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Sample records for targeted nanogel delivery

  1. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  2. Internalized compartments encapsulated nanogels for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Sun, Wujin; Wang, Chao; Ranson, Davis; Ye, Yanqi; Weng, Yuyan; Gu, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The resulting nanogels loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) displayed enhanced internalization efficiency to the source cells through a specific homotypic affinity in vitro. However, when treated with the non-source cells, the EM-NGs exhibited insignificant difference in therapeutic efficiency compared to a bare HA nanogel with DOX. This study illustrates the potential of utilizing an internalized compartments encapsulated formulation for targeted cancer therapy, and offers guidelines for developing a natural particulate-inspired drug delivery system.Drug delivery systems inspired by natural particulates hold great promise for targeted cancer therapy. An endosome formed by internalization of plasma membrane has a massive amount of membrane proteins and receptors on the surface, which is able to specifically target the homotypic cells. Herein, we describe a simple method to fabricate an internalized compartments encapsulated nanogel with endosome membrane components (EM-NG) from source cancer cells. Following intracellular uptake of methacrylated hyaluronic acid (m-HA) adsorbed SiO2/Fe3O4 nanoparticles encapsulating a crosslinker and a photoinitiator, EM-NG was readily prepared through in situ crosslinking initiated under UV irradiation after internalization. The

  3. LHRH-targeted nanogels as delivery system for cisplatin to ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nukolova, Natalia V.; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Zhao, Yi; Chekhonin, Vladimir P.; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery using multifunctional polymeric nanocarriers is a modern approach for cancer therapy. Our purpose was to prepare targeted nanogels for selective delivery of chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor overexpressing tumor in vivo. Building blocks of such delivery systems consisted of innovative soft block copolymer nanogels with ionic cores serving as a reservoir for cisplatin (loading 35%) and a synthetic analog of LHRH conjugated to the nanogels via poly(ethylene glycol) spacer. Covalent attachment of (D-Lys6)-LHRH to nanogels was shown to be possible without loss in either the ligand binding affinity or the nanogel drug incorporation ability. LHRH-nanogel accumulation was specific to the LHRH-receptor positive A2780 ovarian cancer cells and not towards LHRH-receptor negative SKOV-3 cells. The LHRH-nanogel cisplatin formulation was more effective and less toxic than equimolar doses of free cisplatin or untargeted nanogels in the treatment of receptor-positive ovarian cancer xenografts in mice. Collectively, the study indicates that LHRH mediated nanogel-cisplatin delivery is a promising formulation strategy for therapy of tumors that express the LHRH receptor. PMID:23957812

  4. Galactose-functionalized multi-responsive nanogels for hepatoma-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shaofeng; Gao, Shan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Chun; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using a combination of enzymatic transesterification and emulsion copolymerization for intracellular drug delivery. The nanogel exhibited redox, pH and temperature-responsive properties, which can be adjusted by varying the monomer feeding ratio. Furthermore, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the nanogels was close to body temperature and can result in rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed that the P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel showed uniform spherical monodispersion. With pyrene as a probe, the fluorescence excitation spectra demonstrated nanogel degradation in response to glutathione (GSH). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed an amorphous property of DOX within the nanogel, which was used in this study as a model anti-cancer drug. Drug-releasing characteristics of the nanogel were examined in vitro. The results showed multi-responsiveness of DOX release by the variation of environmental pH values, temperature or the availability of GSH, a biological reductase. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed a higher anti-tumor activity of the galactose-functionalized DOX-loaded nanogels against human hepatoma HepG2 cells, which was, at least in part, due to specific binding between the galactose segments and the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs) in hepatic cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometric profiles further confirmed elevated cellular uptake of DOX by the galactose-functionalised nanogels. Thus, we report here a multi-responsive P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel with a hepatoma-specific targeting ability for anti-cancer drug delivery.We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using

  5. Galactose-functionalized multi-responsive nanogels for hepatoma-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lou, Shaofeng; Gao, Shan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Chun; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-02-21

    We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-D-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using a combination of enzymatic transesterification and emulsion copolymerization for intracellular drug delivery. The nanogel exhibited redox, pH and temperature-responsive properties, which can be adjusted by varying the monomer feeding ratio. Furthermore, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the nanogels was close to body temperature and can result in rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed that the P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel showed uniform spherical monodispersion. With pyrene as a probe, the fluorescence excitation spectra demonstrated nanogel degradation in response to glutathione (GSH). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed an amorphous property of DOX within the nanogel, which was used in this study as a model anti-cancer drug. Drug-releasing characteristics of the nanogel were examined in vitro. The results showed multi-responsiveness of DOX release by the variation of environmental pH values, temperature or the availability of GSH, a biological reductase. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed a higher anti-tumor activity of the galactose-functionalized DOX-loaded nanogels against human hepatoma HepG2 cells, which was, at least in part, due to specific binding between the galactose segments and the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs) in hepatic cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometric profiles further confirmed elevated cellular uptake of DOX by the galactose-functionalised nanogels. Thus, we report here a multi-responsive P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel with a hepatoma-specific targeting ability for anti-cancer drug delivery. PMID:25613320

  6. Multifunctional quantum dot-polypeptide hybrid nanogel for targeted imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Yao, Ming-Hao; Wen, Lang; Song, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Bo

    2014-09-01

    A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs can be simultaneously loaded in a QD-polypeptide nanogel. In vitro drug release of drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogels varies strongly with temperature, pH, and competitors. A drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogel with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif exhibited efficient receptor-mediated endocytosis in αvβ3 overexpressing HeLa cells but not in the control MCF-7 cells as analyzed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In contrast, non-targeted QD-polypeptide nanogels revealed minimal binding and uptake in HeLa cells. Compared with the original QDs, the QD-polypeptide nanogels showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity for both HeLa cells and NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the targeted QD-polypeptide nanogel was lower for normal NIH 3T3 cells than that for HeLa cancer cells. These results demonstrate that the integration of imaging and drug delivery functions in a single QD-polypeptide nanogel has the potential for application in cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy.A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron

  7. Multifunctional quantum dot-polypeptide hybrid nanogel for targeted imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yao, Ming-Hao; Wen, Lang; Song, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Bo

    2014-10-01

    A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs can be simultaneously loaded in a QD-polypeptide nanogel. In vitro drug release of drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogels varies strongly with temperature, pH, and competitors. A drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogel with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif exhibited efficient receptor-mediated endocytosis in αvβ3 overexpressing HeLa cells but not in the control MCF-7 cells as analyzed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In contrast, non-targeted QD-polypeptide nanogels revealed minimal binding and uptake in HeLa cells. Compared with the original QDs, the QD-polypeptide nanogels showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity for both HeLa cells and NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the targeted QD-polypeptide nanogel was lower for normal NIH 3T3 cells than that for HeLa cancer cells. These results demonstrate that the integration of imaging and drug delivery functions in a single QD-polypeptide nanogel has the potential for application in cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. PMID:25130175

  8. Near-infrared light-responsive core-shell nanogels for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-06-28

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA cross-linked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR-based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer-functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution. PMID:21542633

  9. Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Core-Shell Nanogels for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Huaizhi; Trondoli, Anna Carolina; Zhu, Guizhi; Chen, Yan; Chang, Ya-Jen; Liu, Haipeng; Huang, Yu-Fen; Zhang, Xiaoling; Tan, Weihong

    2011-01-01

    A near-infrared light-responsive drug delivery platform based on Au-Ag-nanorods (Au-Ag NRs) coated with DNA-crosslinked polymeric shells was constructed. DNA complementarity has been applied to develop a polyacrylamide-based sol-gel transition system to encapsulate anticancer drugs into the gel scaffold. The Au-Ag NR based nanogels can also be readily functionalized with targeting moieties, such as aptamers, for specific recognition of tumor cells. When exposed to NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the Au-Ag NRs leads to a rapid rise in the temperature of the surrounding gel, resulting in the fast release of the encapsulated payload with high controllability. In vitro study confirmed that aptamer functionalized nanogels can be used as drug carriers feasible for targeted drug delivery with remote control capability by NIR light with high spatial/temporal resolution. PMID:21542633

  10. iRGD-coupled responsive fluorescent nanogel for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Su, Shishuai; Wang, Hai; Liu, Xiaoguang; Wu, Yan; Nie, Guangjun

    2013-04-01

    In this investigation, we have designed and synthesized a multifunctional nanogel for anti-tumor drug delivery. Thermo- and pH-responsive poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) nanogels (NGs) were synthesized by free radical precipitation polymerization. Positive charged chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin (DOX) was introduced into the negatively charged swollen NGs by electrostatic adsorption at pH 7.4. Fluorescent bovine serum albumin (BSA) encapsulated gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) were conjugated onto the surface of NGs, followed by functionalization of tumor targeting peptide iRGD onto the BSA for tumor targeting. Interestingly, the DOX-encapsulated iRGD-decorated NGs maintain both thermo- and pH-responsive properties, which are favorable for achieving a controlled drug release in tumor tissues. Stable red fluorescent emission, derived from AuNCs, was used to detect and track the NGs in vitro. As expected, the iRGD motif mediated specific targeting to tumor and endothelial cells and enhanced cellular uptake of the NGs, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy assays. In vitro cytotoxicity studies proved that the presence of iRGD enhanced the cytotoxic efficiency of DOX to the targeted cells. All together, our current study indicates that the NGs drug-carriers can deliver chemotherapeutic drug specifically to the tumor and endothelial cells with enhanced anti-tumor efficacy and controlled drug release. PMID:23410678

  11. Triple-responsive Expansile Nanogel for Tumor and Mitochondria Targeted Photosensitizer Delivery

    PubMed Central

    He, Huacheng; Cattran, Alexander W.; Nguyen, Tu; Nieminen, Anna-Liisa

    2014-01-01

    A pH, thermal, and redox potential triple-responsive expansile nanogel system (TRN), which swells at acidic pH, temperature higher than its transition temperature, and reducing environment, has been developed. TRN quickly expands from 108 nm to over 1200 nm (in diameter), achieving more than 1000-fold size enlargement (in volume), within 2 h in a reducing environment at body temperature. Sigma-2 receptor targeting-ligand functionalized TRN can effectively target head and neck tumor, and help Pc 4 targeting mitochondria inside cancer cells to achieve enhanced photodynamic therapy efficacy. PMID:25154666

  12. Pravastatin chitosan nanogels-loaded erythrocytes as a new delivery strategy for targeting liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I.; Badran, Mohamed M.; AlQahtani, Saeed A.; Alanazi, Fars K.; Attia, Sabry M.

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan nanogels (CNG) are developed as one of the most promising carriers for cancer targeting. However, these carriers are rapidly eliminated from circulation by reticuloendothelial system (RES), which limits their application. Therefore, erythrocytes (ER) loaded CNG as multifunctional carrier may overcome the massive elimination of nanocarriers by RES. In this study, erythrocytes loaded pravastatin–chitosan nanogels (PR–CNG–ER) were utilized as a novel drug carrier to target liver cancer. Thus, PR–CNG formula was developed in nanosize, with good entrapment efficiency, drug loading and sustained release over 48 h. Then, PR–CNG loaded into ER were prepared by hypotonic preswelling technique. The resulting PR–CNG–ER showed 36.85% of entrapment efficiency, 66.82% of cell recovery and release consistent to that of hemoglobin over 48 h. Moreover, PR–CNG–ER exhibited negative zeta potential, increasing of hemolysis percent, marked phosphatidylserine exposure and stomatocytes shape compared to control unloaded erythrocytes. PR–CNG–ER reduced cells viability of HepG2 cells line by 28% compared to unloaded erythrocytes (UER). These results concluded that PR–CNG–ER are promising drug carriers to target liver cancer. PMID:26903771

  13. Pravastatin chitosan nanogels-loaded erythrocytes as a new delivery strategy for targeting liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Badran, Mohamed M; AlQahtani, Saeed A; Alanazi, Fars K; Attia, Sabry M

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan nanogels (CNG) are developed as one of the most promising carriers for cancer targeting. However, these carriers are rapidly eliminated from circulation by reticuloendothelial system (RES), which limits their application. Therefore, erythrocytes (ER) loaded CNG as multifunctional carrier may overcome the massive elimination of nanocarriers by RES. In this study, erythrocytes loaded pravastatin-chitosan nanogels (PR-CNG-ER) were utilized as a novel drug carrier to target liver cancer. Thus, PR-CNG formula was developed in nanosize, with good entrapment efficiency, drug loading and sustained release over 48 h. Then, PR-CNG loaded into ER were prepared by hypotonic preswelling technique. The resulting PR-CNG-ER showed 36.85% of entrapment efficiency, 66.82% of cell recovery and release consistent to that of hemoglobin over 48 h. Moreover, PR-CNG-ER exhibited negative zeta potential, increasing of hemolysis percent, marked phosphatidylserine exposure and stomatocytes shape compared to control unloaded erythrocytes. PR-CNG-ER reduced cells viability of HepG2 cells line by 28% compared to unloaded erythrocytes (UER). These results concluded that PR-CNG-ER are promising drug carriers to target liver cancer. PMID:26903771

  14. Target-specific intracellular delivery of siRNA using degradable hyaluronic acid nanogels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyukjin; Mok, Hyejung; Lee, Soohyeon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2007-06-01

    Novel hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels physically encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA) were fabricated by an inverse water-in-oil emulsion method. Thiol-conjugated HA dissolved in aqueous emulsion droplets was ultrasonically crosslinked via the formation of disulfide linkages to produce HA nanogels with a size distribution from 200 to 500 nm. Green fluorescence protein (GFP) siRNA was physically entrapped within the HA nanogels during the emulsion/crosslinking process. The HA/siRNA nanogels were readily taken up by HA receptor positive cells (HCT-116 cells) having HA-specific CD44 receptors on the surface. Release rates of siRNA from the HA nanogels could be modulated by changing the concentration of glutathione (GSH) in the buffer solution, indicating that the degradation/erosion of disulfide crosslinked HA nanogels, triggered by an intracellular reductive agent, controlled the release pattern of siRNA. When HA nanogels containing GFP siRNA were co-transfected with GFP plasmid/Lipofectamine to HCT-116 cells, a significant extent of GFP gene silencing was observed in both serum and non-serum conditions. The gene silencing effect was reduced in the presence of free HA in the transfection medium, revealing that HA nanogels were selectively taken up by HCT-116 cells via receptor mediated endocytosis. PMID:17408798

  15. Polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Ventura, Judy; Zhuang, Jiaming; Thayumanavan, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we put the spotlight on crosslinked polymer nanogels, a promising platform that has the characteristics of an “ideal” drug delivery vehicle. Some of the key aspects of drug delivery vehicle design like stability, response to biologically relevant stimuli, passive targeting, active targeting, toxicity and ease of synthesis are discussed. We discuss several delivery systems in this light and highlight some examples of systems, which satisfy some or all of these design requirements. In particular, we point to the advantages that crosslinked polymeric systems bring to drug delivery. We review some of the synthetic methods of nanogel synthesis and conclude with the diverse applications in drug delivery where nanogels have been fruitfully employed. PMID:22342438

  16. Dual responsive nanogels for intracellular doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Hamed; Khoee, Sepideh

    2016-09-10

    Nanosized polymeric delivery systems that encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific intracellular stimulus are of promising interest for cancer therapy. Here, we demonstrated a simple and fast synthetic protocol of redox-responsive nanogels with high drug encapsulation efficiency and stability. The prepared nanogels displayed narrow size distributions and versatility of surface modification. The polymer precursor of these nanogels is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. The nanogels were prepared through a lock-in strategy in aqueous media via self cross-linking of PDS groups. By changing polymer concentration, we could control the size of nanogels in range of 80-115nm. The formed nanogels presented high doxorubicin (DOX) encapsulation efficiency (70% (w/w)) and displayed pH and redox-controlled drug release triggered by conditions mimicking the reducible intracellular environment. The nanogels displayed an excellent cytocompatibility and were effectively endocytosed by A2780CP ovarian cancer cells, which make them promising nanomaterials for the efficient intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:27444549

  17. Redox-Sensitive and Intrinsically Fluorescent Photoclick Hyaluronic Acid Nanogels for Traceable and Targeted Delivery of Cytochrome c to Breast Tumor in Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Zhang, Jian; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Yu, Lin; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2016-08-24

    In spite of their high specificity and potency, few protein therapeutics are applied in clinical cancer therapy owing to a lack of safe and efficacious delivery systems. Here, we report that redox-sensitive and intrinsically fluorescent photoclick hyaluronic acid nanogels (HA-NGs) show highly efficient loading and breast tumor-targeted delivery of cytochrome c (CC). HA-NGs were obtained from hyaluronic acid-graft-oligo(ethylene glycol)-tetrazole (HA-OEG-Tet) via inverse nanoprecipitation and catalyst-free photoclick cross-linking with l-cystine dimethacrylamide (MA-Cys-MA). HA-NGs exhibited a superb CC loading content of up to 40.6 wt %, intrinsic fluorescence (λem = 510 nm), and a small size of ca. 170 nm. Notably, CC-loaded nanogels (CC-NGs) showed a fast glutathione-responsive protein release behavior. Importantly, released CC maintained its bioactivity. MTT assays revealed that CC-NGs were highly potent with a low IC50 of 3.07 μM to CD44+ MCF-7 human breast tumor cells. Confocal microscopy observed efficient and selective internalization of fluorescent HA-NGs into MCF-7 cells. Interestingly, HA-NGs exhibited also effective breast tumor penetration. The therapeutic results demonstrated that CC-NGs effectively inhibited the growth of MCF-7 breast tumor xenografts at a particularly low dose of 80 or 160 nmol CC equiv./kg. Moreover, CC-NGs did not cause any change in mice body weight, corroborating their low systemic side effects. Redox-sensitive and intrinsically fluorescent photoclick hyaluronic acid nanogels have appeared as a "smart" protein delivery nanoplatform enabling safe, efficacious, traceable, and targeted cancer protein therapy in vivo. PMID:27509045

  18. New progress and prospects: The application of nanogel in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Yingjie; Wang, Juan; Zhai, Guangxi

    2016-03-01

    Nanogel has attracted considerable attention as one of the most versatile drug delivery systems especially for site-specific and/or time-controlled delivery of bioactive agents owing to their combining features of hydrogel and nanoparticle. Physically synthesized nanogels can offer a platform to encapsulate various types of bioactive compounds, particularly hydrophobic drugs and biomacromolecules, but they have poor mechanical stability, whereas nanogels prepared by chemical cross-link have a wider application and larger flexibility. As an ideal drug-delivery carrier, nanogel has excellent drug loading capacity, high stability, biologic consistence and response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli. Nowadays, targeting and response especially multi-response of the nanogel system for drug delivery have become an issue in research. And the application study of nanogels mainly focuses on antitumor agents and proteins. This review focuses on the formation of nanogels (physical and chemical cross-linking) and their release behavior. Recent application of nanogels is also discussed. PMID:26706564

  19. Surface-Modified P(HEMA-co-MAA) Nanogel Carriers for Oral Vaccine Delivery: Design, Characterization, and In Vitro Targeting Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Durán-Lobato, Matilde; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Khairandish, Yasmine; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Oral drug delivery is a route of choice for vaccine administration because of its noninvasive nature and thus efforts have focused on efficient delivery of vaccine antigens to mucosal sites. An effective oral vaccine delivery system must protect the antigen from degradation upon mucosal delivery, penetrate mucosal barriers, and control the release of the antigen and costimulatory and immunomodulatory agents to specific immune cells (i.e., APCs). In this paper, mannan-modified pH-responsive P(HEMA-co-MAA) nanogels were synthesized and assessed as carriers for oral vaccination. The nanogels showed pH-sensitive properties, entrapping and protecting the loaded cargo at low pH values, and triggered protein release after switching to intestinal pH values. Surface decoration with mannan as carbohydrate moieties resulted in enhanced internalization by macrophages as well as increasing the expression of relevant costimulatory molecules. These findings indicate that mannan-modified P(HEMA-co-MAA) nanogels are a promising approach to a more efficacious oral vaccination regimen. PMID:24955658

  20. Poly(ethylene glycol)-co-methacrylamide-co-acrylic acid based nanogels for delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Parveen; Behl, Gautam; Sikka, Manisha; Chhikara, Aruna; Chopra, Madhu

    2016-10-01

    Polymeric nanogels have been widely explored for their potential application as delivery carriers for cancer therapeutics. The ability of nanogels to encapsulate therapeutics by simple diffusion mechanism and the ease of their fabrication to impart target specificity in addition to their ability to get internalized into target cells make them good candidates for drug delivery. The present study aims to investigate the applicability of poly(ethylene glycol)-co-methacrylamide-co-acrylic acid (PMA)-based nanogels as a viable option for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX). The nanogels were synthesized by free radical polymerization in an inverse mini-emulsion and characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. DOX was physically incorporated into the nanogels (PMA-DOX) and the mechanism of its in vitro release was studied. TEM experiment revealed spherical morphology of nanogels and the hydrodynamic diameter of the neat nanogels was in the range of 160 ± 46.95 nm. The size of the nanogels increased from 235.1 ± 28.46 to 403.7 ± 89.89 nm with the increase in drug loading capacity from 4.68 ± 0.03 to 13.71 ± 0.01%. The sustained release of DOX was observed upto 80 h and the release rate decreased with increased loading capacity following anomalous release mechanism as indicated by the value of diffusion exponent (n = 0.64-0.75) obtained from Korsmeyer-Peppas equation. Further, cytotoxicity evaluation of PMA-DOX nanogels on HeLa cells resulted in relatively higher efficacy (IC50~5.88 μg/mL) as compared to free DOX (IC50~7.24 μg/mL) thus demonstrating that the preparation is potentially a promising drug delivery carrier. PMID:27383582

  1. Click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels: emerging platforms for drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanjiao; Chen, Jing; Deng, Chao; Suuronen, Erik J; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2014-06-01

    Hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have emerged as versatile and viable platforms for sustained protein release, targeted drug delivery, and tissue engineering due to excellent biocompatibility, a microporous structure with tunable porosity and pore size, and dimensions spanning from human organs, cells to viruses. In the past decade, remarkable advances in hydrogels, microgels and nanogels have been achieved with click chemistry. It is a most promising strategy to prepare gels with varying dimensions owing to its high reactivity, superb selectivity, and mild reaction conditions. In particular, the recent development of copper-free click chemistry such as strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition, radical mediated thiol-ene chemistry, Diels-Alder reaction, tetrazole-alkene photo-click chemistry, and oxime reaction renders it possible to form hydrogels, microgels and nanogels without the use of potentially toxic catalysts or immunogenic enzymes that are commonly required. Notably, unlike other chemical approaches, click chemistry owing to its unique bioorthogonal feature does not interfere with encapsulated bioactives such as living cells, proteins and drugs and furthermore allows versatile preparation of micropatterned biomimetic hydrogels, functional microgels and nanogels. In this review, recent exciting developments in click hydrogels, microgels and nanogels, as well as their biomedical applications such as controlled protein and drug release, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine are presented and discussed. PMID:24674460

  2. Polymeric nanogel formulations of nucleoside analogs

    PubMed Central

    Vinogradov, Serguei V

    2008-01-01

    Nanogels are colloidal microgel carriers that have been introduced recently as a prospective drug delivery system for nucleotide therapeutics. The crosslinked protonated polymer network of nanogels binds oppositely charged drug molecules, encapsulating them into submicron particles with a core-shell structure. The nanogel network also provides a suitable template for chemical engineering, surface modification and vectorisation. This review reveals recent attempts to develop novel drug formulations of nanogels with antiviral and antiproliferative nucleoside analogs in the active form of 5′-triphosphates; discusses structural approaches to the optimisation of nanogel properties, and; discusses the development of targeted nanogel drug formulations for systemic administration. Notably, nanogels can improve the CNS penetration of nucleoside analogs that are otherwise restricted from passing across the blood–brain barrier. The latest findings reviewed here demonstrate an efficient intracellular release of nucleoside analogs, encouraging further applications of nanogel carriers for targeted drug delivery. PMID:17184158

  3. Effects of different polysaccharides on the formation of egg yolk LDL complex nanogels for nutrient delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mingyong; Hu, Qiaobin; Wang, Taoran; Xue, Jingyi; Luo, Yangchao

    2016-11-20

    Five polysaccharides, pectin, carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC), gum arabic, carrageenan and alginate, were studied to form complex nanogels with egg yolk low density lipoprotein (LDL). All nanogels were smaller than 85nm with high negative zeta potential, while LDL/carrageenan and LDL/alginate nanogels exhibited more heterogeneous size distribution. Fourier transform infrared spectrum suggested that hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions were involved to form nanogels. Overall, significant expansion of nanogels was observed after encapsulation of curcumin, being studied as a model lipophilic nutrient. Fluorescence spectra evidenced that LDL provided non-polar microenvironment for curcumin and polysaccharides played an important role in the encapsulation process. All nanogels showed sustained release of curcumin under simulated gastrointestinal conditions. Furthermore, nanoscale, smooth and spherical ultrafine dry powders of nanogels were obtained by innovative nano spray drying technology. Our study indicated that LDL/polysaccharides may serve as potential oral delivery systems for lipophilic nutrients. PMID:27561504

  4. Multifunctional hybrid nanogels for theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Martin, B; Fernandez-Barbero, A

    2015-11-14

    This paper reviews a wide set of theranostic applications based on the special properties associated with composite nanogels. The nanogels presented here are mostly hybridized with quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles, and plasmonic metal noble nanoparticles. These inorganic components confer nanogels multifunctional properties that extend their applications from drug delivery systems to diagnosis and therapy. Nanogels can also be surface functionalized with specific ligands to achieve targeted therapy and reduce toxicity. This versatility makes hybrid nanogels very promising agents for imaging, diagnosis and treatment of cancer and other diseases. PMID:26371991

  5. Preparation and evaluation of chitosan-based nanogels/gels for oral delivery of myricetin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yashu; Xia, Mengxin; Wang, Huizhen; Li, Guowen; Shen, Hongyi; Ji, Guang; Meng, Qianchao; Xie, Yan

    2016-08-25

    A novel nanogel/gel based on chitosan (CS) for the oral delivery of myricetin (Myr) was developed and evaluated comprehensively. The particle size of the obtained Myr-loaded CS/β-glycerol phosphate (β-GP) nanogels was in the range of 100-300nm. The rheological tests showed that the sol-gel transition happened when the nanogels were exposed to physiological temperatures, and 3D network structures of the gelatinized nanogels (gels) were confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Myr was released from CS/β-GP nanogel/gel in acidic buffers via a Fickian mechanism, and this release was simultaneously accompanied by swelling and erosion. Moreover, the nanogel/gel exhibited no cytotoxicity by MTT assay, and the oral bioavailability of Myr in rats was improved with an accelerated absorption rate after Myr was loaded into CS/β-GP nanogel/gel. In summary, all of the above showed that CS/β-GP nanogel/gel was an excellent system for orally delivering Myr. PMID:27328876

  6. Microfluidic Directed Synthesis of Alginate Nanogels with Tunable Pore Size for Efficient Protein Delivery.

    PubMed

    Bazban-Shotorbani, Salime; Dashtimoghadam, Erfan; Karkhaneh, Akbar; Hasani-Sadrabadi, Mohammad Mahdi; Jacob, Karl I

    2016-05-17

    Alginate is a biopolymer with favorable pH-sensitive properties for oral delivery of peptides and proteins. However, conventional alginate nanogels have limitations such as low encapsulation efficiency because of drug leaching during bead preparation and burst release in high pH values. These shortcomings originate from large pore size of the nanogels. In this work, we proposed an on-chip hydrodynamic flow focusing approach for synthesis of alginate nanogels with adjustable pore size to achieve fine-tunable release profile of the encapsulated bioactive agents. It is demonstrated that the microstructure of nanogels can be controlled through adjusting flow ratio and mixing time directed on microfluidic platforms consisting of cross-junction microchannels. In this study, the average pore size of alginate nanogels (i.e., average molecular weight between cross-links, Mc) was related to synthesis parameters. Mc was calculated from equations based on equilibrium swelling theory and proposed methods to modify the theory for pH-sensitive nanogels. In the equations we derived, size and compactness of nanogels are key factors, which can be adjusted by controlling the flow ratio. It was found that increase in flow ratio increases the size of nanogels and decreases their compactness. The size of on-chip generated nanogels for flow ratio of 0.02-0.2 was measured to be in the range of 68-138 nm. Moreover, a method based on the Mie theory was implemented to estimate the aggregation number (Nagg) of polymer chains inside the nanogels as an indicator of compactness. According to the size and compactness results along with equations of modified swelling theory, Mc obtained to be in the range of 0.5-0.8 kDa. The proposed method could be considered as a promising approach for efficient polypeptides encapsulation and their sustained release. PMID:26938744

  7. Bio-derived poly(gamma-glutamic acid) nanogels as controlled anticancer drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hee Ho; Cho, Mi Young; Hong, Ji Hyeon; Poo, Haryoung; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lim, Yong Taik

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a novel type of polymer nanogel loaded with anticancer drug based on bio-derived poly(gamma- glutamic acid) (gamma-PGA). gamma-PGA is a highly anionic polymer that is synthesized naturally by microbial species, most prominently in various bacilli, and has been shown to have excellent biocompatibility. Thiolated gamma-PGA was synthesized by covalent coupling between the carboxyl groups of gamma-PGA and the primary amine group of cysteamine. Doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated using the following steps: (1) an ionic nanocomplex was formed between thiolated gamma-PGA as the negative charge component, and Dox as the positive charge component; (2) addition of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) induced hydrogen-bond interactions between thiol groups of thiolated gamma-PGA and hydroxyl groups of PEG, resulting in the nanocomplex; and (3) disulfide crosslinked gamma-PGA nanogels were fabricated by ultrasonication. The average size and surface charge of Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels in aqueous solution were 136.3 +/- 37.6 nm and -32.5 +/- 5.3 mV, respectively. The loading amount of Dox was approximately 38.7 microgram per mg of gamma-PGA nanogel. The Dox-loaded disulfide cross-linked gamma-PGA nanogels showed controlled drug release behavior in the presence of reducing agents, glutathione (GSH) (1- 10 mM). Through fluorescence microscopy and FACS, the cellular uptake of gamma-PGA nanogels into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) was analyzed. The cytotoxic effect was evaluated using the MTT assay and was determined to be dependent on both the concentration and treatment time of gamma-PGA nanogels. The bio-derived gamma-PGA nanogels are expected to be a well-designed delivery carrier for controlled drug delivery applications. PMID:23221543

  8. Naphthalene-hydrophobized β-1,3-glucan nanogel for doxorubicin delivery to immunocytes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kazuya; Mochizuki, Shinichi; Sanada, Yusuke; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2014-04-15

    A water soluble β-1,3-glucan schizophyllan (SPG) can be recognized by an immunocyte receptor called dectin-1. When we introduced naphthalene into the side chain of SPG (nSPG), it formed nanogel by physical cross-link and gained capability to ingest hydrophobic compounds such as doxorubicin. Our in vitro assay revealed that this nanogel can be used as specific delivery of anti-cancer drugs to immunocytes. PMID:24684841

  9. Nanogels as potential nanomedicine carrier for treatment of cancer: A mini review of the state of the art

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Govind; Yadav, Khushwant S.

    2014-01-01

    Nanogels are being explored as drug delivery agents for targeting cancer due to their easy tailoring properties and ability to efficiently encapsulate therapeutics of diverse nature through simple mechanisms. Nanogels are proficiently internalized by the target cells, avoid accumulating in nontarget tissues thereby lower the therapeutic dosage and minimize harmful side effects. However, there is an urgent need for relevant clinical data from nanogels so as to allow translation of the nanogel concept into a viable therapeutic application for the treatment of cancer. This review highlights some of the recent progress in nanogels as a carrier in the field of nanomedicine for the treatment of cancer. The present review critically analyzes the use of extracellular pH targeting for nanogels, siRNA delivery, PEGylated nanogels, multi-responsive nanogels and intracellular delivery of nanogels for improved therapy of cancer. PMID:27013905

  10. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel (`nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination.

  11. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel ('nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination. PMID:20562880

  12. Amphiphilic cationic nanogels as brain-targeted carriers for activated nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Warren, G; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Senanayake, T; Rivera, K; Gorantla, S; Poluektova, LY; Vinogradov, SV

    2015-01-01

    Progress in AIDS treatment shifted emphasis towards limiting adverse effects of antiviral drugs while improving the treatment of hard-to-reach viral reservoirs. Many therapeutic nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) have a limited access to the central nervous system (CNS). Increased NRTI levels induced various complications during the therapy, including neurotoxicity, due to the NRTI toxicity to mitochondria. Here, we describe an innovative design of biodegradable cationic cholesterol-ε-polylysine nanogel carriers for delivery of triphosphorylated NRTIs that demonstrated high anti-HIV activity along with low neurotoxicity, warranting minimal side effects following systemic administration. Efficient CNS targeting was achieved by nanogel modification with brain-specific peptide vectors. Novel dual and triple-drug nanoformulations, analogous to therapeutic NRTI cocktails, displayed equal or higher antiviral activity in HIV-infected macrophages compared to free drugs. Our results suggest potential alternative approach to HIV-1 treatment focused on the effective nanodrug delivery to viral reservoirs in the CNS and reduced neurotoxicity. PMID:25559020

  13. Modular ‘Click-in-Emulsion’ Bone-Targeted Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Heller, Daniel A.; Levi, Yair; Pelet, Jeisa M.; Doloff, Joshua C.; Wallas, Jasmine; Pratt, George W.; Jiang, Shan; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Schroeder, Josh E.; Chyan, Yieu; Zurenko, Christopher; Querbes, William; Manzano, Miguel; Kohane, Daniel S.; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2013-01-01

    A new class of nanogel demonstrates modular biodistribution and affinity for bone. Nanogels, 67 nm in diameter and synthesized via an astoichiometric click-chemistry-inemulsion method, controllably display residual, free click-able functional groups. Functionalization with a bisphosphonate ligand results in significant binding to bone on the inner walls of marrow cavities, liver avoidance, and anti-osteoporotic effects. PMID:23280931

  14. Polysaccharide based nanogels in the drug delivery system: Application as the carrier of pharmaceutical agents.

    PubMed

    Debele, Tilahun Ayane; Mekuria, Shewaye Lakew; Tsai, Hsieh-Chih

    2016-11-01

    Polysaccharide-based nanoparticles have fascinated attention as a vesicle of different pharmaceutical agents due to their unique multi-functional groups in addition to their physicochemical properties, including biocompatibility and biodegradability. The existence of multi-functional groups on the polysaccharide backbone permits facile chemical or biochemical modification to synthesize polysaccharide based nanoparticles with miscellaneous structures. Polysaccharide-based nanogels have high water content, large surface area for multivalent bioconjugation, tunable size, and interior network for the incorporation of different pharmaceutical agents. These unique properties offer great potential for the utilization of polysaccharide-based nanogels in the drug delivery systems. Hence, this review describes chemistry of certain common polysaccharides, several methodologies used to synthesize polysaccharide nanoparticles and primarily focused on the polysaccharide (or polysaccharide derivative) based nanogels as the carrier of pharmaceutical agents. PMID:27524098

  15. Polypeptide nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores: Synthesis, characterization and implications for anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Oh; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Desale, Swapnil; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanogels have gained considerable attention as a potential platform for drug delivery applications. Here we describe the design and synthesis of novel polypeptide-based nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores. Diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-glutamic acid), hydrophobically modified with L-phenylalanine methyl ester moieties was used for controlled template synthesis of nanogels with small size (ca. 70 nm in diameter) and narrow particle size distribution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies using coumarin C153 indicated the existence of hydrophobic domains in the ionic cores of the nanogels. Stable doxorubicin-loaded nanogels were prepared at high drug capacity (30 w/w%). We show that nanogels are enzymatically-degradable leading to accelerated drug release under simulated lysosomal acidic pH. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nanogel-based formulation of doxorubicin is well tolerated and exhibit an improved antitumor activity compared to a free doxorubicin in an ovarian tumor xenograft mouse model. Our results signify the point to a potential of these biodegradable nanogels as attractive carriers for delivery of chemotherapeutics. PMID:23998716

  16. Self-Assembled Modified Soy Protein/Dextran Nanogel Induced by Ultrasonication as a Delivery Vehicle for Riboflavin.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bei; Zhou, Xiaosong; Li, Xiangzhong; Lin, Weiqin; Chen, Guangbin; Qiu, Riji

    2016-01-01

    A simple and green approach was developed to produce a novel nanogel via self-assembly of modified soy protein and dextran, to efficiently deliver riboflavin. First, modified soy protein was prepared by heating denaturation at 60 °C for 30 min or Alcalase hydrolysis for 40 min. Second, modified soy protein was mixed with dextran and ultrasonicated for 70 min so as to assemble nanogels. The modified soy protein-dextran nanogels were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ζ-potential studies to confirm the formation of NGs. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the NGs to be spherical with core-shell structures, in the range of 32-40 nm size. The nanogels were stable against various environmental conditions. Furthermore, the particle size of the nanogels hardly changed with the incorporation of riboflavin. The encapsulation efficiency of nanogels was found to be up to 65.9% at a riboflavin concentration of 250 μg/mL. The nanogels exhibited a faster release in simulated intestine fluid (SIF) compared with simulated gastric fluid (SGF). From the results obtained it can be concluded that modified soy protein-dextran nanogels can be considered a promising carrier for drugs and other bioactive molecule delivery purposes. PMID:26999081

  17. An Enzyme-Responsive Nanogel Carrier Based on PAMAM Dendrimers for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Luo, Yiyang; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Zhijian; Xu, Zejun; Jia, Xinru

    2016-08-10

    G4 PAMAM dendrimer molecules were modified via covalently conjugating RGDC, RAADyC, and PEG chains on the periphery (Mac-1), by which a nanogel drug carrier with enzyme-sensitivity (NG-1) was constructed through an oxidation reaction by using NaIO4 to initiate the chemical cross-link of the functional groups on the periphery of dendrimers. Mac-1 and NG-1 both had a spherelike shape with a relatively uniform size of 20 nm for Mac-1 and 50 nm for NG-1 as evidenced by TEM, SEM, and DLS measurements. NG-1 showed much higher drug loading capacity as compared with that of Mac-1 although the cavities in the dendritic structure were used to encapsulate drug molecules as reported in many literatures. In addition, the size of NG-1 with embedded doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) decreased significantly to 15 nm in the presence of elastase, which indicated the decomposition of the nanogel triggered by enzyme, leading to drug release in a sustained manner in vitro. The NG-1 carrier was noncytotoxic and biocompatible, and it achieved the same cytotoxicity as free DOX when the drug molecules were loaded inside. From confocal images, the penetrative process of DOX from nanogel could be clearly observed in 8 h. Such a dendrimer-based nanogel may be a potential nanocarrier for drug delivery in cancer therapy. PMID:27420576

  18. Delivery of LLKKK18 loaded into self-assembling hyaluronic acid nanogel for tuberculosis treatment.

    PubMed

    Silva, João P; Gonçalves, Carine; Costa, César; Sousa, Jeremy; Silva-Gomes, Rita; Castro, António G; Pedrosa, Jorge; Appelberg, Rui; Gama, F Miguel

    2016-08-10

    Tuberculosis (TB), a disease caused by the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, recently joined HIV/AIDS on the top rank of deadliest infectious diseases. Low patient compliance due to the expensive, long-lasting and multi-drug standard therapies often results in treatment failure and emergence of multi-drug resistant strains. In this scope, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) arise as promising candidates for TB treatment. Here we describe the ability of the exogenous AMP LLKKK18 to efficiently kill mycobacteria. The peptide's potential was boosted by loading into self-assembling Hyaluronic Acid (HA) nanogels. These provide increased stability, reduced cytotoxicity and degradability, while potentiating peptide targeting to main sites of infection. The nanogels were effectively internalized by macrophages and the peptide presence and co-localization with mycobacteria within host cells was confirmed. This resulted in a significant reduction of the mycobacterial load in macrophages infected in vitro with the opportunistic M. avium or the pathogenic M. tuberculosis, an effect accompanied by lowered pro-inflammatory cytokine levels (IL-6 and TNF-α). Remarkably, intra-tracheal administration of peptide-loaded nanogels significantly reduced infection levels in mice infected with M. avium or M. tuberculosis, after just 5 or 10 every other day administrations. Considering the reported low probability of resistance acquisition, these findings suggest a great potential of LLKKK18-loaded nanogels for TB therapeutics. PMID:27261333

  19. Stimulus responsive nanogel with innate near IR fluorescent capability for drug delivery and bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, Vineeth M; Shenoy, Sachin J; Victor, Sunita P; Muthu, Jayabalan

    2016-10-01

    A brighter, non toxic and biocompatible optical imaging agent is one of the major quests of biomedical research. Here in, we report a photoluminescent comacromer [PEG-poly(propylene fumarate)-citric acid-glycine] and novel stimulus (pH) responsive nanogel endowed with excitation wavelength dependent fluorescence (EDF) for combined drug delivery and bioimaging applications. The comacromer when excited at different wavelengths in visible region from 400nm to 640nm exhibits fluorescent emissions from 510nm to 718nm in aqueous condition. It has high Stokes shift (120nm), fluorescent lifetime (7 nanoseconds) and quantum yield (50%). The nanogel, C-PLM-NG, prepared with this photoluminescent comacromer and N,N-dimethyl amino ethylmethacrylate (DMEMA) has spherical morphology with particle size around 100nm and 180nm at pH 7.4 (physiological) and 5.5 (intracellular acidic condition of cancer cells) respectively. The studies on fluorescence characteristics of C-PLM NG in aqueous condition reveal large red-shift with emissions from 523nm to 700nm for excitations from 460nm to 600nm ascertaining the EDF characteristics. Imaging the near IR emission with excitation at 535nm was accomplished using cut-off filters. The nanogel undergoes pH responsive swelling and releases around 50% doxorubicin (DOX) at pH 5.5 in comparison with 15% observed at pH 7.4. The studies on in vitro cytotoxicity with MTT assay and hemolysis revealed that the present nanogel is non-toxic. The DOX-loaded C-PLM-NG encapsulated in Hela cells induces lysis of cancer cells. The inherent EDF characteristics associated with C-PLM NG enable cellular imaging of Hela cells. The studies on biodistribution and clearance mechanism of C-PLM-NG from the body of mice reveal bioimaging capability and safety of the present nanogel. This is the first report on a polymeric nanogel with innate near IR emissions for bioimaging applications. PMID:27262258

  20. Multi Drug Loaded Thermo-Responsive Fibrinogen-graft-Poly(N-vinyl Caprolactam) Nanogels for Breast Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Rejinold, N Sanoj; Baby, Thejus; Chennazhi, K P; Jayakumar, R

    2015-03-01

    This study aims at the targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and Megestrol acetate (Meg) loaded fibrinogen-graft-poly(N-Vinyl caprolactam) nanogels (5-FU/Meg-fib-graft-PNVCL NGs) toward α5β1-integrins receptors expressed on breast cancer cells to have enhanced anti-cancer effect in vitro. To achieve this aim, we developed biocompatible thermoresponsive fib-graft-PNVCL NGs using fibrinogen and carboxyl terminated PNVCL via EDC/NHS amidation reaction. The Lower Critical Solution Temperature (LCST) of fib-graft-PNVCL could be tuned according to PNVCL/fibrinogen compositions. The 100-120 nm sized nanogels of fib-graft-PNVCL (LCST = 35 ?1 'C) was prepared using CaCl2 cross-linker. The 5-FU/Meg-fib-graft-PNVCL NGs showed a particle size of 150-170 nm size. The drug loading efficiency with 5-FU was 62% while Meg showed 74%. The 5-FU and Meg release was prominent above LCST than below LCST. The multi drug loaded fib-graft-PNVCL NGs showed enhanced toxicity, apoptosis and uptake by breast cancer (MCF-7) cells compared to their individual doses above their LCST. The in vivo assessment in Swiss albino mice showed sustained release of Meg and 5-FU as early as 3 days, confirming the therapeutic efficiency of the formulation. These results demonstrate an enhanced platform for the future animal studies on breast tumor xenograft model. PMID:26307823

  1. Skin permeating nanogel for the cutaneous co-delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit P; Desai, Pinaki R; Patel, Apurva R; Singh, Mandip S

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective drug delivery system for the simultaneous topical delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs, spantide II (SP) and ketoprofen (KP). To achieve this primary goal, we have developed a skin permeating nanogel system (SPN) containing surface modified polymeric bilayered nanoparticles along with a gelling agent. Poly-(lactide-co-glycolic acid) and chitosan were used to prepare bilayered nanoparticles (NPS) and the surface was modified with oleic acid (NPSO). Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and Carbopol with the desired viscosity were utilized to prepare the nanogels. The nanogel system was further investigated for in vitro skin permeation, drug release and stability studies. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and psoriatic plaque like model were used to assess the effectiveness of SPN. Dispersion of NPSO in HPMC (SPN) produced a stable and uniform dispersion. In vitro permeation studies revealed increase in deposition of SP for the SP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in the epidermis and dermis by 8.5 and 9.5 folds, respectively than SP-gel. Further, the deposition of KP for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in epidermis and dermis was 9.75 and 11.55 folds higher, respectively than KP-gel. Similarly the amount of KP permeated for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN was increased by 9.92 folds than KP-gel. The ear thickness in ACD model and the expression of IL-17 and IL-23; PASI score and TEWL values in psoriatic plaque like model were significantly less (p < 0.001) for SPN compared to control gel. Our results suggest that SP+KP-SPN have significant potential for the percutaneous delivery of SP and KP to the deeper skin layers for treatment of various skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:22118820

  2. Skin permeating nanogel for the cutaneous co-delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Punit; Desai, Pinaki; Patel, Apurva; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an effective drug delivery system for the simultaneous topical delivery of two anti-inflammatory drugs, spantide II (SP) and ketoprofen (KP). To achieve this primary goal we have developed a skin permeating nanogel system (SPN) containing surface modified polymeric bilayered nanoparticles along with a gelling agent. Poly-(lactide-co-glycolic acid) and chitosan were used to prepare bilayered nanoparticles (NPS) and the surface was modified with oleic acid (NPSO). Hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) and Carbopol with the desired viscosity were utilized to prepare the nanogels. The nanogel system was further investigated for in vitro skin permeation, drug release and stability studies. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) and psoriatic plaque like model were used to assess the effectiveness of SPN. Dispersion of NPSO in HPMC (SPN) produced a stable and uniform dispersion. In vitro permeation studies revealed increase in deposition of SP for the SP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in the epidermis and dermis by 8.5 and 9.5 folds, respectively than SP-gel. Further, the deposition of KP for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN in epidermis and dermis was 9.75 and 11.55 folds higher, respectively than KP-gel. Similarly the amount of KP permeated for KP-SPN or SP+KP-SPN was increased by 9.92 folds than KP-gel. The ear thickness in ACD model and the expression of IL-17 and IL-23; PASI score and TEWL values in psoriatic plaque like model were significantly less (p<0.001) for SPN compared to control gel. Our results suggest that SP+KP-SPN have significant potential for the percutaneous delivery of SP and KP to the deeper skin layers for treatment of various skin inflammatory disorders. PMID:22118820

  3. Targeted Nanogel Conjugate for Improved Stability and Cellular Permeability of Curcumin: Synthesis, Pharmacokinetics, and Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a unique natural compound with promising anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the therapeutic efficacy of curcumin was challenged in clinical trials, mostly due to its low bioavailability, rapid metabolism, and elimination. We designed a nanodrug form of curcumin, which makes it stable and substantially enhances cellular permeability and anticancer activity at standard oral administration. Curcumin was conjugated as an ester to cholesteryl-hyaluronic acid (CHA) nanogel that is capable of targeted delivery to CD44-expressing drug-resistant cancer cells. CHA-CUR nanogels demonstrated excellent solubility and sustained drug release in physiological conditions. It induced apoptosis in cancer cells, suppressing the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α, and COX-2 cellular targets similar to free curcumin. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) studies also revealed improved circulation parameters of CHA-CUR at oral, i.p. and i.v. administration routes. CHA-CUR showed targeted tumor accumulation and effective tumor growth inhibition in human pancreatic adenocarcinoma MiaPaCa-2 and aggressive orthotropic murine mammary carcinoma 4T1 animal models. CHA-CUR treatment was well-tolerated and resulted in up to 13-fold tumor suppression, making this nanodrug a potential candidate for cancer prevention and therapeutic treatment. PMID:25072100

  4. Poly-α,β-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-α,β-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  5. Minimalism in radiation synthesis of biomedical functional nanogels.

    PubMed

    Dispenza, Clelia; Sabatino, Maria Antonietta; Grimaldi, Natascia; Bulone, Donatella; Bondì, Maria Luisa; Casaletto, Maria Pia; Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Adamo, Giorgia; Ghersi, Giulio

    2012-06-11

    A scalable, single-step, synthetic approach for the manufacture of biocompatible, functionalized micro- and nanogels is presented. In particular, poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone)-grafted-(aminopropyl)methacrylamide microgels and nanogels were generated through e-beam irradiation of PVP aqueous solutions in the presence of a primary amino-group-carrying monomer. Particles with different hydrodynamic diameters and surface charge densities were obtained at the variance of the irradiation conditions. Chemical structure was investigated by different spectroscopic techniques. Fluorescent variants were generated through fluorescein isothiocyanate attachment to the primary amino groups grafted to PVP, to both quantify the available functional groups for bioconjugation and follow nanogels localization in cell cultures. Finally, a model protein, bovine serum albumin, was conjugated to the nanogels to demonstrate the attachment of biologically relevant molecules for targeting purposes in drug delivery. The described approach provides a novel strategy to fabricate biohybrid nanogels with a very promising potential in nanomedicine. PMID:22571354

  6. Hyaluronic acid nanogels with enzyme-sensitive cross-linking group for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenchen; Wang, Xin; Yao, Xikuang; Zhang, Yajun; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-05-10

    A methacrylation strategy was employed to functionalize hyaluronic acid and prepare hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels. Dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analyzer and electron microscopy were utilized to characterize the nanogels and their enzyme-degradability in vitro. It was found that these nanogels had a spherical morphology with the diameter of about 70nm, and negative surface potential. When doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded into the nanogels, the diameter decreased to approximately 50nm with a drug loading content of 16% and encapsulation efficiency of 62%. Cellular uptake examinations showed that HA nanogels could be preferentially internalized by two-dimensional (2D) cells and three-dimensional (3D) multicellular spheroids (MCs) which both overexpress CD44 receptor. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging, biodistribution and penetration examinations in tumor tissue indicated that the HA nanogels could efficiently accumulate and penetrate the tumor matrix. In vivo antitumor evaluation found that DOX-loaded HA nanogels exhibited a significantly superior antitumor effect. PMID:25665867

  7. Self-assembled lysozyme/carboxymethylcellulose nanogels for delivery of methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenshun; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Chunlan; Chen, Yijie; Li, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Nanogels (NGs) were fabricated with lysozyme and carboxymethylcellulose via a green self-assembly method. The prepared NGs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Pyrene and isothiocyanate were introduced as fluorescent probes to research the hydrophobic area of the NGs and cells endocytosis, respectively. Methotrexate (MTX) was used to investigate the drug encapsulation property of the NGs. It turned out to be that the drug loaded NGs were regular spherical shape with a hydrodynamic diameter of about 123 nm. The drug loading efficiency was about 14.2%. The NGs can slowly release the drug and increase the bioavailability of the loaded drug. The NGs are promising carriers for the delivery of drugs and other bioactive molecules. PMID:25637692

  8. Self-Assembled Thermoresponsive Nanogels Prepared by Reverse Micelle → Positive Micelle Method for Ophthalmic Delivery of Muscone, a Poorly Water-Soluble Drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guohua; Nie, Qixia; Zang, Chen; Zhang, Baoxian; Zhu, Qiong; Luo, Gan; Wang, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to design a nanocarrier ophthalmic delivery system of muscone, a poorly water-soluble drug. The muscone thermoresponsive nanogels were self-assembled by reverse micelle → positive micelle method. Muscone was demonstrated to have uniform narrow particle size distribution in nanogel by the dynamic light scattering test. The developed nanocomposite hydrogel had a high muscone loading, and the rheology results showed that the phase transition temperature was 34.05°C. Thixotropy test indicated that the nanogel was able to resist the blinking of eyes because of the thixotropy recovery time, which is <5 s. Compared with muscone eye drops, muscone nanogels showed longer retention time on the corneal surface using fluorescent labeling technology and produced a 3.4-fold increase in apparent permeability coefficients (Papp). Draize testing showed that the developed nanogel caused no eye irritation. In vivo pharmacokinetic study indicated that the nanogel could significantly increase the bioavailability of muscone after administration compared with eye drops. These results indicate that self-assembled thermoresponsive nanogel prepared by reverse micelle → positive micelle method has potential for the ophthalmic delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. PMID:27041413

  9. Enhanced cytoplasmic delivery of siRNA using a stabilized polyion complex based on PEGylated nanogels with a cross-linked polyamine structure.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsushi; Oishi, Motoi; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2009-07-13

    A novel siRNA delivery system using a polyion complex (PIC) based on PEGylated polyamine nanogels composed of a chemically cross-linked poly[2-(N,N-diethylaminoethyl)methacrylate] (PDEAMA) core and surrounded by PEG tethered chains is described. The nanogel formed PIC spontaneously through electrostatic interaction upon mixing with siRNA. The nanogel/siRNA complex was characterized by a gel retardation assay, size and ζ-potential measurements, and gene silencing activity using a cultured cell line. The nanogel/siRNA complexes showed higher polyanion exchange tolerability compared with the noncross-linked PEG-b-PDEAMA/siRNA complexes, indicating that the three-dimensionally cross-linked structure of the nanogel enhanced the stability of the PIC. Furthermore, the nanogel/siRNA complex was observed to undergo a remarkable enhancement of the gene silencing activity against the firefly luciferase gene expressed in HuH-7 cells at low N/P ratios (N/P = 2), whereas the noncross-linked PEG-b-PDEAMA/siRNA complexes showed negligible gene silencing activity. Moreover, confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed an efficient endosomal escape capability for the transportation of siRNAs into the cytoplasm, presumably due to the buffering effect of the PDEAMA core. Therefore, the PIC of siRNA with cross-linked polyamine nanogel is a potentially effective siRNA carrier for the development of in vivo therapeutic applications of siRNA. PMID:19505137

  10. pH-Triggered Magnetic-Chitosan Nanogels (MCNs) For Doxorubicin Delivery: Physically vs. Chemically Cross Linking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sadighian, Somayeh; Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan; Rostamizadeh, Kobra; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the impact of cross linking strategy on the characteristics of magnetic chitosan nanogels (MCNs) as targeted drug delivery system for doxorubicin. Methods: Sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and glutaraldehyde were used as physical (electrostatic) and chemical (covalent binding) cross-linker agents, respectively. MCNs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the formation of spherical nanostructures with the final average particle size of around 35-40 nm. Results: The finding proved the superparamagnetic properties of the MCNs with relatively high-magnetization values which indicate that the MCNs were enough sensitive to external magnetic fields as a magnetic drug carrier. To understand the differences between the drug delivery properties of chemically and physically cross linked MCNs, the drug release studies were also conducted. Altogether, the results of this study clearly indicate that, however, both MCNs exhibited sustained drug release behaviour, the chemically cross linked MCNs provided enhanced controlled drug release characteristics in comparison to physically cross linked MCNs. Besides, according to the drug release behaviour of MCNs in buffer solutions in two different medium with the pH values of 5.3 and 7.4, it was clear that both nanoparticles exhibited pH sensitivity where the extent of drug release in the acidic media was significantly higher than neutral media. Conclusion: It can be concluded that chemically cross linked MCNs may serve as an ideal carrier for stimuli-triggered and controlled anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25789228

  11. Multi-functionalized hyaluronic acid nanogels crosslinked with carbon dots as dual receptor-mediated targeting tumor theranostics.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xu; Han, Yu; Pei, Mingliang; Zhao, Xubo; Tian, Kun; Zhou, Tingting; Liu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA)-based theranostic nanogels were designed for the tumor diagnosis and chemotherapy, by crosslinking the folate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol) modified hyaluronic acid (FA-PEG-HA) with carbon dots (CDs) for the first time. Due to the extraordinary fluorescence property of the integrated CDs, the theranostic nanogels could be used for the real-time and noninvasive location tracking to cancer cells. HA could load Doxorubicin (DOX) via electrostatic interaction with a drug-loading capacity (DLC) of 32.5%. The nanogels possessed an ideal release of DOX in the weak acid environment, while it was restrained in the neutral media, demonstrating the pH-responsive controlled release behavior. The cytotoxicity and cellular uptake results clearly illustrated that most DOX was released and accumulated in the cell nuclei and killed the cancer cells efficaciously, due to their dual receptor-mediated targeting characteristics. PMID:27516286

  12. Development of a hybrid dextrin hydrogel encapsulating dextrin nanogel as protein delivery system.

    PubMed

    Molinos, Maria; Carvalho, Vera; Silva, Dina M; Gama, Francisco M

    2012-02-13

    Dextrin, a glucose polymer with low molecular weight, was used to develop a fully resorbable hydrogel, without using chemical initiators. Dextrin was first oxidized (oDex) with sodium periodate and then cross-linked with adipic acid dihidrazide, a nontoxic cross-linking molecule. Furthermore, a new bidimensional composite hydrogel, made of oxidized dextrin incorporating dextrin nanogels (oDex-nanogel), was also developed. The oDex hydrogels showed good mechanical properties and biocompatibility, allowing the proliferation of mouse embryo fibroblasts 3T3 cultured on top of the gel. The gelation time may be controlled selecting the concentrations of the polymer and reticulating agent. Both the oDex and oDex-nanogel hydrogels are biodegradable and present a 3-D network with a continuous porous structure. The obtained hybrid hydrogel enables the release of the dextrin nanogel over an extended period of time, paralleling the mass loss curve due to the degradation of the material. The dextrin nanogel allowed the efficient incorporation of interleukin-10 and insulin in the oDex hydrogel, providing a sophisticated system of controlled release. The new hydrogels present promising properties as an injectable carrier of bioactive molecules. Both proteins and poorly water-soluble low-molecular-weight drugs are efficiently encapsulated in the nanogel, which performs as a controlled release system entrapped in the hydrogel matrix. PMID:22288730

  13. Investigation of dual-sensitive nanogels based on chitosan and N-isopropylacrylamide and its intelligent drug delivery of 10-hydroxycamptothecine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Wang, Jiu; Xu, Hongjiang; Ge, Liang; Zhu, Jiabi

    2015-01-01

    The work was to prepare and characterize a responsive drug delivery system built of chitosan-g-poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (CTS-g-PNIPAAm) nanogels and to evaluate the effects of CTS molecular weight (Mw) on the loading and in vitro release of insoluble drug 10-hydroxycamptothecine (HCPT). The CTS-g-PNIPAAm copolymers were synthesized by radical polymerization. The Mw and physical chemistry properties such as diameter, second virial coefficient of grafted PNIPAAm were investigated by dynamic and static laser light scattering method. A series of cross-linked CTS-g-PNIPAAm nanogels were prepared with N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide initially added as a cross-linker. The thermal and pH-sensitive features of cross-linked CTS-g-PNIPAAm nanogels were studied by determining the variance of transmittance, changeable size and reversed zeta potential. The critical aggregation concentrations (CAC) of resultant nanogels decreased from 0.045 to 0.036 mg/mL with CTS Mw increased from 50 kDa to 700 kDa. The loading efficiency of the HCPT encapsulated into CTS-g-PNIPAAm nanogels increased in parallel with CTS Mw, while the cumulative release percentage of HCPT-loaded nanogels decreased with CTS Mw increasing at both 25 °C and 37 °C. Fitting results of HCPT release data to different mathematical models suggested a diffusion-controlled mechanism at 25 °C. However, the release behaviors were dominated by combined effects of polymer erosion and osmotic pressure driven at 37 °C. The cytotoxicity study of the CTS-g-PNIPAAm nanogels against hepatic L02 cells indicated that the resultant nanogels did not exhibit apparent cytotoxicity. PMID:24512347

  14. Minimalism in fabrication of self-organized nanogels holding both anti-cancer drug and targeting moiety.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungwon; Park, Kyong Mi; Ko, Jin Young; Kwon, Ick Chan; Cho, Hyeon Geun; Kang, Dongmin; Yu, In Tag; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Na, Kun

    2008-05-01

    Recent researches to develop nano-carrier systems in anti-cancer drug delivery have focused on more complicated design to improve therapeutic efficacy and to reduce side effects. Although such efforts have great impact to biomedical science and engineering, the complexity has been a huddle because of clinical and economic problems. In order to overcome the problems, a simplest strategy to fabricate nano-carriers to deliver doxorubicin (DOX) was proposed in the present study. Two significant subjects (i) formation of nanoparticles loading and releasing DOX and (ii) binding specificity of them to cells, were examined. Folic acid (FA) was directly coupled with pullulan (Pul) backbone by ester linkage (FA/Pul conjugate) and the degree of substitution (DS) was varied, which were confirmed by 1H NMR and UV spectrophotometry. Light scattering results revealed that the nanogels possessed two major size distributions around 70 and 270 nm in an aqueous solution. Their critical aggregation concentrations (CACs) were less than 10 microg/mL, which are lower than general critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) of low-molecular-weight surfactants. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed well-dispersed nanogel morphology in a dried state. Depending on the DS, the nanogels showed different DOX-loading and releasing profiles. The DOX release rate from FA8/Pul (with the highest DS) for 24h was slower than that from FA4/or FA6/Pul, indicating that the FA worked as a hydrophobic moiety for drug holding. Cellular uptake of the nanogels (KB cells) was also monitored by confocal microscopy. All nanogels were internalized regardless of the DS of FA. Based on the results, the objectives of this study, to suggest a new method overcoming the complications in the drug carrier design, were successfully verified. PMID:18164602

  15. Multi-functional core-shell hybrid nanogels for pH-dependent magnetic manipulation, fluorescent pH-sensing, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2011-12-01

    Remotely optical sensing and drug delivery using an environmentally-guided magnetically-driven hybrid nanogel particle could allow for medical diagnostics and treatment. Such multifunctional hybrid nanogels (<200 nm) were prepared through the first synthesis of magnetic Ni NPs, followed by a moderate growth of fluorescent metallic Ag on the surface of Ni NPs, and then a coverage of a pH-responsive copolymer gel shell of poly(ethylene glycol-co-methacrylic acid) [p(EG-MAA)] onto the Ni-Ag bimetallic NP cores (18 ± 5 nm). The introduction of the pH-responsive p(EG-MAA) gel shell onto the magnetic and fluorescent Ni-Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ni-Ag NPs responsive to pH over the physiologically important range 5.0-7.4. The hybrid nanogels can adapt to surrounding pH and regulate the sensitivity in response to external magnetic field (such as a small magnet of 0.1 T), resulting in the accumulation of the hybrid nanogels within the duration from hours to a few seconds as the pH value decreases from 7.4 to 5.0. The pH-dependent magnetic response characteristic of the hybrid nanogels were further integrated with the pH change to fluorescent signal transduction and pH-regulated anticancer drug (a model drug 5-fluorouracil) delivery functions. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The multiple responsive hybrid nanogel that can be manipulated in tandem endogenous and exogenous activation should enhance our ability to address the complexity of biological systems. PMID:21944827

  16. Multi-stage, charge conversional, stimuli-responsive nanogels for therapeutic protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Kai; Haag, Rainer

    2015-11-01

    A boronate ester crosslinked zwitterionic nanogel (NGCA) with ATP/pH-sensitivity has been developed with an inverse nanoprecipitation technique to achieve a two-stage charge conversion that responds to tumor extracellular conditions (pH 6.5-6.8) and an intracellular acidic environment (pH 5-6). Cationic cytochrome C (CC), a therapeutic protein, has been encapsulated into NGCA through inverse nanoprecipitation via electrostatic interactions to form protein-loaded nanogel (NGCA-CC). By adjusting the ratio of the amino and carboxyl groups in the nanogels, negatively charged nanogels that are safer under physiological conditions (pH 7.4) can convert their surface charge to positive at tumor extracellular pH, which enhance their cellular uptake efficiency. The citraconic amide formed from citraconic anhydride and amine can be cleaved in the intracellular acidic organelles to expose more amino groups and facilitate endosomal escape. The release of CC is accelerated in the presence of 5 mM ATP or under acidic conditions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry have shown that NGCA-CC's cell uptake is higher at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. MTT and real-time cell analysis (RTCA) have illustrated that there is more toxicity at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. The apoptosis process induced by CC was determined by flow cytometry. PMID:26288853

  17. Development of gellan gum containing formulations for transdermal drug delivery: Component evaluation and controlled drug release using temperature responsive nanogels.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Moran, Carlos A; Zavgorodnya, Oleksandra; Penman, Andrew D; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Bridges, S Louis; Hergenrother, Robert W; Singh, Jasvinder A; Wick, Timothy M

    2016-07-25

    Enhancing skin permeation is important for development of new transdermal drug delivery formulations. This is particularly relevant for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). To address this, semisolid gel and solid hydrogel film formulations containing gellan gum as a gelling agent were developed and the effects of penetration enhancers (dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropyl alcohol and propylene glycol) on transport of the NSAID diclofenac sodium was quantified. A transwell diffusion system was used to accelerate formulation development. After 4h, diclofenac flux from a superior formulation of the semisolid gel or the solid hydrogel film was 130±11μg/cm(2)h and 108±7μg/cm(2)h, respectively, and significantly greater than that measured for a currently available diclofenac sodium topical gel (30±4μg/cm(2)h, p<0.05) or solution formulation (44±6μg/cm(2)h, p<0.05) under identical conditions. Over 24h diclofenac transport from the solid hydrogel film was greater than that measured for any new or commercial diclofenac formulation. Entrapment of temperature-responsive nanogels within the solid hydrogel film provides temperature-activated prolonged release of diclofenac. Diclofenac transport was minimal at 22°C, when diclofenac is entrapped within temperature-responsive nanogels incorporated into the solid hydrogel film, but increased 6-fold when the temperature was increased to skin surface temperature of 32°C. These results demonstrate the feasibility of the semisolid gel and solid hydrogel film formulations that can include thermo-responsive nanogels for development of transdermal drug formulations with adjustable drug transport kinetics. PMID:27260133

  18. Efficient reduction and pH co-triggered DOX-loaded magnetic nanogel carrier using disulfide crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Huang, Juan; Xue, Yanan; Cai, Ning; Zhang, Han; Wen, Kaikai; Luo, Xiaogang; Long, Sihui; Yu, Faquan

    2015-01-01

    To reduce leakage on the drug-delivery pathway to minimize side effect of reduction or pH sensitive drug delivery systems, we designed a glutathione (GSH)/pH co-triggered magnetic nanogel drug delivery system for doxorubicin (DOX) based on the GSH concentration and pH difference between intracellular and extracellular environments. The introduction of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) was intended for magnetic targeting. The magnetic DOX-loaded nanogel was then prepared by the oxidation of thiolated alginate with thiolated SPION in the presence of DOX. The nanogel size can be readily regulated in a range of 120-320 nm upon preparation conditions, with a negative surface charge of around -40 mV. Saturation magnetization was estimated at 27.4 emu/g Fe by VSM. In vitro release was conducted in simulated cancerous environment conditions such as a high GSH concentration and mild acidity. As a result, the nanogel expressed, upon dual stimuli of pH 5/10 mM GSH, significantly higher accumulative release than upon single stimulus of pH 5 without GSH or pH 7.4/10 mM GSH. In vitro cytotoxicity against HeLa cells clearly illustrated that the nanogel could effectively inhibit cell growth, and the IC50 was figured out to be 2.3 μg/mL of the nanogel, while the nanogel exclusive of DOX was nontoxic. Confocal laser scanning microscopy observation, combined with the result of Prussian blue staining, indicated that DOX was efficiently internalized into HeLa cells through endocytosis, released into the cytoplasm, and then principally entered the nuclei. The quantitative examination of the iron content revealed an exponential increase in the cellular uptake and an exponential decrease in the uptake efficiency with the fed nanogel. This drug-loaded nanogel could be a promising drug carrier for effective tumor-targeted chemotherapy. PMID:25491958

  19. Self-assembled mannan nanogel: cytocompatibility and cell localization.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sílvia A; Carvalho, Vera; Costa, Carla; Teixeira, João Paulo; Vilanova, Manuel; Gama, Francisco M

    2012-06-01

    Amphiphilic mannan, produced by the Michael addition of hydrophobic 1-hexadecanethiol to vinyl methacrylated mannan, self-assembles in aqueous medium through hydrophobic interactions among alkyl chains. Resultant nanogel is stable, spherical, polydisperse, with 50-140 nm mean hydrodynamic diameter depending on the polymer degree of substitution, and nearly neutral negative surface charge. No cytotoxicity of mannan nanogel is detected up to about 0.4 mg/mL in mouse embryo fibroblast cell line 3T3 and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) using cell proliferation, lactate dehydrogenase and Live/Dead assays. Comet assay, under the tested conditions, reveals no DNA damage in fibroblasts but possible in BMDM. BMDM internalize the mannan nanogel, which is observed in vesicles in the cytoplasm by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Confocal colocalization image analysis denotes that the entrance and exit of nanogel and FM 4-64 might occur by the same processes--endocytosis and exocytosis--in BMDM. Physicochemical characteristics, in vitro cytocompatibility and uptake of self-assembled mannan nanogel by mouse BMDM are great signals of the potential applicability of this nanosystem for macrophages targeted delivery of vaccines or drugs, acting as potential nanomedicines, always with the key goal of preventing and/or treating diseases. PMID:22764417

  20. Development of a thermally responsive nanogel based on chitosan-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) for paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yajing; Xu, Hongjiang; Wang, Jiu; Ge, Liang; Zhu, Jiabi

    2014-07-01

    A thermally responsive nanogel was developed through the radical polymerization based on chitosan (CTS) and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm) with acrylamide (AAm) blended to explore the possibility of increasing the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT). The thermally sensitive features of resultant nanogels were studied by determining variance of transmittance and changeable size. The VPTT of the CTS-poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm5.5) nanogel, coplymerized with 5.5% wt. AAm /wt. NIPAAm, was 38 °C in contrast to 32 °C of the CTS-poly(NIPAAm) polymer and the former was studied thereafter. The critical aggregation concentration of CTS-poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm5.5) nanogels was 1.11 μg/mL, much smaller than CTS-poly(NIPAAm) nanogels (5.00 μg/mL). Paclitaxel (PTX) was encapsulated in CTS-poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm5.5) nanogels with loading efficiency of about 9.06 ± 0.195% (n = 3). Thermally responsive PTX in vitro release fromPTX-loaded nanogels was verified. Coumarin-6-loaded nanogels showed thermally responsive cellular uptake because of electrostatic absorptive endocytosis. Furthermore, the half maximal inhibitory concentration of PTX-loaded nanogels was about 2.025 nmol/L, 10-fold improved relative to PTX solutions against SMMC 7721 cells. In vivo, PTX-loaded nanogels presented remarkably higher antitumor efficacy against human colon carcinoma cells HT-29 xenograft nude mice model after intravenous administration. Accordingly, our results reinforced the potential means of CTS-poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm5.5) nanogels for the combination of thermal therapy and chemotherapy. PMID:24823900

  1. Magnetic and pH dual responsive core-shell hybrid nanogels: a single nano-object for pH-dependent magnetic manipulation, fluorescent pH-sensing, and drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjeea, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2011-01-01

    Remotely optical sensing and drug delivery using an environmentally-guided magnetically-driven hybrid nanogel particle could allow for medical diagnostics and treatment. Such multifunctional hybrid nanogels (<200 nm) were prepared through the first synthesis of magnetic Ni NPs, followed by a moderate growth of fluorescent metallic Ag on the surface of Ni NPs, and then a coverage of a pH-responsive copolymer gel shell of poly(ethylene glycol-co-methacrylic acid) [p(EG-MAA)] onto the Ni-Ag bimetallic NP cores (18 {+-} 5 nm). The introduction of the pH-responsive p(EG-MAA) gel shell onto the magnetic and fluorescent Ni-Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ni-Ag NPs responsive to pH over the physiologically important range 5.0-7.4. The hybrid nanogels can adapt to surrounding pH and regulate the sensitivity in response to external magnetic field (such as a small magnet of 0.1 T), resulting in the accumulation of the hybrid nanogels within the duration from hours to a few seconds as the pH value decreases from 7.4 to 5.0. The pH-dependent magnetic response characteristic of the hybrid nanogels were further integrated with the pH change to fluorescent signal transduction and pH-regulated anticancer drug (a model drug 5-fluorouracil) delivery functions. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The multiple responsive hybrid nanogel that can be manipulated in tandem endogenous and exogenous activation should enhance our ability to address the complexity of biological systems.

  2. The use of cationic nanogels to deliver proteins to myeloma cells and primary T lymphocytes that poorly express heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kozo; Tsuchiya, Yumiko; Kawaguchi, Yoshinori; Sawada, Shin-ichi; Ayame, Hirohito; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Tsubata, Takeshi

    2011-09-01

    Fusion proteins containing protein transduction domain (PTD) are widely used for intracellular delivery of exogenous proteins. PTD-mediated delivery requires expression of heparan sulfate on the surface of the target cells. However, some of metastatic tumor cells and primary lymphocytes poorly express heparan sulfate. Here we demonstrate that proteins complexed with nanosize hydrogels formed by cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulans (cCHP) are efficiently delivered to myeloma cells and primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes probably by induction of macropinocytosis, although these cells are resistant to PTD-mediated protein delivery as a consequence of poor heparan sulfate expression. The anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL delivered by cCHP nanogels efficiently blocked apoptosis of these cells, establishing functional regulation of cells by proteins delivered by cCHP nanogels. Thus, cCHP nanogel is a useful tool to deliver proteins for development of new cancer therapy and immune regulation. PMID:21605901

  3. Core-shell hybrid nanogels for integration of optical temperature-sensing, targeted tumor cell imaging, and combined chemo-photothermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-10-01

    We report a class of core-shell structured hybrid nanogels to demonstrate the conception of integrating the functional building blocks into a single nanoparticle system for simultaneously optical temperature-sensing, cancer cell targeting, fluorescence imaging, and combined chemo-photothermal treatment. The hybrid nanogels were constructed by coating the Ag-Au bimetallic NP core with a thermo-responsive nonlinear poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel as shell, and semi-interpenetrating the targeting ligands of hyaluronic acid chains into the surface networks of gel shell. The Ag-Au NP core can emit strong visible fluorescence for imaging of mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The reversible thermo-responsive volume phase transition of the nonlinear PEG-based gel shell cannot only modify the physicochemical environment of the Ag-Au NP core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also provide a high loading capacity for a model anticancer drug temozolomide and offer a thermo-triggered drug release. The drug release can be induced by both the heat generated by external NIR irradiation and the temperature increase of local environmental media. The ability of the hybrid nanogels to combine the local specific chemotherapy with external NIR photothermal treatment significantly improves the therapeutic efficacy due to a synergistic effect. PMID:20643481

  4. In Vivo GFP Knockdown by Cationic Nanogel-siRNA Polyplexes

    PubMed Central

    Shrivats, Arun R.; Mishina, Yuji; Averick, Saadyah; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Hollinger, Jeffrey O.

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful tool to treat diseases and elucidate target gene function. Prior to clinical implementation, however, challenges including the safe, efficient and targeted delivery of siRNA must be addressed. Here, we report cationic nanogel nanostructured polymers (NSPs) prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) for in vitro and in vivo siRNA delivery in mammalian models. Outcomes from siRNA protection studies suggested that nanogel NSPs reduce enzymatic degradation of siRNA within polyplexes. Further, the methylation of siRNA may enhance nuclease resistance without compromising gene knockdown potency. NSP-mediated RNAi treatments against Gapdh significantly reduced GAPDH enzyme activity in mammalian cell culture models supplemented with 10% serum. Moreover, nanogel NSP-mediated siRNA delivery significantly inhibited in vivo GFP expression in a mouse model. GFP knockdown was siRNA sequence-dependent and facilitated by nanogel NSP carriers. Continued testing of NSP/siRNA compositions in disease models may produce important new therapeutic options for patient care. PMID:27280121

  5. Nanogels fabricated from bovine serum albumin and chitosan via self-assembly for delivery of anticancer drug.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuntao; Xu, Shasha; Xiong, Wenfei; Pei, Yaqiong; Li, Bin; Chen, Yijie

    2016-10-01

    In this study, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and chitosan (CS) were used to prepare BSA-CS nanogels by a simple green self-assembly technique. Then the nanogels were successfully used to entrap doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with an entrapment ratio of 46.3%, aiming to realize the slow-release effect and lower the cytotoxicity of DOX. The IC50 values of DOX-loaded BSA-CS (DOX-BSA-CS) and free DOX obtained by MTT assay in SGC7901 cells were 0.22 and 0.05μg/mL, respectively. The cytotoxicity of DOX significantly decreased within 24h after encapsulation by the nanogels, indicating that the loaded drug could slowly release within 24h and the BSA-CS was a good slow release system. The cellular uptake experiments indicated DOX-BSA-CS diffused faster into the cancer cell than the bare drug. The flow cytometry and TUNEL assay proved DOX-BSA-CS could induce a larger apoptosis proportion of gastric cancer cells 7901 than the bare drug and it is promising to be used for curing gastric cancer. PMID:27262260

  6. Stimuli-responsive polyamine-DNA blend nanogels for co-delivery in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Queiroz, João

    2015-08-01

    Polyamine plasmid DNA (pDNA) hydrogels have been synthesized by an original approach which conjugates pDNA condensation by polyamines and cross-linking reaction with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether. In an attempt to design more sophisticated vectors with enhanced transfection efficiency and targeting ability, the cell-binding ligand transferrin has been incorporated into polyethylenimine formulations. All systems are photodegradable which allows for the controlled release of different plasmids (pVAX1-LacZ and pcDNA3-FLAG-p53) and anticancer drugs (doxorubicin, epirubicin and paclitaxel). The tumoral treatment through the combined action of pcDNA3-FLAG-p53 gene and an anticancer drug has a stronger potential to suppress the development of cancer cells. The effect is greatly improved when transferrin is encapsulated into the carriers. This study is a relevant contribution for the design of novel generation of plasmid biopharmaceuticals for progresses in gene cancer therapy, feeding the hope of cancer cure. PMID:26047882

  7. A novel dual-responsive core-crosslinked magnetic-gold nanogel for triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Marjan; Hamishehkar, Hamed; Arsalani, Nasser; Entezami, Ali Akbar

    2016-11-01

    A facial approach was reported to prepare a novel dual-responsive core-crosslinked nanogel and investigated for the triggered methotrexate (MTX) release. Nanogels with core-shell architecture were synthesized by decoration of Au/Fe3O4 core/shell NPs using poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly((N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-maleic acid (PEG-b-P(DMAEMA-co-HEMA)-MA) for crosslinking and autoreduction processes. The second block containing amino groups and maleate groups as the inner shell was used for the reduction of HAuCl4 (auric cation) in the presence of Fe3O4 NPs and as a crosslinker agent, respectively. Furthermore, to improve the long-term dispersibility of the nanogels, poly(ethylene glycol) was preferred as outer shell even under high ionic strength. After that, NIPAAm was polymerized from the vinyl double bonds for fabricating the thermo and pH-responsive core-crosslinked nanogels. MTX (an anti-cancer agent) was successfully loaded (the loading capacity of 37%) into the nanogels by both ionic interaction and entrapment in polymeric network in the inner shell. The triggered MTX release ability of the synthesized nanocarriers was proved through the comparison of in-vitro drug release at simulated physiological condition and tumor tissue environment. MTT assay showed that MTX-loaded nanocarriers revealed high antitumor activity in MCF7 cell line after incubation following 24 and 48h. It was concluded that the developed nanogels have many promising qualities as an efficient carrier for the targeted MTX delivery to cancer tissues. PMID:27524039

  8. Preparation, characterization and biological evaluation of curcumin loaded alginate aldehyde-gelatin nanogels.

    PubMed

    P R, Sarika; James, Nirmala Rachel; P R, Anil Kumar; Raj, Deepa K

    2016-11-01

    Curcumin, a natural polyphenol exhibits chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities towards cancer. In order to improve the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy, curcumin is encapsulated in alginate aldehyde-gelatin (Alg Ald-Gel) nanogels. Alginate aldehyde-gelatin nanogels are prepared by inverse miniemulsion technique. Physicochemical properties of the curcumin loaded nanogels are evaluated by, Dynamic light scattering (DLS), NMR spectroscopy and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Curcumin loaded nanogels show hydrodynamic diameter of 431±8nm and a zeta potential of -36±4mV. The prepared nanogels exhibit an encapsulation efficiency of 72±2%. In vitro drug release studies show a controlled release of curcumin from nanogels over a period of 48h. Hemocompatibility and cytocompatibility of the nanogels are evaluated. Bare nanogels are cytocompatible and curcumin loaded nanogels induce anticancer activity towards MCF-7 cells. In vitro cellular uptake of the curcumin loaded nanogels using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) confirms the uptake of nanogels in MCF-7 cells. Hence, the developed nanogel system can be a suitable candidate for curcumin delivery to cancer cells. PMID:27524019

  9. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  10. Sunflower-type nanogels carrying a quantum dot nanoprobe for both superior gene delivery efficacy and tracing of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Yi, Se Won; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Seong Min; Shim, Sung Han; Park, Keun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sunflower-type nanogels carrying the QD 655 nanoprobe can be used for both gene transfection and bioimaging of hMSCs. The entry of sunflower-type nanogels into hMSCs can be possibly controlled by changing the formation of QDs. The physico-chemical properties of sunflower-type nanogels internalized by hMSCs were confirmed by AFM, SEM, TEM, gel retardation, and ζ-potential analyses. The bioimaging capacity was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy, Kodak imaging, and Xenogen imaging. Specifically, we investigated the cytotoxicity of sunflower-type nanogels via SNP analysis. Internalization of sunflower-type nanogels does not cause malfunction of hMSCs. PMID:26576046

  11. Ex vivo skin permeation and retention studies on chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan ternary nanogel prepared by in situ ionic gelation technique--a tool for controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Abioye, Amos Olusegun; Issah, Sureya; Kola-Mustapha, Adeola Tawakalitu

    2015-07-25

    The chemical potentials of drug-polymer electrostatic interaction have been utilized to develop a novel ternary chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan nanogel as controlled transdermal delivery tool for ibuprofen. The ternary nanogels were prepared by a combination of electrostatic nanoassembly and ionic gelation techniques. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between ibuprofen and chitosan were confirmed with FTIR, while DSC, TGA and SEM confirmed the physical state, thermal and morphological characteristics, respectively. The ex vivo delivery of ibuprofen onto and across the skin was evaluated based on system specific drug release parameters such as steady state permeation rate, permeability coefficient, permeability enhancement ratio, skin/gel partition coefficient, diffusion coefficient, lag time and release rate constant and mechanisms of release were determined using mathematical models. Interaction between ibuprofen and chitosan produced new spherical eutectic nanoconjugates with remarkable decrease in particle size of ibuprofen from 4580 (length-to-breadth aspect ratio) to a minimum of 14.15 nm (324-times), and thermally stable amorphous characteristics. The nanogels exhibited significant elastic and pseudoplastic characteristics dictated by the concentration of chitosan with maximum swelling capacity of 775% w/w at 6.55 mM chitosan compared with 281.16 and 506.50% for plain gellan and control ibuprofen hydrogel, respectively. Chitosan enhanced the skin penetration, permeability and the rate of transdermal release of ibuprofen by a factor of 4, dictated by the extent of ibuprofen-chitosan ionic interaction and its concentration. The major mechanism of ibuprofen release through the pig skin was drug diffusion however drug partition and matrix erosion also occurred. It was evident that ternary nanogels are novel formulations with potential application in controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen. PMID:25997660

  12. Chemically crosslinked nanogels of PEGylated poly ethyleneimine (l-histidine substituted) synthesized via metal ion coordinated self-assembly for delivery of methotrexate: Cytocompatibility, cellular delivery and antitumor activity in resistant cells.

    PubMed

    Abolmaali, Samira Sadat; Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad; Mohammadi, Samaneh; Amoozgar, Zohreh; Dinarvand, Rasoul

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled nanogels were engineered by forming Zn(2+)-coordinated micellar templates of PEGylated poly ethyleneimine (PEG-g-PEI), chemical crosslinking and subsequent removal of the metal ion. Creation of stable micellar templates is a crucial step for preparing the nanogels. To this aim, imidazole moieties were introduced to the polymer by Fmoc-l-histidine using carbodiimide chemistry. It was hypothesized the nanogels loaded with methotrexate (MTX), a chemotherapeutic agent, circumvent impaired carrier activity in HepG2 cells (MTX-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma). So, the nanogels were post-loaded with MTX and characterized by (1)H-NMR, FTIR, dynamic light scattering-zeta potential, atomic force microscopy, and drug release experiments. Cellular uptake and the antitumor activity of MTX-loaded nanogels were investigated by flow cytometry and MTT assay. Discrete, spherical and uniform nanogels, with sizes about 77-83 nm and a relatively high drug loading (54 ± 4% w/w), showed a low polydispersity and neutral surface charges. The MTX-loaded nanogels, unlike empty nanogels, lowered viability of HepG2 cells; the nanogels demonstrated cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis comparably higher than MTX as free drug that was shown to be through i) cellular uptake of the nanogels by clathrin-mediated transport and ii) endosomolytic activity of the nanogels in HepG2 cells. These findings indicate the potential antitumor application of this preparation, which has to be investigated in-vivo. PMID:26952497

  13. Integrin Targeted Delivery of Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kai; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics is defined in the sense, that is, to maximize the therapeutic index of a chemotherapeutic agent by strictly localizing its pharmacological activity to the site or tissue of action. Integrins are a family of heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins involved in a wide range of cell-to-extracellular matrix (ECM) and cell-to-cell interactions. As cell surface receptors, integrins readily interact with extracellular ligands and play a vital role in angiogenesis, leukocytes function and tumor development, which sets up integrins as an excellent target for chemotherapy treatment. The peptide ligands containing the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD), which displays a strong binding affinity and selectivity to integrins, particularly to integrin αvβ3, have been developed to conjugate with various conventional chemotherapeutic agents, such as small molecules, peptides and proteins, and nanoparticle-carried drugs for integtrin targeted therapeutic studies. This review highlights the recent advances in integrin targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic agents with emphasis on target of integrin αvβ3, and describes the considerations for the design of the diverse RGD peptide-chemotherapeutics conjugates and their major applications. PMID:21547159

  14. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  15. Boronate cross-linked ATP- and pH-responsive nanogels for intracellular delivery of anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejiao; Achazi, Katharina; Haag, Rainer

    2015-03-11

    A novel adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and pH dual-responsive degradable nanogel (NG) system are developed based on the complexation of 1,2-diols in dendritic polyglycerol (dPG), and boronic acids, which are conjugated with dPG as the macromolecular cross-linker. The NG is formed by a mild and surfactant-free inverse nanoprecipitation method. An anticancer drug, methotrexate (MTX), is coprecipitated with the macromolecular precursors and cross-linkers to form MTX-loaded NG (NG-MTX) with a loading capacity of 13 wt%. The size of NG is controllable from 100 to 300 nm, which is suitable for the enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect and can be degraded into small fragments that are within the clearance limitation in the presence of 5 × 10(-3) m ATP or at pH 4 after 24 h. Increasing ATP concentrations and decreasing pH values of the release medium accelerate the release of MTX. Both the real-time cell analysis (RTCA) and MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) results show no cytotoxic effect of NG and a dose-dependent effect of NG-MTX on HeLa cells as well as MCF-7 cells. The fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled NG (FITC-NG) exhibits a time-dependent intracellular uptake tendency and cell organelle permeability as determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) or flow cytometry. PMID:25388994

  16. Aptamers and aptamer targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Amy C.; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    When aptamers first emerged almost two decades ago, most were RNA species that bound and tagged or inhibited simple target ligands. Very soon after, the ‘selectionologists’ developing aptamer technology quickly realized more potential for the aptamer. In recent years, advances in aptamer techniques have enabled the use of aptamers as small molecule inhibitors, diagnostic tools and even therapeutics. Aptamers are now being employed in novel applications. We review, herein, some of the recent and exciting applications of aptamers in cell-specific recognition and delivery. PMID:19458497

  17. Targeting delivery in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Newland, Ben; Dunnett, Stephen B; Dowd, Eilís

    2016-08-01

    Disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD), with the potential to halt the neurodegenerative process and to stimulate the protection, repair, and regeneration of dopaminergic neurons, remain a vital but unmet clinical need. Targeting the delivery of current and new therapeutics directly to the diseased brain region (in particular the nigrostriatal pathway) could result in greater improvements in the motor functions that characterise PD. Here, we highlight some of the opportunities and challenges facing the development of the next generation of therapies for patients with PD. PMID:27312875

  18. Polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers for oral colon-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Sang, Yuan; Feng, Jing; Li, Zhaoming; Zhao, Aili

    2016-08-01

    Oral colon-targeted drug delivery has attracted many researchers because of its distinct advantages of increasing the bioavailability of the drug at the target site and reducing the side effects. Polysaccharides that are precisely activated by the physiological environment of the colon hold greater promise for colon targeting. Considerable research efforts have been directed towards developing polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers. Types of polysaccharides for colon targeting and in vitro/in vivo assessments of polysaccharide-based carriers for oral colon-targeted drug delivery are summarised. Polysaccharide-based microspheres have gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon (colon cancer, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), amoebiasis and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)), but also for it's potential for the delivery of anti-rheumatoid arthritis and anti-chronic stable angina drugs. Besides, Polysaccharide-based micro/nanocarriers such as microbeads, microcapsules, microparticles, nanoparticles, nanogels and nanospheres are also introduced in this review. PMID:26766303

  19. pH-responsive targeted and controlled doxorubicin delivery using hyaluronic acid nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Gurav, Deepanjali D; Kulkarni, Anuja S; Khan, Ayesha; Shinde, Vaishali S

    2016-07-01

    Biocompatible nanogels were prepared using thiol modified hyaluronic acid and diacrylated pluronic F127 polymer. A simple Michael type addition reaction of activated thiol groups on acrylate moiety lead to the formation of these nanogels, which were further effectively fabricated with an anticancer drug for evaluating sustained drug release approach. Nanogels prepared were of 150nm in diameter with a narrow size distribution pattern. DOX released from these nanogels showed a slow and sustained release at acidic pH 5.0 as compared to minimal release at physiological pH 7.4. Cytotoxicity data revealed the higher efficiency of DOX loaded nanogels as compared to free DOX in Hela cell lines. Cellular uptake images supported the cytotoxicity data and displayed DOX intercalation at nuclear level of cells. The sustained drug delivery system showed DOX release after 24h and continued thereafter without affecting normal cells. Based on these findings, such nanogel system may be useful for delivering anticancer drug without hampering their toxicity value over longer durations and reducing the total dose amount in anticancer therapy. PMID:27022876

  20. Synthesis and characterization of NIR-responsive Aurod@pNIPAAm-PEGMA nanogels as vehicles for delivery of photodynamic therapy agents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A near-infrared (NIR)-responsive Aurod@pNIPAAm-PEGMA nanogel was synthesized in two steps, growing a PEGMA monolayer on the surface of gold nanorods (AuNRs), followed by in situ polymerization and cross-linking of N-iso-propylacrylamide (NIPAAm) and poly-(ethylene glycol)-methacrylate (PEGMA). The AuNRs and Aurod@pNIPAAm-PEGMA nanogel were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The lower critical solution temperature of the Aurod@pNIPAAm-PEGMA nanogel could be tuned by changing the molar ratio of NIPAAm/PEGMA. The NIR-mediated drug release behavior of the Aurod@pNIPAAm-PEGMA nanogel was studied with zinc phthalocyanines (ZnPc4) as a drug model. It was also demonstrated that the loaded ZnPc4 could keep the capability of generating singlet oxygen, and the in vitro study showed a great photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect on Hela cells. It thus indicated the potential of this Aurod@pNIPAAm-PEGMA nanogel for application as a drug carrier in PDT, which might make contributions to oncotherapy. PMID:23279853

  1. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity.

    PubMed

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-03-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface. PMID:26697736

  2. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8α+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  3. Application of activated nucleoside analogs for the treatment of drug-resistant tumors by oral delivery of nanogel-drug conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Senanayake, Thulani H.; Warren, Galya; Wei, Xin; Vinogradov, Serguei V.

    2013-01-01

    A majority of nanoencapsulated drugs that have shown promise in cancer chemotherapy are administered intravenously. Development of effective oral nanoformulations presents a very challenging medical goal. Here, we describe successful applications of innovative polymeric nanogels in the form of conjugates with activated nucleoside analogs for oral administration in cancer chemotherapy. Previously, we reported the synthesis of amphiphilic polyvinyl alcohol and dextrin-based nanogel conjugates with the phosphorylated 5-FU nucleoside Floxuridine and demonstrated their enhanced activity against regular and drug-resistant cancers[1]. In this study, we synthesized and evaluated oral applications of nanogel conjugates of a protected Gemcitabine, the drug never used in oral therapies. These conjugates were able to quickly release an active form of the drug (Gemcitabine 5′-mono-, di- and triphosphates) by specific enzymatic activities, or slowly during hydrolysis. Gemcitabine conjugates demonstrated up to 127 times higher in vitro efficacy than the free drug against various cancer cells, including the lines resistant to nucleoside analogs. Surprisingly, these nanogel-drug conjugates were relatively stable in gastric conditions and able to actively penetrate through the gastrointestinal barrier based on permeability studies in Caco-2 cell model. In tumor xenograft models of several drug-resistant human cancers, we observed an efficient inhibition of tumor growth and extended the life-span of the animals by 4 times that of the control with orally treated Gemcitabine- or Floxuridine-nanogel conjugates. Thus, we have demonstrated a potential of therapeutic nanogel conjugates with the activated and stabilized Gemcitabine as a successful oral drug form against Gemcitabine-resistant and other drug-resistant tumors. PMID:23385032

  4. Smart nanogels at the air/water interface: structural studies by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielińska, Katarzyna; Sun, Huihui; Campbell, Richard A.; Zarbakhsh, Ali; Resmini, Marina

    2016-02-01

    The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes of nanogels as a function of the degree of cross-linking at the air/water interface.The development of effective transdermal drug delivery systems based on nanosized polymers requires a better understanding of the behaviour of such nanomaterials at interfaces. N-Isopropylacrylamide-based nanogels synthesized with different percentages of N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide as cross-linker, ranging from 10 to 30%, were characterized at physiological temperature at the air/water interface, using neutron reflectivity (NR), with isotopic contrast variation, and surface tension measurements; this allowed us to resolve the adsorbed amount and the volume fraction of nanogels at the interface. A large conformational change for the nanogels results in strong deformations at the interface. As the percentage of cross-linker incorporated in the nanogels becomes higher, more rigid matrices are obtained, although less deformed, and the amount of adsorbed nanogels is increased. The data provide the first experimental evidence of structural changes

  5. Ultrasound-Targeted Retroviral Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Sarah L.; Rahim, Ahad A.; Bush, Nigel L.; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Porter, Colin D.

    2007-05-01

    This study demonstrates the ability of focused ultrasound to target retroviral gene delivery. Key to our experiments was the use of non-infectious virus particles lacking the envelope protein required for receptor-mediated entry. The novelty of our approach is that spatial control at a distance is exerted upon viral delivery by subsequent exposure to ultrasound, leading to stable gene delivery. The technology is ideally suited to controlling gene delivery in vivo following systemic vector administration. Our data provide a solution to the critical issue of obtaining tissue specificity with retroviral vectors and impart stability of expression to ultrasound-mediated gene delivery.

  6. Nanogel scavengers for drugs: Local anesthetic uptake by thermoresponsive nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Todd; Sivakumaran, Daryl; Stefanescu, Cristina; Lawlor, Michael W.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    The use of functional nanogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for effectively scavenging compounds (here, the model drug bupivacaine) is demonstrated using an in vitro cell-based assay. Nanogels containing higher loadings of acidic functional groups or more core-localized functional group distributions bound more bupivacaine, while nanogel size had no significant effect on drug binding. Increasing the dose of nanogel applied also facilitated more bupivacaine binding for all nanogel compositions tested. Binding was driven predominantly by acid-base interactions between the nanogels (anionic) and bupivacaine (cationic) at physiological pH, although both non-specific absorption and hydrophobic partitioning also contributed to drug scavenging. Nanogels exhibited minimal cytotoxicity to multiple cell types and were well-tolerated in vivo via peritoneal injections, although larger nanogels caused limited splenic toxicity at higher concentrations. The cell-based assay described herein is found to facilitate more robust drug uptake measurements for nanogels than conventional centrifugation-based assays, in which nanogels can be compressed (and thus drug released) during the measurement. PMID:22244983

  7. Targeted Drug Delivery in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xianjun; Zhang, Yuqing; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi; Li, Min

    2009-01-01

    Effective drug delivery in pancreatic cancer treatment remains a major challenge. Because of the high resistance to chemo and radiation therapy, the overall survival rate for pancreatic cancer is extremely low. Recent advances in drug delivery systems hold great promise for improving cancer therapy. Using liposomes, nanoparticles, and carbon nanotubes to deliver cancer drugs and other therapeutic agents such as siRNA, suicide gene, oncolytic virus, small molecule inhibitor and antibody has been a success in recent pre-clinical trials. However, how to improve the specificity and stability of the delivered drug using ligand or antibody directed delivery represent a major problem. Therefore, developing novel, specific, tumor-targeted drug delivery systems is urgently needed for this terrible disease. This review summarizes the current progress on targeted drug delivery in pancreatic cancer, and provides important information on potential therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer treatment. PMID:19853645

  8. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  9. Curcumin-encapsulating Nanogels as an Effective Anticancer Formulation for Intracellular Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Anna; Vinogradov, Serguei V.; Morrissey, Phil; Chernin, Mitchell; Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery systems represent an attractive strategy to improve both the efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs. In this work, we describe nanoformulation of curcumin, a most potent natural anticancer compound capable of killing cancer cells while sparing the normal tissues. Since curcumin is a natural hydrophobic polyphenol, it has a low aqueous solubility and bioavailability, which are challenging to its therapeutic efficacy. We developed and evaluated a novel colloidal nanogel carrier for encapsulation of curcumin to increase its solubility and cytotoxicity. Amphiphilic Poloxamer-cationic network in the nanogel NG127 was designed to efficiently encapsulate curcumin. Homogenous drug complexes were obtained with 20–25% content of curcumin and the particle size of ca. 150 nm. Using ImageStream multispectral imaging flow cytometry, we demonstrated that the curcumin-nanogel formulation (C-NG) was readily internalized into MDA-231 breast cancer cells. A real-time cell growth electronic sensing assay was used to measure proliferation responses of various breast cancer cells to C-NG treatments. Our results indicated that the C-NG formulation was 70–85% more effective in inhibiting growth, at concentrations lower than IC50 of free curcumin. This was also confirmed morphologically by modified acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining and fluorescent microscopy. Importantly, nanocarrier NG127 alone displayed practically no cytotoxicity. We conclude that nanogel carriers offer an innovative way to encapsulate curcumin and to obtain more effective anticancer therapeutics than curcumin alone with a potential to specific tumor targeting, such as using antibodies against surface receptors specific to breast cancer cells. PMID:26937266

  10. Smart pH/Redox Dual-Responsive Nanogels for On-Demand Intracellular Anticancer Drug Release.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Wang, Qin; Huang, Shan; Xiao, Ai; Li, Fuying; Gan, Lu; Yang, Xiangliang

    2016-03-30

    Efficient accumulation and intracellular drug release in cancer cells remain a crucial challenge in developing ideal anticancer drug delivery systems. Here, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-ss-acrylic acid (P(NIPAM-ss-AA)) nanogels based on NIPAM and AA cross-linked by N,N'-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) were constructed by precipitation polymerization. The nanogels exhibited pH/redox dual responsive doxorubicin (DOX) release behavior in vitro and in tumor cells, in which DOX release from nanogels was accelerated in lysosomal pH (pH 4.5) and cytosolic reduction (10 mM GSH) conditions. Moreover, intracellular tracking of DOX-loaded nanogels confirmed that after the nanogels and the loaded DOX entered the cells simultaneously mainly via lipid raft/caveolae-mediated endocytosis, DOX-loaded nanogels were transported to lysosomes and then the loaded DOX was released to nucleus triggered by lysosomal pH and cytoplasmic high GSH. MTT analysis showed that DOX-loaded nanogels could efficiently inhibit the proliferation of HepG2 cells. In vivo animal studies demonstrated that DOX-loaded nanogels were accumulated and penetrated in tumor tissues more efficiently than free DOX. Meanwhile, DOX-loaded nanogels exhibited stronger tumor inhibition activity and fewer side effects. This study indicated that pH/redox dual-responsive nanogels might present a prospective platform for intracellular drug controlled release in cancer therapy. PMID:26960600

  11. Targeted delivery of therapeutics to endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2009-01-01

    The endothelium is a target for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in a plethora of human disease conditions including ischemia, inflammation, edema, oxidative stress, thrombosis and hemorrhage, and metabolic and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, drugs have no affinity to the endothelium, thereby limiting the localization, timing, specificity, safety, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Molecular determinants on the surface of resting and pathologically altered endothelial cells, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and receptors involved in endocytosis, can be used for drug delivery to the endothelial surface and into intracellular compartments. Drug delivery platforms such as protein conjugates, recombinant fusion constructs, targeted liposomes, and stealth polymer carriers have been designed to target drugs and imaging agents to these determinants. We review endothelial target determinants and drug delivery systems, describe parameters that control the binding of drug carriers to the endothelium, and provide examples of the endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes designed for the treatment of acute vascular disorders including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. PMID:18815813

  12. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications. PMID:25563951

  13. Matrix metalloproteases: Underutilized targets for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Deepali G.; Gemeinhart, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Pathophysiological molecules in the extracellular environment offer excellent targets that can be exploited for designing drug targeting systems. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of extracellular proteolytic enzymes that are characterized by their overexpression or overactivity in several pathologies. Over the last two decades, the MMP literature reveals heightened interest in the research involving MMP biology, pathology, and targeting. This review describes various strategies that have been designed to utilize MMPs for targeting therapeutic entities. Key factors that need to be considered in the successful design of such systems have been identified based on the analyses of these strategies. Development of targeted drug delivery using MMPs has been steadily pursued; however, drug delivery efforts using these targets need to be intensified and focused to realize the clinical application of the fast developing fundamental MMP research. PMID:17365270

  14. Nanoscale drug delivery for targeted chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yong; Huang, Qian; Tang, Jian-Qin; Hou, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Pei; Zhang, Long Zhen; Jiang, Guan

    2016-08-28

    Despite significant improvements in diagnostic methods and innovations in therapies for specific cancers, effective treatments for neoplastic diseases still represent major challenges. Nanotechnology as an emerging technology has been widely used in many fields and also provides a new opportunity for the targeted delivery of cancer drugs. Nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy drugs to the tumor site is highly desirable. Recent studies have shown that nanoscale drug delivery systems not only have the ability to destroy cancer cells but may also be carriers for chemotherapy drugs. Some studies have demonstrated that delivery of chemotherapy via nanoscale carriers has greater therapeutic benefit than either treatment modality alone. In this review, novel approaches to nanoscale delivery of chemotherapy are described and recent progress in this field is discussed. PMID:27235607

  15. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  16. Targeted Delivery of Immunomodulators to Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Jamil; Yin, Qian; Uehara, Mayuko; Ohori, Shunsuke; Tang, Li; Cai, Kaimin; Ichimura, Takaharu; McGrath, Martina; Maarouf, Omar; Kefaloyianni, Eirini; Loughhead, Scott; Petr, Jarolim; Sun, Qidi; Kwon, Mincheol; Tullius, Stefan; von Andrian, Ulrich H; Cheng, Jianjun; Abdi, Reza

    2016-05-10

    Active-targeted delivery to lymph nodes represents a major advance toward more effective treatment of immune-mediated disease. The MECA79 antibody recognizes peripheral node addressin molecules expressed by high endothelial venules of lymph nodes. By mimicking lymphocyte trafficking to the lymph nodes, we have engineered MECA79-coated microparticles containing an immunosuppressive medication, tacrolimus. Following intravenous administration, MECA79-bearing particles showed marked accumulation in the draining lymph nodes of transplanted animals. Using an allograft heart transplant model, we show that targeted lymph node delivery of microparticles containing tacrolimus can prolong heart allograft survival with negligible changes in tacrolimus serum level. Using MECA79 conjugation, we have demonstrated targeted delivery of tacrolimus to the lymph nodes following systemic administration, with the capacity for immune modulation in vivo. PMID:27134176

  17. Stimuli-responsive smart nanogels for cancer diagnostics and therapy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Motoi; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2010-04-01

    This article discusses stimuli-responsive poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coated (PEGylated) nanogels and their biomedical applications. Preparation and characterization of stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels composed of a crosslinked poly(2-[N,N-diethylamino]ethyl methacrylate) (PEAMA) core and PEG tethered chains are initially described. Stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels show unique properties and functions in synchronizing with the reversible volume phase transition of the PEAMA core in response to the extracellular pH (7-6.5) of a tumor environment as well as endosomal/lysosomal pH (6.5-5.0) and temperature. We list several biomedical applications of stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels, including (19)F magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRS/I) probe to visualize acidosis (tumor tissue), intracellular drug and siRNA delivery, antennas for cancer photothermal therapy and apoptosis probe for monitoring response to cancer therapy. Thus, stimuli-responsive PEGylated nanogels can be utilized as smart nanomedicines for cancer diagnostics and therapy. PMID:20394537

  18. Targeting the brain: advances in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Blumling Iii, James P; Silva, Gabriel A

    2012-09-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) represents a significant obstacle for drug delivery to the brain. Many therapeutics with potential for treating neurological conditions prove incompatible with intravenous delivery simply because of this barrier. Rather than modifying drugs to penetrate the BBB directly, it has proven more efficacious to either physically bypass the barrier or to use specialized delivery vehicles that circumvent BBB regulatory mechanisms. Controlled-release intracranial polymer implants and particle injections are the clinical state of the art with regard to localized delivery, although these approaches can impose significant surgical risks. Focused ultrasound provides a non-invasive alternative that may prove more desirable for acute treatment of brain tumors and other conditions requiring local tissue necrosis. For targeting the brain as a whole, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and molecular trojan horses (MTHs) have demonstrated particular ability as delivery molecules and will likely see increased application. CPPs are not brain specific but offer the potential for efficient traversal of the BBB, and tandem systems with targeting molecules may produce extremely effective brain drug delivery tools. Molecular trojan horses utilize receptor-mediated transcytosis to transport cargo and are thus limited by the quantity of relevant receptors; however, they can be very selective for the BBB endothelium and have shown promise in gene therapy. PMID:23016646

  19. Janus nanogels of PEGylated Taxol and PLGA-PEG-PLGA copolymer for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Wang, Huaimin; Zhu, Meifeng; Ding, Dan; Li, Dongxia; Yin, Zhinan; Wang, Lianyong; Yang, Zhimou

    2013-09-01

    Nanogels are promising carriers for the delivery of anti-cancer drugs for cancer therapy. We report in this study on a Janus nanogel system formed by mixing a prodrug of Taxol (PEGylated Taxol) and a copolymer of PLGA-PEG-PLGA. The Janus nanogels have good stability over months in aqueous solutions and the freeze-dried powder of nanogels can be re-dispersed instantly in aqueous solutions. The Janus nanogels show an enhanced inhibition effect on tumor growth in a mice breast cancer model probably due to the enhanced uptake of the nano-sized materials by the EPR effect. What is more, the nanogels can also serve as physical carriers to co-deliver other anti-cancer drugs such as doxorubicin to further improve the anti-cancer efficacy. The results obtained from H&E staining and TUNEL assay also support the observation of tumor growth inhibition. These results suggest the potential of this novel delivery system for cancer therapy.Nanogels are promising carriers for the delivery of anti-cancer drugs for cancer therapy. We report in this study on a Janus nanogel system formed by mixing a prodrug of Taxol (PEGylated Taxol) and a copolymer of PLGA-PEG-PLGA. The Janus nanogels have good stability over months in aqueous solutions and the freeze-dried powder of nanogels can be re-dispersed instantly in aqueous solutions. The Janus nanogels show an enhanced inhibition effect on tumor growth in a mice breast cancer model probably due to the enhanced uptake of the nano-sized materials by the EPR effect. What is more, the nanogels can also serve as physical carriers to co-deliver other anti-cancer drugs such as doxorubicin to further improve the anti-cancer efficacy. The results obtained from H&E staining and TUNEL assay also support the observation of tumor growth inhibition. These results suggest the potential of this novel delivery system for cancer therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis and characterization of compounds, dynamic time sweep, H

  20. Biomimetic synthesis of hybrid hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using nanogel template for controlled release of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jinli; Zhong, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun

    2016-05-01

    A biomimetic method was used to prepare hybrid hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanoparticles with chitosan/polyacrylic acid (CS-PAA) nanogel. The morphology, structure, crystallinity, thermal properties and biocompatibility of the obtained hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles have been characterized. In addition, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to study the loading and release behaviors of the hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles. The results indicated that the obtained HAP nanoparticles were agglomerated and the nanogel could regulate the formation of HAP. When the nanogel concentration decreased, different HAP crystal shapes and agglomerate structures were obtained. The loading amount of BSA reached 67.6 mg/g for the hybrid nanoparticles when the mineral content was 90.4%, which decreased when the nanogel concentration increased. The release profile of BSA was sustained in neutral buffer. Meanwhile, an initial burst release was found at pH 4.5 due to the desorption of BSA from the surface, followed by a slow release. The hemolysis percentage of the hybrid nanoparticles was close to the negative control, and these particles were non-toxic to bone marrow stromal stem cells. The results suggest that these hybrid nanogel-HAP nanoparticles are promising candidate materials for biocompatible drug delivery systems. PMID:26952436

  1. Synthesis of surfactant-free hydroxypropyl methylcellulose nanogels for controlled release of insulin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Shi, Xiaodi; Liu, Tianqun; Lu, Xihua; Qiu, Gao; Shea, Kenneth J

    2016-10-20

    A facile controlled-release nanogels delivery system has been developed by using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) hybrid nanogels as encapsulation shell materials, which were synthesized by surfactant-free polymerization in aqueous solution. The effects of reaction time and cross-linker concentration on the size of the nanogels have been studied. The results showed that in a certain range, the particle size decreased with increasing reaction time and increasing concentration of cross-linker. Meanwhile, at the feeding ratio 0.05/1 of HPMC/methacrylic acid (MAA), the LCST of prepared nanogels at pH=6 was close to the body temperature, which can be used as sustained insulin delivery system. Besides, the HPMC nanogels loaded with insulin had a high drug loading of 21.3% and a high entrapment efficiency of 95.7%. The release behavior of the insulin nanogels can be adjusted by pH and temperature which will have potential applications in controlled release delivery system. PMID:27474648

  2. Targeted TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ningning; Singh, Saurabh; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-10-30

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent an antigene approach for gene regulation through direct interaction with genomic DNA. While this strategy holds great promise owing to the fact that only two alleles need silencing to impact gene regulation, delivering TFOs to target cells in vivo is still a challenge. Our recent efforts have focused on conjugating TFOs to carrier molecules like cholesterol to enhance their cellular uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) to target TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) for treating liver fibrosis. These approaches however are rendered less effective owing to a lack of targeted delivery, as seen with lipid-conjugates, and the potential immune reactions due to repeated dosing with high molecular weight BSA conjugated TFO. In this review, we discuss our latest efforts to enhance the effectiveness of TFO for treating liver fibrosis. We have shown that conjugation of TFOs to M6P-HPMA can enhance TFO delivery to HSCs and has the potential to treat liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis. This TFO conjugate shows negligible immunogenicity owing to the use of HPMA, one of the least immunogenic copolymers, thereby making it a suitable and more effective candidate for antifibrotic therapy. PMID:21763370

  3. Targeted TFO Delivery to Hepatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ningning; Singh, Saurabh; Mahato, Ram I

    2011-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) represent an antigene approach for gene regulation through direct interaction with genomic DNA. While this strategy holds great promise owing to the fact that only two alleles need silencing to impact gene regulation, delivering TFOs to target cells in vivo is still a challenge. Our recent efforts have focused on conjugating TFOs to carrier molecules like cholesterol to enhance their cellular uptake and mannose-6-phosphate-bovine serum albumin (M6P-BSA) to target TFO delivery to hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) for treating liver fibrosis. These approaches however are rendered less effective owing to a lack of targeted delivery, as seen with lipid-conjugates, and the potential immune reactions due to repeated dosing with high molecular weight BSA conjugated TFO. In this review, we discuss our latest efforts to enhance the effectiveness of TFO for treating liver fibrosis. We have shown that conjugation of TFOs to M6P-HPMA can enhance TFO delivery to HSCs and has the potential to treat liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen synthesis. This TFO conjugate shows negligible immunogenicity owing to the use of HPMA, one of the least immunogenic copolymers, thereby making it a suitable and more effective candidate for antifibrotic therapy. PMID:21763370

  4. Polyamide Nanogels from GRAS Components and Their Toxicity in Mouse Pre-implantation Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Priyaa; Molla, Mijanur Rahaman; Cui, Wei; Canakci, Mine; Osborne, Barbara; Mager, Jesse; Thayumanavan, S.

    2016-01-01

    Safe delivery systems that can not only encapsulate hydrophobic drug molecules, but also release them in response to specific triggers, are important in several therapeutic and biomedical applications. In this paper, we have designed a nanogel based on molecules that are generally recognized as safe (GRAS). We have shown that the resultant polymeric nanogels exhibit responsive molecular release, and also show high in vitro cellular viability on HEK 293T, HeLa, MCF 7 and A549 cell lines. The toxicity of these nanogels was further evaluated with a highly sensitive assay using mouse preimplantation embryo development, where blastocysts were formed after four days of in vitro culture and live pups were born when morulae/early blastocysts were transferred to the uteri of surrogate recipients. Our results indicate that these nanogels are non-toxic during mammalian development and do not alter normal growth or early embryo success rate. PMID:26367020

  5. Effects of thermoresponsivity and softness on skin penetration and cellular uptake of polyglycerol-based nanogels.

    PubMed

    Rancan, Fiorenza; Asadian-Birjand, Mazdak; Dogan, Serap; Graf, Christina; Cuellar, Luis; Lommatzsch, Stefanie; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Calderón, Marcelo; Vogt, Annika

    2016-04-28

    Nanogels are water soluble cross-linked polymer networks with nanometer size dimensions that can be designed to incorporate different types of compounds and are promising carrier systems for drugs and biological molecules. In this study, the interactions of thermoresponsive nanogels (tNGs) with the human skin barrier and underlying epidermis cells were investigated with the aim of using such macromolecules to improve dermal and transdermal drug delivery. The investigated tNGs were made of acrylated dendritic polyglycerol, as water soluble cross-linker, and of oligo ethylene glycol methacrylate (OEGMA) as subunit conferring thermoresponsive properties. tNGs with different polymer transition temperatures were tagged with Rhodamine B (RhdB) and analyzed for their physicochemical properties. We found that tNGs with cloud point temperatures (Tcps) of 38 °C (tNG-RhdB-T38) lost softness (measured by PeakForce quantitative nanomechanics, QNM) and aggregated to bigger sized particles (measured as increase of particle average size by dynamic light scattering, DLS) when temperature changed from 15 to 37 °C. On the contrary, at the same conditions, tNGs with higher Tcps (tNG-RhdB-T55) did not show any significant changes of these characteristics. Applied on excised human skin, both tNGs penetrated deep in the stratum corneum (SC). Small amounts of tNGs were detected also in cells of the viable epidermis. Interestingly, whereas tNG softness correlated with higher penetration in SC, a better cellular uptake was observed for the thermoresponsive tNG-RhdB-T38. We conclude that soft nanocarriers possess a high SC penetration ability and that thermoresponsive nanogels are attractive carrier systems for the targeting of drugs to epidermis cells. PMID:26948381

  6. Cooperative assembly in targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auguste, Debra

    2012-02-01

    Described as cell analogues, liposomes are self-assembled lipid bilayer spheres that encapsulate aqueous volumes. Liposomes offer several drug delivery advantages due to their structural versatility related to size, composition, bilayer fluidity, and ability to encapsulate a large variety of compounds non-covalently. However, liposomes lack the structural information embedded within cell membranes. Partitioning of unsaturated and saturated lipids into liquid crystalline (Lα) and gel phase (Lβ) domains, respectively, affects local molecular diffusion and elasticity. Liposome microdomains may be used to pattern molecules, such as antibodies, on the liposome surface to create concentrated, segregated binding regions. We have synthesized, characterized, and evaluated a series of homogeneous and heterogeneous liposomal vehicles that target inflamed endothelium. These drug delivery vehicles are designed to complement the heterogeneous presentation of lipids and receptors on endothelial cells (ECs). EC surfaces are dynamic; they segregate receptors within saturated lipid microdomains on the cell surface to regulate binding and signaling events. We have demonstrated that cooperative binding of two antibodies enhances targeting by multiple fold. Further, we have shown that organization of these antibodies on the surface can further enhance cell uptake. The data suggest that EC targeting may be enhanced by designing liposomes that mirror the segregated structure of lipid and receptor molecules involved in neutrophil-EC adhesion. This strategy is employed in an atherosclerotic mouse model in vivo.

  7. Targeted polysaccharide nanoparticle for adamplatin prodrug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2013-12-12

    A series of conjugated hyaluronic acid particles (HAP), composed of a hydrophobic anticancer drug core and hydrophilic cyclodextrin/hyaluronic acid shell, were prepared through self-assembling and characterized by (1)H NMR titration, electron microscopy, zeta potential, and dynamic light-scattering experiments. The nanometer-sized HAP thus prepared was biocompatible and biodegradable and was well-recognized by the hyaluronic acid receptors overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells, which enabled us to exploit HAP as an efficient targeted delivery system for anticancer drugs. Indeed, HAP exhibited anticancer activities comparable to the commercial anticancer drug cisplatin but with lower side effects both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24252070

  8. Targeted delivery of colloids by swimming bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Koumakis, N.; Lepore, A.; Maggi, C.; Di Leonardo, R.

    2013-01-01

    The possibility of exploiting motile microorganisms as tiny propellers represents a fascinating strategy for the transport of colloidal cargoes. However, delivery on target sites usually requires external control fields to steer propellers and trigger cargo release. The need for a constant feedback mechanism prevents the design of compact devices where biopropellers could perform their tasks autonomously. Here we show that properly designed three-dimensional (3D) microstructures can define accumulation areas where bacteria spontaneously and efficiently store colloidal beads. The process is stochastic in nature and results from the rectifying action of an asymmetric energy landscape over the fluctuating forces arising from collisions with swimming bacteria. As a result, the concentration of colloids over target areas can be strongly increased or depleted according to the topography of the underlying structures. Besides the significance to technological applications, our experiments pose some important questions regarding the structure of stationary probability distributions in non-equilibrium systems. PMID:24100868

  9. Injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yi; Li, Ye; Wu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Nanocrystals are pure drug crystals with sizes in the nanometer range. Due to the advantages of high drug loading, platform stability, and ease of scaling-up, nanocrystals have been widely used to deliver poorly water-soluble drugs. Nanocrystals in the blood stream can be recognized and sequestered as exogenous materials by mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS) cells, leading to passive accumulation in MPS-rich organs, such as liver, spleen and lung. Particle size, morphology and surface modification affect the biodistribution of nanocrystals. Ligand conjugation and stimuli-responsive polymers can also be used to target nanocrystals to specific pathogenic sites. In this review, the progress on injected nanocrystals for targeted drug delivery is discussed following a brief introduction to nanocrystal preparation methods, i.e., top-down and bottom-up technologies. PMID:27006893

  10. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 μm) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ≥2.5 μm. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  11. Thermoresponsive hyaluronic acid nanogels as hydrophobic drug carrier to macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fernandes Stefanello, Talitha; Szarpak-Jankowska, Anna; Appaix, Florence; Louage, Benoit; Hamard, Lauriane; De Geest, Bruno G; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Auzély-Velty, Rachel

    2014-11-01

    Delivery systems for macrophages are particularly attractive since these phagocytic cells play a important role in immunological and inflammatory responses, also acting as host cells for microorganisms that are involved in deadly infectious diseases, such as leishmaniasis. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is specifically recognized by macrophages that are known to express HA receptors. Therefore, in this study, we focused on HA-based nanogels as drug carriers for these cells. The drug delivery was validated in an in vivo study on mice using intravital two-photon laser scanning microscopy. HA derivatives were modified with a biocompatible oligo(ethylene glycol)-based thermoresponsive polymer to form nanogels. These HA conjugates were readily prepared by varying the molar mass of initial HA and the degree of substitution via radical-mediated thiol-ene chemistry in aqueous solution. The derivatives were shown to self-assemble into spherical gel particles with diameters ranging from 150 to 214 nm above 37 °C. A poorly water-soluble two-photon dye was successfully loaded into the nanogels during this self-assembly process. In vitro cellular uptake tests using a RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line showed successful intracellular delivery of the hydrophobic dye. After intravenous injection in mice, the nanogels circulated freely in the blood but were rapidly phagocytized within 13 min by circulating macrophages and stored in the liver and spleen, as observed by two-photon microscopy. Benefit can be thus expected in using such a delivery system for the liver and spleen macrophage-associated diseases. PMID:25110287

  12. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  13. One-Step "Click Chemistry"-Synthesized Cross-Linked Prodrug Nanogel for Highly Selective Intracellular Drug Delivery and Upregulated Antitumor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Ding, Jianxun; Li, Mingqiang; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Chunsheng; Zhuang, Xiuli; Huang, Yubin; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-05-01

    Polymeric prodrugs formed by the conjugation of drugs onto polymers have shown great promise in cancer therapy because of the enhancement of water solubility, elimination of premature drug release, and the improvement of pharmacokinetics. To integrate the two advantages of upregulated stability during circulation and selective release of drug in cancer cells, a pH and reduction dual-sensitive prodrug nanogel (CLP) was synthesized via a simple one step "click chemistry". CLP was spherically shaped with a uniform diameter of 60.6 ± 13.7 nm and exhibited great stability in size against large volume dilution, high salt concentration, and long-time incubation in phosphate-buffered saline. Owing to the presence of hydrazone-bonded doxorubicin (DOX) and disulfide cross-linker, CLP released minimal amount (7.8%) of drug under normal physiological pH (i.e., 7.4) condition. But it released 85.5% of the loaded DOX at endosomal pH (i.e., 5.5) plus the presence of 5.0 mM GSH in 120 h. CLP could be effectively internalized by tumor cells and subsequently release DOX in the intracellular environment, resulting in effective proliferation inhibition of HeLa and MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, compared with free DOX and non-cross-linked prodrug micelle (NCLP), CLP accumulated more in tumor site but less in the normal organs, so that CLP performed the enhanced antitumor efficiency and reduced side-toxicities toward the MCF-7 human breast cancer xenograft nude mouse model. With convenient fabrication, favorable stability, controlled release properties, optimized biodistribution, and enhanced suppression of tumor growth, CLP held great potential for optimal antitumor therapy. PMID:27077549

  14. Progress in aptamer-mediated drug delivery vehicles for cancer targeting and its implications in addressing chemotherapeutic challenges.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jie; Huang, He; Dong, Shiwu; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are novel oligonucleotides with flexible three-dimensional configurations that recognize and bind to their cognate targets, including tumor surface receptors, in a high-affinity and highly specific manner. Because of their unique intrinsic properties, a variety of aptamer-mediated nanovehicles have been developed to directionally transport anti-cancer drugs to tumor sites to minimize systemic cytotoxicity and to enhance permeation by these tumoricidal agents. Despite advances in the selection and synthesis of aptamers and in the conjugation and self-assembly of nanotechnologies, current chemotherapy and drug delivery systems face great challenges. These challenges are due to the limitations of aptamers and vehicles and because of complicated tumor mechanisms, including heterogeneity, anti-cancer drug resistance, and hypoxia-induced aberrances. In this review, we will summarize current approaches utilizing tumor surface hallmarks and aptamers and their roles and mechanisms in therapeutic nanovehicles targeting tumors. Delivery forms include nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanogels, aptamer-drug conjugates, and novel molecular trains. Moreover, the obstacles posed by the aforementioned issues will be highlighted, and possible solutions will be acknowledged. Furthermore, future perspectives will be presented, including cutting-edge integration with RNA interference nanotechnology and personalized chemotherapy, which will facilitate innovative approaches to aptamer-based therapeutics. PMID:25057317

  15. Progress in Aptamer-Mediated Drug Delivery Vehicles for Cancer Targeting and Its Implications in Addressing Chemotherapeutic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Huang, He; Dong, Shiwu; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Aptamers are novel oligonucleotides with flexible three-dimensional configurations that recognize and bind to their cognate targets, including tumor surface receptors, in a high-affinity and highly specific manner. Because of their unique intrinsic properties, a variety of aptamer-mediated nanovehicles have been developed to directionally transport anti-cancer drugs to tumor sites to minimize systemic cytotoxicity and to enhance permeation by these tumoricidal agents. Despite advances in the selection and synthesis of aptamers and in the conjugation and self-assembly of nanotechnologies, current chemotherapy and drug delivery systems face great challenges. These challenges are due to the limitations of aptamers and vehicles and because of complicated tumor mechanisms, including heterogeneity, anti-cancer drug resistance, and hypoxia-induced aberrances. In this review, we will summarize current approaches utilizing tumor surface hallmarks and aptamers and their roles and mechanisms in therapeutic nanovehicles targeting tumors. Delivery forms include nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanogels, aptamer-drug conjugates, and novel molecular trains. Moreover, the obstacles posed by the aforementioned issues will be highlighted, and possible solutions will be acknowledged. Furthermore, future perspectives will be presented, including cutting-edge integration with RNA interference nanotechnology and personalized chemotherapy, which will facilitate innovative approaches to aptamer-based therapeutics. PMID:25057317

  16. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications. PMID:24881520

  17. Targeted medication delivery using magnetic nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Mina

    2007-01-01

    We use quaternion molecular dynamics simulations to describe field-induced structural transitions in systems of few magnetic dipoles and their use for targeted medication delivery. Compact ring isomers of magnetic particles are contained, together with molecules of an active medication, inside inert microcapsules. The filled microcapsules may be transported within the body using a weak,inhomogeneous magnetic field. Medication release is triggered by puncturing the container during a structural transition within the magnetic subsystem, induced by an externally applied strong magnetic field. Our simulations describe not only the time evolution of the magnetic subsystem during a successful medication release, but also address ways to suppress an accidental release induced by thermal and magnetic fluctuations.

  18. Fluorescent nanogel based on four-arm PEG-PCL copolymer with porphyrin core for bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xia; Wei, Chang; Lu, Li; Liu, Tianjun; Lv, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Four-arm PEG-PCL copolymer with porphyrin core (POR-PEG-PCL) exhibits beneficial fluorescence ability in vivo. To further develop an application of thermosensitive porphyrin hydrogel based on four-arm PEG-PCL copolymer as a drug carrier, a POR-PEG-PCL nanogel was tracked and located to tumor tissue with porphyrin as a fluorescence tag via intravenous injection. The structure and function of the nanogel were evaluated by TEM, DLS, H-NMR, UV-vis and fluorescence spectra. The fluorescent nanogel was monitored by an in vivo imaging system with hepatoma tumor-bearing mice. Good biocompatibility and safety in vitro and in vivo show that the POR-PEG-PCL nanogel is a potential drug carrier that targets tumor tissues with fluorescence bioimaging. PMID:26838843

  19. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-09-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [(18)F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [(18)F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  20. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-01-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [18F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [18F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  1. Bioinspired Nanonetworks for Targeted Cancer Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Raz, Nasibeh Rady; Akbarzadeh-T, Mohammad-R; Tafaghodi, Mohsen

    2015-12-01

    A biomimicry approach to nanonetworks is proposed here for targeted cancer drug delivery (TDD). The swarm of bioinspired nanomachines utilizes the blood distribution network and chemotaxis to carry drug through the vascular system to the cancer site, recognized by a high concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Our approach is multi-scale and includes processes that occur both within cells and with their neighbors. The proposed bionanonetwork takes advantage of several organic processes, some of which already occur within the human body, such as a plate-like structure similar to those of red blood cells for more environmental contact; a berry fruit architecture for its internal multi-foams architecture; the penetrable structure of cancer cells, tissue, as well as the porous structure of the capillaries for drug penetration; state of glycocalyx for ligand-receptor adhesion; as well as changes in pH state of blood and O 2 release for nanomachine communication. For a more appropriate evaluation, we compare our work with a conventional chemotherapy approach using a mathematical model of cancer under actual experimental parameter settings. Simulation results show the merits of the proposed method in targeted cancer therapy by improving the densities of the relevant cancer cell types and VEGF concentration, while following more organic and natural processes. PMID:26529771

  2. Mitochondrial biology, targets, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Trivedi, Malav; Singh, Amit; Talekar, Meghna; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-06-10

    In recent years, mitochondrial medicine has emerged as a new discipline resting at the intersection of mitochondrial biology, pathology, and pharmaceutics. The central role of mitochondria in critical cellular processes such as metabolism and apoptosis has placed mitochondria at the forefront of cell science. Advances in mitochondrial biology have revealed that these organelles continually undergo fusion and fission while functioning independently and in complex cellular networks, establishing direct membrane contacts with each other and with other organelles. Understanding the diverse cellular functions of mitochondria has contributed to understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in disease states. Polyplasmy and heteroplasmy contribute to mitochondrial phenotypes and associated dysfunction. Residing at the center of cell biology, cellular functions, and disease pathology and being laden with receptors and targets, mitochondria are beacons for pharmaceutical modification. This review presents the current state of mitochondrial medicine with a focus on mitochondrial function, dysfunction, and common disease; mitochondrial receptors, targets, and substrates; and mitochondrial drug design and drug delivery with a focus on the application of nanotechnology to mitochondrial medicine. Mitochondrial medicine is at the precipice of clinical translation; the objective of this review is to aid in the advancement of mitochondrial medicine from infancy to application. PMID:25841699

  3. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  4. Preparation and characterization of tri-block poly(lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) nanogels for controlled release of naltrexone.

    PubMed

    Asadi, H; Rostamizadeh, K; Salari, D; Hamidi, M

    2011-09-15

    Tri-block poly(lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (PLA-PEG-PLA) copolymers and related acrylated derivative were synthesized and used to prepare micelles and nanogels for controlled release of naltrexone. The resulting copolymers, micelles and nanogels were characterized by various techniques such as proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, fluorescence spectrometry, differential scanning calorimetry, photon correlation spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The nanogels exhibited high encapsulation efficiency around 60% and excellent stability for long periods of time. The drug release profiles of micelles and nanogels were compared and it was found that the naltrexone loaded nanogels offered a steady and long-term release pattern for different periods of time up to 35 days, depending on the crosslinker concentration, compared to the micelles. The size of nanogels could be manipulated easily in the range of 128-200nm by variations in polymer concentration used in the nanogels preparation step. From the results obtained it can be concluded that PLA-PEG-PLA nanogels can be considered as a promising carrier for drug delivery purpose. PMID:21729744

  5. A Fluorescent Responsive Hybrid Nanogel for Closed-Loop Control of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weitai; Chen, Shoumin; Hu, Yumei; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2012-01-01

    Background The concept of closed-loop control of glucose, in which continuous glucose sensing is coupled to a fully automated insulin delivery device, without human input, has been an attractive idea for diabetes management. This study presents a new class of hybrid nanogels that can integrate glucose sensing and glucose-responsive insulin release into a single nano-object. Methods Zinc oxide@poly[N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM)-acrylamide (AAm)- 2-aminomethyl-5-fluorophenylboronic acid (FPBA)] hybrid nanogels were synthesized and investigated for size, morphology, volume phase transition, photoluminescence properties, and in vitro insulin release under different glucose concentrations. Glucose sensing was performed both in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and in blood samples. The insulin release in PBS of varying glucose levels, as well as a stepwise treatment between two glucose levels (126.0 and 270.0 mg/dl), was performed to test the glucose-responsive insulin release ability of the hybrid nanogels. Results Zinc oxide@poly(NIPAM-AAm-FPBA) hybrid nanogels can sensitively and selectively detect glucose in highly reproducible fluorescent signals over the clinically relevant glucose concentration range of 18−540 mg/dl. The glucose-responsive volume phase transition of the nanogels can further regulate the release of the preloaded insulin. The insulin release from the nanogels exhibits the slowest rate (~5% released in 76 h) at a normal glucose level (108.0 mg/dl) but becomes quicker and quicker as the glucose increases to higher and higher levels. Conclusions The rationally designed hybrid nanogel can optically signal the glucose level with high sensitivity and selectivity and simultaneously regulate the insulin release rate in response to the glucose reading, which shows a promising concept toward the development of a miniaturized closed-loop glycemic control system. PMID:22920816

  6. Targeted Delivery Systems for Molecular Therapy in Skeletal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; Li, Fangfei; Wang, Luyao; Li, Defang; Guo, Baosheng; He, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Feng; Liang, Chao; Liu, Biao; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; He, Bing; Lu, Jun; Lu, Cheng; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Abnormalities in the integral components of bone, including bone matrix, bone mineral and bone cells, give rise to complex disturbances of skeletal development, growth and homeostasis. Non-specific drug delivery using high-dose systemic administration may decrease therapeutic efficacy of drugs and increase the risk of toxic effects in non-skeletal tissues, which remain clinical challenges in the treatment of skeletal disorders. Thus, targeted delivery systems are urgently needed to achieve higher drug delivery efficiency, improve therapeutic efficacy in the targeted cells/tissues, and minimize toxicities in non-targeted cells/tissues. In this review, we summarize recent progress in the application of different targeting moieties and nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in skeletal disorders, and also discuss the advantages, challenges and perspectives in their clinical translation. PMID:27011176

  7. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  8. Polysaccharide-based Noncovalent Assembly for Targeted Delivery of Taxol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The construction of synthetic straightforward, biocompatible and biodegradable targeted drug delivery system with fluorescent tracking abilities, high anticancer activities and low side effects is still a challenge in the field of biochemistry and material chemistry. In this work, we constructed targeted paclitaxel (Taxol) delivery nanoparticles composed of permethyl-β-cyclodextrin modified hyaluronic acid (HApCD) and porphyrin modified paclitaxel prodrug (PorTaxol), through host-guest and amphiphilic interactions. The obtained nanoparticles (HATXP) were biocompatible and enzymatic biodegradable due to their hydrophilic hyaluronic acid (HA) shell and hydrophobic Taxol core, and exhibited specific targeting internalization into cancer cells via HA receptor mediated endocytosis effects. The cytotoxicity experiments showed that the HATXP exhibited similar anticancer activities to, but much lower side effects than commercial anticancer drug Taxol. The present work would provide a platform for targeted paclitaxel drug delivery and a general protocol for the design of advanced multifunctional nanoscale biomaterials for targeted drug/gene delivery. PMID:26759029

  9. Synthesis of Nanogel-Protein Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Maynard, Heather D.; Thayumanavan, S.

    2014-01-01

    The covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to disulfide cross-linked polymeric nanogels is reported. Polymeric nanogel precursors were synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) random copolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and pyridyl disulfide methacrylate (PDSMA). Reaction of the p(PEGMA-co-PDSMA) with dithiothreitol resulted in the formation of nanogels. PDSMA serves as both a crosslinking agent and a reactive handle for the surface modification of the nanogels. Lipophilic dye, DiI, was sequestered within the nanogels by performing the crosslinking reaction in the presence of the hydrophobic molecule. Thiol-enriched BSA was conjugated to nanogels loaded with DiI via a disulfide reaction between the BSA and the surface exposed nanogel pyridyl disulfides. Conjugation was confirmed by fast protein liquid chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We expect that this methodology is generally applicable to the preparation of nanogel-protein therapeutics. PMID:24761162

  10. Synthesis of Nanogel-Protein Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Nicholas M; González-Toro, Daniella C; Chacko, Reuben T; Maynard, Heather D; Thayumanavan, S

    2013-04-21

    The covalent conjugation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to disulfide cross-linked polymeric nanogels is reported. Polymeric nanogel precursors were synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) random copolymerization of poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) and pyridyl disulfide methacrylate (PDSMA). Reaction of the p(PEGMA-co-PDSMA) with dithiothreitol resulted in the formation of nanogels. PDSMA serves as both a crosslinking agent and a reactive handle for the surface modification of the nanogels. Lipophilic dye, DiI, was sequestered within the nanogels by performing the crosslinking reaction in the presence of the hydrophobic molecule. Thiol-enriched BSA was conjugated to nanogels loaded with DiI via a disulfide reaction between the BSA and the surface exposed nanogel pyridyl disulfides. Conjugation was confirmed by fast protein liquid chromatography, dynamic light scattering, and agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. We expect that this methodology is generally applicable to the preparation of nanogel-protein therapeutics. PMID:24761162

  11. Antiproliferative Activity of Fucan Nanogel

    PubMed Central

    Dantas-Santos, Nednaldo; Almeida-Lima, Jailma; Vidal, Arthur Anthunes Jacome; Gomes, Dayanne Lopes; Oliveira, Ruth Medeiros; Santos Pedrosa, Silvia; Pereira, Paula; Gama, Francisco Miguel; Oliveira Rocha, Hugo Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Sulfated fucans comprise families of polydisperse natural polysaccharides based on sulfated L-fucose. Our aim was to investigate whether fucan nanogel induces cell-specific responses. To that end, a non toxic fucan extracted from Spatoglossum schröederi was chemically modified by grafting hexadecylamine to the polymer hydrophilic backbone. The resulting modified material (SNFuc) formed nanosized particles. The degree of substitution with hydrophobic chains was close to 100%, as estimated by elemental analysis. SNFfuc in aqueous media had a mean diameter of 123 nm and zeta potential of −38.3 ± 0.74 mV, as measured by dynamic light scattering. Nanoparticles conserved their size for up to 70 days. SNFuc cytotoxicity was determined using the MTT assay after culturing different cell lines for 24 h. Tumor-cell (HepG2, 786, H-S5) proliferation was inhibited by 2.0%–43.7% at nanogel concentrations of 0.05–0.5 mg/mL and rabbit aorta endothelial cells (RAEC) non-tumor cell line proliferation displayed inhibition of 8.0%–22.0%. On the other hand, nanogel improved Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and monocyte macrophage cell (RAW) non-tumor cell line proliferation in the same concentration range. The antiproliferative effect against tumor cells was also confirmed using the BrdU test. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the fucan nanogel inhibited 786 cell proliferation through caspase and caspase-independent mechanisms. In addition, SNFuc blocks 786 cell passages in the S and G2-M phases of the cell cycle. PMID:23118717

  12. Shell-crosslinked hyaluronic acid nanogels for live monitoring of hyaluronidase activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; Chong, Youhoon; Mok, Hyejung

    2014-06-01

    A hyaluronidase (HAdase) has been noticed as a potential drug target as well as prognostic marker because of its close associations with tumor invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Accordingly, precise monitoring of HAdase activity in vivo seems to be crucial not only for the evaluation of HAdase activity but also for non-invasive molecular imaging. In our study, we propose a new organic, near-infrared fluorescence imaging probe, indocyanine green (ICG)-based stimuli-responsive fluorescence probe for selective imaging of HAdases with appreciable signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios in serum and in vivo. Shell-crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) nanogels (sc-nanogels) are generated via a reducible covalent linkage which incorporate ICG derivatives. The ICG-embeded HA nanogels via shell-crosslinking have preferable properties for ideal selective imaging and detection of HAdase activity in vivo. The sc-nanogels exhibit prominent chemical stability against external light, greatly control background signals in serum, and small size compared to use of self-assembled ICG-based carriers. Collapsed ICG in the hydrogel core is selectively disentangled by HAdase treatment for selective near-infrared imaging without unwanted background signal. The newly designed sc-nanogels may have great potential to serve as probes for improved selective imaging of HAdase-associated diseases in clinics as well as HAdase-activity screening in vivo. PMID:24505028

  13. Design of Nanoparticle-Based Carriers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Muqing; Duval, Kayla; Guo, Xing; Chen, Zi

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have shown promise as both drug delivery vehicles and direct antitumor systems, but they must be properly designed in order to maximize efficacy. Computational modeling is often used both to design new nanoparticles and to better understand existing ones. Modeled processes include the release of drugs at the tumor site and the physical interaction between the nanoparticle and cancer cells. In this article, we provide an overview of three different targeted drug delivery methods (passive targeting, active targeting and physical targeting), compare methods of action, advantages, limitations, and the current stage of research. For the most commonly used nanoparticle carriers, fabrication methods are also reviewed. This is followed by a review of computational simulations and models on nanoparticle-based drug delivery. PMID:27398083

  14. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain drug and non-functionalized nanosystems in delivering therapeutic agents to mitochondria. Although the field is in its infancy, studies to date suggest the superior therapeutic activity of functionalized nanosystems for treating mitochondrial defects. PMID:22138492

  15. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging

  16. Surface modulatable nanocapsids for targeting and tracking toward nanotheranostic delivery.

    PubMed

    Stark, Marie; Cheng, R Holland

    2016-09-01

    Nanoparticle diagnostics and therapeutics (nanotheranostics) have significantly advanced cancer detection and treatment. However, many nanotheranostics are ineffective due to defects in tumor localization and bioavailability. An engineered Hepatitis E Virus (HEV) nanocapsid is a proposed platform for targeted cancer-cell delivery. Self-assembling from HEV capsid subunits, nanocapsids retain the capacity to enter cells and resist proteolytic/acidic conditions, but lack infectious viral elements. The nanocapsid surface was modified for chemical activation to confer tumor-specific targeting and detection, immune-response manipulation and controlled theranostic delivery. Nanotheranostic molecules can be packaged in the hollow nanocapsid shell during in vitro assembly. Complementing the adapted stability and cell-entry characteristics of the HEV capsid, a modified nanocapsid serves as a tunable tumor-targeting platform for nanotheronostic delivery. PMID:27610752

  17. Fabrication and characterization of sol-gel based nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Reeta

    Nanogels are cross linked polymeric sol-gel based nanoparticles that offer an interior network for incorporation and protection of biomolecules, exhibiting unique advantages for polymer based delivery systems. We have successfully synthesized stable sol-gel nanoparticles by means of [a] silicification reactions using cationic peptides like polylysine as gelating agents, and [b] lyophilization of sol-gels. Macromolecules such as Hemoglobin and Glucose Oxidase and small molecules such as Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) and antibiotics were encapsulated within the nanogels. We have used transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, and spectroscopy to perform a physicochemical characterization of the nanogels resulting from the two approaches. Our studies have indicated that the nanogel encapsulated proteins and small molecules remain intact, stable and functional. A Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and Nitric Oxide (NO) generating drug carrier was synthesized using these nanogels and the effect of generation of H2O2 from Glucose Oxidase encapsulated nanogels and NO from SNP encapsulated nanogels was tested on E.coli. The results show that the nanoparticles exert antimicrobial activity against E.Coli, in addition NO generating nanogels potentiated H2O2 generating nanogels induced killing. These data suggest that these NO and H2O2 releasing nanogels have the potential to serve as a novel class of antimicrobials for the treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria. The unique properties of these protein/drug incorporated nanogels raise the prospect of fine tailoring to specific applications such as drug delivery and bio imaging.

  18. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Forte, Trudy M.; Nikanjam, Mina

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  19. Convection-Enhanced Delivery for Targeted Delivery of Antiglioma Agents: The Translational Experience

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jonathan; Rothrock, Robert J.; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the understanding of glioblastoma (GBM) have allowed for increased ability to develop specific, targeted therapies. In parallel, however, there is a need for effective methods of delivery to circumvent the therapeutic obstacles presented by the blood-brain barrier and systemic side effects. The ideal delivery system should allow for adequate targeting of the tumor while minimizing systemic exposure, applicability across a wide range of potential therapies, and have existing safe and efficacious systems that allow for widespread application. Though many alternatives to systemic delivery have been developed, this paper will focus on our experience with convection-enhanced delivery (CED) and our focus on translating this technology from pre-clinical studies to the treatment of human GBM. PMID:23476784

  20. Targeted delivery to bone and mineral deposits using bisphosphonate ligands.

    PubMed

    Cole, Lisa E; Vargo-Gogola, Tracy; Roeder, Ryan K

    2016-04-01

    The high concentration of mineral present in bone and pathological calcifications is unique compared with all other tissues and thus provides opportunity for targeted delivery of pharmaceutical drugs, including radiosensitizers and imaging probes. Targeted delivery enables accumulation of a high local dose of a therapeutic or imaging contrast agent to diseased bone or pathological calcifications. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the most widely utilized bone-targeting ligand due to exhibiting high binding affinity to hydroxyapatite mineral. BPs can be conjugated to an agent that would otherwise have little or no affinity for the sites of interest. This article summarizes the current state of knowledge and practice for the use of BPs as ligands for targeted delivery to bone and mineral deposits. The clinical history of BPs is briefly summarized to emphasize the success of these molecules as therapeutics for metabolic bone diseases. Mechanisms of binding and the relative binding affinity of various BPs to bone mineral are introduced, including common methods for measuring binding affinity in vitro and in vivo. Current research is highlighted for the use of BP ligands for targeted delivery of BP conjugates in various applications, including (1) therapeutic drug delivery for metabolic bone diseases, bone cancer, other bone diseases, and engineered drug delivery platforms; (2) imaging probes for scintigraphy, fluorescence, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography; and (3) radiotherapy. Last, and perhaps most importantly, key structure-function relationships are considered for the design of drugs with BP ligands, including the tether length between the BP and drug, the size of the drug, the number of BP ligands per drug, cleavable tethers between the BP and drug, and conjugation schemes. PMID:26482186

  1. Galactose engineered solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashay; Kesharwani, Prashant; Garg, Neeraj K; Jain, Atul; Jain, Som Akshay; Jain, Amit Kumar; Nirbhavane, Pradip; Ghanghoria, Raksha; Tyagi, Rajeev Kumar; Katare, Om Prakash

    2015-10-01

    The present investigation reports the preparation, optimization, and characterization of surface engineered solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) encapsulated with doxorubicin (DOX). Salient features such as biocompatibility, controlled release, target competency, potential of penetration, improved physical stability, low cost and ease of scaling-up make SLNs viable alternative to liposomes for effective drug delivery. Galactosylation of SLNs instructs some gratifying characteristic, which leads to the evolution of promising delivery vehicles. The impendence of lectin receptors on different cell surfaces makes the galactosylated carriers admirable for targeted delivery of drugs to ameliorate their therapeutic index. Active participation of some lectin receptors in immune responses to antigen overlaid the application of galactosylated carriers in delivery of antigen and immunotherapy for treatment of maladies like cancer. These advantages revealed the promising potential of galactosylated carriers in each perspective of drug delivery. The developed DOX loaded galactosylated SLNs formulation was found to have particle size 239 ± 2.40 nm, PDI 0.307 ± 0.004, entrapment efficiency 72.3 ± 0.9%. Higher cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and nuclear localization of galactosylated SLNs against A549 cells revealed higher efficiency of the formulation. In a nutshell, the galactosylation strategy with SLNs could be a promising approach in improving the delivery of DOX for cancer therapy. PMID:26142628

  2. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hoop, M; Mushtaq, F; Hurter, C; Chen, X-Z; Nelson, B J; Pané, S

    2016-07-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies. PMID:27297037

  3. Strategies on the nuclear-targeted delivery of genes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Fan, Ying; Li, Yuanke; Huang, Leaf

    2016-01-01

    To improve the nuclear-targeted delivery of non-viral vectors, extensive effort has been carried out on the development of smart vectors which could overcome multiple barriers. The nuclear envelope presents a major barrier to transgene delivery. Viruses are capable of crossing the nuclear envelope to efficiently deliver their genome into the nucleus through the specialized protein components. However, non-viral vectors are preferred over viral ones because of the safety concerns associated with the latter. Non-viral delivery systems have been designed to include various types of components to enable nuclear translocation at the periphery of the nucleus. This review summarizes the progress of research regarding nuclear transport mechanisms. “Smart” non-viral vectors that have been modified by peptides and other small molecules are able to facilitate the nuclear translocation and enhance the efficacy of gene expression. The resulting technology may also enhance delivery of other macromolecules to the nucleus. PMID:23964565

  4. Membrane-targeting liquid crystal nanoparticles (LCNPs) for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Okhil K.; Naciri, Jawad; Spillmann, Christopher M.; Delehanty, James B.

    2016-03-01

    In addition to maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, the plasma membrane regulates multiple important cellular processes, such as endocytosis and trafficking, apoptotic pathways and drug transport. The modulation or tracking of such cellular processes by means of controlled delivery of drugs or imaging agents via nanoscale delivery systems is very attractive. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery systems that mediate long-term residence (e.g., days) and controlled release of the cargoes in the plasma membrane while simultaneously not interfering with regular cellular physiology would be ideal for this purpose. Our laboratory has developed a plasma membrane-targeted liquid crystal nanoparticle (LCNP) formulation that can be loaded with dyes or drugs which can be slowly released from the particle over time. Here we highlight the utility of these nanopreparations for membrane delivery and imaging.

  5. Targeted Delivery of Bleomycin: A Comprehensive Anticancer Review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiqiang; Yan, Bo; Gao, Liqian; Dong, Chenbo; Zhong, Jian; D Ortenzio, Mathew; Nguyen, Brandon; Seong Lee, Su; Hu, Xianglong; Liang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Despite being one of the most effective broad-spectrum chemotherapeutic agents in the treatment of cancers, the clinical applications of bleomycins (BLMs) have been limited due to their poor drug delivery abilities, and the side effect of causing lung fibrosis. With the increased therapeutics and the reduction of side effects, research and development of targeted drug delivery systems (TDDS) with BLMs have become essential for the expansive clinical usage of BLM-based therapeutics. This review summarizes the recent developments of various TDDS for BLMs, including techniques such as photochemical internalization, ultrasound, and micelle, liposome, and nanoparticle formation. The advantages and disadvantages for each delivery approach are outlined, along with the specific challenges associated with each delivery system. PMID:26632436

  6. Delivery of Therapeutic RNAs Into Target Cells IN VIVO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Mei Ying; Hagen, Thilo

    2014-02-01

    RNA-based therapy is one of the most promising approaches to treat human diseases. Specifically, the use of short interfering RNA (siRNA) siRNA and microRNA (miRNA) mimics for in vivo RNA interference has immense potential as it directly lowers the expression of the therapeutic target protein. However, there are a number of major roadblocks to the successful implementation of siRNA and other RNA based therapies in the clinic. These include the instability of RNAs in vivo and the difficulty to efficiently deliver the RNA into the target cells. Hence, various innovative approaches have been taken over the years to develop effective RNA delivery methods. These methods include liposome-, polymeric nanoparticle- and peptide-mediated cellular delivery. In a recent innovative study, bioengineered bacterial outer membrane vesicles were used as vehicles for effective delivery of siRNA into cells in vivo.

  7. Chondroitin sulfate derived theranostic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Oommen P; Liu, Jianping; Sundaram, Karthi; Hilborn, Jöns; Oommen, Oommen P

    2016-08-16

    Glycosaminoglycan derived nanoparticles are a promising delivery system owing to their unique tumour targeting ability. Exploiting fluorescein for inducing amphiphilicity in these biopolymers provides inherent imaging and drug stabilization capabilities by π-π stacking interactions with aromatic antineoplastic agents. This offers a versatile and highly customizable nanocarrier with narrow size distribution and high drug loading efficiency (80%) with sustained drug release. PMID:27431007

  8. The Targeted-liposome Delivery System of Antitumor Drugs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei-dang; Yi, Xiu-lin; Jiang, Li-xin; Li, Ya-zhuo; Gao, Jing; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Rong-da; Dai, Li-peng; Li, Wei; Ci, Xiao-yan; Si, Duan-yun; Liu, Chang-xiao

    2015-01-01

    The liposome delivery system has been intensively explored as novel drug delivery system (DDS) for antitumor drugs, due to its safety, selective cytotoxicity, long circulation and slow elimination in blood, which is favorable for cancer therapy. The liposome-based chemotherapeutics are used to treat a variety of cancers to enhance the therapeutic index of antitumor drugs. Here, the author reviewed the important targets for cancer therapy and the pharmacokinetic behavior of liposomal drugs in vivo, as well as the application of the targeting liposomal system in cancer therapy. Considering further application for clinical use, the great challenges of the liposome-based delivery system were also proposed as follows: 1) prepare stealth liposome with steric stabilization and further enhance the therapeutic effects and safety; 2) explore more safe clinical targets and complementary or different types of targeting liposome; 3) thirdly, more investment is needed on the research of pharmacokinetics of the elements such as the ligands (antibody), PEG and lipids of liposome delivery system as well as safety evaluation. Considering the complex process of the liposomal encapsulation drugs in vivo, the author inferred that there are maybe different forms of the encapsulation drug to be internalized by the tumor tissues at the same time and space, although there are little reports on it. PMID:26652257

  9. Charge-conversional and reduction-sensitive poly(vinyl alcohol) nanogels for enhanced cell uptake and efficient intracellular doxorubicin release.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Achazi, Katharina; Schade, Boris; Haag, Rainer

    2015-05-10

    Charge-conversional and reduction-sensitive polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanogels were developed for efficient cancer treatment by enhanced cell uptake and intracellular triggered doxorubicin (DOX) release. These PVA nanogels were prepared in a straightforward manner by inverse nanoprecipitation via "click" reaction with an average diameter of 118nm. The introduction of COOH into the PVA nanogels efficiently improved the DOX encapsulation due to the electrostatic interaction. The in vitro release result showed that the decrease of electrostatic interaction between COOH and DOX under a mimicking endosomal pH, in combination with the cleavage of the intervening disulfide bonds in response to a high glutathione (GSH) concentration led to a fast and complete release of DOX. Furthermore, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) revealed that the ultra pH-sensitive terminal groups allowed nanogels to reverse their surface charge from negative to positive under a tumor extracellular pH (6.5-6.8) which facilitated cell internalization. MTT assays and real time cell analysis (RTCA) showed that these DOX-loaded charge-conversional and reducible PVA nanogels had much better cell toxicity than DOX-loaded non-charge-conversional or reduction-insensitive PVA nanogels following 48h of incubation. These novel charge-conversional and stimuli-responsive PVA nanogels are highly promising for targeted intracellular anticancer drug release. PMID:25445693

  10. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty

  11. Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh

    2006-11-15

    Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without

  12. Tetraspecific ligand for tumor-targeted delivery of nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D; Liu, Rihe

    2014-07-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in Escherichia coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various 'smart' biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  13. Tetraspecific Ligand for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dongwook; Friedman, Adam D.; Liu, Rihe

    2014-01-01

    The polygenetic nature of most cancers emphasizes the necessity of cancer therapies that target multiple essential signaling pathways. However, there is a significant paucity of targeting ligands with multi-specificities for targeted delivery of biomaterials. To address this unmet need, we generated a tetraspecific targeting ligand that recognizes four different cancer biomarkers, including VEGFR2, αvβ3 integrin, EGFR, and HER2 receptors, which have been implicated in numerous malignant tumors. The tetraspecific targeting ligand was constructed by sequentially connecting four targeting ligand subunits via flexible linkers, yielding a fusion protein that can be highly expressed in E. coli and readily purified to near homogeneity. Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), Bio-Layer Interferometry (BLI) studies and extensive cellular binding analyses indicated that all the targeting ligand subunits in the tetraspecific fusion protein recognized their target receptors proximately to the corresponding monospecific ligands. The resulting tetraspecific targeting ligand was applied for the delivery of nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for targeted hyperthermic killing of various cancer cell lines with biomarkers of interest expressed. We demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand can be facilely introduced on the surface of AuNPs and efficient target-dependent killing of cancer cells can be achieved only when the AuNPs are conjugated with the tetraspecific ligand. Significantly, the tetraspecific ligand simultaneously interacts with more than one receptors, such as EGFR and HER2 receptors, when they are expressed on the surface of the same cell, as demonstrated by in vitro binding assays and cell binding analyses. Our results demonstrate that the tetraspecific ligand, through multivalency and synergistic binding, can be readily used to generate various ‘smart’ biomaterials with greatly broadened tumor targeting range for simultaneous targeting of multiple

  14. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  15. Targeted gene delivery via N-acetylglucosamine receptor mediated endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bijay; Maharjan, Sushila; Kim, You-Kyoung; Jiang, Tai; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Kang, Sang-Kee; Cho, Myung-Haing; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2014-11-01

    Receptor-mediated endocytosis is a promising approach of gene delivery into the target cells via receptor-ligand interaction. Vimentins at the cell surface are recently known to bind N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue, therefore, the cell surfaces of vimentin-expressing cells could be targeted by using the GlcNAc residue as a specific ligand for receptor-mediated gene delivery. Here, we have developed polymeric gene delivery vectors, based on poly(ethylene oxide)(PEO) and poly(aspartamide), namely poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO-(GlcNAc)] (PADPG) and poly[(aspartamide)(diethylenetriamine)]-b-[PEO] (PADP) to elucidate the efficiency of GlcNAc ligand for gene delivery through receptor mediated endocytosis. To determine the efficiency of these polymeric vectors for specific gene delivery, the DNA condensation ability of PADPG and PADP and the subsequent formation of polymeric nanoparticles were confirmed by gel retardation assay and transmission electron microscopy respectively. Both PADPG and PADP had lower cytotoxicity than polyethylenimine 25 K (PEI 25 K). However, their transfection efficiency was comparatively lower than PEI 25 K due to hydrophilic property of PEO in the vectors. To observe the stability of polymeric nanoparticles, the transfection of PADPG and PADP was carried out in the presence of serum. Favorably, the interfering effect of serum on the transfection efficiency of PADPG and PADP was also very low. Finally, when the cell specificity of these polymeric vectors was investigated, PADPG had high gene transfection in vimentin-expressing cells than vimentin-deficiency cells. The high transfection efficiency of PADPG was attributed to the GlcNAc in the polymeric vector which interact specifically with vimentin in the cells for the receptor-mediated endocytosis. The competitive inhibition assay further proved the receptor-mediated endocytosis of PADPG. Thus, this study demonstrates that conjugation of GlcNAc is an effective and rational

  16. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  17. Active Targeted Drug Delivery for Microbes Using Nano-Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Sheng; Lee, Ming-Yuan; Yang, Chih-Hui; Huang, Keng-Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines and antibiotics could kill or inhibit microbes, many infectious diseases remain difficult to treat because of acquired resistance and adverse side effects. Nano-carriers-based technology has made significant progress for a long time and is introducing a new paradigm in drug delivery. However, it still has some challenges like lack of specificity toward targeting the infectious site. Nano-carriers utilized targeting ligands on their surface called ‘active target’ provide the promising way to solve the problems like accelerating drug delivery to infectious areas and preventing toxicity or side-effects. In this mini review, we demonstrate the recent studies using the active targeted strategy to kill or inhibit microbes. The four common nano-carriers (e.g. liposomes, nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes) delivering encapsulated drugs are introduced. PMID:25877093

  18. Non-Spherical Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinrong; Clay, Nicholas; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2015-01-01

    Nano- and microparticles loaded with various bioimaging contrast agents or therapeutic molecules have been increasingly used for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tissue defects. These particles, often a filled or hollow sphere, can extend the lifetime of encapsulated biomedical modalities in circulation and in target tissue. However, there is a great need to improve the drug loading and targeting efficiency of these particles. Recently, several simulation and in vitro experimental studies reported that particle shape plays a pivotal role in the targeted delivery of molecules. To better understand these findings and subsequently expedite the use of particles in biomedical applications, this review paper summarizes the methods to prepare non-spherical nano- and micro-scaled particles. In addition, this review covers studies reporting the effects of particle shape on the loading, delivery and release of encapsulated bioactive cargos. Finally, it discusses future directions to further improve the properties of non-spherical particles. PMID:25838583

  19. Pericyte-targeting drug delivery and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kang, Eunah; Shin, Jong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Pericytes are contractile mural cells that wrap around the endothelial cells of capillaries and venules. Depending on the triggers by cellular signals, pericytes have specific functionality in tumor microenvironments, properties of potent stem cells, and plasticity in cellular pathology. These features of pericytes can be activated for the promotion or reduction of angiogenesis. Frontier studies have exploited pericyte-targeting drug delivery, using pericyte-specific peptides, small molecules, and DNA in tumor therapy. Moreover, the communication between pericytes and endothelial cells has been applied to the induction of vessel neoformation in tissue engineering. Pericytes may prove to be a novel target for tumor therapy and tissue engineering. The present paper specifically reviews pericyte-specific drug delivery and tissue engineering, allowing insight into the emerging research targeting pericytes. PMID:27313454

  20. The role of acoustofluidics in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Nilanjana; Zhang, Xunli; Maiti, Tapas K.; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    With the fast development of acoustic systems in clinical and therapeutic applications, acoustically driven microbubbles have gained a prominent role as powerful tools to carry, transfer, direct, and target drug molecules in cells, tissues, and tumors in the expanding fields of targeted drug delivery and gene therapy. The aim of the present study is to establish a biocompatible acoustic microfluidic system and to demonstrate the generation of an acoustic field and its effects on microbubbles and biological cells in the microfluidic system. The acoustic field creates non-linear oscillations of the microbubble-clusters, which results in generation of shear stress on cells in such microsystems. This effectively helps in delivering extracellular probes in living cells by sonoporation. The sonoporation is investigated under the combined effects of acoustic stress and hydrodynamic stress during targeted drug and gene delivery. PMID:26339329

  1. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites. PMID:26556723

  2. RAFT-mediated Control of Nanogel Structure and Reactivity: Chemical, Physical and Mechanical Properties of Monomer-dispersed Nanogel Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examines how nanogel structure correlates with photopolymerization and key polymer properties upon addition of nanogels with latent reactivity into a monomer dispersant to produce polymer/polymer composites. Methods Two nanogels that retained RAFT functionality based on the synthetic approach were prepared to have different branching densities. These reactive nanogels were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at 0–40 wt%. Reaction kinetics, volumetric shrinkage and shrinkage stress associated with the photopolymerization of nanogel-modified formulations were measured in real time with mechanical properties of the polymers also evaluated. The basic structure of RAFT-derived nanogel particles was examined by the preparation of a separate nanogel constructed with degradable disulfide crosslinking groups. The model nanogel molecular weight and polydispersity were compared before and after degradation. Results Despite the controlled radical synthetic approach, the nanogels, which are composed of multiple interconnected, short primary chains presented relatively high polydispersity. Through addition of the reactive nanogels to a monomer that both infiltrates and disperses the nanogels, the photopolymerization rate was moderately reduced with the increase of nanogel loading levels. Volumetric shrinkage decreased proportionally with nanogel concentration; however, a greater than proportional reduction of polymerization-induced stress was observed. Mechanical properties, such as flexural strength, storage modulus were maintained at the same levels as the control resin for nanogel systems up to 40 wt%. Significance This study demonstrated that beyond the use of RAFT functionality to produce discrete nano-polymeric structures, the residual chain end groups are important to maintain reactivity and mechanical properties of nanogel-modified resin materials. PMID:25205366

  3. Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2011-01-01

    As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

  4. Targeted Cellular Drug Delivery using Tailored Dendritic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2002-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorble, ‘peripheral’ functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug and gene delivery. The large number of end groups can also be tailored to create special affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, in-vitro drug loading, in-vitro drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Polyamidoamine and Polyol dendrimers, with different generations and end-groups are studied, with drugs such as Ibuprofen and Methotrexate. Our results indicate that a large number of drug molecules can be encapsulated/attached to the dendrimers, depending on the end groups. The drug-encapsulated dendrimer is able to enter the cells rapidly and deliver the drug. Targeting strategies being explored

  5. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  6. A smart multifunctional drug delivery nanoplatform for targeting cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoop, M.; Mushtaq, F.; Hurter, C.; Chen, X.-Z.; Nelson, B. J.; Pané, S.

    2016-06-01

    Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of most tumors. Approximately a 2.5 times higher drug release from Ni nanotubes at pH = 6 is achieved compared to that at pH = 7.4. The outside of the Ni tube is coated with gold. A fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labeled thiol-ssDNA, a biological marker, was conjugated on its surface by thiol-gold click chemistry, which enables traceability. The Ni nanotube allows the propulsion of the device by means of external magnetic fields. As the proposed nanoarchitecture integrates different functional building blocks, our drug delivery nanoplatform can be employed for carrying molecular drug conjugates and for performing targeted combinatorial therapies, which can provide an alternative and supplementary solution to current drug delivery technologies.Wirelessly guided magnetic nanomachines are promising vectors for targeted drug delivery, which have the potential to minimize the interaction between anticancer agents and healthy tissues. In this work, we propose a smart multifunctional drug delivery nanomachine for targeted drug delivery that incorporates a stimuli-responsive building block. The nanomachine consists of a magnetic nickel (Ni) nanotube that contains a pH-responsive chitosan hydrogel in its inner cavity. The chitosan inside the nanotube serves as a matrix that can selectively release drugs in acidic environments, such as the extracellular space of

  7. Immunoliposomes for Targeted Delivery of an Antifibrotic Drug.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Liane; Seifert, Oliver; Vollmer, Stefanie; Kontermann, Roland E; Schlosshauer, Burkhard; Hartmann, Hanna

    2015-09-01

    Excessive extracellular matrix formation in organs and tissues arises from an imbalance between the synthesis and degradation of matrix proteins, especially collagen. This condition interferes with proper wound healing and regeneration, and to date, no specific treatment is available. In the present study, we propose a targeted drug delivery system consisting of cell-specific immunoliposomes (ILs) loaded with deferoxamine (DFO) as an antifibrotic drug. ILs were functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to improve the steric stability and prolong their half-life. In addition, a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment that specifically targets fibroblast activation protein (FAP) was incorporated. An in vitro fibrosis model was employed to test this construct. This model consisted of highly activated pro-fibrotic fibroblasts with 2- to 6-fold induction of selected fibrosis markers: cell/matrix deposited collagen I, total soluble collagen, and α smooth muscle actin. The activation was accompanied by a significant and cell-specific elevation of FAP expression and activity, thereby confirming that FAP is an adequate target for antifibrotic drug delivery. Purified anti-FAP scFv was shown to bind specifically to these cells without influencing the FAP enzymatic activity. DFO was demonstrated to have a dose-dependent antifibrotic activity as quantified by collagen deposition. Specific binding and intracellular uptake of DiI-labeled ILs into the activated fibroblasts were shown by flow cytometry and microscopy. Finally, DFO-loaded ILs targeted to FAP caused a significant reduction in the collagen deposition, whereas no effect was observed using liposomes that lacked the targeting antibody fragment. These results suggest that the FAP-specific scFv-conjugated liposomes have considerable potential for cell-specific targeting applicable as a therapy for excessive collagen deposition during fibrosis. In general, through liposome encapsulation, bioactive molecules, such as

  8. Ocular Drug Delivery - New Strategies for Targeting Anterior and Posterior Segments of the Eye.

    PubMed

    Fangueiro, Joana F; Veiga, Francisco; Silva, Amelia M; Souto, Eliana B

    2016-01-01

    The ocular delivery of drugs encounters several limitations because of the dynamic and static barriers of the human's eye anatomy and physiology. The poor bioavailability of drugs are mainly related to the topical administration, i.e. eye drops which is the most common drug dosage form for the treatment of eye pathologies. Precorneal factors and drug limitations related to its solubility and susceptibility for physicochemical degradation could be the main reasons for the poor permeation and uptake in the ocular mucosa. Pathologies affecting the anterior and posterior segment of the eye are thereafter difficult to be treated and, given the chronic and degenerative nature of some of these injuries, it is crucial to improve drugs therapeutic effect. Nanotechnology-based delivery systems could be a suitable approach to overcome these limitations. Some of the most important colloidal systems are highlighted in this review, such as the use of mucoadhesive polymers, prodrugs, nanogels, liposomes, microemulsions, lipid and polymeric nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, dendrimers and nanocrystals, along with their clinical and therapeutic relevance for the administration of drugs for ocular delivery. PMID:26675225

  9. The Platin-X series: activation, targeting, and delivery.

    PubMed

    Basu, Uttara; Banik, Bhabatosh; Wen, Ru; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2016-08-16

    Anticancer platinum (Pt) complexes have long been considered to be one of the biggest success stories in the history of medicinal inorganic chemistry. Yet there remains the hunt for the "magic bullet" which can satisfy the requirements of an effective chemotherapeutic drug formulation. Pt(iv) complexes are kinetically more inert than the Pt(ii) congeners and offer the opportunity to append additional functional groups/ligands for prodrug activation, tumor targeting, or drug delivery. The ultimate aim of functionalization is to enhance the tumor selective action and attenuate systemic toxicity of the drugs. Moreover, an increase in cellular accumulation to surmount the resistance of the tumor against the drugs is also of paramount importance in drug development and discovery. In this review, we will address the attempts made in our lab to develop Pt(iv) prodrugs that can be activated and delivered using targeted nanotechnology-based delivery platforms. PMID:27493131

  10. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A; Robinet, Eric; De Cola, Luisa

    2016-04-01

    "Pop goes the particle". Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. PMID:26974603

  11. A hyaluronic acid nanogel for photo-chemo theranostics of lung cancer with simultaneous light-responsive controlled release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Zehedina; Nurunnabi, Md; Nafiujjaman, Md; Reeck, Gerald R; Khan, Haseeb A; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-kyu

    2015-06-28

    The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid nanogel) that exerts an activity with multiple effects: thermo and chemotherapeutic, real-time noninvasive imaging, and light-glutathione-responsive controlled drug release. The nanogel is mono-dispersed with an average diameter of 120 nm as observed by using TEM and a hydrodynamic size analyzer. It has excellent photo-luminescence properties and good stability in buffer and serum solutions. Graphene itself, being photoluminescent, can be considered an optical imaging contrast agent as well as a heat source when excited by laser irradiation. Thus the nanogel shows simultaneous thermo-chemotherapeutic effects on noninvasive optical imaging. We have also found that irradiation enhances the release of doxorubicin in a controlled manner. This release synergizes therapeutic activity of the nanogel in killing tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that the graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in the hyaluronic acid nanogel is very effective in killing the human lung cancer cell line (A549) with limited toxicity in the non-cancerous cell line (MDCK). PMID:26030737

  12. Recent Advances in Targeted Drug Delivery Approaches Using Dendritic Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Bugno, Jason; Hsu, Hao-Jui; Hong, Seungpyo

    2014-01-01

    Since they were first synthesized over 30 years ago, dendrimers have seen rapid translation into various biomedical applications. A number of reports have not only demonstrated their clinical utility, but also revealed novel design approaches and strategies based on the elucidation of underlying mechanisms governing their biological interactions. This review focuses on presenting the latest advances in dendrimer design, discussing the current mechanistic understandings, and highlighting recent developments and targeted approaches using dendrimers in drug/gene delivery. PMID:26221937

  13. Breakable mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggini, Laura; Cabrera, Ingrid; Ruiz-Carretero, Amparo; Prasetyanto, Eko A.; Robinet, Eric; de Cola, Luisa

    2016-03-01

    ``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery.``Pop goes the particle''. Here we report on the preparation of redox responsive mesoporous organo-silica nanoparticles containing disulfide (S-S) bridges (ss-NPs) that, even upon the exohedral grafting of targeting ligands, retained their ability to undergo structural degradation, and increase their local release activity when exposed to a reducing agent. This degradation could be observed also inside glioma C6 cancer cells. Moreover, when anticancer drug-loaded pristine and derivatized ss-NPs were fed to glioma C6 cells, the responsive hybrids were more effective in their cytotoxic action compared to non-breakable particles. The possibility of tailoring the surface functionalization of this hybrid, yet preserving its self-destructive behavior and enhanced drug delivery properties, paves the way for the development of effective biodegradable materials for in vivo targeted drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Full experimental procedures, additional SEM and TEM images of particles, complete UV-Vis and PL-monitored characterization of the breakdown of

  14. Targeted gene knockout by direct delivery of ZFN proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gaj, Thomas; Guo, Jing; Kato, Yoshio; Sirk, Shannon J.; Barbas, Carlos F.

    2012-01-01

    Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are versatile reagents that have redefined genome engineering. Realizing the full potential of this technology requires the development of safe and effective methods for delivering ZFNs into cells. We demonstrate the intrinsic cell-penetrating capabilities of the standard ZFN architecture and show that direct delivery of ZFNs as proteins leads to efficient endogenous gene disruption in a variety of mammalian cell types with minimal off-target effects. PMID:22751204

  15. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  16. Self-Assembled Smart Nanocarriers for Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Li, Junbai; Decher, Gero

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured drug-carrier systems promise numerous benefits for drug delivery. They can be engineered to precisely control drug-release rates or to target specific sites within the body with a specific amount of therapeutic agent. However, to achieve the best therapeutic effects, the systems should be designed for carrying the optimum amount of a drug to the desired target where it should be released at the optimum rate for a specified time. Despite numerous attempts, fulfilling all of these requirements in a synergistic way remains a huge challenge. The trend in drug delivery is consequently directed toward integrated multifunctional carrier systems, providing selective recognition in combination with sustained or triggered release. Capsules as vesicular systems enable drugs to be confined for controlled release. Furthermore, carriers modified with recognition groups can enhance the capability of encapsulated drug efficacy. Here, recent advances are reviewed regarding designing and preparing assembled capsules with targeting ligands or size controllable for selective recognition in drug delivery. PMID:26436442

  17. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  18. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol. PMID:26241560

  19. Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles for Imaging, Targeting, and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Lu, Jie; Kovochich, Michael; Xia, Tian; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Nel, Andre E.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Zink, Jeffrey I.

    2009-01-01

    Drug delivery, magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, magnetic manipulation, and cell targeting are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated inside mesostructured silica spheres that were labeled with fluorescent dye molecules and coated with hydrophilic groups to prevent aggregation. Water-insoluble anticancer drugs were delivered into human cancer cells; surface conjugation with cancer-specific targeting agents increased the uptake into cancer cells relative to that in non-cancerous fibroblasts. The highly versatile multifunctional nanoparticles could potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapeutic applications. PMID:19206485

  20. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Myerson, Jacob W; Brenner, Jacob S; Greineder, Colin F; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  1. Systems approaches to design of targeted therapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Myerson, Jacob W.; Brenner, Jacob S.; Greineder, Colin F.; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery aims to improve therapeutic effects and enable mechanisms that are not feasible for untargeted agents (e.g., due to impermeable biological barriers). To achieve targeting, a drug or its carrier should possess properties providing specific accumulation from circulation at the desired site. There are several examples of systems-inspired approaches that have been applied to achieve this goal. First, proteomics analysis of plasma membrane fraction of the vascular endothelium has identified a series of target molecules and their ligands (e.g., antibodies) that deliver conjugated cargoes to well-defined vascular cells and subcellular compartments. Second, selection of ligands binding to cells of interest using phage display libraries in vitro and in vivo has provided peptides and polypeptides that bind to normal and pathologically altered cells. Finally, large-scale high-throughput combinatorial synthesis and selection of lipid- and polymer-based nanocarriers varying their chemical components has yielded a series of carriers accumulating in diverse organs and delivering RNA interference agents to diverse cells. Together, these approaches offer a basis for systems-based design and selection of targets, targeting molecules, and targeting vehicles. Current studies focus on expanding the arsenal of these and alternative targeting strategies, devising drug delivery systems capitalizing on these strategies and evaluation of their benefit/risk ratio in adequate animal models of human diseases. These efforts, combined with better understanding of mechanisms and unintended consequences of these targeted interventions, need to be ultimately translated into industrial development and the clinical domain. PMID:25946066

  2. Cell-targeting aptamers act as intracellular delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel; Chen, Yeng; Arshad, M K Md; Kerishnan, Jesinda P; Ruslinda, A R; Al-Douri, Yarub; Voon, C H; Hashim, Uda

    2016-08-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded nucleic acids or peptides identified from a randomized combinatorial library through specific interaction with the target of interest. Targets can be of any size, from small molecules to whole cells, attesting to the versatility of aptamers for binding a wide range of targets. Aptamers show drug properties that are analogous to antibodies, with high specificity and affinity to their target molecules. Aptamers can penetrate disease-causing microbial and mammalian cells. Generated aptamers that target surface biomarkers act as cell-targeting agents and intracellular delivery vehicles. Within this context, the "cell-internalizing aptamers" are widely investigated via the process of cell uptake with selective binding during in vivo systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) or by cell-internalization SELEX, which targets cell surface antigens to be receptors. These internalizing aptamers are highly preferable for the localization and functional analyses of multiple targets. In this overview, we discuss the ways by which internalizing aptamers are generated and their successful applications. Furthermore, theranostic approaches featuring cell-internalized aptamers are discussed with the purpose of analyzing and diagnosing disease-causing pathogens. PMID:27350620

  3. Targeted delivery of liquid microvolumes into the lung.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; O'Neill, John D; Dorrello, N Valerio; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-09-15

    The ability to deliver drugs to specific sites in the lung could radically improve therapeutic outcomes of a variety of lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, severe bronchopneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Using conventional methods for pulmonary drug administration, precise, localized delivery of exact doses of drugs to target regions remains challenging. Here we describe a more controlled delivery of soluble reagents (e.g., drugs, enzymes, and radionuclides) in microvolume liquid plugs to targeted branches of the pulmonary airway tree: upper airways, small airways (bronchioles), or the most distal alveoli. In this approach, a soluble liquid plug of very small volume (<1 mL) is instilled into the upper airways, and with programmed air ventilation of the lungs, the plug is pushed into a specific desired (more distal) airway to achieve deposition of liquid film onto the lung epithelium. The plug volume and ventilation conditions were determined by mathematical modeling of plug transport in a tubular geometry, and targeted liquid film deposition was demonstrated in rat lungs by three different in vivo imaging modalities. The experimental and modeling data suggest that instillation of microvolumes of liquid into a ventilated pulmonary airway could be an effective strategy to deliver exact doses of drugs to targeted pathologic regions of the lung, especially those inaccessible by bronchoscopy, to increase in situ efficacy of the drug and minimize systemic side effects. PMID:26324893

  4. Tumor targeting and microenvironment-responsive nanoparticles for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shixian; Shao, Kun; Kuang, Yuyang; Liu, Yang; Li, Jianfeng; An, Sai; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

    2013-07-01

    A tumor targeting nanoparticle system has been successfully developed to response to the lowered tumor extracellular pH (pHe) and upregulated matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in the tumor microenvironment. The nanoparticles are modified with activatable cell-penetrating peptide (designated as dtACPP) that's dual-triggered by the lowered pHe and MMP2. In dtACPP, the internalization function of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is quenched by a pH-sensitive masking peptide, linking by a MMP2 substrate. The masking peptide is negatively charged to quench the cationic CPP well after systemic administration. Hence, dtACPP-modified nanoparticles possesses passive tumor targetability via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Once reaching the tumor microenvironment, the pre-existing attraction would be eliminated due to the lowered pHe, accompanying the linker cleaved by MMP2, dtACPP would be activated to expose CPP to drive the nanoparticles' internalization into the intratumoral cells. The studies of plasmid DNA loading, toxicity assessment, cellular uptake, tumor targeting delivery, and gene transfection demonstrate that dtACPP-modified nanoparticle system is a potential candidate for tumor targeting gene delivery. PMID:23562171

  5. Targeted delivery of liquid microvolumes into the lung

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; O’Neill, John D.; Dorrello, N. Valerio; Bacchetta, Matthew; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-01-01

    The ability to deliver drugs to specific sites in the lung could radically improve therapeutic outcomes of a variety of lung diseases, including cystic fibrosis, severe bronchopneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and lung cancer. Using conventional methods for pulmonary drug administration, precise, localized delivery of exact doses of drugs to target regions remains challenging. Here we describe a more controlled delivery of soluble reagents (e.g., drugs, enzymes, and radionuclides) in microvolume liquid plugs to targeted branches of the pulmonary airway tree: upper airways, small airways (bronchioles), or the most distal alveoli. In this approach, a soluble liquid plug of very small volume (<1 mL) is instilled into the upper airways, and with programmed air ventilation of the lungs, the plug is pushed into a specific desired (more distal) airway to achieve deposition of liquid film onto the lung epithelium. The plug volume and ventilation conditions were determined by mathematical modeling of plug transport in a tubular geometry, and targeted liquid film deposition was demonstrated in rat lungs by three different in vivo imaging modalities. The experimental and modeling data suggest that instillation of microvolumes of liquid into a ventilated pulmonary airway could be an effective strategy to deliver exact doses of drugs to targeted pathologic regions of the lung, especially those inaccessible by bronchoscopy, to increase in situ efficacy of the drug and minimize systemic side effects. PMID:26324893

  6. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Andreas J; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  7. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-03-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity.

  8. Multi-Shell Hollow Nanogels with Responsive Shell Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas J.; Dubbert, Janine; Rudov, Andrey A.; Pedersen, Jan Skov; Lindner, Peter; Karg, Matthias; Potemkin, Igor I.; Richtering, Walter

    2016-01-01

    We report on hollow shell-shell nanogels with two polymer shells that have different volume phase transition temperatures. By means of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) employing contrast variation and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations we show that hollow shell-shell nanocontainers are ideal systems for controlled drug delivery: The temperature responsive swelling of the inner shell controls the uptake and release, while the thermoresponsive swelling of the outer shell controls the size of the void and the colloidal stability. At temperatures between 32 °C < T < 42 °C, the hollow nanocontainers provide a significant void, which is even larger than the initial core size of the template, and they possess a high colloidal stability due to the steric stabilization of the swollen outer shell. Computer simulations showed, that temperature induced switching of the permeability of the inner shell allows for the encapsulation in and release of molecules from the cavity. PMID:26984478

  9. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  10. Nano-enhanced optical delivery into targeted cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Weldon; Pradhan, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    Nano-enhanced optical field of gold nanoparticles allowed the use of a continuous wave (cw) laser beam for efficient delivery of exogenous impermeable materials into targeted cells. Using this Nano-enhanced Optical Delivery (NOD) method, we show that large molecules could be delivered with low power cw laser with exposure time ~ 1sec. At such low power (and exposure), the non-targeted cells (not bound to gold nanoparticles) were not adversely affected by the laser beam. Further, by varying the size of the gold nanoparticles, cells could be exclusively sensitized to selective wavelengths of laser beam. In contrast other nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles were found to have lower cytotoxicity, making it better suited for clinical NOD. Further, as compared with pulsed lasers, cw (diode) lasers are compact, easy-to-use and therefore, NOD using cw laser beam has significant translational potential for delivery of impermeable bio-molecules to tissues in different organs. We will present optimization of NOD parameters for delivering different molecules to different cells. Success of this NOD method may lead to a new clinical approach for treating AMD and RP patients with geographic atrophy in retina.

  11. Lung-targeted delivery system of curcumin loaded gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Cao, Fengliang; Ding, Buyun; Sun, Min; Guo, Chenyu; Zhang, Lin; Zhai, Guangxi

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of the study is to design and evaluate curcumin loaded gelatin microspheres (C-GMS) for effective drug delivery to the lung. C-GMS was prepared by the emulsification-linkage technique and the formulation was optimized by orthogonal design. The mean encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the optimal C-GMS were 75.5 ± 3.82 % and 6.15 ± 0.44%, respectively. The C-GMS presented a spherical shape and smooth surface with a mean particle diameter of 18.9 μm. The in vitro drug release behavior of C-GMS followed the first-order kinetics. The tissue distribution showed that the drug concentrations at lung tissue for the C-GMS suspension were significantly higher than those for the curcumin solution, and the Ce for lung was 36.19. Histopathological studies proved C-GMS was efficient and safe to be used as a passive targeted drug delivery system to the lung. Hence, C-GMS has a great potential for the targeted delivery of curcumin to the lung. PMID:21812751

  12. Tumor Targeting and Drug Delivery by Anthrax Toxin.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Christopher; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Anthrax toxin is a potent tripartite protein toxin from Bacillus anthracis. It is one of the two virulence factors and causes the disease anthrax. The receptor-binding component of the toxin, protective antigen, needs to be cleaved by furin-like proteases to be activated and to deliver the enzymatic moieties lethal factor and edema factor to the cytosol of cells. Alteration of the protease cleavage site allows the activation of the toxin selectively in response to the presence of tumor-associated proteases. This initial idea of re-targeting anthrax toxin to tumor cells was further elaborated in recent years and resulted in the design of many modifications of anthrax toxin, which resulted in successful tumor therapy in animal models. These modifications include the combination of different toxin variants that require activation by two different tumor-associated proteases for increased specificity of toxin activation. The anthrax toxin system has proved to be a versatile system for drug delivery of several enzymatic moieties into cells. This highly efficient delivery system has recently been further modified by introducing ubiquitin as a cytosolic cleavage site into lethal factor fusion proteins. This review article describes the latest developments in this field of tumor targeting and drug delivery. PMID:27376328

  13. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  14. Chlorotoxin labeled magnetic nanovectors for targeted gene delivery to glioma.

    PubMed

    Kievit, Forrest M; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-08-24

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG), and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA-bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  15. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  16. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization. PMID:25375342

  17. Transformable DNA nanocarriers for plasma membrane targeted delivery of cytokine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wujin; Ji, Wenyan; Hu, Quanyin; Yu, Jicheng; Wang, Chao; Qian, Chenggen; Hochu, Gabrielle; Gu, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Direct delivery of cytokines using nanocarriers holds great promise for cancer therapy. However, the nanometric scale of the vehicles made them susceptible to size-dependent endocytosis, reducing the plasma membrane-associated apoptosis signaling. Herein, we report a tumor microenvironment-responsive and transformable nanocarrier for cell membrane targeted delivery of cytokine. This formulation is comprised of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) degradable liposome as a shell, and complementary DNA nanostructures (designated as nanoclews) decorated with cytokines as the cores. Utilizing the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a model cytokine, we demonstrate that the TRAIL loaded DNA nanoclews are capable of transforming into nanofibers after PLA2 activation. The nanofibers with micro-scaled lengths efficiently present the loaded TRAIL to death receptors on the cancer cell membrane and amplified the apoptotic signaling with reduced TRAIL internalization. PMID:27131597

  18. Nanogel-based PspA intranasal vaccine prevents invasive disease and nasal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  19. Nanogel-Based PspA Intranasal Vaccine Prevents Invasive Disease and Nasal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E.; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  20. Multifunctional Particles for Melanoma-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wadajkar, Aniket S.; Bhavsar, Zarna; Ko, Cheng-Yu; Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Cui, Weina; Tang, Liping; Nguyen, Kytai T.

    2012-01-01

    New magnetic-based core-shell particles (MBCSP) were developed to target skin cancer cells while delivering chemotherapeutic drugs in a controlled fashion. MBCSP consist of a thermo-responsive shell of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-acrylamide-allylamine) and a core of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) embedded with magnetite nanoparticles. To target melanoma cancer cells, MBCSP were conjugated with Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) peptides that specifically bind to the α5β3+ receptor of melanoma cell. MBCSP consist of unique multifunctional and controlled drug delivery characteristics. Specially, they can provide dual drug release mechanisms (a sustained release of drugs through degradation of PLGA core and a controlled release in response to changes in temperature via thermo-responsive polymer shell), and dual targeting mechanisms (magnetic localization and receptor-mediated targeting). Results from in vitro studies indicate that GRGDS-conjugated MBCSP has an average diameter of 296 nm and exhibit no cytotoxicity towards human dermal fibroblasts up to 500 μg ml−1. Further, a sustained release of curcumin from the core and a temperature-dependent release of doxorubicin from the shell of MBCSP were observed. The particles also produced a dark contrast signal in magnetic resonance imaging. Finally, the particles were accumulated at the tumor site in a B16F10 melanoma orthotopic mouse model, especially in presence of a magnet. Results indicate great potential of MBCSP as a platform technology to target, treat, and monitor melanoma for targeted drug delivery to reduce side effects of chemotherapeutic reagents. PMID:22561668

  1. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  2. [Drug delivery strategies for targeted treatment of inflammatory bowel disease].

    PubMed

    Lautenschläger, C; Schmidt, C; Lange, K; Stallmach, A

    2015-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a frequently occurring disease in young people, which is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The therapy of IBD is dominated by the administration of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents, which suppress the intestinal inflammatory burden and improve the disease-related symptoms. Present treatment strategies are characterized by a limited therapeutical efficacy and the occurrence of adverse drug reactions. The development of novel disease-targeted drug delivery strategies is preferable for a more effective therapy and thus demonstrates the potential to address unmet medical needs. This review gives an overview about drug delivery strategies for the treatment of IBD. Therefore, established intestine-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the diseased part of the gastrointestinal tract will be presented, including prodrugs, and dosage forms with pH-/time-dependent drug release. Furthermore future-oriented disease-targeting strategies for a selective drug release into the intestinal inflammation will be described, including micro-/nanosized synthetic and biologic drug carriers. This novel therapeutic approach may enable a more effective anti-inflammatory treatment of IBD with reduced risks of adverse reactions. PMID:25723326

  3. "Nanotheranostics" for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique is a promising tool that improves cancer detection, facilitates diagnosis and monitors therapeutic effects. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have emerged as MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging and as potential vectors for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery; nevertheless, the application of SPIOs has been hampered due to a lack of specificity to tumor tissues and premature drug release. This project aims at developing multifunctional SPIOs for both cancer imaging and targeted drug delivery via conjugation of tumor specific antibodies with SPIOs. The application of anti-TAG-72 antibodies as tumor targeting modalities was evaluated in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in xenograft models by using fluorescent imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It was demonstrated that antibody-labeled SPIOs were superior imaging agents and drug carriers for increased tumor specificity. The regulation and kinetics of intracellular drug release from SPIOs were explored by means of fluorescence imaging. In vitro and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging was employed to investigate the mechanisms of premature drug release from nanocarriers. The large volume and high hydrophobicity of cell membranes were found to play an important role in premature drug release. The encapsulation of SPIOs into nanocarriers decreased drug release in a dose-dependent mode. This study provided future opportunities to improve the efficiency of nanocarriers by exploring the mechanism of drug release and disassembly of SPIO-loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

  4. Polymeric protective agents for nanoparticles in drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Bejenaru, Cornelia; Bejenaru, Ludovic Everard

    2016-08-30

    Surface modification/functionalization of nanoparticles (NPs) using polymeric protective agents is an issue of great importance and actuality for drug delivery and targeting. Improving the blood circulation half-life of surface-protected nanocarriers is closely related to the elimination of main biological barriers and limiting factors (protein absorption and opsonization), due to the phagocytic activity of reticuloendothelial system. For passive or active targeted delivery, in biomedical area, surface-functionalized NPs with tissue-recognition ligands were designed and optimized as a result of modern research techniques. Also, multi-functionalized nanostructures are characterized by enhanced bioavailability, efficacy, targeted localization, active cellular uptake, and low side effects. Surface-protected NPs are obtained from biocompatible, biodegradable and less toxic natural polymers (dextran, β-cyclodextrin, chitosan, hyaluronic acid, heparin, gelatin) or synthetic polymers, such as poly(lactic acid), poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid, poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(alkyl cyanoacrylates). PEGylation is one of the most important functionalization methods providing steric stabilization, long circulating and 'stealth' properties for both polymeric and inorganic-based nanosystems. In addition, for their antimicrobial, antiviral and antitumor effects, cutting-edge researches in the field of pharmaceutical nanobiotechnology highlighted the importance of noble metal (platinum, gold, silver) NPs decorated with biopolymers. PMID:26972379

  5. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ηm, which increase to 60–80 ηm upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ηm) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression

  6. Influence of network topology on the swelling of polyelectrolyte nanogels.

    PubMed

    Rizzi, L G; Levin, Y

    2016-03-21

    It is well-known that the swelling behavior of ionic nanogels depends on their cross-link density; however, it is unclear how different topologies should affect the response of the polyelectrolyte network. Here we perform Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the equilibrium properties of ionic nanogels as a function of salt concentration Cs and the fraction f of ionizable groups in a polyelectrolyte network formed by cross-links of functionality z. Our results indicate that the network with cross-links of low connectivity result in nanogel particles with higher swelling ratios. We also confirm a de-swelling effect of salt on nanogel particles. PMID:27004897

  7. Cancer Nanomedicine: From Targeted Delivery to Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Ho, William; Zhang, Xueqing; Bertrand, Nicolas; Farokhzad, Omid

    2015-01-01

    The advent of nanomedicine marks an unparalleled opportunity to advance the treatment of a variety of diseases, including cancer. The unique properties of nanoparticles, such as large surface-to volume ratio, small size, the ability to encapsulate a variety of drugs, and tunable surface chemistry, gives them many advantages over their bulk counterparts. This includes multivalent surface modification with targeting ligands, efficient navigation of the complex in vivo environment, increased intracellular trafficking, and sustained release of drug payload. These advantages make nanoparticles a mode of treatment potentially superior to conventional cancer therapies. This article highlights the most recent developments in cancer treatment using nanoparticles as drug-delivery vehicles, including promising opportunities in targeted and combination therapy. PMID:25656384

  8. From hybrid compounds to targeted drug delivery in antimalarial therapy.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rudi; Miranda, Daniela; Magalhães, Joana; Capela, Rita; Perry, Maria J; O'Neill, Paul M; Moreira, Rui; Lopes, Francisca

    2015-08-15

    The discovery of new drugs to treat malaria is a continuous effort for medicinal chemists due to the emergence and spread of resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum to nearly all used antimalarials. The rapid adaptation of the malaria parasite remains a major limitation to disease control. Development of hybrid antimalarial agents has been actively pursued as a promising strategy to overcome the emergence of resistant parasite strains. This review presents the journey that started with simple combinations of two active moieties into one chemical entity and progressed into a delivery/targeted system based on major antimalarial classes of drugs. The rationale for providing different mechanisms of action against a single or additional targets involved in the multiple stages of the parasite's life-cycle is highlighted. Finally, a perspective for this polypharmacologic approach is presented. PMID:25913864

  9. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  10. Modular Nanotransporters for Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Drugs: Folate Receptors as Potential Targets

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to a subcellular drug delivery system, modular nanotransporters (MNT) that can penetrate into target cells and deliver a therapeutic into their subcellular compartments, particularly into the nucleus. The therapeutics which need such type of delivery belong to two groups: (i) those that exert their effect only when delivered into a certain cell compartment (like DNA delivered into the nucleus); and (ii) those drugs that are capable of exerting their effect in different parts of the cells, however there can be found a cell compartment that is the most sensitive to their effect. A particular interest attract such cytotoxic agents as Auger electron emitters which are known to be ineffective outside the cell nucleus, whereas they possess high cytotoxicity in the vicinity of nuclear DNA through the induction of non-reparable double-strand DNA breaks. The review discusses main approaches permitting to choose internalizable receptors permitting both recognition of target cells and penetration into them. Special interest attract folate receptors which become accessible to blood circulating therapeutics after malignant transformation or on activated macrophages which makes them an attractive target for both several oncological and inflammatory diseases, like atherosclerosis. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that MNT is a promising platform for targeted delivery of different therapeutics into the nuclei of target cells. PMID:25312738

  11. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  12. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  13. Magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and triggered drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Mukherjee, Sumit; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-10-01

    The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ideal system for the biomedical

  14. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  15. Design and Application of Nanogel-Based Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailing, Eric Alan

    Crosslinked polymer networks have wide application in biomaterials, from soft hydrogel scaffolds for cell culture and tissue engineering to glassy, high modulus dental restoratives. Composite materials formed with nanogels as a means for tuning network structure on the nanoscale have been reported, but no investigation into nanogels as the primary network component has been explored to this point. This thesis was dedicated to studying network formation from the direct polymerization of nanogels and investigating applications for these unique materials. Covalently crosslinked polymer networks were synthesized from polymerizable nanogels without the use of reactive small monomers or oligomers. Network properties were controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the nanogel, allowing for materials to be designed from nanostructured macromolecular precursors. Nanogels were synthesized from a thermally initiated solution free radical polymerization of a monomethacrylate, a dimethacrylate, and a thiol-based chain transfer agent. Monomers with a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic character were copolymerized, and polymerizable groups were introduced through an alcohol-isocyanate click reaction. Nanogels were dispersible in water up to 75 wt%, including nanogels that contained a relatively high fraction of a conventionally water-insoluble component. Nanogels with molecular weights that ranged from 10's to 100's of kDa and hydrodynamic radii between 4 and 10 nm were obtained. Macroscopic crosslinked polymer networks were synthesized from the photopolymerization of methacrylate-functionalized nanogels in inert solvent, which was typically water. The nanogel composition and internal branching density affected both covalent and non-covalent interparticle interactions, which dictated the final mechanical properties of the networks. Nanogels with progressively disparate hydrophilic and hydrophobic character were synthesized to explore the potential for creating

  16. Advanced drug delivery and targeting technologies for the ocular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Barar, Jaleh; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Fathi, Marziyeh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ocular targeted therapy has enormously been advanced by implementation of new methods of drug delivery and targeting using implantable drug delivery systems (DDSs) or devices (DDDs), stimuli-responsive advanced biomaterials, multimodal nanomedicines, cell therapy modalities and medical bioMEMs. These technologies tackle several ocular diseases such as inflammation-based diseases (e.g., scleritis, keratitis, uveitis, iritis, conjunctivitis, chorioretinitis, choroiditis, retinitis, retinochoroiditis), ocular hypertension and neuropathy, age-related macular degeneration and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Such therapies appear to provide ultimate treatments, even though much more effective, yet biocompatible, noninvasive therapies are needed to control some disabling ocular diseases/disorders. Methods: In the current study, we have reviewed and discussed recent advancements on ocular targeted therapies. Results: On the ground that the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses of ophthalmic drugs need special techniques, most of ocular DDSs/devices developments have been designed to localized therapy within the eye. Application of advanced DDSs such as Subconjunctival insert/implants (e.g., latanoprost implant, Gamunex-C), episcleral implant (e.g., LX201), cationic emulsions (e.g., Cationorm™, Vekacia™, Cyclokat™), intac/punctal plug DDSs (latanoprost punctal plug delivery system, L-PPDS), and intravitreal implants (I-vitaion™, NT-501, NT- 503, MicroPump, Thethadur, IB-20089 Verisome™, Cortiject, DE-102, Retisert™, Iluvein™ and Ozurdex™) have significantly improved the treatment of ocular diseases. However, most of these DDSs/devices are applied invasively and even need surgical procedures. Of these, use of de novo technologies such as advanced stimuli-responsive nanomaterials, multimodal nanosystems (NSs)/nanoconjugates (NCs), biomacromolecualr scaffolds, and bioengineered cell therapies

  17. Cargo-Delivery Platforms for Targeted Delivery of Inhibitor Cargos Against Botulism

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ho, Mengfei

    2015-01-01

    Delivering therapeutic cargos to specific cell types in vivo poses many technical challenges. There is currently a plethora of drug leads and therapies against numerous diseases, ranging from small molecule compounds to nucleic acids to peptides to proteins with varying binding or enzymatic functions. Many of these candidate therapies have documented potential for mitigating or reversing disease symptoms, if only a means for gaining access to the intracellular target were available. Recent advances in our understanding of the biology of cellular uptake and transport processes and the mode of action of bacterial protein toxins have accelerated the development of toxin-based cargo-delivery vehicle platforms. This review provides an updated survey of the status of available platforms for targeted delivery of therapeutic cargos, outlining various strategies that have been used to deliver different types of cargo into cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the application of toxin-based approaches, examining critical issues that have hampered realization of post-intoxication antitoxins against botulism. PMID:25335885

  18. Functional liposomes in the cancer-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tila, Dena; Ghasemi, Saeed; Yazdani-Arazi, Seyedeh Narjes; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Cancer is considered as one of the most severe health problems and is currently the third most common cause of death in the world after heart and infectious diseases. Novel therapies are constantly being discovered, developed and trialed. Many of the current anticancer agents exhibit non-ideal pharmaceutical and pharmacological properties and are distributed non-specifically throughout the body. This results in death of the both normal healthy and malignant cells and substantially leads to accruing a variety of serious toxic side effects. Therefore, the efficient systemic therapy of cancer is almost impossible due to harmful side effects of anticancer agents to the healthy organs and tissues. Furthermore, several problems such as low bioavailability of the drugs, low drug concentrations at the site of action, lack of drug specificity and drug-resistance also cause many restrictions on clinical applications of these drugs in the tumor therapy. Different types of the liposomal formulations have been used in medicine due to their distinctive advantages associated with their structural flexibility in the encapsulation of various agents with different physicochemical properties. They can also mediate delivery of the cargo to the appropriate cell type and subcellular compartment, reducing the effective dosage and possible side effects which are related to high systemic concentrations. Therefore, these novel systems were found very promising and encouraging dosage forms for the treatment of different types of cancer by increasing efficiency and reducing the systemic toxicity due to the specific drug delivery and targeting. PMID:25823898

  19. Development of targeted delivery techniques for Zequanox®

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Severson, Todd J.; Luoma, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of water temperature and concentration on the physical characteristics of Zequanox®, a dead-cell spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) used for controlling invasive dreissenid mussels (zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, and quagga mussel, Dreissena bugensis), were investigated to determine optimal temperature-specific concentrations and delivery techniques for use during open-water subsurface Zequanox applications. Temperature-controlled laboratory tests evaluated viscosity, settling, stratification, and buoyancy of various concentrations of Zequanox suspension in water to select an optimal target viscosity for Zequanox applications. A two-step linear regression procedure was used to create a temperature-specific Zequanox prediction model from the viscosity data. The prediction model and subsurface application techniques were validated by conducting three independent outdoor pond trials at temperatures of ~9, 14, and 20°C. During these outdoor trials, subsurface applications of Zequanox at concentrations predicted by the model were performed and water samples were collected at varying depths and analyzed via spectroscopy to determine Zequanox concentration and dispersion. Although the predicted Zequanox concentrations and delivery techniques used resulted in successfully maintaining lethal Zequanox concentrations in the bottom 7.5 cm of the water column for the duration of the exposure, a revised prediction model is also provided for more accurately selecting temperature-specific Zequanox concentrations.

  20. Improved Biochemical Strategies for Targeted Delivery of Taxoids

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) and docetaxel (Taxotere ®) are very important anti-tumor drugs in clinical use for cancer. However, their clinical utility is limited due to systemic toxicity, low solubility and inactivity against drug resistant tumors. To improve chemotherapeutic levels of these drugs, it would be highly desirable to design strategies which bypass the above limitations. In this respect various prodrug and drug targeting strategies have been envisioned either to improve oral bioavailability or tumor specific delivery of taxoids. Abnormal properties of cancer cells with respect to normal cells have guided in designing of these protocols. This review article records the designed biochemical strategies and their biological efficacies as potential taxoid chemotherapeutics. PMID:17419065

  1. Possibilities of acoustic thermometry for controlling targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Nemchenko, O. Yu.; Less, Yu. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Model acoustic thermometry experiments were conducted during heating of an aqueous liposome suspension. Heating was done to achieve the liposome phase transition temperature. At the moment of the phase transition, the thermal acoustic signal achieved a maximum and decreased, despite continued heating. During subsequent cooling of the suspension, when lipids again passed through the phase transition point, the thermal acoustic signal again increased, despite a reduction in temperature. This effect is related to an increase in ultrasound absorption by the liposome suspension at the moment of the lipid phase transition. The result shows that acoustic thermography can be used to control targeted delivery of drugs mixed in thermally sensitive liposomes, the integrity of which is violated during heating to the phase transition temperature.

  2. Targeting tumor metastases: drug delivery mechanisms and technologies

    PubMed Central

    Ganapathy, Vidya; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Roth, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Primary sites of tumor are the focal triggers of cancers, yet it is the subsequent metastasis events that cause the majority of the morbidity and mortality. Metastatic tumor cells exhibit a phenotype that differs from that of the parent cells, as they represent a resistant, invasive subpopulation of the original tumor, may have acquired additional genetic or epigenetic alterations under exposure to prior chemotherapeutic or radiotherapeutic treatments, and reside in a microenvironment differing from that of its origin. This combination of resistant phenotype and distal location make tracking and treating metastases particularly challenging. In this review, we highlight some of the unique biological traits of metastasis, which in turn, inspire emerging strategies for targeted imaging of metastasized tumors and metastasis-directed delivery of therapeutics. PMID:26409123

  3. Lactosylated liposomes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin to hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoju; Zhang, Mengzi; Yung, Bryant; Li, Hong; Zhou, Chenguang; Lee, L James; Lee, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Background N-lactosyl-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Lac-DOPE) was synthesized and evaluated as a liver-specific targeting ligand via asialoglycoprotein receptors for liposomal delivery of doxorubicin. Methods Lactosylated liposomes encapsulating calcein (Lac-L-calcein) or doxorubicin (Lac-L-DOX) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, monomethoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and Lac-DOPE at 50:35:5:10 (mol/mol) were prepared by polycarbonate membrane extrusion and evaluated in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Cellular uptake of Lac-L-calcein was monitored by confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of Lac-L-DOX was evaluated by MTT assay. The pharmacokinetic properties of Lac-L-DOX were studied in normal mice, and its biodistribution and antitumor activity were studied in nude mice with HepG2 xenografts. Results The size of Lac-L-DOX was less than 100 nm and the liposomes demonstrated excellent colloidal stability. In vitro uptake of Lac-L-calcein by HepG2 cells was four times greater than that of non-targeted L-calcein. In the presence of 20 mM lactose, the uptake of Lac-L-calcein was inhibited, suggesting that asialoglycoprotein receptors mediated the observed cellular uptake. Lac-L-DOX exhibited enhanced in vivo cytotoxicity compared with the nontargeted liposomal doxorubicin (L-DOX), and its pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that Lac-L-DOX has a long blood circulation time (t1/2 8.73 hours). Tissue distribution and therapeutic efficacy studies in nude mice bearing HepG2 xenografts show that Lac-L-DOX had significantly stronger tumor inhibitory activity compared with L-DOX and free doxorubicin, along with a higher accumulation of drug within the tumor site and greater cellular uptake by tumor cells. Conclusion These data suggest that lactosylated liposomes are promising drug delivery vehicles for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23093902

  4. Monitoring of imatinib targeted delivery in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Kralj, Eva; Žakelj, Simon; Trontelj, Jurij; Pajič, Tadej; Preložnik Zupan, Irena; Černelč, Peter; Ostanek, Barbara; Marc, Janja; Kristl, Albin

    2013-09-27

    The success of imatinib therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia is highly influenced by its active transport into target cells. However, the methodology for analytical evaluation of intracellular drug concentration is rare and usually reliant upon the use of radioactively labeled drugs. More specifically, there is no published method available in the literature for the determination of imatinib concentration in granulocytes. To gain further insight into the intracellular drug uptake a very reliable two-stage sample concentration procedure was devised and coupled with a sensitive ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The reliability of this sample preparation and sensitivity of the analysis was confirmed by a successful validation of all necessary method parameters to an impressive lower limit of quantification of 0.5 ng imatinib per 10(6) cells still at the signal to noise ratio of 670. The usefulness of the method is further improved with only 6 mL of blood being necessary for patient analysis. The method has been applied to blood samples of 13 CML patients treated with imatinib and all the measured intracellular drug concentrations were within the validated range. These and further measurements will enable the research of factors which may, besides blood plasma concentration, influence the individual's response to imatinib therapy. Furthermore, individualisation of dosing based on the directly measured targeted drug delivery could be possible. PMID:23643738

  5. Target gene delivery from targeting ligand conjugated chitosan-PEI copolymer for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joung-Pyo; Nah, Jae-Woon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we designed a novel carrier which was having low cytotoxicity, site-specific target function, and high transfection efficiency using low molecular weight water soluble O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCh), branched low molecular weight poly(ethyleneimine) (bPEI), and targeting ligand (epitope type, HER-2/neu). OCMCh/bPEI/targeting ligand, HPOCP copolymer, and targeting ligand-modified polyamphoteric polymer, and were prepared by chemical reaction and characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR. The binding affinity, protecting efficiency, and releasing ability of gene/HPOCP polyplex were confirmed by gel retardation assay. The pDNA(pEGFP)/HPOCP polyplexes showed high gene transfection efficiency in HCT 119 cell. In addition, siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes formed spherical shape and have particle sizes from 100 to 300nm. The siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes have lower cytotoxicity than PEI in the all of siRNA concentrations ranging from 0 to 2μg/μL in HEK 293 cells. The cell viability of siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes was performed in SK-Br3 cells with VEGF siRNA or BCL2 siRNA. In addition, confocal laser-scanning microscopy and flow cytometry assay were performed for cellular localization and cellular uptake efficiency of siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes. The results of the present study demonstrate that HPOCP copolymer is a good candidate as gene delivery carriers for gene delivery system or gene therapy. PMID:26453863

  6. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-02-16

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 {micro}m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 {micro}m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial

  7. Efficient Inhibition of Ovarian Cancer by Gelonin Toxin Gene Delivered by Biodegradable Cationic Heparin-polyethyleneimine Nanogels.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Gou, Maling; Yi, Tao; Yang, Li; Liu, Lili; Lin, Xiaojuan; Su, Dan; Wei, Yuquan; Zhao, Xia

    2015-01-01

    The use of toxins for cancer therapy has great promise. Gelonin, a potent plant toxin, causes cell death by inactivating the 60S ribosomal subunit. Recently, we developed a novel gene delivery system using biodegradable cationic heparin-polyethyleneimine (HPEI) nanogels. In the current study, the antitumor activity of a recombinant plasmid expressing gelonin (pGelonin) on human ovarian cancer was assessed. The application of HPEI nanogels, was also evaluated. Gelonin-cDNA was cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid vector and transfected into SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cells using biodegradable cationic HPEI nanogels. The expression of gelonin in vitro and in vivo was confirmed using RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Cell viability and apoptosis were examined using an MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. For the in vivo study, an SKOV3 intraperitoneal ovarian carcinomatosis model was established, and nude mice were randomly assigned into four groups receiving i.p. administration of pGelonin/HPEI complexes, pVAX/HPEI complexes, HPEI alone and 5% glucose solution. The tumor weight was monitored, and a TUNEL assay and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry were performed to evaluate apoptosis and cell proliferation in the tumor tissue sections, respectively. Gelonin was efficiently expressed in SKOV3 cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using pGelonin incorporated with HPEI nanogels. The pGelonin/HPEI complexes inhibited cell viability and induced apoptosis in the cell culture. Treatment for intraperitoneal carcinomatosis with pGelonin/HPEI complexes reduced the tumor weight by ~58.55% compared to the control groups (P<0.05). The antitumor effect was accompanied by increased apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation (P<0.05). No significant side effects were observed with i.p. administration of the pGelonin/HPEI complexes. Our data indicate that HPEI nanogel-delivered pGelonin may have promising applications against human ovarian cancer. PMID:26005374

  8. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  9. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and

  10. Reversible Masking Using Low-Molecular-Weight Neutral Lipids to Achieve Optimal-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Nancy Smyth; Senzer, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of therapeutics is required to effectively treat or cure metastatic cancer, certain cardiovascular diseases, and other acquired or inherited diseases. Using this route of delivery allows potential uptake in all disease targets that are accessed by the bloodstream. However, normal tissues and organs also have the potential for uptake of therapeutic agents. Therefore, investigators have used targeted delivery to attempt delivery solely to the target cells; however, use of ligands on the surface of delivery vehicles to target specific cell surface receptors is not sufficient to avoid nonspecific uptake. PEGylation has been used for decades to try to avoid nonspecific uptake but suffers from many problems known as “The PEGylation Dilemma.” We have solved this dilemma by replacing PEGylation with reversible masking using low-molecular-weight neutral lipids in order to achieve optimal-targeted delivery solely to target cells. Our paper will focus on this topic. PMID:22655199

  11. Chitosan coatings to control release and target tissues for therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Jessica Amber; Wells, Carlos Montez; McGraw, Gregory S; Velasquez Pulgarin, Diego A; Whitaker, Marsalas D; Pruitt, Reginald L; Bumgardner, Joel David

    2015-07-01

    The natural biopolymer chitosan has versatile applications in therapeutic delivery. Coating drug delivery matrices or biomaterials with chitosan offers several advantages in drug delivery, including control of drug release, slowing degradation rate and improving biocompatibility. Advanced uses of chitosan in coating form include targeting drug delivery vehicles to specific tissue as well as providing a stimulus-controlled release response. The present review summarizes the current applications of chitosan coatings in the context of different biomaterial delivery technologies, as well as future directions of chitosan coatings for drug delivery technologies under development. PMID:26228776

  12. Buparvaquone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery in theleriosis

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Maheshkumar P.; Shelkar, Nilakash; Gaikwad, Rajiv V.; Vanage, Geeta R.; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buparvaquone (BPQ), a hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative, has been investigated for the treatment of many infections and is recommended as the gold standard for the treatment of theileriosis. Theileriosis, an intramacrophage infection is localized mainly in reticuloendotheileial system (RES) organs. The present study investigates development of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of BPQ for targeted delivery to the RES. Materials and Methods: BPQ SLN was prepared using melt method by adding a molten mixture into aqueous Lutrol F68 solution (80°C). Larger batches were prepared up to 6 g of BPQ with GMS: BPQ, 2:1. SLN of designed size were obtained using ultraturrax and high pressure homogenizer. A freeze and thaw study was used to optimize type and concentration of cryoprotectant with Sf: Mean particle size, Si: Initial particle size <1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was performed on optimized formulation. Formulation was investigated for in vitro serum stability, hemolysis and cell uptake study. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study was performed in Holtzman rat. Results: Based on solubility in lipid; glyceryl monostearate (GMS) was selected for preparation of BPQ SLN. Batches of BPQ SLN were optimized for average particle size and entrapment efficiency at <100 mg solid content. A combination of Solutol HS-15 and Lutrol F68 at 2% w/v and greater enabled the desired Sf/Si < 1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed decrease in crystallinity of BPQ in BPQ SLN while, scanning electron microscope revealed spherical morphology. BPQ SLN revealed good stability at 4°C and 25°C. Low hemolytic potential (<8%) and in vitro serum stability up to 5 h was observed. Cytotoxicity of SLN to the U937 cell was low. The macrophage cell line revealed high (52%) uptake of BPQ SLN in 1 h suggesting the potential to RES uptake. SLN revealed longer

  13. Disulfide-based multifunctional conjugates for targeted theranostic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have

  14. Oligoperoxide Based Physically Detectable Nanocomposites for Cell Targeting, Visualization and Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaichenko, A.; Mitina, N.; Shevchuk, O.; Shapoval, O.; Boiko, N.; Bilyy, R.; Stoika, R.; Voloshinovskii, A.; Horak, D.

    2010-10-01

    Novel promising routes for the obtaining luminescent, magnetic, plasmon resonance capable nanocomposites as well as drug delivery systems are proposed and studied. These routes are based on the synthesis and application of original type of functional oligoperoxides, their coordinating complexes of transition including rare earth metal cations for controlled synthesis of block, comb-like or nanogel oligoelectrolytes as well as for template synthesis of functional polymer and polymer-mineral nanoparticles. Developed nanoscale delivery systems were tested as medicines for cancer administration in vitro and in vivo. Physically detectable lectin-conjugated nanocomposites were studied as biomarkers for pathological cell targeting and visualization.

  15. Modern prodrug design for targeted oral drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Arik; Zimmermann, Ellen M; Ben-Shabat, Shimon

    2014-01-01

    The molecular information that became available over the past two decades significantly influenced the field of drug design and delivery at large, and the prodrug approach in particular. While the traditional prodrug approach was aimed at altering various physiochemical parameters, e.g., lipophilicity and charge state, the modern approach to prodrug design considers molecular/cellular factors, e.g., membrane influx/efflux transporters and cellular protein expression and distribution. This novel targeted-prodrug approach is aimed to exploit carrier-mediated transport for enhanced intestinal permeability, as well as specific enzymes to promote activation of the prodrug and liberation of the free parent drug. The purpose of this article is to provide a concise overview of this modern prodrug approach, with useful successful examples for its utilization. In the past the prodrug approach used to be viewed as a last option strategy, after all other possible solutions were exhausted; nowadays this is no longer the case, and in fact, the prodrug approach should be considered already in the very earliest development stages. Indeed, the prodrug approach becomes more and more popular and successful. A mechanistic prodrug design that aims to allow intestinal permeability by specific transporters, as well as activation by specific enzymes, may greatly improve the prodrug efficiency, and allow for novel oral treatment options. PMID:25317578

  16. A hyaluronic acid nanogel for photo-chemo theranostics of lung cancer with simultaneous light-responsive controlled release of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Zehedina; Nurunnabi, Md; Nafiujjaman, Md; Reeck, Gerald R.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-Kyu

    2015-06-01

    The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid nanogel) that exerts an activity with multiple effects: thermo and chemotherapeutic, real-time noninvasive imaging, and light-glutathione-responsive controlled drug release. The nanogel is mono-dispersed with an average diameter of 120 nm as observed by using TEM and a hydrodynamic size analyzer. It has excellent photo-luminescence properties and good stability in buffer and serum solutions. Graphene itself, being photoluminescent, can be considered an optical imaging contrast agent as well as a heat source when excited by laser irradiation. Thus the nanogel shows simultaneous thermo-chemotherapeutic effects on noninvasive optical imaging. We have also found that irradiation enhances the release of doxorubicin in a controlled manner. This release synergizes therapeutic activity of the nanogel in killing tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that the graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in the hyaluronic acid nanogel is very effective in killing the human lung cancer cell line (A549) with limited toxicity in the non-cancerous cell line (MDCK).The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid

  17. Plasmonic nanogels with robustly tunable optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Tao; Wani, Satvik N.; Zhou, Georo; Baszczuk, Elia; Sureshkumar, Radhakrishna

    2011-10-01

    Low viscosity fluids with tunable optical properties can be processed to manufacture thin film and interfaces for molecular detection, light trapping in photovoltaics and reconfigurable optofluidic devices. In this work, self-assembly in wormlike micelle solutions is used to uniformly distribute various metallic nanoparticles to produce stable suspensions with localized, multiple wavelength or broad-band optical properties. Their spectral response can be robustly modified by varying the species, concentration, size and/or shape of the nanoparticles. Structure, rheology and optical properties of these plasmonic nanogels as well as their potential applications to efficient photovoltaics design are discussed.

  18. Microemulsion-based drug delivery system for transnasal delivery of Carbamazepine: preliminary brain-targeting study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmin Bharatbhai; Patel, Mrunali Rashmin; Bhatt, Kashyap K; Patel, Bharat G; Gaikwad, Rajiv V

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the development and evaluation of Carbamazepine (CMP)-loaded microemulsions (CMPME) for intranasal delivery in the treatment of epilepsy. The CMPME was prepared by the spontaneous emulsification method and characterized for physicochemical parameters. All formulations were radiolabeled with (99m)Tc (technetium) and biodistribution of CMP in the brain was investigated using Swiss albino rats. Brain scintigraphy imaging in rats was also performed to determine the uptake of the CMP into the brain. CMPME were found crystal clear and stable with average globule size of 34.11 ± 1.41 nm. (99m)Tc-labeled CMP solution (CMPS)/CMPME/CMP mucoadhesive microemulsion (CMPMME) were found to be stable and suitable for in vivo studies. Brain/blood ratio at all sampling points up to 8 h following intranasal administration of CMPMME compared to intravenous CMPME was found to be 2- to 3-fold higher signifying larger extent of distribution of the CMP in brain. Drug targeting efficiency and direct drug transport were found to be highest for CMPMME post-intranasal administration compared to intravenous CMP. Rat brain scintigraphy also demonstrated higher intranasal uptake of the CMP into the brain. This investigation demonstrates a prompt and larger extent of transport of CMP into the brain through intranasal CMPMME, which may prove beneficial for treatment of epilepsy. PMID:24825492

  19. Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

  20. Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

  1. Universal conformational properties of polymers in ionic nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Winkler, Roland G.

    2016-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte gels are known to undergo significant conformational changes in response to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, or the dielectric constant. Specifically, an increase of the degree of ionization associated with an increasing number of counterions leads to swelling of the network. For a macroscopically large gel, which is electrostatically neutral in its interior, swelling is no longer governed by electrostatic interactions, but rather by the osmotic pressure of counterions. However, this electrostatic neutrality is typically violated for nanogels, because counterions are free to leave a gel particle. Although nanogel-swelling exhibits similar features as swelling of micro- and macrogels, another mechanism has to be relevant. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations and scaling theory to unravel the structural properties of nanogels upon changing the electrostatic interactions. We demonstrate that the swelling of nanogels is governed by screened electrostatic interactions without a relevant contribution by the counterion osmotic pressure. PMID:26830457

  2. Universal conformational properties of polymers in ionic nanogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Winkler, Roland G.

    2016-02-01

    Polyelectrolyte gels are known to undergo significant conformational changes in response to external stimuli such as pH, temperature, or the dielectric constant. Specifically, an increase of the degree of ionization associated with an increasing number of counterions leads to swelling of the network. For a macroscopically large gel, which is electrostatically neutral in its interior, swelling is no longer governed by electrostatic interactions, but rather by the osmotic pressure of counterions. However, this electrostatic neutrality is typically violated for nanogels, because counterions are free to leave a gel particle. Although nanogel-swelling exhibits similar features as swelling of micro- and macrogels, another mechanism has to be relevant. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations and scaling theory to unravel the structural properties of nanogels upon changing the electrostatic interactions. We demonstrate that the swelling of nanogels is governed by screened electrostatic interactions without a relevant contribution by the counterion osmotic pressure.

  3. Metal Chelating Crosslinkers Form Nanogels with High Chelation Stability.

    PubMed

    Lux, Jacques; Chan, Minnie; Elst, Luce Vander; Schopf, Eric; Mahmoud, Enas; Laurent, Sophie; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-12-14

    We present a series of hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) incorporating either acyclic or cyclic metal chelates as crosslinkers. These crosslinkers are used to formulate polyacrylamide-based nanogels (diameter 50 to 85 nm) yielding contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities (up to 6-fold greater than Dotarem®), because this nanogel structure slows the chelator's tumbling frequency and allows fast water exchange. Importantly, these nanogels also stabilize Gd(3+) within the chelator thermodynamically and kinetically against metal displacement through transmetallation, which should reduce toxicity associated with release of free Gd(3+). This chelation stability suggests that the chelate crosslinker strategy may prove useful for other applications of metal-chelating nanoparticles in medicine, including other imaging modalities and radiotherapy. PMID:24505553

  4. Metal Chelating Crosslinkers Form Nanogels with High Chelation Stability

    PubMed Central

    Elst, Luce Vander; Schopf, Eric; Mahmoud, Enas; Laurent, Sophie; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-01-01

    We present a series of hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) incorporating either acyclic or cyclic metal chelates as crosslinkers. These crosslinkers are used to formulate polyacrylamide-based nanogels (diameter 50 to 85 nm) yielding contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities (up to 6-fold greater than Dotarem®), because this nanogel structure slows the chelator's tumbling frequency and allows fast water exchange. Importantly, these nanogels also stabilize Gd3+ within the chelator thermodynamically and kinetically against metal displacement through transmetallation, which should reduce toxicity associated with release of free Gd3+. This chelation stability suggests that the chelate crosslinker strategy may prove useful for other applications of metal-chelating nanoparticles in medicine, including other imaging modalities and radiotherapy. PMID:24505553

  5. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, I.; Petran, A.; Turcu, R.; Daia, C.; Marinica, O.; Vekas, L.

    2013-11-13

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application.

  6. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, I.; Petran, A.; Daia, C.; Marinica, O.; Vekas, L.; Turcu, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application.

  7. Degradable thermoresponsive nanogels for protein encapsulation and controlled release.

    PubMed

    Bhuchar, Neha; Sunasee, Rajesh; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Thundat, Thomas; Narain, Ravin

    2012-01-18

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization technique was used for the fabrication of stable core cross-linked micelles (CCL) with thermoresponsive and degradable cores. Well-defined poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine), poly(MPC) macroRAFT agent, was first synthesized with narrow molecular weight distribution via the RAFT process. These CCL micelles (termed as nanogels) with hydrophilic poly(MPC) shell and thermoresponsive core consisting of poly(methoxydiethylene glycol methacrylate) (poly(MeODEGM) and poly(2-aminoethyl methacrylamide hydrochloride) (poly(AEMA) were then obtained in a one-pot process by RAFT polymerization in the presence of an acid degradable cross-linker. These acid degradable nanogels were efficiently synthesized with tunable sizes and low polydispersities. The encapsulation efficiencies of the nanogels with different proteins such as insulin, BSA, and β-galactosidase were studied and found to be dependent of the cross-linker concentration, size of protein, and the cationic character of the nanogels imparted by the presence of AEMA in the core. The thermoresponsive nature of the synthesized nanogels plays a vital role in protein encapsulation: the hydrophilic core and shell of the nanogels at low temperature allow easy diffusion of the proteins inside out and, with an increase in temperature, the core becomes hydrophobic and the nanogels are easily separated out with entrapped protein. The release profile of insulin from nanogels at low pH was studied and results were analyzed using bicinchoninic assay (BCA). Controlled release of protein was observed over 48 h. PMID:22171688

  8. Hybrid Nanogels for Sustainable Positive Thermosensitive Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Yongsoon ); Chang, Jeong H.; Liu, Jun; Williford, Rick E. ); Shin, Young-Kook; Exarhos, Gregory J. )

    2001-05-18

    A hybrid nanogel is developed based on interpenetrating networks of thermosensitive PNIPAAm gels and tailored nanoporous silica. Sustainable positive thermo-responsive drug release profile is obtained. When the temperature rises, the polymer gel shrinks, squeezing the drug into the porous channels, and at the same time, opening the pore to the outside media. The drug slowly diffuses out of the porous channels. The overall release rate can be adjusted by changing the composition of the nanogel.

  9. Dual responsive PNIPAM-chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Ramasamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal; Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation.

  10. Smart linkers in polymer-drug conjugates for tumor-targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Minglu; Zhang, Fang; Wei, Ting; Zuo, Tiantian; Guan, Yuanyuan; Lin, Guimei; Shao, Wei

    2016-07-01

    To achieve effective chemotherapy, many types of drug delivery systems have been developed for the specific environments in tumor tissues. Polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly used in tumor therapy due to several significant advantages over traditional delivery systems. In the fabrication of polymer-drug conjugates, a smart linker is an important component that joins two fragments or molecules together and can be cleared by a specific stimulus, which results in targeted drug delivery and controlled release. By regulating the conjugation between the drug and the nanocarriers, stimulus-sensitive systems based on smart linkers can offer high payloads, certified stability, controlled release and targeted delivery. In this review, we summarize the current state of smart linkers (e.g. disulfide, hydrazone, peptide, azo) used recently in various polymer-drug conjugate-based delivery systems with a primary focus on their sophisticated design principles and drug delivery mechanisms as well as in vivo processes. PMID:26560242