrolysis and the tars from pine wood chip, pine plywood trim, pecan shell, peanut shell, sugarcane bagasse, corncob, rice hull, and cottonseed hull gasification), and compares the use of several catalysts in a trickle bed reactor for kinetic studies of the hyroprocessing reaction.

  5. Quantitative analysis of the hydrogen peroxide formed in aqueous cigarette tar extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Church, D.F.; Pryor, W.A. )

    1989-01-01

    We have established, for the first time, a reliable method to quantitate hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) generated in aqueous extracts of cigarette smoke tar. The aqueous tar extract was passed through a short reverse-phase column and its H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration determined by differential pulse polarography using an automatic reference subtraction system. The H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration increased with aging, pH and temperature; the presence of superoxide dismutase lead to lower H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations. This method was applied to many kinds of research and commercial cigarettes. With a few exceptions, the amount of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formed after a fixed time from each cigarette smoke was proportional to its tar yield.

  6. A Case-Control Study of Asphalt and Tar Exposure and Lung Cancer in Minorities

    PubMed Central

    McClean, Michael D.; Kelsey, Karl T.; Sison, Jennette D; Quesenberry, Charles P; Wrensch, Margaret R; Wiencke, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Considerable controversy surrounds the carcinogenic potential of asphalt and tar. Since minority individuals may have had relatively high historical exposures, we investigated asphalt and tar exposure and lung cancer risk among African Americans and Latino Americans. Methods We conducted a case-control study of lung cancer among African Americans and Latino Americans in the San Francisco Bay area (422 cases, 894 controls). A questionnaire was used to obtain detailed work histories and exposure information. Self-reported exposure to asphalt and tar as well as other factors (eg. smoking, automobile exhaust, and asbestos) were evaluated as predictors of lung cancer risk. Potential effect modification by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 was also explored. Results Self-reported duration of exposure to asphalt and tar was associated with a statistically significant excess risk of lung cancer in the overall population (OR: 1.11, 95%CI: 1.011.22), evaluating risk per year of exposure. Years of exposure to automobile exhaust (OR: 1.02, 95%CI: 1.001.05) and asbestos (OR: 1.04, 95%CI: 1.021.06) were also associated with statistically significant elevations in risk. In Latino Americans, the lung cancer risks associated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-related exposures were consistently higher in the CYP1A1 wildtype subjects as compared to the variant genotype subjects, and the interaction was statistically significant for smoking and the CYP1A1 M2 polymorphism (p-valueinteraction=0.02). Conclusions These data are consistent with the literature suggesting that exposure to asphalt and tar may increase risk of lung cancer. However, it was not possible to separate the effects and asphalt and tar in this study. PMID:21882217

  7. A useful algorithm for calculating central ray TAR and TMR values

    SciTech Connect

    Wrede, D.E.; Dawalibi, H.

    1980-05-01

    An algorithm utilizing a two-dimensional polynomial power functions least squares fit has been applied to the calculations of TAR in the case of C0-60 teletherapy and TMR in the case of an 8MV LS75/10 linear accelerator giving less than +/- 1/2% errors respectively between calculated and measured values. The TAR and TMR algorithms are used as subroutines in pocket sized and table top programmable calculators or computers and thus provide rapid calculation of treatment time or monitor units as well as given dose.

  8. Radiocarbon dating of extinct fauna in the Americas recovered from tar pits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Iturralde-Vinent, M.; O'Malley, J. M.; MacPhee, R. D. E.; McDonald, H. G.; Martin, P. S.; Moody, J.; Rincn, A.

    2004-08-01

    We have obtained radiocarbon dates by accelerator mass spectrometry on bones of extinct large mammals from tar pits. Results on some samples of Glyptodon and Holmesina (extinct large mammals similar to armadillos) yielded ages of >25 and >21 ka, respectively. We also studied the radiocarbon ages of three different samples of bones from the extinct Cuban ground sloth, Parocnus bownii, which yielded dates ranging from 4960 280 to 11 880 420 yr BP. In order to remove the tar component pretreat the samples sufficiently to obtain reliable dates, we cleaned the samples by Soxhlet extraction in benzene. Resulting samples of collagenous material were often small.

  9. Adsorption of nicotine and tar from the mainstream smoke of cigarettes by oxidized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Zhang, Lisha; Tang, Yiwen; Jia, Zhijie

    2006-02-01

    The adsorption of nicotine and tar from the mainstream smoke (MS) by the filter tips filled respectively with oxidized carbon nanotubes (O-CNTs), activated carbon and zeolite (NaY) has been investigated. O-CNTs show exceptional removal efficiency and their adsorption mechanism is investigated. Capillary condensation of some ingredients from MS in the inner hole of O-CNTs is observed and may be the primary reason for their superior removal efficiency. The effect of O-CNTs mass on the removal efficiencies is also studied and the results show that about 20-30 mg O-CNTs per cigarette can effectively remove most of nicotine and tar.

  10. In situ heat treatment of a tar sands formation after drive process treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Stanecki, John

    2010-09-21

    A method for treating a tar sands formation includes providing a drive fluid to a hydrocarbon containing layer of the tar sands formation to mobilize at least some hydrocarbons in the layer. At least some first hydrocarbons from the layer are produced. Heat is provided to the layer from one or more heaters located in the formation. At least some second hydrocarbons are produced from the layer of the formation. The second hydrocarbons include at least some hydrocarbons that are upgraded compared to the first hydrocarbons produced by using the drive fluid.

  11. Tar sands. June 1970-November 1983 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for June 1970-November 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning mining processes and recovery of tar sands from bitumen and other materials. The physical and chemical properties of tar sands are discussed, and the economics of their recovery are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 164 citations, none of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  12. Tar sands. December 1983-March 1990 (A Bibliography from the COMPENDEX data base). Report for December 1983-March 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning mining processes and recovery of tar sands from bitumen and other materials. The physical and chemical properties of tar sands are discussed, and the economics of their recovery are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 352 citations, all of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  13. 33 CFR 165.927 - Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN. 165.927 Section 165.927 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District 165.927 Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation...

  14. 33 CFR 165.927 - Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN. 165.927 Section 165.927 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District 165.927 Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation...

  15. 33 CFR 165.927 - Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN. 165.927 Section 165.927 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District 165.927 Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation...

  16. 33 CFR 165.927 - Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN. 165.927 Section 165.927 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District 165.927 Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation...

  17. 33 CFR 165.927 - Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation Site, Duluth, MN. 165.927 Section 165.927 Navigation and Navigable... Coast Guard District 165.927 Safety Zone; St. Louis River, Duluth/Interlake Tar Remediation...

  18. COMPARATIVE CARCINOGENIC AND MUTAGENIC ACTIVITY OF COAL TAR AND PETROLEUM ASPHALT PAINTS USED IN POTABLE WATER SUPPLY SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coal tar and petroleum asphalt paints used as coatings for water pipes and storage tanks were tested in the Ames mutagenesis and the mouse skin carcinogenesis bioassays. One coal tar product was positive when tested as a complete carcinogen in the mouse, whereas the asphalt paint...

  19. The Decoy Duck.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Anna

    1997-01-01

    Describes the development processes of an instructional video for use in a course offered through the Extended Learning Institute of Northern Virginia Community College entitled Women Writers II. Characterizes the process of transforming this English course from a print-based to a distance-learning course as time-consuming, creative, and

  20. Skylab Food Heating and Serving Tray

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    Shown here is the Skylab food heating and serving tray in its stowed position. The Marshall Space Flight Center had program management responsibility for the development of Skylab hardware and experiments.

  1. 5 CFR 1201.83 - Serving subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... least 18 years of age and who is not a party to the appeal may serve a subpoena. The means prescribed by applicable state law are sufficient. The party who requested the subpoena, and to whom the subpoena has...

  2. 5 CFR 1201.83 - Serving subpoenas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... least 18 years of age and who is not a party to the appeal may serve a subpoena. The means prescribed by applicable state law are sufficient. The party who requested the subpoena, and to whom the subpoena has...

  3. Skin cancer in patients with psoriasis treated with coal tar. A 25-year follow-up study

    SciTech Connect

    Pittelkow, M.R.; Perry, H.O.; Muller, S.A.; Maughan, W.Z.; O'Brien, P.C.

    1981-08-01

    For many years, crude coal tar has been used for the treatment of psoriasis. The possible carcinogenic effect of crude coal tar and ultraviolet (UV) radiation (Goeckerman regimen), considered individually or in combination, has been of some concern to physicians. A 25-year follow-up study was completed on 280 patients with psoriasis who were hospitalized and treated with crude coal tar and UV radiation at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, during the years 1950 through 1954. The results of this study suggest that the incidence of skin cancer is not appreciably increased above the expected incidence for the general population when patients are treated with coal tar ointments. It seems that the Goeckerman regimen (topical crude coal tar combined with UV radiation) can be used with minimal risk for skin cancer in the treatment of psoriasis.

  4. Vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of primary coal tars. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1 - September 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.; Oja, V.; Lilly, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    The vapor pressure correlations that exist at present for coal tars are very crude and they are not considered reliable to even an order of magnitude. This project seeks to address this important gap in the near term by direct measurement of vapor pressures of coal tar fractions, by application of well-established techniques and modifications thereof. The principal objectives of the program are to: (1) obtain data on the vapor pressures and heats of vaporization of tars from a range of ranks of coal; (2) develop correlations based on a minimum set of conveniently measurable characteristics of the tars; and (3) develop equipment that would allow performing such measurements in a reliable, straightforward fashion. During this quarter we have extended the work on measurements of vapor pressures of coal tars, using the continuous Knudsen effusion technique. These results need further analysis and therefore in this report we describe only the general idea behind the technique, and also show some typical results.

  5. Characterization of tar produces from rapid pyrolysis of bituminous coals. Seventh quarterly progress report, April-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Suuberg, E.M.; Unger, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    The data on molecular weight distributions of tars continue to provide new insights into the mechanisms of transport during coal pyrolysis. It now appears unequivocally established that mass transfer controlled vaporization processes must play a role in determining the rate of tar escape from pyrolyzing coal. In addition, it looks as though radical-based vapor phase recombination mechanisms are unlikely to be responsible for the high molecular weight tar species. These conclusions are outlined in detail in this report. The analytical techniques developed for coal tars have proven applicable to shale tars as well. As a by-product of this work, we will soon be able to report molecular weight distributions of a limited number of shale oil samples as well. 27 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  6. Analysis of the use of coal tar as a binder in bituminous mixtures, using Marshall and Ramcodes methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa-Díaz, R.

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an alternative use of coal tar, a by-product of the steel industry, given the problems of accumulation and negative environmental impact. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the incorporation of coal tar as a binder in paving mixtures. First, this paper presents the origin, description of the main characteristics, and properties of tar. Then, this paper evaluates the mix of coal tar by means of the RAMCODES and Marshall methodologies to determine its resistance. The results of the tests explain the physical and mechanical properties of the mix. Taking into account the results of both methods, this paper makes a comparison to determine the suitability of the RAMCODES methodology in the mix design. Finally, it analyzes the alternatives to coal tar that can be used as binders in bituminous mixes for pavement and the advantages of their uses under some specific conditions.

  7. Epigenetic inactivation of TRAIL decoy receptors at 8p12-21.3 commonly deleted region confers sensitivity to Apo2L/trail-Cisplatin combination therapy in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Gopeshwar; Xie, Dongxu; Ishdorj, Ganchimeg; Scotto, Luigi; Mansukhani, Mahesh; Pothuri, Bhavana; Wright, Jason D; Kaufmann, Andreas M; Schneider, Achim; Arias-Pulido, Hugo; Murty, Vundavalli V

    2016-02-01

    Multiple chromosomal regions are affected by deletions in cervical cancer (CC) genomes, but their consequence and target gene involvement remains unknown. Our single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array identified 8p copy number losses localized to an 8.4 Mb minimal deleted region (MDR) in 36% of CC. The 8p MDR was associated with tumor size, treatment outcome, and with multiple HPV infections. Genetic, epigenetic, and expression analyses of candidate genes at MDR identified promoter hypermethylation and/or inactivation of decoy receptors TNFRSF10C and TNFRSF10D in the majority of CC patients. TNFRSF10C methylation was also detected in precancerous lesions suggesting that this change is an early event in cervical tumorigenesis. We further demonstrate here that CC cell lines exhibiting downregulated expression of TNFRSF10C and/or TNFRSF10D effectively respond to TRAIL-induced apoptosis and this affect was synergistic in combination with DNA damaging chemotherapeutic drugs. We show that the CC cell lines harboring epigenetic inactivation of TRAIL decoy receptors effectively activate downstream caspases suggesting a critical role of inactivation of these genes in efficient execution of extrinsic apoptotic pathway and therapy response. Therefore, these findings shed new light on the role of genetic/epigenetic defects in TRAIL decoy receptor genes in the pathogenesis of CC and provide an opportunity to explore strategies to test decoy receptor gene inactivation as a biomarker of response to Apo2L/TRAIL-combination therapy. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26542757

  8. 21 CFR 740.18 - Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer. 740.18... posing a risk of cancer. (a) The principal display panel of the label and any labeling accompanying a... your skin and has been determined to cause cancer in laboratory animals. (b) Hair dyes containing...

  9. PRODUCTION AND PROCESSING OF U.S. TAR SANDS: AN ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Factors traceable to the increasing shortfall in U.S. production of natural crude have rekindled interests in U.S. tar sands as a source of synthetic fuel. Reported here are the results of a preliminary study to assess the potential primary environmental impacts of production and...

  10. Diffusion of heterocyclic compounds from a complex mixture of coal tar compounds in natural clayey till

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broholm, Mette M.; Broholm, Kim; Arvin, Erik

    1999-10-01

    The diffusion of coal-tar compounds in natural clayey till was studied experimentally. Cores were exposed to a solution with near constant concentration of coal-tar compounds in a multi-component mixture for 5 months, the cores were subsequently sub-sampled and analyzed. Diffusion profile data strongly indicates highly non-linear sorption isotherms. For dibenzofuran, dibenzothiophene, 2-methylquinoline, carbazole, phenanthrene, and fluorene, the profiles indicated significantly stronger sorption at high solute concentrations than at low solute concentrations, and than expected based on linear sorption isotherms. This corresponds with observed dramatic increase in sorption of these compounds at high surface density. For benzofuran, benzothiophene, quinoline, phenols, naphthalenes, and BTEXs the profiles indicated significantly weaker sorption at high solute concentrations than at low solute concentrations and than expected based on linear or Freundlich isotherms. The observed diffusion profiles have important implications with respect to transport of dissolved coal-tar compounds in multi-component mixtures of high concentrations as expected near immiscible phase coal-tar sources. Breakthrough times and concentration levels are affected significantly.

  11. Effect of the bioemulsifier emulsan on naphthalene mineralization from coal tar in aqueous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skubal, K.L.; Luthy, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Coal tar in aerobic aqueous systems was treated with purified emulsan, the anionic heteropolysaccharide bioemulsifier produced by Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG-1; with inocula of various concentrations of stationary phase RAG-1 cells; or with cell-free broth from stationary phase RAG-1 cultures. Naphthalene mineralization by a mixed PAH-degrading population was measured by recovering {sup 14}CO{sub 2} evolved during biotransformation of the [{sup 14}C]naphthalene-labeled coal tar. There was no evidence of naphthalene mineralization by RAG- 1 cells alone. The addition of emulsan, RAG-1 inocula, or cell-free broth to systems containing the PAH-degrading population did not significantly affect naphthalene mineralization in any of the systems tested. Coal tar in these experiments was present either as a free dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), or as DNAPL imbibed into microporous silica particles. Emulsification of the tar was not observed in either case. The presence or absence of microporous silica did not affect the extent or rate of naphthalene mineralization, nor did the concentration of RAG-1 inocula or the amount of broth added. The addition of cell-free broth, emulsan, or RAG-1 cells late in the experiments did not yield significantly different results compared to initial addition of these substances. Thus, emulsan and related fractions from RAG-1 cultures were ineffective in altering naphthalene mineralization in this study.

  12. Analysis of reverse combustion in tar sands: a one-dimensional model

    SciTech Connect

    Amr, A.

    1980-08-01

    This paper describes a one-dimensional numerical model which simulates oil recovery from tar sands by reverse combustion. The method of lines is used to solve the nonlinear differential equations describing the flow. The effects of volumetric air flux on the peak temperature, flame velocity, and oil recovery efficiency are reported. The results are compared to the results of relevant experimental studies.

  13. Time scales of organic contaminant dissolution from complex source zones: coal tar pools vs. blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, Christina; Grathwohl, Peter

    2002-11-01

    Groundwater contamination due to complex organic mixtures such as coal tar, creosote and fuels is a widespread problem in industrialized regions. Although most compounds in these mixtures are biodegradable, the contaminant sources are very persistent for many decades after the contamination occurred (e.g., more than 100 years ago at gasworks sites). This limited bioavailability is due to slow dissolution processes. This study presents results from a large scale tank experiment (8 m long) on the long-term (354 days) dissolution kinetics of BTEX and PAHs from a 2.5 m long coal tar pool and 0.5 m long (smear) zone containing coal tar blobs distributed in a coarse sand. The results indicate (1) that Raoult's law holds for estimation of the saturation aqueous concentrations of the coal tar constituents, (2) that for the dissolution of smear zones longer than approximately 0.1 m and with more than 3-5% residual saturation, the local equilibrium assumption is valid and (3) that although very small (<0.1 mm), the transverse vertical dispersivity dominates the pool dissolution processes. Typical time scales for removal of the pollutants from the blob zone and the pool are in the order of a few weeks to more than 10,000 years, respectively.

  14. PAHs underfoot: contaminated dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement is widespread in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Peter C. Van Metre; Barbara J. Mahler; Jennifer T. Wilson

    2009-01-15

    We reported in 2005 that runoff from parking lots treated with coal-tar-based sealcoat was a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to streams in Austin, Texas. Here we present new data from nine U.S. cities that show nationwide patterns in concentrations of {Sigma}PAHs associated with sealcoat. Dust was swept from parking lots in six cities in the central and eastern U.S., where coal-tar-based sealcoat dominates use, and three cities in the western U.S., where asphalt-based sealcoat dominates use. For six central and eastern cities, median SPAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are 2200 and 27 mg/kg, respectively. For three western cities, median SPAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are similar and very low (2.1 and 0.8 mg/kg, respectively). Lakes in the central and eastern cities where pavement was sampled have bottom sediments with higher PAH concentrations than do those in the western cities relative to degree of urbanization. Bottom-sediment PAH assemblages are similar to those of sealcoated pavement dust regionally, implicating coal-tar-based sealcoat as a PAH source to the central and eastern lakes. Concentrations of benzo(a)pyrene in dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement and adjacent soils greatly exceed generic soil screening levels, suggesting that research on human-health risk is warranted. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. PAHs underfoot: Contaminated dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement is widespread in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, P.C.; Mahler, B.J.; Wilson, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    We reported in 2005 that runoff from parking lots treated with coal-tar-based sealcoat was a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to streams in Austin, Texas. Here we present new data from nine U. S. cities that show nationwide patterns in concentrations of PAHs associated with sealcoat Dust was swept from parking lots in six cities in the central and eastern U. S., where coal-tar-based sealcoat dominates use, and three cities in the western U. S., where asphalt-based sealcoat dominates use. For six central and eastern cities, median ?? PAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are 2200 and 27 mg/kg, respectively. For three western cities, median ?? PAH concentrations in dust from sealcoated and unsealcoated pavement are similar and very low (2. 1 and 0. 8 mg/kg, respectively). Lakes in the central and eastern cities where pavement was sampled have bottom sediments with higher PAH concentrations than do those in the western cities relative to degree of urbanization. Bottom-sediment PAH assemblages are similar to those of sealcoated pavement dust regionally, implicating coal-tar-based sealcoat as a PAH source to the central and eastern lakes. Concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene in dust from coal-tar sealcoated pavement and adjacent soils greatly exceed generic soil screening levels, suggesting that research on human-health risk is warranted.

  16. Volatilization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar-sealed pavement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Metre, Peter C.; Majewski, Michael S.; Mahler, Barbara J.; Foreman, William T.; Braun, Christopher L.; Wilson, Jennifer T.; Burbank, Teresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Coal-tar-based pavement sealants, a major source of PAHs to urban water bodies, are a potential source of volatile PAHs to the atmosphere. An initial assessment of volatilization of PAHs from coal-tar-sealed pavement is presented here in which we measured summertime gas-phase PAH concentrations 0.03 m and 1.28 m above the pavement surface of seven sealed (six with coal-tar-based sealant and one with asphalt-based sealant) and three unsealed (two asphalt and one concrete) parking lots in central Texas. PAHs also were measured in parking lot dust. The geometric mean concentration of the sum of eight frequently detected PAHs (?PAH8) in the 0.03-m samples above sealed lots (1320 ng m-3) during the hottest part of the day was 20 times greater than that above unsealed lots (66.5 ng m-3). The geometric mean concentration in the 1.28-m samples above sealed lots (138 ng m-3) was five times greater than above unsealed lots (26.0 ng m-3). Estimated PAH flux from the sealed lots was 60 times greater than that from unsealed lots (geometric means of 88 and 1.4 ?g m-2 h-1, respectively). Although the data set presented here is small, the much higher estimated fluxes from sealed pavement than from unsealed pavement indicate that coal-tar-based sealants are emitting PAHs to urban air at high rates compared to other paved surfaces.

  17. REGISTRATION OF TARS-SR05 MULTIPLE DISEASE-RESISTANT DRY BEAN GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    TARS-SR05 was developed cooperatively by the USDA-ARS, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the College of Agricultural Science, University of Puero Rico, and the University of Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station as a multiple disease-resistant, small red dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplas...

  18. BENCH SCALE FIXATION OF SOILS FROM THE TACOMA TAR PITS SUPRFUND SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the results of bench-scale soil fixation study conducted with materials from the Tacoma Tar Pits SuperfundSite. Chemical fixation (also called stabilization/solidification)is a relatively new technique for remediating contaminated soils. It entails both immo...

  19. Tar analysis from biomass gasification by means of online fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumhakl, Christoph; Karellas, Sotirios

    2011-07-01

    Optical methods in gas analysis are very valuable mainly due to their non-intrusive character. That gives the possibility to use them for in-situ or online measurements with only optical intervention in the measurement volume. In processes like the gasification of biomass, it is of high importance to monitor the gas quality in order to use the product gas in proper machines for energy production following the restrictions in the gas composition but also improving its quality, which leads to high efficient systems. One of the main problems in the biomass gasification process is the formation of tars. These higher hydrocarbons can lead to problems in the operation of the energy system. Up to date, the state of the art method used widely for the determination of tars is a standardized offline measurement system, the so-called "Tar Protocol". The aim of this work is to describe an innovative, online, optical method for determining the tar content of the product gas by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. This method uses optical sources and detectors that can be found in the market at low cost and therefore it is very attractive, especially for industrial applications where cost efficiency followed by medium to high precision are of high importance.

  20. Gasification and effect of gasifying temperature on syngas quality and tar generation: A short review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guangul, Fiseha Mekonnen; Sulaiman, Shaharin Anwar; Raghavan, Vijay R.

    2012-06-01

    Corrosion, erosion and plugging of the downstream equipments by tar and ash particle and, low energy content of syngas are the main problems of biomass gasification process. This paper attempts to review the findings of literature on the effect of temperature on syngas quality, and in alleviating the tar and ash problems in the gasification process. The review of literature indicates that as the gasification temperature increases, concentration of the resulting H2 and carbon conversion efficiency increase, the amount of tar in the syngas decreases. For the same condition, CH4 and CO concentration do not show consistent trend when the feedstock and gasification process varies. These necessitate the need for conducting an experiment for a particular gasification process and feedstock to understand fully the benefits of controlling the gasification temperature. This paper also tries to propose a method to improve the syngas quality and to reduce the tar amount by using preheated air and superheated steam as a gasifying media for oil palm fronds (OPF) gasification.

  1. 40 CFR 61.132 - Standard: Process vessels, storage tanks, and tar-intercepting sumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and procedures specified in § 61.245(c), and shall visually... owner or operator shall install, operate, and maintain a water leg seal on the tar decanter roof near... system abnormalities, such as blocked or plugged lines, sticking valves, plugged condensate traps,...

  2. 40 CFR 61.132 - Standard: Process vessels, storage tanks, and tar-intercepting sumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and procedures specified in § 61.245(c), and shall visually... owner or operator shall install, operate, and maintain a water leg seal on the tar decanter roof near... system abnormalities, such as blocked or plugged lines, sticking valves, plugged condensate traps,...

  3. 40 CFR 61.132 - Standard: Process vessels, storage tanks, and tar-intercepting sumps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., using Method 21 (40 CFR part 60, appendix A) and procedures specified in § 61.245(c), and shall visually... owner or operator shall install, operate, and maintain a water leg seal on the tar decanter roof near... system abnormalities, such as blocked or plugged lines, sticking valves, plugged condensate traps,...

  4. MUTAGENICITY OF COAL TAR PAINTS USED IN DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the mutagenicity of coal tar paints used for coating drinking water tanks and pipes, as a preliminary screening for potential genotoxic hazards associated with leaching of mutagens into drinking water during water storage and distribution. To...

  5. Observation of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein induced TAR DNA melting at the single molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosa, Gonzalo; Harbron, Elizabeth; O'Connor, Donald; Musier-Forsyth, Karin; Barbara, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Reverse transcription of the HIV-1 RNA genome involves several nucleic acid rearrangement steps, and the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) plays a key role in this process. NC is a nucleic acid chaperone protein, which facilitates the formation of the most stable nucleic acid structures. Single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (SM-FRET) measurements enable us to observe the NC-induced conformational fluctuations of a transactivation response region (TAR) DNA hairpin, which is part of the initial product of reverse transcription known as minus-strand strong-stop DNA. SM-FRET studies show that the majority of conformational fluctuations of the fluorescently-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the presence of NC occur in <100 ms. A single molecule explores a wide range of confomations unpon NC binding, with fluctuations encompassing as many as 40 bases in both arms of the hairpin. No conformational fluctuations are observed with the dye-labeled TAR DNA hairpin in the absence of NC or when a labeled TAR DNA hairpin variant lacking bulges and internal loops is analyzed in the presence of NC. This study represents the first real-time observation of NC-mediated nucleic acid conformational fluctuations, revealing new insights into NC's nucleic acid chaperone activity.

  6. Processing of Arroyo Grande tar sand using the Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE copyright ) process

    SciTech Connect

    King, S.B.

    1989-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to (1) evaluate the applications of the ROPE{copyright} process to a California tar sand using the screw pyrolysis reactor-process development unit (SPR-PDU) reactor, (2) produce kinetics data for the recycle product oil-spent sand interaction, and (3) produce oil for end-use evaluation. 6 refs., 1 fig., 23 tabs.

  7. On the Periphery of the Tar Sands. Documents in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodysh, Henry W.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the diary of Karl Clark that focuses on his experiences in the Athabasca tar sands. The diary helps decipher the nature of 1920s town life and the pioneering spirit involved in exploring the oil sands. Includes background information on Clark. (CMK)

  8. Coal-tar-based pavement sealcoat, polycyclic aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), and environmental health

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2011-01-01

    Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have identified coal-tar-based sealcoat-the black, viscous liquid sprayed or painted on asphalt pavement such as parking lots-as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in urban areas for large parts of the Nation. Several PAHs are suspected human carcinogens and are toxic to aquatic life.

  9. 21 CFR 740.18 - Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer. 740.18... posing a risk of cancer. (a) The principal display panel of the label and any labeling accompanying a... your skin and has been determined to cause cancer in laboratory animals. (b) Hair dyes containing...

  10. 21 CFR 740.18 - Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer. 740.18... posing a risk of cancer. (a) The principal display panel of the label and any labeling accompanying a... your skin and has been determined to cause cancer in laboratory animals. (b) Hair dyes containing...

  11. 21 CFR 740.18 - Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer. 740.18... posing a risk of cancer. (a) The principal display panel of the label and any labeling accompanying a... your skin and has been determined to cause cancer in laboratory animals. (b) Hair dyes containing...

  12. 21 CFR 740.18 - Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Coal tar hair dyes posing a risk of cancer. 740.18... posing a risk of cancer. (a) The principal display panel of the label and any labeling accompanying a... your skin and has been determined to cause cancer in laboratory animals. (b) Hair dyes containing...

  13. Extraction of coal tar pitch using a mixture of compressed CO{sub 2} and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.L.; Knutson, B.L.; Kimber, G.

    1999-09-01

    The removal of low-molecular-weight components from commercial pitches is a critical step in the production of suitable precursors for isotropic carbon fiber formation. A unique extraction process employing a one-phase binary mixture of carbon dioxide and toluene has been developed to remove low-molecular-weight components from coal tar pitch, with an ultimate goal of increasing the softening point of the pitch. The mass fraction of coal tar pitch extracted was determined as a function of extraction temperature (25--75 C), pressure (8.7--14.9 MPa), and extractive solvent composition (40--70 wt % toluene) using a factorial experimental design. As much as 44 wt % of the coal tar pitch was removed at these extraction conditions, and softening points greater than 250 C were achieved. The separation is controlled by the temperature and composition of the extractant solvent. This compressed gas/organic solvent extraction process removes low-molecular-weight material from the coal tar pitch using significantly milder solvents and reduced temperatures relative to traditional extractive processes.

  14. Extraction of coal tar pitch using a mixture of compressed CO[sub 2] and toluene

    SciTech Connect

    White, K.L.; Knutson, B.L.; Kimber, G. )

    1999-09-01

    The removal of low-molecular-weight components from commercial pitches is a critical step in the production of suitable precursors for isotropic carbon fiber formation. A unique extraction process employing a one-phase binary mixture of carbon dioxide and toluene has been developed to remove low-molecular-weight components from coal tar pitch, with an ultimate goal of increasing the softening point of the pitch. The mass fraction of coal tar pitch extracted was determined as a function of extraction temperature (25--75 C), pressure (8.7--14.9 MPa), and extractive solvent composition (40--70 wt % toluene) using a factorial experimental design. As much as 44 wt % of the coal tar pitch was removed at these extraction conditions, and softening points greater than 250 C were achieved. The separation is controlled by the temperature and composition of the extractant solvent. This compressed gas/organic solvent extraction process removes low-molecular-weight material from the coal tar pitch using significantly milder solvents and reduced temperatures relative to traditional extractive processes.

  15. CARCINOGENIC ACTIVITY ASSOCIATED WITH ASPHALTIC AND COAL TAR COATINGS USED IN POTABLE WATER MAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carcinogenic response was assessed with 0.2 ml of 4 asphaltic and 3 coal tar based paints applied topically in acetone to the shaved back of female SENCAR mice. Two weeks later a promotion schedule involving application of 1 microgram of TPA in acetine 3 x weekly to the back was ...

  16. Implication of Coal Tar and Asphalt on Black Carbon Quantification in Urban Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y.; Werth, C. J.; Ligouis, B.; Razzaque, M.

    2008-12-01

    Sorption to black carbon (BC) is an important process that controls the transport and fate of persistent organic pollutants in aquatic environments. Efforts have been made to measure BC in different environmental matrices including aerosols, soils, and sediments; however, few studies have attempted to evaluate BC in dust from urban streets or parking lots, which can be an important BC source in urban lake sediments. Methods to quantify BC in soils and sediments usually involve the removal of non-BC carbonaceous materials with chemical and/or thermal oxidation followed by elemental analysis. The presence of coal tar pitch and asphalt in urban pavement dust is hypothesized to potentially result in an overestimate of BC. The primary objectives of this research are to identify the distribution of BC in a small urban watershed and to investigate the potential interference from coal tar and asphalt on BC quantification by method intercomparison. Samples were collected from the Lake Como watershed in Fort Worth, Texas. They include dust from coal-tar-sealed and unsealed parking lots and residential streets, soils from residential and commercial areas, stream bed sediments, and lake sediment cores. After density separation, samples were subjected to sequential chemical treatments and thermal treatment. Commercial coal tar pitch and asphalt products were subjected to these same treatments for comparison. BC contents quantified with chemical treatment and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375) were compared with those characterized using organic petrography. The chemical treatment predicted greater BC contents than organic petrography in all samples, and the greatest difference is in the sealed parking lot dust. CTO-375 method also predicted greater BC content in this sample than organic petrography. Commercial coal tar pitch was resistant to thermal oxidation and both coal tar pitch and asphalt were resistant to the chemical treatment. These results indicate that chemical and thermal treatments can overestimate BC contents due to the chemical and thermal resistance of these materials. We recommend that interference from coal tar pitch and asphalt be considered when chemical or thermal oxidation methods are applied to quantify BC in urban environments, where urban runoff from parking lots and paved streets plays an important source role.

  17. The search for a source rock for the giant Tar Sand triangle accumulation, southeastern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntoon, J.E.; Hansley, P.L.; Naeser, N.D.

    1999-01-01

    A large proportion (about 36%) of the world's oil resource is contained in accumulations of heavy oil or tar. In these large deposits of degraded oil, the oil in place represents only a fraction of what was present at the time of accumulation. In many of these deposits, the source of the oil is unknown, and the oil is thought to have migrated over long distances to the reservoirs. The Tar Sand triangle in southeastern Utah contains the largest tar sand accumulation in the United States, with 6.3 billion bbl of heavy oil estimated to be in place. The deposit is thought to have originally contained 13-16 billion bbl prior to the biodegradation, water washing, and erosion that have taken place since the middle - late Tertiary. The source of the oil is unknown. The tar is primarily contained within the Lower Permian White Rim Sandstone, but extends into permeable parts of overlying and underlying beds. Oil is interpreted to have migrated into the White Rim sometime during the Tertiary when the formation was at a depth of approximately 3500 m. This conclusion is based on integration of fluid inclusion analysis, time-temperature reconstruction, and apatite fission-track modeling for the White Rim Sandstone. Homogenization temperatures cluster around 85-90??C for primary fluid inclusions in authigenic, nonferroan dolomite in the White Rim. The fluid inclusions are associated with fluorescent oil-bearing inclusions, indicating that dolomite precipitation was coeval with oil migration. Burial reconstruction suggests that the White Rim Sandstone reached its maximum burial depth from 60 to 24 Ma, and that maximum burial was followed by unroofing from 24 to 0 Ma. Time-temperature modeling indicates that the formation experienced temperatures of 85-90??C from about 35 to 40 Ma during maximum burial. Maximum formation temperatures of about 105-110??C were reached at about 24 Ma, just prior to unroofing. Thermal modeling is used to examine the history of potential source rocks for the White Rim oil. The most attractive potential sources for White Rim oil include beds within one or more of the following formations: the Proterozoic Chuar Group, which is present in the subsurface southwest of the Tar Sand triangle; the Mississippian Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone and equivalent formations, the Permian Kaibab Limestone, the Sinbad Limestone Member of the Triassic Moenkopi Formation, and the Jurassic Arapien Shale, Twin Creek Limestone, and Carmel Formation, which are present west of the Tar Sand triangle; the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation in the Paradox basin east of the Tar Sand triangle; and the Permian Park City Formation northwest of the Tar Sand triangle. Each formation has a high total organic carbon content and is distributed over a wide enough geographic area to have provided a huge volume of oil. Source beds in all of the formations reached thermal maturity at times prior to or during the time that migration into the White Rim is interpreted to have occurred. Based on all available data, the most likely source for the Tar Sand triangle appears to be the Mississippian Delle Phosphatic Member of the Deseret Limestone. Secondary migration out of the Delle is interpreted to have occurred during the Cretaceous, during Sevier thrusting. Subsequent tertiary migration into the Tar Sand triangle reservoir is interpreted to have occurred later, during middle Tertiary Laramide deformation.

  18. The bulge region of HIV-1 TAR RNA binds metal ions in solution

    PubMed Central

    Olejniczak, Miko?aj; Gdaniec, Zofia; Fischer, Artur; Grabarkiewicz, Tomasz; Bielecki, ?ukasz; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2002-01-01

    Binding of Mg2+, Ca2+ and Co(NH3)63+ ions to the HIV-1 TAR RNA in solution was analysed by 19F NMR spectroscopy, metal ion-induced RNA cleavages and Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations. Chemically synthesised 29mer oligoribonucleotides of the TAR sequence labelled with 5-fluorouridine (FU) were used for 19F NMR-monitored metal ion titration. The chemical shift changes of fluorine resonances FU-23, FU-25 and FU-40 upon titration with Mg2+ and Ca2+ ions indicated specific, although weak, binding at the bulge region with the dissociation constants (Kd) of 0.9 0.6 and 2.7 1.7 mM, respectively. Argininamide, inducing largest 19F chemical shifts changes at FU-23, was used as a reference ligand (Kd = 0.3 0.1 mM). In the Pb2+-induced TAR RNA cleavage experiment, strong and selective cleavage of the C24-U25 phosphodiester bond was observed, while Mg2+ and Ca2+ induced cuts at all 3-nt residues of the bulge. The inhibition of Pb2+-specific TAR cleavage by di- and trivalent metal ions revealed a binding specificity [in the order Co(NH3)63+ > Mg2+ > Ca2+] at the bulge site. A BD simulation search of potential magnesium ion sites within the NMR structure of HIV-1 TAR RNA was conducted on a set of 20 conformers (PDB code 1ANR). For most cases, the bulge region was targeted by magnesium cations. PMID:12364603

  19. Glycosylation of Wall Teichoic Acid in Staphylococcus aureus by TarM*

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Guoqing; Maier, Lisa; Sanchez-Carballo, Patricia; Li, Min; Otto, Michael; Holst, Otto; Peschel, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Wall teichoic acid (WTA) glycopolymers are major constituents of cell envelopes in Staphylococcus aureus and related Gram-positive bacteria with important roles in cell wall maintenance, susceptibility to antimicrobial molecules, biofilm formation, and host interaction. Most S. aureus strains express polyribitol phosphate WTA substituted with d-alanine and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). WTA sugar modifications are highly variable and have been implicated in bacteriophage susceptibility and immunogenicity, but the pathway and enzymes of staphylococcal WTA glycosylation have remained unknown. Revisiting the structure of S. aureus RN4220 WTA by NMR analysis revealed the presence of canonical polyribitol phosphate WTA bearing only α-linked GlcNAc substituents. A RN4220 transposon mutant resistant to WTA-dependent phages was identified and shown to produce altered WTA, which exhibited faster electrophoretic migration and lacked completely the WTA α-GlcNAc residues. Disruption of a gene of unknown function, renamed tarM, was responsible for this phenotype. Recombinant TarM was capable of glycosylating WTA in vitro in a UDP-GlcNAc-dependent manner, thereby confirming its WTA GlcNAc-transferase activity. Deletion of the last seven amino acids from the C terminus abolished the activity of TarM. tarM-related genes were found in the genomes of several WTA-producing bacteria, suggesting that TarM-mediated WTA glycosylation is a general pathway in Gram-positive bacteria. Our study represents a basis for dissecting the biosynthesis and function of glycosylated WTA in S. aureus and other bacteria. PMID:20185825

  20. Investigation of the ROPE copyright (Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction) process performance on Sunnyside tar sand

    SciTech Connect

    Cha, C.Y.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.; Guffey, F.D.

    1990-07-01

    The main objectives of this research were to determine the optimum pyrolysis temperature for Sunnyside tar sand and to verify the operability and efficiency of the ROPE process at steady-state conditions for production of feedstock materials. The experiments were conducted in the 2-inch screw pyrolysis reactor (SPR). Four 24-hour tests and one 105-hour test were performed in the 2-inch SPR using Sunnyside tar sand. The 24-hour tests were designed to predict the optimum pyrolysis temperature for oil yield. The 105-hour test was conducted to confirm the optimum pyrolysis temperature with sufficient operating time to reach steady-state conditions with respect to product compositions. The following conclusions can be drawn from the Sunnyside tar sand 2-inch SPR tests: (1) Sunnyside tar sand can be processed without any major operational difficulty by the ROPE process. (2) Oil yields greater than Fischer assay were obtained during the 2-inch SPR tests. Oil yield greater than 80 wt % of the bitumen was obtained from the 105-hr test. (3) The ratio of heavy oil to light product oil is strongly dependent upon the pyrolysis temperature and increases with a decrease in the reaction temperature. The gas yield increases with the increase in pyrolysis temperature but the residual carbon in the spent sand decreases with the increase in pyrolysis temperature, reaches the minimum at 675{degrees}F, and then increases with further increase in the pyrolysis temperature. ROPE process product oils from Sunnyside tar sand have market application as blending stocks for the production of diesel fuels, but they are not suited for the production of unleaded gasoline or high-density aviation turbine fuels. 3 refs., 3 figs., 17 tabs.

  1. Physicochemical Approaches for the Remediation of Former Manufactured Gas Plant Tars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauswirth, S.; Miller, C. T.

    2014-12-01

    Former manufactured gas plant (FMGP) tars are one of the most challenging non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) contaminants to remediate due to their complex chemical composition, high viscosities, and ability to alter wettability. In this work, we investigate several in situ remediation techniques for the removal of tar from porous media. Batch and column experiments were conducted to test the effectiveness of mobilization, solubilization, and chemical oxidation remediation approaches. Alkaline (NaOH), surfactant (Triton X-100), and polymer (xanthan gum) agents were used in various combinations to reduce tar-water interfacial tension, increase flushing solution viscosity, and increase the solubilities of tar components. Base-activated sodium persulfate was used alone and in combination with surfactant to chemically oxidized tar components. The effectiveness of each method was assessed in terms of both removal of PAHs from the system and reduction of dissolved-phase effluent polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations. In column studies, alkaline-polymer (AP) and alkaline-surfactant-polymer (ASP) solutions efficiently mobilized 81-93% and 95-96% of residual PAHs, respectively, within two pore volumes. The impact of AP flushing on dissolved-phase PAH concentrations was relatively low; however, the concentrations of several low molar mass PAHs were significantly reduced after ASP flushing. Surfactant-polymer (SP) solutions removed over 99% of residual PAHs through a combination of mobilization and solubilization, and reduced the post-remediation, dissolved-phase total PAH concentration by 98.4-99.1%. Degradation of residual PAHs by base-activated sodium persulfate was relatively low (30-50%), and had little impact on dissolved-phase PAH concentrations.

  2. Understanding the fate and transport of petroleum hydrocarbons from coal tar within gasholders.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Frdric; Orsi, Roberto; Turner, Claire; Walton, Chris; Daly, Paddy; Pollard, Simon J T

    2009-02-01

    Coal tars have been identified as posing a threat to human health due to their toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic characteristics. Workers involved in former gasholders decommissioning are potentially exposed to relevant concentrations of volatile and semi-volatile hydrocarbons upon opening up derelict tanks and during tar excavation/removal. While information on contaminated sites air-quality and its implications on medium-long term exposure is available, acute exposure issues associated with the execution of critical tasks are less understood. Calculations indicated that the concentration of a given contaminant in the gasholder vapour phase only depends on the coal tar composition, being only barely affected by the presence of water in the gasholder and the tar volume/void space ratio. Fugacity modelling suggested that risk-critical compounds such as benzene, naphthalene and other monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons may gather in the gasholder air phase at significant concentrations. Gasholder emissions were measured on-site and compared with the workplace exposure limits (WELs) currently in use in UK. While levels for most of the toxic compounds were far lower than WELs, benzene air-concentrations where found to be above the accepted threshold. In addition due to the long exposure periods involved in gasholder decommissioning and the significant contribution given by naphthalene to the total coal tar vapour concentration, the adoption of a WEL for naphthalene may need to be considered to support operators in preventing human health risk at the workplace. The Level I fugacity approach used in this study demonstrated its suitability for applications to sealed environments such as gasholders and its further refining could provide a useful tool for land remediation risk assessors. PMID:18657318

  3. TAR independent activation of the human immunodeficiency virus in phorbol ester stimulated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Harrich, D; Garcia, J; Mitsuyasu, R; Gaynor, R

    1990-12-01

    Multiple regulatory elements in the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat (HIV LTR) are required for activation of HIV gene expression. Previous transfection studies of HIV LTR constructs linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene indicated that multiple regulatory regions including the enhancer, SP1, TATA and TAR regions were important for HIV gene expression. To characterize these regulatory elements further, mutations in these regions were inserted into both the 5' and 3' HIV LTRs and infectious proviral constructs were assembled. These constructs were transfected into either HeLa cells, Jurkat cells or U937 cells in both the presence and absence of phorbol esters which have previously been demonstrated to activate HIV gene expression. Viral gene expression was assayed by the level of p24 gag protein released from cultures transfected with the proviral constructs. Results in all cell lines indicated that mutations of the SP1, TATA and the TAR loop and stem secondary structure resulted in marked decreases in gene expression while mutations of the enhancer motif or TAR primary sequence resulted in only slight decreases. However, viruses containing mutations in either the TAR loop sequences or stem secondary structure which were very defective for gene expression in untreated Jurkat cells, gave nearly wild-type levels of gene expression in phorbol ester-treated Jurkat cells but not in phorbol ester-treated HeLa or U937 cells. High level gene expression of these TAR mutant constructs in phorbol ester-treated Jurkat cells was eliminated by second site mutations in the enhancer region or by disruption of the tat gene.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2124973

  4. Targeting of CCL2-CCR2-Glycosaminoglycan Axis Using a CCL2 Decoy Protein Attenuates Metastasis through Inhibition of Tumor Cell Seeding1

    PubMed Central

    Roblek, Marko; Strutzmann, Elisabeth; Zankl, Christina; Adage, Tiziana; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Atlic, Aid; Weis, Roland; Kungl, Andreas; Borsig, Lubor

    2016-01-01

    The CCL2-CCR2 chemokine axis has an important role in cancer progression where it contributes to metastatic dissemination of several cancer types (e.g., colon, breast, prostate). Tumor cell–derived CCL2 was shown to promote the recruitment of CCR2+/Ly6Chi monocytes and to induce vascular permeability of CCR2+ endothelial cells in the lungs. Here we describe a novel decoy protein consisting of a CCL2 mutant protein fused to human serum albumin (dnCCL2-HSA chimera) with enhanced binding affinity to glycosaminoglycans that was tested in vivo. The monocyte-mediated tumor cell transendothelial migration was strongly reduced upon unfused dnCCL2 mutant treatment in vitro. dnCCL2-HSA chimera had an extended serum half-life and thus a prolonged exposure in vivo compared with the dnCCL2 mutant. dnCCL2-HSA chimera bound to the lung vasculature but caused minimal alterations in the leukocyte recruitment to the lungs. However, dnCCL2-HSA chimera treatment strongly reduced both lung vascular permeability and tumor cell seeding. Metastasis of MC-38GFP, 3LL, and LLC1 cells was significantly attenuated upon dnCCL2-HSA chimera treatment. Tumor cell seeding to the lungs resulted in enhanced expression of a proteoglycan syndecan-4 by endothelial cells that correlated with accumulation of the dnCCL2-HSA chimera in the vicinity of tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that the CCL2-based decoy protein effectively binds to the activated endothelium in lungs and blocks tumor cell extravasation through inhibition of vascular permeability. PMID:26806351

  5. Targeting of CCL2-CCR2-Glycosaminoglycan Axis Using a CCL2 Decoy Protein Attenuates Metastasis through Inhibition of Tumor Cell Seeding.

    PubMed

    Roblek, Marko; Strutzmann, Elisabeth; Zankl, Christina; Adage, Tiziana; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Atlic, Aid; Weis, Roland; Kungl, Andreas; Borsig, Lubor

    2016-01-01

    The CCL2-CCR2 chemokine axis has an important role in cancer progression where it contributes to metastatic dissemination of several cancer types (e.g., colon, breast, prostate). Tumor cell-derived CCL2 was shown to promote the recruitment of CCR2(+)/Ly6C(hi) monocytes and to induce vascular permeability of CCR2(+) endothelial cells in the lungs. Here we describe a novel decoy protein consisting of a CCL2 mutant protein fused to human serum albumin (dnCCL2-HSA chimera) with enhanced binding affinity to glycosaminoglycans that was tested in vivo. The monocyte-mediated tumor cell transendothelial migration was strongly reduced upon unfused dnCCL2 mutant treatment in vitro. dnCCL2-HSA chimera had an extended serum half-life and thus a prolonged exposure in vivo compared with the dnCCL2 mutant. dnCCL2-HSA chimera bound to the lung vasculature but caused minimal alterations in the leukocyte recruitment to the lungs. However, dnCCL2-HSA chimera treatment strongly reduced both lung vascular permeability and tumor cell seeding. Metastasis of MC-38GFP, 3LL, and LLC1 cells was significantly attenuated upon dnCCL2-HSA chimera treatment. Tumor cell seeding to the lungs resulted in enhanced expression of a proteoglycan syndecan-4 by endothelial cells that correlated with accumulation of the dnCCL2-HSA chimera in the vicinity of tumor cells. These findings demonstrate that the CCL2-based decoy protein effectively binds to the activated endothelium in lungs and blocks tumor cell extravasation through inhibition of vascular permeability. PMID:26806351

  6. Intravitreal Delivery of Human NgR-Fc Decoy Protein Regenerates Axons After Optic Nerve Crush and Protects Ganglion Cells in Glaucoma Models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Lin, Jun; Arzeno, Alexander; Choi, Jin Young; Boccio, Juliann; Frieden, Eric; Bhargava, Ajay; Maynard, George; Tsai, James C.; Strittmatter, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Glaucoma is a major cause of vision loss due to retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration. Therapeutic intervention controls increased IOP, but neuroprotection is unavailable. NogoReceptor1 (NgR1) limits adult central nervous system (CNS) axonal sprouting and regeneration. We examined NgR1 blocking decoy as a potential therapy by defining the pharmacokinetics of intravitreal NgR(310)-Fc, its promotion of RGC axonal regeneration following nerve crush, and its neuroprotective effect in a microbead glaucoma model. Methods. Human NgR1(310)-Fc was administered intravitreally, and levels were monitored in rat vitreal humor and retina. Axonal regeneration after optic nerve crush was assessed by cholera toxin ? anterograde labeling. In a microbead model of glaucoma with increased IOP, the number of surviving and actively transporting RGCs was determined after 4 weeks by retrograde tracing with Fluro-Gold (FG) from the superior colliculus. Results. After intravitreal bolus administration, the terminal half-life of NgR1(310)-Fc between 1 and 7 days was approximately 24 hours. Injection of 5 ?g protein once per week after optic nerve crush injury significantly increased RGCs with regenerating axons. Microbeads delivered to the anterior chamber increased pressure, and caused 15% reduction in FG-labeled RGCs of control rats, with a 40% reduction in large diameter RGCs. Intravitreal treatment with NgR1(310)-Fc did not reduce IOP, but maintained large diameter RGC density at control levels. Conclusions. Human NgR1(310)-Fc has favorable pharmacokinetics in the vitreal space and rescues large diameter RGC counts from increased IOP. Thus, the NgR1 blocking decoy protein may have efficacy as a disease-modifying therapy for glaucoma. PMID:25655801

  7. Examination of TAR-independent Trans activation by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat in human glial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y S; Panganiban, A T

    1996-03-15

    Astrocytic glial cells derived from central nervous system (CNS) can support human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication in cell culture, may be infected in tissue culture, and are thought to be a large HIV-1 reservoir in vivo. The Tat protein of HIV-1 interacts with a cis-acting target sequence referred to as TAR. However, Tat can also stimulate gene expression directed from some heterologous promoters and, in certain circumstances, an HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) that lacks the TAR element. Therefore, we attempted to investigate Tat trans activation of HIV-1 LTR in the astrocytic glial cells. Using transfection of LTR-reporter gene constructs and HIV-1 proviral constructs, we demonstrate TAR-dependent replication in astrocytic cells. We also examined the expression of HIV-1 env gene from an LTR that lacks TAR element. In a previous study (Kim and Panganiban: J Virol 67:3739-3747, 1993), we observed that env expression is trans activated only by the full-length Tat protein through a TAR-independent manner in HeLa cells. However, in astrocytic glial cells, the trans activation of env expression from the LTR-lacking TAR element was mediated by the first exon peptide of Tat as well as the full-length Tat peptide through a post-transcriptional mechanism rather than a transcriptional one. This result suggests that cell type-specific factor(s) is involved in the TAR-independent Tat responsiveness. PMID:8984195

  8. Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak) in a laboratory screw type reactor and secondary thermal/catalytic tar decomposition.

    PubMed

    Haydary, J; Susa, D; Dud, J

    2013-05-01

    Pyrolysis of aseptic packages (tetrapak cartons) in a laboratory apparatus using a flow screw type reactor and a secondary catalytic reactor for tar cracking was studied. The pyrolysis experiments were realized at temperatures ranging from 650 C to 850 C aimed at maximizing of the amount of the gas product and reducing its tar content. Distribution of tetrapak into the product yields at different conditions was obtained. The presence of H2, CO, CH4, CO2 and light hydrocarbons, HCx, in the gas product was observed. The Aluminum foil was easily separated from the solid product. The rest part of char was characterized by proximate and elemental analysis and calorimetric measurements. The total organic carbon in the tar product was estimated by elemental analysis of tars. Two types of catalysts (dolomite and red clay marked AFRC) were used for catalytic thermal tar decomposition. Three series of experiments (without catalyst in a secondary cracking reactor, with dolomite and with AFRC) at temperatures of 650, 700, 750, 800 and 850 C were carried out. Both types of catalysts have significantly affected the content of tars and other components in pyrolytic gases. The effect of catalyst on the tetrapack distribution into the product yield on the composition of gas and on the total organic carbon in the tar product is presented in this work. PMID:23428565

  9. Modeling the impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on tar yield and its fluctuations during biomass fast pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Qingang; Ramirez, Emilio; Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C. Stuart; Xu, Fei

    2015-10-09

    The impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on temporal variations in the exit tar yield for biomass fast pyrolysis was investigated using computational simulations of an experimental laboratory-scale reactor. A multi-fluid computational fluid dynamics model was employed to simulate the differential conservation equations in the reactor, and this was combined with a multi-component, multi-step pyrolysis kinetics scheme for biomass to account for chemical reactions. The predicted mean tar yields at the reactor exit appear to match corresponding experimental observations. Parametric studies predicted that increasing the fluidization velocity should improve the mean tar yield but increase its temporal variations. Increases in the mean tar yield coincide with reducing the diameter of sand particles or increasing the initial sand bed height. However, trends in tar yield variability are more complex than the trends in mean yield. The standard deviation in tar yield reaches a maximum with changes in sand particle size. As a result, the standard deviation in tar yield increases with the increases in initial bed height in freely bubbling state, while reaches a maximum in slugging state.

  10. Modeling the impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on tar yield and its fluctuations during biomass fast pyrolysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xiong, Qingang; Ramirez, Emilio; Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C. Stuart; Xu, Fei

    2015-10-09

    The impact of bubbling bed hydrodynamics on temporal variations in the exit tar yield for biomass fast pyrolysis was investigated using computational simulations of an experimental laboratory-scale reactor. A multi-fluid computational fluid dynamics model was employed to simulate the differential conservation equations in the reactor, and this was combined with a multi-component, multi-step pyrolysis kinetics scheme for biomass to account for chemical reactions. The predicted mean tar yields at the reactor exit appear to match corresponding experimental observations. Parametric studies predicted that increasing the fluidization velocity should improve the mean tar yield but increase its temporal variations. Increases in themore » mean tar yield coincide with reducing the diameter of sand particles or increasing the initial sand bed height. However, trends in tar yield variability are more complex than the trends in mean yield. The standard deviation in tar yield reaches a maximum with changes in sand particle size. As a result, the standard deviation in tar yield increases with the increases in initial bed height in freely bubbling state, while reaches a maximum in slugging state.« less

  11. Getting It Together: Serving the Adult Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakshis, Robert D.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a community needs assessment survey conducted by the College of DuPage (Illinois) which served to advertise existing programs, provide public relations for the adult education council, and obtain measures of need for existing or expanded educational and leisure activities. (MB)

  12. Making a Difference by Serving All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olley, Rivka I.

    2009-01-01

    Randi Brown came to school psychology almost as a family business. Her grandmother was a school psychologist and the first licensed psychologist in the state of New York. Randi graduated with a doctoral degree from Yeshiva University and has served students in Westchester County, New York, for 18 years. She exemplifies the dedication typical of so…

  13. Serving Stakeholders at a Small Regional University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrage, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The Southeastern Oklahoma State University Honors Program serves a unique role in a small, rural setting such as Durant, Oklahoma. The honors program has a traditional mission in a university that offers a nontraditional setting and history within the context of higher education. The program thus offers special rewards to its students and to the

  14. Measuring the Velocity of a Tennis Serve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eng, John; Lietman, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    Presents an alternative to the use of a radar to determine how fast an individual can serve a tennis ball. Equipped with a tape recorder and a Macintosh computer, students determine the velocity of a tennis ball by analyzing the sounds and echoes heard on the court. (ZWH)

  15. Making a Difference by Serving All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olley, Rivka I.

    2009-01-01

    Randi Brown came to school psychology almost as a family business. Her grandmother was a school psychologist and the first licensed psychologist in the state of New York. Randi graduated with a doctoral degree from Yeshiva University and has served students in Westchester County, New York, for 18 years. She exemplifies the dedication typical of so

  16. Serving Rural Youth: A Regional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett D.

    The regional approach as an alternative for meeting the needs of rural youth is discussed in comparison to the small school district which cannot possibly serve the broad spectrum of student needs in rural areas. The rural educational setting and its shortcomings are described as the lack of facilities, a lack of an obvious connection between

  17. Serving up Success! Team Nutrition Days, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This publication presents success stories and actual activities from Team Nutrition Days 1997 to serve as a starting point for other schools wanting to create their own nutrition education activities. Team Nutrition Days was a 1-week celebration that used innovative, interactive activities to teach children that nutrition is the link between

  18. Serving Business in an Information Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    The Bookmark, 1988

    1988-01-01

    The 23 articles in this theme issue focus on various aspects of library services to business in an information economy: "Serving Business in an Information Economy" (C. Bain); "New York's Resurging Economy and State Economic Development Information" (R. G. Paolino); "Department of Economic Development Library: Services to Business" (B. S.

  19. Graduate Students Serve Extension as Evaluation Consultants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Megan; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to provide graduate students at a distance with field-based learning experiences and evaluation resources to statewide Extension programs, 24 Master's students participating in a distance-delivered program evaluation course served as evaluation consultants for Extension programs. State evaluation specialists unable to conduct…

  20. Do carotenoids serve as transmembrane radical channels?

    PubMed

    Johnson, James D

    2009-08-01

    Carotenoids are a diverse group of terpenoid pigments that originated in prokaryotes over 3 billion years ago. Their primary function in plants is to serve as photomodulators of the oxidizing side of Photosystem II. In animals, which must acquire carotenoids from their diets, carotenoids serve a host of functions and are viewed primarily as efficient scavengers of singlet oxygen and radicals within the domain of membranes where they reside. Recently it has been demonstrated that carotenoids react cooperatively and synergistically with vitamin C and E, serving to regenerate a pro-oxidant radical carotenoid after the antioxidant reduction of a radical species. The exact location and behavior of carotenoids within biological membrane systems remain largely unknown. A hypothesis is proposed suggesting that carotenoids may serve as transmembrane radical channels. In this capacity carotenoids may reduce radicals in one biological compartment, while simultaneously being reduced in another. The benefit of rapid radical quenching across membrane compartments by transmembrane-spanning carotenoids such as zeaxanthin and lutein may be especially advantageous to intra- and extracellular redox control. PMID:19446633

  1. Students Serving Students. Linking Learning with Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Jan; Smink, Jay; Duckenfield, Marty

    The National Dropout Prevention Center designed a project, Student Serving Students, to see if students in kindergarten through twelfth grade could help other students who were at risk of dropping out of school. Communities in Florida, Georgia, and South Carolina developed a variety of ways for students to meet the needs of children at risk.…

  2. Graduate Students Serve Extension as Evaluation Consultants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Megan; Fuhrman, Nicholas E.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to provide graduate students at a distance with field-based learning experiences and evaluation resources to statewide Extension programs, 24 Master's students participating in a distance-delivered program evaluation course served as evaluation consultants for Extension programs. State evaluation specialists unable to conduct

  3. Serving Distant Learners through Instructional Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drea, John T.; Armistead, L. Pendleton

    John Wood Community College (JWCC) serves a district population of approximately 90,000 in a predominantly rural section of west-central Illinois. In an effort to address the needs of the rural long-distance learner, JWCC has implemented a variety of instructional delivery techniques. Since its inception, JWCC has contracted with other area

  4. Science To Serve the Common Good.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Garry D.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews "Upstream: Salmon and Society in the Pacific Northwest", a report produced by a committee of the National Research Council that offers a model of a new and better approach to addressing environmental problems that could enable science to serve the common good. Demonstrates a successful approach to doing science and contributing to society.

  5. How Finland Serves Gifted and Talented Pupils

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tirri, Kirsi; Kuusisto, Elina

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the ways gifted and talented pupils are served in Finland. The trend toward individualism and freedom of choice as well as national policy affecting gifted education are discussed. Empirical research on Finnish teachers' attitudes toward gifted education with respect to the national

  6. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yaning; Mahler, Barbara J.; Van Metre, Peter C.; Ligouis, Bertrand; Werth, Charles J.

    2010-12-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr 2O 7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375 °C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr 2O 7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr 2O 7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr 2O 7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr 2O 7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr 2O 7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods.

  7. Potential contributions of asphalt and coal tar to black carbon quantification in urban dust, soils, and sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, Y.; Mahler, B.J.; Van Metre, P.C.; Ligouis, B.; Werth, C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of black carbon (BC) using either chemical or thermal oxidation methods are generally thought to indicate the amount of char and/or soot present in a sample. In urban environments, however, asphalt and coal-tar particles worn from pavement are ubiquitous and, because of their pyrogenic origin, could contribute to measurements of BC. Here we explored the effect of the presence of asphalt and coal-tar particles on the quantification of BC in a range of urban environmental sample types, and evaluated biases in the different methods used for quantifying BC. Samples evaluated were pavement dust, residential and commercial area soils, lake sediments from a small urban watershed, and reference materials of asphalt and coal tar. Total BC was quantified using chemical treatment through acid dichromate (Cr2O7) oxidation and chemo-thermal oxidation at 375??C (CTO-375). BC species, including soot and char/charcoal, asphalt, and coal tar, were quantified with organic petrographic analysis. Comparison of results by the two oxidation methods and organic petrography indicates that both coal tar and asphalt contribute to BC quantified by Cr2O7 oxidation, and that coal tar contributes to BC quantified by CTO-375. These results are supported by treatment of asphalt and coal-tar reference samples with Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. The reference asphalt is resistant to Cr2O7 oxidation but not to CTO-375, and the reference coal tar is resistant to both Cr2O7 oxidation and CTO-375. These results indicate that coal tar and/or asphalt can contribute to BC measurements in samples from urban areas using Cr2O7 oxidation or CTO-375, and caution is advised when interpreting BC measurements made with these methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Characterization of the HIV-1 TAR RNA-Tat peptide and drug interactions by on-line acoustic wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tassew, Nardos Gobena

    This thesis presents the application of the thickness shear-mode (TSM) acoustic wave sensor to the study of RNA-protein and RNA-drug interactions at the solid-liquid interface. The binding of the human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 Tat protein to the trans-activation responsive RNA element (TAR) has been studied using this sensor. Data from such measurements show that the sensor is able to discriminate between different Tat peptides derived from the parent protein based on size. The effects of mutations introduced at specific sites in the protein and RNA on the TAR-Tat binding have also been examined in detail. Reduced level of response in acoustic parameters due to mutations was observed indicating that the decrease in binding in response to site specific mutations can be acoustically detected. Data from acoustic wave sensor measurements indicate that the TAR-Tat binding is also affected by ionic strength. Both the frequency and motional resistance signals show periodic responses when varying concentrations of salt are introduced on a TAR-modified surface. The binding of the two molecules seems to be a function of the response of the nucleic acid to salt concentrations. The kinetics of binding of Tat peptides to TAR RNA and to a bulge mutant analogue (MTAR) is also examined from the rate of change of the series resonant frequency. Results from such analysis illustrate longer Tat peptides formed more stable complexes with TAR RNA and exhibited increased discrimination between mutant and wild type TAR. The binding of two aminoglycoside antibiotics, neomycin and streptomycin, to TAR RNA and their effectiveness in preventing TAR-Tat complex formation has been studied in detail. Binding affinity is directly correlated with the inhibitory potency of these molecules and the TSM sensor shows that neomycin exhibits at least a ten fold greater affinity to TAR and that it is also a more potent inhibitor than streptomycin. The results from this research involving TAR-Tat and TAR-drug interactions compare well with those reported in the literature using other non-biosensor techniques. Thus, acoustic physics offers considerable potential for detailed biophysical analysis of nucleic acid-ligand binding and for screening of small molecule interactions with nucleic acids.

  9. Influence of the presence of PAHs and coal tar on naphthalene sorption in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayard, Rmy; Barna, Ligia; Mahjoub, Borhane; Gourdon, Rmy

    2000-11-01

    The mobility of the most water-soluble polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as naphthalene in contaminated soils from manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites or other similar sites is influenced not only by the naturally occurring soil organic matter (SOM) but also, and in many cases mostly, by the nature and concentration of coal tar xenobiotic organic matter (XOM) and other PAH molecules present in the medium under various physical states. The objective of the present study was to quantify the effects of these factors using batch experiments, in order to simulate naphthalene transport in soil-tar-water systems using column experiments. Naphthalene sorption was studied in the presence of (i) solid coal tar particles, (ii) phenanthrene supplied as pure crystals, in the aqueous solution or already sorbed onto the soil, (iii) fluoranthene as pure crystals, and (iv) an aqueous solution of organic molecules extracted from a liquid tar. All experiments were conducted under abiotic conditions using short naphthalene/sorbent contact times of 24-60 h. Although these tests do not reflect true equilibrium conditions which usually take more time to establish, they were used to segregate relatively rapid sorption phenomena ("pseudo equilibrium") from slow sorption and other aging phenomena. For longer contact times, published data have shown that experimental biases due to progressive changes in the characteristics of the soil and the solution may drastically modify the affinity of the solutes for the soil. Slow diffusion in the microporosity and in dense organic phases may also become significant over the long term, along with some irreversible aging phenomena which have not been addressed in this work. Results showed that PAHs had no effect on naphthalene sorption when present in the aqueous solution or as pure crystals, due to their low solubility in water. Adsorbed phenanthrene was found to reduce naphthalene adsorption only when present at relatively high concentrations (about 120 mg/kg) in the soil. In contrast, experiments carried out with coal tar particles revealed a significant effect. Naphthalene sorption appeared to be proportional to the amount of coal tar added to the sand or soil, and a much higher affinity of naphthalene for XOM ( Koc above 2000 cm 3/g) than SOM ( Koc around 300 cm 3/g) was observed. Naphthalene transport in the columns of sand or soil spiked with coal tar particles was simulated very satisfactorily with a dual double-domain model. Around 90% of naphthalene retention by coal tar was found to occur within the organic phase, suggesting a phase partition process which may be explained by the amorphous nature of the XOM and its extreme affinity for naphthalene. For SOM, however, which is present as porous microaggregates of clay and humic substances, with less affinity for naphthalene, only 1/3 of naphthalene retention was found to occur within the organic phase, underlining the significant role of surface adsorption in the short term behavior of naphthalene in soil. For longer contact times, the model simulations proposed in the present study should be coupled to slow sorption, aging and biodegradation models to describe long-term behavior of naphthalene in soil-tar-water systems.

  10. Risk of cancer from the use of tar bitumen in road works.

    PubMed Central

    Knecht, U; Woitowitz, H J

    1989-01-01

    Tar bitumens are increasingly being used as a binder in road works. They consist of a standard product of about 70% bitumen and 25-30% tar. Tar bitumens are classifiable as the pyrolysis products of organic materials and are applied hot. Depending on the temperature used there are emissions of various intensities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), some of which are carcinogenic. A total of 250 one hour air samples was taken at breathing height on 20 days at 11 road works sites. The region of road paving operations in the immediate neighbourhood of the finishing machine operator and the screedmen were the chosen sampling points. A total of 19 unsubstituted chromatography/mass spectrometry. These included benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, chrysene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, and indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, all of which are carcinogenic. The median concentrations of chrysene and of benzo[b,j + k] fluoranthenes (determined en masse) were 9.3 and 2.8 micrograms/m3 respectively. The median concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and indeno[1,2,3,-cd]pyrene were 0.7 and 0.2 micrograms/m3 respectively. Dibenzo[a,h]anthracene had the lowest median concentration with about 0.03 micrograms/m3. Of the resulting shift means, the BaP concentration was over 1 microgram/m3 in about 50% of the cases, over 2 micrograms/m3 in 35%, and over 5 micrograms/m3 in about 15%. Even when the temperature of the paving mix was only between 120 degrees and 135 degrees C. 4.8% of the concentrations (identical to 3 samples) were greater than 2 micrograms BaP/m3, this value was exceeded in 34.9% of the determinations (identical to 30 samples) when the temperature of the tar bitumen was between 135 degrees and 150 degrees C. The highest concentration measured here was 17.8 micrograms BaP/m3. The recommended maximum paving temperature of the paving mix of 150 degrees C was exceeded in about 23% of all cases. The maximum concentration determined under any condition was 22 microgram/m(3). Thus the employment of tar bitumen as a binding material during road paving operations must be regarded as causing a considerable risk to health. The primary task is to ascertain whether tar bitumen can be replaced as a binder in paving for roads and what safety measures are practicable. PMID:2920140

  11. Quinoline and derivatives at a tar oil contaminated site: hydroxylated products as indicator for natural attenuation?

    SciTech Connect

    Anne-Kirsten Reineke; Thomas Goeen; Alfred Preiss; Juliane Hollender

    2007-08-01

    LC-MS-MS analysis of groundwater of a tar oil contaminated site (a former coal mine and coking plant in Castrop-Rauxel, Germany) showed the occurrence of the N-heterocycles quinoline and isoquinoline as well as their hydroxylated and hydrogenated metabolites. The concentrations of the hydroxylated compounds, 2(1H)-quinolinone and 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, were significantly higher than those of the nonsubstituted parent compounds. Therefore, exclusive quantification of the parent compounds leads to an underestimation of the amount of N-heterocycles present in the groundwater. Microbial degradation experiments of quinoline and isoquinoline with aquifer material of the site as inocculum showed the formation of hydroxylated and hydrogenated products under sulfate-reducing conditions, the prevailing conditions in the field. However, since analyses of seven tar products showed that these compounds are also primary constituents, their detection in groundwater is found to be a nonsufficient indicator for the occurrence of biological natural attenuation processes. Instead, the ratio of hydroxylated to parent compound (R{sub metabolite}) is proposed as a useful indicator. We found that 65-83% of all groundwater samples showed R{sub metabolite} for 2(1H)-quinolinone, 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 3,4-dihydro-2(1H)-quinolinone, and 3,4-dihydro-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, which was higher than the highest ratio found in tar products. With respect to the observed partition coefficient between tar oil and water of 3.5 for quinoline and isoquinoline and 0.3 for 2(1H)-quinolinone and 1(2H)-isoquinolinone, the ratio in groundwater would be approximately 10 times higher than the ratio in tar oil. When paying attention to these two parameters, 19-31% of groundwater samples exceed the highest tar oil ratio. This indicates that biological processes take place in the aquifer of the site and R{sub metabolite} is an applicable indicator for natural attenuation. 42 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Emerging Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs): Serving Latino Students. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The invention of Hispanic-serving Institutions (HSIs) in the 1980s was grounded in the theory that institutions enrolling a large concentration of Latino students would adapt their institutional practices to serve these students better. Specifically, critical mass theory suggests once a definable group reaches a certain size within an…

  13. Minority-Serving Institutions of Higher Education: Serving Communities, Revitalizing the Nation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Institutions of higher education (IHEs) that serve minority populations are unique both in their missions and in their day-to-day operations. Some of these colleges and universities are located in remote regions of the country, while others serve congested urban neighborhoods. Their constituents range from Native Americans, the country's oldest

  14. Acquaintance molestation and youth-serving organizations.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Kenneth V; Dietz, Park

    2014-10-01

    This article is based not only on the research literature but also on the extensive field experience of the authors in consulting with investigators, attorneys, and organizations on the prevention, investigation, prosecution, and civil litigation of molestation of children within or in connection with youth-serving organizations. Acquaintance molesters have often pursued careers or sought out paid or volunteer work with organizations through which they can meet children. To address the problem of such offenders, it is necessary for youth-serving organizations to recognize the diversity of sexual activity, the phenomena of "nice-guy" offenders and compliant child victims, and the grooming/seduction process, each of which is reviewed here. The four most important protection practices for organizations are screening; management, and supervision; response to suspicions, allegations, and complaints; and prevention and awareness programs. The authors recommend general approaches to each of these and describe the reasons many organizations resist implementing available preventive measures. PMID:24860081

  15. Equipment for Hot-to-serve Foods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    Patented surface heating devices with a much faster air-to-solid heat transfer rate than previous air ovens were developed. The accelerated surface heating can brown, sear or crisp much more rapidly than in conventional ovens so that partially prepared food can be finished quickly and tastefully immediately before serving. The crisp, freshly browned surfaces result from the faster heat transfer which does not dry out the food. The devices are then compared to convection ovens and microwave heating processes.

  16. Use of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen in the production of thermally expanded graphite (Short Communication)

    SciTech Connect

    T.P. Miloshenko; O.Yu. Fetisova; M.L. Shchipko; B.N. Kuznetsov

    2008-06-15

    The applicability of coal tar pitch and petroleum bitumen to the production of thermally expanded graphite was studied. The dependence of the coefficient of thermal expansion and the specific surface area on the amount of added substances was examined.

  17. Multivalency in the recognition and antagonism of a HIV TAR RNA-TAT assembly using an aminoglycoside benzimidazole scaffold.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Ranjan, Nihar; Kellish, Patrick; Gong, Changjun; Watkins, Derrick; Arya, Dev P

    2016-02-01

    Recognition of RNA by high-affinity binding small molecules is crucial for expanding existing approaches in RNA recognition, and for the development of novel RNA binding drugs. A novel neomycin dimer benzimidazole conjugate (DPA 83) was synthesized by conjugating a neomycin-dimer with a benzimidazole alkyne using click chemistry to target multiple binding sites on HIV TAR RNA. Ligand significantly enhances the thermal stability of HIV TAR RNA and interacts stoichiometrically with HIV TAR RNA with a low nanomolar affinity. displayed enhanced binding compared to its individual building blocks including the neomycin dimer azide and benzimidazole alkyne. In essence, a high affinity multivalent ligand was designed and synthesized to target HIV TAR RNA. PMID:26765486

  18. Mineralization of PAH's in a Coal-Tar Impacted Aquifer Sediments and Associated Microbial Community Structure Investigated with FISH

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The microbial community structure and mineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer were investigated spatially using fluorescence in situ hybridization and with laboratory-scale incubations. Microbial populations in the contaminated sediments were thr...

  19. Mineralization Of PAHs In Coal-Tar Impacted Aquifer Sediments And Associated Microbial Community Structure Investigated With FISH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The microbial community structure and mineralization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer were investigated spatially using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and in laboratory-scale incubations of the aquifer sediments. DAPI-detect...

  20. Multivalent binding oligomers inhibit HIV Tat-TAR interaction critical for viral replication.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Wang D; Iera J; Baker H; Hogan P; Ptak R; Yang L; Hartman T; Buckheit RW Jr; Desjardins A; Yang A; Legault P; Yedavalli V; Jeang KT; Appella DH

    2009-12-15

    We describe the development of a new type of scaffold to target RNA structures. Multivalent binding oligomers (MBOs) are molecules in which multiple sidechains extend from a polyamine backbone such that favorable RNA binding occurs. We have used this strategy to develop MBO-based inhibitors to prevent the association of a protein-RNA complex, Tat-TAR, that is essential for HIV replication. In vitro binding assays combined with model cell-based assays demonstrate that the optimal MBOs inhibit Tat-TAR binding at low micromolar concentrations. Antiviral studies are also consistent with the in vitro and cell-based assays. MBOs provide a framework for the development of future RNA-targeting molecules.