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Sample records for targeted nanogel delivery

  1. Nanogel Carrier Design for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Eckmann, D. M.; Composto, R. J.; Tsourkas, A.; Muzykantov, V. R.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer-based nanogel formulations offer features attractive for drug delivery, including ease of synthesis, controllable swelling and viscoelasticity as well as drug loading and release characteristics, passive and active targeting, and the ability to formulate nanogel carriers that can respond to biological stimuli. These unique features and low toxicity make the nanogels a favorable option for vascular drug targeting. In this review, we address key chemical and biological aspects of nanogel drug carrier design. In particular, we highlight published studies of nanogel design, descriptions of nanogel functional characteristics and their behavior in biological models. These studies form a compendium of information that supports the scientific and clinical rationale for development of this carrier for targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID:25485112

  2. Galactose-functionalized multi-responsive nanogels for hepatoma-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Shaofeng; Gao, Shan; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Mingming; Zhang, Ju; Wang, Chun; Li, Chen; Kong, Deling; Zhao, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using a combination of enzymatic transesterification and emulsion copolymerization for intracellular drug delivery. The nanogel exhibited redox, pH and temperature-responsive properties, which can be adjusted by varying the monomer feeding ratio. Furthermore, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the nanogels was close to body temperature and can result in rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed that the P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel showed uniform spherical monodispersion. With pyrene as a probe, the fluorescence excitation spectra demonstrated nanogel degradation in response to glutathione (GSH). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed an amorphous property of DOX within the nanogel, which was used in this study as a model anti-cancer drug. Drug-releasing characteristics of the nanogel were examined in vitro. The results showed multi-responsiveness of DOX release by the variation of environmental pH values, temperature or the availability of GSH, a biological reductase. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed a higher anti-tumor activity of the galactose-functionalized DOX-loaded nanogels against human hepatoma HepG2 cells, which was, at least in part, due to specific binding between the galactose segments and the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs) in hepatic cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometric profiles further confirmed elevated cellular uptake of DOX by the galactose-functionalised nanogels. Thus, we report here a multi-responsive P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel with a hepatoma-specific targeting ability for anti-cancer drug delivery.We report here a hepatoma-targeting multi-responsive biodegradable crosslinked nanogel, poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-galactose-ss-N-vinylcaprolactam-ss-methacrylic acid) P(ODGal-VCL-MAA), using a combination of enzymatic transesterification and emulsion copolymerization for intracellular drug delivery. The nanogel exhibited redox, pH and temperature-responsive properties, which can be adjusted by varying the monomer feeding ratio. Furthermore, the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of the nanogels was close to body temperature and can result in rapid thermal gelation at 37 °C. Scanning electron microscopy also revealed that the P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel showed uniform spherical monodispersion. With pyrene as a probe, the fluorescence excitation spectra demonstrated nanogel degradation in response to glutathione (GSH). X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed an amorphous property of DOX within the nanogel, which was used in this study as a model anti-cancer drug. Drug-releasing characteristics of the nanogel were examined in vitro. The results showed multi-responsiveness of DOX release by the variation of environmental pH values, temperature or the availability of GSH, a biological reductase. An in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed a higher anti-tumor activity of the galactose-functionalized DOX-loaded nanogels against human hepatoma HepG2 cells, which was, at least in part, due to specific binding between the galactose segments and the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGP-Rs) in hepatic cells. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometric profiles further confirmed elevated cellular uptake of DOX by the galactose-functionalised nanogels. Thus, we report here a multi-responsive P(ODGal-VCL-MAA) nanogel with a hepatoma-specific targeting ability for anti-cancer drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06714b

  3. Multifunctional quantum dot-polypeptide hybrid nanogel for targeted imaging and drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jie; Yao, Ming-Hao; Wen, Lang; Song, Ji-Tao; Zhang, Ming-Zhen; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Bo

    2014-09-01

    A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs can be simultaneously loaded in a QD-polypeptide nanogel. In vitro drug release of drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogels varies strongly with temperature, pH, and competitors. A drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogel with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif exhibited efficient receptor-mediated endocytosis in ?v?3 overexpressing HeLa cells but not in the control MCF-7 cells as analyzed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In contrast, non-targeted QD-polypeptide nanogels revealed minimal binding and uptake in HeLa cells. Compared with the original QDs, the QD-polypeptide nanogels showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity for both HeLa cells and NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the targeted QD-polypeptide nanogel was lower for normal NIH 3T3 cells than that for HeLa cancer cells. These results demonstrate that the integration of imaging and drug delivery functions in a single QD-polypeptide nanogel has the potential for application in cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy.A new type of multifunctional quantum dot (QD)-polypeptide hybrid nanogel with targeted imaging and drug delivery properties has been developed by metal-affinity driven self-assembly between artificial polypeptides and CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs. On the surface of QDs, a tunable sandwich-like microstructure consisting of two hydrophobic layers and one hydrophilic layer between them was verified by capillary electrophoresis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering measurements. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs can be simultaneously loaded in a QD-polypeptide nanogel. In vitro drug release of drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogels varies strongly with temperature, pH, and competitors. A drug-loaded QD-polypeptide nanogel with an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif exhibited efficient receptor-mediated endocytosis in ?v?3 overexpressing HeLa cells but not in the control MCF-7 cells as analyzed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. In contrast, non-targeted QD-polypeptide nanogels revealed minimal binding and uptake in HeLa cells. Compared with the original QDs, the QD-polypeptide nanogels showed lower in vitro cytotoxicity for both HeLa cells and NIH 3T3 cells. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of the targeted QD-polypeptide nanogel was lower for normal NIH 3T3 cells than that for HeLa cancer cells. These results demonstrate that the integration of imaging and drug delivery functions in a single QD-polypeptide nanogel has the potential for application in cancer diagnosis, imaging, and therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03058c

  4. Nanogels for delivery, imaging and therapy.

    PubMed

    Sivaram, Amal J; Rajitha, P; Maya, S; Jayakumar, R; Sabitha, M

    2015-01-01

    Nanogels are hydrogels having size in nanoregime, which is composed of cross-linked polymer networks. The advantages of nanogels include stimuli-responsive nature, easy drug loading, and higher drug-loading capacity, physical stability, versatility in design, stability of entrapped drug, and controlled release of the anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, protein, peptide and anticancer drugs. Stimuli-responsive nature of nanogel is of particular importance in anticancer and anti-inflammatory drug delivery, as cancer and inflammation are associated with acidic pH, heat generation, and change in ionic content. Nanogels composed of muco-adhesive polymers provide prolonged residence time and increase the ocular availability of loaded drugs. By forming suitably sized complex with proteins or by acting as artificial chaperones, they thus help to keep the proteins and enzymes in proper confirmation necessary for exerting biological activity; nanogels can increase the stability and activity of protein/peptide drugs. Better drug penetrations achieved by prolonged contact with skin contribute much in transdermal drug delivery. When it comes to cancer drug delivery, the presence of multiple interactive functional groups in nanogels different targeting agents can be conjugated for delivery of the selective drugs. This review focuses on applications of nanogels in cancer drug delivery and imaging, anti-inflammatory, anti-psoriatic, transdermal, ocular and protein/peptide drug delivery and therapy. PMID:25581024

  5. Polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Reuben T.; Ventura, Judy; Zhuang, Jiaming; Thayumanavan, S.

    2012-01-01

    In this review we put the spotlight on crosslinked polymer nanogels, a promising platform that has the characteristics of an “ideal” drug delivery vehicle. Some of the key aspects of drug delivery vehicle design like stability, response to biologically relevant stimuli, passive targeting, active targeting, toxicity and ease of synthesis are discussed. We discuss several delivery systems in this light and highlight some examples of systems, which satisfy some or all of these design requirements. In particular, we point to the advantages that crosslinked polymeric systems bring to drug delivery. We review some of the synthetic methods of nanogel synthesis and conclude with the diverse applications in drug delivery where nanogels have been fruitfully employed. PMID:22342438

  6. New progress and prospects: The application of nanogel in drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Zhai, Yingjie; Wang, Juan; Zhai, Guangxi

    2016-03-01

    Nanogel has attracted considerable attention as one of the most versatile drug delivery systems especially for site-specific and/or time-controlled delivery of bioactive agents owing to their combining features of hydrogel and nanoparticle. Physically synthesized nanogels can offer a platform to encapsulate various types of bioactive compounds, particularly hydrophobic drugs and biomacromolecules, but they have poor mechanical stability, whereas nanogels prepared by chemical cross-link have a wider application and larger flexibility. As an ideal drug-delivery carrier, nanogel has excellent drug loading capacity, high stability, biologic consistence and response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli. Nowadays, targeting and response especially multi-response of the nanogel system for drug delivery have become an issue in research. And the application study of nanogels mainly focuses on antitumor agents and proteins. This review focuses on the formation of nanogels (physical and chemical cross-linking) and their release behavior. Recent application of nanogels is also discussed. PMID:26706564

  7. Current advances in self-assembled nanogel delivery systems for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Yoshiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2015-12-01

    Since nanogels (nanometer-sized gels) were developed two decades ago, they were utilized as carriers of innovative drug delivery systems. In particular, immunological drug delivery via self-assembled nanogels (self-nanogels) owing to their nanometer size and molecular chaperon-like ability to encapsulate large biomolecules is one of the most well studied and successful applications of nanogels. In the present review, we focus on self-nanogel applications as immunological drug delivery systems for cancer vaccines, cytokine delivery, nasal vaccines, and nucleic acid delivery, including several clinical trials. Cancer vaccines were the first practical application of self-nanogels as vehicles for drug delivery. After successful pre-clinical studies, phase I clinical trials were conducted, and it was found that vaccines consisting of self-nanogels could be administered repeatedly to humans without serious adverse effects, and self-nanogel vaccines induced antigen-specific cellular and humoral immunity. Cytokine delivery via self-nanogels led to the sustained release of IL-12, suppressed tumor growth, and increased Th1-type immune responses. Cationic self-nanogels were effective in penetrating the nasal mucosa and resulted in successful nasal vaccines in mice and nonhuman primates. Cationic self-nanogels were also used for the intracellular delivery of proteins and nucleic acids, and were successfully used to knockdown tumor growth factor expression using short interfering RNA with the immunological effect. These studies suggest that self-nanogels are currently one of the most unique and attractive immunological drug delivery systems and are edging closer to practical use. PMID:26482187

  8. Synthesis and characterization of novel dual-responsive nanogels and their application as drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jinrong; Qi, Tingting; Liao, Jinfeng; Fan, Min; Luo, Feng; Li, He; Qian, Zhiyong

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a temperature/pH dual-response nanogel based on NIPAm, MAA, and PEGMA was synthesized via emulsion polymerization and characterized by 1H-NMR, FT-IR, TEM and DLS. By introducing a novel initiator, through which PEG-AIBN-PEG was synthesized, it was revealed that the PEG segments from PEG-AIBN-PEG with a dosage of initiator had a significant influence over the macro-state and stability of the nanogels. In order to optimize the feeding prescription for better application as a drug delivery system, the effect of the co-monomer contents on the response to stimuli (temperature and pH value) and cytotoxicity of the nanogels has been studied in detail. The results demonstrated that the responsiveness, reversibility and volume phase transition critical value of the nanogels could be controlled by adjusting the feeding ratio of the co-monomers in the synthesis process. MTT assay results revealed that nanogels with appropriate compositions showed good biocompatibility and relatively low toxicity. Most importantly, by studying the drug loading behavior, it was found that the dimensions of the drug molecules had a considerable influence on the drug loading efficiency and loading capacity of the nanogels, and that the mechanism by which drug molecule sizes influence the drug loading behavior of nanogels needs further investigation. The results indicated that such PNMP nanogels might have potential applications in drug delivery and other medical applications, but that the drug loading mechanism must be further developed.

  9. Construction of pH-sensitive lysozyme/pectin nanogel for tumor methotrexate delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liufeng; Xu, Wei; Liang, Hongshan; He, Lei; Liu, Shilin; Li, Yan; Li, Bin; Chen, Yijie

    2015-02-01

    Novel nano-particles were developed from lysozyme-pectin through self-assembly, and the nanogels could be used as a carrier for the antitumor agent, methotrexate (MTX). The nanogels exhibited spherical with diameters about 109 ± 2 nm and narrow particle size distribution, as well as negative surface charge. Furthermore, the particle size and morphology of the nanogels hardly changed with the incorporation of MTX. The loading capacity of MTX in nanogels could reach 17.58 ± 0.85%. MTX-loaded nanogels were pH-dependent, accelerated release of MTX at a decreasing pH from 7.4 to 5.3. The MTT assay indicated that encapsulated MTX exhibited higher anticancer activity than free MTX. Meanwhile, MTX-loaded nanogels could be effectively endocytosed by HepG2 cells, resulting in enhanced cancer-cell apoptosis comparing to free MTX. It indicated that the nanogels had good biocompatibility and low toxicity. The obtained nanogels had great potential in the development of a new nanocarrier for anti-cancer drug delivery. PMID:25601095

  10. Soy protein/soy polysaccharide complex nanogels: folic acid loading, protection, and controlled delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xuzhe; Yao, Ping

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we developed a facile approach to produce nanogels via self-assembly of folic acid, soy protein, and soy polysaccharide. High-pressure homogenization was introduced to break down the original aggregates of soy protein, which benefits the binding of soy protein with soy polysaccharide and folic acid at pH 4.0. After a heat treatment that causes the soy protein denaturation and gelation, folic acid-loaded soy protein/soy polysaccharide complex nanogels were fabricated. The nanogels have a polysaccharide surface that makes the nanogels dispersible in acidic conditions where folic acid is insoluble and soy protein forms precipitates after heating. More importantly, the protein and polysaccharide can inhibit the reactions between dissolved oxygen and folic acid during UV irradiation. After the preparation and storage of the nanogels in the presence of heat, oxygen, and light in acidic conditions, most of the folic acid molecules in the nanogels remain in their natural structure and can be released rapidly at neutral pH, that is, in the intestine. Because most food and beverages are acidic, the nanogels are a suitable delivery system of folic acid in food and beverages. PMID:23758109

  11. Modular ‘Click-in-Emulsion’ Bone-Targeted Nanogels

    E-print Network

    Heller, Daniel A.

    A new class of nanogel demonstrates modular biodistribution and affinity for bone. Nanogels, ~70 nm in diameter and synthesized via an astoichiometric click-chemistry in-emulsion method, controllably display residual, free ...

  12. Anti-cancer vaccination by transdermal delivery of antigen peptide-loaded nanogels via iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Mao; Hama, Susumu; Ikeda, Yutaka; Nagasaki, Yukio; Kogure, Kentaro

    2015-04-10

    Transdermal vaccination with cancer antigens is expected to become a useful anti-cancer therapy. However, it is difficult to accumulate enough antigen in the epidermis for effective exposure to Langerhans cells because of diffusion into the skin and muscle. Carriers, such as liposomes and nanoparticles, may be useful for the prevention of antigen diffusion. Iontophoresis, via application of a small electric current, is a noninvasive and efficient technology for transdermal drug delivery. Previously, we succeeded in the iontophoretic transdermal delivery of liposomes encapsulating insulin, and accumulation of polymer-based nanoparticle nanogels in the stratum corneum of the skin. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the use of iontophoresis with cancer antigen gp-100 peptide KVPRNQDWL-loaded nanogels for anti-cancer vaccination. Iontophoresis resulted in the accumulation of gp-100 peptide and nanogels in the epidermis, and subsequent increase in the number of Langerhans cells in the epidermis. Moreover, tumor growth was significantly suppressed by iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels. Thus, iontophoresis of the antigen peptide-loaded nanogels may serve as an effective transdermal delivery system for anti-cancer vaccination. PMID:25681719

  13. Nanogel antigenic protein-delivery system for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nochi, Tomonori; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Mejima, Mio; Kohda, Tomoko; Harada, Norihiro; Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Kataoka, Nobuhiro; Tokuhara, Daisuke; Kurokawa, Shiho; Takahashi, Yuko; Tsukada, Hideo; Kozaki, Shunji; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an innovative method of freely controlling nanometre-sized materials. Recent outbreaks of mucosal infectious diseases have increased the demands for development of mucosal vaccines because they induce both systemic and mucosal antigen-specific immune responses. Here we developed an intranasal vaccine-delivery system with a nanometre-sized hydrogel (`nanogel') consisting of a cationic type of cholesteryl-group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). A non-toxic subunit fragment of Clostridium botulinum type-A neurotoxin BoHc/A administered intranasally with cCHP nanogel (cCHP-BoHc/A) continuously adhered to the nasal epithelium and was effectively taken up by mucosal dendritic cells after its release from the cCHP nanogel. Vigorous botulinum-neurotoxin-A-neutralizing serum IgG and secretory IgA antibody responses were induced without co-administration of mucosal adjuvant. Importantly, intranasally administered cCHP-BoHc/A did not accumulate in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Moreover, intranasally immunized tetanus toxoid with cCHP nanogel induced strong tetanus-toxoid-specific systemic and mucosal immune responses. These results indicate that cCHP nanogel can be used as a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free intranasal vaccination.

  14. Polypeptide nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores: Synthesis, characterization and implications for anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong Oh; Oberoi, Hardeep S.; Desale, Swapnil; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2014-01-01

    Polymer nanogels have gained considerable attention as a potential platform for drug delivery applications. Here we describe the design and synthesis of novel polypeptide-based nanogels with hydrophobic moieties in the cross-linked ionic cores. Diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-glutamic acid), hydrophobically modified with L-phenylalanine methyl ester moieties was used for controlled template synthesis of nanogels with small size (ca. 70 nm in diameter) and narrow particle size distribution. Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies using coumarin C153 indicated the existence of hydrophobic domains in the ionic cores of the nanogels. Stable doxorubicin-loaded nanogels were prepared at high drug capacity (30 w/w%). We show that nanogels are enzymatically-degradable leading to accelerated drug release under simulated lysosomal acidic pH. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the nanogel-based formulation of doxorubicin is well tolerated and exhibit an improved antitumor activity compared to a free doxorubicin in an ovarian tumor xenograft mouse model. Our results signify the point to a potential of these biodegradable nanogels as attractive carriers for delivery of chemotherapeutics. PMID:23998716

  15. Poly-?,?-Polyasparthydrazide-Based Nanogels for Potential Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: In Vitro and In Vivo Properties.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingwen; Ma, Mingxin; Chang, Di; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Chen; Yue, Yang; Liu, Jia; Wang, Siling; Jiang, Tongying

    2015-12-01

    A family of nanogel drug carriers has been designed to enhance the oral absorption of paclitaxel (PTX). The PAHy-based nanogels were prepared by the interpenetration of poly-?,?-polyasparthydrazide (PAHy) chains and dicarboxyl-poly (ethylene glycol) (CPEG), forming a smart chain network. The PAHy-based nanogels were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The adhesion and retention properties of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanogels in vivo were investigated using an in vivo imaging system and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The smart nanogels had a particle size of -200 nm, increased the degree and rate of release, and spent over 12 h in the gastrointestinal tract. They also produced excellent adhesion, permeability and retention (APR) effects and increased oral absorption, confirming their use as potential sustained-release carriers for the oral delivery of the hydrophobic anticancer agent PTX. PMID:26510316

  16. Novel core shell magnetic nanogels synthesized in an emulsion-free aqueous system under UV irradiation for targeted radiopharmaceutical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Hanwen; Yu, Jiahui; Gong, Peijun; Xu, Dongmei; Zhang, Chunfu; Yao, Side

    2005-07-01

    Novel core-shell poly(acrylamide) magnetic nanogels with controllable particle size produced via a photochemical method in an emulsion-free aqueous system at room temperature have been developed for the first time. After Hoffmann elimination of carbonyl, nanogels with amino groups, or poly(acrylamide-vinyl amine) magnetic nanogels, were also obtained. Particle size, size distributions and zeta potential of the magnetic nanogels before and after Hoffmann elimination were measured by photo-correlation spectroscopy (PCS). The structure and morphology of the magnetic nanogels were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The higher dispersibility and stability of the magnetic nanogels suggest promising potential applications in targeted radiopharmaceuticals carriers for cancer therapy, and in biological and medical studies as well.

  17. Self-assembled lysozyme/carboxymethylcellulose nanogels for delivery of methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenshun; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Chunlan; Chen, Yijie; Li, Bin

    2015-04-01

    Nanogels (NGs) were fabricated with lysozyme and carboxymethylcellulose via a green self-assembly method. The prepared NGs were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Pyrene and isothiocyanate were introduced as fluorescent probes to research the hydrophobic area of the NGs and cells endocytosis, respectively. Methotrexate (MTX) was used to investigate the drug encapsulation property of the NGs. It turned out to be that the drug loaded NGs were regular spherical shape with a hydrodynamic diameter of about 123 nm. The drug loading efficiency was about 14.2%. The NGs can slowly release the drug and increase the bioavailability of the loaded drug. The NGs are promising carriers for the delivery of drugs and other bioactive molecules. PMID:25637692

  18. Quantum dots loaded nanogels for low cytotoxicity, pH-sensitive fluorescence, cell imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenshun; Xu, Wei; Wang, Yuntao; Shah, Bakht Ramin; Zhang, Chunlan; Chen, Yijie; Li, Yan; Li, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Nanogels (NGs) with drug tracking and delivery possess promising usage in clinical treatment. In this study, an available, low toxic and facile approach was developed to synthesize CdTe quantum dots loaded nanogels (QDs-NGs). The QDs-NGs retained the intrinsic pH sensitivity of the QDs with regard to the fluorescence intensity. The QDs-NGs were easily internalized by the cells as fluorescence probes, and acted as carriers for delivering methotrexate (MTX). The cellular uptake indicated that the QDs-NGs can protect QDs from decomposition in cytoplasm and retain the native fluorescence intensity. MTT assay demonstrated that the QDs-NGs greatly decreased the cytotoxicity of the QDs. The MTX loaded QDs-NGs exhibited slow release property in PBS buffer. Moreover, the MTX loaded QDs-NGs distinctly enhanced the availability of drug. The QDs-NGs are potential nanocarriers for the cell imaging and drug delivery. PMID:25659723

  19. pH-Triggered Magnetic-Chitosan Nanogels (MCNs) For Doxorubicin Delivery: Physically vs. Chemically Cross Linking Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sadighian, Somayeh; Hosseini-Monfared, Hassan; Rostamizadeh, Kobra; Hamidi, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the impact of cross linking strategy on the characteristics of magnetic chitosan nanogels (MCNs) as targeted drug delivery system for doxorubicin. Methods: Sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) and glutaraldehyde were used as physical (electrostatic) and chemical (covalent binding) cross-linker agents, respectively. MCNs were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the formation of spherical nanostructures with the final average particle size of around 35-40 nm. Results: The finding proved the superparamagnetic properties of the MCNs with relatively high-magnetization values which indicate that the MCNs were enough sensitive to external magnetic fields as a magnetic drug carrier. To understand the differences between the drug delivery properties of chemically and physically cross linked MCNs, the drug release studies were also conducted. Altogether, the results of this study clearly indicate that, however, both MCNs exhibited sustained drug release behaviour, the chemically cross linked MCNs provided enhanced controlled drug release characteristics in comparison to physically cross linked MCNs. Besides, according to the drug release behaviour of MCNs in buffer solutions in two different medium with the pH values of 5.3 and 7.4, it was clear that both nanoparticles exhibited pH sensitivity where the extent of drug release in the acidic media was significantly higher than neutral media. Conclusion: It can be concluded that chemically cross linked MCNs may serve as an ideal carrier for stimuli-triggered and controlled anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25789228

  20. Intracellular pH-sensitive metallo-supramolecular nanogels for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xuemei; Chen, Li; Chen, Xiaofei; Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Hui; He, Chaoliang; Zhang, Jingping; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-05-28

    For drug delivery systems, the most important factors are biocompatibility and stability. To achieve excellent biocompatibility, learning from naturally occurring systems may be the best choice. Herein, a series of pH-sensitive metallo-supramolecular nanogels (MSNs) were prepared by the metallo-supramolecular coordinated interaction between histidine and iron-meso-tetraphenylporphin, which mimicks the way that hemoglobin carries oxygen. With the excellent biocompatibility and special supramolecular pH sensitivity, MSNs had been exploited to load and release anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). In vitro drug release profiles showed that only a small amount of the loaded DOX was released in PBS solution at pH 7.4, while up to about 80% of the loaded DOX could be quickly released at pH 5.3 due to the pH-dependent disassembly of MSNs. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry were used to verify the cellular uptake and intracellular drug release behaviors of DOX-loaded MSNs toward MCF-7. Efficient cellular proliferation inhibition against MCF-7 and HeLa cells was also observed by a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. These features suggested that MSNs could be of great potential as intelligent drug delivery systems. PMID:24758547

  1. Positive/negative surface charge of chitosan based nanogels and its potential influence on oral insulin delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Juan; Xu, Mengxue; Cheng, Xiaojie; Kong, Ming; Liu, Ya; Feng, Chao; Chen, Xiguang

    2016-01-20

    To develop insulin delivery system for the treatment of diabetes, two insulin-loaded nanogels with opposite zeta potential (-15.94±0.449mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) and +17.15±0.492mV for insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+)) were obtained. Ex vivo results showed that the nanogels with opposite surface charge exhibited different adhesion and permeation in specific intestinal segments. There was no significant differences in adhesion and permeation in rat duodenum, but in rat jejunum, insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) exhibited enhanced adhesion and permeation, which were about 3 folds (adhesion) and 1.7 folds (permeation) higher than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+). These results demonstrated that the surface charge property of nanogels determined the absorption sites of CMCS/CS-NGs in small intestine. In vivo study, the blood glucose level in insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(-) group had 3mmol/L lower than insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs(+) group during 1h to 11h after the oral administration, which demonstrated that negative insulin:CMCS/CS-NGs had a better management of blood glucose than positive ones. PMID:26572423

  2. Smart thermo/pH responsive magnetic nanogels for the simultaneous delivery of doxorubicin and methotrexate.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Roya; Rasouli, Sepideh; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-06-20

    Two novel dual temperature/pH-sensitive superparamagnetic nanogels were developed with the aim of simultaneously delivering two different anticancer drugs, doxorubicin (DOX) and methotrexate (MTX). The studied copolymers were characterized by (1)H NMR, SEM, and FTIR spectroscopy. Morphological investigations showed that both blank and drug-loaded nanogels had uniform shapes with a mean diameter of less than 30 nm. The drug storage/release behaviors were investigated. The nanogels showed an encapsulation efficiency of about 95% for both drugs. The cumulative in vitro release of the DOX/MTX-loaded nanogels exhibited an apparent thermo/pH-triggered controlled drug release in a sustained manner that was able to distinguish between tumor tissues. The cytotoxicity assay of a blank carrier to MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines indicated that the nanogels were suitable as drug carriers. Cell viability experiments further confirmed that the co-administration of DOX with MTX had a superior cytotoxicity to the mentioned cells compared with free dual drug- or single drug-loaded forms. Therefore, dual anticancer drug-loaded thermo/pH-sensitive nanogels have the potential to be used for cancer therapy, because they maintain a low premature drug release during blood circulation while having a rapid release upon reaching tumorous tissue. PMID:25895723

  3. Targeted delivery of platinum-taxane combination therapy in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Desale, Swapnil S; Soni, Kruti S; Romanova, Svetlana; Cohen, Samuel M; Bronich, Tatiana K

    2015-12-28

    Biodegradable polypeptide-based nanogels have been developed from amphiphilic block copolymers, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-glutamic acid)-b-poly(l-phenylalanine), which effectively co-incorporate cisplatin and paclitaxel, the clinically used drug combination for the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer. In order to target both drugs selectively to the tumor cells, we explored the benefits of ligand-mediated drug delivery by targeting folate receptors, which are overexpressed in most ovarian cancers. Drug-loaded nanogels were surface-functionalized with folic acid (FA) with the help of a PEG spacer without affecting the ligand binding affinity and maintaining the stability of the carrier system. FA-decorated nanogels significantly suppressed the growth of intraperitoneal ovarian tumor xenografts outperforming their nontargeted counterparts without extending their cytotoxicity to the normal tissues. We also confirmed that synchronized co-delivery of the platinum-taxane drug combination via single carrier to the same targeted cells is more advantageous than a combination of targeted single drug formulations administered at the same drug ratio. Lastly, we demonstrated that the same platform can also be used for localized chemotherapy. Our data indicate that intraperitoneal administration can be more effective in the context of targeted combination therapy. Our findings suggest that multifunctional nanogels are promising drug delivery carriers for improvement of current treatment for ovarian cancer. PMID:26381902

  4. A nanogel of on-site tunable pH-response for efficient anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Xiao, Chuanfu; Fan, Jiao; Chen, Shoumin; Shen, Jing; Wu, Weitai; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2013-01-01

    A smart, soft and small nanoparticulate drug carrier that can efficiently transport therapeutics into tumor cells to control the intracellular drug concentration will enable major advancements in cancer therapy. To facilitate a remote modulation of the intracellular pH-regulated drug release, we have designed a new class of pH-responsive chitosan-based nanogels (<200 nm) by the physical interpenetration of chitosan chains into a nonlinear poly(ethylene glycol) (nonlinear PEG) chain network. The resultant PEG-chitosan nanogels not only respond to the changes in environmental pH over the physiologically important range of 5.0-7.4, but - more importantly - also enable us to remotely modulate the pH response by external cooling/heating. The nanogel, as well as the nanogel loaded with a model anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), is capable of varying its surface charge from nearly neutral to positive around tumor extracellular pH (~6.0-6.2) to facilitate cell internalization. Subsequently, the significantly increased acidity in subcellular compartments (~5.0) can trigger 5-FU release from the endocytosed drug carriers. While this nanogel serving as a drug carrier exhibits a reduced toxicity in combined chemo-thermo treatments, it has shown significantly enhanced therapeutic efficacy in combined chemo-cryo treatments of the model B16F10 melanoma cells, indicating its great potential for cancer therapy. PMID:22906624

  5. Multi-stage, charge conversional, stimuli-responsive nanogels for therapeutic protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Kai; Haag, Rainer

    2015-10-13

    A boronate ester crosslinked zwitterionic nanogel (NGCA) with ATP/pH-sensitivity has been developed with an inverse nanoprecipitation technique to achieve a two-stage charge conversion that responds to tumor extracellular conditions (pH 6.5-6.8) and an intracellular acidic environment (pH 5-6). Cationic cytochrome C (CC), a therapeutic protein, has been encapsulated into NGCA through inverse nanoprecipitation via electrostatic interactions to form protein-loaded nanogel (NGCA-CC). By adjusting the ratio of the amino and carboxyl groups in the nanogels, negatively charged nanogels that are safer under physiological conditions (pH 7.4) can convert their surface charge to positive at tumor extracellular pH, which enhance their cellular uptake efficiency. The citraconic amide formed from citraconic anhydride and amine can be cleaved in the intracellular acidic organelles to expose more amino groups and facilitate endosomal escape. The release of CC is accelerated in the presence of 5 mM ATP or under acidic conditions. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry have shown that NGCA-CC's cell uptake is higher at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. MTT and real-time cell analysis (RTCA) have illustrated that there is more toxicity at pH 6.5 than at pH 7.4. The apoptosis process induced by CC was determined by flow cytometry. PMID:26288853

  6. Fluconazole loaded chitin nanogels as a topical ocular drug delivery agent for corneal fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Nishil; Rejinold, N Sanoj; Mangalathillam, Sabitha; Biswas, Raja; Nair, Shantikumar V; Jayakumar, R

    2013-09-01

    Poor bioavailability of antifungal drugs due to the various protective mechanisms of the eye is a serious concern for the treatment of corneal fungal infections in today's world. The use of nanosystems that can improve the bioavailability of these antifungal drugs is relatively a new idea being conceived and here we have synthesized fluconazole loaded chitin nanogels (Flu-CNGs) which can be used for the treatment of corneal fungal infections. These nanogels were characterized using DLS, Zeta potential, SEM, FTIR and TG/DTA. The prepared Flu-CNGs have controlled release pattern which is ideal for the continuous availability of fluconazole over a longer period of time for an effective fungal treatment. Flu-CNGs are haemocompatible, cytocompatible and also showed very good cell uptake in human dermal fibroblast cells and penetration to the deeper sections of the porcine cornea with no signs of destruction or inflammation to corneal cells as shown in ex vivo permeation studies. PMID:23980500

  7. Therapeutic effect of nanogel-based delivery of soluble FGFR2 with S252W mutation on craniosynostosis.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Masako; Kobayashi, Yukiho; Morita, Jumpei; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshihide; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Moriyama, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Apert syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by missense mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). Surgical procedures are frequently required to reduce morphological and functional defects in patients with Apert syndrome; therefore, the development of noninvasive procedures to treat Apert syndrome is critical. Here we aimed to clarify the etiological mechanisms of craniosynostosis in mouse models of Apert syndrome and verify the effects of purified soluble FGFR2 harboring the S252W mutation (sFGFR2IIIcS252W) on calvarial sutures in Apert syndrome mice in vitro. We observed increased expression of Fgf10, Esrp1, and Fgfr2IIIb, which are indispensable for epidermal development, in coronal sutures in Apert syndrome mice. Purified sFGFR2IIIcS252W exhibited binding affinity for fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 2 but also formed heterodimers with FGFR2IIIc, FGFR2IIIcS252W, and FGFR2IIIbS252W. Administration of sFGFR2IIIcS252W also inhibited Fgf2-dependent proliferation, phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules, and mineralization of FGFR2S252W-overexpressing MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. sFGFR2IIIcS252W complexed with nanogels maintained the patency of coronal sutures, whereas synostosis was observed where the nanogel without sFGFR2S252W was applied. Thus, based on our current data, we suggest that increased Fgf10 and Fgfr2IIIb expression may induce the onset of craniosynostosis in patients with Apert syndrome and that the appropriate delivery of purified sFGFR2IIIcS252W could be effective for treating this disorder. PMID:25003957

  8. Therapeutic Effect of Nanogel-Based Delivery of Soluble FGFR2 with S252W Mutation on Craniosynostosis

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Masako; Kobayashi, Yukiho; Morita, Jumpei; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshihide; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Moriyama, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    Apert syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder caused by missense mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). Surgical procedures are frequently required to reduce morphological and functional defects in patients with Apert syndrome; therefore, the development of noninvasive procedures to treat Apert syndrome is critical. Here we aimed to clarify the etiological mechanisms of craniosynostosis in mouse models of Apert syndrome and verify the effects of purified soluble FGFR2 harboring the S252W mutation (sFGFR2IIIcS252W) on calvarial sutures in Apert syndrome mice in vitro. We observed increased expression of Fgf10, Esrp1, and Fgfr2IIIb, which are indispensable for epidermal development, in coronal sutures in Apert syndrome mice. Purified sFGFR2IIIcS252W exhibited binding affinity for fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) 2 but also formed heterodimers with FGFR2IIIc, FGFR2IIIcS252W, and FGFR2IIIbS252W. Administration of sFGFR2IIIcS252W also inhibited Fgf2-dependent proliferation, phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules, and mineralization of FGFR2S252W-overexpressing MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. sFGFR2IIIcS252W complexed with nanogels maintained the patency of coronal sutures, whereas synostosis was observed where the nanogel without sFGFR2S252W was applied. Thus, based on our current data, we suggest that increased Fgf10 and Fgfr2IIIb expression may induce the onset of craniosynostosis in patients with Apert syndrome and that the appropriate delivery of purified sFGFR2IIIcS252W could be effective for treating this disorder. PMID:25003957

  9. Carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) formed nanogels with branched poly(ethyleneimine) (bPEI) for inhibition of cytotoxicity in human MSCs as a gene delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han Na; Park, Ji Sun; Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Keun-Hong

    2015-05-20

    Specific vehicles are necessary for safe and efficient gene transfection into cells. Nano-type hydrogels (nanogel) comprising carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) complexed with branched type cationic poly(ethleneimine) (bPEI) were used as gene delivery vehicles. When complexes of CMC and bPEI were used in vitro, CMC showed nano-gel type properties, as shown by the results of a viscosity test, and bPEI showed low cytotoxicity comparing to bPEI alone. Together, these properties are shown to maintain high gene transfection efficiency. In viability experiments using three types of adult stem cells, cell viability varied depending on the branch form of PEI and whether or not it is in a complex with CMC. The gene delivery efficacy showed that the CMC nanogel complexed with bPEI (CMC-bPEI) showed more uptaking and gene transfection ability in hMSCs comparing to bPEI alone. In osteogenesis, the CMC-bPEI complexed with OSX pDNA showed more easy internalization than bPEI alone complexed with OSX pDNA in hMSCs. Specific genes and proteins related in osteogenic differentiation were expressed in hMSCs when the CMC-bPEI complexed with OSX pDNA was used. PMID:25817668

  10. Targeted delivery of nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Kumar Khanna, Vinod

    2012-01-01

    The role of targeting of the diseased region by a drug is emphasized. The rationale for resorting to nanomaterials as drug carriers is explained. A clear understanding of the biological environment, its degradation in diseased condition, and the interaction of the drug with it in normal condition and during illness lie at the core of successful drug delivery. Passive and active drug targeting approaches are differentiated. Commonly used drug targets, targeting ligands, and nanoscale systems are elaborated. Mechanisms of internalization of nanomedicines and circumventing P-glycoprotein mediated resistance are outlined. The paper presents an overview of the current scenario of targeted transportation of nanomedicines to the affected organ and suggests future research directions. PMID:22577576

  11. Colloidal chitin nanogels: A plethora of applications under one shell.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Priya, M; Sabitha, M; Jayakumar, R

    2016-01-20

    Chitin nanogels (CNGs) are a relatively new class of natural polymeric nanomaterials which have a large potential in the field of drug delivery and nanotherapeutics. These nanogels being very biocompatible are non-toxic when internalized by cells. In this review various properties, preparation techniques and applications of CNGs have been described. CNGs because of their nano-size possess certain unique properties which enable them to be used in a number of biomedical applications. CNGs are prepared by simple regeneration technique without using any cross-linkers. Various polymers, drugs and fluorescent dyes can be blended or incorporated or labelled with the chitin hydrogel network. Drugs and molecules encapsulated within CNGs can be used for targeted delivery, in vivo monitoring or even for therapeutic purposes. Here various applications of CNGs in the field of drug delivery, imaging, sensing and therapeutics have been discussed. PMID:26572393

  12. Magnetic and pH dual responsive core-shell hybrid nanogels: a single nano-object for pH-dependent magnetic manipulation, fluorescent pH-sensing, and drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Gai, Zheng; Hong, Kunlun; Banerjeea, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2011-01-01

    Remotely optical sensing and drug delivery using an environmentally-guided magnetically-driven hybrid nanogel particle could allow for medical diagnostics and treatment. Such multifunctional hybrid nanogels (<200 nm) were prepared through the first synthesis of magnetic Ni NPs, followed by a moderate growth of fluorescent metallic Ag on the surface of Ni NPs, and then a coverage of a pH-responsive copolymer gel shell of poly(ethylene glycol-co-methacrylic acid) [p(EG-MAA)] onto the Ni-Ag bimetallic NP cores (18 {+-} 5 nm). The introduction of the pH-responsive p(EG-MAA) gel shell onto the magnetic and fluorescent Ni-Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ni-Ag NPs responsive to pH over the physiologically important range 5.0-7.4. The hybrid nanogels can adapt to surrounding pH and regulate the sensitivity in response to external magnetic field (such as a small magnet of 0.1 T), resulting in the accumulation of the hybrid nanogels within the duration from hours to a few seconds as the pH value decreases from 7.4 to 5.0. The pH-dependent magnetic response characteristic of the hybrid nanogels were further integrated with the pH change to fluorescent signal transduction and pH-regulated anticancer drug (a model drug 5-fluorouracil) delivery functions. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The multiple responsive hybrid nanogel that can be manipulated in tandem endogenous and exogenous activation should enhance our ability to address the complexity of biological systems.

  13. Receptor-mediated gene delivery into human mesenchymal stem cells using hyaluronic acid-shielded polyethylenimine/pDNA nanogels.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Yi, Se Won; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Keun-Hong

    2016-01-20

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) has been used as a vehicle to deliver genes to cancer cells and somatic cells. In this study, cationic polymers of PEI were shielded with anionic polymers of hyaluronic acid (HA) to safely and effectively deliver genes into human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). HA interacted with CD44 in the plasma membranes of hMSCs to facilitate the internalization of HA-shielded PEI/pDNA complexes. The HA-shielded PEI/pDNA nanogels were confirmed by size changes, ?-potential, and gel retardation assays. HA-shielded nanogels were easily internalized by hMSCs, and this was reduced by pretreatment with a specific monoclonal antibody that blocked CD44. By shielding PEI/pDNA complexes with HA, nanogels were easily internalized to hMSCs when it did not blocked by anti-CD44. These shielded nanogels were also easily internalized by HeLa cells, and this was reduced by pretreatment with an anti-CD44 monoclonal antibody. Following internalization of the SOX9 gene, chondrogenesis of hMSCs was increased, as determined by RT-PCR, real-time quantitative PCR, and histological analyses. PMID:26572414

  14. Sunflower-type nanogels carrying a quantum dot nanoprobe for both superior gene delivery efficacy and tracing of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Sun; Yi, Se Won; Kim, Hye Jin; Kim, Seong Min; Shim, Sung Han; Park, Keun-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Sunflower-type nanogels carrying the QD 655 nanoprobe can be used for both gene transfection and bioimaging of hMSCs. The entry of sunflower-type nanogels into hMSCs can be possibly controlled by changing the formation of QDs. The physico-chemical properties of sunflower-type nanogels internalized by hMSCs were confirmed by AFM, SEM, TEM, gel retardation, and ?-potential analyses. The bioimaging capacity was confirmed by confocal laser microscopy, Kodak imaging, and Xenogen imaging. Specifically, we investigated the cytotoxicity of sunflower-type nanogels via SNP analysis. Internalization of sunflower-type nanogels does not cause malfunction of hMSCs. PMID:26576046

  15. Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Chow, Gan-Moog

    Nanoparticles were synthesized and modified for target drug delivery. The research involved the aqueous synthesis of near infrared (NIR) sensitive Au-Au2S nanoparticles. An anti-cancer drug (cis-platin) ...

  16. Liposomes interiorly thickened with thermosensitive nanogels as novel drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Chen, Jian; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2013-10-15

    The fundamental structure of liposomes suffers from drawbacks of physical instability. To overcome this problem, the hypothesis of this study was to thicken the liposomal interior by incorporating thermosensitive in situ gel. The so called gelliposomes (GLs) were prepared by a thin-film method using poloxamer solutions as interior aqueous phase. Interior thermosensitive gelation was proved by observation of sustained dissolving of the poloxamer gel after destroying the lipid bilayers with Triton X-100; structural transformation as observed under optical microscopy in a heating-cooling circle also proved the fact of interior gelling. The sol-gel transition temperatures of GLs were in good correlation with those of the bulk poloxamer solution counterparts, which could be easily tailored by adjusting the concentration and ratio of poloxamer 407 (P407) to poloxamer 188 (P188). Membrane anisotropy measurement indicated increased membrane rigidity. In vitro release of the model drug cytosine arabinoside from GLs showed sustained release characteristics for at least one week with typical biphasic kinetics. Study on storage stability and protection against the destroying effect by membrane destroyers indicated improved physical stability in comparison with conventional liposomes. In situ evading of phagocytic uptake by macrophages was observed for GLs, which however should be attributed to the effect of exteriorly adsorbed poloxamers. In conclusion, GLs present distinct characteristics to be used as potential drug delivery systems. PMID:23872301

  17. Stimuli-responsive polyamine-DNA blend nanogels for co-delivery in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Queiroz, João

    2015-08-01

    Polyamine plasmid DNA (pDNA) hydrogels have been synthesized by an original approach which conjugates pDNA condensation by polyamines and cross-linking reaction with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether. In an attempt to design more sophisticated vectors with enhanced transfection efficiency and targeting ability, the cell-binding ligand transferrin has been incorporated into polyethylenimine formulations. All systems are photodegradable which allows for the controlled release of different plasmids (pVAX1-LacZ and pcDNA3-FLAG-p53) and anticancer drugs (doxorubicin, epirubicin and paclitaxel). The tumoral treatment through the combined action of pcDNA3-FLAG-p53 gene and an anticancer drug has a stronger potential to suppress the development of cancer cells. The effect is greatly improved when transferrin is encapsulated into the carriers. This study is a relevant contribution for the design of novel generation of plasmid biopharmaceuticals for progresses in gene cancer therapy, feeding the hope of cancer cure. PMID:26047882

  18. The effects of topically applied polyNIPAM-based nanogels and their monomers on skin cyclooxygenase expression, ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Abu Samah, Nor H; Heard, Charles M

    2014-02-01

    Stimulus-responsive nanogels have potential as carriers for drugs targeting the skin. It is important to estimate the biocompatibility of such materials with the skin since they are directly in contact upon application and may induce irritation or inflammation. In the current work, blank (drug-free) polyN-isopropylacrylamide (polyNIPAM), poly(NIPAM copolymerized butyl acrylate) [poly(NIPAM-co-BA)], and poly(NIPAM copolymerized with 5% w/v acrylic acid) [poly(NIPAM-co-AAc)(5%)] nanogels were dosed onto freshly excised full-thickness porcine ear skin and the effects on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) determined ex vivo by Western blotting. Modulated COX-2 expression was indicative that the material had penetrated the skin and keratinocytes of the viable epidermis. The poly(NIPAM-co-BA) nanogel was found to exert a proinflammatory response when applied topically, as reflected by 67% higher COX-2 expression relative to the control treatment (p = 0.0035). The data obtained for the poly(NIPAM-co-AAc)(5%) nanogel, on the other hand, indicated no significant modulation in the expression of COX-2 (p = 0.1578), suggesting the particles are compatible with skin. This was even the case in the presence of co-administered aqueous citric acid solution. Overall the data support the use of the multi-responsive poly(NIPAM-co-AAc)(5%) nanogel for triggered or controlled topical drug delivery applications. PMID:23194376

  19. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108

    TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS
    T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5
    1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

  20. Ex vivo skin permeation and retention studies on chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan ternary nanogel prepared by in situ ionic gelation technique--a tool for controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen.

    PubMed

    Abioye, Amos Olusegun; Issah, Sureya; Kola-Mustapha, Adeola Tawakalitu

    2015-07-25

    The chemical potentials of drug-polymer electrostatic interaction have been utilized to develop a novel ternary chitosan-ibuprofen-gellan nanogel as controlled transdermal delivery tool for ibuprofen. The ternary nanogels were prepared by a combination of electrostatic nanoassembly and ionic gelation techniques. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions as well as hydrogen bonding between ibuprofen and chitosan were confirmed with FTIR, while DSC, TGA and SEM confirmed the physical state, thermal and morphological characteristics, respectively. The ex vivo delivery of ibuprofen onto and across the skin was evaluated based on system specific drug release parameters such as steady state permeation rate, permeability coefficient, permeability enhancement ratio, skin/gel partition coefficient, diffusion coefficient, lag time and release rate constant and mechanisms of release were determined using mathematical models. Interaction between ibuprofen and chitosan produced new spherical eutectic nanoconjugates with remarkable decrease in particle size of ibuprofen from 4580 (length-to-breadth aspect ratio) to a minimum of 14.15 nm (324-times), and thermally stable amorphous characteristics. The nanogels exhibited significant elastic and pseudoplastic characteristics dictated by the concentration of chitosan with maximum swelling capacity of 775% w/w at 6.55 mM chitosan compared with 281.16 and 506.50% for plain gellan and control ibuprofen hydrogel, respectively. Chitosan enhanced the skin penetration, permeability and the rate of transdermal release of ibuprofen by a factor of 4, dictated by the extent of ibuprofen-chitosan ionic interaction and its concentration. The major mechanism of ibuprofen release through the pig skin was drug diffusion however drug partition and matrix erosion also occurred. It was evident that ternary nanogels are novel formulations with potential application in controlled transdermal delivery of ibuprofen. PMID:25997660

  1. Glutathione-degradable drug-loaded nanogel effectively and securely suppresses hepatoma in mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingang; Wang, Jianmeng; Xu, Weiguo; Ding, Jianxun; Shi, Bo; Huang, Kexin; Zhuang, Xiuli; Chen, Xuesi

    2015-01-01

    The reduction-responsive polymeric nanocarriers have attracted considerable interest because of a significantly higher concentration of intracellular glutathione in comparison with that outside cells. The smart nanovehicles can selectively transport the antitumor drugs into cells to improve efficacies and decrease side effects. In this work, a facilely prepared glutathione-degradable nanogel was employed for targeting intracellular delivery of an antitumor drug (ie, doxorubicin [DOX]). DOX was loaded into nanogel through a sequential dispersion and dialysis approach with a drug loading efficiency of 56.8 wt%, and the laden nanogel (noted as NG/DOX) showed an appropriate hydrodynamic radius of 56.1±3.5 nm. NG/DOX exhibited enhanced or improved maximum tolerated dose on healthy Kunming mice and enhanced intratumoral accumulation and dose-dependent antitumor efficacy toward H22 hepatoma-xenografted mouse model compared with free drug. In addition, the upregulated antitumor efficacy of NG/DOX was further confirmed by the histopathological and immunohistochemical analyses. Furthermore, the excellent in vivo security of NG/DOX was confirmed by the detection of body weight, histopathology, and biochemical indices of corresponding organs and serum. With controllable large-scale preparation and fascinating in vitro and in vivo properties, the reduction-responsive nanogel exhibited a good prospect for clinical chemotherapy. PMID:26543363

  2. Preparation and characterisation of gelatin-gum arabic aldehyde nanogels via inverse miniemulsion technique.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin-gum arabic aldehyde nanogels designed by a nanoreactor concept using inverse miniemulsion technique were reported. Stable separate miniemulsions were prepared from gelatin (Gel) and gum arabic aldehyde (GAA). These emulsions were intermixed under sonication to obtain cross-linked nanogels. During fusion, cross-linking occurred between aldehyde groups of GAA and amino groups of gelatin. The concentration of the surfactant and weight fraction of water in the inverse miniemulsion was optimised so as to yield nanogels with controlled particle size. Properties of the nanogels were studied by FT-IR spectroscopy, particle size analysis and XRD. Surface morphology of the nanogels was established by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM and particle size analysis confirmed that nanogels possess spherical morphology with an average diameter of 151 ± 6 nm. Hemolysis property of the nanogels was examined and the results indicated that the nanogels were hemocompatible. The in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanogels towards MCF-7 cells was evaluated by MTT assay and the nanogels showed nontoxic behaviour towards the cells. All these studies confirm that these nanogels are potential candidates in applications such as drug and gene delivery. PMID:25748843

  3. Kidney–targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Peng; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Zhirong

    2014-01-01

    Kidney-targeted drug delivery systems represent a promising technology to improve drug efficacy and safety in the treatment of renal diseases. In this review, we summarize the strategies that have been employed to develop kidney-targeted drug delivery systems. We also describe how macromolecular carriers and prodrugs play crucial roles in targeting drugs to particular target cells in the kidney. New technologies render it possible to create renal targeting conjugates and other delivery systems including nanoparticles and liposomes present promising strategies to achieve the goal of targeting drugs to the kidney.

  4. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery strategies

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoli; Chen, Xishan; Ying, Man; Lu, Weiyue

    2014-01-01

    Despite the application of aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy in clinics, brain tumors are still a difficult health challenge due to their fast development and poor prognosis. Brain tumor-targeted drug delivery systems, which increase drug accumulation in the tumor region and reduce toxicity in normal brain and peripheral tissue, are a promising new approach to brain tumor treatments. Since brain tumors exhibit many distinctive characteristics relative to tumors growing in peripheral tissues, potential targets based on continuously changing vascular characteristics and the microenvironment can be utilized to facilitate effective brain tumor-targeted drug delivery. In this review, we briefly describe the physiological characteristics of brain tumors, including blood–brain/brain tumor barriers, the tumor microenvironment, and tumor stem cells. We also review targeted delivery strategies and introduce a systematic targeted drug delivery strategy to overcome the challenges.

  5. Design, characterization and in vitro evaluation of novel shell crosslinked poly(butylene adipate)-co-N-succinyl chitosan nanogels containing loteprednol etabonate: A new system for therapeutic effect enhancement via controlled drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Farzaneh Hashemi; Khoee, Sepideh

    2015-09-18

    This study reports on the development of a novel mucoadhesive and biocompatible shell-crosslinked nanogel system based on poly(butylene adipate) (PBA) and N-succinyl chitosan (S-Cs) by coupling reaction with a new formulation method. For this purpose, two different molecular weights of dendrimerized PBA with amine terminated functional groups were synthesized separately and characterized well by FT-IR, (1)HNMR and GPC. The PBA nanoparticles containing loteprednol etabonate (LPE) prepared by O/W emulsion technique were reacted immediately with modified carboxylated chitosan via carbodiimide chemistry. TEM photographs of the nanoparticles and crosslinked nanoparticles displayed a spherical morphology closely corresponding to the results obtained by DLS. On The other hand, biodegradability, biocompatibility and bioadhesiveness of the prepared nanoparticles were also studied. It is concluded that the core-shell structured nanogels can be used as novel ocular drug delivery systems with appropriate loading capacity for slightly water soluble LPE as an anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:26263245

  6. Nanogels based on alginic aldehyde and gelatin by inverse miniemulsion technique: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Sarika, P R; Anil Kumar, P R; Raj, Deepa K; James, Nirmala Rachel

    2015-03-30

    Nanogels were developed from alginic aldehyde and gelatin by an inverse miniemulsion technique. Stable inverse miniemulsions were prepared by sonication of noncontinuous aqueous phase (mixture of alginic aldehyde and gelatin) in a continuous organic phase (Span 20 dissolved in cyclohexane). Cross-linking occurred between alginic aldehyde (AA) and gelatin (gel) in the presence of borax by Schiff's base reaction during the formation of inverse miniemulsion. The effects of surfactant (Span 20) concentration, volume of the aqueous phase and AA/gel weight ratio on the size of the alginic aldehyde-gelatin (AA-gel) nanoparticles were studied. Nanogels were characterized by DLS, FT-IR spectroscopy, TGA, SEM and TEM. DLS, TEM and SEM studies demonstrated nanosize and spherical morphology of the nanogels. Hemocompatibility and in vitro cytocompatibility analyses of the nanogels proved their nontoxicity. The results indicated the potential of the present nanogel system as a candidate for drug- and gene-delivery applications. PMID:25563951

  7. Special delivery: targeted therapy with small RNAs.

    PubMed

    Peer, D; Lieberman, J

    2011-12-01

    Harnessing RNA interference using small RNA-based drugs has great potential to develop drugs designed to knock down expression of any disease-causing gene, thereby greatly expanding the universe of possible drug targets. However, delivering small RNAs into specific tissues and cells is still a hurdle. Here, we review recent progress in overcoming systemic, local and cellular barriers to RNA drug delivery, focusing on strategies for targeted uptake. PMID:21490679

  8. Targeted drug delivery systems for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Khare, Vaibhav; Alam, Noor; Saneja, Ankit; Dubey, Ravindra Dhar; Gupta, Prem N

    2014-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is usually diagnosed at the advanced stages, responds poorly to the available chemotherapeutics and constitutes the major factor for high mortality rate. Selective delivery of therapeutics to their cellular targets, without side effects is the foremost objective of the current investigations for effective treatment of pancreatic cancer. The development of the drugs which can selectively target pancreatic cancer along with carriers that can deliver drugs specifically to the rapidly dividing cells is considered as magic bullet for the efficient treatment of this fatal disease. This review describes various factors hampering the efficacy of drug targeting to pancreatic cancer including stromal fortress, hypocascularity, hyaluronan and interstitial fluid pressure, and exploration of various cellular targets for the site specific drug delivery. An account of burgeoning applications of novel drug delivery systems including nanoparticles, liposomes, quantum dots, micelles and drug conjugates in the management of pancreatic cancer is also provided. Additionally, potential of target based therapeutic agents and nanomedicines in clinical trials for the pancreatic cancer therapy are highlighted. PMID:26000366

  9. Polysaccharides for colon targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chourasia, M K; Jain, S K

    2004-01-01

    Colon targeted drug delivery has the potential to deliver bioactive agents for the treatment of a variety of colonic diseases and to deliver proteins and peptides to the colon for their systemic absorption. Various strategies, currently available to target the release of drugs to colon, include formation of prodrug, coating of pH-sensitive polymers, use of colon-specific biodegradable polymers, timed released systems, osmotic systems, and pressure controlled drug delivery systems. Among the different approaches to achieve targeted drug release to the colon, the use of polymers especially biodegradable by colonic bacteria holds great promise. Polysaccharidases are bacterial enzymes that are available in sufficient quantity to be exploited in colon targeting of drugs. Based on this approach, various polysaccharides have been investigated for colon-specific drug release. These polysaccharides include pectin, guar gum, amylose, inulin, dextran, chitosan, and chondroitin sulphate. This family of natural polymers has an appeal to drug delivery as it is comprised of polymers with a large number of derivatizable groups, a wide range of molecular weights, varying chemical compositions, and, for the most part, low toxicity and biodegradability yet high stability. The most favorable property of these materials is their approval as pharmaceutical excipients. PMID:15200012

  10. Integrin targeted delivery of gene therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Rudy L; Ming, Xin; Nakagawa, Osamu; Xu, Rongzuo; Yoo, Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Integrins have become key targets for molecular imaging and for selective delivery of anti-cancer agents. Here we review recent work concerning the targeted delivery of antisense and siRNA oligonucleotides via integrins. A variety of approaches have been used to link oligonucleotides to ligands capable of binding integrins with high specificity and affinity. This includes direct chemical conjugation, incorporating oligonucleotides into lipoplexes, and use of various polymeric nanocarriers including dendrimers. The ligand-oligonucleotide conjugate or complex associates selectively with the integrin, followed by internalization into endosomes and trafficking through subcellular compartments. Escape of antisense or siRNA from the endosome to the cytosol and nucleus may come about through endogenous trafficking mechanisms, or because of membrane disrupting capabilities built into the conjugate or complex. Thus a variety of useful strategies are available for using integrins to enhance the pharmacological efficacy of therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:21547161

  11. Acid-activatable prodrug nanogels for efficient intracellular doxorubicin release.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fuxing; Chen, Wei; Wang, Zhongjuan; Lu, Wentao; Cheng, Ru; Deng, Chao; Meng, Fenghua; Liu, Haiyan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2011-10-10

    Endosomal pH-activatable doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug nanogels were designed, prepared, and investigated for triggered intracellular drug release in cancer cells. DOX prodrugs with drug grafting contents of 3.9, 5.7, and 11.7 wt % (denoted as prodrugs 1, 2, and 3, respectively) were conveniently obtained by sequential treatment of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-ethyl glycinate methacrylamide) (PEG-b-P(HEMA-co-EGMA)) copolymers with hydrazine and doxorubicin hydrochloride. Notably, prodrugs 1, 2, and 3 formed monodispersed nanogels with average sizes of 114.4, 75.3, and 66.3 nm, respectively, in phosphate buffer (PB, 10 mM, pH 7.4). The in vitro release results showed that DOX was released rapidly and nearly quantitatively from DOX prodrug nanogels at endosomal pH and 37 °C in 48 h, whereas only a minor amount (ca. 20% or less) of drug was released at pH 7.4 under otherwise the same conditions. Confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) observations revealed that DOX prodrug nanogels delivered and released DOX into the cytosols as well as cell nuclei of RAW 264.7 cells following 24 h incubation. MTT assays demonstrated that prodrug 3 had pronounced cytotoxic effects to tumor cells following 72 h incubation with IC(50) data determined to be 2.0 and 3.4 ?g DOX equiv/mL for RAW 264.7 and MCF-7 tumor cells, respectively. The corresponding polymer carrier, PEG-b-P(HEMA-co-GMA-hydrazide), was shown to be nontoxic up to a tested concentration of 1.32 mg/mL. These endosomal pH-activatable DOX prodrug nanogels uniquely combining features of water-soluble macromolecular prodrugs and nanogels offer a promising platform for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:21905663

  12. Targeted Lung Delivery of Nasally Administered Aerosols

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Geng; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P. Worth

    2014-01-01

    Using the nasal route to deliver pharmaceutical aerosols to the lungs has a number of advantages including co-administration during non-invasive ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the growth and deposition characteristics of nasally administered aerosol throughout the conducting airways based on delivery with streamlined interfaces implementing two forms of controlled condensational growth technology. Characteristic conducting airways were considered including a nose-mouth-throat (NMT) geometry, complete upper tracheobronchial (TB) model through the third bifurcation (B3), and stochastic individual path (SIP) model to the terminal bronchioles (B15). Previously developed streamlined nasal cannula interfaces were used for the delivery of submicrometer particles using either enhanced condensational growth (ECG) or excipient enhanced growth (EEG) techniques. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations predicted aerosol transport, growth and deposition for a control (4.7 ?m) and three submicrometer condensational aerosols with budesonide as a model insoluble drug. Depositional losses with condensational aerosols in the cannula and NMT were less than 5% of the initial dose, which represents an order-of-magnitude reduction compared to the control. The condensational growth techniques increased the TB dose by a factor of 1.1–2.6x, delivered at least 70% of the dose to the alveolar region, and produced final aerosol sizes ?2.5 ?m. Compared to multiple commercial orally inhaled products, the nose-to-lung delivery approach increased dose to the biologically important lower TB region by factors as large as 35x. In conclusion, nose-to-lung delivery with streamlined nasal cannulas and condensational aerosols was highly efficient and targeted deposition to the lower TB and alveolar regions. PMID:24932058

  13. Thermoresponsive nanogels for prolonged duration local anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hoare, Todd; Young, Stuart; Lawlor, Michael W.; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Nanogels based on poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) are attractive vehicles for prolonged duration local anesthesia because of their tunable size, number of functional groups, thermoresponsiveness, and their anionic charge. Nerve block durations of up to nine hours were achieved using acrylic acid-loaded nanogels loaded with bupivacaine. Increasing the anionic charge density of the nanogels or (for more highly acid-functionalized nanogels) decreasing the nanogel size facilitated longer duration anesthetic release. Small (<300 nm diameter) nanogels formed dense aggregates upon injection in vivo and induced only mild inflammatory responses, while large (>500 nm diameter) nanogels typically remained as liquid-like residues in vivo and induced more severe inflammatory reactions. PMID:22732383

  14. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-07-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications. PMID:24881520

  15. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  16. Nanogel-based pneumococcal surface protein A nasal vaccine induces microRNA-associated Th17 cell responses with neutralizing antibodies against Streptococcus pneumoniae in macaques.

    PubMed

    Fukuyama, Y; Yuki, Y; Katakai, Y; Harada, N; Takahashi, H; Takeda, S; Mejima, M; Joo, S; Kurokawa, S; Sawada, S; Shibata, H; Park, E J; Fujihashi, K; Briles, D E; Yasutomi, Y; Tsukada, H; Akiyoshi, K; Kiyono, H

    2015-09-01

    We previously established a nanosized nasal vaccine delivery system by using a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan nanogel (cCHP nanogel), which is a universal protein-based antigen-delivery vehicle for adjuvant-free nasal vaccination. In the present study, we examined the central nervous system safety and efficacy of nasal vaccination with our developed cCHP nanogel containing pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA-nanogel) against pneumococcal infection in nonhuman primates. When [(18)F]-labeled PspA-nanogel was nasally administered to a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), longer-term retention of PspA was noted in the nasal cavity when compared with administration of PspA alone. Of importance, no deposition of [(18)F]-PspA was seen in the olfactory bulbs or brain. Nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination effectively induced PspA-specific serum IgG with protective activity and mucosal secretory IgA (SIgA) Ab responses in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Nasal PspA-nanogel-induced immune responses were mediated through T-helper (Th) 2 and Th17 cytokine responses concomitantly with marked increases in the levels of miR-181a and miR-326 in the serum and respiratory tract tissues, respectively, of the macaques. These results demonstrate that nasal PspA-nanogel vaccination is a safe and effective strategy for the development of a nasal vaccine for the prevention of pneumonia in humans. PMID:25669148

  17. Bio-responsive chitin-poly(L-lactic acid) composite nanogels for liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Arunraj, T R; Sanoj Rejinold, N; Ashwin Kumar, N; Jayakumar, R

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancer and its treatment has been considered a therapeutic challenge. Doxorubicin (Dox) is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment for liver cancer. However, the efficacy of Dox therapy is restricted by the dose-dependent toxic side effects. To overcome the cardiotoxicity of Dox as well as the current problems of conventional modality treatment of HCC, we developed a locally injectable, biodegradable, and pH sensitive composite nanogels for site specific delivery. Both control and Dox loaded composite nanogel systems were analyzed by DLS, SEM, FTIR and TG/DTA. The size ranges of the control composite nanogels and their drug loaded counterparts were found to be 90±20 and 270±20 nm, respectively. The control chitin-PLA CNGs and Dox-chitin-PLA CNGs showed higher swelling and degradation in acidic pH. Drug entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were carried out and showed a higher drug release at acidic pH compared to neutral pH. Cellular internalization of the nanogel systems was confirmed by fluorescent microscopy. The cytotoxicity of the composite nanogels was analyzed toward HepG2 (human liver cancer) cell lines. Furthermore, the results of in vitro hemolytic assay and coagulation assay substantiate the blood compatibility of the system. Overall Dox-chitin-PLA CNGs system could be a promising anticancer drug delivery system for liver cancer therapy. PMID:24129331

  18. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  19. Expert Review Functionalized Micellar Systems for Cancer Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jinming

    Expert Review Functionalized Micellar Systems for Cancer Targeted Drug Delivery Damon Sutton,1, and general use of micelles as drug delivery systems (4Y13). The purpose of this review is to provide stability, ability to solubilize water insoluble anticancer drugs, and prolonged blood circulation times

  20. Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Xiao

    2012-07-16

    Hydrophobic drug paclitaxel nanoparticles (PAX NPs) and pH sensitive hydrogels were prepared in this study to build a colon targeting nanoparticle based drug delivery system for oral administration. Negative charged PAX NPs at the size of 110...

  1. Colon targeted delivery systems: review of polysaccharides for encapsulation and delivery.

    PubMed

    Kosaraju, Shantha L

    2005-01-01

    Colon-targeted delivery of bioactives has recently gained importance in addressing specific needs in the therapy of colon-based diseases. Many approaches have been attempted for the development of colon-specific delivery systems, with not much success in the past. Recent research into the utilization of the metabolic activity and the colonic microenvironment in the lower gastrointestinal tract has attained great value in the design of novel colon-targeted delivery systems based on natural biodegradable polymers. In the current article, special emphasis has been placed on polysaccharide systems, with minimal chemical modification, that have been exploitedfor colon targeting. These polysaccharide based encapsulation and targeted delivery systems are envisaged to have an immense potential for the development of food/nutraceutical formulations for colon-based diseases, including colorectal cancer. PMID:16047493

  2. Differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells into endothelial cells by heparin-modified supramolecular pluronic nanogels encapsulating bFGF and complexed with VEGF165 genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Han Na; Choi, Jong Hoon; Park, Ji Sun; Jeon, Su Yeon; Park, Ki Dong; Park, Keun-Hong

    2014-05-01

    Specific genes and growth factors are involved in stem cell differentiation. In this study, we fabricated a delivery carrier for both protein and gene delivery that was introduced into human endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). The highly negative charge carried by the heparin-modified pluronic nanogels allowed for binding to growth factors and localization in the core of nanogels. The residues of negatively charged heparin can complex with positively charged cationic materials, making it suitable for gene delivery. Supramolecular nanogels can be easily encapsulated the hydrophilic drugs and highly positive surfaces can be complexed with negative charge carrying plasmid DNA (pDNA). The size distribution, gel retardation, and denaturation of encapsulated growth factors and supramolecular nanogels modified with heparin were evaluated. The supramolecular nanogels containing basic fibroblast growth factors and complexing VEGF165 pDNA internalized into EPCs have been well formed vascular formation in matrigel gels. Proteins and genes introduced into EPCs using nanogels promoted neovascularization in an animal model of limb ischemia. EPCs that differentiated into endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo were tested. PMID:24630837

  3. Responsive polymer-fluorescent carbon nanoparticle hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, near-infrared light-responsive drug release, and tumor cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Ke, Fuyou; Mararenko, Anton; Wei, Zengyan; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications.Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCNPs) have been successfully immobilized into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)] nanogels based on one-pot precipitation copolymerization of NIPAM monomers with hydrogen bonded FCNP-AAm complex monomers in water. The resultant poly(NIPAM-AAm)-FCNP hybrid nanogels can combine functions from each building block for fluorescent temperature sensing, cell imaging, and near-infrared (NIR) light responsive drug delivery. The FCNPs in the hybrid nanogels not only emit bright and stable photoluminescence (PL) and exhibit up-conversion PL properties, but also increase the loading capacity of the nanogels for curcumin drug molecules. The reversible thermo-responsive swelling/shrinking transition of the poly(NIPAM-AAm) nanogel can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the FCNPs to manipulate the PL intensity for sensing the environmental temperature change, but also regulate the releasing rate of the loaded anticancer drug. In addition, the FCNPs embedded in the nanogels can convert the NIR light to heat, thus an exogenous NIR irradiation can further accelerate the drug release and enhance the therapeutic efficacy. The hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells upon laser excitation. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels with nontoxic and optically active FCNPs immobilized in responsive polymer nanogels are promising for the development of a new generation of multifunctional materials for biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1-S5. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01030b

  4. Fabrication and characterization of sol-gel based nanoparticles for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Reeta

    Nanogels are cross linked polymeric sol-gel based nanoparticles that offer an interior network for incorporation and protection of biomolecules, exhibiting unique advantages for polymer based delivery systems. We have successfully synthesized stable sol-gel nanoparticles by means of [a] silicification reactions using cationic peptides like polylysine as gelating agents, and [b] lyophilization of sol-gels. Macromolecules such as Hemoglobin and Glucose Oxidase and small molecules such as Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP) and antibiotics were encapsulated within the nanogels. We have used transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, and spectroscopy to perform a physicochemical characterization of the nanogels resulting from the two approaches. Our studies have indicated that the nanogel encapsulated proteins and small molecules remain intact, stable and functional. A Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2) and Nitric Oxide (NO) generating drug carrier was synthesized using these nanogels and the effect of generation of H2O2 from Glucose Oxidase encapsulated nanogels and NO from SNP encapsulated nanogels was tested on E.coli. The results show that the nanoparticles exert antimicrobial activity against E.Coli, in addition NO generating nanogels potentiated H2O2 generating nanogels induced killing. These data suggest that these NO and H2O2 releasing nanogels have the potential to serve as a novel class of antimicrobials for the treatment of multidrug resistant bacteria. The unique properties of these protein/drug incorporated nanogels raise the prospect of fine tailoring to specific applications such as drug delivery and bio imaging.

  5. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting. PMID:26587994

  6. Polypropylene nanogel: “Myth or reality”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliani, W. L.; Parra, D. F.; Riella, H. G.; Lima, L. F. C. P.; Lugao, A. B.

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this work is the investigation of the nanogel and microgel formation in modified PP. The modified PP in pellets was synthesized by gamma irradiation of pristine PP under a crosslinking atmosphere of acetylene in dose of 5, 12.5 and 20 kGy, followed by thermal treatment for radical recombination and annihilation of the remaining radicals. The thin film gel of the polypropylenes was obtained by extraction in boiling xylene for period of 12 h at 138 °C, followed by decantation in beaker at room temperature of 25 °C with the total volatilization of the xylene and deposition of dried material film on glass substrate under agitation by Settling process. The thin film gel formed of pristine PP and modified PP (i.e., irradiated) was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The PP morphology indicated the nanogels and microgel formation with increase of spherulitic concentration and crystallinity at dose of 12.5 kGy.

  7. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  8. Liver cell-targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Toita, Riki; Murata, Masaharu

    2016-02-01

    The liver is the largest internal organ in mammals and is involved in metabolism, detoxification, synthesis of proteins and lipids, secretion of cytokines and growth factors and immune/inflammatory responses. Hepatitis, alcoholic or non-alcoholic liver disease, hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatic veno-occlusive disease, and liver fibrosis and cirrhosis are the most common liver diseases. Safe and efficient delivery of therapeutic molecules (drugs, genes or proteins) into the liver is very important to increase the clinical efficacy of these molecules and to reduce their side effects in other organs. Several liver cell-targeted delivery systems have been developed and tested in vivo or ex vivo/in vitro. In this review, we discuss the literature concerning liver cell-targeted delivery systems, with a particular emphasis on the results of in vivo studies. PMID:25025274

  9. Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyer, Tyson

    The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty, targeted PA nanofibers showed enhanced binding by fluorescence relative to spherical micelles with the same targeting sequence, demonstrating the importance of nanostructure shape for vascular binding. Nitric oxide was functionalized onto the PA nanostructure through the S-nitrosylation (SNO) of a cysteine residue. Two weeks after vascular injury, the SNO-functionalized, targeted nanofibers showed significantly decreased levels of restenosis. In all treatment methods described, the control of multivalency through the tuning of supramolecular structure was essential to achieve optimal binding. Understanding the role of dynamic, supramolecular structures for the systemic delivery of peptide therapeutics should be an important focus of future work.

  10. Untethered magnetic millirobot for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Veronica; Lucarini, Gioia; Ricotti, Leonardo; Dario, Paolo; Dupont, Pierre E; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the design and development of a novel millimeter-sized robotic system for targeted therapy. The proposed medical robot is conceived to perform therapy in relatively small diameter body canals (spine, urinary system, ovary, etc.), and to release several kinds of therapeutics, depending on the pathology to be treated. The robot is a nearly-buoyant bi-component system consisting of a carrier, in which the therapeutic agent is embedded, and a piston. The piston, by exploiting magnetic effects, docks with the carrier and compresses a drug-loaded hydrogel, thus activating the release mechanism. External magnetic fields are exploited to propel the robot towards the target region, while intermagnetic forces are exploited to trigger drug release. After designing and fabricating the robot, the system has been tested in vitro with an anticancer drug (doxorubicin) embedded in the carrier. The efficiency of the drug release mechanism has been demonstrated by both quantifying the amount of drug released and by assessing the efficacy of this therapeutic procedure on human bladder cancer cells. PMID:26009273

  11. Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh

    2006-11-15

    Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without motion. The BSD plan was also delivered on the phantom that moved with the prescheduled pattern and synchronized with the delivery of each beam. Film dosimetry showed underdose and overdose in the superior and inferior regions of the target, respectively, if the tumor motion is not compensated during the delivery. BSD delivery resulted in a dose distribution very similar to the planned treatments.

  12. Prostate Cancer Relevant Antigens and Enzymes for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Barve, Ashutosh; Jin, Wei; Cheng, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the most widely used approaches in combating advanced prostate cancer, but its therapeutic efficacy is usually insufficient due to lack of specificity and associated toxicity. Lack of targeted delivery to prostate cancer cells is also the primary obstacles in achieving feasible therapeutic effect of other promising agents including peptide, protein, and nucleic acid. Consequently, there remains a critical need for strategies to increase the selectivity of anti-prostate cancer agents. This review will focus on various prostate cancer-specific antigens and enzymes that could be exploited for prostate cancer targeted drug delivery. Among various targeting strategies, active targeting is the most advanced approach to specifically deliver drugs to their designated cancer cells. In this approach, drug carriers are modified with targeting ligands that can specifically bind to prostate cancer-specific antigens. Moreover, there are several specific enzymes in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer that can be exploited for stimulus-responsive drug delivery systems. These systems can specifically release the active drug in the tumor microenvironment of prostate cancer, leading to enhanced tumor penetration efficiency. PMID:24878184

  13. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site. PMID:26069867

  14. Targeted drug delivery using genetically engineered diatom biosilica.

    PubMed

    Delalat, Bahman; Sheppard, Vonda C; Rasi Ghaemi, Soraya; Rao, Shasha; Prestidge, Clive A; McPhee, Gordon; Rogers, Mary-Louise; Donoghue, Jacqueline F; Pillay, Vinochani; Johns, Terrance G; Kröger, Nils; Voelcker, Nicolas H

    2015-01-01

    The ability to selectively kill cancerous cell populations while leaving healthy cells unaffected is a key goal in anticancer therapeutics. The use of nanoporous silica-based materials as drug-delivery vehicles has recently proven successful, yet production of these materials requires costly and toxic chemicals. Here we use diatom microalgae-derived nanoporous biosilica to deliver chemotherapeutic drugs to cancer cells. The diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana is genetically engineered to display an IgG-binding domain of protein G on the biosilica surface, enabling attachment of cell-targeting antibodies. Neuroblastoma and B-lymphoma cells are selectively targeted and killed by biosilica displaying specific antibodies sorbed with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Treatment with the same biosilica leads to tumour growth regression in a subcutaneous mouse xenograft model of neuroblastoma. These data indicate that genetically engineered biosilica frustules may be used as versatile 'backpacks' for the targeted delivery of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs to tumour sites. PMID:26556723

  15. RAFT-mediated Control of Nanogel Structure and Reactivity: Chemical, Physical and Mechanical Properties of Monomer-dispersed Nanogel Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examines how nanogel structure correlates with photopolymerization and key polymer properties upon addition of nanogels with latent reactivity into a monomer dispersant to produce polymer/polymer composites. Methods Two nanogels that retained RAFT functionality based on the synthetic approach were prepared to have different branching densities. These reactive nanogels were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at 0–40 wt%. Reaction kinetics, volumetric shrinkage and shrinkage stress associated with the photopolymerization of nanogel-modified formulations were measured in real time with mechanical properties of the polymers also evaluated. The basic structure of RAFT-derived nanogel particles was examined by the preparation of a separate nanogel constructed with degradable disulfide crosslinking groups. The model nanogel molecular weight and polydispersity were compared before and after degradation. Results Despite the controlled radical synthetic approach, the nanogels, which are composed of multiple interconnected, short primary chains presented relatively high polydispersity. Through addition of the reactive nanogels to a monomer that both infiltrates and disperses the nanogels, the photopolymerization rate was moderately reduced with the increase of nanogel loading levels. Volumetric shrinkage decreased proportionally with nanogel concentration; however, a greater than proportional reduction of polymerization-induced stress was observed. Mechanical properties, such as flexural strength, storage modulus were maintained at the same levels as the control resin for nanogel systems up to 40 wt%. Significance This study demonstrated that beyond the use of RAFT functionality to produce discrete nano-polymeric structures, the residual chain end groups are important to maintain reactivity and mechanical properties of nanogel-modified resin materials. PMID:25205366

  16. Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

  17. TLR9-Targeted SiRNA Delivery In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Dewan Md Sakib; Moreira, Dayson; Zhang, Qifang; Nechaev, Sergey; Swiderski, Piotr; Kortylewski, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The SiRNA strategy is a potent and versatile method for modulating expression of any gene in various species for investigational or therapeutic purposes. Clinical translation of SiRNA-based approaches proved challenging, mainly due to the difficulty of targeted SiRNA delivery into cells of interest and the immunogenic side effects of oligonucleotide reagents. However, the intrinsic sensitivity of immune cells to nucleic acids can be utilized for the delivery of SiRNAs designed for the purpose of cancer immunotherapy. We have demonstrated that synthetic ligands for the intracellular receptor TLR9 can serve as targeting moiety for cell-specific delivery of SiRNAs. Chemically synthesized CpG-SiRNA conjugates are quickly internalized by TLR9-positive cells in the absence of transfection reagents, inducing target gene silencing. The CpG-SiRNA strategy allows for effective targeting of TLR9-positive cells in vivo after local or systemic administration of these oligonucleotides into mice. PMID:26472451

  18. Targeted Cellular Drug Delivery using Tailored Dendritic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2002-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorble, ‘peripheral’ functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug and gene delivery. The large number of end groups can also be tailored to create special affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, in-vitro drug loading, in-vitro drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Polyamidoamine and Polyol dendrimers, with different generations and end-groups are studied, with drugs such as Ibuprofen and Methotrexate. Our results indicate that a large number of drug molecules can be encapsulated/attached to the dendrimers, depending on the end groups. The drug-encapsulated dendrimer is able to enter the cells rapidly and deliver the drug. Targeting strategies being explored

  19. A hyaluronic acid nanogel for photo-chemo theranostics of lung cancer with simultaneous light-responsive controlled release of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Khatun, Zehedina; Nurunnabi, Md; Nafiujjaman, Md; Reeck, Gerald R; Khan, Haseeb A; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-kyu

    2015-06-28

    The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid nanogel) that exerts an activity with multiple effects: thermo and chemotherapeutic, real-time noninvasive imaging, and light-glutathione-responsive controlled drug release. The nanogel is mono-dispersed with an average diameter of 120 nm as observed by using TEM and a hydrodynamic size analyzer. It has excellent photo-luminescence properties and good stability in buffer and serum solutions. Graphene itself, being photoluminescent, can be considered an optical imaging contrast agent as well as a heat source when excited by laser irradiation. Thus the nanogel shows simultaneous thermo-chemotherapeutic effects on noninvasive optical imaging. We have also found that irradiation enhances the release of doxorubicin in a controlled manner. This release synergizes therapeutic activity of the nanogel in killing tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that the graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in the hyaluronic acid nanogel is very effective in killing the human lung cancer cell line (A549) with limited toxicity in the non-cancerous cell line (MDCK). PMID:26030737

  20. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin using stealth liposomes modified with transferrin.

    PubMed

    Li, XueMing; Ding, Liyan; Xu, Yuanlong; Wang, Yonglu; Ping, QiNeng

    2009-05-21

    Site-specific delivery of drugs and therapeutics can significantly reduce drug toxicity and increase the therapeutic effect. Transferrin (Tf) is one suitable ligand to be conjugated to drug delivery systems to achieve site-specific targeting, due to its specific binding to transferrin receptors (TfR), highly expressed on the surfaces of tumor cells. Stealth liposomes are effective vehicles for drugs, genes and vaccines and can be easily modified with proteins, antibodies, and other appropriate ligands, resulting in attractive formulations for targeted drug delivery. In this study, we prepared doxorubicin-loaded stealth liposomes (Tf-SL-DOX) by film dispersion followed by ammonium sulphate gradient method, then conjugated Tf to the liposome surface by an amide bound between DSPE-PEG(2000)-COOH and Tf. The results of the intracellular uptake study indicated that Tf-modified SL was able to enhance the intracellular uptake of the entrapped DOX by HepG2 cells compared to SL-DOX. We studied tissue distribution and therapeutic effects of Free DOX, SL-DOX and Tf-SL-DOX in tumor-bearing mice and pharmacokinetics in rats. The pharmacokinetic behavior of Tf-SL-DOX in the plasma was closed to SL-DOX. Administration of Tf-SL-DOX to tumor-bearing mice could be used to deliver DOX effectively to the targeted site, significantly increasing DOX concentration in tumor and decreasing DOX concentration in heart and kidney. In summary, our study indicated that the Tf-coupled PEG liposomes (Tf-SL) could be as the targeted carriers to facilitate the delivery of the encapsulated anticancer drugs into tumor cells by receptor-mediated way. PMID:19429296

  1. Cardiac responses to the intrapericardial delivery of metoprolol: targeted delivery compared to intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Eric S; Rolfes, Christopher; Woo, Oh Sang; Elmquist, William F; Benditt, David G; Iaizzo, Paul A

    2012-08-01

    Anti-arrhythmic drugs have narrow therapeutic ranges and typically can engender harmful side effects. The intrapericardial (IP) delivery of anti-arrhythmic agents proposes to achieve higher myocardial levels while minimizing plasma concentrations, thus diminishing systemic side effects. Furthermore, IP delivery enables concentrations at the target site to be more precisely controlled. Our study objective was to compare the relative cardiac effects of intrapericardial administration of metoprolol to standard intravenous (IV) delivery in a swine surgical model. In order to answer the question of how IP metoprolol affects sinus tachycardia, atrial electrophysiology, and pharmacokinetics compared with IV delivery, a medial sternotomy was performed on 21 swine that were divided into three groups: (1) After inducing sinus tachycardia, metoprolol boluses were delivered IP (n = 4) or IV (n = 4); (2) metoprolol was administered either IP (n = 3) or IV (n = 3) with saline controls (n = 3), and electrophysiologic data were collected; (3) metoprolol levels were tracked both in the blood (IV, n = 2) and pericardial (IP, n = 2) fluid. After either IP or IV delivery of metoprolol, heart rates were lowered significantly to 70% and 73% of control rate, respectively. The therapeutic effect of IV-administered metoprolol was considerably reduced after 1 h but was sustained longer in the IP group. Additionally, ventricular contractility and mean arterial pressure parameters were significantly lower in IV-treated animals but were nearly unaffected in IP-treated animals. With IP administration, the elimination half-life of metoprolol in pericardial fluid was 14.4 min with negligible accumulations in the plasma, whereas with IV delivery, the elimination half-life in plasma was 11.1 min with negligible amounts found in the pericardial fluid. The targeted intrapericardial delivery of metoprolol effectively lowers heart rates for sustained periods of time, with minimal effect on either ventricular contractility or mean arterial pressure. We did not observe dramatic changes in induced atrial fibrillation times or refractory periods using this model. PMID:21877256

  2. Cutting Edge: Nanogel-Based Delivery of an Inhibitor of CaMK4 to CD4+ T Cells Suppresses Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Lupus-like Disease in Mice.

    PubMed

    Otomo, Kotaro; Koga, Tomohiro; Mizui, Masayuki; Yoshida, Nobuya; Kriegel, Christina; Bickerton, Sean; Fahmy, Tarek M; Tsokos, George C

    2015-12-15

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases is still largely based on the use of systemically acting immunosuppressive drugs, which invariably cause severe side effects. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV is involved in the suppression of IL-2 and the production of IL-17. Its pharmacologic or genetic inhibition limits autoimmune disease in mice. In this study, we demonstrate that KN93, a small-molecule inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV, targeted to CD4(+) T cells via a nanolipogel delivery system, markedly reduced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and was 10-fold more potent than the free systemically delivered drug in the lupus mouse models. The targeted delivery of KN93 did not deplete T cells but effectively blocked Th17 cell differentiation and expansion as measured in the spinal cords and kidneys of mice developing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or lupus, respectively. These results highlight the promise of cell-targeted inhibition of molecules involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity as a means of advancing the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26561550

  3. Peptide Anchor for Folate-Targeted Liposomal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Mangialavori, Irene C; Loureiro, Ana; Azoia, Nuno G; Sárria, Marisa P; Nogueira, Patrícia; Freitas, Jaime; Härmark, Johan; Shimanovich, Ulyana; Rollett, Alexandra; Lacroix, Ghislaine; Bernardes, Gonçalo J L; Guebitz, Georg; Hebert, Hans; Moreira, Alexandra; Carmo, Alexandre M; Rossi, Juan Pablo F C; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-09-14

    Specific folate receptors are abundantly overexpressed in chronically activated macrophages and in most cancer cells. Directed folate receptor targeting using liposomes is usually achieved using folate linked to a phospholipid or cholesterol anchor. This link is formed using a large spacer like polyethylene glycol. Here, we report an innovative strategy for targeted liposome delivery that uses a hydrophobic fragment of surfactant protein D linked to folate. Our proposed spacer is a small 4 amino acid residue linker. The peptide conjugate inserts deeply into the lipid bilayer without affecting liposomal integrity, with high stability and specificity. To compare the drug delivery potential of both liposomal targeting systems, we encapsulated the nuclear dye Hoechst 34580. The eventual increase in blue fluorescence would only be detectable upon liposome disruption, leading to specific binding of this dye to DNA. Our delivery system was proven to be more efficient (2-fold) in Caco-2 cells than classic systems where the folate moiety is linked to liposomes by polyethylene glycol. PMID:26241560

  4. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  5. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G.; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  6. Nanogel-based PspA intranasal vaccine prevents invasive disease and nasal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  7. The ability of retention, drug release and rheological properties of nanogel bioadhesives based on cellulose derivatives.

    PubMed

    Keshavarz, M; Kaffashi, B

    2014-12-01

    The rheological and drug release behavior of biopolymer nanocomposite gels based on the cellulose derivatives, formulated as the bioadhesive drug delivery platforms, were investigated. The bioadhesive gel is composed of the microcrystalline cellulose, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and phosphate buffered saline (pH?=?7.4 at 20?°C) as the dissolution and release medium. The reinforcing nanofillers such as MMT-clay, fumed porous silica and porous starch were used as additives in the nanogel bioadhesive. The constant steady state viscosities of this nanogels upon incorporation of various nanofillers into the systems is the sign of structural stability. Hence, this system is suitable for use in the controlled drug delivery systems in contact with the biological tissues. Based on the rheological measurements, the shear flow properties (i.e. zero shear viscosity and yield stress) were influenced by the concentration of polymers and nanoparticles. The results indicate that the nonlinear rheological data are fitted properly by the Giesekus model. Furthermore, the results showed that the nonlinear viscoelastic parameters (? and ?) are highly affected by the biogel and nanoparticles concentrations. Finally, the drug release was measured, and the results indicated that the biopolymer-clay nanocomposites have appropriate release pattern as the release is better controlled compared to the other nanogel formulations. PMID:24160773

  8. Magnetic nanoparticles as targeted delivery systems in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Prijic, Sara; Sersa, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Background Many different types of nanoparticles, magnetic nanoparticles being just a category among them, offer exciting opportunities for technologies at the interfaces between chemistry, physics and biology. Some magnetic nanoparticles have already been utilized in clinical practice as contrast enhancing agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, their physicochemical properties are constantly being improved upon also for other biological applications, such as magnetically-guided delivery systems for different therapeutics. By exposure of magnetic nanoparticles with attached therapeutics to an external magnetic field with appropriate characteristics, they are concentrated and retained at the preferred site which enables the targeted delivery of therapeutics to the desired spot. Conclusions The idea of binding chemotherapeutics to magnetic nanoparticles has been around for 30 years, however, no magnetic nanoparticles as delivery systems have yet been approved for clinical practice. Recently, binding of nucleic acids to magnetic nanoparticles has been demonstrated as a successful non-viral transfection method of different cell lines in vitro. With the optimization of this method called magnetofection, it will hopefully become another form of gene delivery for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22933928

  9. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Masood, Farha

    2016-03-01

    A targeted delivery system based on the polymeric nanoparticles as a drug carrier represents a marvelous avenue for cancer therapy. The pivotal characteristics of this system include biodegradability, biocompatibility, non-toxicity, prolonged circulation and a wide payload spectrum of a therapeutic agent. Other outstanding features are their distinctive size and shape properties for tissue penetration via an active and passive targeting, specific cellular/subcellular trafficking pathways and facile control of cargo release by sophisticated material engineering. In this review, the current implications of encapsulation of anticancer agents within polyhydroxyalkanoates, poly-(lactic-co-glycolic acid) and cyclodextrin based nanoparticles to precisely target the tumor site, i.e., cell, tissue and organ are highlighted. Furthermore, the promising perspectives in this emerging field are discussed. PMID:26706565

  10. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization. PMID:25375342

  11. "Nanotheranostics" for tumor imaging and targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Peng

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique is a promising tool that improves cancer detection, facilitates diagnosis and monitors therapeutic effects. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs) have emerged as MRI contrast agents for tumor imaging and as potential vectors for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery; nevertheless, the application of SPIOs has been hampered due to a lack of specificity to tumor tissues and premature drug release. This project aims at developing multifunctional SPIOs for both cancer imaging and targeted drug delivery via conjugation of tumor specific antibodies with SPIOs. The application of anti-TAG-72 antibodies as tumor targeting modalities was evaluated in cultured colorectal cancer cells and in xenograft models by using fluorescent imaging and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. It was demonstrated that antibody-labeled SPIOs were superior imaging agents and drug carriers for increased tumor specificity. The regulation and kinetics of intracellular drug release from SPIOs were explored by means of fluorescence imaging. In vitro and in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging was employed to investigate the mechanisms of premature drug release from nanocarriers. The large volume and high hydrophobicity of cell membranes were found to play an important role in premature drug release. The encapsulation of SPIOs into nanocarriers decreased drug release in a dose-dependent mode. This study provided future opportunities to improve the efficiency of nanocarriers by exploring the mechanism of drug release and disassembly of SPIO-loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

  12. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles in target drug delivery system: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Charu; Nagaich, Upendra; Pal, Ashok Kumar; Gulati, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Due to lack of specification and solubility of drug molecules, patients have to take high doses of the drug to achieve the desired therapeutic effects for the treatment of diseases. To solve these problems, there are various drug carriers present in the pharmaceuticals, which can used to deliver therapeutic agents to the target site in the body. Mesoporous silica materials become known as a promising candidate that can overcome above problems and produce effects in a controllable and sustainable manner. In particular, mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are widely used as a delivery reagent because silica possesses favorable chemical properties, thermal stability, and biocompatibility. The unique mesoporous structure of silica facilitates effective loading of drugs and their subsequent controlled release of the target site. The properties of mesoporous, including pore size, high drug loading, and porosity as well as the surface properties, can be altered depending on additives used to prepare MSNs. Active surface enables functionalization to changed surface properties and link therapeutic molecules. They are used as widely in the field of diagnosis, target drug delivery, bio-sensing, cellular uptake, etc., in the bio-medical field. This review aims to present the state of knowledge of silica containing mesoporous nanoparticles and specific application in various biomedical fields. PMID:26258053

  13. Specifically targeted delivery of protein to phagocytic macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Min; Chen, Zeming; Guo, Wenjun; Wang, Jin; Feng, Yupeng; Kong, Xiuqi; Hong, Zhangyong

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages play important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases, and are important potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, macrophages are key antigen-presenting cells and important in vaccine design. In this study, we report on the novel formulation (bovine serum albumin [BSA]-loaded glucan particles [GMP-BSA]) based on ?-glucan particles from cell walls of baker’s yeast for the targeted delivery of protein to macrophages. Using this formulation, chitosan, tripolyphosphate, and alginate were used to fabricate colloidal particles with the model protein BSA via electrostatic interactions, which were caged and incorporated BSA very tightly within the ?-glucan particle shells. The prepared GMP-BSA exhibited good protein-release behavior and avoided protein leakage. The particles were also highly specific to phagocytic macrophages, such as Raw 264.7 cells, primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and peritoneal exudate macrophages, whereas the particles were not taken up by nonphagocytic cells, including NIH3T3, AD293, HeLa, and Caco-2. We hypothesize that these tightly encapsulated protein-loaded glucan particles deliver various types of proteins to macrophages with notably high selectivity, and may have broad applications in targeted drug delivery or vaccine design against macrophages. PMID:25784802

  14. Real-time DMLC IMRT delivery for mobile and deforming targets

    SciTech Connect

    Papiez, Lech; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Keall, Paul

    2005-09-15

    In numerous cases of radiotherapy delivery to moving targets, simplifying assumptions of identical pattern of motions of tissue for each fraction are not satisfied. Therefore, algorithms capable to respond in real time to motions of target registered at treatment should be developed to improve the precision of radiation intensity delivery. The DMLC delivery of predetermined intensity maps to moving and deforming targets in real time is developed in this paper. Algorithms are constructed so that constraints on maximum admissible speed of leaves are preserved during delivery. A sequence of examples is presented to illustrate behavior of leaf trajectories for representative cases of [dynamic multileaf collimator] (DMLC) [intensity modulated radiation therapy] (IMRT) real-time delivery. The examples presented show real-time deliveries to targets moving as rigid bodies and targets deforming uniformly over their volumes. Examples are admitting random perturbations of predefined target motions that are time dependent only, i.e., target motion perturbations are identical for all target points.

  15. Improved Biochemical Strategies for Targeted Delivery of Taxoids

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Thota

    2008-01-01

    Paclitaxel (Taxol ®) and docetaxel (Taxotere ®) are very important anti-tumor drugs in clinical use for cancer. However, their clinical utility is limited due to systemic toxicity, low solubility and inactivity against drug resistant tumors. To improve chemotherapeutic levels of these drugs, it would be highly desirable to design strategies which bypass the above limitations. In this respect various prodrug and drug targeting strategies have been envisioned either to improve oral bioavailability or tumor specific delivery of taxoids. Abnormal properties of cancer cells with respect to normal cells have guided in designing of these protocols. This review article records the designed biochemical strategies and their biological efficacies as potential taxoid chemotherapeutics. PMID:17419065

  16. Modular Nanotransporters for Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Drugs: Folate Receptors as Potential Targets

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to a subcellular drug delivery system, modular nanotransporters (MNT) that can penetrate into target cells and deliver a therapeutic into their subcellular compartments, particularly into the nucleus. The therapeutics which need such type of delivery belong to two groups: (i) those that exert their effect only when delivered into a certain cell compartment (like DNA delivered into the nucleus); and (ii) those drugs that are capable of exerting their effect in different parts of the cells, however there can be found a cell compartment that is the most sensitive to their effect. A particular interest attract such cytotoxic agents as Auger electron emitters which are known to be ineffective outside the cell nucleus, whereas they possess high cytotoxicity in the vicinity of nuclear DNA through the induction of non-reparable double-strand DNA breaks. The review discusses main approaches permitting to choose internalizable receptors permitting both recognition of target cells and penetration into them. Special interest attract folate receptors which become accessible to blood circulating therapeutics after malignant transformation or on activated macrophages which makes them an attractive target for both several oncological and inflammatory diseases, like atherosclerosis. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that MNT is a promising platform for targeted delivery of different therapeutics into the nuclei of target cells. PMID:25312738

  17. Magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and triggered drug release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Mukherjee, Sumit; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-10-01

    The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ideal system for the biomedical applications due to their excellent optical properties, magnetic properties, high drug loading capacity and responsive drug release behavior.The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ide

  18. Oral heparin delivery: design and in vivo evaluation of a stomach-targeted mucoadhesive delivery system.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Thierry; Leitner, Verena M; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2005-05-01

    Low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) is an agent of choice in the anti-coagulant therapy and prophylaxis of thrombosis and coronary syndromes. However, the therapeutic use is partially limited due to a poor oral bioavailability. It was therefore the aim of this study to design and evaluate a highly efficient stomach-targeted oral delivery system for LMWH. In order to appraise the influence of the molecular weight on the oral bioavailability, mini-tablets comprising 3 kDa (279 IU) and 6 kDa (300 IU) LMWH, respectively, were generated and tested in vivo in rats. The potential of the test formulations based on thiolated polycarbophil, was evaluated in comparison to hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) as control carrier matrix. The plasma levels of LMWH after oral versus subcutaneous administration were determined in order to calculate the relative bioavailability. With the delivery system containing 3 kDa LMWH (279 IU) a relative bioavailability of 19.1% was achieved, offering a significantly (p < 0.05) better bioavailability than the control system displaying a relative bioavailability of 8.1% The 6 kDa LMWH (300 IU) formulation displayed a relative bioavailability of 10.7% in contrast to the control displaying a relative bioavailability of 2.1%. In conclusion, these results suggest that mucoadhesive thiolated polymers are a promising tool for the non-invasive stomach-targeted systemic delivery of LMWH as model for a hydrophilic macromolecular polysaccharide. PMID:15793802

  19. Tumor Regression by Targeted Gene Delivery to the Neovasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, John D.; Bednarski, Mark; Frausto, Ricardo; Guccione, Samira; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Xiang, Rong; Cheresh, David A.

    2002-06-01

    Efforts to influence the biology of blood vessels by gene delivery have been hampered by a lack of targeting vectors specific for endothelial cells in diseased tissues. Here we show that a cationic nanoparticle (NP) coupled to an integrin ?v?3-targeting ligand can deliver genes selectively to angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing mice. The therapeutic efficacy of this approach was tested by generating NPs conjugated to a mutant Raf gene, ATP?-Raf, which blocks endothelial signaling and angiogenesis in response to multiple growth factors. Systemic injection of the NP into mice resulted in apoptosis of the tumor-associated endothelium, ultimately leading to tumor cell apoptosis and sustained regression of established primary and metastatic tumors.

  20. Luminescent/magnetic hybrid nanoparticles with folate-conjugated peptide composites for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian-Min; Guan, Xing-Mei; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Lan, Jing-Feng; Cheng, Ting; Zhang, Hai-Xia

    2012-05-16

    We developed a novel chitosan-based luminescent/magnetic hybrid nanoparticles with folate-conjugated tetrapeptide composites (CLMNPs-tetrapeptide-FA) by conjugation in situ. First, chitosan, CdTe quantum dots (QDs), and superparamagnetic iron oxide were directly gelled into ternary hybrid nanogels. Subsequently, tetrapeptides (GFFG and LGPV) and folate were conjugated orderly into the hybrid nanoparticles. The morphology, composition, and properties of the as-prepared copolymers have also been characterized and determined using TEM, EDX, XRD, FTIR spectra, DLS, fluorescence spectroscopy, VSM, and fluorescence microscopy imaging studies. The size range of the end product CLMNPs-tetrapeptide-FA copolymers was from 150 to 190 nm under simulated physiological environment. In vivo, the experimental results of magnetic accumulation showed that the copolymers could be trapped in the tumor tissue under magnetic guidance. Under the present experimental conditions, the loading efficiencies of CPT were approximately 8.6 wt % for CLMNPs-GFFG-FA and 1.1 wt % for CLMNPs-LGPV-FA, respectively. The CPT cumulative release under dialysis condition mainly occurred for the first 28 h, and could reach 55% at pH 5.3 and 46% at pH 7.4 from CPT-loaded CLMNPs-GFFG-FA, and 69% at pH 5.3 and 57% at pH 7.4 from CPT-loaded CLMNPs-LGPV-FA within 28 h, respectively. The hemolysis percentages (<2%) and coagulation properties of blank and CPT-loaded copolymers were within the scope of safe values. Compared to free CPT, the CPT-loaded CLMNPs-tetrapeptide-FA copolymers showed specific targeting to A549 cells in vitro. More than 75% viability in L02 cells were seen in CLMNPs-GFFG-FA and CLMNPs-LGPV-FA copolymer concentration of 500 ?g/mL, respectively. It was found that the two kinds of copolymers were transported into the A549 cells by a folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis mechanism. These results indicate that the multifunctional CLMNPs-tetrapeptide-FA copolymers possess a moderate CPT loading efficiency, low cytotoxicity, and favorable biocompatibility, and are promising candidates for tumor-targeted drug delivery. PMID:22486419

  1. Synergistic Antitumor Activity from Two-Stage Delivery of Targeted Toxins and Endosome-Disrupting Nanoparticles

    E-print Network

    Su, Xingfang

    Plant-derived Type I toxins are candidate anticancer therapeutics requiring cytosolic delivery into tumor cells. We tested a concept for two-stage delivery, whereby tumor cells precoated with an antibody-targeted gelonin ...

  2. Multifunctional DNA-gold nanoparticles for targeted doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Colleen M; Hamner, Kristen L; Maye, Mathew M; Dabrowiak, James C

    2014-07-16

    In this report we describe the synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxic properties of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles having attached folic acid (FA), a thermoresponsive polymer (p), and/or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers that could be used to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) in chemotherapy. The FA-DNA oligomer used in the construction of the delivery vehicle was synthesized through the reaction of the isolated folic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester with the amino-DNA and the conjugated DNA product was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This approach ultimately allowed control of the amount of FA attached to the surface of the delivery vehicle. Cytotoxicity studies using SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with drug loaded delivery vehicles were carried out using a variety of exposure times (1-48 h) and recovery times (1-72 h), and in order to access the effects of varying amounts of attached FA, in culture media deficient in FA. DOX loaded delivery vehicles having 50% of the DNA strands with attached FA were more cytotoxic than when all of the strands contained FA. Since FA stimulates cell growth, the reduced cytotoxicity of vehicles fully covered with FA suggests that the stimulatory effects of FA can more than compensate for the cytotoxic effects of the drug on the cell population. While attachment of hexa-ethylene glycol PEG(18) to the surface of the delivery vehicle had no effect on cytotoxicity, 100% FA plus the thermoresponsive polymer resulted in IC50 = 0.48 ± 0.01 for an exposure time of 24 h and a recovery time of 1 h, which is an order of magnitude more cytotoxic than free DOX. Confocal microscopic studies using fluorescence detection showed that SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells exposed to DOX-loaded vehicles have drug accumulation inside the cell and, in the case of vehicles with attached FA and thermoresponsive polymer, the drug appears more concentrated. Since the biological target of DOX is DNA, the latter observation is consistent with the high cytotoxicity of vehicles having both FA and the thermoresponsive polymer. The study highlights the potential of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for doxorubicin in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24911830

  3. Magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive hybrid nanogels for optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and triggered drug release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Yi, Jinhui; Mukherjee, Sumit; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2014-11-01

    The paper demonstrates a class of multifunctional core-shell hybrid nanogels with fluorescent and magnetic properties, which have been successfully developed for simultaneous optical temperature sensing, tumor cell imaging and magnetic/NIR-thermally responsive drug carriers. The as-synthesized hybrid nanogels were designed by coating bifunctional nanoparticles (BFNPs, fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core) with a thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) [poly(NIPAM-AAm)]-based hydrogel as the shell. The BFNPs in hybrid nanogels not only demonstrate excellent photoluminescence (PL) and photostability due to the fluorescent carbon dots embedded in the porous carbon shell, but also has targeted drug accumulation potential and a magnetic-thermal conversion ability due to the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals clustered in the core. The thermo-responsive poly(NIPAM-AAm)-based gel shell can not only modify the physicochemical environment of the BFNPs core to manipulate the fluorescence intensity for sensing the variation of the environmental temperature, but also regulate the release rate of the loaded anticancer drug (curcumin) by varying the local temperature of environmental media. In addition, the carbon layer of BFNPs can adsorb and convert the NIR light to heat, leading to a promoted drug release under NIR irradiation and improving the therapeutic efficacy of drug-loaded hybrid nanogels. Furthermore, the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals in the core of BFNPs can trigger localized heating using an alternating magnetic field, leading to a phase change in the polymer gel to trigger the release of loaded drugs. Finally, the multifunctional hybrid nanogels can overcome cellular barriers to enter the intracellular region and light up the mouse melanoma B16F10 cells. The demonstrated hybrid nanogels would be an ideal system for the biomedical applications due to their excellent optical properties, magnetic properties, high drug loading capacity and responsive drug release behavior. PMID:25243783

  4. Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Spatial and Temporal Control

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

  5. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  6. Design and Application of Nanogel-Based Polymer Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dailing, Eric Alan

    Crosslinked polymer networks have wide application in biomaterials, from soft hydrogel scaffolds for cell culture and tissue engineering to glassy, high modulus dental restoratives. Composite materials formed with nanogels as a means for tuning network structure on the nanoscale have been reported, but no investigation into nanogels as the primary network component has been explored to this point. This thesis was dedicated to studying network formation from the direct polymerization of nanogels and investigating applications for these unique materials. Covalently crosslinked polymer networks were synthesized from polymerizable nanogels without the use of reactive small monomers or oligomers. Network properties were controlled by the chemical and physical properties of the nanogel, allowing for materials to be designed from nanostructured macromolecular precursors. Nanogels were synthesized from a thermally initiated solution free radical polymerization of a monomethacrylate, a dimethacrylate, and a thiol-based chain transfer agent. Monomers with a range of hydrophilic and hydrophobic character were copolymerized, and polymerizable groups were introduced through an alcohol-isocyanate click reaction. Nanogels were dispersible in water up to 75 wt%, including nanogels that contained a relatively high fraction of a conventionally water-insoluble component. Nanogels with molecular weights that ranged from 10's to 100's of kDa and hydrodynamic radii between 4 and 10 nm were obtained. Macroscopic crosslinked polymer networks were synthesized from the photopolymerization of methacrylate-functionalized nanogels in inert solvent, which was typically water. The nanogel composition and internal branching density affected both covalent and non-covalent interparticle interactions, which dictated the final mechanical properties of the networks. Nanogels with progressively disparate hydrophilic and hydrophobic character were synthesized to explore the potential for creating densely crosslinked, small monomer free dental materials. Nanogel-based networks showed no decrease in flexural modulus between the dry and water-equilibrated states in contrast to nanogel-monomer composites that exhibited a decrease in modulus upon water infiltration. The nanogel networks also exhibited higher conversion and lower volumetric shrinkage compared to the composite networks. Adhesive nanogels were designed with amphiphilic character and specific hydrogen-bonding groups. These nanogels gelled within 10 s of low intensity UV light exposure and demonstrated the ability to bond strongly to both hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates that were dry or under water. Nanogel-based coatings were explored as a means to create multistructured, multifunctional polymer networks. Shape memory polymers were coated with nanogels through a dip-coating and subsequent photocrosslinking method. The presence of the coating did not affect the shape recovery of the polymer, and coatings formed with dexamethasone-loaded nanogels were demonstrated to release a physiologically relevant amount of the anti-inflammatory drug. These materials have potential application as minimally invasive implantable devices. Coatings were also formed from interfacial redox polymerizations. Nanogels with varying crosslinking density were coated onto dexamethasone-loaded networks, which had the effect of changing the diffusion coefficient of dexamethasone as it was released from the core network. A fluorescein-loaded nanogel was coated onto a rhodamine-loaded network, which provided multidrug release from both the coating and the core material through two distinct release profiles.

  7. Thermally Switched Release from a Nanogel-in-Microfiber Device.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Guangliang; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Shaobing

    2015-08-01

    A nanogel-in-microfiber device, whose release can be switched on and off in response to a temperature change, is successfully developed. The release behaviors are realized through the deswelling and swelling of the nanogels in shell layer of fiber by alternatively elevating and lowering the environmental temperature. PMID:25998801

  8. Cubosomes as targeted drug delivery systems - a biopharmaceutical approach.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Naga M; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R; Vadlamudi, Harini C; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yaga, Gowri; K, Haritha

    2014-01-01

    Cubosomes are reversed bicontinuous cubic phases and possess unique physicochemical properties. These special systems are receiving much attention for the delivery of various hydrophilic, hydrophobic and amphiphilic drugs with enhanced bioavailability and high loading capacity. A wide variety of drugs are applicable for cubosome formulation for various routes of delivery. The lipids used in cubosome formulation are more stable and offer stability to the formulation during shelf-life. The article reviews about the back ground, techniques of cubosome preparation such as high pressure homogenization, probe ultrasonication and automated cubosome preparation; and also methods of cubosomes preparation such as top down, bottom up and other methods with pictorial presentation. This article emphasizes the phase transition and also targeted approaches of cubosomes. The characterization studies for cubosomes such as cryo transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy followed by in-vitro and in-vivo evaluation studies of cubosomes were explained with appropriate examples. Recent applications of cubosomes were explained with reference to flurbiprofen, odorranalectin, diazepam and dexamethasone. The advantages, disadvantages and limitations of cubosomal technology were emphasized. PMID:24836404

  9. Possibilities of acoustic thermometry for controlling targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anosov, A. A.; Nemchenko, O. Yu.; Less, Yu. A.; Kazanskii, A. S.; Mansfel'd, A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Model acoustic thermometry experiments were conducted during heating of an aqueous liposome suspension. Heating was done to achieve the liposome phase transition temperature. At the moment of the phase transition, the thermal acoustic signal achieved a maximum and decreased, despite continued heating. During subsequent cooling of the suspension, when lipids again passed through the phase transition point, the thermal acoustic signal again increased, despite a reduction in temperature. This effect is related to an increase in ultrasound absorption by the liposome suspension at the moment of the lipid phase transition. The result shows that acoustic thermography can be used to control targeted delivery of drugs mixed in thermally sensitive liposomes, the integrity of which is violated during heating to the phase transition temperature.

  10. Targeting tumor metastases: Drug delivery mechanisms and technologies.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy, Vidya; Moghe, Prabhas V; Roth, Charles M

    2015-12-10

    Primary sites of tumor are the focal triggers of cancers, yet it is the subsequent metastasis events that cause the majority of the morbidity and mortality. Metastatic tumor cells exhibit a phenotype that differs from that of the parent cells, as they represent a resistant, invasive subpopulation of the original tumor, may have acquired additional genetic or epigenetic alterations under exposure to prior chemotherapeutic or radiotherapeutic treatments, and reside in a microenvironment differing from that of its origin. This combination of resistant phenotype and distal location make tracking and treating metastases particularly challenging. In this review, we highlight some of the unique biological traits of metastasis, which in turn, inspire emerging strategies for targeted imaging of metastasized tumors and metastasis-directed delivery of therapeutics. PMID:26409123

  11. Target gene delivery from targeting ligand conjugated chitosan-PEI copolymer for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joung-Pyo; Nah, Jae-Woon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we designed a novel carrier which was having low cytotoxicity, site-specific target function, and high transfection efficiency using low molecular weight water soluble O-carboxymethyl chitosan (OCMCh), branched low molecular weight poly(ethyleneimine) (bPEI), and targeting ligand (epitope type, HER-2/neu). OCMCh/bPEI/targeting ligand, HPOCP copolymer, and targeting ligand-modified polyamphoteric polymer, and were prepared by chemical reaction and characterized by (1)H NMR and FT-IR. The binding affinity, protecting efficiency, and releasing ability of gene/HPOCP polyplex were confirmed by gel retardation assay. The pDNA(pEGFP)/HPOCP polyplexes showed high gene transfection efficiency in HCT 119 cell. In addition, siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes formed spherical shape and have particle sizes from 100 to 300nm. The siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes have lower cytotoxicity than PEI in the all of siRNA concentrations ranging from 0 to 2?g/?L in HEK 293 cells. The cell viability of siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes was performed in SK-Br3 cells with VEGF siRNA or BCL2 siRNA. In addition, confocal laser-scanning microscopy and flow cytometry assay were performed for cellular localization and cellular uptake efficiency of siRNA/HPOCP polyplexes. The results of the present study demonstrate that HPOCP copolymer is a good candidate as gene delivery carriers for gene delivery system or gene therapy. PMID:26453863

  12. Synthetic Aptamer-Polymer Hybrid Constructs for Programmed Drug Delivery into Specific Target Cells

    E-print Network

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Synthetic Aptamer-Polymer Hybrid Constructs for Programmed Drug Delivery into Specific Target Cells effective drug delivery with fewer side effects.8,9 The systems that have made the greatest progress. They achieve this by performing a coordinated series of complex functions, resulting in delivery that is far

  13. Reversible Masking Using Low-Molecular-Weight Neutral Lipids to Achieve Optimal-Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Nancy Smyth; Senzer, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Intravenous injection of therapeutics is required to effectively treat or cure metastatic cancer, certain cardiovascular diseases, and other acquired or inherited diseases. Using this route of delivery allows potential uptake in all disease targets that are accessed by the bloodstream. However, normal tissues and organs also have the potential for uptake of therapeutic agents. Therefore, investigators have used targeted delivery to attempt delivery solely to the target cells; however, use of ligands on the surface of delivery vehicles to target specific cell surface receptors is not sufficient to avoid nonspecific uptake. PEGylation has been used for decades to try to avoid nonspecific uptake but suffers from many problems known as “The PEGylation Dilemma.” We have solved this dilemma by replacing PEGylation with reversible masking using low-molecular-weight neutral lipids in order to achieve optimal-targeted delivery solely to target cells. Our paper will focus on this topic. PMID:22655199

  14. Magnetically responsive microparticles for targeted drug and radionuclide delivery.

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, M. D.; Ghebremeskel, A. N.; Nunez, L.; Kasza, K. E.; Chang, F.; Chien, T.-H.; Fisher, P. F.; Eastman, J. A.; Rosengart, A. J.; McDonald, L.; Xie, Y.; Johns, L.; Pytel, P.; Hafeli, U. O.

    2004-02-16

    We are currently investigating the use of magnetic particles--polymeric-based spheres containing dispersed magnetic nanocrystalline phases--for the precise delivery of drugs via the human vasculature. According to this review, meticulously prepared magnetic drug targeting holds promise as a safe and effective method of delivering drugs to specific organ, tissue or cellular targets. We have critically examined the wide range of approaches in the design and implementation of magnetic-particle-based drug delivery systems to date, including magnetic particle preparation, drug encapsulation, biostability, biocompatibility, toxicity, magnetic field designs, and clinical trials. However, we strongly believe that there are several limitations with past developments that need to be addressed to enable significant strides in the field. First, particle size has to be carefully chosen. Micrometer-sized magnetic particles are better attracted over a distance than nanometer sized magnetic particles by a constant magnetic field gradient, and particle sizes up to 1 {micro}m show a much better accumulation with no apparent side effects in small animal models, since the smallest blood vessels have an inner diameter of 5-7 {micro}m. Nanometer-sized particles <70 nm will accumulate in organ fenestrations despite an effective surface stabilizer. To be suitable for future human applications, our experimental approach synthesizes the magnetic drug carrier according to specific predefined outcome metrics: monodisperse population in a size range of 100 nm to 1.0 {micro}m, non-toxic, with appropriate magnetic properties, and demonstrating successful in vitro and in vivo tests. Another important variable offering possible improvement is surface polarity, which is expected to prolong particle half-life in circulation and modify biodistribution and stability of drugs in the body. The molecules in the blood that are responsible for enhancing the uptake of particles by the reticuloendothelial system (RES) prefer to associate with hydrophobic surfaces. Accordingly, we will tackle this challenge by modifying the particles with hydrophilic coatings such as PEG or poloxamer (co-polymers containing hydrophobic polyoxypropylene segments and repetitive polyoxyethylene hydrophilic groups), which have a proven ability to mask recognition by the RES. Modeling is needed to help optimize the performance of targeted magnetic-particle delivery, enhance its medicinal value, and expedite its medical application. To this end, scientists at Argonne National Laboratory, working with The University of Chicago and Cleveland Clinic Hospital, are working on an effective magnetic drug targeting system based on custom magnetic field designs coupled to a three-dimensional imaging platform that addresses all associated physical and theoretical problems. Furthermore, while our clinical trial results are encouraging with regard to the tolerance and applicability of the system, more improvements must be made with respect to future study designs and systems being used. Given the technical hurdles in developing this potentially important technology, we believe we have made great progress and that we have a strong developmental plan.

  15. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and without any attached support. As composites of aligned nanofibers, yarns potentially combine the inherent advantages of nanofibers with the strength and pliability of larger sized fibers. As such, we became interested in exploring the potential of nanofiber yarns as drug carriers. Our study evolved to accommodate comparative studies between the behavior of traditional nonwoven mats and nanofiber yarns. Throughout the process, we sought to answer the bigger question: Can guar galactomannan nanofibers be used as a new biodegradable platform for drug delivery?

  16. A hyaluronic acid nanogel for photo-chemo theranostics of lung cancer with simultaneous light-responsive controlled release of doxorubicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatun, Zehedina; Nurunnabi, Md; Nafiujjaman, Md; Reeck, Gerald R.; Khan, Haseeb A.; Cho, Kwang Jae; Lee, Yong-Kyu

    2015-06-01

    The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid nanogel) that exerts an activity with multiple effects: thermo and chemotherapeutic, real-time noninvasive imaging, and light-glutathione-responsive controlled drug release. The nanogel is mono-dispersed with an average diameter of 120 nm as observed by using TEM and a hydrodynamic size analyzer. It has excellent photo-luminescence properties and good stability in buffer and serum solutions. Graphene itself, being photoluminescent, can be considered an optical imaging contrast agent as well as a heat source when excited by laser irradiation. Thus the nanogel shows simultaneous thermo-chemotherapeutic effects on noninvasive optical imaging. We have also found that irradiation enhances the release of doxorubicin in a controlled manner. This release synergizes therapeutic activity of the nanogel in killing tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that the graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in the hyaluronic acid nanogel is very effective in killing the human lung cancer cell line (A549) with limited toxicity in the non-cancerous cell line (MDCK).The combined delivery of photo- and chemo-therapeutic agents is an emerging strategy to overcome drug resistance in treating cancer, and controlled light-responsive drug release is a proven tactic to produce a continuous therapeutic effect for a prolonged duration. Here, a combination of light-responsive graphene, chemo-agent doxorubicin and pH-sensitive disulfide-bond linked hyaluronic acid form a nanogel (called a graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in a hyaluronic acid nanogel) that exerts an activity with multiple effects: thermo and chemotherapeutic, real-time noninvasive imaging, and light-glutathione-responsive controlled drug release. The nanogel is mono-dispersed with an average diameter of 120 nm as observed by using TEM and a hydrodynamic size analyzer. It has excellent photo-luminescence properties and good stability in buffer and serum solutions. Graphene itself, being photoluminescent, can be considered an optical imaging contrast agent as well as a heat source when excited by laser irradiation. Thus the nanogel shows simultaneous thermo-chemotherapeutic effects on noninvasive optical imaging. We have also found that irradiation enhances the release of doxorubicin in a controlled manner. This release synergizes therapeutic activity of the nanogel in killing tumor cells. Our findings demonstrate that the graphene-doxorubicin conjugate in the hyaluronic acid nanogel is very effective in killing the human lung cancer cell line (A549) with limited toxicity in the non-cancerous cell line (MDCK). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: In vitro stability study method and results, FT-IR data, optical properties and thermal stability (TGA and DTA), cell image and in vivo optical image and histological images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01075f

  17. Preparation and characterisation of thermoresponsive nanogels for smart antibacterial fabrics.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Muhammad; Shah, Tahir; Rawal, Amit; Siores, Elias

    2014-07-01

    The present investigation involves the preparation and characterisation of silver containing nanogels and their incorporation onto the surface of woven fabrics so that they can be potentially used in biomedical applications such as wound dressings. These silver nanoparticles were mixed with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) based nanogels during and at the end of polymerisation process prior to their application onto the fabrics. NIPAM based nanogels were found to have a peak of lower critical solution temperature (LCST) that is close to the human body temperature. These nanogels were applied on cotton fabrics and cured for 15 h at 30°C. Silver based nanogels were padded onto the fabrics followed by drying at 30°C overnight. Scanning electron microscopy images have shown excellent distribution of silver nanoparticles on the fabric surface. EDX analysis was also conducted to confirm the presence of silver particles on the fabric surface. The results showed that a cotton fabric treated with silver based nanogels prevented the growth of bacteria, i.e. Gram-positive (Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli), on whereas the control cotton fabric samples exhibited considerable level of bacterial growth. Specifically, the nanogels in which the silver particles were added during the polymerisation process were observed to have higher antibacterial efficacy towards both types of bacteria. PMID:24857475

  18. Disulfide-Based Multifunctional Conjugates for Targeted Theranostic Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min Hee; Sessler, Jonathan L; Kim, Jong Seung

    2015-11-17

    Theranostics, chemical entities designed to combine therapeutic effects and imaging capability within one molecular system, have received considerable attention in recent years. Much of this interest reflects the promise inherent in personalized medicine, including disease-targeted treatments for cancer patients. One important approach to realizing this latter promise involves the development of so-called theranostic conjugates, multicomponent constructs that selectively target cancer cells and deliver cytotoxic agents while producing a readily detectable signal that can be monitored both in vitro and in vivo. This requires the synthesis of relatively complex systems comprising imaging reporters, masked chemotherapeutic drugs, cleavable linkers, and cancer targeting ligands. Ideally, the cleavage process should take place within or near cancer cells and be activated by cellular components that are associated with cancer states or specifically expressed at a higher level in cancer cells. Among the cleavable linkers currently being explored for the construction of such localizing conjugates, disulfide bonds are particularly attractive. This is because disulfide bonds are stable in most blood pools but are efficiently cleaved by cellular thiols, including glutathione (GSH) and thioredoxin (Trx), which are generally found at elevated levels in tumors. When disulfide bonds are linked to fluorophores, changes in emission intensity or shifts in the emission maxima are typically seen upon cleavage as the result of perturbations to internal charge transfer (ICT) processes. In well-designed systems, this allows for facile imaging. In this Account, we summarize our recent studies involving disulfide-based fluorescent drug delivery conjugates, including preliminary tests of their biological utility in vitro and in vivo. To date, a variety of chemotherapeutic agents, such as doxorubicin, gemcitabine, and camptothecin, have been used to create disulfide-based conjugates, as have a number of fluorophores, including naphthalimide, coumarin, BODIPY, rhodol, and Cy7. The resulting theranostic core (drug-disulfide-fluorophore) can be further linked to any of several site-localizing entities, including galactose, folate, biotin, and the RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide sequence, to create systems with an intrinsic selectivity for cancer cells over normal cells. Site-specific cleavage by endogenous thiols serves to release the cytotoxic drug and produce an easy-to-monitor change in the fluorescence signature of the cell. On the basis of the results summarized in this Account, we propose that disulfide-based cancer-targeting theranostics may have a role to play in advancing drug discovery efforts, as well as improving our understanding of cellular uptake and drug release mechanisms. PMID:26513450

  19. Engineering targeted proteins for intracellular delivery of biotherapeutics

    E-print Network

    Pirie, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Biotherapeutics have revolutionized medicine with their ability to achieve unprecedented molecular recognition and mediate complex biological responses. The intracellular delivery of biotherapeutics is an unmet scientific ...

  20. Metal Chelating Crosslinkers Form Nanogels with High Chelation Stability

    PubMed Central

    Elst, Luce Vander; Schopf, Eric; Mahmoud, Enas; Laurent, Sophie; Almutairi, Adah

    2013-01-01

    We present a series of hydrogel nanoparticles (nanogels) incorporating either acyclic or cyclic metal chelates as crosslinkers. These crosslinkers are used to formulate polyacrylamide-based nanogels (diameter 50 to 85 nm) yielding contrast agents with enhanced relaxivities (up to 6-fold greater than Dotarem®), because this nanogel structure slows the chelator's tumbling frequency and allows fast water exchange. Importantly, these nanogels also stabilize Gd3+ within the chelator thermodynamically and kinetically against metal displacement through transmetallation, which should reduce toxicity associated with release of free Gd3+. This chelation stability suggests that the chelate crosslinker strategy may prove useful for other applications of metal-chelating nanoparticles in medicine, including other imaging modalities and radiotherapy. PMID:24505553

  1. Delivery of drugs to intracellular organelles using drug delivery systems: Analysis of research trends and targeting efficiencies.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2015-12-30

    Targeting of drug delivery systems (DDSs) to specific intracellular organelles (i.e., subcellular targeting) has been investigated in numerous publications, but targeting efficiency of these systems is seldom reported. We searched scientific publications in the subcellular DDS targeting field and analyzed targeting efficiency and major formulation parameters that affect it. We identified 77 scientific publications that matched the search criteria. In the majority of these studies nanoparticle-based DDSs were applied, while liposomes, quantum dots and conjugates were used less frequently. The nucleus was the most common intracellular target, followed by mitochondrion, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. In 65% of the publications, DDSs surface was decorated with specific targeting residues, but the efficiency of this surface decoration was not analyzed in predominant majority of the studies. Moreover, only 23% of the analyzed publications contained quantitative data on DDSs subcellular targeting efficiency, while the majority of publications reported qualitative results only. From the analysis of publications in the subcellular targeting field, it appears that insufficient efforts are devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters and of the DDSs' intracellular fate. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for future studies in the field of organelle-specific drug delivery and targeting. PMID:26516100

  2. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    SciTech Connect

    Craciunescu, I.; Petran, A.; Turcu, R.; Daia, C.; Marinica, O.; Vekas, L.

    2013-11-13

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application.

  3. Stimuli responsive magnetic nanogels for biomedical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciunescu, I.; Petran, A.; Daia, C.; Marinica, O.; Vekas, L.; Turcu, R.

    2013-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanogels based on magnetite nanoparticles sterically stabilized by double layer oleic acid in water carrier and chemically cross linked poly (N-isopropylacril amide) (pNIPA) and poly (acrylic acid) (pAAc). In this structure the magnetite nanoparticles are attached to the flexible network chain by adhesive forces, resulting in a direct coupling between magnetic and elastic properties. Stable water suspensions of dual responsive magnetic nanogels based on temperature-responsive N-isopropyl acryl amide, pH responsive acrylic acid were obtained. The FTIR spectra of p(NIPA-AAc) ferrogel samples, showed the absorption region of the specific chemical groups associated with pNIPA, pAAc and the Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles. The morphology and the structure of the as prepared materials were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the size distribution was determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The magnetic microgels have high magnetization and superparamagnetic behaviour being suitable materials for biomedical application.

  4. Dual responsive PNIPAM-chitosan targeted magnetic nanopolymers for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Ramasamy, Shivaraman; Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Michael, Isaac; Therese, Helen Annal; Chennakesavulu, Ramasamy

    2015-04-01

    A dual stimuli sensitive magnetic hyperthermia based drug delivery system has been developed for targeted cancer treatment. Thermosensitive amine terminated poly-N-isopropylacrylamide complexed with pH sensitive chitosan nanoparticles was prepared as the drug carrier. Folic acid and fluorescein were tagged to the nanopolymer complex via N-hydroxysuccinimide and ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide reaction to form a fluorescent and cancer targeting magnetic carrier system. The formation of the polymer complex was confirmed using infrared spectroscopy. Gadolinium doped nickel ferrite nanoparticles prepared by a hydrothermal method were encapsulated in the polymer complex to form a magnetic drug carrier system. The proton relaxation studies on the magnetic carrier system revealed a 200% increase in the T1 proton relaxation rate. These magnetic carriers were loaded with curcumin using solvent evaporation method with a drug loading efficiency of 86%. Drug loaded nanoparticles were tested for their targeting and anticancer properties on four cancer cell lines with the help of MTT assay. The results indicated apoptosis of cancer cell lines within 3 h of incubation.

  5. MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jinming

    MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells Jagadeesh Setti micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased Rv 6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer

  6. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    PubMed

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins. PMID:22019910

  7. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

    2015-03-01

    A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:25656155

  8. Trans-splicing Ribozymes for Targeted Gene Delivery Uwe Kohler1

    E-print Network

    Haseloff, Jim

    Trans-splicing Ribozymes for Targeted Gene Delivery Uwe KoÈhler1 , Brian G. Ayre1 , Howard M, and cucumber mosaic virus, and demonstrated trans-splicing and delivery of a marker gene in Escherichia coli: Tetrahymena thermophila; gene therapy; HIV; CMV; bioassay*Corresponding author Introduction Self-splicing

  9. A light sensitive self-assembled nanogel as a tecton for protein patterning materials.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Tomoki; Takara, Masahiro; Mukai, Sada-Atsu; Sawada, Shin-Ichi; Sasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    A self-assembled nanogel is constructed from light-sensitive cholesteryl pullulan (Ls-CHP) by using photo-labile ortho-nitrobenzyl (o-NB) units. The nanogel-based film is obtained by evaporation of an Ls-CHP nanogel solution. Exposure of the resulting nanogel-based film to light with a mask resulted in a patterned film that can encapsulate FITC-insulin. PMID:26610266

  10. Targeted delivery of a cisplatin prodrug for safer and more effective prostate cancer therapy in vivo

    E-print Network

    Dhar, Shanta

    Targeted delivery and controlled release of inactive platinum (Pt) prodrugs may offer a new approach to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the Pt family of drugs, which are used to treat 50% of all cancers today. ...

  11. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

  12. A Nonpolycationic Fully Proteinaceous Multiagent System for Potent Targeted Delivery of siRNA

    E-print Network

    Liu, David V.

    Protein-based methods of targeted short-interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery have the potential to solve some of the problems faced by nanoparticle-based methods, such as poor pharmacokinetics and biodistribution, low tumor ...

  13. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Mortensen, Luke J.

    The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery ...

  14. Targeted Stimuli-Responsive Dextran Conjugates for Doxorubicin Delivery to Hepatocytes

    E-print Network

    Zaman, Noreen T.

    A targeted, stimuli-responsive, polymeric drug delivery vehicle has been developed to help alleviate the severe side-effects caused by narrow therapeutic window drugs. Doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent ...

  15. Biomimetic nanoassembly for targeted antigen delivery and enhanced Th1-type immune response.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Dong, Kai; Zhang, Yan; Ju, Enguo; Chen, Zhaowei; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-11-14

    A new type of biomimetic nanoassembly for targeted antigen delivery and enhanced Th1-type response is reported for the first time, to combat the major challenges in the treatment of infected cells. PMID:26383825

  16. Near Infrared-Sensitive Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Tan, Mei Chee

    The invasive nature and undesirable side-effects related to conventional cancer therapy, such as surgery and chemotherapy, have led to the development of novel drug delivery systems (DDS). A minimally invasive DDS using ...

  17. Protocells and their use for targeted delivery of multicomponent cargos to cancer cells

    DOEpatents

    Brinker, C Jeffrey; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Jiang, Xingmao; Liu, Juewen; Peabody, David S; Wharton, Walker Richard; Carnes, Eric; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L

    2015-03-31

    Various embodiments provide materials and methods for synthesizing protocells for use in targeted delivery of cargo components to cancer cells. In one embodiment, the lipid bilayer can be fused to the porous particle core to form a protocell. The lipid bilayer can be modified with targeting ligands or other ligands to achieve targeted delivery of cargo components that are loaded within the protocell to a target cell, e.g., a type of cancer. Shielding materials can be conjugated to the surface of the lipid bilayer to reduce undesired non-specific binding.

  18. Nanostructured lipid carriers and their current application in targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Piyush; Gidwani, Bina; Vyas, Amber

    2014-05-01

    In the last few decades, various drug-delivery technologies have emerged and a fascinating part of this has been the development of nanoscale drug delivery devices. Nanoparticles (NPs) and other colloidal drug-delivery systems modify the kinetics, drug distribution in the body and release profile of an associated drug. Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) have been reported to be an alternative system to emulsions, liposomes, microparticles, solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and their polymeric counterparts due to their numerous advantages. This paper basically reviews the types of NLCs, mechanism of skin penetration, stability related issues along with their production techniques, characterisation and applications towards targeted drug delivery. PMID:24813223

  19. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Badshah, Shaikh Atik; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  20. Progress and Challenges in Developing Aptamer-Functionalized Targeted Drug Delivery Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Biao; Lu, Jun; Li, Fangfei; Li, Defang; Liang, Chao; Dang, Lei; Liu, Jin; He, Bing; Atik Badshah, Shaikh; Lu, Cheng; He, Xiaojuan; Guo, Baosheng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing; Tan, Weihong; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2015-01-01

    Aptamers, which can be screened via systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), are superior ligands for molecular recognition due to their high selectivity and affinity. The interest in the use of aptamers as ligands for targeted drug delivery has been increasing due to their unique advantages. Based on their different compositions and preparation methods, aptamer-functionalized targeted drug delivery systems can be divided into two main categories: aptamer-small molecule conjugated systems and aptamer-nanomaterial conjugated systems. In this review, we not only summarize recent progress in aptamer selection and the application of aptamers in these targeted drug delivery systems but also discuss the advantages, challenges and new perspectives associated with these delivery systems. PMID:26473828

  1. Ferri-liposomes as an MRI-visible drug-delivery system for targeting tumours and their

    E-print Network

    Bogyo, Matthew

    Ferri-liposomes as an MRI-visible drug-delivery system for targeting tumours-invasively monitor drug delivery in vivo. We also visualize the targeting of the tumour microenvironment by the drug substantially reduced the size of the tumour compared with systemic delivery of the same drug. C ancer

  2. 31S. Svenson and R.K. Prud'homme (eds.), Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery Applications: Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery, Nanostructure Science and Technology,

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Jianjun

    31S. Svenson and R.K. Prud'homme (eds.), Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery) for their usage in the clinic [9]. The report of the first lipo- somal drug delivery system dates back to the 1960 Applications: Imaging, Targeting, and Delivery, Nanostructure Science and Technology, DOI 10

  3. Cell targeted gene delivery system based on modified pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus pectin modified with various amine groups have been studied for its potential as a novel non-viral gene delivery carrier. The modified cationic pectin was able to condense DNA and mediate transfection in a cell type specific manner. The modified pectin seems to be a promising carrier, attra...

  4. Plasmid DNA nanogels as photoresponsive materials for multifunctional bio-applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Queiroz, João

    2015-05-20

    This study provides a detailed description on the synthesis and characterization of novel polyamine plasmid DNA nanogels. Ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether was used as cross-linker, in conjugation with polyamines to promote pDNA condensation. The biocompatible nanovectors exhibit a unique swelling behavior in water and salt solutions. These systems are light photodegradable allowing their use in a broad range of biotechnological applications. Different plasmids, pVAX1-LacZ and pcDNA3-FLAG-p53, and anticancer drugs were, thus, efficiently loaded in the nanogels and their controlled release was demonstrated. Furthermore, the dual delivery of pcDNA3-FLAG-p53 gene and anticancer drugs illustrates the possibility of the combination of chemical and gene therapies. This new versatile and easy method of nanohydrogels preparation provides a potential synthetic approach for the design of tunable systems which can display multiple functions, sensitivity to different stimuli and exhibit programmed responses as well. PMID:25449013

  5. Organ-targeted high-throughput in vivo biologics screen identifies materials for RNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tsung-Yao; Shi, Peng; Steinmeyer, Joseph D.; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Tillberg, Paul; Love, Kevin T.; Eimon, Peter M.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Therapies based on biologics involving delivery of proteins, DNA, and RNA are currently among the most promising approaches. However, although large combinatorial libraries of biologics and delivery vehicles can be readily synthesized, there are currently no means to rapidly characterize them in vivo using animal models. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput in vivo screening of biologics and delivery vehicles by automated delivery into target tissues of small vertebrates with developed organs. Individual zebrafish larvae are automatically oriented and immobilized within hydrogel droplets in an array format using a microfluidic system, and delivery vehicles are automatically microinjected to target organs with nearly perfect repeatability and precision. We screened a library of lipid-like delivery vehicles for their ability to facilitate the expression of protein-encoding RNAs in the central nervous system. We discovered delivery vehicles that are effective in both larval zebrafish and rats. Our results showed that the in vivo zebrafish model can be significantly more predictive of both false positives and false negatives in mammals than in vitro mammalian cell culture assays. Our screening results also suggest certain structure-activity relationship, which can potentially be applied to design novel delivery vehicles. PMID:25184623

  6. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using ?PAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer. PMID:22571485

  7. Protein engineering for targeted delivery of radionuclides to tumors

    E-print Network

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis

    2010-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatment strategies include systemic chemotherapy, external beam radiation, and surgical excision. Chemotherapy is nonspecific, and targets all rapidly dividing cells. External beam radiation and surgery ...

  8. Computational design of nanoparticle drug delivery systems for selective targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Bevan, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ?R, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ?L. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues.Ligand-functionalized nanoparticles capable of selectively binding to diseased versus healthy cell populations are attractive for improved efficacy of nanoparticle-based drug and gene therapies. However, nanoparticles functionalized with high affinity targeting ligands may lead to undesired off-target binding to healthy cells. In this work, Monte Carlo simulations were used to quantitatively determine net surface interactions, binding valency, and selectivity between targeted nanoparticles and cell surfaces. Dissociation constant, KD, and target membrane protein density, ?R, are explored over a range representative of healthy and cancerous cell surfaces. Our findings show highly selective binding to diseased cell surfaces can be achieved with multiple, weaker affinity targeting ligands that can be further optimized by varying the targeting ligand density, ?L. Using the approach developed in this work, nanomedicines can be optimally designed for exclusively targeting diseased cells and tissues. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Movie showing simulation renderings of targeted (?L = 1820/?m2, KD = 120 ?M) nanoparticle selective binding to cancer (?R = 256/?m2) vs. healthy (?R = 64/?m2) cell surfaces. Target membrane proteins have linear color scale depending on binding energy ranging from white when unbound (URL = 0) to red when tightly bound (URL = UM). See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03691g

  9. Magnetic Targeted Delivery of Dexamethasone Acetate across the Round Window Membrane in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; Chen, Kejian; Kuriyavar, Satish; Kopke, Richard D.; Grady, Brian P.; Bourne, David H.; Li, Wei; Dormer, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis Magnetically susceptible PLGA nanoparticles will effectively target the round window membrane (RWM) for delivery of dexamethasone-acetate (Dex-Ac) to the scala tympani. Background Targeted delivery of therapeutics to specific tissues can be accomplished using different targeting mechanisms. One technology includes iron oxide nanoparticles, susceptible to external magnetic fields. If a nanocomposite composed of biocompatible polymer (PLGA), magnetite, and Dex-Ac can be pulled into and across the mammalian RWM, drug delivery can be enhanced. Method In vitro targeting and release kinetics of PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac nanoparticles first were measured using a RWM model. Next, these optimized nanocomposites were targeted to the RWM by filling the niche in anesthetized guinea pigs. A permanent magnet was placed opposite the RWM for 1 hour. Cochlear soft tissues, perilymph, and RWM were harvested after euthanasia and steroid levels were measured using HPLC. Results Membrane transport, in vitro, proved optimal targeting using a lower particle magnetite concentration (1 versus 5 or 10 mg/ml). In vivo targeted PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac particles had an average size of 482.8 ± 158 nm (DLS) and an average zeta potential ?19.9 ± 3.3 mV. In 1 hour, there was significantly increased cochlear targeted delivery of Dex or Dex-Ac, compared with diffusion alone. Conclusion Superparamagnetic PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac nanoparticles under an external magnetic field (0.26 mT) for 1 hour significantly increased Dex-Ac delivery to the inner ear. The RWM was not completely permeated and also became loaded with nanocomposites, indicating that delivery to the cochlea would continue for weeks by PLGA degradation and passive diffusion. PMID:23187928

  10. Novel targeted bladder drug-delivery systems: a review

    PubMed Central

    Zacchè, Martino Maria; Srikrishna, Sushma; Cardozo, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The objective of pharmaceutics is the development of drugs with increased efficacy and reduced side effects. Prolonged exposure of the diseased tissue to the drug is of crucial importance. Drug-delivery systems (DDSs) have been introduced to control rate, time, and place of release. Drugs can easily reach the bladder through a catheter, while systemically administered agents may undergo extensive metabolism. Continuous urine filling and subsequent washout hinder intravesical drug delivery (IDD). Moreover, the low permeability of the urothelium, also described as the bladder permeability barrier, poses a major challenge in the development of the IDD. DDSs increase bioavailability of drugs, therefore improving therapeutic effect and patient compliance. This review focuses on novel DDSs to treat bladder conditions such as overactive bladder, interstitial cystitis, bladder cancer, and recurrent urinary tract infections. The rationale and strategies for both systemic and local delivery methods are discussed, with emphasis on new formulations of well-known drugs (oxybutynin), nanocarriers, polymeric hydrogels, intravesical devices, encapsulated DDSs, and gene therapy. We give an overview of current and future prospects of DDSs for bladder disorders, including nanotechnology and gene therapy. PMID:26649286

  11. Contact-facilitated drug delivery with Sn2 lipase labile prodrugs optimize targeted lipid nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dipanjan; Pham, Christine T N; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Tomasson, Michael H; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Sn2 lipase labile phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery offer an important advancement in Nanomedicine. Many drugs incorporated into nanosystems, targeted or not, are substantially lost during circulation to the target. However, favorably altering the pharmacokinetics and volume of distribution of systemic drug delivery can offer greater efficacy with lower toxicity, leading to new prolonged-release nanoexcipients. However, the concept of achieving Paul Erhlich's inspired vision of a 'magic bullet' to treat disease has been largely unrealized due to unstable nanomedicines, nanosystems achieving low drug delivery to target cells, poor intracellular bioavailability of endocytosed nanoparticle payloads, and the substantial biological barriers of extravascular particle penetration into pathological sites. As shown here, Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs in conjunction with contact-facilitated drug delivery prevent premature drug diffusional loss during circulation and increase target cell bioavailability. The Sn2 phospholipid prodrug approach applies equally well for vascular constrained lipid-encapsulated particles and micelles the size of proteins that penetrate through naturally fenestrated endothelium in the bone marrow or thin-walled venules of an inflamed microcirculation. At one time Nanomedicine was considered a 'Grail Quest' by its loyal opposition and even many in the field adsorbing the pains of a long-learning curve about human biology and particles. However, Nanomedicine with innovations like Sn2 phospholipid prodrugs has finally made 'made the turn' toward meaningful translational success. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2015, 8:85-106. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1355 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26296541

  12. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J.; Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D{sub 2} or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  13. Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. ); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. )

    1993-05-01

    The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D[sub 2] or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

  14. Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

  15. Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

    2010-01-01

    The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

  16. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  17. Cancer cell-targeted drug delivery utilizing oligopeptide transport activity.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, T; Tamai, I; Takaki, A; Tsuji, A

    2000-10-15

    To study the drug delivery to tumor by utilization of an oligopeptide transport activity, we examined the accumulation of dipeptides and the peptide-mimetic anti-cancer drug, bestatin, a substrate of oligopeptide transporter PepT1. Firstly, we established HeLa cells stably expressing human peptide transporter (hPepT1) (HeLa-hPepT1). Secondly, we constructed an experimental model by inoculation of HeLa-hPepT1 cells subcutaneously into Balb/c nu/nu mice to demonstrate the contribution of PepT1 to the tissue-selective drug delivery. The accumulations of a hydrolysis-resistant dipeptide [(3)H]carnosine and bestatin in solid tumors formed by HeLa-hPepT1 or HeLa-pcDNA3, which are transfected with vector DNA (pcDNA3) were measured. After I.V. administration, tissue-to-plasma concentration ratios (K(p)) of both compounds, in HeLa-hPepT1 tumor was significantly greater than that of [(14)C]inulin, a marker for extracellular fluid space, those of dipeptides in muscle, or those in HeLa-pcDNA3 tumor. Furthermore, bestatin exhibited growth inhibition of HeLa-hPepT1 in vitro. In vivo, repeated oral administration of bestatin for 28 days suppressed the growth of HeLa-hPepT1 tumor specifically. When HT-1080 cells, which may naturally express oligopeptide transport activity, were transplanted, K(p) of [(3)H]carnosine was significantly increased in comparison with that in muscle. In addition, oligopeptide transport activities among various human cell lines were examined. These results provide the first demonstration for the selective delivery of oligopeptides to tumors by specific oligopeptide transport activity. PMID:11004680

  18. Synthesis and characterization of biomimetic nanogels for immunorecognition.

    PubMed

    Silva, Claudia S O; Lansalot, Muriel; Garcia, Jaqueline Q; Taipa, M Ângela; Martinho, José M G

    2013-12-01

    Biomimetic nanoparticles are promising materials for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Cationic poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) nanogels containing charged amine groups brought by addition of 2-aminoethylmethacrylate hydrochloride (AEMH) or N-(3-aminopropyl) methacrylamide hydrochloride (APMH) as co-monomers were prepared by surfactant-free precipitation polymerization. The influence of the relative amount and mode of addition of the co-monomer on both the size and the amine group density of the nanogel particles was studied. Two nanogels, one prepared using APMH (1%mol/mol NIPAM, in batch) and another with AEMH (2%mol/mol NIPAM, by shot addition) as co-monomers, were selected for the covalent coupling of a Protein L-mimic ligand to free amine groups on the particles. The ability of the synthesized biomimetic nanoparticles for recognizing and binding human IgG (hIgG) molecules was assessed and the selectivity toward immunoglobulin molecules evaluated. PMID:23994750

  19. Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100?nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

  20. Dendritic polymer-based nanodevices for targeted drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Gurdag, Sezen; Khandare, Jayant; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2004-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers are unimolecular micellar nanostructures, characterized by globular shape ( ˜ 20 nm) and large density of functional groups at periphery. The tailorable end groups make them ideal for conjugation with drugs, ligands, and imagining agents, making them an attractive molecular nanodevices for drug delivery. Compared to linear polymers and nanoparticles, these nanodevices enter cells rapidly, carrying drugs and delivering them inside cells. Performance of nanodevices prepared for asthma and cancer drug delivery will be discussed. Our conjugation procedure produced very high drug payloads. Dendritic polymer-drug conjugates were very effective in transporting methotrexate (a chemotherapy drug) into both sensitive (CCRF-CEM cell line) and resistant cell line (CEM-MTX). The conjugate nanodevice was 3 times more effective than free drug in the sensitive line, and 9 times more effective in the resistant cell line (based on IC50). The physics of cell entry and drug release from these nanodevices are being investigated. The conjugates appear to enter cells through endocytosis, with the rate of entry dependent on end-group, molecular weight, the pH of the medium, and the cancerous nature of the cells.

  1. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively con-trolled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics). Conclusion The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent. PMID:23678437

  2. Cancer targeted therapeutics: From molecules to drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daxing; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-12-10

    The pitfall of all chemotherapeutics lies in drug resistance and the severe side effects experienced by patients. One way to reduce the off-target effects of chemotherapy on healthy tissues is to alter the biodistribution of drug. This can be achieved in two ways: Passive targeting utilizes shape, size, and surface chemistry to increase particle circulation and tumor accumulation. Active targeting employs either chemical moieties (e.g. peptides, sugars, aptamers, antibodies) to selectively bind to cell membranes or responsive elements (e.g. ultrasound, magnetism, light) to deliver its cargo within a local region. This article will focus on the systemic administration of anti-cancer agents and their ability to home to tumors and, if relevant, distant metastatic sites. PMID:26342659

  3. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  4. Tumor vasculature targeted photodynamic therapy for enhanced delivery of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Zipeng; Tang, Wei; Chuang, Yen-Jun; Todd, Trever; Zhang, Weizhong; Lin, Xin; Niu, Gang; Liu, Gang; Wang, Lianchun; Pan, Zhengwei; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Xie, Jin

    2014-06-24

    Delivery of nanoparticle drugs to tumors relies heavily on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. While many consider the effect to be equally effective on all tumors, it varies drastically among the tumors' origins, stages, and organs, owing much to differences in vessel leakiness. Suboptimal EPR effect represents a major problem in the translation of nanomedicine to the clinic. In the present study, we introduce a photodynamic therapy (PDT)-based EPR enhancement technology. The method uses RGD-modified ferritin (RFRT) as "smart" carriers that site-specifically deliver (1)O2 to the tumor endothelium. The photodynamic stimulus can cause permeabilized tumor vessels that facilitate extravasation of nanoparticles at the sites. The method has proven to be safe, selective, and effective. Increased tumor uptake was observed with a wide range of nanoparticles by as much as 20.08-fold. It is expected that the methodology can find wide applications in the area of nanomedicine. PMID:24806291

  5. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells

    Cancer.gov

    Current methods to deliver proteins into cells (e.g., using retrovirus, DNA transfection, protein transduction, microinjection, complexing the protein with lipids, etc.) have many shortcomings, such as lack of target specificity toxicity, or unwanted random integration into the host chromosome.

  6. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  7. The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

  8. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to mitochondria using mesoporous silica nanoparticle nanocarriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Qiuyu; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-10-01

    A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery.A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional synthesis and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05139h

  9. Functionalized triazolopeptoids--a novel class for mitochondrial targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Althuon, Daniela; Rönicke, Franziska; Fürniss, Daniel; Quan, Jasmin; Wellhöfer, Isabelle; Jung, Nicole; Schepers, Ute; Bräse, Stefan

    2015-04-14

    Here we introduce linear 1,4-triazolopeptoids as a novel class of cell penetrating peptidomimetics suitable as organ targeting molecular transporters of bioactive cargo. Repetitive triazole moieties with up to three residues were assembled on solid supports using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloadditions (CuAAC) in a submonomer approach. Depending on the lipophilicity of their side chain appendages the 1,4-triazolopeptoids showed either endosomal localization or a strong colocalization with the mitochondria of HeLa cells with moderate toxicity. While the basic triazolopeptoids mainly target the neuromast cells in zebrafish embryos, the lipophilic ones colocalize with either cartilage in the jaws and the blood vessel system. PMID:25739445

  10. Near-infrared-controlled, targeted hydrophobic drug-delivery system for synergistic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinjian; Liu, Zhen; Li, Zhenhua; Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-07-29

    Hydrophobicity has been an obstacle that hinders the use of many anticancer drugs. A critical challenge for cancer therapy concerns the limited availability of effective biocompatible delivery systems for most hydrophobic therapeutic anticancer drugs. In this study, we have developed a targeted near-infrared (NIR)-regulated hydrophobic drug-delivery platform based on gold nanorods incorporated within a mesoporous silica framework (AuMPs). Upon application of NIR light, the photothermal effect of the gold nanorods leads to a rapid rise in the local temperature, thus resulting in the release of the entrapped drug molecules. By integrating chemotherapy and photothermotherapy into one system, we have studied the therapeutic effects of camptothecin-loaded AuMP-polyethylene glycol-folic acid nanocarrier. Results revealed a synergistic effect in vitro and in vivo, which would make it possible to enhance the therapeutic effect of hydrophobic drugs and decrease drug side effects. Studies have shown the feasibility of using this nanocarrier as a targeted and noninvasive remote-controlled hydrophobic drug-delivery system with high spatial/temperal resolution. Owing to these advantages, we envision that this NIR-controlled, targeted drug-delivery method would promote the development of high-performance hydrophobic anticancer drug-delivery system in future clinical applications. PMID:23765904

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor mediated liposomal delivery system for targeted induction of apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Priyanka; Banerjee, Rajkumar; Narayan, Kumar Pranav

    2016-02-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) are nuclear hormone receptors that are ubiquitously present in all cell types and are known to mediate distinct physiological functions like regulating Na(+) and K(+) balance and water excretion. MRs are linked to cell proliferation and can be exploited for the targeted control of cell mass in cancer. The present study is aimed towards extending the concept of using MR ligand spironolactone for selective delivery of genes in cancer cells. The lipoplex (SP) has shown MR mediated targeted transfections as indicated by receptor down-regulation studies using MR antagonists and siRNA. SP-targeted delivery of genes resulted in apoptosis in cell-specific manner while free drug was found to be cytotoxic irrespective of the cancerous or non-cancerous nature. In conclusion, this study presents MR as a target for efficiently delivering anticancer genes and thereby treating cancer through MR-mediated pathway. PMID:26620075

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-29

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression. PMID:25091504

  13. Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2014-08-01

    Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

  14. Transferrin receptor-targeted theranostic gold nanoparticles for photosensitizer delivery in brain tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixit, Suraj; Novak, Thomas; Miller, Kayla; Zhu, Yun; Kenney, Malcolm E.; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is not only inefficient, but also nonspecific to brain stroma. These are major limitations in the effective treatment of brain cancer. Transferrin peptide (Tfpep) targeted gold nanoparticles (Tfpep-Au NPs) loaded with the photodynamic pro-drug, Pc 4, have been designed and compared with untargeted Au NPs for delivery of the photosensitizer to brain cancer cell lines. In vitro studies of human glioma cancer lines (LN229 and U87) overexpressing the transferrin receptor (TfR) show a significant increase in cellular uptake for targeted conjugates as compared to untargeted particles. Pc 4 delivered from Tfpep-Au NPs clusters within vesicles after targeting with the Tfpep. Pc 4 continues to accumulate over a 4 hour period. Our work suggests that TfR-targeted Au NPs may have important therapeutic implications for delivering brain tumor therapies and/or providing a platform for noninvasive imaging.

  15. Hydrodynamic modeling of targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel.

    PubMed

    Weng, Huei Chu

    2013-03-01

    Since the flow of a magnetic fluid could easily be influenced by an external magnetic field, its hydrodynamic modeling promises to be useful for magnetically controllable delivery systems. It is desirable to understand the flow fields and characteristics before targeted magnetic particles arrive at their destination. In this study, we perform an analysis for the effects of particles and a magnetic field on biomedical magnetic fluid flow to study the targeted magnetic-particle delivery in a blood vessel. The fully developed solutions of velocity, flow rate, and flow drag are derived analytically and presented for blood with magnetite nanoparticles at body temperature. Results reveal that in the presence of magnetic nanoparticles, a minimum magnetic field gradient (yield gradient) is required to initiate the delivery. A magnetic driving force leads to the increase in velocity and has enhancing effects on flow rate and flow drag. Such a magnetic driving effect can be magnified by increasing the particle volume fraction. PMID:24231820

  16. Biomolecular corona on nanoparticles: a survey of recent literature and its implications in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Ryan M.; Juettner, Vanessa V.; Hong, Seungpyo

    2014-01-01

    Achieving controlled cellular responses of nanoparticles (NP) is critical for the successful development and translation of NP-based drug delivery systems. However, precise control over the physicochemical and biological properties of NPs could become convoluted, diminished, or completely lost as a result of the adsorption of biomolecules to their surfaces. Characterization of the formation of the “biomolecular” corona has thus received increased attention due to its impact on NP and protein structure as well as its negative effect on NP-based targeted drug delivery. This review presents a concise survey of the recent literature concerning the importance of the NP-biomolecule corona and how it can be utilized to improve the in vivo efficacy of targeted delivery systems. PMID:25506050

  17. Computational and Pharmacological Target of Neurovascular Unit for Drug Design and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md. Mirazul; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic and highly selective permeable interface between central nervous system (CNS) and periphery that regulates the brain homeostasis. Increasing evidences of neurological disorders and restricted drug delivery process in brain make BBB as special target for further study. At present, neurovascular unit (NVU) is a great interest and highlighted topic of pharmaceutical companies for CNS drug design and delivery approaches. Some recent advancement of pharmacology and computational biology makes it convenient to develop drugs within limited time and affordable cost. In this review, we briefly introduce current understanding of the NVU, including molecular and cellular composition, physiology, and regulatory function. We also discuss the recent technology and interaction of pharmacogenomics and bioinformatics for drug design and step towards personalized medicine. Additionally, we develop gene network due to understand NVU associated transporter proteins interactions that might be effective for understanding aetiology of neurological disorders and new target base protective therapies development and delivery. PMID:26579539

  18. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

  19. Targeting blood–brain barrier changes during inflammatory pain: an opportunity for optimizing CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is the most significant obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight-junction protein complexes and, influx and efflux transporters) that restrict xenobiotic permeation. Pathophysiological stressors (i.e., peripheral inflammatory pain) can alter BBB tight junctions and transporters, which leads to drug-permeation changes. This is especially critical for opioids, which require precise CNS concentrations to be safe and effective analgesics. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters and intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This article summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present the greatest opportunity for controlling drug permeation and/or drug transport across the BBB in an effort to achieve optimal CNS opioid delivery. PMID:22468221

  20. Theranostic Nanoparticles Carrying Doxorubicin Attenuate Targeting Ligand Specific Antibody Responses Following Systemic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N.; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

  1. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

  2. TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PHARMACEUTICALS USING AN IN SILICO DOSIMETRY MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present an in silico dosimetry model which can be used for inhalation toxicology (risk assessment of inhaled air pollutants) and aerosol therapy ( targeted delivery of inhaled drugs). This work presents scientific and clinical advances beyond the development of the original in...

  3. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug Delivery Vehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    E-print Network

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu, Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-01-01

    Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug Deliverynano-LDL (nLDL) particle was developed and tested to determine its utility as a drug deliverynano-LDLs described here are taken up by LDLR and can serve as a drug delivery

  4. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  5. Acoustic Molecular Imaging and Targeted Drug Delivery with Perfluorocarbon Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanza, Gregory M.; Hughes, Michael. S.; Marsh, Jon N.; Scott, Michael J.; Zhang, Huiying; Lacy, Elizabeth K.; Allen, John S.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2005-03-01

    Advances in molecular biology and cellular biochemistry are providing new opportunities for diagnostic medical imaging to "see" beyond the anatomical manifestations of disease to the earliest biochemical signatures of disease. Liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticles provide inherent acoustic contrast when bound to targets, e.g., fibrin deposits in a thrombus, but unbound nanoparticles are undetectable. This nanoparticle platform may be further functionalized with paramagnetic metals, such as gadolinium, or radionuclides, with homing ligands, like anti-?v?3-integrins, and therapeutic agents. Acoustic imaging of densely distributed biomarkers, e.g., fibrin epitopes, is readily accommodated with fundamental imaging, but for sparse biomarkers, e.g., integrins, we have developed and implemented novel, nonlinear imaging techniques based upon information-theoretic receivers (i.e., thermodynamic receivers). These novel receivers allow sensitive direct imaging of contrast development.

  6. Characterization of Magnetic Viral Complexes for Targeted Delivery in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Almstätter, Isabella; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Settles, Marcus; Altomonte, Jennifer; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Ebert, Oliver; Plank, Christian; Braren, Rickmer

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are promising new agents in cancer therapy. Success of tumor lysis is often hampered by low intra-tumoral titers due to a strong anti-viral host immune response and insufficient tumor targeting. Previous work on the co-assembly of oncolytic virus particles (VPs) with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was shown to provide shielding from inactivating immune response and improve targeting by external field gradients. In addition, MNPs are detected by magnet resonance imaging (MRI) enabling non-invasive therapy monitoring. In this study two selected core-shell type iron oxide MNPs were assembled with adenovirus (Ad) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The selected MNPs were characterized by high r2 and r2* relaxivities and thus could be quantified non-invasively by 1.5 and 3.0 tesla MRI with a detection limit below 0.001 mM iron in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Assembly and cell internalization of MNP-VP complexes resulted in 81 - 97 % reduction of r2 and 35 - 82 % increase of r2* compared to free MNPs. The relaxivity changes could be attributed to the clusterization of particles and complexes shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In a proof-of-principle study the non-invasive detection of MNP-VPs by MRI was shown in vivo in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma model. In conclusion, MNP assembly and compartmentalization have a major impact on relaxivities, therefore calibration measurements are required for the correct quantification in biodistribution studies. Furthermore, our study provides first evidence of the in vivo applicability of selected MNP-VPs in cancer therapy. PMID:25897333

  7. Targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes to cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarty, Pavitra

    CD22 is broadly expressed on human B cell lymphomas. Monoclonal anti-CD22 antibodies (MAbs) alone, or coupled to toxins, have been used to selectively target these tumors both in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with xenografted human lymphomas and in patients. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attached to antibodies or peptides represent another approach to targeting cancer cells. CNTs convert absorbed near-infrared (NIR) light into heat, which can thermally ablate cells in the vicinity of the CNTs. We have made MAb-CNT constructs where the MAb was either noncovalently or covalently coupled to CNTs, and investigated their ability to bind specifically to cells and to thermally ablate them after exposure to NIR light. The specific binding of these MAb-CNT constructs to antigen-positive and antigen-negative cells was demonstrated in vitro by using CD22+CD25 - Daudi cells, CD22-CD25+ phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CNTs coupled non-covalently or covalently to either anti-CD22 or anti-CD25. We then demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs could bind to tumor cells expressing the relevant antigen but not to cells lacking the antigen. Furthermore we showed that, following exposure to NIR light, the cells could be thermally ablated. We also determined the stability of the MAb-CNTs in conditions designed to mimic the in vivo environment, i.e. mouse serum at 37°C. We then use the intrinsic Raman signature of CNTs to study the circulation and tissue distribution of intravenously injected MAb-CNTs in a murine xenograft model of lymphoma in vivo over a period of 24 hrs. We demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs have a short half-life in blood and that most of them are cleared by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). In the current embodiment, these constructs would therefore be of limited effectiveness in vivo.

  8. Targeted delivery of CCR2 antagonist to activated pulmonary endothelium prevents metastasis.

    PubMed

    Roblek, Marko; Calin, Manuela; Schlesinger, Martin; Stan, Daniela; Zeisig, Reiner; Simionescu, Maya; Bendas, Gerd; Borsig, Lubor

    2015-12-28

    Enhanced levels of the inflammatory chemokine CCL2 are known to correlate with increased tumorigenesis and metastases, and thereby poor prognosis for cancer patients. The CCL2-CCR2 chemokine axis was shown to facilitate the metastatic initiation through the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes and the activation of endothelial cells at metastatic sites. Both steps are required for efficient cancer cell trans-endothelial migration and seeding in the targeted tissue. The translation of preclinical evidence proved to be challenging due to systemic effects of chemokine inhibition and limited target specificity. Here we tested an approach of a targeted delivery of the CCR2 antagonist Teijin Compound 1 to metastatic sites. VCAM-1 binding peptide tagged liposomes carrying the CCR2 antagonist enabled a specific delivery to cancer cell-activated endothelium. The subsequent binding of target-sensitive liposomes triggered the release of the Teijin Compound 1 and thereby local inhibition of CCR2 in the lungs. Blocking of CCR2 resulted in reduced induction of the lungs vascular permeability, and thereby reduced tumor cell extravasation. However, the recruitment of inflammatory monocytes to the pre-metastatic lungs remained unaltered. Endothelial VCAM-1 targeted delivery of the CCR2 antagonist resulted in inhibition of pulmonary metastases both in a murine (MC-38GFP cells) and a human xenograft (patient-derived cells) model. Thus, timely- and spatially-defined inhibition of CCR2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic approach for treatment of metastasis without affecting homeostatic functions. PMID:26522070

  9. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

    2014-01-01

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

  10. Targeted delivery of EV peptide to tumor cell cytoplasm using lipid coated calcium carbonate nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Kyoon; Foote, Michael B; Huang, Leaf

    2013-07-01

    Intracellular-acting peptide drugs are effective for inhibiting cytoplasmic protein targets, yet face challenges with penetrating the cancer cell membrane. We have developed a lipid nanoparticle formulation that utilizes a pH-sensitive calcium carbonate complexation mechanism to enable the targeted delivery of the intracellular-acting therapeutic peptide EEEEpYFELV (EV) into lung cancer cells. Lipid-calcium-carbonate (LCC) nanoparticles were conjugated with anisamide, a targeting ligand for the sigma receptor which is expressed on lung cancer cells. LCC EV nanoparticle treatment provoked severe apoptotic effects in H460 non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro. LCC NPs also mediated the specific delivery of Alexa-488-EV peptide to tumor tissue in vivo, provoking a high tumor growth retardation effect with minimal uptake by external organs and no toxic effects. PMID:22796364

  11. Targeted in vivo delivery of siRNA and an endosome-releasing agent to hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sebestyén, Magdolna G; Wong, So C; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Lewis, David L; Wooddell, Christine I

    2015-01-01

    The discoveries of RNA interference (RNAi) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have provided the opportunity to treat diseases in a fundamentally new way: by co-opting a natural process to inhibit gene expression at the mRNA level. Given that siRNAs must interact with the cells' natural RNAi machinery in order to exert their silencing effect, one of the most fundamental requirements for their use is efficient delivery to the desired cell type and, specifically, into the cytoplasm of those cells. Numerous research efforts involving the testing of a large number of delivery approaches using various carrier molecules and inventing several distinct formulation technologies during the past decade illustrate the difficulty and complexity of this task. We have developed synthetic polymer formulations for in vivo siRNA delivery named Dynamic PolyConjugates™ (DPCs) that are designed to mimic the features viruses possess for efficient delivery of their nucleic acids. These include small size, long half-life in circulation, capability of displaying distinct host cell tropism, efficient receptor binding and cell entry, disassembly in the endosome and subsequent release of the nucleic acid cargo to the cytoplasm. Here we present an example of this delivery platform composed of a hepatocyte-targeted endosome-releasing agent and a cholesterol-conjugated siRNA (chol-siRNA). This delivery platform forms the basis of ARC-520, an siRNA-based therapeutic for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In this chapter, we provide a general overview of the steps in developing ARC-520 and detailed protocols for two critical stages of the discovery process: (1) verifying targeted in vivo delivery to hepatocytes and (2) evaluating in vivo drug efficacy using a mouse model of chronic HBV infection. PMID:25319651

  12. Reiterated Targeting Peptides on the Nanoparticle Surface Significantly Promote Targeted Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Gene Delivery to Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Dong; Yang, Mingying; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin

    2015-12-14

    Nonviral gene delivery vectors hold great promise for gene therapy due to the safety concerns with viral vectors. However, the application of nonviral vectors is hindered by their low transfection efficiency. Herein, in order to tackle this challenge, we developed a nonviral vector integrating lipids, sleeping beauty transposon system and 8-mer stem cell targeting peptides for safe and efficient gene delivery to hard-to-transfect mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The 8-mer MSC-targeting peptides, when synthetically reiterated in three folds and chemically presented on the surface, significantly promoted the resultant lipid-based nanoparticles (LBNs) to deliver VEGF gene into MSCs with a high transfection efficiency (?52%) and long-lasting gene expression (for longer than 170 h) when compared to nonreiterated peptides. However, the reiterated stem cell targeting peptides do not enable the highly efficient gene transfer to other control cells. This work suggests that the surface presentation of the reiterated stem cell-targeting peptides on the nonviral vectors is a promising method for improving the efficiency of cell-specific nonviral gene transfection in stem cells. PMID:26588028

  13. Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system

    SciTech Connect

    Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. )

    1990-04-01

    Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

  14. Synthesis of surfactant-free hydroxypropylcellulose nanogel and its dual-responsive properties.

    PubMed

    An, Dong; Zhao, Di; Li, Xueting; Lu, Xihua; Qiu, Gao; Shea, Kenneth J

    2015-12-10

    Surfactant-free hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) nanogels were synthesized by using thermo-sensitive HPC as a template to form HPC/PMAA nanoscale complex. The formation mechanism was owing to the interpolymer hydrogen bonding between HPC and PMAA induced phase transition of HPC in aqueous media. The average size of the resulting HPC nanogels ranges from about 98 to 241nm. It was found that the average size of HPC nanogels changed little with increasing polymerization temperature below 26°C, whereas it greatly increased above 26°C. When the concentration of HPC was increased from 0.1 to 0.9wt.%, the diameter of nanogels decreased firstly and then increased. Besides, an increasing crosslinker BIS concentration led to a reduced size of HPC nanogels, and the nanogels had the narrowest size distribution when its concentration was 0.1wt.%. In addition to intrinsic thermo-sensitivity, HPC nanogels also display pH-induced phase transition due to pH-responsive PMAA contained in HPC nanogels. Surfactant-free, dual-responsive HPC nanogels would have promising applications in biotechnology and nanomedicine. PMID:26428138

  15. MSCs: Delivery Routes and Engraftment, Cell-Targeting Strategies, and Immune Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Kean, Thomas J.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Dennis, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being widely investigated both in the lab and in clinical trials for multiple disease states. The differentiation, trophic, and immunomodulatory characteristics of MSCs contribute to their therapeutic effects. Another often overlooked factor related to efficacy is the degree of engraftment. When reported, engraftment is generally low and transient in nature. MSC delivery methods should be tailored to the lesion being treated, which may be local or systemic, and customized to the mechanism of action of the MSCs, which can also be local or systemic. Engraftment efficiency is enhanced by using intra-arterial delivery instead of intravenous delivery, thus avoiding the “first-pass” accumulation of MSCs in the lung. Several methodologies to target MSCs to specific organs are being developed. These cell targeting methodologies focus on the modification of cell surface molecules through chemical, genetic, and coating techniques to promote selective adherence to particular organs or tissues. Future improvements in targeting and delivery methodologies to improve engraftment are expected to improve therapeutic results, extend the duration of efficacy, and reduce the effective (MSC) therapeutic dose. PMID:24000286

  16. Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

  17. Colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems: design trends and approaches.

    PubMed

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS. PMID:26070545

  18. A smart polymeric platform for multistage nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Li, Lian; Zhu, Xi; Guan, Shan; Yang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell nucleus-targeted delivery of antitumor agents is of great interest in cancer therapy, since the nucleus is one of the most frequent targets of drug action. Here we report a smart polymeric conjugate platform, which utilizes stimulus-responsive strategies to achieve multistage nuclear drug delivery upon systemic administration. The conjugates composed of a backbone based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer and detachable nucleus transport sub-units that sensitive to lysosomal enzyme. The sub-units possess a biforked structure with one end conjugated with the model drug, H1 peptide, and the other end conjugated with a novel pH-responsive targeting peptide (R8NLS) that combining the strength of cell penetrating peptide and nuclear localization sequence. The conjugates exhibited prolonged circulation time and excellent tumor homing ability. And the activation of R8NLS in acidic tumor microenvironment facilitated tissue penetration and cellular internalization. Once internalized into the cell, the sub-units were unleashed for nuclear transport through nuclear pore complex. The unique features resulted in 50-fold increase of nuclear drug accumulation relative to the original polymer-drug conjugates in vitro, and excellent in vivo nuclear drug delivery efficiency. Our report provides a strategy in systemic nuclear drug delivery by combining the microenvironment-responsive structure and detachable sub-units. PMID:26142775

  19. DNA and aptamer stabilized gold nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Celli, Anna; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Ma, Jeffrey; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

    2014-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00019f

  20. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-11-14

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5(th) most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein, ganglioside GM1 cell surface ligand, epidermal growth factor receptor receptors, monoclonal antibodies, retinoic acid receptors, integrin receptors targeted by Arg-Gly-Asp peptide, folate, and transferrin receptors are the most widely studied cell surface receptors which are used for the site specific delivery of drugs and siRNA-based therapeutics in HCC and discussed in detail in this article. PMID:26576089

  1. Nanoparticles for targeted delivery of therapeutics and small interfering RNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Farzan, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the 5th most common malignancy which is responsible for more than half million annual mortalities; also, it is the third leading cause of cancer related death. Unfavorable systemic side-effects of chemotherapeutic agents and susceptibility to the degradation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which can knock down a specific gene involved in the disease, have hampered their clinical application. So, it could be beneficial to develop an efficient carrier for the stabilization and specific delivery of drugs and siRNA to cells. Targeted nanoparticles have gained considerable attention as an efficient drug and gene delivery system, which is due to their capability in achieving the highest accumulation of cytotoxic agents in tumor tissue, modifiable drug pharmacokinetic- and bio-distribution, improved effectiveness of treatment, and limited side-effects. Recent studies have shed more light on the advantages of novel drug loaded carrier systems vs free drugs. Most of the animal studies have reported improvement in treatment efficacy and survival rate using novel carrier systems. Targeted delivery may be achieved passively or actively. In passive targeting, no ligand as homing device is used, while targeting is achieved by incorporating the therapeutic agent into a macromolecule or nanoparticle that passively reaches the target organ. However, in active targeting, the therapeutic agent or carrier system is conjugated to a tissue or cell-specific receptor which is over-expressed in a special malignancy using a ligand called a homing device. This review covers a broad spectrum of targeted nanoparticles as therapeutic and non-viral siRNA delivery systems, which are developed for enhanced cellular uptake and targeted gene silencing in vitro and in vivo and their characteristics and opportunities for the clinical applications of drugs and therapeutic siRNA are discussed in this article. Asialoglycoprotein receptors, low-density lipoprotein, ganglioside GM1 cell surface ligand, epidermal growth factor receptor receptors, monoclonal antibodies, retinoic acid receptors, integrin receptors targeted by Arg-Gly-Asp peptide, folate, and transferrin receptors are the most widely studied cell surface receptors which are used for the site specific delivery of drugs and siRNA-based therapeutics in HCC and discussed in detail in this article. PMID:26576089

  2. Phage display: development of nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Bakhshinejad, Babak; Karimi, Marzieh; Khalaj-Kondori, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The blood brain barrier represents a formidable obstacle for the transport of most systematically administered neurodiagnostics and neurotherapeutics to the brain. Phage display is a high throughput screening strategy that can be used for the construction of nanomaterial peptide libraries. These libraries can be screened for finding brain targeting peptide ligands. Surface functionalization of a variety of nanocarriers with these brain homing peptides is a sophisticated way to develop nanobiotechnology-based drug delivery platforms that are able to cross the blood brain barrier. These efficient drug delivery systems raise our hopes for the diagnosis and treatment of various brain disorders in the future. PMID:26199590

  3. Targeted drug delivery into reversibly injured myocardium with silica nanoparticles: surface functionalization, natural biodistribution, and acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Galagudza, Michael M; Korolev, Dmitry V; Sonin, Dmitry L; Postnov, Viktor N; Papayan, Garry V; Uskov, Ivan S; Belozertseva, Anastasia V; Shlyakhto, Eugene V

    2010-01-01

    The clinical outcome of patients with ischemic heart disease can be significantly improved with the implementation of targeted drug delivery into the ischemic myocardium. In this paper, we present our original findings relevant to the problem of therapeutic heart targeting with use of nanoparticles. Experimental approaches included fabrication of carbon and silica nanoparticles, their characterization and surface modification. The acute hemodynamic effects of nanoparticle formulation as well as nanoparticle biodistribution were studied in male Wistar rats. Carbon and silica nanoparticles are nontoxic materials that can be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. Concepts of passive and active targeting can be applied to the development of targeted drug delivery to the ischemic myocardial cells. Provided that ischemic heart-targeted drug delivery can be proved to be safe and efficient, the results of this research may contribute to the development of new technologies in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20463939

  4. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that functional proteins can be delivered intracellularly in vitro using nanoparticles and used to target key signaling proteins and regulate cell signaling pathways. The same concept of naturally occurring protein-protein interactions can also be implemented to selectively bring intracellular protein targets in close proximity to proteasomal degradation machinery in cells and effect their depletion from the cellular compartments. This approach will be able to not only target entire pool of proteins to ubiquitination-mediated degradation, but also to specific sub-pools of posttranslationally modified proteins in the cell, provided peptides having distinct binding affinities are identified for posttranslational modifications. This system can then be tested for intracellular protein delivery using nanoparticle carriers to identify roles of different posttranslational modifications on the protein's activity. In future work, we propose to develop a cellular detection system, based on GFP complementation, which can be used to evaluate the efficiency of different protein delivery carriers to internalize proteins into the cell cytosol. We envision the application of nanoscale materials as intracellular protein delivery vehicles to target diverse cell signaling pathways at the posttranslational level, and subsequent metabolic manipulation, which may have interesting therapeutic properties and can potentially target stem cell fate.

  5. LIPOSOMAL MODULAR COMPLEXES FOR SIMULTANEOUS TARGETED DELIVERY OF BIOACTIVE GASES AND THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Klegerman, Melvin E.; Wassler, Michael; Huang, Shao-Ling; Zou, Yuejiao; Kim, Hyunggun; Shelat, Harnath S.; Holland, Christy K.; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Intrinsically echogenic liposomes (ELIP) can be adapted to encapsulate nitric oxide to facilitate ultrasound-enhanced delivery of therapeutic agents to atherosclerotic plaques. However, the NO loading of targeted ELIP caused a 93% decrease of antibody (Ab) immunoreactivity. The following hypothesis was tested: biotin/avidin-mediated coupling of NO-ELIP and Ab-conjugated ELIP will enable co-delivery of bioactive gases and ELIP that can encapsulate other agents without loss of targeting efficiency. Complex formation was initiated by addition of excess streptavidin to equal proportions of biotinylated Ab-ELIP and NO-ELIP. Fluorescence deconvolution microscopy, Coulter Multisizer 3 analysis and flow cytometry demonstrated that the ELIP coupling procedure formed mixed aggregates of ?10 liposomes within 1 minute. Intravascular ultrasound imaging and ELISA showed that echogenicity and targeting efficiency were completely and 69–99% retained, respectively. When complexed to NO-ELIP, ELIP bifunctionally targeted to both CD34 and ICAM-1 (BF-ELIP) increased human mononuclear cell migration through human coronary artery endothelial cell monolayers in transwell plates 4-fold relative to a nonspecific IgG-ELIP control and 2-fold relative to BF-ELIP alone. It was concluded that this novel multi-functional conjugation methodology provides a platform technology for site-specific co-delivery of bioactive gases and other agents. PMID:19903503

  6. Glycoprotein CD98 as a receptor for colitis-targeted delivery of nanoparticle†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Viennois, Emilie; Zhang, Yuchen; Ayyadurai, Saravanan; Baker, Mark; Laroui, Hamed; Merlin, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Treatment strategies for inflammatory bowel disease have been constrained by limited therapeutic efficacy and serious adverse effects owing to a lack of receptor for targeted drug delivery to the inflamed colon. Upon inflammation, CD98 expression is highly elevated in colonic epithelial cells and infiltrating immune cells. To investigate whether CD98 can be used as a colitis-targeted delivery receptor, we constructed CD98 Fab?-bearing quantum dots (QDs)-loaded nanoparticles (Fab?-NPs). The resultant Fab?-NPs had desired particle size (~458 nm) with a narrow size distribution and zeta-potential (approximately +19 mV), low cytotoxicity, and excellent fluorescence properties. Electron microscopy images provided direct evidence for the well-dispersed distribution of QDs within spherical Fab?-NPs. Cellular uptake experiments demonstrated that Fab?-NPs were efficiently internalized into Colon-26 and RAW 264.7 cells through the CD98-mediated endocytosis pathway, and showed that the targeting effect of CD98 Fab? markedly increased their cellular uptake efficiency compared with control pegylated QDs-loaded NPs (PEG-NPs). Furthermore, ex vivo studies showed much more effective accumulation of Fab?-NPs in colitis tissue than that of PEG-NPs. These findings suggest that because of inflammation-dependent over-expression of CD98, active colitis-targeted delivery can be accomplished using NPs decorated with CD98 antibody. PMID:24729869

  7. Construction of targeting-clickable and tumor-cleavable polyurethane nanomicelles for multifunctional intracellular drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Song, Nijia; Ding, Mingming; Pan, Zhicheng; Li, Jiehua; Zhou, Lijuan; Tan, Hong; Fu, Qiang

    2013-12-01

    New strategies for the construction of versatile nanovehicles to overcome the multiple challenges of targeted delivery are urgently needed for cancer therapy. To address these needs, we developed a novel targeting-clickable and tumor-cleavable polyurethane nanomicelle for multifunctional delivery of antitumor drugs. The polyurethane was synthesized from biodegradable poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) and L-lysine ethyl ester diisocyanate (LDI), further extended by a new designed L-cystine-derivatized chain extender bearing a redox-responsive disulfide bond and clickable alkynyl groups (Cys-PA), and finally terminated by a detachable methoxyl-poly(ethylene glycol) with a highly pH-sensitive benzoic-imine linkage (BPEG). The obtained polymers show attractive self-assembly characteristics and stimuli-responsiveness, good cytocompatibility, and high loading capacity for doxorubicin (DOX). Furthermore, folic acid (FA) as a model targeting ligand was conjugated to the polyurethane micelles via an efficient click reaction. The decoration of FA results in an enhanced cellular uptake and improved drug efficacy toward FA-receptor positive HeLa cancer cells in vitro. As a proof-of-concept, this work provides a facile approach to the design of extracellularly activatable nanocarriers for tumor-targeted and programmed intracellular drug delivery. PMID:24219322

  8. Liver-Targeted SiRNA Delivery Using Biodegradable Poly(amide) Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Stephanie E; Guidry, Erin N

    2016-01-01

    The realization of polymer conjugate-based RNA delivery as a clinical modality requires the development and optimization of novel formulations. Although many literature examples of polymer conjugate-based SiRNA delivery systems exist, the protocols described herein represent a robust and facile way of screening any poly(amine)-based polymer system for SiRNA delivery. In this chapter, we describe the synthetic methods used to prepare poly(amide) polymers using a controlled polymerization method, as well as the preparation of the resulting targeted SiRNA polymer conjugates. In addition, detailed methods are provided for the characterization of the biodegradable poly(peptides) as well as the polymer conjugate that ensues. PMID:26472438

  9. Sequence-defined shuttles for targeted nucleic acid and protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Röder, Ruth; Wagner, Ernst

    2014-09-01

    Molecular medicine opens into a space of novel specific therapeutic agents: intracellularly active drugs such as peptides, proteins or nucleic acids, which are not able to cross cell membranes and enter the intracellular space on their own. Through the development of cell-targeted shuttles for specific delivery, this restriction in delivery has the potential to be converted into an advantage. On the one hand, due to the multiple extra- and intracellular barriers, such carrier systems need to be multifunctional. On the other hand, they must be precise and reproducibly manufactured due to pharmaceutical reasons. Here we review the design of precise sequence-defined delivery carriers, including solid-phase synthesized peptides and nonpeptidic oligomers, or nucleotide-based carriers such as aptamers and origami nanoboxes. PMID:25375344

  10. Radiofrequency-triggered tumor-targeting delivery system for theranostics application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Panpan; Shi, Jinjin; Hao, Yongwei; Meng, Dehui; Zhao, Yalin; Yanyan, Yin; Li, Dong; Chang, Junbiao; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2015-03-18

    In this study, a new type of magnetic tumor-targeting PEGylated gold nanoshell drug delivery system (DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG) based on doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive magnetoliposomes was successfully obtained. The reverse-phase evaporation method was used to construct the magnetoliposomes, and then gold nanoshells were coated on the surface of it. The DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG delivery system was synthesized after SH-PEG2000 modification. This multifunction system was combined with a variety of functions, such as radiofrequency-triggered release, chemo-hyperthermia therapy, and dual-mode magnetic resonance/X-ray imaging. Importantly, the DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG complex was found to escape from endosomes after cellular uptake by radiofrequency-induced endosome disruption before lysosomal degradation. All results in vitro and in vivo indicated that DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG is a promising effective drug delivery system for diagnosis and treatment of tumors. PMID:25706857

  11. Vorinostat-polymer conjugate nanoparticles for Acid-responsive delivery and passive tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Denis, Iza; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Collette, Floraine; Delatouche, Régis; Gueugnon, Fabien; Pouliquen, Daniel; Pichavant, Loic; Héroguez, Valérie; Grégoire, Marc; Bertrand, Philippe; Blanquart, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    In vivo histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition by vorinostat under clinically acceptable dosing is limited by its poor pharmacokinetics properties. A new type of nontoxic pH-responsive delivery system has been synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization, allowing for the selective distribution of vorinostat in mesothelioma tumors in vivo and subsequent histone reacetylation. The delivery system is synthesized by generic click chemistry, possesses native stealth properties for passive tumor targeting, and does not need additional chemistry for cellular internalization. Although vorinostat alone at 50 mg/kg in mice showed no effect, our new delivery system with 2 mg/kg vorinostat promoted histone reacetylation in tumors without side effects, demonstrating that our strategy improves the activity of this HDAC inihibitor in vivo. PMID:25333409

  12. In vitro Assay for Screening of Optimal Targets for Antigen-Delivery to Murine Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Pugholm, L H; Varming, K; Agger, R

    2015-12-01

    Targeting of antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) increase the efficiency of immunization procedures and may facilitate the development of more effective vaccines. Several surface molecules on DCs have shown to be useful for antigen targeting, but many more deserves investigation for their efficacy in this respect. With this end in mind, a simple in vitro assay for screening of optimal targets for antigen-delivery to murine DCs was established. Splenocytes from mice immunized with rat IgG were targeted in vitro with a panel of different rat monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against surface markers on murine DCs. The resulting T-cell activation was analysed by determining the number of IFN-? and IL-4 secreting cells by ELISPOT. A positive effect of targeting was evident with several of the mAbs. Thus, mAbs against CD11c, CD36, CD205 and Clec7A all induced IFN-? responses that were significantly higher than those induced by non-targeting control mAbs. Anti-CD36 also induced IL-4 responses that were significantly higher than the control. The assay described here allows simultaneous analysis of a large number of potential target structures and facilitates direct comparison between the different targets regarding the strength of the T-cell responses induced by the targeted DCs. The assay could be useful as a first-line screening of potential target structures on murine DCs. PMID:26331836

  13. Tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

    2015-04-01

    Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25686010

  14. Multi-small molecule conjugations as new targeted delivery carriers for tumor therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Lingling; Liu, Ming; Wu, Chao; Zhao, Liang; Li, Siwen; Xu, Lisheng; Cao, Wengen; Gao, Guizhen; Gu, Yueqing

    2015-01-01

    In response to the challenges of cancer chemotherapeutics, including poor physicochemical properties, low tumor targeting ability, and harmful side effects, we developed a new tumor-targeted multi-small molecule drug delivery platform. Using paclitaxel (PTX) as a model therapeutic, we prepared two prodrugs, ie, folic acid-fluorescein-5(6)-isothiocyanate-arginine-paclitaxel (FA-FITC-Arg-PTX) and folic acid-5-aminofluorescein-glutamic-paclitaxel (FA-5AF-Glu-PTX), composed of folic acid (FA, target), amino acids (Arg or Glu, linker), and fluorescent dye (fluorescein in vitro or near-infrared fluorescent dye in vivo) in order to better understand the mechanism of PTX prodrug targeting. In vitro and acute toxicity studies demonstrated the low toxicity of the prodrug formulations compared with the free drug. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated that folate receptor-mediated uptake of PTX-conjugated multi-small molecule carriers induced high antitumor activity. Notably, compared with free PTX and with PTX-loaded macromolecular carriers from our previous study, this multi-small molecule-conjugated strategy improved the water solubility, loading rate, targeting ability, antitumor activity, and toxicity profile of PTX. These results support the use of multi-small molecules as tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. PMID:26366078

  15. Targeted Delivery of Antiglaucoma Drugs to the Supraciliary Space Using Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that highly targeted delivery of antiglaucoma drugs to the supraciliary space by using a hollow microneedle allows dramatic dose sparing of the drug compared to topical eye drops. The supraciliary space is the most anterior portion of the suprachoroidal space, located below the sclera and above the choroid and ciliary body. Methods. A single, hollow 33-gauge microneedle, 700 to 800 ?m in length, was inserted into the sclera and used to infuse antiglaucoma drugs into the supraciliary space of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 3–6 per group). Sulprostone, a prostaglandin analog, and brimonidine, an ?2-adrenergic agonist, were delivered via supraciliary and topical administration at various doses. The drugs were delivered unilaterally, and intraocular pressure (IOP) of both eyes was measured by rebound tonometry for 9 hours after injection to assess the pharmacodynamic responses. To assess safety of the supraciliary injection, IOP change immediately after intravitreal and supraciliary injection were compared. Results. Supraciliary delivery of both sulprostone and brimonidine reduced IOP by as much as 3 mm Hg bilaterally in a dose-related response; comparison with topical administration at the conventional human dose showed approximately 100-fold dose sparing by supraciliary injection for both drugs. A safety study showed that the kinetics of IOP elevation immediately after supraciliary and intravitreal injection of placebo formulations were similar. Conclusions. This study introduced the use of targeted drug delivery to the supraciliary space by using a microneedle and demonstrated dramatic dose sparing of antiglaucoma therapeutic agents compared to topical eye drops. Targeted delivery in this way can increase safety by reducing side effects and could allow a single injection to contain enough drug for long-term sustained delivery. PMID:25212782

  16. Intranasal microemulsion for targeted nose to brain delivery in neurocysticercosis: Role of docosahexaenoic acid.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Rajshree L; Bharkad, Gopal P; Devarajan, Padma V

    2015-10-01

    Intranasal Microemulsions (MEs) for nose to brain delivery of a novel combination of Albendazole sulfoxide (ABZ-SO) and Curcumin (CUR) for Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a brain infection are reported. MEs prepared by simple solution exhibited a globule size <20nm, negative zeta potential and good stability. The docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) ME revealed high and rapid ex vivo permeation of drugs through sheep nasal mucosa. Intranasal DHA ME resulted in high brain concentrations and 10.76 (ABZ-SO) and 3.24 (CUR) fold enhancement in brain area-under-the-curve (AUC) compared to intravenous DHA MEs at the same dose. Direct nose to brain transport (DTP) of >95% was seen for both drugs. High drug targeting efficiency (DTE) to the brain compared to Capmul ME and drug solution (P<0.05) suggested the role of DHA in aiding nose to brain delivery. Histopathology study confirmed no significant changes. High efficacy of ABZ-SO: CUR (100:10ng/mL) DHA ME in vitro on Taenia solium cysts was confirmed by complete ALP inhibition and disintegration of cysts at 96h. Considering that the brain concentration at 24h was 1400±160.1ng/g (ABZ-SO) and 120±35.2ng/g (CUR), the in vitro efficacy seen at a 10 fold lower concentration of the drugs strongly supports the assumption of clinical efficacy. The intranasal DHA ME is a promising delivery system for targeted nose to brain delivery. PMID:26318978

  17. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non-transport permissive and intact BBB, we also assessed the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) disruption of the BBB in enhancing permeation of AuNPs across the intact BBB and tumor BBB in vivo. MRgFUS is a novel technique that can transiently increase BBB permeability thereby allowing delivery of therapeutics into the CNS. We demonstrated enhanced delivery of AuNPs with therapeutic potential into the CNS via MRgFUS. Our study was the first to establish a definitive role for MRgFUS in delivering AuNPs into the CNS. In summary, this thesis describes results from a series of research projects that have contributed to our understanding of the influence of design features on AuNP permeation through the BBB and also the potential role of MRgFUS in AuNP permeation across the BBB.

  18. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Luke J.; Levy, Oren; Phillips, Joseph P.; Stratton, Tara; Triana, Brian; Ruiz, Juan P.; Gu, Fangqi; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Lin, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery quantification. Here we examine Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) labeled with a series of 4 membrane dyes from which we select the optimal dye combination for pair-wise comparisons of delivery to inflamed tissue in the mouse ear using confocal fluorescence imaging. The use of an optimized dye pair for simultaneous tracking of two cell populations in the same animal enables quantification of a test population that is referenced to an internal control population, thereby eliminating intra-subject variations and variations in injected cell numbers. Consistent results were obtained even when the administered cell number varied by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating an ability to neutralize one of the largest sources of in vivo experimental error and to greatly reduce the number of cells required to evaluate cell delivery. With this method, we are able to show a small but significant increase in the delivery of cytokine pre-treated MSCs (TNF-? & IFN-?) compared to control MSCs. Our results suggest future directions for screening cell strategies using our in vivo cell delivery assay, which may be useful to develop methods to maximize cell therapeutic potential. PMID:24205131

  19. Collagen Coated Nanoliposome as a Targeted and Controlled Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Stephen, P.; Prabhu, M.; Sehgal, P. K.; Sadulla, S.

    2010-10-01

    The collagen coated nanoliposome (CCNL) have been prepared and characterized in order to develop a targeted and controlled drug delivery system. The zeta potential (ZP) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Cell viability assay data showed that the collagen coated nanoliposome particle size and charges, structural interaction and surface morphology and high bio-cyto-compatibility of collagen coated nanoliposome. The particle sizes of nanoliposome (NL) and collagen coated nanoliposome are 20-300 nm and 0.1-10 ?m respectively. The introduction of triple helical, coiled coil and fibrous protein of collagen into nanoliposome can improves the stability of nanoliposome, resistant to phospholipase activities and decreasing the phagocytosis of liposomes by reticuloendothelial system. The collagen coated nanoliposome is expected to be used as for targeted and controlled drug delivery system, and tissue engineering application.

  20. Exploitation of pleiotropic actions of statins by using tumour-targeted delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Licarete, Emilia; Sesarman, Alina; Banciu, Manuela

    2015-11-01

    Statins are drugs traditionally used to lower cholesterol levels in blood. At concentrations 100- to 500-fold higher than those needed for reaching cholesterol lowering activity, they have anti-tumour activity. This anti-tumour activity is based on statins pleiotropic effects derived from their ability to inhibit the mevalonate synthesis and include anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-metastatic actions and modulatory effects on intra-tumour oxidative stress. Thus, in this review, we summarise the possible pleiotropic actions of statins involved in tumour growth inhibition. Since the administration of these high doses of statins is accompanied by severe side effects, targeted delivery of statins seems to be the appropriate strategy for efficient application of statins in oncology. Therefore, we also present an overview of the current status of targeted delivery systems for statins with possible utilisation in oncology. PMID:26299551

  1. An Interbacterial NAD(P)(+) Glycohydrolase Toxin Requires Elongation Factor Tu for Delivery to Target Cells.

    PubMed

    Whitney, John C; Quentin, Dennis; Sawai, Shin; LeRoux, Michele; Harding, Brittany N; Ledvina, Hannah E; Tran, Bao Q; Robinson, Howard; Goo, Young Ah; Goodlett, David R; Raunser, Stefan; Mougous, Joseph D

    2015-10-22

    Type VI secretion (T6S) influences the composition of microbial communities by catalyzing the delivery of toxins between adjacent bacterial cells. Here, we demonstrate that a T6S integral membrane toxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Tse6, acts on target cells by degrading the universally essential dinucleotides NAD(+) and NADP(+). Structural analyses of Tse6 show that it resembles mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase proteins, such as diphtheria toxin, with the exception of a unique loop that both excludes proteinaceous ADP-ribose acceptors and contributes to hydrolysis. We find that entry of Tse6 into target cells requires its binding to an essential housekeeping protein, translation elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). These proteins participate in a larger assembly that additionally directs toxin export and provides chaperone activity. Visualization of this complex by electron microscopy defines the architecture of a toxin-loaded T6S apparatus and provides mechanistic insight into intercellular membrane protein delivery between bacteria. PMID:26456113

  2. Ultralow protein adsorbing coatings from clickable PEG nanogel solutions: Benefits of attachment under salt-induced phase separation conditions and comparison with PEG/albumin nanogel coatings

    PubMed Central

    Donahoe, Casey D.; Cohen, Thomas L.; Li, Wenlu; Nguyen, Peter K.; Fortner, John D.; Mitra, Robi D.; Elbert, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    Clickable nanogel solutions were synthesized by using the copper catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to partially polymerize solutions of azide and alkyne functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monomers. Coatings were fabricated using a second click reaction: a UV thiol-yne attachment of the nanogel solutions to mercaptosilanated glass. Because the CuAAC reaction was effectively halted by the addition of a copper-chelator, we were able to prevent bulk gelation and limit the coating thickness to a single monolayer of nanogels in the absence of the solution reaction. This enabled the inclusion of kosmotropic salts, which caused the PEG to phase-separate and nearly double the nanogel packing density, as confirmed by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D). Protein adsorption was analyzed by single molecule counting with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and cell adhesion assays. Coatings formed from the phase-separated clickable nanogel solutions attached with salt adsorbed significantly less fibrinogen than other 100% PEG coatings tested, as well as poly-L-lysine-g-PEG (PLL-g-PEG) coatings. However, PEG/albumin nanogel coatings still outperformed the best 100% PEG clickable nanogel coatings. Additional surface crosslinking of the clickable nanogel coating in the presence of copper further reduced levels of fibrinogen adsorption closer to those of PEG/albumin nanogel coatings. However, this step negatively impacted long-term resistance to cell adhesion and dramatically altered the morphology of the coating by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The main benefit of the click strategy is that the partially polymerized solutions are stable almost indefinitely, allowing attachment in the phase-separated state without danger of bulk gelation, and thus, producing the best performing 100% PEG coating that we have studied to date. PMID:23441808

  3. Ultralow protein adsorbing coatings from clickable PEG nanogel solutions: benefits of attachment under salt-induced phase separation conditions and comparison with PEG/albumin nanogel coatings.

    PubMed

    Donahoe, Casey D; Cohen, Thomas L; Li, Wenlu; Nguyen, Peter K; Fortner, John D; Mitra, Robi D; Elbert, Donald L

    2013-03-26

    Clickable nanogel solutions were synthesized by using the copper catalyzed azide/alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to partially polymerize solutions of azide and alkyne functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) monomers. Coatings were fabricated using a second click reaction: a UV thiol-yne attachment of the nanogel solutions to mercaptosilanated glass. Because the CuAAC reaction was effectively halted by the addition of a copper-chelator, we were able to prevent bulk gelation and limit the coating thickness to a single monolayer of nanogels in the absence of the solution reaction. This enabled the inclusion of kosmotropic salts, which caused the PEG to phase-separate and nearly double the nanogel packing density, as confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Protein adsorption was analyzed by single molecule counting with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and cell adhesion assays. Coatings formed from the phase-separated clickable nanogel solutions attached with salt adsorbed significantly less fibrinogen than other 100% PEG coatings tested, as well as poly(L-lysine)-g-PEG (PLL-g-PEG) coatings. However, PEG/albumin nanogel coatings still outperformed the best 100% PEG clickable nanogel coatings. Additional surface cross-linking of the clickable nanogel coating in the presence of copper further reduced levels of fibrinogen adsorption closer to those of PEG/albumin nanogel coatings. However, this step negatively impacted long-term resistance to cell adhesion and dramatically altered the morphology of the coating by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The main benefit of the click strategy is that the partially polymerized solutions are stable almost indefinitely, allowing attachment in the phase-separated state without danger of bulk gelation, and thus producing the best performing 100% PEG coating that we have studied to date. PMID:23441808

  4. Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Aptamer-Targeted SNALPs for the Delivery of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Wilner, Samantha E; Levy, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Aptamers selected against cell surface receptors represent a unique set of ligands that can be used to target nanoparticles and other therapeutics to specific cell types. Here, we describe a method for using aptamers to deliver stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs) encapsulating small interfering RNA (siRNA) to cells in vitro. Using this method, we have demonstrated the ability of aptamer-conjugated SNALPs to achieve target-specific delivery and siRNA-mediated knockdown of a gene of interest. We also describe methods to characterize SNALP size, siRNA encapsulation efficiency, and aptamer conjugation efficiency. PMID:26552829

  6. Targeted Delivery with Imaging Assessment of siRNA Expressing Nanocassettes into Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei; Yang, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Molecular therapy using small interfering RNA (siRNA) shows great promise in the development of novel therapeutics for cancer. Although various approaches have been developed for in vivo delivery of siRNAs into tumors, stability of siRNA in blood circulation, and low efficiency of siRNA delivery into tumor cells are the major obstacles for further translation into cancer therapeutics. In this protocol, we describe methods of the production of shRNA expressing DNA nanocassettes by PCR amplification of double-stranded DNA fragments containing a U6 promoter and a shRNA gene. Those DNA nanocassettes can be conjugated to the polymer coating of nanoparticles that are targeted to cellular receptors highly expressed in tumor cells, such as urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), for targeted delivery and receptor mediated internalization of shRNA expressing DNA nanocassettes. Methods for in vitro and in vivo evaluation of target specificity and gene-knockdown effect are also provided. PMID:26530914

  7. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  8. A smart multifunctional nanocomposite for intracellular targeted drug delivery and self-release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan; Lv, Piping; Wei, Wei; Tao, Shengyang; Hu, Tao; Yang, Jingbang; Meng, Changgong

    2011-10-01

    A multifunctional 'all-in-one' nanocomposite is fabricated using a colloid, template and surface-modification method. This material encompasses magnetic induced target delivery, cell uptake promotion and controlled drug release in one system. The nanocomposite is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared material has a diameter of 350-400 nm, a high surface area of 420.29 m2 g - 1, a pore size of 1.91 nm and a saturation magnetization of 32 emu g - 1. Doxorubicin (DOX) is loaded in mesopores and acid-sensitive blockers are introduced onto the orifices of the mesopores by a Schiff base linker to implement pH-dependent self-release. Folate was also introduced to improve DOX targeted delivery and endocytosis. The linkers remained intact to block pores with ferrocene valves and inhibit the diffusion of DOX at neutral pH. However, in lysosomes of cancer cells, which have a weak acidic pH, hydrolysis of the Schiff base group removes the nanovalves and allows the trapped DOX to be released. These processes are demonstrated by UV-visible absorption spectra, confocal fluorescence microscopy images and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assays in vitro, which suggest that the smart nanocomposite successfully integrates targeted drug delivery with internal stimulus induced self-release and is a potentially useful material for nanobiomedicine.

  9. Aptamer-MiRNA Conjugates for Cancer Cell-Targeted Delivery.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Carla L; Catuogno, Silvia; de Franciscis, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short noncoding RNAs that effectively regulate the expression of a wide variety of genes. Increasing evidences have shown a fundamental role of miRNAs in cancer initiation and progression, thus indicating these molecules among the most promising for new approaches in cancer therapy. However, several hurdles limit the translation of miRNAs into the clinic. One of the most critical aspects is represented by the lack of a safe and reliable way to selectively target organs and tissues. Therefore, the development of cell-specific delivery means has become an essential step for the translation of miRNA-based therapeutics to clinic for cancer management. To this end aptamer-based approaches may provide efficient delivery tools for the selective accumulation of miRNA to target tumors, their intracellular uptake, processing, and functional silencing of target genes. In this chapter, we discuss the direct conjugation of miRNAs to aptamers against transmembrane receptors as innovative experimental approach for their selective delivery to cancer cells. PMID:26472452

  10. MRI-visible liposome nanovehicles for potential tumor-targeted delivery of multimodal therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Shizhen; Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-01

    Real-time diagnosis and monitoring of disease development, and therapeutic responses to treatment, are possible by theranostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report the synthesis of a multifunctional liposome, which contains Gd-DOTA (an MRI probe), paclitaxel and c(RGDyk) (a targeted peptide). This nanoparticle overcame the insolubility of paclitaxel, reduced the side effects of FDA-approved formulation of PTX-Cre (Taxol®) and improved drug delivery efficiency to the tumor. c(RGDyk) modification greatly enhanced the cytotoxicity of the drug in tumor cells A549. The T1 relaxivity in tumor cells treated with the targeted liposome formulation was increased 16-fold when compared with the non-targeted group. In vivo, the tumors in mice were visualized using T1-weighted imaging after administration of the liposome. Also the tumor growth could be inhibited well after the treatment. Fluorescence images in vitro and ex vivo also showed the targeting effect of this liposome in tumor cells, indicating that this nanovehicle could limit the off-target side effects of anticancer drugs and contrast agents. These findings lay the foundation for further tumor inhibition study and application of this delivery vehicle in cancer therapy settings.

  11. Bifunctional Coupling Agents for Radiolabeling of Biomolecules and Target-Specific Delivery of Metallic Radionuclides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuang

    2008-01-01

    Receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals are of great current interest in early molecular imaging and radiotherapy of cancers, and provide a unique tool for target-specific delivery of radionuclides to the diseased tissues. In general, a target-specific radiopharmaceutical can be divided into four parts: targeting biomolecule (BM), pharmacokinetic modifying (PKM) linker, bifunctional coupling or chelating agent (BFC), and radionuclide. The targeting biomolecule serves as a “carrier” for specific delivery of the radionuclide. PKM linkers are used to modify radiotracer excretion kinetics. BFC is needed for radiolabeling of biomolecules with a metallic radionuclide. Different radiometals have significant difference in their coordination chemistry, and require BFCs with different donor atoms and chelator frameworks. Since the radiometal chelate can have a significant impact on physical and biological properties of the target-specific radiopharmaceutical, its excretion kinetics can be altered by modifying the coordination environment with various chelators or coligand, if needed. This review will focus on the design of BFCs and their coordination chemistry with technetium, copper, gallium, indium, yttrium and lanthanide radiometals. PMID:18538888

  12. ‘One-pot’ synthesis of multifunctional GSH-CdTe quantum dots for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoqin; Tang, Yajun; Cai, Bing; Fan, Hongsong

    2014-06-01

    A novel quantum dots-based multifunctional nanovehicle (DOX-QD-PEG-FA) was designed for targeted drug delivery, fluorescent imaging, tracking, and cancer therapy, in which the GSH-CdTe quantum dots play a key role in imaging and drug delivery. To exert curative effects, the antineoplastic drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was loaded on the GSH-CdTe quantum dots through a condensation reaction. Meanwhile, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell was introduced to wrap the DOX-QD, thus stabilizing the structure and preventing clearance and drug release during systemic circulation. To actively target cancer cells and prevent the nanovehicles from being absorbed by normal cells, the nanoparticles were further decorated with folic acid (FA), allowing them to target HeLa cells that express the FA receptor. The multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA conjugates were simply prepared using the ‘one pot’ method. In vitro study demonstrated that this simple, multifunctional nanovehicle can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles. After reaching the tumor cells, the FA on the DOX-QD-PEG surface allowed folate receptor recognition and increased the drug concentration to realize a higher curative effect. This novel, multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA system shows great potential for tumor imaging, targeting, and therapy.

  13. Self-assembled nanoplatform for targeted delivery of chemotherapy agents via affinity-regulated molecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Spencer; Kang, Sungkwon; Veach, Alexander J.; Vedvyas, Yogindra; Zarnegar, Rasa; Kim, Ju-Young; Jin, Moonsoo M.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs while minimizing unwanted distribution has been one of the pursued goals in cancer therapy. In this endeavor, we have developed targeted polymeric nanoparticles called amphiphilic urethane acrylate nonionomer (UAN) for encapsulation of diverse water-insoluble drugs and diagnostic agents, as well as for simple and reproducible surface conjugation of targeting ligands. Using monoclonal antibodies or lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) I domain engineered for varying affinities to intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, we were able to deliver UAN nanoparticles to human cancer cells with the efficiency dependent on the strength of the molecular interactions and the degree of ICAM-1 expression on cell surface. Compared to non-specific uptake of free drugs, targeted delivery of UAN nanoparticles carrying equal amount of drugs produced more potent cytotoxicity. Notably, without the targeting ligands attached, UAN nanoparticles were largely precluded from non-specific uptake by the cells, resulting in much lower toxicity. The versatility of our UAN nanoparticles in both payload encapsulation and presentation of targeting ligands may facilitate developing a robust platform for evaluating various combinations of cancer drugs and molecular interactions toward developing effective cancer therapy formulations. PMID:20667589

  14. The impact of nanoparticle protein corona on cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity and target drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Corbo, Claudia; Molinaro, Roberto; Parodi, Alessandro; Toledano Furman, Naama E; Salvatore, Francesco; Tasciotti, Ennio

    2016-01-01

    In a perfect sequence of events, nanoparticles (NPs) are injected into the bloodstream where they circulate until they reach the target tissue. The ligand on the NP surface recognizes its specific receptor expressed on the target tissue and the drug is released in a controlled manner. However, once injected in a physiological environment, NPs interact with biological components and are surrounded by a protein corona (PC). This can trigger an immune response and affect NP toxicity and targeting capabilities. In this review, we provide a survey of recent findings on the NP-PC interactions and discuss how the PC can be used to modulate both cytotoxicity and the immune response as well as to improve the efficacy of targeted delivery of nanocarriers. PMID:26653875

  15. Efficient Management of Fruit Pests by Pheromone Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K.; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  16. Efficient management of fruit pests by pheromone nanogels.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, Deepa; Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2013-01-01

    Environment-friendly management of fruit flies involving pheromones is useful in reducing the undesirable pest populations responsible for decreasing the yield and the crop quality. A nanogel has been prepared from a pheromone, methyl eugenol (ME) using a low-molecular mass gelator. This was very stable at open ambient conditions and slowed down the evaporation of pheromone significantly. This enabled its easy handling and transportation without refrigeration, and reduction in the frequency of pheromone recharging in the orchard. Notably the involvement of the nano-gelled pheromone brought about an effective management of Bactrocera dorsalis, a prevalent harmful pest for a number of fruits including guava. Thus a simple, practical and low cost green chemical approach is developed that has a significant potential for crop protection, long lasting residual activity, excellent efficacy and favorable safety profiles. This makes the present invention well-suited for pest management in a variety of crops. PMID:23416455

  17. Matrix-specific anchors: a new concept for targeted delivery and retention of therapeutic cells.

    PubMed

    Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Jolanta; Beredjiklian, Pedro; Wang, Mark L; Fertala, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Biomedical strategies for tissue engineering and repair utilize specific cells, scaffolds, and growth factors to reconstruct elements of damaged tissue. The cellular element of these strategies is limited, however, by poor efficiency of delivery and retention of therapeutic cells in target sites. We propose that the presence of a cellular anchor that is able to specifically bind a defined element of target tissue will facilitate efficient binding and retention of therapeutic cells, thereby promoting repair of the target site. To do so, we engineered an artificial collagen-specific anchor (ACSA) that is able to specifically bind collagen I. The ACSA was engineered by creating a construct comprising rationally designed consecutive domains. The binding specificity of the ACSA was achieved by employing variable regions of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a unique epitope present in human collagen I. Meanwhile, cell membrane localization of the ACSA was provided by the presence of a transmembrane domain. We determined that the ACSA was localized within cell membranes and interacted with its intended target, that is, collagen I. We have demonstrated that, in comparison to the control, the cells expressing the ACSA attached better to collagen I and exhibited improved retention in sites of seeding. We have also demonstrated that the presence of the ACSA did not interfere with cell proliferation, the biosynthesis of endogenous collagen I, or the biological functions of native collagen receptors. Since the presented cell delivery system utilizes a common characteristic of major connective tissues, namely the presence of collagen I, the findings described here could have a broad positive impact for improving the repair processes of tendon, ligament, bone, intervertebral disc, skin, and other collagen I-rich connective tissues. If successful, the ACSA approach to deliver cells will serve as an outline for developing cell delivery methods that target other elements of extracellular matrices, including other collagen types, laminins, and fibronectins. PMID:25435302

  18. Tumor targeting RGD conjugated bio-reducible polymer for VEGF siRNA expressing plasmid delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Nam, Kihoon; Kim, Sung Wan

    2014-08-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutic genes to the tumor site is critical for successful and safe cancer gene therapy. The arginine grafted bio-reducible poly (cystamine bisacrylamide-diaminohexane, CBA-DAH) polymer (ABP) conjugated poly (amido amine) (PAMAM), PAM-ABP (PA) was designed previously as an efficient gene delivery carrier. To achieve high efficacy in cancer selective delivery, we developed the tumor targeting bio-reducible polymer, PA-PEG1k-RGD, by conjugating cyclic RGDfC (RGD) peptides, which bind ?v?3/5 integrins, to the PAM-ABP using polyethylene glycol (PEG, 1 kDa) as a spacer. Physical characterization showed nanocomplex formation with bio-reducible properties between PA-PEG1k-RGD and plasmid DNA (pDNA). In transfection assays, PA-PEG1k-RGD showed significantly higher transfection efficiency in comparison with PAM-ABP or PA-PEG1k-RAD in ?v?3/5 positive MCF7 breast cancer and PANC-1 pancreatic cancer cells. The targeting ability of PA-PEG1k-RGD was further established using a competition assay. To confirm the therapeutic effect, the VEGF siRNA expressing plasmid was constructed and then delivered into cancer cells using PA-PEG1k-RGD. PA-PEG1k-RGD showed 20-59% higher cellular uptake rate into MCF7 and PANC-1 than that of non-targeted polymers. In addition, MCF7 and PANC-1 cancer cells transfected with PA-PEG1k-RGD/pshVEGF complexes had significantly decreased VEGF gene expression (51-71%) and cancer cell viability (35-43%) compared with control. These results demonstrate that a tumor targeting bio-reducible polymer with an anti-angiogenic therapeutic gene could be used for efficient and safe cancer gene therapy. PMID:24894645

  19. Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes

    E-print Network

    Chau, Ying

    2005-01-01

    We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

  20. Self-assembled polymeric nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of retinoic acid to the hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Lapteva, Maria; Möller, Michael; Gurny, Robert; Kalia, Yogeshvar N

    2015-11-28

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A(®) Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 ± 1.1% vs. 0.4 ± 0.1% and 7.5 ± 0.8% vs. 0.8 ± 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm(®) (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A(®) Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A(®) Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 ± 3.2% vs. 0.6 ± 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU, potentially translating to a safer and more efficient clinical management of acne. PMID:26498006

  1. Cancer Nanotheranostics: Improving Imaging and Therapy by Targeted Delivery across Biological Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-01-01

    Cancer nanotheranostics aims to combine imaging and therapy of cancer through use of nanotechnology. The ability to engineer nanomaterials to interact with cancer cells at the molecular level can significantly improve the effectiveness and specificity of therapy to cancers that are currently difficult to treat. In particular, metastatic cancers, drug-resistant cancers, and cancer stem cells impose the greatest therapeutic challenge that requires targeted therapy to treat effectively. Targeted therapy can be achieved with appropriate designed drug delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles, adult stem cells, or T cells in immunotherapy. In this article, we first review the different types of materials commonly used to synthesize nanotheranostic particles and their use in imaging. We then discuss biological barriers that these nanoparticles encounter and must bypass to reach the target cancer cells, including the blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, and particularly the blood-brain barrier. We then review how nanotheranostics can be used to improve targeted delivery and treatment of cancer cells using nanoparticles, adult stem cells, and T cells in immunotherapy. Finally, we discuss development of nanoparticles to overcome current limitations in cancer therapy. PMID:21842473

  2. RNA nanoparticle as a vector for targeted siRNA delivery into glioblastoma mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Jin; Haque, Farzin; Shu, Dan; Yoo, Ji Young; Li, Hui; Yokel, Robert A.; Horbinski, Craig; Kim, Tae Hyong; Kim, Sung-Hak; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Nakano, Ichiro; Kaur, Balveen; Guo, Peixuan; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic siRNA administration to target and treat glioblastoma, one of the most deadly cancers, requires robust and efficient delivery platform without immunogenicity. Here we report newly emerged multivalent naked RNA nanoparticle (RNP) based on pRNA 3-way-junction (3WJ) from bacteriophage phi29 to target glioblastoma cells with folate (FA) ligand and deliver siRNA for gene silencing. Systemically injected FA-pRNA-3WJ RNPs successfully targeted and delivered siRNA into brain tumor cells in mice, and efficiently reduced luciferase reporter gene expression (4-fold lower than control). The FA-pRNA-3WJ RNP also can target human patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells, thought to be responsible for tumor initiation and deadly recurrence, without accumulation in adjacent normal brain cells, nor other major internal organs. This study provides possible application of pRNA-3WJ RNP for specific delivery of therapeutics such as siRNA, microRNA and/or chemotherapeutic drugs into glioblastoma cells without inflicting collateral damage to healthy tissues. PMID:25885522

  3. Cardiological Biopharmaceuticals in the Conception of Drug Targeting Delivery: Practical Results and Research Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Maksimenko, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The results of the clinical use of thrombolytic and antithrombotic preparations developed on the basis of protein conjugates obtained within the framework of the conception of drug targeting delivery in the organism are considered. A decrease has been noted in the number of biomedical projects focused on these derivatives as a result of various factors: the significant depletion of financial and organizational funds, the saturation of the pharmaceutical market with preparations of this kind, and the appearance of original means for interventional procedures. Factors that actively facilitate the conspicuous potentiation of the efficacy of bioconjugates were revealed: the biomedical testing of protein domains and their selected combinations, the optimization of molecular sizes for the bioconjugates obtained, the density of target localization, the application of cell adhesion molecules as targets, and the application of connected enzyme activities. Enzyme antioxidants and the opportunity for further elaboration of the drug delivery conception via the elucidation and formation of therapeutic targets for effective drug reactions by means of pharmacological pre- and postconditioning of myocardium arouse significant interest. PMID:23150805

  4. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T.; Park, Angela I.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S.; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G.; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S.; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t1/2 ~ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t1/2 ~ 6 min).

  5. Nanogel-Conjugated Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors and Their Combinations as Novel Antiviral Agents with Increased Efficacy against HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, T H; Gorantla, S; Makarov, E; Lu, Y; Warren, G; Vinogradov, S V

    2015-12-01

    Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are an integral part of the current antiretroviral therapy (ART), which dramatically reduced the mortality from AIDS and turned the disease from lethal to chronic. The further steps in curing the HIV-1 infection must include more effective targeting of infected cells and virus sanctuaries inside the body and modification of drugs and treatment schedules to reduce common complications of the long-term treatment and increase patient compliancy. Here, we describe novel NRTI prodrugs synthesized from cholesteryl-?-polylysine (CEPL) nanogels by conjugation with NRTI 5'-succinate derivatives (sNRTI). Biodegradability, small particle size, and high NRTI loading (30% by weight) of these conjugates; extended drug release, which would allow a weekly administration schedule; high therapeutic index (>1000) with a lower toxicity compared to NRTIs; and efficient accumulation in macrophages known as carriers for HIV-1 infection are among the most attractive properties of new nanodrugs. Nanogel conjugates of zidovudine (AZT), lamivudine (3TC), and abacavir (ABC) have been investigated individually and in formulations similar to clinical NRTI cocktails. Nanodrug formulations demonstrated 10-fold suppression of reverse transcriptase activity (EC90) in HIV-infected macrophages at 2-10, 2-4, and 1-2 ?M drug levels, respectively, for single nanodrugs and dual and triple nanodrug cocktails. Nanogel conjugate of lamivudine was the most effective single nanodrug (EC90 2 ?M). Nanodrugs showed a more favorable pharmacokinetics compared to free NRTIs. Infrequent iv injections of PEGylated CEPL-sAZT alone could efficiently suppress HIV-1 RT activity to background level in humanized mouse (hu-PBL) HIV model. PMID:26565115

  6. Non-Condensing Polymeric Nanoparticles for Targeted Gene and siRNA Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jing; Ganesh, Shanthi; Amiji, Mansoor

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy has shown a tremendous potential to benefit patients in a variety of disease conditions. However, finding a safe and effective systemic delivery system is the major obstacle in this area. Although viral vectors showed promise for high transfection rate, the immunogenicity associated with these systems has hindered further development. As an alternative to viral gene delivery, this review focuses on application of novel safe and effective non-condensing polymeric systems that have shown high transgene expression when administered systemically or by the oral route. Type B gelatin-based engineered nanocarriers were evaluated for passive and active tumor-targeted delivery and transfection using both reporter and therapeutic plasmid DNA. Additionally, we have shown that nanoparticles-in-microsphere oral system (NiMOS) can efficiently deliver reporter and therapeutic gene constructs in the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, there has been a significant recent interest in the use small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a therapeutic system for gene silencing. Both gelatin nanoparticles and NiMOS have shown activity in systemic and oral delivery of siRNA, respectively. PMID:21621597

  7. Safety Assessment of Liver-Targeted Hydrodynamic Gene Delivery in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kamimura, Kenya; Kanefuji, Tsutomu; Yokoo, Takeshi; Abe, Hiroyuki; Suda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yuji; Zhang, Guisheng; Aoyagi, Yutaka; Liu, Dexi

    2014-01-01

    Evidence in support of safety of a gene delivery procedure is essential toward gene therapy. Previous studies using the hydrodynamics-based procedure primarily focus on gene delivery efficiency or gene function analysis in mice. The current study focuses on an assessment of the safety of computer-controlled and liver-targeted hydrodynamic gene delivery in dogs as the first step toward hydrodynamic gene therapy in clinic. We demonstrate that the impacts of the hydrodynamic procedure were limited in the injected region and the influences were transient. Histological examination and the hepatic microcirculation measurement using reflectance spectrophotometry reveal that the liver-specific impact of the procedure involves a transient expansion of the liver sinusoids. No systemic damage or toxicity was observed. Physiological parameters, including electrocardiogram, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and body temperature, remained in normal ranges during and after hydrodynamic injection. Body weight was also examined to assess the long-term effects of the procedure in animals who underwent 3 hydrodynamic injections in 6 weeks with 2-week time interval in between. Serum biochemistry analysis showed a transient increase in liver enzymes and a few cytokines upon injection. These results demonstrate that image-guided, liver-specific hydrodynamic gene delivery is safe. PMID:25251246

  8. NIR-to-visible upconversion nanoparticles for fluorescent labeling and targeted delivery of siRNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shan; Zhang, Yong; Lim, Kian Meng; Sim, Eugene K. W.; Ye, Lei

    2009-04-01

    Near-infrared (NIR)-to-visible upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles were synthesized and used for imaging and targeted delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to cancer cells. Silica-coated NaYF4 upconversion nanoparticles (UCNs) co-doped with lanthanide ions (Yb/Er) were synthesized. Folic acid and anti-Her2 antibody conjugated UCNs were used to fluorescently label the folate receptors of HT-29 cells and Her2 receptors of SK-BR-3 cells, respectively. The intracellular uptake of the folic acid and antibody conjugated UCNs was visualized using a confocal fluorescence microscope equipped with an NIR laser. siRNA was attached to anti-Her2 antibody conjugated UCNs and the delivery of these nanoparticles to SK-BR-3 cells was studied. Meanwhile, a luciferase assay was established to confirm the gene silencing effect of siRNA. Upconversion nanoparticles can serve as a fluorescent probe and delivery system for simultaneous imaging and delivery of biological molecules.

  9. Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues

    PubMed Central

    Madaan, Kanika; Kumar, Sandeep; Poonia, Neelam; Lather, Viney; Pandita, Deepti

    2014-01-01

    Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach) respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity. PMID:25035633

  10. Preparation of Pickering emulsions through interfacial adsorption by soft cyclodextrin nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Shintaro; Akashi, Mitsuru; Sato, Hirofumi; Shizuma, Motohiro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background: Emulsions stabilized by colloidal particles are known as Pickering emulsions. To date, soft microgel particles as well as inorganic and organic particles have been utilized as Pickering emulsifiers. Although cyclodextrin (CD) works as an attractive emulsion stabilizer through the formation of a CD–oil complex at the oil–water interface, a high concentration of CD is normally required. Our research focuses on an effective Pickering emulsifier based on a soft colloidal CD polymer (CD nanogel) with a unique surface-active property. Results: CD nanogels were prepared by crosslinking heptakis(2,6-di-O-methyl)-?-cyclodextrin with phenyl diisocyanate and subsequent immersion of the resulting polymer in water. A dynamic light scattering study shows that primary CD nanogels with 30–50 nm diameter assemble into larger CD nanogels with 120 nm diameter by an increase in the concentration of CD nanogel from 0.01 to 0.1 wt %. The CD nanogel has a surface-active property at the air–water interface, which reduces the surface tension of water. The CD nanogel works as an effective Pickering emulsion stabilizer even at a low concentration (0.1 wt %), forming stable oil-in-water emulsions through interfacial adsorption by the CD nanogels. Conclusion: Soft CD nanogel particles adsorb at the oil–water interface with an effective coverage by forming a strong interconnected network and form a stable Pickering emulsion. The adsorption property of CD nanogels on the droplet surface has great potential to become new microcapsule building blocks with porous surfaces. These microcapsules may act as stimuli-responsive nanocarriers and nanocontainers.

  11. Targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to cholangiocarcinoma cells using folic acid as a targeting agent.

    PubMed

    Ngernyuang, Nipaporn; Seubwai, Wunchana; Daduang, Sakda; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-03-01

    There are limits to the standard treatment for cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) including drug resistance and side effects. The objective of this study was to develop a new technique for carrying drugs by conjugation with gold nanoparticles and using folic acid as a targeting agent in order to increase drug sensitivity. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were functionalized with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and folic acid (FA) using polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell as a linker (AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA). Its cytotoxicity was tested in CCA cell lines (M139 and M213) which express folic acid receptor (FA receptor). The results showed that AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA increased the cytotoxic effects in the M139 and M213 cells by 4.76% and 7.95%, respectively compared to those treated with free 5FU+FA. It is found that the cytotoxicity of the AuNPs-PEG-5FU-FA correlates with FA receptor expression suggested the use of FA as a targeted therapy. The mechanism of cytotoxicity was mediated via mitochondrial apoptotic pathway as determined by apoptosis array. In conclusion, our findings shed some light on the use of gold nanoparticles for conjugation with potential compounds and FA as targeted therapy which contribute to the improvement of anti-cancer drug efficacy. In vivo study should be warranted for its effectiveness of stability, biosafety and side effect reduction. PMID:26706547

  12. Chitosan-DNA nanoparticles delivered by intrabiliary infusion enhance liver-targeted gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hui; Jiang, Xuan; Tan, Geoffrey CY; Chen, Yong; Torbenson, Michael; Leong, Kam W; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of liver-targeted gene delivery by chitosan-DNA nanoparticles through retrograde intrabiliary infusion (RII). The transfection efficiency of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles, as compared with PEI-DNA nanoparticles or naked DNA, was evaluated in Wistar rats by infusion into the common bile duct, portal vein, or tail vein. Chitosan-DNA nanoparticles administrated through the portal vein or tail vein did not produce detectable luciferase expression. In contrast, rats that received chitosan-DNA nanoparticles showed more than 500 times higher luciferase expression in the liver 3 days after RII; and transgene expression levels decreased gradually over 14 days. Luciferase expression in the kidney, lung, spleen, and heart was negligible compared with that in the liver. RII of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles did not yield significant toxicity and damage to the liver and biliary tree as evidenced by liver function analysis and histopathological examination. Luciferase expression by RII of PEI-DNA nanoparticles was 17-fold lower than that of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on day 3, but it increased slightly over time. These results suggest that RII is a promising routine to achieve liver-targeted gene delivery by non-viral nanoparticles; and both gene carrier characteristics and mode of administration significantly influence gene delivery efficiency. PMID:17369870

  13. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  14. Biocompatible and biodegradable fibrinogen microspheres for tumor-targeted doxorubicin delivery

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jae Yeon; Park, Gil Yong; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    In the development of effective drug delivery carriers, many researchers have focused on the usage of nontoxic and biocompatible materials and surface modification with targeting molecules for tumor-specific drug delivery. Fibrinogen (Fbg), an abundant glycoprotein in plasma, could be a potential candidate for developing drug carriers because of its biocompatibility and tumor-targeting property via arginine–glycine–aspartate (RGD) peptide sequences. Doxorubicin (DOX), a chemotherapeutic agent, was covalently conjugated to Fbg, and the microspheres were prepared. Acid-labile and non-cleavable linkers were used for the conjugation of DOX to Fbg, resulting in an acid-triggered drug release under a mild acidic condition and a slow-controlled drug release, respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity tests confirmed low cytotoxicity in normal cells and high antitumor effect toward cancer cells. In addition, it was discovered that a longer linker could make the binding of cells to Fbg drug carriers easier. Therefore, DOX–linker–Fbg microspheres could be a suitable drug carrier for safer and effective drug delivery. PMID:26366073

  15. Chlorotoxin bound magnetic nanovector tailored for cancer cell targeting, imaging, and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest M; Fang, Chen; Mu, Ni; Jana, Soumen; Leung, Matthew C; Mok, Hyejung; Ellenbogen, Richard G; Park, James O; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-11-01

    Ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) is a powerful molecular tool that has potential to revolutionize the treatment of cancer. One major challenge of applying this technology for clinical application is the lack of site-specific carriers that can effectively deliver short interfering RNA (siRNA) to cancer cells. Here we report the development and assessment of a cancer-cell specific magnetic nanovector construct for efficient siRNA delivery and non-invasive monitoring through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The base of the nanovector construct is comprised of a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle core coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-grafted chitosan, and polyethylenimine (PEI). The construct was then further functionalized with siRNA and a tumor-targeting peptide, chlorotoxin (CTX), to improve tumor specificity and potency. Flow cytometry, quantitative RT-PCR, and fluorescence microscopy analyses confirmed receptor-mediated cellular internalization of nanovectors and enhanced gene knockdown through targeted siRNA delivery. The ability of this nanovector construct to generate specific contrast enhancement of glioblastoma cells was demonstrated through MR imaging. These findings suggest that this CTX enabled nanoparticle carrier may be well suited for delivery of RNAi therapeutics to brain cancer cells. PMID:20673683

  16. Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

  17. Focusing of photomechanical waves with an optical lens for depth-targeted molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Takuichirou; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2014-02-01

    We have been developing molecular delivery systems based on photomechanical waves (PMWs), which are generated by the irradiation of a laser absorbing material with nanosecond laser pulses. This method enables highly site-specific delivery in the horizontal plane of the tissue. However, targeting in the vertical direction is a remaining challenge. In this study, we developed a novel PMW focusing device for deeper tissue targeting. A commercial optical concave lens and black natural rubber sheet (laser absorber) were attached to the top and bottom end of a cylindrical spacer, respectively, which was filled with water. A laser pulse was transmitted through the lens and water and hit the rubber sheet to induce a plasma, generating a PMW. The PMW was propagated both downward and upward. The downward wave (1st wave) was diffused, while the upward (2nd wave) wave was reflected with the concave surface of the lens and focused at a depth determined by the geometrical parameters. To attenuate the 1st wave, a small-diameter silicon sponge rubber disk was adhered just under the rubber sheet concentrically with the laser axis. With the lens of f = -40 mm, the 2nd wave was focused to a diameter of 5.7 mm at a targeted depth of 20 mm, which was well agreed with the result of calculation by ray tracing. At a laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2, peak pressure of the PMW reached ~40 MPa at the depth of 20 mm. Under this condition, we examined depth-targeted gene delivery to the rat skin.

  18. Bacillus-shape design of polymer based drug delivery systems with janus-faced function for synergistic targeted drug delivery and more effective cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yang; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Hongjie; Yu, Fei; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Ye, Shefang; Luo, Fanghong; Hou, Zhenqing

    2015-04-01

    The particle shape of the drug delivery systems had a strong impact on their in vitro and in vivo performance, but there was limited availability of techniques to produce the specific shaped drug carriers. In this article, the novel methotrexate (MTX) decorated MPEG-PLA nanobacillus (MPEG-PLA-MTX NB) was prepared by the self-assembly technique followed by the extrusion through SPG membrane with high N2 pressure for targeted drug delivery, in which Janus-like MTX was not only used as a specific anticancer drug but could also be served as a tumor-targeting ligand. The MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs demonstrated much higher in vitro and in vivo targeting efficiency compared to the MPEG-PLA-MTX nanospheres (MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs) and MPEG-PLA nanospheres (MPEG-PLA NSs). In addition, the MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs also displayed much more excellent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity than the MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs and free MTX injection. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the integration of the shape design (which mediated an early phase tumor accumulation and a late-phase cell internalization) and Janus-faced function (which mediated an early phase active targeting effect and a late-phase anticancer effect) on the basis of nanoscaled drug delivery systems. The highly convergent and cooperative drug delivery strategy opens the door to more drug delivery systems with new shapes and functions for cancer therapy. PMID:25710590

  19. In vivo mouse fluorescence imaging for folate-targeted delivery and release kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Esther H. R.; Bentz, Brian Z.; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Gaind, Vaibhav; Webb, Kevin J.; Low, Philip S.

    2014-01-01

    Many cancer cells over-express folate receptors, and this provides an opportunity for both folate-targeted fluorescence imaging and the development of targeted anti-cancer drugs. We present an optical imaging modality that allows for the monitoring and evaluation of drug delivery and release through disulfide bond reduction inside a tumor in vivo for the first time. A near-infrared folate-targeting fluorophore pair was synthesized and used to image a xenograft tumor grown from KB cells in a live mouse. The in vivo results are shown to be in agreement with previous in vitro studies, confirming the validity and feasibility of our method as an effective tool for preclinical studies in drug development. PMID:26236559

  20. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles bearing fibroblast growth factor-2 by ultrasonic microbubble destruction for therapeutic arteriogenesis.

    PubMed

    Chappell, John C; Song, Ji; Burke, Caitlin W; Klibanov, Alexander L; Price, Richard J

    2008-10-01

    Therapeutic strategies in which recombinant growth factors are injected to stimulate arteriogenesis in patients suffering from occlusive vascular disease stand to benefit from improved targeting, less invasiveness, better growth-factor stability, and more sustained growth-factor release. A microbubble contrast-agent-based system facilitates nanoparticle deposition in tissues that are targeted by 1-MHz ultrasound. This system can then be used to deliver poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles containing fibroblast growth factor-2 to mouse adductor muscles in a model of hind-limb arterial insufficiency. Two weeks after treatment, significant increases in both the caliber and total number of collateral arterioles are observed, indicating that the delivery of nanoparticles bearing fibroblast growth factor-2 by ultrasonic microbubble destruction may represent an effective and minimally invasive strategy for the targeted stimulation of therapeutic arteriogenesis. PMID:18720443

  1. Design, Synthesis and Bio-evaluation of an EphA2-based Targeted Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Elisa; Wang, Si; Das, Swadesh K.; Noberini, Roberta; Dahl, Russell; Stebbins, John L.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Fisher, Paul B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    We recently described a new targeted delivery system based on specific EphA2 receptor targeting peptides conjugated with the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. In this manuscript we investigate the chemical determinants responsible for the stability and degradation of these agents in plasma. Introducing modifications in both the peptide and the linker between the peptide and paclitaxel, resulted in drug conjugates that are both long-lived in rat plasma and that markedly reduced tumor size in a prostate cancer xenograft model compared to paclitaxel alone treatment. These studies identify critical rate-limiting degradation sites on the peptide-drug conjugates, enabling the design of agents with increased stability and efficacy. These results provide support for our central hypothesis that peptide-drug conjugates targeting the EphA2 receptor represent an innovative and potentially effective strategy to selectively deliver cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. PMID:24677792

  2. Targeted Delivery of Nanoparticles Bearing Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 by Ultrasonic Microbubble Destruction for Therapeutic Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, John C.; Song, Ji; Burke, Caitlin W.

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies in which recombinant growth factors are injected to stimulate arteriogenesis in patients suffering from occlusive vascular disease stand to benefit from improved targeting, less invasiveness, better growth-factor stability, and more sustained growth-factor release. A microbubble contrast-agent-based system facilitates nanoparticle deposition in tissues that are targeted by 1-MHz ultrasound. This system can then be used to deliver poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles containing fibroblast growth factor-2 to mouse adductor muscles in a model of hind-limb arterial insufficiency. Two weeks after treatment, significant increases in both the caliber and total number of collateral arterioles are observed, indicating that the delivery of nanoparticles bearing fibroblast growth factor-2 by ultrasonic microbubble destruction may represent an effective and minimally invasive strategy for the targeted stimulation of therapeutic arteriogenesis. PMID:18720443

  3. Investigation of strategies for drug delivery by combination targeting of nanocarriers to multiple epitopes or receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papademetriou, Iason Titos

    Development of drug delivery systems (ie. nanocarriers) with controllable composition, architecture, and functionalities is heavily investigated in the field of drug delivery in order to improve clinical interventions. Designing drug nanocarriers which possess targeting properties is critical to enable them to reach the intended site of intervention in the body. To achieve this goal, the surface of drug nanocarriers can be modified with targeting moieties (antibodies, peptides, etc.) addressed to cell surface molecules expressed on the diseased tissues and cells. If these molecules are receptors capable of internalizing bound ligands via endocytosis, targeting can then enable drug transport into cells or across cellular barriers in the body. Yet, addressing nanocarriers to single targets presents limited control over cellular interactions and biodistribution. Since most cell-surface markers are not exclusively expressed in a precise site in vivo, high affinity of targeted nanocarriers may lead to non-desired accumulation in regions of the body associated with low expression. Modification of nanocarriers to achieve combined-targeting (binding to more than one cell-surface receptor) may help modulate binding to cells and also endocytosis, since cell receptors possess distinct functions and features affecting these parameters, such as their expression, location on the plasmalemma, activation in disease, mechanism of endocytosis, etc. Further, targeting nanocarriers to multiple epitopes of the same receptor, a strategy which has never been tested, may also modulate these parameters since they are highly epitope specific. In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of targeting model polymer nanocarriers to: (1) multiple receptors of similar function (intercellular-, platelet-endothelial-, and/or vascular-cell adhesion molecules), (2) multiple receptors of different function (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and transferrin receptor), or (3) multiple epitopes of the same receptor (transferrin receptor epitopes 8D3 and R17). Binding to cells, endocytosis within cells, and biodistribution in mice were tested. Results indicate that combination targeting enhanced performance of nanocarriers with regard to these three parameters as compared to non-targeted nanocarriers and modulated their outcome relative to single-targeted nanocarriers. This modulation was observed as enhanced, intermediate, or diminished interaction with cells, accumulation in particular organs, and specificity for diseased sites relative to single-targeted nanocarriers. These results were general to strategies 1--3 and were difficult to foresee a priori due to the complex nature of said interactions. Importantly, outcomes depended on the multiplicity (dual- vs. triple-targeting) and/or combination of affinity moieties displayed on the nanocarrier surface, as well as the physiological/pathological state of cells and tissues. Modulation of the delivery of a model therapeutic cargo in mice relative to single-targeted nanocarriers demonstrated the potential of these strategies to control the biodistribution of therapeutic agents. Therefore, these findings illustrate that combination-targeting enables modulation over cellular interactions and biodistribution of nanocarriers, which may aid the development of nanocarriers tailored for particular therapeutic needs.

  4. Tumor-targeted liposomal drug delivery mediated by a diseleno bond-stabilized cyclic peptide.

    PubMed

    Li, Chong; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao

    2013-01-01

    Peptide ligands have played an important role in tumor-targeted drug delivery as targeting moieties. The in vivo fate of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and the following antitumor effects may greatly depend on the stability of the peptide ligand. In the current study, a tumor-targeting cyclic peptide screened by phage display, Lyp-1 (a peptide that specifically binds to tumor and endothelial cells of tumor lymphatics in certain tumors), was structurally modified by replacement of the original intramolecular disulfide bond with a diseleno bond. The produced analog Syp-1 (seleno derivative of Lyp-1) maintained specific binding ability to the target protein p32 (Kd = 18.54 nM), which is similar to that of Lyp-1 (Kd = 10.59 nM), indicated by surface plasmon resonance assay. Compared with Lyp-1, Syp-1 showed significantly improved stability against serum. After the peptide attached onto the surface of fluorophore-encapsulating liposomes, the more efficient tumor uptake of liposomal fluorophore mediated by Syp-1 was observed. Furthermore, Syp-1 modified liposomal doxorubicin presented the most potent tumor growth inhibitory ability among all the therapeutic groups, with a low half maximal inhibitory concentration of 588 nM against MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro and a high tumor inhibition rate of 73.5% in vivo. These findings clearly indicated that Syp-1 was a stable and effective tumor targeting ligand and suggest that the sulfur-to-selenium replacement strategy may help stabilize the phage-displayed cyclic peptide containing disulfide-bond under physiological conditions and strongly support the validity of peptide-mediated drug targeting. PMID:23515368

  5. Redox Potential Ultrasensitive Nanoparticle for the Targeted Delivery of Camptothecin to HER2-Positive Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ideal “smart” nanoparticles for drug delivery should enhance therapeutic efficacy without introducing side effects. To achieve that, we developed a drug delivery system (HCN) based on a polymer–drug conjugate of poly[2-(pyridin-2-yldisulfanyl)]-graft-poly(ethylene glycol) and camptothecin with an intracellularly cleavable linker and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) targeting ligands. An in vitro drug release study found that HCN was stable in the physiological environment and supersensitive to the stimulus of elevated intracellular redox potential, releasing all payloads in less than 30 min. Furthermore, confocal microscopy revealed that HCN could specifically enter HER2-positive cancer cells. As a consequence, HCN could effectively kill HER2-positive cancer cells while not affecting HER2-negative cells. PMID:24779647

  6. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-10-14

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free "green" post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. PMID:26372069

  7. Drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: A promising therapy method

    PubMed Central

    MA, JING; DU, LIAN FANG; CHEN, MING; WANG, HANG HUI; XING, LING XI; JING, LI FANG; LI, YUN HUA

    2013-01-01

    The nano-microcapsules drug delivery system is currently a promising method for the treatment of many types of diseases, particularly tumors. However, the drug delivery efficiency does not reach a satisfactory level to meet treatment demands. Therefore, the effectiveness of delivery needs to be improved. Based on the alterations in the structure and modification of nano-microcapsules, ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), a safe physical targeted method, may increase tissue penetration and cell membrane permeability, aiding the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules ingress the interior of targeted tissues and cells. The effectiveness and exact mechanism of action of the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by UTMD have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the latest advancement in UTMD-mediated drug loaded nano-microcapsules system technology was reviewed and the hindrances of UTMD-mediated drug delivery were assessed, in combination with a prospective study. The findings suggested that the drug delivery efficiency of nano-microcapsules mediated by UTMD was distinctly improved. Thus, the UTMD-mediated drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system may significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery, which may be a promising new therapeutic method. PMID:24648976

  8. On the accuracy of a moving average algorithm for target tracking during radiation therapy treatment delivery

    PubMed Central

    George, Rohini; Suh, Yelin; Murphy, Martin; Williamson, Jeffrey; Weiss, Elizabeth; Keall, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Real-time tumor targeting involves the continuous realignment of the radiation beam with the tumor. Real-time tumor targeting offers several advantages such as improved accuracy of tumor treatment and reduced dose to surrounding tissue. Current limitations to this technique include mechanical motion constraints. The purpose of this study was to investigate an alternative treatment scenario using a moving average algorithm. The algorithm, using a suitable averaging period, accounts for variations in the average tumor position, but respiratory induced target position variations about this average are ignored during delivery and can be treated as a random error during planning. In order to test the method a comparison between five different treatment techniques was performed: (1) moving average algorithm, (2) real-time motion tracking, (3) respiration motion gating (at both inhale and exhale), (4) moving average gating (at both inhale and exhale) and (5) static beam delivery. Two data sets were used for the purpose of this analysis: (a) external respiratory-motion traces using different coaching techniques included 331 respiration motion traces from 24 lung-cancer patients acquired using three different breathing types [free breathing (FB), audio coaching (A) and audio-visual biofeedback (AV)]; (b) 3D tumor motion included implanted fiducial motion data for over 160 treatment fractions for 46 thoracic and abdominal cancer patients obtained from the Cyberknife Synchrony. The metrics used for comparison were the group systematic error (M), the standard deviation (SD) of the systematic error (?) and the root mean square of the random error (?). Margins were calculated using the formula by Stroom et al. [Int. J. Radiat. Oncol., Biol., Phys. 43(4), 905–919 (1999)]: 2?+0.7?. The resultant calculations for implanted fiducial motion traces (all values in cm) show that M and ? are negligible for moving average algorithm, moving average gating, and real-time tracking (i.e., M and ?=0 cm) compared to static beam (M=0.02 cm and ?=0.16 cm) or gated beam delivery (M=?0.05 and 0.16 cm at both exhale and inhale, respectively, and ?=0.17 and 0.26 cm at both exhale and inhale, respectively). Moving average algorithm ?=0.22 cm has a slightly lower random error than static beam delivery ?=0.24 cm, though gating, moving average gating, and real-time tracking have much lower random error values for implanted fiducial motion. Similar trends were also observed for the results using the external respiratory motion data. Moving average algorithm delivery significantly reduces M and ? compared with static beam delivery. The moving average algorithm removes the nonstationary part of the respiration motion which is also achieved by AV, and thus the addition of the moving average algorithm shows little improvement with AV. Overall, a moving average algorithm shows margin reduction compared with gating and static beam delivery, and may have some mechanical advantages over real-time tracking when the beam is aligned with the target and patient compliance advantages over real-time tracking when the target is aligned to the beam. PMID:18649469

  9. A multifunctional metal-organic framework based tumor targeting drug delivery system for cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Dong, Zhi-Yue; Cheng, Hong; Wan, Shuang-Shuang; Chen, Wei-Hai; Zou, Mei-Zhen; Huo, Jia-Wei; Deng, He-Xiang; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects.Drug delivery systems (DDSs) with biocompatibility and precise drug delivery are eagerly needed to overcome the paradox in chemotherapy that high drug doses are required to compensate for the poor biodistribution of drugs with frequent dose-related side effects. In this work, we reported a metal-organic framework (MOF) based tumor targeting DDS developed by a one-pot, and organic solvent-free ``green'' post-synthetic surface modification procedure, starting from the nanoscale MOF MIL-101. Owing to the multifunctional surface coating, premature drug release from this DDS was prevented. Due to the pH responsive benzoic imine bond and the redox responsive disulfide bond at the modified surface, this DDS exhibited tumor acid environment enhanced cellular uptake and intracellular reducing environment triggered drug release. In vitro and in vivo results showed that DOX loaded into this DDS exhibited effective cancer cell inhibition with much reduced side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Synthesis procedure, 1HNMR, ESI-MS and additional data. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04045k

  10. pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots for targeting hypoxic tumor siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, HongYan; Zhang, ShengYu; Ling, Yong; Meng, GuoLiang; Yang, Yu; Zhang, Wei

    2015-12-28

    Hypoxia is a characteristic of cancer and plays a key role in tumorigenesis, angiogenesis and resistance to cancer therapies. SiRNA treatment is effective against hypoxic tumors by gene silencing. However, siRNA delivery to the hypoxic regions of solid tumors still presents a challenge due to the distance from blood vessels and the increased presence of efflux transporters. Therefore, tumor therapies would be improved through the immediate development of an effective siRNA delivery system to hypoxic regions. To this end, we synthesized a system to deliver HIF-1? siRNA into hypoxic tumor cells. The system consists of a functional shell composed of 2-deoxyglucose (DG)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) connected with the compound of lipoic acid, lysine and 9-poly-d-arginine (LA-Lys-9R) by a hydrazone bond and a core of CdTe quantum dots (QDs). The molecular structure of DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The multifunctional CdTe QDs measured approximately 200nm and showed excellent biocompatibility, perfect siRNA binding capability and enhanced hypoxic tumor targeting. Importantly, the system described here is pH-responsive with a hydrazone bond; therefore, it avoids GLUT1 receptor-mediated endocytic recycling, resulting in irreversible delivery of the siRNA. We used Western blots to confirm the superior gene silencing efficiency induced by the DG-PEG-LA-Lys-9R with hydrazone modified CdTe QDs. Here, we demonstrate high efficacy of the siRNA tumor delivery system using in vitro and in vivo experiments. In addition, these studies demonstrate that pH-responsive hybrid quantum dots show improved antitumor efficacy with decreased organ toxicity, indicating a promising siRNA delivery system for hypoxic cancer therapy. PMID:26590349

  11. Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs

    PubMed Central

    Accardo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morelli, Giancarlo; Tesauro, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs); and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles) loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors. PMID:24741304

  12. Self-assembled polymeric nanocarriers for the targeted delivery of retinoic acid to the hair follicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapteva, Maria; Möller, Michael; Gurny, Robert; Kalia, Yogeshvar N.

    2015-11-01

    Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A® Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 +/- 1.1% vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1% and 7.5 +/- 0.8% vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm® (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A® Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A® Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 +/- 3.2% vs. 0.6 +/- 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU, potentially translating to a safer and more efficient clinical management of acne.Acne vulgaris is a highly prevalent dermatological disease of the pilosebaceous unit (PSU). An inability to target drug delivery to the PSU results in poor treatment efficacy and the incidence of local side-effects. Cutaneous application of nanoparticulate systems is reported to induce preferential accumulation in appendageal structures. The aim of this work was to prepare stable polymeric micelles containing retinoic acid (RA) using a biodegradable and biocompatible diblock methoxy-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(hexylsubstituted lactic acid) copolymer (MPEG-dihexPLA) and to evaluate their ability to deliver RA to skin. An innovative punch biopsy sample preparation method was developed to selectively quantify follicular delivery; the amounts of RA present were compared to those in bulk skin, (i.e. without PSU), which served as the control. RA was successfully incorporated into micelle nanocarriers and protected from photoisomerization by inclusion of Quinoline Yellow. Incorporation into the spherical, homogeneous and nanometer-scale micelles (dn < 20 nm) increased the aqueous solubility of RA by >400-fold. Drug delivery experiments in vitro showed that micelles were able to deliver RA to porcine and human skins more efficiently than Retin-A® Micro (0.04%), a marketed gel containing RA loaded microspheres, (7.1 +/- 1.1% vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1% and 7.5 +/- 0.8% vs. 0.8 +/- 0.1% of the applied dose, respectively). In contrast to a non-colloidal RA solution, Effederm® (0.05%), both the RA loaded MPEG-dihexPLA polymeric micelles (0.005%) and Retin-A® Micro (0.04%) displayed selectivity for delivery to the PSU with 2-fold higher delivery to PSU containing samples than to control samples. Moreover, the micelle formulation outperformed Retin-A® Micro in terms of delivery efficiency to PSU presenting human skin (10.4 +/- 3.2% vs. 0.6 +/- 0.2%, respectively). The results indicate that the polymeric micelle formulation enabled an increased and targeted delivery of RA to the PSU, potent

  13. Notch1 targeting siRNA delivery nanoparticles for rheumatoid arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Ju; Park, Jong-Sung; Lee, So Jin; Jang, Jiyeon; Park, Jin Su; Back, Seung Hyun; Bahn, Gahee; Park, Jae Hyung; Kang, Young Mo; Kim, Sun Hwa; Kwon, Ick Chan; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2015-10-28

    Notch pathway plays a pivotal role in synoviocytes involved in progression of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Herein, we designed the Notch1 targeting siRNA delivery nanoparticles (siRNA-NPs) in order to confirm the anti-inflammatory effect in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. The siRNA-NPs were successfully produced by encapsulating polymerized siRNA (poly-siRNA) into thiolated glycol chitosan (tGC) nanoparticles in aqueous condition. The in vitro Notch1 inhibition of siRNA-NPs in murine macrophage cell (RAW 264.7) was confirmed using confocal microscopy and real time PCR. Fluorescently labeled siRNA-NPs were successfully transfected in RAW 264.7 and modulated the expression of Notch1 in mRNA level. For in vivo study, siRNA-NPs exhibited the higher targeting efficiency in the arthritic joins of CIA mice, confirmed by the near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging. Furthermore, inhibition of Notch1 with siRNA-NPs resulted in retarded progression of inflammation, bone erosion, and cartilage damage in CIA mice. Novel Notch1 targeting siRNA delivery system of siRNA-NPs showed effective RA treatment by suppressing Notch1 signaling pathway without undesirable severe toxicity. Thus, Notch1 inhibiting siRNA-NPs demonstrated the great potential in RA therapeutics that was hard to be achieved using conventional drugs. PMID:26282098

  14. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  15. Tumor Acidity-Sensitive Polymeric Vector for Active Targeted siRNA Delivery.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chun-Yang; Shen, Song; Xu, Cong-Fei; Li, Hong-Jun; Liu, Yang; Cao, Zhi-Ting; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Xia, Jin-Xing; Wang, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Although surface PEGylation of siRNA vectors is effective for preventing protein adsorption and thereby helps these vectors to evade the reticuloendothelial system (RES) in vivo, it also suppresses the cellular uptake of these vectors by target cells. This dilemma could be overcome by employing stimuli-responsive shell-detachable nanovectors to achieve enhanced cellular internalization while maintaining prolonged blood circulation. Among the possible stimuli, dysregulated pH in tumor (pHe) is the most universal and practical. However, the design of pHe-sensitive system is problematic because of the subtle differences between the pHe and pH in other tissues. Here, a simple acid-sensitive bridged copolymer is developed and used for tumor-targeted systemic delivery of siRNA. After forming the micelleplex delivery system, the corresponding nanoparticles (Dm-NP) might undergo several modifications as follows: (i) a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) corona, which is stable in the circulatory system and protects nanovectors from RES clearance; (ii) a pHe responsive linkage breakage, which induces PEG detachment at tumor sites and thereby facilitates cell targeting; and (iii) a cell-penetration peptide, which is exposed upon the removal of PEG and further enhances cellular uptake. Thus, Dm-NP achieved both prolonged circulation and effective accumulation in tumor cells and resulted in the safe and enhanced inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer growth. PMID:26571079

  16. A dual-functionally modified chitosan derivative for efficient liver-targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Wang, Xiaoyu; Qiu, Zhiye; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Lei; Wan, Ying; Zhang, Shengmin

    2013-07-01

    Galactosylated chitosan-hydroxypropyltrimethylammonium (gal-HTCC) was synthesized by galactosylating and quaternizing chitosan to endue chitosan with targeting specificity for potential applications as gene vectors. The composition and physicochemical properties of gal-HTCC were characterized by FT-IR, (1) H NMR, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, and turbidity measurement. It was found that water-soluble gal-HTCC showed a more amorphous structure than chitosan, and it also had a much better plasmid condensation capability than galactosylated chitosan. Cytotoxicity measurements revealed that gal-HTCC showed significantly lower cytotoxicity in HepG2 and HeLa cell lines compared to branched polyethylenimine (bPEI, 25 kDa) which was used as a positive control. The nanoparticles (NPs) consisted of gal-HTCC and plasmid DNA had desirable particle size (around 250 nm) with a narrow size distribution. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed that NPs could be internalized and transported to the nucleus efficiently within 6 h. In vitro gene transfection results indicated that gal-HTCC had significantly higher transfection efficiency (7- to 32-fold) compared to chitosan and gal-chitosan for targetable delivery of pGL3 luciferase plasmid to HepG2, and its transfection efficiency was highly inhibited in the presence of galactose (20 mM). All these results suggest that gal-HTCC can function as a promising nonviral gene vector for efficient liver-targeted gene delivery. PMID:23203540

  17. An inflammation-targeting hydrogel for local drug delivery in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sufeng; Ermann, Joerg; Succi, Marc D; Zhou, Allen; Hamilton, Matthew J; Cao, Bonnie; Korzenik, Joshua R; Glickman, Jonathan N; Vemula, Praveen K; Glimcher, Laurie H; Traverso, Giovanni; Langer, Robert; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2015-08-12

    There is a clinical need for new, more effective treatments for chronic and debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Targeting drugs selectively to the inflamed intestine may improve therapeutic outcomes and minimize systemic toxicity. We report the development of an inflammation-targeting hydrogel (IT-hydrogel) that acts as a drug delivery system to the inflamed colon. Hydrogel microfibers were generated from ascorbyl palmitate, an amphiphile that is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. IT-hydrogel microfibers loaded with the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone (Dex) were stable, released drug only upon enzymatic digestion, and demonstrated preferential adhesion to inflamed epithelial surfaces in vitro and in two mouse colitis models in vivo. Dex-loaded IT-hydrogel enemas, but not free Dex enemas, administered every other day to mice with colitis resulted in a significant reduction in inflammation and were associated with lower Dex peak serum concentrations and, thus, less systemic drug exposure. Ex vivo analysis of colon tissue samples from patients with ulcerative colitis demonstrated that IT-hydrogel microfibers adhered preferentially to mucosa from inflamed lesions compared with histologically normal sites. The IT-hydrogel drug delivery platform represents a promising approach for targeted enema-based therapies in patients with colonic IBD. PMID:26268315

  18. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5?nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in?vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities. PMID:25600241

  19. LFA-1 on Leukemic Cells as a Target for Therapy or Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Phongpradist, Rungsinee; Chittasupho, Chuda; Okonogi, Siriporn; Siahaan, Teruna; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Berkland, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia therapeutics are aiming for improved efficacy by targeting molecular markers differentially expressed on cancerous cells. Lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) expression on various types of leukemia has been well studied. Here, the role and expression of LFA-1 on leukemic cells and the possibility of using this integrin as a target for drug delivery is reviewed. To support this rationale, experimental results were also included where cIBR, a cyclic peptide derived from a binding site of LFA-1, was conjugated to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles and used as a targeting ligand. These studies revealed a correlation of LFA-1 expression level on leukemic cell lines and binding and internalization of cIBR-NPs suggesting a differential binding and internalization of cIBR-NPs to leukemic cells overexpressing LFA-1. Nanoparticles conjugated with a cyclic peptide against an accessible molecular marker of disease hold promise as a selective drug delivery system for leukemia treatment. PMID:20618153

  20. Tumor-targeted delivery of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin by use of a peptide that selectively binds to irradiated tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lowery, Amanda; Onishko, Halina; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Han, Zhaozhong

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery improves anti-tumor efficacy and reduces systemic toxicity by limiting bioavailability of cytotoxic drugs to within tumors. Targeting reagents, such as peptides or antibodies recognizing molecular targets over-expressed within tumors, have been used to improve liposome-encapsulated drug accumulation within tumors and resulted in enhanced tumor growth control. In this report, we expand the scope of targeting reagents by showing that one peptide, HVGGSSV which was isolated from an in vivo screening of phage-displayed peptide library due to its selective binding within irradiated tumors, enabled highly selective tumor-targeted delivery of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin and resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity within tumors. Targeting liposomes (TL) and non-targeting liposomes (nTL) were labeled with Alexa Fluor 750. Biodistribution of the liposomes within tumor-bearing mice was studied with near infrared (NIR) imaging. In the single dose pharmacokinetic study, the liposomal doxorubicin has an extended circulation half life as compared to the free doxorubicin. Targeting liposomes partitioned to the irradiated tumors and improved drug deposition and retention within tumors. The tumor-targeted delivery of doxorubicin improved tumor growth control as indicated with reduced tumor growth rate and tumor cell proliferation, enhanced tumor blood vessel destruction, and increased treatment-associated apoptosis and necrosis of tumor cells. Collectively, the results demonstrated the remarkable capability of the HVGGSSV peptide in radiation-guided drug delivery to tumors. PMID:21075152

  1. Intranasal delivery bypasses the blood-brain barrier to target therapeutics to the CNS William H. Frey II, Ph.D., Senior Director

    E-print Network

    Thomas, David D.

    Intranasal delivery bypasses the blood-brain barrier to target therapeutics to the CNS Speaker, Stanford University, HealthPartners Research Foundation and others, target delivery of therapeutic agents. His intranasal therapeutic cell delivery and treatment methods have been validated in animals

  2. Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel to EphA2-Expressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Si; Noberini, Roberta; Stebbins, John L.; Das, Swadesh; Zhang, Ziming; Wu, Bainan; Mitra, Sayantan; Billet, Sandrine; Fernandez, Ana; Bhowmick, Neil A.; Kitada, Shinichi; Pasquale, Elena B.; Fisher, Paul B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Purpose YSA is an EphA2-targeting peptide that effectively delivers anti-cancer agents to prostate cancer tumors (1). Here, we report on how we increased the drug-like properties of this delivery system. Experimental Design By introducing non-natural amino acids, we have designed two new EphA2 targeting peptides: YNH, where norleucine and homoserine replace the two methionine residues of YSA, and dYNH, where a D-tyrosine replaces the L-tyrosine at the first position of the YNH peptide. We describe the details of the synthesis of YNH and dYNH paclitaxel conjugates (YNH-PTX and dYNH-PTX) and their characterization in cells and in vivo. Results dYNH-PTX showed improved stability in mouse serum and significantly reduced tumor size in a prostate cancer xenograft model and also reduced tumor vasculature in a syngeneic orthotopic allograft mouse model of renal cancer compared to vehicle or paclitaxel treatments. Conclusion This study reveals that targeting EphA2 with dYNH drug conjugates could represent an effective way to deliver anti-cancer agents to a variety of tumor types. Translational Relevance Overexpression of the EphA2 positively correlates with tumor malignancy and poor prognosis. For this reason, EphA2 is an attractive target for cancer cell specific drug delivery. In this study, we report on the development of dYNH, an EphA2 targeting peptide that when coupled to paclitaxel (PTX) has favorable pharmacological properties and possesses powerful anti-tumor activity in vivo. dYNH-PTX may allow for an expanded therapeutic index of paclitaxel as well as precluding the need for complex formulations and long infusion times. PMID:23155185

  3. Liposome-based glioma targeted drug delivery enabled by stable peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Gao, Jie; Zhan, Changyou; Xie, Cao; Chai, Zhilan; Ran, Danni; Ying, Man; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-11-28

    The treatment of glioma is one of the most challenging tasks in clinic. As an intracranial tumor, glioma exhibits many distinctive characteristics from other tumors. In particular, various barriers including enzymatic barriers in the blood and brain capillary endothelial cells, blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB) rigorously prevent drug and drug delivery systems from reaching the tumor site. To tackle this dilemma, we developed a liposomal formulation to circumvent multiple-barriers by modifying the liposome surface with proteolytically stable peptides, (D)CDX and c(RGDyK). (D)CDX is a D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on the BBB, and c(RGDyK) is a ligand of integrin highly expressed on the BBTB and glioma cells. Lysosomal compartments of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in the transcytosis of those liposomes. However, both peptide ligands displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate, ensuring that intact ligands could exert subsequent exocytosis from brain capillary endothelial cells and glioma targeting. In the cellular uptake studies, dually labeled liposomes could target both brain capillary endothelial cells and tumor cells, effectively traversing the BBB and BBTB monolayers, overcoming enzymatic barrier and targeting three-dimensional tumor spheroids. Its targeting ability to intracranial glioma was further verified in vivo by ex vivo imaging and histological studies. As a result, doxorubicin liposomes modified with both (D)CDX and c(RGDyK) presented better anti-glioma effect with prolonged median survival of nude mice bearing glioma than did unmodified liposomes and liposomes modified with individual peptide ligand. In conclusion, the liposome suggested in the present study could effectively overcome multi-barriers and accomplish glioma targeted drug delivery, validating its potential value in improving the therapeutic efficacy of doxorubicin for glioma. PMID:26428462

  4. Design of an integrated hardware interface for AOSLO image capture and cone-targeted stimulus delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qiang; Arathorn, David W.; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; Vogel, Curtis R.; Roorda, Austin

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an integrated FPGA solution to project highly stabilized, aberration-corrected stimuli directly onto the retina by means of real-time retinal image motion signals in combination with high speed modulation of a scanning laser. By reducing the latency between target location prediction and stimulus delivery, the stimulus location accuracy, in a subject with good fixation, is improved to 0.15 arcminutes from 0.26 arcminutes in our earlier solution. We also demonstrate the new FPGA solution is capable of delivering stabilized large stimulus pattern (up to 256x256 pixels) to the retina. PMID:20721171

  5. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  6. AAV-Mediated Delivery of Zinc Finger Nucleases Targeting Hepatitis B Virus Inhibits Active Replication

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Stone, Daniel; Sedlak, Ruth Hall; De Silva Feelixge, Harshana S.; Roychoudhury, Pavitra; Schiffer, Joshua T.; Aubert, Martine; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment that targets active and persistent HBV infections remains. As a novel approach to treat HBV, we have targeted the HBV genome for disruption to prevent viral reactivation and replication. We generated 3 zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that target sequences within the HBV polymerase, core and X genes. Upon the formation of ZFN-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB), imprecise repair by non-homologous end joining leads to mutations that inactivate HBV genes. We delivered HBV-specific ZFNs using self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV) vectors and tested their anti-HBV activity in HepAD38 cells. HBV-ZFNs efficiently disrupted HBV target sites by inducing site-specific mutations. Cytotoxicity was seen with one of the ZFNs. scAAV-mediated delivery of a ZFN targeting HBV polymerase resulted in complete inhibition of HBV DNA replication and production of infectious HBV virions in HepAD38 cells. This effect was sustained for at least 2 weeks following only a single treatment. Furthermore, high specificity was observed for all ZFNs, as negligible off-target cleavage was seen via high-throughput sequencing of 7 closely matched potential off-target sites. These results show that HBV-targeted ZFNs can efficiently inhibit active HBV replication and suppress the cellular template for HBV persistence, making them promising candidates for eradication therapy. PMID:24827459

  7. On the scattered light by dilute aqueous dispersions of nanogel particles.

    PubMed

    Callejas-Fernández, J; Ramos, J; Forcada, J; Moncho-Jordá, A

    2015-07-15

    This work deals with the scattered light by nanoparticles formed by a temperature sensitive polymer networks, namely nanogel particles. The scattered light is measured as a function of the scattering angle at temperatures below and above the volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) of nanogel particles. Our experimental results indicate that nanogel particles have a core-shell structure, formed by a uniform highly cross-linked core surrounded by a fuzzy shell where the polymer density decays to zero gradually for swollen configurations and sharply for shrunken states. The theoretical fitting of the experimental curves shows that the scattered light at low angle obeys a decreasing power law with the scattering vector, q(-?). The value of exponent ? provides information about the radial dependence of the polymer density at the external shell of the particles for swollen nanogels, and about the degree of roughness of the surface for the case of shrunken nanogels. On the one hand, at low temperatures (below the VPPT), the nanogel particle is in the swollen state and the light scattering data show that its shell structure follows a fractal behaviour, with a polymer density that decays as r(?-3), where r is the distance to the particle centre. On the other hand, above the VPPT the results indicate that nanogel collapses into a core of uniform polymer density and a rough shell, with a fractal surface dimension of 2.5. PMID:25837408

  8. Folated Synperonic-Cholesteryl Hemisuccinate Polymeric Micelles for the Targeted Delivery of Docetaxel in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Taymouri, Somayeh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Haghjooy Javanmard, Shaghayegh; Rostami, Mahboobeh

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was the synthesis of folic acid- (FA-) targeted polymeric micelles of Synperonic PE/F 127-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (PF127-Chol) for specific delivery of docetaxel (DTX). Targeted or nontargeted micelles loaded with DTX were prepared via dialysis method. The effects of processing variables on the physicochemical properties of targeted micelles were evaluated using a full factorial design. After the optimization of the polymer/drug ratio, the organic solvent type used for the preparation of the micelles, and the temperature of dialyzing medium, the in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the optimized micelles were studied on B16F10 melanoma cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. The anticancer efficacy of DTX-loaded FA-PF127-Chol was evaluated in mice bearing melanoma tumor. Optimized targeted micelles had the particle size of 171.3?nm, zeta potential of ?7.8?mV, PDI of 0.325, and a high encapsulation efficiency that released the drug within 144?h. The MTT assay indicated that targeted micelles carrying DTX were significantly more cytotoxic, had higher cellular uptake, and reduced the tumor volume significantly more than the nontargeted micelles and the free drug. FA-PF127-Chol could be, therefore, a promising biomaterial for tumors overexpressing folate receptors. PMID:25839040

  9. A novel in situ gel for sustained drug delivery and targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Sudipta; Dash, Alekha K

    2004-05-19

    The objective of this study was to develop a novel chitosan-glyceryl monooleate (GMO) in situ gel system for sustained drug delivery and targeting. The delivery system consisted of 3% (w/v) chitosan and 3% (w/v) GMO in 0.33M citric acid. In situ gel was formed at a biological pH. In vitro release studies were conducted in Sorensen's phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) and drugs were analyzed either by HPLC or spectrophotometry. Characterization of the gel included the effect of cross-linker, determination of diffusion coefficient and water uptake by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Mucoadhesive property of the gel was evaluated in vitro using an EZ-Tester. Incorporation of a cross-linker (glutaraldehyde) retarded the rate and extent of drug release. The in vitro release can further be sustained by replacing the free drug with drug-encapsulated microspheres. Drug release from the gel followed a matrix diffusion controlled mechanism. Inclusion of GMO enhanced the mucoadhesive property of chitosan by three- to sevenfold. This novel in situ gel system can be useful in the sustained delivery of drugs via oral as well as parenteral routes. PMID:15113617

  10. Influence of Red Blood Cells on Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery in Microcirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jifu; Thomas, Antony; Liu, Yaling

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, a particle-cell hybrid model is developed to model Nanoparticle (NP) transport, dispersion, and binding dynamics in blood suspension under the influence of Red blood cells (RBCs). The motion and deformation of RBCs is captured through the Immersed Finite Element Method. The motion and adhesion of individual NPs are tracked through Brownian adhesion dynamics. A mapping algorithm and an interaction potential function are introduced to consider the cell-particle collision. NP dispersion and binding rates are derived from the developed model under various rheology conditions. The influence of RBCs, vascular flow rate, and particle size on NP distribution and delivery efficacy is characterized. A non-uniform NP distribution profile with higher particle concentration near the vessel wall is observed. Such distribution leads to over 50% higher particle binding rate compared to the case without RBC considered. The tumbling motion of RBCs in the core region of the capillary is found to enhance NP dispersion, with dispersion rate increases as shear rate increases. Results from this study contribute to the fundamental understanding and knowledge on how the particulate nature of blood influences NP delivery, which will provide mechanistic insights on the nanomedicine design for targeted drug delivery applications.

  11. Targeted drug delivery to bone: pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of acidic oligopeptide-tagged drugs.

    PubMed

    Takahashi-Nishioka, Tatsuo; Yokogawa, Koichi; Tomatsu, Shunji; Nomura, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Shinjiro; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi

    2008-03-01

    Site-specific drug delivery to bone is considered to be achievable by utilizing acidic amino acid homopeptides. We found that fluorescence-labeled acidic amino acid (L-Asp or L-Glu) homopeptides containing six or more residues bound strongly to hydroxyapatite, which is a major component of bone, and were selectively delivered to and retained in bone after systemic administration. We explored the applicability of this result for drug delivery by conjugation of estradiol and levofloxacin with an L-Asp hexapeptide. We also similarly tagged an enzyme, tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, to see whether this would improve the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy. The L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs, including the enzyme, were selectively delivered to bone in comparison with the untagged drugs. It was expected that the ester linkage to the hexapeptide would be susceptible to hydrolysis in situ, releasing the drug or enzyme from the acidic oligopeptide. An in vivo experiment confirmed the efficacy of L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged estradiol and levofloxacin, although there was some loss of bioactivity of estradiol and levofloxacin in vitro, suggesting that the acidic hexapeptide was partly removed by hydrolysis in the body after delivery to bone. The adverse effect of estradiol on the uterus was greatly reduced by conjugation to the hexapeptide. These results support the usefulness of acidic oligopeptides as bone-targeting carriers for therapeutic agents. We present some pharmacokinetic and pharmacological properties of the L-Asp hexapeptide-tagged drugs and enzyme. PMID:18537566

  12. Biomaterials-based nanofiber scaffold: targeted and controlled carrier for cell and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-04-01

    Nanofiber scaffold formulations (diameter less than 1000 nm) were successfully used to deliver the drug/cell/gene into the body organs through different routes for an effective treatment of various diseases. Various fabrication methods like drawing, template synthesis, fiber-mesh, phase separation, fiber-bonding, self-assembly, melt-blown, and electrospinning are successfully used for fabrication of nanofibers. These formulations are widely used in various fields such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, cosmetics, as filter media, protective clothing, wound dressing, homeostatic, sensor devices, etc. The present review gives a detailed account on the need of the nanofiber scaffold formulation development along with the biomaterials and techniques implemented for fabrication of the same against innumerable diseases. At present, there is a huge extent of research being performed worldwide on all aspects of biomolecules delivery. The unique characteristics of nanofibers such as higher loading efficiency, superior mechanical performance (stiffness and tensile strength), controlled release behavior, and excellent stability helps in the delivery of plasmid DNA, large protein drugs, genetic materials, and autologous stem-cell to the target site in the future. PMID:25539071

  13. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Alyautdin, Renad; Kocherga, Ganna; Bakar, Muhamad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood–retinal barrier and blood–cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood–brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF) from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration. PMID:25995632

  14. Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery of

    E-print Network

    Summa, Christopher M.

    Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery States of America Abstract Background: Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous

  15. Peptides as targeting probes against tumor vasculature for diagnosis and drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor vasculature expresses a distinct set of molecule signatures on the endothelial cell surface different from the resting blood vessels of other organs and tissues in the body. This makes them an attractive target for cancer therapy and molecular imaging. The current technology using the in vivo phage display biopanning allows us to quickly isolate and identify peptides potentially homing to various tumor blood vessels. Tumor-homing peptides in conjugation with chemotherapeutic drugs or imaging contrast have been extensively tested in various preclinical and clinical studies. These tumor-homing peptides have valuable potential as targeting probes for tumor molecular imaging and drug delivery. In this review, we summarize the recent advances about the applications of tumor-homing peptides selected by in vivo phage display library screening against tumor vasculature. We also introduce the characteristics of the latest discovered tumor-penetrating peptides in their potential clinical applications. PMID:23046982

  16. Thermal treatment of galactose-branched polyelectrolyte microcapsules to improve drug delivery with reserved targetability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fu; Wu, Qi; Liu, Li-Jun; Chen, Zhi-Chun; Lin, Xian-Fu

    2008-06-01

    A novel multilayered drug delivery system by LbL assembly of galactosylated polyelectrolyte, which is possible to have the potential in hepatic targeting by the presence of galactose residues at the microcapsule's surface, is designed. Thermal treatment was performed on the capsules and a dramatic thermal shrinkage up to 60% decrease of capsule diameter above 50 degrees C was observed. This thermal behavior was then used to manipulate drug loading capacity and release rate. Heating after drug loading could seal the capsule shell, enhancing the loading capacity and reducing the release rate significantly. Excellent affinity between galactose-binding lectin and heated galactose-containing microcapsules were observed, indicating a stable targeting potential even after high temperature elevating up to 90 degrees C. PMID:18304765

  17. Targeted delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible gold nanoparticles into cancer cell nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Wei; Curry, Taeyjuana; Che, Yong; Kopelman, Raoul

    2013-02-01

    Nucleus remains a significant target for nanoparticles with diagnostic and therapeutic applications because both genetic information of the cell and transcription machinery reside there. Novel therapeutic strategies (for example, gene therapy), enabled by safe and efficient delivery of nanoparticles and drug molecules into the nucleus, are heralded by many as the ultimate treatment for severe and intractable diseases. However, most nanomaterials and macromolecules are incapable of reaching the cell nucleus on their own, because of biological barriers carefully honed by evolution including cellular membrane and nuclear envelope. In this paper, we have demonstrated an approach of fabrication of biocompatible gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based vehicles which can entering into cancer cell nucleus by modifying Au NPs with both PEG 5000 and two different peptides (RGD and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide). The Au NPs used were fabricated via femtosecond laser ablation of Au bulk target in deionized water. The Au NPs produced by this method provide chemical free, virgin surface, which allows us to carry out "Sequential Conjugation" to modify their surface with PEG 5000, RGD, and NLS. "Sequential Conjugation" described in this presentation is very critical for the fabrication of Au NP-based vehicles capable of entering into cancer cell nucleus as it enables the engineering and tuning surface chemistries of Au NPs by independently adjusting amounts of PEG and peptides bound onto surface of Au NPs so as to maximize their nuclear targeting performance and biocompatibility regarding the cell line of interest. Both optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to confirm the in vitro targeted nuclear delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible Au NPs by showing their presence in the cancer cell nucleus.

  18. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  19. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Anton M; Gabriel, Samantha A; Sukhorukov, Gleb B; Gould, David J

    2015-06-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule?:?cell ratio of 100?:?1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells. PMID:25960267

  20. Aerosol fabrication of thermosensitive nanogels and in situ hybridization with iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Jang-Woo

    2012-07-01

    Collison atomized n-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) droplets were thermally treated with different furnace wall temperatures to form nanogels in an aerosol state. The size of the aerosol nanogels decreased from 40.3 nm to 32.8 nm by increasing the temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C due to the coil-to-globule transition of the NIPAM. A serial reactor consisting of a spark generator coupled to a collison atomizer was further employed to efficiently (>90% in production yield) fabricate biocompatible (78.8% in cell viability)-magnetic (30.3 emu g-1 in saturation magnetization) hybrid nanogels of NIPAM and iron nanoparticles.

  1. Immuno-LipoTRAIL: Targeted delivery of TRAIL-functionalized liposomal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Oliver; Pollak, Nadine; Nusser, Anja; Steiniger, Frank; Rüger, Ronny; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Kontermann, Roland E

    2014-05-21

    The TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a powerful inducer of apoptosis in tumor cells; however, clinical studies with recombinant soluble TRAIL were rather disappointing. Here, we developed TRAIL-functionalized liposomes (LipoTRAIL, LT) to mimic membrane-displayed TRAIL for efficient activation of death receptors DR4 and DR5 and enhanced induction of apoptosis, which were combined with an anti-EGFR single-chain Fv fragment (scFv) for targeted delivery to EGFR-positive tumor cells. These immuno-LipoTRAILs (ILTs) bound specifically to EGFR-expressing cells (Colo205) and exhibited increased cytotoxicity compared with that of nontargeted LTs. Compared to that of the soluble TRAIL, the plasma half-life of the functionalized liposomes was strongly extended, and increased antitumor activity of LT and ILT was demonstrated in a xenograft tumor model. Thus, we established a multifunctional liposomal TRAIL formulation (ILT) with improved pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior, characterized by targeted delivery and increased induction of apoptosis due to multivalent TRAIL presentation. PMID:24766622

  2. Intraneural convection enhanced delivery of AAVrh20 for targeting primary sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Pleticha, Josef; Jeng-Singh, Christian; Rezek, Rahaf; Zaibak, Manal; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is an attractive strategy to treat disorders of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), such as chronic pain or peripheral neuropathies. Although intrathecal (IT) administration of AAV has been the standard in the field for targeting the PNS, it lacks anatomical specificity and results in wide rostro-caudal distribution of the vector. An alternative approach is to deliver AAV directly to the peripheral nerve axon. The present study employed convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of a novel AAV serotype, AAVrh20, expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) into rat sciatic nerve investigating its efficacy, anatomical selectivity, and safety, compared to the IT route. Intraneural CED resulted in transduction confined to the ipsilateral L4 and L5 DRG while IT administration led to promiscuous DRG transduction encompassing the entire lumbar region bilaterally. The transduction rate for intraneural AAV administration was similar to IT delivery (24% for L4 and 31.5% for L5 DRG versus 50% for L4 and 19.5% for L5 DRG). Use of hyperosmotic diluent did not further improve the transduction efficiency. AAVrh20 was superior to reference serotypes previously described to be most active for each route. Intraneural CED of AAV was associated with transient allodynia that resolved spontaneously. These findings establish intraneural CED as an alternative to IT administration for AAV mediated gene transfer to the PNS and, based on a reference rodent model, suggest AAVrh20 as a superior serotype for targeting the PNS. PMID:24769104

  3. Maximizing gene delivery efficiencies of cationic helical polypeptides via balanced membrane penetration and cellular targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Yin, Lichen; Song, Ziyuan; Ma, Liang; Tang, Haoyu; Gabrielson, Nathan P.; Lu, Hua; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The application of non-viral gene delivery vectors is often accompanied with the poor correlation between transfection efficiency and the safety profiles of vectors: vectors with high transfection efficiencies often suffer from high toxicities, making it unlikely to improve their efficiencies by increasing the DNA dosage. In the current study, we developed a ternary complex system which consisted of a highly membrane-active cationic helical polypeptide (PVBLG-8), a low-toxic, membrane-inactive cationic helical polypeptide (PVBLG-7) capable of mediating mannose receptor targeting, and DNA. The PVBLG-7 moiety notably enhanced the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of PVBLG-8 in a variety of mannose receptor-expressing cell types (HeLa, COS-7, and Raw 264.7), while it did not compromise the membrane permeability of PVBLG-8 or bring additional cytotoxicities. Because of the simplicity and adjustability of the self-assembly approach, optimal formulations of the ternary complexes with a proper balance between membrane activity and targeting capability were easily identified in each specific cell type. The optimal ternary complexes displayed desired cell tolerability and markedly outperformed the PVBLG-8/DNA binary complexes as well as commercial reagent Lipofectamine™ 2000 in terms of transfection efficiency. This study therefore provides an effective and facile strategy to overcome the efficiency-toxicity poor correlation of non-viral vectors, which contributes insights into the design strategy of effective and safe non-viral gene delivery vectors. PMID:24211080

  4. Carboxymethyl chitosan-mediated synthesis of hyaluronic acid-targeted graphene oxide for cancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huihui; Bremner, David H; Tao, Lei; Li, Heyu; Hu, Juan; Zhu, Limin

    2016-01-01

    In order to enhance the efficiency and specificity of anticancer drug delivery and realize intelligently controlled release, a new drug carrier was developed. Graphene oxide (GO) was first modified with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), followed by conjugation of hyaluronic acid (HA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI). The resulting GO-CMC-FI-HA conjugate was characterized and used as a carrier to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to study in vitro release behavior. The drug loading capacity is as high as 95% and the drug release rate under tumor cell microenvironment of pH 5.8 is significantly higher than that under physiological conditions of pH 7.4. Cell uptake studies show that the GO-CMC-FI-HA/DOX complex can specifically target cancer cells, which are over-expressing CD44 receptors and effectively inhibit their growth. The above results suggest that the functionalized graphene-based material has potential applications for targeted delivery and controlled release of anticancer drugs. PMID:26453853

  5. Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Kuldeep Hemraj; Nath, Lilakant

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A), and concentration of cross linking agent (B) on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24511481

  6. Glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and their specific interaction with tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Ma, Fang-Kui; Dang, Qi-Feng; Liang, Xing-Guo; Chen, Xi-Guang

    2014-12-01

    A novel targeted drug delivery system, glucose-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles (GCNPs), was developed for specific recognition and interaction with glucose transporters (Gluts) over-expressed by tumor cells. GC was synthesized by using succinic acid as a linker between glucosamine and chitosan (CS), and successful synthesis was confirmed by NMR and elemental analysis. GCNPs were prepared by ionic crosslinking method, and characterized in terms of morphology, size, and zeta potential. The optimally prepared nanoparticles showed spherical shapes with an average particle size of (187.9 ± 3.8) nm and a zeta potential of (- 15.43 ± 0.31) mV. The GCNPs showed negligible cytotoxicity to mouse embryo fibroblast and 4T1 cells. Doxorubicin (DOX) could be efficiently entrapped into GCNPs, with a loading capacity and encapsulation efficiency of 20.11% and 64.81%, respectively. DOX-loaded nanoparticles exhibited sustained-release behavior in phosphate buffered saline (pH 7.4). In vitro cellular uptake studies showed that the GCNPs had better endocytosis ability than CSNPs, and the antitumor activity of DOX/GCNPs was 4-5 times effectiveness in 4T1 cell killing than that of DOX/CSNPs. All the results demonstrate that nanoparticles decorated with glucose have specific interactions with cancer cells via the recognition between glucose and Gluts. Therefore, Gluts-targeted GCNPs may be promising delivery agents in cancer therapies.

  7. Systematic Studies of Phase Transitions in Thermo-Responsive Polymers Used in Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Janae; Denmark, Daniel; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2015-03-01

    Thermo-responsive polymers such as poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) can undergo reversible phase transitions in aqueous solutions under varying temperatures. They are ideal candidates for the polymer shell of a targeted drug delivery capsule. Concentration and pH can affect the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the PNIPAM polymer and its physical properties. In this work, a systematic study of the factors that influence the LCST of the PNIPAM polymer mixed with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) during thermal bath heating is presented. A series of PNIPAM solutions with varying concentrations of PNIPAM with MNPs were prepared and characterized using scanning electron microscopy. In-situ transmission measurements were used to determine the LCST of PNIPAM concentrations. A systematic decrease in the LCST was observed as the concentration of PNIPAM was increased. In addition, the impact of pH on the LCST of PNIPAM was examined by increasing the basicity of the PNIPAM solutions by adding adjusted KOH pellets. An increase in the thermal stability of the LCST was observed when the basicity of the PNIPAM solution was increased. The results from this study provide valuable information towards using these thermo-responsive polymers in targeted drug delivery. Principal Investigator

  8. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. PMID:23836972

  9. Targeted Delivery of PSC-RANTES for HIV-1 Prevention using Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Anthony S.; Cost, Marilyn R.; Sassi, Alexandra B.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nanoparticles formulated from the biodegradable co-polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), were investigated as a drug delivery system to enhance tissue uptake, permeation, and targeting for PSC-RANTES anti-HIV-1 activity. Materials and Methods PSC-RANTES nanoparticles formulated via a double emulsion process and characterized in both in vitro and ex vivo systems to determine PSC-RANTES release rate, nanoparticle tissue permeation, and anti-HIV bioactivity. Results Spherical, monodisperse (PDI = 0.098 ± 0.054) PSC-RANTES nanoparticles (d = 256.58 ± 19.57 nm) with an encapsulation efficiency of 82.23 ± 8.35% were manufactured. In vitro release studies demonstrated a controlled release profile of PSC-RANTES (71.48 ± 5.25% release). PSC-RANTES nanoparticle maintained comparable anti-HIV activity with unformulated PSC-RANTES in a HeLa cell-based system with an IC50 of approximately 1pM. In an ex vivo cervical tissue model, PSC-RANTES nanoparticles displayed a fivefold increase in tissue uptake, enhanced tissue permeation, and significant localization at the basal layers of the epithelium over unformulated PSC-RANTES. Conclusions These results indicate that PSC-RANTES can readily be encapsulated into a PLGA nanoparticle drug delivery system, retain its anti-HIV-1 activity, and deliver PSC-RANTES to the target tissue. This is crucial for the success of this drug candidate as a topical microbicide product. PMID:19002569

  10. Mesoporous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite for targeted drug delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Lina; He, Xiaomei; Wu, Zhenyu

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Mesoporous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite was synthesized by a simple, efficient and environmental friendly method. • The prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability. • DOX-loaded Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite exhibited surprising slow drug release behavior and pH-dependent behavior. - Abstract: In this contribution, we introduced a simple, efficient, and green method of preparing a mesoporous Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite (HA) composite. The as-prepared material had a large surface area, high pore volume, and good magnetic separability, which made it suitable for targeted drug delivery systems. The chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX) was used to investigate the drug release behavior of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/HA composite. The drug release profiles displayed a little burst effect and pH-dependent behavior. The release rate of DOX at pH 5.8 was larger than that at pH 7.4, which could be attributed to DOX protonation in acid medium. In addition, the released DOX concentrations remained at 0.83 and 1.39 ?g/ml at pH 7.4 and 5.8, respectively, which indicated slow, steady, and safe release rates. Therefore, the as-prepared Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/hydroxyapatite composite could be an efficient platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery.

  11. Green synthesis of pullulan stabilized gold nanoparticles for cancer targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganeshkumar, Moorthy; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Raja, Modhugoor Devendiran; Subamekala, Muthaiya Kannappan; Suguna, Lonchin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize green chemistry based gold nanoparticles using liver specific biopolymer and to develop a liver cancer targeted drug delivery system with enhanced efficacy and minimal side effects. Pullulan stabilized gold nanoparticles (PAuNPs) were coupled with 5-Fluorouracil (5-Fu) and folic acid (Fa) which could be used as a tool for targeted drug delivery and imaging of cancer. The toxicity of 5-Fu, 5-Fu adsorbed gold nanoparticles (5-Fu@AuNPs), Fa-coupled 5-Fu adsorbed gold nanoparticles (5-Fu@AuNPs-Fa), was studied using zebrafish embryo as an in vivo model. The in vitro cytotoxicity of free 5-Fu, 5-Fu@AuNPs, 5-Fu@AuNPs-Fa against HepG2 cells was studied and found that the amount of 5-Fu required to achieve 50% of growth of inhibition (Ic50) was much lower in 5-Fu@AuNP-Fa than in free 5-Fu, 5-Fu@AuNPs. The in vivo biodistribution of PAuNPs showed that higher amount of gold had been accumulated in liver (54.42 ± 5.96 ?g) than in other organs.

  12. Characterization of cubosomes as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinsheng; Zhou, Yanfang; Han, Ke; Qin, Lingzhen; Dian, Linghui; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-01-01

    Phytantriol- and glycerol monooleate-based cubosomes were produced and characterized as a targeted and sustained transdermal delivery system for capsaicin. The cubosomes were prepared by emulsification and homogenization of phytantriol (F1), glycerol monooleate (F2), and poloxamer dispersions, characterized for morphology and particle size distribution by transmission electron microscope and photon correlation spectroscopy. Their Im3m crystallographic space group was confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. An in vitro release study showed that the cubosomes provided a sustained release system for capsaicin. An in vitro diffusion study conducted using Franz diffusion cells indicated that the skin retention of capsaicin from cubosomes in the stratum corneum was much higher (2.75±0.22 ?g versus 4.32±0.13 ?g, respectively) than that of capsaicin cream (0.72±0.13 ?g). The stress testing showed that the cubosome formulations were stable under strong light and high temperature for up to 10 days. After multiapplications on mouse skin, the irritation of capsaicin cubosomes and cream was light with the least amount of side effects. Overall, the present study demonstrated that cubosomes may be a suitable skin-targeted and sustained delivery system for the transdermal administration of capsaicin. PMID:26345516

  13. Novel therapeutic approaches for pulmonary arterial hypertension: Unique molecular targets to site-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Gupta, Vivek

    2015-08-10

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiopulmonary disorder characterized by increased blood pressure in the small arterioles supplying blood to lungs for oxygenation. Advances in understanding of molecular and cellular biology techniques have led to the findings that PAH is indeed a cascade of diseases exploiting multi-faceted complex pathophysiology, with cellular proliferation and vascular remodeling being the key pathogenic events along with several cellular pathways involved. While current therapies for PAH do provide for amelioration of disease symptoms and acute survival benefits, their full therapeutic potential is hindered by patient incompliance and off-target side effects. To overcome the issues related with current therapy and to devise a more selective therapy, various novel pathways are being investigated for PAH treatment. In addition, inability to deliver anti-PAH drugs to the disease site i.e., distal pulmonary arterioles has been one of the major challenges in achieving improved patient outcomes and improved therapeutic efficacy. Several novel carriers have been explored to increase the selectivity of currently approved anti-PAH drugs and to act as suitable carriers for the delivery of investigational drugs. In the present review, we have discussed potential of various novel molecular pathways/targets including RhoA/Rho kinase, tyrosine kinase, endothelial progenitor cells, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and miRNA in PAH therapeutics. We have also discussed various techniques for site-specific drug delivery of anti-PAH therapeutics so as to improve the efficacy of approved and investigational drugs. This review will provide gainful insights into current advances in PAH therapeutics with an emphasis on site-specific drug payload delivery. PMID:26036906

  14. Nanogel-quantum dot hybrid nanoparticles for live cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Urara; Nomura, Shin-ichiro M.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Hirano, Takashi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; E-mail: akiyoshi.org@tmd.ac.jp

    2005-06-17

    We report here a novel carrier of quantum dots (QDs) for intracellular labeling. Monodisperse hybrid nanoparticles (38 nm in diameter) of QDs were prepared by simple mixing with nanogels of cholesterol-bearing pullulan (CHP) modified with amino groups (CHPNH{sub 2}). The CHPNH{sub 2}-QD nanoparticles were effectively internalized into the various human cells examined. The efficiency of cellular uptake was much higher than that of a conventional carrier, cationic liposome. These hybrid nanoparticles could be a promising fluorescent probe for bioimaging.

  15. Targeted delivery of antibody-based therapeutic and imaging agents to CNS tumors: Crossing the blood-brain-barrier divide

    PubMed Central

    Chacko, Ann-Marie; Li, Chunsheng; Pryma, Daniel A.; Brem, Steven; Coukos, George; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Brain tumors are inherently difficult to treat in large part due to the cellular blood-brain barriers (BBB) that limit the delivery of therapeutics to the tumor tissue from the systemic circulation. Virtually no large-molecules, including antibody-based proteins, can penetrate the BBB. With antibodies fast becoming attractive ligands for highly specific molecular targeting to tumor antigens, a variety of methods are being investigated to enhance the access of these agents to intracranial tumors for imaging or therapeutic applications. Areas covered This review describes the characteristics of the BBB and the vasculature in brain tumors, described as the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB). Antibodies targeted to molecular markers of CNS tumors will be highlighted, and current strategies for enhancing the delivery of antibodies across these cellular barriers into the brain parenchyma to the tumor will be discussed. Non-invasive imaging approaches to assess BBB/BBTB permeability and/or antibody targeting will be presented as a means of guiding the optimal delivery of targeted agents to brain tumors. Expert Opinion Pre-clinical and clinical studies highlight the potential of several approaches in increasing brain tumor delivery across the blood-brain barrier divide. However, each carries its own risks and challenges. There is tremendous potential in using neuroimaging strategies to assist in understanding and defining the challenges to translating and optimizing molecularly-targeted antibody delivery to CNS tumors to improve clinical outcomes. PMID:23751126

  16. Preparation of Quantum Dot/Drug Nanoparticle Formulations for Traceable Targeted Delivery and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Wang, Yucheng; Roy, Indrajit; Rui, Hu; Swihart, Mark T.; Law, Wing-Cheung; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ye, Ling; Liu, Jianwei; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Reynolds, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are luminescent nanocrystals with rich surface chemistry and unique optical properties that make them useful as probes or carriers for traceable targeted delivery and therapy applications. QDs can be functionalized to target specific cells or tissues by conjugating them with targeting ligands. Recent advancement in making biocompatible QD formulations has made these nanocrystals suitable for in vivo applications. This review provides an overview of the preparation of QDs and their use as probes or carriers for traceable, targeted therapy of diseases in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, recent advances in the integration of QDs with drug formulations for therapy and their potential toxicity in vitro and in vivo are highlighted. The current findings and challenges for optimizing QD/drug formulations with respect to optimal size and stability, short-term and long-term toxicity, and in vivo applications are described. Lastly, we attempt to predict key trends in QD/drug formulation development over the next few years and highlight areas of therapy where their use may provide breakthrough results in the near future. PMID:22896770

  17. Octreotide-Mediated Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery via a Cleavable Doxorubicin-Peptide Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Freidel, Christoph; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Musheev, Michael; Niehrs, Christof; Stalla, Günter; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-12-01

    Although recent methods for targeted drug delivery have addressed many of the existing problems of cancer therapy associated with undesirable side effects, significant challenges remain that have to be met before they find significant clinical relevance. One such area is the delicate chemical bond that is applied to connect a cytotoxic drug with targeting moieties like antibodies or peptides. Here we describe a novel platform that can be utilized for the preparation of drug-carrier conjugates in a site-specific manner, which provides excellent versatility and enables triggered release inside cancer cells. Its key feature is a cleavable doxorubicin-octreotide bioconjugate that targets overexpressed somatostatin receptors on tumor cells, where the coupling between the two components was achieved through the first cleavable disulfide-intercalating linker. The tumor targeting ability and suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion in AtT-20 cells by both octreotide and the doxorubicin hybrid were determined via a specific radioimmunoassay. Both substances reduced the hormone secretion to a similar extent, which demonstrated that the tumor homing peptide is able to interact with the relevant cell surface receptors after the attachment of the drug. Effective drug release was quickly accomplished in the presence of the physiological reducing agent glutathione. We also demonstrate the relevance of this scaffold in biological context in cytotoxicity assays with pituitary, pancreatic, and breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26524088

  18. Functional assays for specific targeting and delivery of RNA nanoparticles to brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tae Jin; Haque, Farzin; Vieweger, Mario; Yoo, Ji Young; Kaur, Balveen; Guo, Peixuan; Croce, Carlo M

    2015-01-01

    Cumulative progress in nanoparticle development has opened a new era of targeted delivery of therapeutics to cancer cells and tissue. However, developing proper detection methods has lagged behind resulting in the lack of precise evaluation and monitoring of the systemically administered nanoparticles. RNA nanoparticles derived from the bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor pRNA have emerged as a new generation of drugs for cancer therapy. Multifunctional RNA nanoparticles can be fabricated by bottom-up self-assembly of engineered RNA fragments harboring targeting (RNA aptamer or chemical ligand), therapeutic (siRNA, miRNA, ribozymes, and small molecule drugs), and imaging (fluorophore, radiolabels) modules. We have recently demonstrated that RNA nanoparticles can reach and target intracranial brain tumors in mice upon systemic injection with little or no accumulation in adjacent healthy brain tissues or in major healthy internal organs. Herein, we describe various functional imaging methods (fluorescence confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, fluorescence whole body imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging) to evaluate and monitor RNA nanoparticle targeting to intracranial brain tumors in mice. Such imaging techniques will allow in-depth evaluation of specifically delivered RNA therapeutics to brain tumors. PMID:25896001

  19. A folate-integrated magnetic polymer micelle for MRI and dual targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Bi; Liu, Peng; Huang, Liang; Yue, Caixia; Gao, Duyang; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Wu

    2014-08-01

    This paper devotes a novel micellar structure for cancer theranostics by incorporating magnetic and therapeutic functionalities into a natural sourced targeting polymer vehicle. Heparin-folic acid micelles taking advantage of both excellent loading capability and cancer targeting ability have been employed to simultaneously incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and doxorubicin through an ultrasonication-assisted microemulsion method. In this system, folic acids not only take the responsibility of micelle construction, but also facilitate cellular uptake due to their specific reorganization by MCF-7 cells over-expressing folate receptors. The obtained micelles exhibit good colloidal stability, a high magnetic content, considerable drug loading and sustained in vitro drug release. These clustered SPIONs exhibited high r2 relaxivity (243.65 mM-1 s-1) and further served as efficient probes for MR imaging. Notably, the transport efficiency of these micelles could be significantly improved under an external magnetic field, owing to their quick magnetic response. As a result, the as-proposed micelle shows great potential in multimodal theranostics, including active targeting, MRI diagnosis and drug delivery.This paper devotes a novel micellar structure for cancer theranostics by incorporating magnetic and therapeutic functionalities into a natural sourced targeting polymer vehicle. Heparin-folic acid micelles taking advantage of both excellent loading capability and cancer targeting ability have been employed to simultaneously incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and doxorubicin through an ultrasonication-assisted microemulsion method. In this system, folic acids not only take the responsibility of micelle construction, but also facilitate cellular uptake due to their specific reorganization by MCF-7 cells over-expressing folate receptors. The obtained micelles exhibit good colloidal stability, a high magnetic content, considerable drug loading and sustained in vitro drug release. These clustered SPIONs exhibited high r2 relaxivity (243.65 mM-1 s-1) and further served as efficient probes for MR imaging. Notably, the transport efficiency of these micelles could be significantly improved under an external magnetic field, owing to their quick magnetic response. As a result, the as-proposed micelle shows great potential in multimodal theranostics, including active targeting, MRI diagnosis and drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02484b

  20. Multifunctional polymer-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for pH-responsive targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayer, Stefan; Weiss, Veronika; Herrmann, Annika; Schmidt, Alexandra; Datz, Stefan; Müller, Katharina; Wagner, Ernst; Bein, Thomas; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    A highly stable modular platform, based on the sequential covalent attachment of different functionalities to the surface of core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery is presented. A reversible pH-responsive cap system based on covalently attached poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was developed as drug release mechanism. Our platform offers (i) tuneable interactions and release kinetics with the cargo drug in the mesopores based on chemically orthogonal core-shell design, (ii) an extremely robust and reversible closure and release mechanism based on endosomal acidification of the covalently attached PVP polymer block, (iii) high colloidal stability due to a covalently coupled PEG shell, and (iv) the ability to covalently attach a wide variety of dyes, targeting ligands and other functionalities at the outer periphery of the PEG shell. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in several cell studies, showing pH-triggered release in the endosome, light-triggered endosomal escape with an on-board photosensitizer, and efficient folic acid-based cell targeting.A highly stable modular platform, based on the sequential covalent attachment of different functionalities to the surface of core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery is presented. A reversible pH-responsive cap system based on covalently attached poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was developed as drug release mechanism. Our platform offers (i) tuneable interactions and release kinetics with the cargo drug in the mesopores based on chemically orthogonal core-shell design, (ii) an extremely robust and reversible closure and release mechanism based on endosomal acidification of the covalently attached PVP polymer block, (iii) high colloidal stability due to a covalently coupled PEG shell, and (iv) the ability to covalently attach a wide variety of dyes, targeting ligands and other functionalities at the outer periphery of the PEG shell. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in several cell studies, showing pH-triggered release in the endosome, light-triggered endosomal escape with an on-board photosensitizer, and efficient folic acid-based cell targeting. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods used for the preparation of the nanoparticles, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, nitrogen sorption isotherms, IR and Raman spectroscopy, in situ release experiments, UV-VIS spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy and in vivo experiments, Fig. S1-S18 including supplementing text. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07245f

  1. Targeted Drug Delivery with Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Using Acoustically-Activated Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cherry C.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O.; Dayton, Paul A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. More homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. PMID:24096019

  2. Doxorubicin loaded magnetic gold nanoparticles for in vivo targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Elbialy, Nihal Saad; Fathy, Mohamed Mahmoud; Khalil, Wafaa Mohamed

    2015-07-25

    Treatment of approximately 50% of human cancers includes the use of chemotherapy. The major problem associated with chemotherapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to specific site of the body without inducing normal tissue toxicity. Latterly, magnetic targeted drug delivery (MTD) has been used to improve the therapeutic performance of the chemotherapeutic agents and reduce the severe side effects associated with the conventional chemotherapy for malignant tumors. In this study, we were focused on designing biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles that can be used as a nanocarrier's candidate for MTD regimen. Magnetic gold nanoparticles (MGNPs) were prepared and functionalized with thiol-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG), then loaded with anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). The physical properties of the prepared NPs were characterized using different techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the spherical mono-dispersed nature of the prepared MGNPs with size about 22 nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) assured the existence of both iron and gold elements in the prepared nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy assessment revealed that PEG and DOX molecules were successfully loaded on the MGNPs surfaces, and the amine group of DOX is the active attachment site to MGNPs. In vivo studies proved that magnetic targeted drug delivery can provide a higher accumulation of drug throughout tumor compared with that delivered by passive targeting. This clearly appeared in tumor growth inhibition assessment, biodistribution of DOX in different body organs in addition to the histopathological examinations of treated and untreated Ehrlich carcinoma. To assess the in vivo toxic effect of the prepared formulations, several biochemical parameters such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), urea, uric acid and creatinine were measured. MTD technology not only minimizes the random distribution of the chemotherapeutic agents, but also reduces their side effects to healthy tissues, which are the two primary concerns in conventional cancer therapies. PMID:25997662

  3. Antisense antibiotics: a brief review of novel target discovery and delivery.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Xue, Xiaoyan; Hou, Zheng; Zhou, Ying; Meng, Jingru; Luo, Xiaoxing

    2010-06-01

    The nightmare of multi-drug resistant bacteria will still haunt if no panacea is ever found. Efforts on seeking desirable natural products with bactericidal property and screening chemically modified derivatives of traditional antibiotics have lagged behind the emergence of new multi-drug resistant bacteria. The concept of using antisense antibiotics, now as revolutionary as is on threshold has experienced ups and downs in the past decade. In the past five years, however, significant technology advances in the fields of microbial genomics, structural modification of oligonucleotides and efficient delivery system have led to fundamental progress in the research and in vivo application of this paradigm. The wealthy information provided in the microbial genomics era has allowed the identification and/or validation of a number of essential genes that may serve as possible targets for antisense inhibition; antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) based on the 3rd generation of modified structures, e.g., peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) have shown great potency in gene expression inhibition in a sequence-specific and dosedependent manner at low micromolar concentrations; and cell penetrating peptide mediated delivery system has enabled the effective display of intracellular antisense inhibition of targeted genes both in vitro and in vivo. The new methods show promise in the discovery of novel gene-specific antisense antibiotics that will be useful in the future battle against drug-resistant bacterial infections. This review describes this promising paradigm, the targets that have been identified and the recent technologies on which it is delivered. PMID:20836761

  4. Current strategies for targeted delivery of bio-active drug molecules in the treatment of brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Garg, Tarun; Bhandari, Saurav; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2015-12-01

    Brain tumor is one of the most challenging diseases to treat. The major obstacle in the specific drug delivery to brain is blood-brain barrier (BBB). Mostly available anti-cancer drugs are large hydrophobic molecules which have limited permeability via BBB. Therefore, it is clear that the protective barriers confining the passage of the foreign particles into the brain are the main impediment for the brain drug delivery. Hence, the major challenge in drug development and delivery for the neurological diseases is to design non-invasive nanocarrier systems that can assist controlled and targeted drug delivery to the specific regions of the brain. In this review article, our major focus to treat brain tumor by study numerous strategies includes intracerebral implants, BBB disruption, intraventricular infusion, convection-enhanced delivery, intra-arterial drug delivery, intrathecal drug delivery, injection, catheters, pumps, microdialysis, RNA interference, antisense therapy, gene therapy, monoclonal/cationic antibodies conjugate, endogenous transporters, lipophilic analogues, prodrugs, efflux transporters, direct conjugation of antitumor drugs, direct targeting of liposomes, nanoparticles, solid-lipid nanoparticles, polymeric micelles, dendrimers and albumin-based drug carriers. PMID:25835469

  5. Strategies of targeting oral drug delivery systems to the colon and their potential use for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Khan, Mansoor A

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women. Often, surgical intervention remains the choice in treating CRC. Traditional dosage forms used for treating CRC deliver drug to wanted as well as unwanted sites of drug action resulting in several adverse side effects. Targeted oral drug delivery systems are being investigated to target and deliver chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive agents directly to colon and rectum. Site-specific delivery of a drug to colon increases its concentration at the target site, and thus requires a lower dose with reduced incidence of side effects. The major obstacle to be overcome for successful targeting of drug to colon through oral route is that drug absorption/degradation must be avoided in stomach and small intestine before the dosage form reaches colon. The review includes discussion of physiological factors that must be considered when targeting drugs directly to colorectal region, an outline on drugs used for treatment and prevention of CRC, and a brief description of various types of colon-targeted oral drug delivery systems. The focus is on the assessment of various formulation approaches being investigated for oral colon-specific delivery of drugs used in the treatment and prevention of CRC. PMID:22681390

  6. SiRNA In Vivo-Targeted Delivery to Murine Dendritic Cells by Oral Administration of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Kun; Liu, Zhongtian; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Tingting; Zhang, Zhiying

    2016-01-01

    SiRNA therapeutics promise a future where any target in the transcriptome could be potentially addressed. However, the delivery of SiRNAs and targeting of particular cell types or organs are major challenges. A novel, efficient, and safe delivery system for promising the introduction of SiRNAs into particular cell types within living organisms is of great significance. Our previous studies have proved that recombinant protein (MSTN) and exogenous gene (EGFP) as vaccines, and furthermore functional CD40 shRNA expression can be delivered into dendritic cells (DCs) in mouse by oral administration of recombinant yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Here, we describe the details of the promising and innovative approach based on oral administration of recombinant yeast that allows in vivo-targeted delivery of functional SiRNA to murine intestinal DCs. PMID:26472450

  7. Unlocking a Caged Lysosomal Protein from a Polymeric Nanogel with a pH Trigger

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A polymeric nanogel has been used to sequester and turn off a lysosomal protein, acid ?-glucosidase (GAA). The nanogel contains a ?-thiopropionate cross-linker, which endows the nanogel with pH-sensitivity. While encapsulation of the enzyme fully turns off its activity, approximately 75% of the activity is recovered upon reducing the pH to 5.0. The recovered activity is ascribed to pH-induced degradation of the ?-thiopropionate cross-linker causing the swelling of the nanogel and ultimately causing the release of the enzyme. We envision that strategies for sequestering protein molecules and releasing them at lysosomal pH might open up new directions for therapeutic treatment of lysosomal storage diseases. PMID:25291086

  8. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to increase O2 in tumors, enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapies.

  9. Localized Increase of Tissue Oxygen Tension by Magnetic Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases, without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs) synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector, L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coaded PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg/kg) to hamster instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. Magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after L35-PMNPs administration with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNP without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNP with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamics changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue, without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to increase O2 in tumors enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapies. PMID:24920392

  10. Contrast ultrasound targeted treatment of gliomas in mice via drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery and microvascular ablation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Caitlin W; Price, Richard J

    2010-01-01

    We are developing minimally-invasive contrast agent microbubble based therapeutic approaches in which the permeabilization and/or ablation of the microvasculature are controlled by varying ultrasound pulsing parameters. Specifically, we are testing whether such approaches may be used to treat malignant brain tumors through drug delivery and microvascular ablation. Preliminary studies have been performed to determine whether targeted drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery can be facilitated by the ultrasound mediated destruction of "composite" delivery agents comprised of 100nm poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) nanoparticles that are adhered to albumin shelled microbubbles. We denote these agents as microbubble-nanoparticle composite agents (MNCAs). When targeted to subcutaneous C6 gliomas with ultrasound, we observed an immediate 4.6-fold increase in nanoparticle delivery in MNCA treated tumors over tumors treated with microbubbles co-administered with nanoparticles and a 8.5 fold increase over non-treated tumors. Furthermore, in many cancer applications, we believe it may be desirable to perform targeted drug delivery in conjunction with ablation of the tumor microcirculation, which will lead to tumor hypoxia and apoptosis. To this end, we have tested the efficacy of non-theramal cavitation-induced microvascular ablation, showing that this approach elicits tumor perfusion reduction, apoptosis, significant growth inhibition, and necrosis. Taken together, these results indicate that our ultrasound-targeted approach has the potential to increase therapeutic efficiency by creating tumor necrosis through microvascular ablation and/or simultaneously enhancing the drug payload in gliomas. PMID:21206463

  11. Hepatic Stellate Cell–Targeted Delivery of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Transgene via Bile Duct Infusion Enhances Its Expression at Fibrotic Foci to Regress Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Liver Fibrosis

    E-print Network

    Narmada, Balakrishnan Chakrapani

    Liver fibrosis generates fibrotic foci with abundant activated hepatic stellate cells and excessive collagen deposition juxtaposed with healthy regions. Targeted delivery of antifibrotic therapeutics to hepatic stellate ...

  12. Inorganic nanovehicle for potential targeted drug delivery to tumor cells, tumor optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shiyong; Gao, Xuechuan; Baigude, Huricha; Hai, Xiao; Zhang, Renfei; Gao, Xiaolong; Shen, Beibei; Li, Zhao; Tan, Zhibing; Su, Haiquan

    2015-03-11

    In this work, an inorganic multifunctional nanovehicle was tailored as a carrier to deliver anticancer drug for tumor optical imaging and therapy. The nanovehicle could be used as a dually targeted drug nanovehicle by bonded magnetical (passive) and folic acid (active) targeting capabilities. In addition, it was developed using rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a fluorescence reagent, and an ?-zirconium phosphate nanoplatform (Zr(HPO4)2·H2O, abbreviated as ?-ZrP) as the anticancer drug nanovehicle. The novel drug-release system was designed and fabricated by intercalation of ?-ZrP with magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles and anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), followed by reacting with a folate acid-chitosan-rhodamine6G (FA-CHI-R6G) complex, and then ?-ZrP intercalated with Fe3O4 nanoparticles and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was successfully encapsulated into chitosan (CHI). The resultant multifunctional drug delivery system was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, photoluminescence spectra, magnetometry, fluorescence microscopy imaging studies and other characterization methods. Simultaneously, the drug release in vitro on the obtained nanocomposites that exhibited a sustained release behavior was carried out in buffer solution at 37 °C, which demonstrated clearly that the nanocomposites shown a sustained release behavior. Meanwhile, cell culture experiments also indicated that the drug-release system had the potential to be used as an dually targeted drug nanovehicle into the tumor cells. PMID:25693506

  13. VEGF???-conjugated mesoporous silica nanoparticle: a tumor targeted drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shreya; Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Valdovinos, Hector F; Hernandez, Reinier; Shi, Sixiang; Barnhart, Todd E; Cai, Weibo

    2014-12-10

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFR) signaling cascade plays a critical role in tumor angiogenesis and metastasis and has been correlated with several poorly prognostic cancers such as malignant gliomas. Although a number of anti-VEGFR therapies have been conceived, inefficient drug administration still limits their therapeutic efficacy and raises concerns of potential side effects. In the present work, we propose the use of uniform mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for VEGFR targeted positron emission tomography imaging and delivery of the anti-VEGFR drug (i.e., sunitinib) in human glioblastoma (U87MG) bearing murine models. MSNs were synthesized, characterized and modified with polyethylene glycol, anti-VEGFR ligand VEGF121 and radioisotope (64)Cu, followed by extensive in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo studies. Our results demonstrated that a significantly higher amount of sunitinib could be delivered to the U87MG tumor by targeting VEGFR when compared with the non-targeted counterparts. The as-developed VEGF121-conjugated MSN could become another attractive nanoplatform for the design of future theranostic nanomedicine. PMID:25353068

  14. In Vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Kevin; Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiaorho; Bentz, Brian; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip

    2012-02-01

    We describe an approach for the evaluation of targeted anti-cancer drug delivery in vivo. The method emulates the drug release and activation process through acceptor release from a targeted donor-acceptor pair that exhibits fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case, folate targeting of the cancer cells is used - 40 % of all human cancers, including ovarian, lung, breast, kidney, brain and colon cancer, over-express folate receptors. We demonstrate the reconstruction of the spatially-dependent FRET parameters in a mouse model and in tissue phantoms. The FRET parameterization is incorporated into a source for a diffusion equation model for photon transport in tissue, in a variant of optical diffusion tomography (ODT) called FRET-ODT. In addition to the spatially-dependent tissue parameters in the diffusion model (absorption and diffusion coefficients), the FRET parameters (donor-acceptor distance and yield) are imaged as a function of position. Modulated light measurements are made with various laser excitation positions and a gated camera. More generally, our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease at the molecular level by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue, and allows the nanometer FRET ruler to be utilized in deep tissue.

  15. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique "microenvironment" was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a "Trojan Horse" strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26519648

  16. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a potential targeting agent for delivery of boron to malignant gliomas

    SciTech Connect

    Capala, J.; Barth, R.F.; Adams, D.M.; Bailey, M.Q.; Soloway, A.H.; Carlsson, J.

    1994-12-31

    The majority of high grade gliomas express an amplified epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, and this often is associated with an increase in cell surface receptor expression. The rapid internalization and degradation of EGF-EGFR complexes, as well as their high affinity make EGF a potential targeting agent for delivery of {sup 10}B to tumor cells with an amplified number of EGFR. Human glioma cells can expresses as many as 10{sup 5} {minus}10{sup 6} EGF receptors per cell, and if these could be saturated with boronated EGF, then > 10{sup 8} boron atoms would be delivered per cell. Since EGF has a comparatively low molecular weight ({approximately} 6 kD), this has allowed us to construct relatively small bioconjugates containing {approximately} 900 boron atoms per EGF molecule{sup 3}, which also had high affinity for EGFR on tumor cells. In the present study, the feasibility of using EGF receptors as a potential target for therapy of gliomas was investigated by in vivo scintigraphic studies using {sup 131}I{minus} or {sup 99m}{Tc}-labeled EGF in a rat brain tumor model. Our results indicate that intratumorally delivered boron- EGF conjugates might be useful for targeting EGFR on glioma cells if the boron containing moiety of the conjugates persisted intracellularly. Further studies are required, however, to determine if this approach can be used for BNCT of the rat glioma.

  17. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. PMID:26276694

  18. Tuning Surface Microstructure and Gradient Property of Polymer by Photopolymerizable Polysiloxane-modified Nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cong; Liu, JianCheng; Sun, Fang; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a series of photopolymerizable polysiloxane-modified nanogels for regulating surface microstructure and gradient property of polymers, which were synthesized by solution polymerization under different feed ratios of a methacrylate-modified polysiloxane, urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and isobornyl methacrylate (IBMA) in the presence of a thiol chain transfer agent. The nanogel structure and composition were characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscope (TEM), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The dispersion of these nanogels in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) can reduce the onset and magnitude of shrinkage stress during polymerization without compromise to mechanical properties of the resulting polymers. Most importantly, as demonstrated by elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the nanogels exhibit good self-floating ability in the monomer/polymer matrix and the increase of polysiloxane content in the nanogel can enhance the self-floating capability due to the lower surface tension and energy associated with the polysiloxane component. As a result, the polysiloxane-modified nanogels can spontaneously form a concentration gradient that can be locked in upon photopolymerization leading to a well-controlled heterogeneous polymer that presents a gradient change in thermal stability. With the increase of polysiloxane content, the thermal stability of the polymer was improved significantly. Furthermore, the enrichment of the nanogel on the surface resulting from the good self-floating ability can reduce the dispersion surface energy of gradient polymer film and generate a more hydrophobic surface with altered surface microstructure. These photopolymerizable polysiloxane-modified nanogels are demonstrated to have potential broad application in the preparation of gradient polymer with controlled surface properties. PMID:25045518

  19. Effect of Varying Magnetic Fields on Targeted Gene Delivery of Nucleic Acid-Based Molecules.

    PubMed

    Oral, Ozlem; C?k?m, Taha; Zuvin, Merve; Unal, Ozlem; Yagci-Acar, Havva; Gozuacik, Devrim; Ko?ar, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Several physical methods have been developed to introduce nucleic acid expression vectors into mammalian cells. Magnetic transfection (magnetofection) is one such transfection method, and it involves binding of nucleic acids such as DNA, RNA or siRNA to magnetic nanoparticles followed by subsequent exposure to external magnetic fields. However, the challenge between high efficiency of nucleic acid uptake by cells and toxicity was not totally resolved. Delivery of nucleic acids and their transport to the target cells require carefully designed and controlled systems. In this study, we introduced a novel magnetic system design providing varying magnet turn speeds and magnetic field directions. The system was tested in the magnetofection of human breast (MCF-7), prostate (DU-145, PC-3) and bladder (RT-4) cancer cell lines using green fluorescent protein DNA as a reporter. Polyethylenimine coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) were used as nucleic acid carriers. Adsorption of PEI on SPION improved the cytocompatibility dramatically. Application of external magnetic field increased intracellular uptake of nanoparticles and transfection efficiency without any additional cytotoxicity. We introduce our novel magnetism-based method as a promising tool for enhanced nucleic acid delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:25963582

  20. Intranasal administration of carbamazepine to mice: a direct delivery pathway for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Serralheiro, Ana; Alves, Gilberto; Fortuna, Ana; Falcão, Amílcar

    2014-08-18

    The currently available antiepileptic drugs are typically administered via oral or intravenous (IV) routes which commonly exhibit high systemic distribution into non-targeted tissues, leading to peripheral adverse effects and limited brain uptake. In order to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the antiepileptic drug therapy, alternative administration strategies have been investigated. The purpose of the present study was to assess the pharmacokinetics of carbamazepine administered via intranasal (IN) and IV routes to mice, and to investigate whether a direct transport of the drug from nose to brain could be involved. The similar pharmacokinetic profiles obtained in all matrices following both administration routes indicate that, after IN delivery, carbamazepine reaches quickly and extensively the bloodstream, achieving the brain predominantly via systemic circulation. However, the uneven biodistribution of carbamazepine through the brain regions with higher concentrations in the olfactory bulb and frontal cortex following IN instillation, in comparison with the homogenous brain distribution pattern after IV injection, strongly suggests the involvement of a direct transport of carbamazepine from nose to brain. Therefore, it seems that IN delivery represents a suitable and promising alternative route to administer carbamazepine not only for the chronically use of the drug but also in emergency conditions. PMID:24813112

  1. BBB-targeting, protein-based nanomedicines for drug and nucleic acid delivery to the CNS.

    PubMed

    Peluffo, Hugo; Unzueta, Ugutz; Negro-Demontel, María Luciana; Xu, Zhikun; Váquez, Esther; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The increasing incidence of diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS) demands the urgent development of efficient drugs. While many of these medicines are already available, the Blood Brain Barrier and to a lesser extent, the Blood Spinal Cord Barrier pose physical and biological limitations to their diffusion to reach target tissues. Therefore, efforts are needed not only to address drug development but specially to design suitable vehicles for delivery into the CNS through systemic administration. In the context of the functional and structural versatility of proteins, recent advances in their biological fabrication and a better comprehension of the physiology of the CNS offer a plethora of opportunities for the construction and tailoring of plain nanoconjugates and of more complex nanosized vehicles able to cross these barriers. We revise here how the engineering of functional proteins offers drug delivery tools for specific CNS diseases and more transversally, how proteins can be engineered into smart nanoparticles or 'artificial viruses' to afford therapeutic requirements through alternative administration routes. PMID:25698504

  2. Protein nanocages for self-triggered nuclear delivery of DNA-targeted chemotherapeutics in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Bellini, Michela; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Sommaruga, Silvia; Fiandra, Luisa; Truffi, Marta; Rizzuto, Maria A; Colombo, Miriam; Tortora, Paolo; Corsi, Fabio; Prosperi, Davide

    2014-12-28

    A genetically engineered apoferritin variant consisting of 24 heavy-chain subunits (HFn) was produced to achieve a cumulative delivery of an antitumor drug, which exerts its cytotoxic action by targeting the DNA at the nucleus of human cancer cells with subcellular precision. The rationale of our approach is based on exploiting the natural arsenal of defense of cancer cells to stimulate them to recruit large amounts of HFn nanoparticles loaded with doxorubicin inside their nucleus in response to a DNA damage, which leads to a programmed cell death. After demonstrating the selectivity of HFn for representative cancer cells compared to healthy fibroblasts, doxorubicin-loaded HFn was used to treat the cancer cells. The results from confocal microscopy and DNA damage assays proved that loading of doxorubicin in HFn nanoparticles increased the nuclear delivery of the drug, thus enhancing doxorubicin efficacy. Doxorubicin-loaded HFn acts as a "Trojan Horse": HFn was internalized in cancer cells faster and more efficiently compared to free doxorubicin, then promptly translocated into the nucleus following the DNA damage caused by the partial release in the cytoplasm of encapsulated doxorubicin. This self-triggered translocation mechanism allowed the drug to be directly released in the nuclear compartment, where it exerted its toxic action. This approach was reliable and straightforward providing an antiproliferative effect with high reproducibility. The particular self-assembling nature of HFn nanocage makes it a versatile and tunable nanovector for a broad range of molecules suitable both for detection and treatment of cancer cells. PMID:25312541

  3. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    E-print Network

    S. Heidegger; S. Niedermayer; A. Schmidt; D. Gößl; C. Argyo; S. Endres; T. Bein; C. Bourquin

    2015-09-03

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications.

  4. Galactoxyloglucan-modified nanocarriers of doxorubicin for improved tumor-targeted drug delivery with minimal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Manu M; Aravind, S R; George, Suraj K; Pillai, K Raveendran; Mini, S; Sreelekha, T T

    2014-11-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is commonly used to treat human malignancies, and the efficacy of Dox can be maximized by limiting toxicity when combined with nanoparticles. PST-Dox nanoparticles were prepared via conjugation of doxorubicin to galactoxyloglucan polysaccharide (PST001) isolated from Tamarindus indica (Ti), and by ionic gelation with tripolyphosphate (TPP). This formulation possessed superior therapeutic efficiency because of the small size and increased surface-to-volume ratio. The PST-Dox nanoparticles exhibited a pH-responsive Dox release in the acidic pH of 4.5, favoring as high as 90% Dox release in a sustainable manner. PST-Dox was characterized and evaluated for its in vitro and in vivo anticancer effects. Surprisingly, this nanoparticle formulation retained the cytotoxic effects of PST001 even at lower concentrations. In vitro studies confirmed the selective cytotoxicity of PST-Dox in cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis. In vivo toxicity studies demonstrated a lower LD50 for Dox and a higher LD50 for the PST-Dox. Evaluation of the biochemical, hematological and histopathological parameters in mice supported the safety and efficacy of this formulation compared to Dox. Biodistribution data substantiated the tumor-specific delivery of these particles. Although prospective studies are warranted, in a complex disease such as cancer, cell-selective and pH-sensitive nanoparticle-based targeted drug delivery systems should be used as an effective choice over standard agents, such as doxorubicin. PMID:26000385

  5. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Heidegger, Simon; Gößl, Dorothée; Schmidt, Alexandra; Niedermayer, Stefan; Argyo, Christian; Endres, Stefan; Bein, Thomas; Bourquin, Carole

    2015-12-23

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1?. In contrast, when surface-functionalized MSN with a pH-responsive polymer capping were loaded with an immune-activating drug, the synthetic Toll-like receptor 7 agonist R848, a strong immune response was provoked. We thus demonstrate that MSN represent an efficient drug delivery vehicle to primary immune cells that is both non-toxic and non-inflammagenic, which is a prerequisite for the use of these particles in biomedical applications. PMID:26659601

  6. Fabrication of high specificity hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles assisted by Eudragit for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    She, Xiaodong; Chen, Lijue; Velleman, Leonora; Li, Chengpeng; Zhu, Haijin; He, Canzhong; Wang, Tao; Shigdar, Sarah; Duan, Wei; Kong, Lingxue

    2015-05-01

    Hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNs) are one of the most promising carriers for effective drug delivery due to their large surface area, high volume for drug loading and excellent biocompatibility. However, the non-ionic surfactant templated HMSNs often have a broad size distribution and a defective mesoporous structure because of the difficulties involved in controlling the formation and organization of micelles for the growth of silica framework. In this paper, a novel "Eudragit assisted" strategy has been developed to fabricate HMSNs by utilising the Eudragit nanoparticles as cores and to assist in the self-assembly of micelle organisation. Highly dispersed mesoporous silica spheres with intact hollow interiors and through pores on the shell were fabricated. The HMSNs have a high surface area (670 m(2)/g), small diameter (120 nm) and uniform pore size (2.5 nm) that facilitated the effective encapsulation of 5-fluorouracil within HMSNs, achieving a high loading capacity of 194.5 mg(5-FU)/g(HMSNs). The HMSNs were non-cytotoxic to colorectal cancer cells SW480 and can be bioconjugated with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) for efficient and specific cell internalization. The high specificity and excellent targeting performance of EGF grafted HMSNs have demonstrated that they can become potential intracellular drug delivery vehicles for colorectal cancers via EGF-EGFR interaction. PMID:25617610

  7. Non-Ionic, Thermo-Responsive DEA/DMA Nanogels: Synthesis, Characterization, and Use for DNA Separations by Microchip Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xihua; Sun, Mingyun; Barron, Annelise E.

    2011-01-01

    Thermo-responsive polymer “nanogels” (crosslinked hydrogel particles with sub-100 nm diameters) are intriguing for many potential applications in biotechnology and medicine. There have been relatively few reports of electrostatically neutral, thermosensitive nanogels comprising a high fraction of hydrophilic co-monomer. Here we demonstrate the syntheses and characterization of novel, nonionic nanogels based on random N,N-diethylacrylamide (DEA) / N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) copolymers, made by free-radical, surfactant-free dispersion polymerization. The volume phase transition temperatures of these DEA/DMA nanogels are strongly affected by co-monomer composition, providing a way to “tune” the phase transition temperature of these non-ionic nanogels. While DEA nanogels (comprising no DMA) can be obtained at 70°C by standard emulsion precipitation, DEA/DMA random copolymer nanogels can be obtained only in a particular range of temperatures, above the initial phase transition temperature and below the critical precipitation temperature of the DEA/DMA copolymer, controlled by co-monomer composition. Increasing percentages of DMA in the nanogels raises the phase transition temperature, and attenuates and broadens it as well. We find that concentrated DEA/DMA nanogel dispersions are optically clear at room temperature. This good optical clarity was exploited for their use in a novel DNA sieving matrix for microfluidic chip electrophoresis. An ultrafast, high-efficiency dsDNA separation was achieved in less than 120 seconds for dsDNA ranging from 75 bp-15000 bp. PMID:21392778

  8. Anti-HER2/neu peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mu, Qingxin; Kievit, Forrest M; Kant, Rajeev J; Lin, Guanyou; Jeon, Mike; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-29

    Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (?30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells. PMID:26469772

  9. Targeted Delivery of Magnetic Cobalt Nanoparticles to the Eye Following Systemic Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengler, Mirko; Saatchi, Katayoun; Dailey, James P.; Matsubara, Joanne; Mikelberg, Frederick S.; Häfeli, Urs O.; Yeung, Sonia N.

    2010-12-01

    The eye offers a unique environment in the body to study progression and response to treatment of various ocular, vascular, and neurologic diseases as they occur in vivo. Due to its clear optical media, we can directly view blood vessels and nerve tissue, which often reflect the health of these tissues in the rest of the body. There are limitations to topical, periocular, or intraocular drug delivery that include access of the drug to the posterior segment of the eye and complications such as local scarring, hemorrhage, retinal detachment, cataract formation, or infection. The aim of this proof-of-concept study was to determine if systemically delivered magnetic cobalt nanoparticles (Co-MNP) could be directed to the eye of C57Bl mice via a unidirectional magnetic field. Both radioactive biodistribution studies and confocal imaging confirmed the increased presence of magnetic particles in the eye following magnetic targeting.

  10. Current understanding of nasal morphology and physiology as a drug delivery target.

    PubMed

    Suman, Julie D

    2013-02-01

    The nasal cavity is both a target for locally and systemically acting medications. An adequate treatment for rhinosinusitis continues to be an unmet need. With the recent approval of intranasal medications for the treatment of pain, the nasal cavity continues to be a viable route for rapid uptake into the systemic circulation. Despite the opportunities, there is still a void in the knowledge of how therapeutic entities interact with the nasal epithelium. In addition, new opportunities in mucosal immunity via nasal vaccination as well as the elusive nose to brain uptake continue to drive innovation. To facilitate understanding of the issues involved that facilitate drug delivery in the nose, a review of nasal morphology and physiology is presented. PMID:25787863

  11. Immune response to functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    E-print Network

    Heidegger, S; Schmidt, A; Gößl, D; Argyo, C; Endres, S; Bein, T; Bourquin, C

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) have attracted substantial attention with regard to their high potential for targeted drug delivery. For future clinical applications it is crucial to address safety concerns and understand the potential immunotoxicity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we assess the biocompatibility and functionality of multifunctional MSN in freshly isolated, primary murine immune cells. We show that the functionalized silica nanoparticles are rapidly and efficiently taken up into the endosomal compartment by specialized antigen-presenting cells such as dendritic cells. The silica nanoparticles showed a favorable toxicity profile and did not affect the viability of primary immune cells from the spleen in relevant concentrations. Cargo-free MSN induced only very low immune responses in primary cells as determined by surface expression of activation markers and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as Interleukin-6, -12 and -1\\beta. In contrast, when surface-funct...

  12. Superparamagnetic calcium ferrite nanoparticles synthesized using a simple sol-gel method for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, N H; Ghazali, M J; Majlis, B Y; Yunas, J; Razali, M

    2015-08-17

    The calcium ferrite nano-particles (CaFe2O4 NPs) were synthesized using a sol-gel method for targeted drug delivery application. The proposed nano-particles were initially prepared by mixing calcium and iron nitrates that were added with citric acid in order to prevent agglomeration and subsequently calcined at a temperature of 550°C to obtain small particle size. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by using an XRD (X-ray diffraction), which revealed the configuration of orthorhombic structures of the CaFe2O4 nano-particles. A crystallite size of ~13.59 nm was obtained using a Scherer's formula. Magnetic analysis using a VSM (Vibrating Sample Magnetometer analysis), revealed that the synthesized particles exhibited super-paramagnetic behavior having magnetization saturation of approximately 88.3emu/g. Detailed observation via the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the calcium ferrite nano-particles were spherical in shape. PMID:26405858

  13. Targeted delivery of curcumin to tumors via PEG-derivatized FTS-based micellar system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yichao; Zhang, Xiaolan; Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-05-01

    Curcumin and S-trans, trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) are two promising anticancer agents. In this study, we demonstrated that the two agents exerted significant synergy in antitumor activity in various types of cancer cells with combination indices ranging from 0.46 to 0.98 (a value of less than unity indicates synergism). We have further shown that synergistic-targeted co-delivery of the two agents can be achieved via formulating curcumin in polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized FTS-based nanomicellar system. Curcumin formulated in PEG-FTS micelles had small size of around 20 nm. The nanomicellar curcumin demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity towards several cancer cell lines in vitro. Intravenous application of curcumin-loaded micelle (20 mg kg(-1) curcumin) led to a significantly more effective inhibition of tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model (4T1.2) than curcumin formulated in Cremophor/EL (P?

  14. A photochemical approach for controlled drug release in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Seok Ki; Verma, Manisha; Silpe, Justin; Moody, Ryan E.; Tang, Kenny; Hanson, Jeffrey J.; Baker, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Photochemistry provides a unique mechanism that enables the active control of drug release in cancer-targeting drug delivery. This study investigates the light-mediated release of methotrexate, an anticancer drug, using a photocleavable linker strategy based on o-nitrobenzyl protection. We evaluated two types of the o-nitrobenzyl-linked methotrexate for the drug release study and further extended the study to a fifth-generation poly(amidoamine) dendrimer carrier covalently conjugated with methotrexate via the o-nitrobenzyl linker. We performed the drug release studies by using a combination of three standard analytical methods that include UV/vis spectrometry, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and anal. HPLC. This article reports that methotrexate is released by the photochemical mechanism in an actively controlled manner. The rate of the drug release varies in response to multiple control parameters, including linker design, light wavelength, exposure time, and the pH of the medium where the drug release occurs. PMID:22225916

  15. Preparation of Poly Acrylic Acid-Poly Acrylamide Composite Nanogels by Radiation Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbaniazar, Parisa; Sepehrianazar, Amir; Eskandani, Morteza; Nabi-Meibodi, Mohsen; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nanogel, a nanoparticle prepared from a cross-linked hydrophilic polymer network, has many biomedical applications. A radiation technique has recently been introduced as one of the appropriate methods for the preparation of polymeric nanogels due to its additive-free initiation and easy control procedure. Methods: We have investigated the formation of nano-sized polymeric gels, based on the radiation-induced inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking of the inter-polymer complex (IPC) of polyacrylamide (PAAm) and polyacrylic acide (PAAc). Results: The results indicated that the prepared polymeric complex composed of PAAm and PAAc was converted into nanogel by irradiation under different doses (1, 3, 5 and 7 kGy). This was due to inter- and intra-molecular cross-linking at the range of 446-930 nm as characterized by the photon correlation spectroscopy method. Increasing the irradiation dose reduced the size of nanoparticles to 3 kGy; however, the higher doses increased the size and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated the nanogel formation in the reported size by particle size and showed the microcapsule structure of the prepared nanogels. Biocompatibility of nanogels were assessed and proved by MTT assay. Conclusion: It was concluded that low dose irradiation can be successfully applied for nanometre-ranged hydrogel. PMID:26236667

  16. Syringe Injectable Electronics: Precise Targeted Delivery with Quantitative Input/Output Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Hong, Guosong; Fu, Tian-Ming; Zhou, Tao; Schuhmann, Thomas G; Huang, Jinlin; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-10-14

    Syringe-injectable mesh electronics with tissue-like mechanical properties and open macroporous structures is an emerging powerful paradigm for mapping and modulating brain activity. Indeed, the ultraflexible macroporous structure has exhibited unprecedented minimal/noninvasiveness and the promotion of attractive interactions with neurons in chronic studies. These same structural features also pose new challenges and opportunities for precise targeted delivery in specific brain regions and quantitative input/output (I/O) connectivity needed for reliable electrical measurements. Here, we describe new results that address in a flexible manner both of these points. First, we have developed a controlled injection approach that maintains the extended mesh structure during the "blind" injection process, while also achieving targeted delivery with ca. 20 ?m spatial precision. Optical and microcomputed tomography results from injections into tissue-like hydrogel, ex vivo brain tissue, and in vivo brains validate our basic approach and demonstrate its generality. Second, we present a general strategy to achieve up to 100% multichannel I/O connectivity using an automated conductive ink printing methodology to connect the mesh electronics and a flexible flat cable, which serves as the standard "plug-in" interface to measurement electronics. Studies of resistance versus printed line width were used to identify optimal conditions, and moreover, frequency-dependent noise measurements show that the flexible printing process yields values comparable to commercial flip-chip bonding technology. Our results address two key challenges faced by syringe-injectable electronics and thereby pave the way for facile in vivo applications of injectable mesh electronics as a general and powerful tool for long-term mapping and modulation of brain activity in fundamental neuroscience through therapeutic biomedical studies. PMID:26317328

  17. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is capable of targeting diseased tissue and preventing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both in vitro and ex vivo models.

  18. Complete Regression of Xenograft Tumors upon Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel via ?-? Stacking Stabilized Polymeric Micelles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yang; van der Meel, Roy; Theek, Benjamin; Blenke, Erik Oude; Pieters, Ebel H.E.; Fens, Marcel H.A.M.; Ehling, Josef; Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Storm, Gert; van Nostrum, Cornelus F.; Lammers, Twan; Hennink, Wim E.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer patients with taxane-based chemotherapeutics, such as paclitaxel (PTX), is complicated by their narrow therapeutic index. Polymeric micelles are attractive nanocarriers for tumor-targeted delivery of PTX, as they can be tailored to encapsulate large amounts of hydrophobic drugs and achieve prolonged circulation kinetics. As a result, PTX deposition in tumors is increased while drug exposure to healthy tissues is reduced. However, many PTX-loaded micelle formulations suffer from low stability and fast drug release in the circulation, limiting their suitability for systemic drug targeting. To overcome these limitations, we have developed paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded micelles which are stable without chemical crosslinking and covalent drug attachment. These micelles are characterized by excellent loading capacity and strong drug retention, attributed to ?-? stacking interaction between PTX and the aromatic groups of the polymer chains in the micellar core. The micelles are based on methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-(N-(2-benzoyloxypropyl) methacrylamide) (mPEG-b-p(HPMAm-Bz)) block copolymers, which improved the pharmacokinetics and the biodistribution of PTX, and substantially increased PTX tumor accumulation (by more than 2000%; as compared to Taxol® or control micellar formulations). Improved biodistribution and tumor accumulation were confirmed by hybrid ?CT-FMT imaging using near-infrared labeled micelles and payload. The PTX-loaded micelles were well tolerated at different doses while they induced complete tumor regression in two different xenograft models (i.e. A431 and MDA-MB-468). Our findings consequently indicate that ?-? stacking-stabilized polymeric micelles are promising carriers to improve the delivery of highly hydrophobic drugs to tumors and to increase their therapeutic index. PMID:25831471

  19. Combination of Antibody Targeting and PTD-Mediated Intracellular Toxin Delivery for Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ah Min, Kyoung; Lee, Kyuri; Moon, Cheol; Balthasar, Joseph P.; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    The bottlenecks of current chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer lie in the ineffectiveness of the existing anti-cancer small molecule drugs as well as the dose-limiting toxicity caused by the nonselective action on normal tissues by such drugs. To address these problems, we introduce a novel therapeutic strategy based on tumor targeting using a non-internalizing anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and intracellular delivery of the extremely potent yet cell-impermeable protein toxin gelonin via the aid of a cell-penetrating peptide (also termed as protein transduction domain; PTD). A chimeric TAT-gelonin fusion protein was genetically engineered, and it displayed remarkably enhanced anti-cancer activity against human colorectal cancer cells, with IC50 values being several orders of magnitude lower than the unmodified gelonin. On the other hand, a chemically synthesized conjugate of heparin and a murine anti-CEA mAb, T84.66 (termed T84.66-Hep) was found able to bind highly specifically to CEA over-expressing LS174T colorectal cancer cells. When mixing together, TAT-gelonin and T84.66-Hep could associate tightly and automatically through an electrostatic interaction between the cationic TAT and anionic heparin. In preliminary in vivo studies using LS174T s.c. xenograft tumor bearing mouse, selective and significantly augmented (58-fold) delivery of TAT-gelonin to the tumor target was observed, when compared with administration of TAT-gelonin alone. More importantly, efficacy studies also revealed that only the TAT-gelonin/T84.66-Hep complex yielded a significant inhibition of tumor growth (46%) without causing gelonin-induced systemic toxicity. Overall, this study suggested a generic strategy to effectively yet safely deliver potent PTD-modified protein toxins to the tumor. PMID:25204286

  20. Chitosan nanoparticles for targeting and sustaining minoxidil sulphate delivery to hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Matos, Breno Noronha; Reis, Thaiene Avila; Gratieri, Taís; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins

    2015-04-01

    This work developed minoxidil sulphate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (MXS-NP) for targeted delivery to hair follicles, which could sustain drug release and improve the topical treatment of alopecia. Chitosan nanoparticles were obtained using low-molecular weight chitosan and tripolyphosphate as crosslink agent. MXS-NP presented a monomodal distribution with hydrodynamic diameter of 235.5 ± 99.9 nm (PDI of 0.31 ± 0.01) and positive zeta potential (+38.6 ± 6.0 mV). SEM analysis confirmed nanoparticles average size and spherical shape. A drug loading efficiency of 73.0 ± 0.3% was obtained with polymer:drug ratio of 1:1 (w/w). Drug release through cellulose acetate membranes from MXS-NP was sustained in about 5 times in comparison to the diffusion rate of MXS from the solution (188.9 ± 6.0 ?g/cm(2)/h and 35.4 ± 1.8 ?g/cm(2)/h). Drug permeation studies through the skin in vitro, followed by selective recovery of MXS from the hair follicles, showed that MXS-NP application resulted in a two-fold MXS increase into hair follicles after 6h in comparison to the control solution (5.9 ± 0.6 ?g/cm(2) and 2.9 ± 0.8 ?g/cm(2)). MXS-loading in nanoparticles appears as a promising and easy strategy to target and sustain drug delivery to hair follicles, which may improve the topical treatment of alopecia. PMID:25647618

  1. Anti-HER2/neu peptide-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel to breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Qingxin; Kievit, Forrest M.; Kant, Rajeev J.; Lin, Guanyou; Jeon, Mike; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells.Nanoparticles (NPs) for targeted therapy are required to have appropriate size, stability, drug loading and release profiles, and efficient targeting ligands. However, many of the existing NPs such as albumin, liposomes, polymers, gold NPs, etc. encounter size limit, toxicity and stability issues when loaded with drugs, fluorophores, and targeting ligands. Furthermore, antibodies are bulky and this can greatly affect the physicochemical properties of the NPs, whereas many small molecule-based targeting ligands lack specificity. Here, we report the utilization of biocompatible, biodegradable, small (~30 nm) and stable iron oxide NPs (IONPs) for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to HER2/neu positive breast cancer cells using an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) targeting ligand. We demonstrate the uniform size and high stability of these NPs in biological medium, their effective tumour targeting in live mice, as well as their efficient cellular targeting and selective killing in human HER2/neu-positive breast cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04867b

  2. Locally Targeted Delivery of a Micron-Size Radiation Therapy Source Using Temperature-Sensitive Hydrogel

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yusung; Seol, Dong Rim; Mohapatra, Sucheta; Sunderland, John J.; Schultz, Michael K.; Domann, Frederick E.; Lim, Tae-Hong

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To propose a novel radiation therapy (RT) delivery modality: locally targeted delivery of micron-size RT sources by using temperature-sensitive hydrogel (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials: Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two US Food and Drug Administration-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as the radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and 3 with RT-saline. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and CT scans were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 h after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL was determined by comparison with that of the control datasets by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results: RT-GEL was successfully injected into the tumor by using a 30-gauge needle. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% at 24 h (44% at 48 h, respectively) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%, respectively) for RT-saline. Fused SPECT-CT images of RT-saline showed considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2886%, 261%, and 262% of RT-GEL at 0, 24, and 48 h, respectively). Conclusions: RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity: 170% (200%, respectively), than that of RT-saline at 24 h (48 h, respectively) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the kidneys. Preliminary data of RT-GEL as a delivery modality of a radiation source to a local tumor are promising.

  3. Locally targeted delivery of a micron-size radiation therapy source using temperature-sensitive hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y; Seol, DR; Mohapatra, S; Sunderland, JJ; Schultz, MK; Domann, FE; Lim, TH

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To propose a novel radiotherapy (RT) delivery modality—locally targeted delivery of micro-size level RT sources using temperature-sensitive hydroGEL (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two FDA-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as a radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-Saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and three with RT-Saline. A SPECT and a CT scan were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 hours after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL over the control datasets was determined by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results RT-GEL was successfully injected to the tumor using 30-gauge needles. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-Saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% (44%) at 24 hours (48 hour) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%) for RT-Saline. SPECT-CT fused images of RT-Saline show considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2,886%, 261% and 262% of RT-GEL at the 0, 24 and 48 hour marks, respectively). Conclusion RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity 170% (200%) than that of RT-Saline 24 hour (48 hour) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the kidneys. The preliminary data of RT-GEL as a delivery modality of a radiation source to a local tumor is promising. PMID:24495593

  4. Modular nanotransporters: a multipurpose in vivo working platform for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Gulak, Pavel V; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Lupanova, Tatiana N; Khramtsov, Yuri V; Zalutsky, Michael R; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2012-01-01

    Background Modular nanotransporters (MNT) are recombinant multifunctional polypeptides created to exploit a cascade of cellular processes, initiated with membrane receptor recognition to deliver selective short-range and highly cytotoxic therapeutics to the cell nucleus. This research was designed for in vivo concept testing for this drug delivery platform using two modular nanotransporters, one targeted to the ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?MSH) receptor overexpressed on melanoma cells and the other to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor overexpressed on several cancers, including glioblastoma, and head-and-neck and breast carcinoma cells. Methods In vivo targeting of the modular nanotransporter was determined by immuno-fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy and by accumulation of 125I-labeled modular nanotransporters. The in vivo therapeutic effects of the modular nanotransporters were assessed by photodynamic therapy studies, given that the cytotoxicity of photosensitizers is critically dependent on their delivery to the cell nucleus. Results Immunohistochemical analyses of tumor and neighboring normal tissues of mice injected with multifunctional nanotransporters demonstrated preferential uptake in tumor tissue, particularly in cell nuclei. With 125I-labeled MNT{?MSH}, optimal tumor:muscle and tumor:skin ratios of 8:1 and 9.8:1, respectively, were observed 3 hours after injection in B16-F1 melanoma-bearing mice. Treatment with bacteriochlorin p-MNT{?MSH} yielded 89%–98% tumor growth inhibition and a two-fold increase in survival for mice with B16-F1 and Cloudman S91 melanomas. Likewise, treatment of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma-bearing mice with chlorin e6- MNT{EGF} resulted in 94% tumor growth inhibition compared with free chlorin e6, with 75% of animals surviving at 3 months compared with 0% and 20% for untreated and free chlorin e6-treated groups, respectively. Conclusion The multifunctional nanotransporter approach provides a new in vivo functional platform for drug development that could, in principle, be applicable to any combination of cell surface receptor and agent (photosensitizers, oligonucleotides, radionuclides) requiring nuclear delivery to achieve maximum effectiveness. PMID:22346349

  5. Folate-modified lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted paclitaxel delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Dong, Xia; Sun, Hongfan; Song, Cunxian; Wang, Chun; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid–polymer hybrid drug carrier comprised of folate (FA) modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs) for sustained, controlled, and targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). The core-shell NPs consist of 1) a poly(?-caprolactone) hydrophobic core based on self-assembly of poly(?-caprolactone)–poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL) amphiphilic copolymers, 2) a lipid monolayer formed with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG2000), 3) a targeting ligand (FA) on the surface, and were prepared using a thin-film hydration and ultrasonic dispersion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid monolayer on the hydrophobic polymer core. Physicochemical characterizations of PTX-loaded FLPNPs, such as particle size and size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, drug loading content, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release, were also evaluated. Fluorescent microscopy proved the internalization efficiency and targeting ability of the folate conjugated on the lipid monolayer for the EMT6 cancer cells which overexpress folate receptor. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of PTX-loaded FLPNPs was lower than that of Taxol®, but higher than that of PTX-loaded LPNPs (without folate conjugation). In EMT6 breast tumor model, intratumoral administration of PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed similar antitumor efficacy but low toxicity compared to Taxol®. More importantly, PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed greater tumor growth inhibition (65.78%) than the nontargeted PTX-loaded LPNPs (48.38%) (P<0.05). These findings indicated that the PTX loaded-FLPNPs with mixed lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core would be a promising nanosized drug formulation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:25844039

  6. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated “stealth” vectors which avoid these interactions. Simultaneous retargeting and detargeting can be achieved by combining multiple genetic and/or chemical modifications. PMID:21994621

  7. Tuberculosis therapeutics: Engineering of nanomedicinal systems for local delivery of targeted drug cocktails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addio, Suzanne M.

    In this thesis, a multifunctional nanocarrier drug delivery system was investigated and optimized to improve tuberculosis therapy by promoting the intracellular delivery of high payloads of antibiotics. To meet the needs of a patient population which continues to grow by close to 10 million people a year, innovative therapeutics must be formulated by robust and scalable processes. We use Flash NanoPrecipitation for the continuous precipitation of nanocarriers by block copolymer directed assembly, which enables the development of nanocarriers with tunable properties. Stable nanocarriers of Rifampicin and a hydrophobic Rifampicin prodrug have efficacy against tuberculosis in vitro that is equivalent to the soluble Rifampicin. To overcome poor in vivo efficacy of the recently discovered antitubercular drug SQ641, we co-encapsulate SQ641 and Cyclosporine A in a stable aqueous nanocarrier suspension, which enables drug administration and also enhances intracellular accumulation and antitubercular efficacy relative to SQ641 in solution. Since the mannose receptor is involved in the phagocytosis of tuberculosis bacilli, we modify the surface of nanocarriers with mannoside residues to target specific intracellular accumulation in macrophages. The surface density of mannoside terminated polyethylene glycol chains was controlled between 0 and 75% and in vitro cellular association reveals a 9% surface density is optimal for internalization mediated by the mannose receptor. We explore the preparation of large, porous aerosol carrier particles of with tunable deposition characteristics by spray freeze drying with ultrasonic atomization for direct dosing to the lungs. Nanocarriers are loaded at 3 - 50 wt% in mannitol particles with constant size, limited nanocarrier aggregation, and 63% dose delivered to the lungs, as determined by in vitro cascade impaction. There has been a lag in the development of new technologies to facilitate development and commercialization of therapeutic nanocarrier formulations. We present three translational technologies. (1) The intrinsic dissolution rates of drug nanocarriers are determined using a novel assay, based on high surface area lipid sink particles and magnetic separations, to improve in vitro/in vivo correlations. (2) The nanocarrier interaction with whole serum and the polymer surface conformation are correlated to in vivo clearance and general rules are proposed for the design of nanocarriers produced by Flash NanoPrecipitation with extended circulation times for targeted delivery. (3) In Hydrogen Bonding Coacervate Precipitation, polyethylene glycol coated nanocarriers are controllably flocculated with the addition of polyacids to enable rapid filtration and drying. In summary, this research outlines approaches to the customization of nanocarrier drug delivery systems to specifically improve outcomes in tuberculosis therapy. New assays and processing techniques for transitioning formulations from bench research to the clinic are developed. The methods are flexible and can be applied to target various diseases, coupled with rational design of nanocarrier payloads, surface functionality, and dosing route.

  8. Hapten-Binding Bispecific Antibodies for the Targeted Delivery of SiRNA and SiRNA-Containing Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Thorey, Irmgard S; Grote, Michael; Mayer, Klaus; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Hapten-binding bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) are effective and versatile tools for targeting diverse payloads, including siRNAs, to specific cells and tissues. In this chapter, we provide examples for successful SiRNA delivery using this powerful targeting platform. We further provide protocols for designing and producing bsAbs, for combining bsAbs with SiRNA into functional complexes, and achieving specific mRNA knockdown in cells by using these functional complexes. PMID:26472454

  9. Tetracycline-grafted PLGA nanoparticles as bone-targeting drug delivery system

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Jun; Tao, Shan; Chai, Guihong; Wang, Jianwei; Hu, Fu-Qiang; Yuan, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nanoparticles (NPs) that target bone tissue were developed using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) copolymers and tetracycline (TC)-based bone-targeting moieties. These NPs are expected to enable the transport of drugs, such as simvastatin (SIM), for the treatment of osteoporosis. Methods The molecular structures of TC–PLGA were validated by 1H-NMR, and the SIM-loaded NPs were prepared using the solvent emulsification method. The surface properties, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake, cell mineralization, bone targeting potential, and animal pharmacodynamics of the TC–PLGA NPs were evaluated and compared to those of PLGA NPs. Results It was confirmed that the average particle size of the NPs was approximately 220 nm. In phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4), the SIM-loaded NPs exhibited a cumulative release of up to 80% within 72 hours. An in vitro cell evaluation indicated that the NPs had an excellent cellular uptake capacity and showed great biocompatibility with MC3T3-E1 cells, thereby reducing the cytotoxic effects of SIM. The cell mineralization assay showed that the SIM-loaded NPs induced osteogenic differentiation and mineralized nodule formation in MC3T3-E1 cells, thereby achieving the same effect as SIM. Preliminary findings from in vitro and in vivo bone affinity assays indicated that the TC–PLGA NPs may display increased bone-targeting efficiency compared to PLGA NPs lacking a TC moiety. The use of SIM-loaded TC–PLGA NPs in treating osteoporosis was tested through animal pharmacodynamics analyses performed in ovariectomized rats, and the results suggested that the SIM-loaded TC–PLGA NPs can improve the curative effects of SIM on the recovery of bone mineral density compared to either SIM-loaded PLGA NPs or SIM alone. Conclusion Bone-targeting NPs, which were based on the conjugation of TC to PLGA copolymers, have the ability to target bone. These NPs may be developed as a delivery system for hydrophobic drugs, and they are expected to improve the curative effects of drugs, reduce the administered drug doses, and reduce side effects in other organs. PMID:26388691

  10. Virus Capsids as Targeted Nanoscale Delivery Vessels of Photoactive Compounds for Site-Specific Photodynamic Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brian A.

    The research presented in this work details the use of a viral capsid as an addressable delivery vessel of photoactive compounds for use in photodynamic therapy. Photodynamic therapy is a treatment that involves the interaction of light with a photosensitizing molecule to create singlet oxygen, a reactive oxygen species. Overproduction of singlet oxygen in cells can cause oxidative damage leading to cytotoxicity and eventually cell death. Challenges with the current generation of FDA-approved photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy primarily stem from their lack of tissue specificity. This work describes the packaging of photoactive cationic porphyrins inside the MS2 bacteriophage capsid, followed by external modification of the capsid with cancer cell-targeting G-quadruplex DNA aptamers to generate a tumor-specific photosensitizing agent. First, a cationic porphyrin is loaded into the capsids via nucleotide-driven packaging, a process that involves charge interaction between the porphyrin and the RNA inside the capsid. Results show that over 250 porphyrin molecules associate with the RNA within each MS2 capsid. Removal of RNA from the capsid severely inhibits the packaging of the cationic porphyrins. Porphyrin-virus constructs were then shown to photogenerate singlet oxygen, and cytotoxicity in non-targeted photodynamic treatment experiments. Next, each porphyrin-loaded capsid is externally modified with approximately 60 targeting DNA aptamers by employing a heterobifunctional crosslinking agent. The targeting aptamer is known to bind the protein nucleolin, a ubiquitous protein that is overexpressed on the cell surface by many cancer cell types. MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells and MCF-10A human mammary epithelial cells were selected as an in vitro model for breast cancer and normal tissue, respectively. Fluorescently tagged virus-aptamer constructs are shown to selectively target MCF-7 cells versus MCF-10A cells. Finally, results are shown in which porphyrin-virus-aptamer constructs selectively target and kill cancer cells versus non-cancer cells. Specifically, the results show that MS2 is a viable candidate as an addressable nanodelivery vessel of photoactive compounds, and the implications are that the nucleotide-driven packaging approach for modifying MS2 can be used to impart new functionalities for a host of diagnostic or therapeutic applications.

  11. Aptamer-mediated up-conversion core/MOF shell nanocomposites for targeted drug delivery and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kerong; Hou, Zhiyao; Li, Xuejiao; Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Yuanxin; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers for targeted bioimaging and drug delivery have attracted much attention in early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. In this work, we develop a novel aptamer-guided nanocarrier based on the mesoporous metal-organic framework (MOF) shell and up-conversion luminescent NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanoparticles (UCNPs) core for the first time to achieve these goals. These UCNPs, chosen as optical labels in biological assays and medical imaging, could emit strong green emission under 980 nm laser. The MOF structure based on iron (III) carboxylate materials [MIL-100 (Fe)] possesses high porosity and non-toxicity, which is of great value as nanocarriers for drug storage/delivery. As a unique nanoplatform, the hybrid inorganic-organic drug delivery vehicles show great promising for simultaneous targeted labeling and therapy of cancer cells. PMID:25597762

  12. Aptamer-Mediated Up-conversion Core/MOF Shell Nanocomposites for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cell Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Kerong; Hou, Zhiyao; Li, Xuejiao; Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Yuanxin; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers for targeted bioimaging and drug delivery have attracted much attention in early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. In this work, we develop a novel aptamer-guided nanocarrier based on the mesoporous metal-organic framework (MOF) shell and up-conversion luminescent NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ nanoparticles (UCNPs) core for the first time to achieve these goals. These UCNPs, chosen as optical labels in biological assays and medical imaging, could emit strong green emission under 980 nm laser. The MOF structure based on iron (III) carboxylate materials [MIL-100 (Fe)] possesses high porosity and non-toxicity, which is of great value as nanocarriers for drug storage/delivery. As a unique nanoplatform, the hybrid inorganic-organic drug delivery vehicles show great promising for simultaneous targeted labeling and therapy of cancer cells.

  13. Aptamer-Mediated Up-conversion Core/MOF Shell Nanocomposites for Targeted Drug Delivery and Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Kerong; Hou, Zhiyao; Li, Xuejiao; Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Yuanxin; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers for targeted bioimaging and drug delivery have attracted much attention in early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. In this work, we develop a novel aptamer-guided nanocarrier based on the mesoporous metal-organic framework (MOF) shell and up-conversion luminescent NaYF4:Yb3+/Er3+ nanoparticles (UCNPs) core for the first time to achieve these goals. These UCNPs, chosen as optical labels in biological assays and medical imaging, could emit strong green emission under 980?nm laser. The MOF structure based on iron (III) carboxylate materials [MIL-100 (Fe)] possesses high porosity and non-toxicity, which is of great value as nanocarriers for drug storage/delivery. As a unique nanoplatform, the hybrid inorganic-organic drug delivery vehicles show great promising for simultaneous targeted labeling and therapy of cancer cells. PMID:25597762

  14. Targeted Delivery of LXR Agonist Using a Site-Specific Antibody-Drug Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Lim, Reyna K V; Yu, Shan; Cheng, Bo; Li, Sijia; Kim, Nam-Jung; Cao, Yu; Chi, Victor; Kim, Ji Young; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Schultz, Peter G; Tremblay, Matthew S; Kazane, Stephanie A

    2015-11-18

    Liver X receptor (LXR) agonists have been explored as potential treatments for atherosclerosis and other diseases based on their ability to induce reverse cholesterol transport and suppress inflammation. However, this therapeutic potential has been hindered by on-target adverse effects in the liver mediated by excessive lipogenesis. Herein, we report a novel site-specific antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that selectively delivers a LXR agonist to monocytes/macrophages while sparing hepatocytes. The unnatural amino acid para-acetylphenylalanine (pAcF) was site-specifically incorporated into anti-CD11a IgG, which binds the ?-chain component of the lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) expressed on nearly all monocytes and macrophages. An aminooxy-modified LXR agonist was conjugated to anti-CD11a IgG through a stable, cathepsin B cleavable oxime linkage to afford a chemically defined ADC. The anti-CD11a IgG-LXR agonist ADC induced LXR activation specifically in human THP-1 monocyte/macrophage cells in vitro (EC50-27 nM), but had no significant effect in hepatocytes, indicating that payload delivery is CD11a-mediated. Moreover, the ADC exhibited higher-fold activation compared to a conventional synthetic LXR agonist T0901317 (Tularik) (3-fold). This novel ADC represents a fundamentally different strategy that uses tissue targeting to overcome the limitations of LXR agonists for potential use in treating atherosclerosis. PMID:25945727

  15. Expression and characterization of myristoylated preS1-conjugated nanocages for targeted cell delivery.

    PubMed

    Murata, Masaharu; Piao, Jing Shu; Narahara, Sayoko; Kawano, Takahito; Hamano, Nobuhito; Kang, Jeong-Hun; Asai, Daisuke; Ugawa, Ryo; Hashizume, Makoto

    2015-06-01

    Lipid modification of proteins plays key roles in cellular signaling pathways. We describe the development of myristoylated preS1-nanocages (myr-preS1-nanocages) that specifically target human hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells in which a specific receptor-binding peptide (preS1) is joined to the surface of naturally occurring ferritin cages. Using a genetic engineering approach, the preS1 peptide was joined to the N-terminal regions of the ferritin cage via flexible linker moieties. Myristoylation of the preS1 peptide was achieved by co-expression with yeast N-myristoyltransferase-1 in the presence of myristic acid in Escherichia coli cells. The myristoylated preS1-nanocages exhibited significantly greater specificity for human hepatocyte-like HepaRG cells than the unmyristoylated preS1-nanocages. These results suggest that the lipid-modified nanocages have great potential for effective targeted delivery to specific cells. PMID:25497224

  16. Folate-conjugated ?-cyclodextrin from click chemistry strategy and for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaihong; Cai, Zhaosheng; Sun, Yu; Yu, Fei; Chen, Yaoqiang; Sun, Baiwang

    2012-09-01

    To enhance site-specific intracellular delivery against the folate receptor, a drug carrier was designed and synthesized by bioconjugation of folic acid (FA) to ?-cyclodextrins (?-CD) through a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer from "click chemistry" strategy. The resulted conjugates were confirmed by (1)H NMR and IR spectroscopy. Host-guest interactions between hydrophobic drug and ?-CD are capable of entrapping a hydrophobic drug, like 5-Fluorouracil, to form drug-?-CD-PEG-FA nanoparticles (NPs) in aqueous solution. The morphology and size of ?-CD-PEG-FA NPs were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The targeting ability of the ?-CD-PEG-FA NPs was investigated against two kinds of cell lines (HeLa and A549), which have different amounts of folate receptors on their surface. Confocal image analysis revealed that ?-CD-PEG-FA conjugate-assembled nanoparticles exhibited a greater extent of cellular uptake against HeLa cells than A549 cells. This suggests folate-receptor-mediated endocytosis can affect the cellular uptake efficiency of drug-loaded ?-CD-PEG-FA NPs. The ?-CD-PEG-FA conjugates that are presented may be promising active tumor-targeting carrier candidates via folate mediation. PMID:22566147

  17. Identification of Targeting Peptides for Mucosal Delivery in Sheep and Mice.

    PubMed

    Kenngott, Elisabeth E; Cole, Sally; Hein, Wayne R; Hoffmann, Ute; Lauer, Uta; Maass, David; Moore, Lloyd; Pfeil, Jennifer; Rosanowski, Sarah; Shoemaker, Charles B; Umair, Saleh; Volkmer, Rudolf; Hamann, Alf; Pernthaner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this study we identified and characterized a novel cyclic peptide that facilitates the rapid transportation of conjugated molecules across the epithelial layer of the small intestine. The peptide was initially selected from phage display libraries using a large animal experimental model, which employed consecutive in vitro and in vivo panning. The procedure was designed to enrich for peptides that facilitated transcytosis across the intestinal epithelium into the intestinal afferent lymphatic system. A small set of peptides was repeatedly isolated using this selection method; however, the cyclic nonamer CTANSSAQC, 13C, dominated. The activity of the putative targeting peptide 13C was then verified using a mouse model. These experiments showed that the 13C peptide as well as macromolecules conjugated to it were rapidly transported across the intestinal mucosa into distinct subsets of epithelial cells and CD11c+ cells located in the lamina propria and Peyer's Patches. Significant amounts of intact protein could be delivered into the systemic circulation after rectal and nasal application. Thus, peptide 13C is regarded as an attractive carrier candidate for mucosal delivery of large molecules. The preferential targeting to distinct intestinal cells may be utilized to deliver active biological drugs for the effective control of diseases of the gut. PMID:26568284

  18. Engineering of Bacteria for the Visualization of Targeted Delivery of a Cytolytic Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent. PMID:23922014

  19. EGFR-Targeted Adenovirus Dendrimer Coating for Improved Systemic Delivery of the Theranostic NIS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Grünwald, Geoffrey K; Vetter, Alexandra; Klutz, Kathrin; Willhauck, Michael J; Schwenk, Nathalie; Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, Reingard; Schwaiger, Markus; Zach, Christian; Wagner, Ernst; Göke, Burkhard; Holm, Per S; Ogris, Manfred; Spitzweg, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We recently demonstrated tumor-selective iodide uptake and therapeutic efficacy of combined radiovirotherapy after systemic delivery of the theranostic sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene using a dendrimer-coated adenovirus. To further improve shielding and targeting we physically coated replication-selective adenoviruses carrying the hNIS gene with a conjugate consisting of cationic poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer linked to the peptidic, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-specific ligand GE11. In vitro experiments demonstrated coxsackie-adenovirus receptor-independent but EGFR-specific transduction efficiency. Systemic injection of the uncoated adenovirus in a liver cancer xenograft mouse model led to high levels of NIS expression in the liver due to hepatic sequestration, which were significantly reduced after coating as demonstrated by 123I-scintigraphy. Reduction of adenovirus liver pooling resulted in decreased hepatotoxicity and increased transduction efficiency in peripheral xenograft tumors. 124I-PET-imaging confirmed EGFR-specificity by significantly lower tumoral radioiodine accumulation after pretreatment with the EGFR-specific antibody cetuximab. A significantly enhanced oncolytic effect was observed following systemic application of dendrimer-coated adenovirus that was further increased by additional treatment with a therapeutic dose of 131I. These results demonstrate restricted virus tropism and tumor-selective retargeting after systemic application of coated, EGFR-targeted adenoviruses therefore representing a promising strategy for improved systemic adenoviral NIS gene therapy. PMID:24193032

  20. Alendronate-decorated biodegradable polymeric micelles for potential bone-targeted delivery of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yingying; Quan, Changyun; Liu, Meiqing; Liu, Jie; Huang, Gang; Tong, Guoquan; Yin, Yihua; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection disease which is caused by bacteria or other germs, and could cause serious impact on the health and working capacity of the patients. Alendronate (ALN) can chelate strongly with the calcium ion of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is commonly used to treat osteoporosis. Nanomedicine has attracted a lot of attention in that the nano-sized carrier can deliver drug molecules to specific site of interest with the aid of targeting moiety and achieve sustained release, resulting in improved therapeutic effect and reduced side effect. In this study, micelles self-assembled from poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-alendronate (PLGA-PEG-ALN) copolymer were prepared for bone-targeted delivery of vancomycin (Van). The chemical structure of PLGA-PEG-ALN was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy. The formation of the nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electronic microscopy as well as the critical micelle concentration measurement. Release profiles from the micelles revealed that the conjugation of ALN to the surface of micelle did not pose adverse effect on the drug-loading capacity and release behaviors. The cytotoxicity of Van-loaded PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles as well as the blank micelles was evaluated via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay toward rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and human embryonic hepatocytes (L02 cells), and results showed that this Van-loaded micelle possesses appropriate cytotoxicity and is safe in the potential treatment of osteomyelitis. The in vitro affinity of PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles to the HA was also confirmed in vitro. The antibacterial effect of Van-loaded PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles was tested against Staphylococcus aureus (SA) which is the main pathogenic bacteria in osteomyelitis, and the results showed that the Van-loaded micelles can effectively inhibit the growth of SA. These results demonstrated that the PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles may be potentially used for the bone targeted delivery of Van. PMID:25994241

  1. Clustered Integrin Ligands as a Novel Approach for the Targeting of Non-Viral Vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Quinn Kwan Tai

    Gene transfer or gene delivery is described as the process in which foreign DNA is introduced into cells. Over the years, gene delivery has gained the attention of many researchers and has been developed as powerful tools for use in biotechnology and medicine. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, such advances in technology allowed for the identification of diseases ranging from hereditary disorders to acquired ones (cancer) which were thought to be incurable. Gene therapy provides the means necessary to treat or eliminate genetic diseases from its origin, unlike traditional medicine which only treat symptoms. With ongoing clinical trials for gene therapy increasing, the greatest difficulty still lies in developing safe systems which can target cells of interest to provide efficient delivery. Nature, over millions of years of evolution, has provided an example of one of the most efficient delivery systems: viruses. Although the use of viruses for gene delivery has been well studied, the safety issues involving immunogenicity, insertional mutagenesis, high cost, and poor reproducibility has provided problems for their clinical application. From understanding viruses, we gain insight to designing new systems for non-viral gene delivery. One of these techniques utilized by adenoviruses is the clustering of ligands on its surface through the use of a protein called a penton base. Through the use of nanotechnology we can mimic this basic concept in non-viral gene delivery systems. This dissertation research is focused on developing and applying a novel system for displaying the integrin binding ligand (RGD) in a constrained manner to form a clustered integrin ligand binding platform to be used to enhance the targeting and efficiency of non-viral gene delivery vectors. Peptide mixed monolayer protected gold nanoparticles provides a suitable surface for ligand clustering. A relationship between the peptide ratios in the reaction solution used to form these ligand clusters compared to the reacted amounts on the surface of the particle was studied. This provided us the ability to control the size of the clusters formed and the spacing between the integrins for gold nanoparticles of various sizes. We then applied the clustered ligand binding system for targeting of DNA/PEI polyplexes and demonstrated that the use of RGD nanoclusters enhances gene transfer up to 35-fold which was dependent on the density of alphavbeta3 integrins on the cell surface. Cell integrin sensitivity was shown in which cells with higher alpha vbeta3 densities resulting in higher luciferase transgene expression. The targeting of RGD nanoclusters for DNA/PEI polyplexes was further shown in vivo using PET/CT technology which displayed improved targeting towards high level alphavbeta3 integrin expression (U87MG) tumors over medium level alphavbeta 3 integrin expression (HeLa). In addition to studying the clustered integrin binding system, the current non-viral vectors used suffer from stability and toxicity issues in vitro and in vivo. We have applied a new chemistry for synthesizing nanogels utilizing a Traut's reagent initiated Michael addition reaction for modification of diamine containing crosslikers which will allow for the development of stable and cell demanded release of oligonucleotides. We have shown bulk gels made were capable of encapsulating and holding DNA within the gel and were able to synthesize them into nanogels. The combined research shown here using clustered integrin ligands and a new type of nanogel synthesis provides an ideal system for gene delivery in the future.

  2. Enhanced noscapine delivery using estrogen-receptor-targeted nanoparticles for breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Madan, Jitender; Gundala, Sushma R; Kasetti, Yoganjaneyulu; Bharatam, Prasad V; Aneja, Ritu; Katyal, Anju; Jain, Upendra K

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine (Nos), an orally available plant-derived antitussive alkaloid, is in phase II clinical trials for cancer chemotherapy. It has extensively been shown to inhibit tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of hematopoietic, breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostate origin. However, high tumor-suppressive Nos dosages encumber the development of oral controlled-release formulations because of a short biological half-life (<2 h), poor absorption, low aqueous solubility, and extensive first-pass metabolism. Here, we present the design, fabrication, optimization, characterization, and biological evaluation of estrone-conjugated noscapine-loaded gelatin nanoparticles (Nos-ES-GN) for targeting estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Gelatin nanoparticles (GN) were a uniformly compact size, stable at physiological pH, and showed a drug entrapment efficiency of 66.1±5.9 and 65.2±5.6% for Nos-GN and Nos-ES-GN, respectively. The secondary structure of gelatin nanocoacervates was predicted using circular dichroism and in-silico molecular modeling. Our data suggest that ethanol-fabricated GN retained the ?-helical content of gelatin, whereas acetone favored the formation of random coils. The conjugation of estrone to Nos-GN did not affect the release rate of the drug, and both formulations followed first-order release kinetics with an initial burst, followed by a slow release. The IC50 value of Nos-ES-GN was 21.2 ?mol/l, which was ?50% lower than the free drug (43.3 ?mol/l), suggesting targeted drug delivery. Our cell uptake study carried out in an estrogen-receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines showed greater accumulation of Nos-ES-GN in MCF-7 cells instead of MDA-MB-231 cells. Our data indicated that estrone-conjugated nanoparticles may potentially be used for targeting breast cancer cells. PMID:24642711

  3. Targeted delivery and controlled release of doxorubicin into cancer cells using a multifunctional graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yao; Tao, Lei; Annie Bligh, S W; Yang, Huihui; Pan, Qixia; Zhu, Limin

    2016-02-01

    We have synthesized a new multifunctional graphene oxide as a drug carrier targeting to hepatocarcinoma cells. Surface modified graphene oxide with polyethyleneimine (PEI) sequentially derivatised with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-linked lactobionic acid (LA), and acetylation of remaining terminal amines of the PEI produced a new multifunctional graphene oxide drug carrier (GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA). Doxorubicin (DOX), an anticancer drug, was encapsulated in GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA to give GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX, with a drug loading percentage of 85%. We showed that both GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA and GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX were water soluble and stable between pH 5.0 and 9.0. In vitro release studies indicated that the release rate of DOX from GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX complexes were significantly higher at pH5.8 than that of the physiological pH. Another important feature of this carrier is its good cell viability in the tested concentration range (0-4?M), and the GO/PEI.Ac-FI-PEG-LA/DOX can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing asialoglycoprotein (ASGPR) receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The enhanced target specificity and the substantial improvement in pH responsive controlled release have made this new carrier a potential choice for non-covalent encapsulation of drugs in GO, and a delivery system for cancer therapy. PMID:26652419

  4. First in human nanotechnology doxorubicin delivery system to target epidermal growth factor receptors in recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Whittle, James R; Lickliter, Jason D; Gan, Hui K; Scott, Andrew M; Simes, John; Solomon, Benjamin J; MacDiarmid, Jennifer A; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Rosenthal, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    There are limited treatment options for patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). The EnGeneIC delivery vehicle (EDV) is a novel nanocellular (minicell) compound which packages theoretically effective concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs that are designed to target tumors via minicell-surface attached bispecific proteins (EnGeneIC, Lane Cove West, NSW, Australia). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in 40-50% of patients with GBM and is a promising target for new therapeutics. (V)EDVDox contains doxorubicin (Dox) within the minicells and targets EGFR through Vectibix (V; Amgen Biologicals, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA). We conducted a first in human Phase I study of (V)EDVDox in adults with recurrent GBM expressing EGFR on immunohistochemistry, following standard therapy including radiation and temozolomide, to establish a safe maximum tolerated dose and determine a recommended Phase II dose (RPTD). (V)EDVDox was administered weekly in an 8week cycle, with dose escalation in successive cohorts of patients using a standard 3+3 design. In total, 14 patients were treated at three dose levels, and the RPTD was identified as 5×10(9)(V)EDVDox. Overall (V)EDVDox was well tolerated, with no dose limiting toxicity and no withdrawals from the study due to adverse events. The most common adverse events were nausea, fever, and chills or rigors, experienced in seven, five and five patients, respectively. Transient uncomplicated hypophosphatemia was seen in seven patients and was not dose-related. Our results demonstrate that (V)EDVDox, up to a dose of 5×10(9)(V)EDVDox weekly, is well tolerated in patients with recurrent GBM. PMID:26279503

  5. Pulmonary targeting microparticulate camptothecin delivery system: anticancer evaluation in a rat orthotopic lung cancer model.

    PubMed

    Chao, Piyun; Deshmukh, Manjeet; Kutscher, Hilliard L; Gao, Dayuan; Rajan, Sujata Sundara; Hu, Peidi; Laskin, Debra L; Stein, Stanley; Sinko, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Large (>6 microm) rigid microparticles (MPs) become passively entrapped within the lungs after intravenous (i.v.) injection making them an attractive and highly efficient alternative to inhalation for pulmonary delivery. In this study, PEGylated 6 microm polystyrene MPs with multiple copies of the norvaline (Nva) alpha-amino acid prodrug of camptothecin (CPT) were prepared. Surface morphology was characterized using a scanning electron microscope. CPT was released from the CPT-Nva-MPs over 24 h in rat plasma at 37 degrees C. In-vivo CPT plasma concentrations were low (approximately 1 ng/ml or less) and constant over a period of 4 days after a single i.v. injection of CPT-Nva-MPs as compared with high but short-lived systemic exposures after an i.v. injection of free CPT. This suggests that sustained local CPT concentrations were achieved in the lung after administration of the MP delivery system. Anticancer efficacy was evaluated in an orthotopic lung cancer animal model and compared with a bolus injection of CPT. Animals receiving free CPT (2 mg/kg) and CPT-Nva-MPs (0.22 mg/kg CPT and 100 mg/kg MPs) were found to have statistically significant smaller areas of lung cancer (P<0.05 and 0.01, respectively) than untreated animals. In addition, 40% of the animals receiving CPT-Nva-MPs were found to be free of cancer. The CPT dose using targeted MPs was 10 times lower than after i.v. injection of free CPT, but was more effective in reducing the amount of cancerous areas. In conclusion, CPT-Nva-MPs were able to achieve effective local lung and low systemic CPT concentrations at a dose that was 10 times lower than systemically administered CPT resulting in a significant improvement in anticancer efficacy in an orthotopic rat model of lung cancer. PMID:19966540

  6. Formulation and Evaluation of Chondroitin Sulphate Tablets of Aceclofenac for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Subbaih Khandasamy, Umadevi; Shanmugam, Suresh; Ruttala, Himabindhu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a single unit, site-specific matrix tablets of aceclofenac allowing targeted drug release in the colon with a microbially degradable polymeric carrier, chondroitin suphate (CS) and to coat the optimized batches with a pH dependent polymeric. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method using starch mucilage as a binding agent and HPMC K-100 as a swellable polymer. Chondroitin Sulphate and drug and physical mixture were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The tablets were tested for their in-vitro dissolution characteristics in various simulated gastric fluids for their suitability as a colon-specific drug delivery system and also the tablets were evaluated for physicochemical properties, drug content, water percentage swelling and erosion characteristics. The dissolution data demonstrates that the 10% w/w increase in coating level of the pH dependent polymer (Eudragit L-100 and Eudragit S-100 in a ratio of 1 : 4 prevented the drug release in the simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2-SGF) and the simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4-SIF). The dissolution rate of the tablet is dependent upon the concentration of Chondroitin sulphate in the simulated colonic fluid (SCF). The rapid increase in release of aceclofenac in SCF was revealed as due to the degradation of the Chondroitin sulphate membrane by bacterial enzymes. The studies confirmed that, the designed system could be used potentially as a carrier for colon delivery of aceclofenac by regulating drug release in stomach and the small intestine. PMID:24250470

  7. Design challenges in nanoparticle-based platforms: Implications for targeted drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullen, Douglas Gurnett

    Characterization and control of heterogeneous distributions of nanoparticle-ligand components are major design challenges for nanoparticle-based platforms. This dissertation begins with an examination of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer-based targeted delivery platform. A folic acid targeted modular platform was developed to target human epithelial cancer cells. Although active targeting was observed in vitro, active targeting was not found in vivo using a mouse tumor model. A major flaw of this platform design was that it did not provide for characterization or control of the component distribution. Motivated by the problems experienced with the modular design, the actual composition of nanoparticle-ligand distributions were examined using a model dendrimer-ligand system. High Pressure Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) resolved the distribution of components in samples with mean ligand/dendrimer ratios ranging from 0.4 to 13. A peak fitting analysis enabled the quantification of the component distribution. Quantified distributions were found to be significantly more heterogeneous than commonly expected and standard analytical parameters, namely the mean ligand/nanoparticle ratio, failed to adequately represent the component heterogeneity. The distribution of components was also found to be sensitive to particle modifications that preceded the ligand conjugation. With the knowledge gained from this detailed distribution analysis, a new platform design was developed to provide a system with dramatically improved control over the number of components and with improved batch reproducibility. Using semi-preparative HPLC, individual dendrimer-ligand components were isolated. The isolated dendrimer with precise numbers of ligands were characterized by NMR and analytical HPLC. In total, nine different dendrimer-ligand components were obtained with degrees of purity ?80%. This system has the potential to serve as a platform to which a precise number of functional molecules can be attached and has the potential to dramatically improve platform efficacy. An additional investigation of reproducibility challenges for current dendrimer-based platform designs is also described. The mass transport quality during the partial acetylation reaction of the dendrimer was found to have a major impact on subsequent dendrimer-ligand distributions that cannot be detected by standard analytical techniques. Consequently, this reaction should be eliminated from the platform design. Finally, optimized protocols for purification and characterization of PAMAM dendrimer were detailed.

  8. A controllable aptamer-based self-assembled DNA dendrimer for high affinity targeting, bioimaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Xie, Yi; An, Yuan; Huang, Yishun; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery is important in cancer therapy to decrease the systemic toxicity resulting from nonspecific drug distribution and to enhance drug delivery efficiency. We have developed an aptamer-based DNA dendritic nanostructure as a multifunctional vehicle for targeted cancer cell imaging and drug delivery. The multifunctional DNA dendrimer is constructed from functional Y-shaped building blocks with predesigned base-pairing hybridization including fluorophores, targeting DNA aptamers and intercalated anticancer drugs. With controllable step-by-step self-assembly, the programmable DNA dendrimer has several appealing features, including facile modular design, excellent biostability and biocompatibility, high selectivity, strong binding affinity, good cell internalization efficiency, and high drug loading capacity. Due to the unique structural features of DNA dendrimers, multiple copies of aptamers can be incorporated into each dendrimer, generating a multivalent aptamer-tethered nanostructure with enhanced binding affinity. A model chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was delivered via these aptamer-based DNA dendrimers and exerted a potent toxicity for target cancer cells (human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line) with low side effects for the non-target cells (human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line). This controllable aptamer-based DNA dendrimer is a promising candidate for biomedical applications. PMID:25959874

  9. A Controllable Aptamer-Based Self-Assembled DNA Dendrimer for High Affinity Targeting, Bioimaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Xie, Yi; An, Yuan; Huang, Yishun; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery is important in cancer therapy to decrease the systemic toxicity resulting from nonspecific drug distribution and to enhance drug delivery efficiency. We have developed an aptamer-based DNA dendritic nanostructure as a multifunctional vehicle for targeted cancer cell imaging and drug delivery. The multifunctional DNA dendrimer is constructed from functional Y-shaped building blocks with predesigned base-pairing hybridization including fluorophores, targeting DNA aptamers and intercalated anticancer drugs. With controllable step-by-step self-assembly, the programmable DNA dendrimer has several appealing features, including facile modular design, excellent biostability and biocompatibility, high selectivity, strong binding affinity, good cell internalization efficiency, and high drug loading capacity. Due to the unique structural features of DNA dendrimers, multiple copies of aptamers can be incorporated into each dendrimer, generating a multivalent aptamer-tethered nanostructure with enhanced binding affinity. A model chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was delivered via these aptamer-based DNA dendrimers and exerted a potent toxicity for target cancer cells (human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line) with low side effects for the non-target cells (human Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line). This controllable aptamer-based DNA dendrimer is a promising candidate for biomedical applications. PMID:25959874

  10. Directed Evolution of Adeno-associated Virus for Enhanced Gene Delivery and Gene Targeting in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Asuri, Prashanth; Bartel, Melissa A; Vazin, Tandis; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Wong, Tiffany B; Schaffer, David V

    2012-01-01

    Efficient approaches for the precise genetic engineering of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can enhance both basic and applied stem cell research. Adeno- associated virus (AAV) vectors are of particular interest for their capacity to mediate efficient gene delivery to and gene targeting in various cells. However, natural AAV serotypes offer only modest transduction of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESCs and hiPSCs), which limits their utility for efficiently manipulating the hPSC genome. Directed evolution is a powerful means to generate viral vectors with novel capabilities, and we have applied this approach to create a novel AAV variant with high gene delivery efficiencies (~50%) to hPSCs, which are importantly accompanied by a considerable increase in gene-targeting frequencies, up to 0.12%. While this level is likely sufficient for numerous applications, we also show that the gene-targeting efficiency mediated by an evolved AAV variant can be further enhanced (>1%) in the presence of targeted double- stranded breaks (DSBs) generated by the co-delivery of artificial zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). Thus, this study demonstrates that under appropriate selective pressures, AAV vectors can be created to mediate efficient gene targeting in hPSCs, alone or in the presence of ZFN- mediated double-stranded DNA breaks. PMID:22108859

  11. Near-infrared light-triggered drug-delivery vehicle for mitochondria-targeted chemo-photothermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ju, Enguo; Li, Zhenhua; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-03-26

    A novel drug-delivery vehicle for mitochondria-targeted chemo-photothermal therapy was demonstrated. A cytochrome c-specific binding aptamer was employed to make the mesoporous silica-encapsulated gold nanorods efficiently accumulate in the mitochondria of cancer cells. This nanocarrier can load various hydrophobic therapeutic agents acting on mitochondria to enhance the therapeutic efficiency and simultaneously depress the toxic side effects. In addition, near-IR treatment could induce cytochrome c release and initiation of the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Importantly, this multifunctional platform could integrate targeting, light-triggered release, and chemo-photothermal therapy into one system. We hope that such a system could open the door to the fabrication of a multifunctional mitochondria-targeted drug-delivery vehicle for cancer therapy. PMID:24559457

  12. Aptamer-directed synthesis of multifunctional lanthanide-doped porous nanoprobes for targeted imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Li, Zhenhua; Ju, Enguo; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2013-12-20

    Multifunctional lanthanide-doped porous nanoparticles are prepared via a facile one-step solvothermal route by employing aptamers as the biotemplate. The nanoparticles feature excellent aqueous dispersibility and biospecific properties and could work as effective nanoprobes for targeted imaging and drug delivery. With aptamer being in principle available for any kind of target, this synthetic strategy may open the door to a new generation of nanoprobes for bioapplications such as time-resolved biodetection, multimode bioimaging/biolabeling, and targeted cancer therapy. PMID:23843269

  13. Targeted lipid based drug conjugates: a novel strategy for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Kwatra, Deep; Earla, Ravinder; Samanta, Swapan K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    A majority of studies involving prodrugs are directed to overcome low bioavailability of the parent drug. The aim of this study is to increase the bioavailability of acyclovir (ACV) by designing a novel prodrug delivery system which is more lipophilic, and at the same time site specific. In this study, a lipid raft has been conjugated to the parent drug molecule to impart lipophilicity. Simultaneously a targeting moiety that can be recognized by a specific transporter/receptor in the cell membrane has also been tethered to the other terminal of lipid raft. Targeted lipid prodrugs i.e., biotin-ricinoleicacid-acyclovir (B-R-ACV) and biotin-12hydroxystearicacid-acyclovir (B-12HS-ACV) were synthesized with ricinoleicacid and 12hydroxystearicacid as the lipophilic rafts and biotin as the targeting moiety. Biotin-ACV (B-ACV), ricinoleicacid-ACV (R-ACV) and 12hydroxystearicacid-ACV (12HS-ACV) were also synthesized to delineate the individual effects of the targeting and the lipid moieties. Cellular accumulation studies were performed in confluent MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. The targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV exhibited much higher cellular accumulation than B-ACV, R-ACV and 12HS-ACV in both cell lines. This result indicates that both the targeting and the lipid moiety act synergistically toward cellular uptake. The biotin conjugated prodrugs caused a decrease in the uptake of [(3)H] biotin suggesting the role of sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in uptake. The affinity of these targeted lipid prodrugs toward SMVT was studied in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Both the targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV (20.25 ± 1.74 ?M) and B-12HS-ACV (23.99 ± 3.20 ?M) demonstrated higher affinity towards SMVT than B-ACV (30.90 ± 4.19 ?M). Further, dose dependent studies revealed a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on [(3)H] biotin uptake in the presence of biotinylated prodrugs. Transepithelial transport studies showed lowering of [(3)H] biotin permeability in the presence of biotin and biotinylated prodrugs, further indicating a carrier mediated translocation by SMVT. Overall, results from these studies clearly suggest that these biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. These prodrugs appear to be potential candidates for the treatment of oral and ocular herpes virus infections, because of higher expression of SMVT on intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion we hypothesize that our novel prodrug design strategy may help in higher absorption of hydrophilic parent drug. Moreover, this novel prodrug design can result in higher cell permeability of hydrophilic therapeutics such as genes, siRNA, antisense RNA, DNA, oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins. PMID:22692074

  14. Non-ionic, thermo-responsive DEA/DMA nanogels: Synthesis, characterization, and use for DNA separations by microchip electrophoresis

    E-print Network

    Barron, Annelise E.

    no DMA) can be obtained at 70 °C by standard emulsion precipitation, DEA/DMA random co-polymer nano- gels DNA separations a b s t r a c t Thermo-responsive polymer ``nanogels'' (crosslinked hydrogel particles,12]. Typically, below the nanogels' volume-phase transition temperature (VPTT) the polymer chains that form

  15. Stable and pH-sensitive protein nanogels made by self-assembly of heat denatured soy protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nannan; Lin, Lianzhu; Sun, Weizheng; Zhao, Mouming

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the possibility of preparing stable soy protein nanogels by simply heating homogeneous soy protein dispersion. The protein nanogels formed were characterized by z-average hydrodynamic diameter, polydispersity index, turbidity, ?-potential, morphology, and their stability to pH and ionic strength change. Soy protein dispersion (1% w/v) was homogeneous around pH 5.9 where it had the lowest polydispersity index (?0.1). Stable and spherical nanogels were formed by heating soy protein dispersion at pH 5.9 under 95 °C. They sustained constantly low polydispersity index (?0.1) in the investigated pH range of 6.06-7.0 and 2.6-3.0. The nanogels were pH-sensitive and would swell with pH change. They were stable at 0-200 mM NaCl concentration. Denaturation of soy glycinin was the prerequisite for the formation of stable nanogels. Soy protein nanogels had a core-shell structure with basic polypeptides and ? subunits interacting together as the hydrophobic core; and acid polypeptides, ?', and ? subunits locating outside the core as hydrophilic shell. The inner structure of soy protein nanogels was mainly stabilized by disulfide bonds cross-linked network and hydrophobic interaction. Soy protein nanogels made in this study would be useful as functional ingredients in biotechnological, pharmaceutical, and food industries. PMID:25180907

  16. siRNA delivery targeting to the lung via agglutination-induced accumulation and clearance of cationic tetraamino fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Kosuke; Okamoto, Koji; Doi, Kent; Harano, Koji; Noiri, Eisei; Nakamura, Eiichi

    2014-05-01

    The efficient treatment of lung diseases requires lung-selective delivery of agents to the lung. However, lung-selective delivery is difficult because the accumulation of micrometer-sized carriers in the lung often induces inflammation and embolization-related toxicity. Here we demonstrate a lung-selective delivery system of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by controlling the size of carrier vehicle in blood vessels. The carrier is made of tetra(piperazino)fullerene epoxide (TPFE), a water-soluble cationic tetraamino fullerene. TPFE and siRNA form sub-micrometer-sized complexes in buffered solution and these complexes agglutinate further with plasma proteins in the bloodstream to form micrometer-sized particles. The agglutinate rapidly clogs the lung capillaries, releases the siRNA into lung cells to silence expression of target genes, and is then cleared rapidly from the lung after siRNA delivery. We applied our delivery system to an animal model of sepsis, indicating the potential of TPFE-based siRNA delivery for clinical applications.

  17. Multifunctional Nanocarriers for diagnostics, drug delivery and targeted treatment across blood-brain barrier: perspectives on tracking and neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology has brought a variety of new possibilities into biological discovery and clinical practice. In particular, nano-scaled carriers have revolutionalized drug delivery, allowing for therapeutic agents to be selectively targeted on an organ, tissue and cell specific level, also minimizing exposure of healthy tissue to drugs. In this review we discuss and analyze three issues, which are considered to be at the core of nano-scaled drug delivery systems, namely functionalization of nanocarriers, delivery to target organs and in vivo imaging. The latest developments on highly specific conjugation strategies that are used to attach biomolecules to the surface of nanoparticles (NP) are first reviewed. Besides drug carrying capabilities, the functionalization of nanocarriers also facilitate their transport to primary target organs. We highlight the leading advantage of nanocarriers, i.e. their ability to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), a tightly packed layer of endothelial cells surrounding the brain that prevents high-molecular weight molecules from entering the brain. The BBB has several transport molecules such as growth factors, insulin and transferrin that can potentially increase the efficiency and kinetics of brain-targeting nanocarriers. Potential treatments for common neurological disorders, such as stroke, tumours and Alzheimer's, are therefore a much sought-after application of nanomedicine. Likewise any other drug delivery system, a number of parameters need to be registered once functionalized NPs are administered, for instance their efficiency in organ-selective targeting, bioaccumulation and excretion. Finally, direct in vivo imaging of nanomaterials is an exciting recent field that can provide real-time tracking of those nanocarriers. We review a range of systems suitable for in vivo imaging and monitoring of drug delivery, with an emphasis on most recently introduced molecular imaging modalities based on optical and hybrid contrast, such as fluorescent protein tomography and multispectral optoacoustic tomography. Overall, great potential is foreseen for nanocarriers in medical diagnostics, therapeutics and molecular targeting. A proposed roadmap for ongoing and future research directions is therefore discussed in detail with emphasis on the development of novel approaches for functionalization, targeting and imaging of nano-based drug delivery systems, a cutting-edge technology poised to change the ways medicine is administered. PMID:20199661

  18. Hyaluronic acid based self-assembling nanosystems for CD44 target mediated siRNA delivery to solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Shanthi; Iyer, Arun K.; Morrissey, David V.; Amiji, Mansoor M.

    2013-01-01

    Anticancer therapeutics employing RNA interference mechanism holds promising potentials for sequence-specific silencing of target genes. However targeted delivery of siRNAs to tumor tissues and cells and more importantly, their intracellular release at sites of interest still remains a major challenge that needs to be addressed before this technique could become a clinically viable option. In the current study, we have engineered and screened a series of CD44 targeting hyaluronic acid (HA) based self-assembling nanosystems for targeted siRNA delivery. The HA polymer was functionalized with lipids of varying carbon chain lengths/nitrogen content, as well as polyamines for assessing siRNA encapsulation. From the screens, several HA-derivatives were identified that could stably encapsulate/complex siRNAs and form self-assembled nanosystems, as determined by gel retardation assays and dynamic light scattering. Many HA derivatives could transfect siRNAs into cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. Interestingly, blocking the CD44 receptors on the cells using free excess soluble HA prior to incubation of cy3-labeled-siRNA loaded HA nano-assemblies resulted in >90% inhibition of the receptor mediated uptake, confirming target specificity. In addition, SSB/PLK1 siRNA encapsulated in HA-PEI/PEG nanosystems demonstrated dose dependent and target specific gene knockdown in both sensitive and resistant A549 lung cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. More importantly, these siRNA encapsulated nanosystems demonstrated tumor selective uptake and target specific gene knock down in vivo in solid tumors as well as in metastatic tumors. The HA based nanosystems thus portend to be promising siRNA delivery vectors for systemic targeting of CD44 overexpressing cancers including tumor initiating (stem-) cells and metastatic lesions. PMID:23410679

  19. Delivery of tissue plasminogen activator and streptokinase magnetic nanoparticles to target vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Tadayon, Ateke; Jamshidi, Reza; Esmaeili, Akbar

    2015-11-10

    Thrombolytic therapy for acute myocardial infarction standardly makes use of the medications streptokinase (SK) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). In this study, the potential of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SiO2-MNPs) as nanocarriers clinical thrombolytic therapy was investigated. SiO2-MNPs for use in targeted therapeutic delivery of tPA and SK were prepared using a combined technique incorporating controlled precipitation and hydrothermal methods. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to evaluate the efficiency of the SiO2-MNPs. The production of SK secreted from Streptococcus equi was enhanced using random mutagenesis. The tPA and SK A were encapsulated by means of a silanizing agent with a surface rich in 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane layered around the SiO2-MNPs. Blood clot lysis assays and fibrin-containing agarose plates were used to carry out in vitro thrombolysis testing. The optimum conditions for producing MNPs were found to be at pH=13 and at a temperature of 75°C for 45min. Culture conditions of 2.75% NaCl concentration at initial pH=7.5 for 90s under UV resulted in maximum SK activity. The tPA/SK-conjugated SiO2-MNPs (SiO2-MNP-tPA-SK) increased operating stability in whole blood and storage stability in a buffer by 92%. More effective thrombolysis using magnetic targeting was indicated by a 38% reduction in blood clot lysis time achieved with SiO2-MNP-tPA-SK compared to administering the SiO2-MNPs without guidance. The silica-coated magnetic nanocarriers developed in this study show potential for improved clinical thrombolytic therapy. PMID:26363110

  20. Bufalin loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles: an efficient drug delivery system for targeted chemotherapy against breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Yin, Hongzhuan; Zhang, Shichen; Luo, Ying; Xu, Kai; Ma, Ping; Sui, Chengguang; Meng, Fandong; Liu, Yunpeng; Jiang, Youhong; Fang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Bufalin is a traditional oriental medicine which is known to induce apoptosis in many tumor cells, and it is thus considered as a new anticancer therapeutic. By now, most of the studies of bufalin are in vitro, however in vivo evaluations of its therapeutic efficacy are less and are in great demand for its development toward anticancer drug. One of the problems probably hampering the development of bufalin is the lack of tumor selectivity, which may reduce the therapeutic effect as well as showing side effects. To overcome this drawback, in this study, we designed a tumor-targeted drug delivery system of bufalin based on enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, by using biotinylated chitosan, resulting in bufalin encapsulating nanoparticles (Bu-BCS-NPs) with mean hydrodynamic size of 171.6 nm, as evidenced by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Bu-BCS-NPs showed a relative slow and almost linear release of bufalin, and about 36.8% of bufalin was released in 24 h when dissolved in sodium phosphate buffer. Compared to native bufalin, Bu-BCS-NPs exhibited a stronger cytotoxicity against breast cancer MCF-7 cells (IC50 of 0.582 ?g/ml vs 1.896 ?g/ml of native bufalin). Similar results were also obtained in intracellular reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis induction, and decrease in mitochondria membrane potential. These results may contribute to the rapid intracellular uptake of nanoparticles, partly benefiting from the highly expressed biotin receptors in tumor cells. In vivo studies using MCF-7 tumor models in nude mice confirmed the remarkable therapeutic effect of Bu-BCS-NPs. These findings suggest the potential of Bu-BCS-NPs as an anticancer drug with tumor targeting property. PMID:24846793

  1. Halobetasol propionate-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) for skin targeting by topical delivery.

    PubMed

    Bikkad, Mahesh L; Nathani, Ajaz H; Mandlik, Satish K; Shrotriya, Shilpa N; Ranpise, Nisharani S

    2014-06-01

    The clinical use of halobetasol propionate (HP) is related to some adverse effects like irritation, pruritus and stinging. The purpose of this work was to construct HP-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (HP-SLN) formulation with skin targeting to minimizing the adverse side effects and providing a controlled release. HP-SLN were prepared by solvent injection method and formula was optimized by the application of 3(2) factorial design. The nanoparticulate dispersion was evaluated for particle size and entrapment efficiency (EE). Optimized batch was characterized for differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction study and finally incorporated into polymeric gels of carbopol for convenient application. The nanoparticulate gels were evaluated comparatively with the commercial product with respect to ex-vivo skin permeation and deposition study on human cadaver skins and finally skin irritation study. HP-SLN showed average size between 200 nm and 84-94% EE. DSC studies revealed no drug-excipient incompatibility and amorphous dispersed of HP in SLN. Ex vivo study of HP-SLN loaded gel exhibited prolonged drug release up to 12 h where as in vitro drug deposition and skin irritation studies showed that HP-SLN formulation can avoid the systemic uptake, better accumulative uptake of the drug and nonirritant to the skin compared to marketed formulation. These results indicate that the studied HP-SLN formulation represent a promising carrier for topical delivery of HP, having controlled drug release, and potential of skin targeting with no skin irritation. PMID:24131382

  2. Applicator for in-vitro ultrasound-activated targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerold, B.; Gourevich, D.; Volovick, A.; Xu, D.; Arditti, F.; Prentice, P.; Cochran, S.; Gnaim, J.; Medan, Y.; Wang, L.; Melzer, A.

    2012-10-01

    Reducing toxicity and improving uptake of cancer drugs in tumors are important goals of targeted drug delivery (TDD). Ultrasonic drug release from various encapsulants has been a focus of many research groups. However, a single standard ultrasonic device, viable for use by biologists, is not currently present in the market. The device reported here is designed to allow investigation of the impact of ultrasound on cellular uptake and cell viability in-vitro. In it, single-element transducers with different operating frequencies are mounted below a standard 96-well plate. The plate is moved above the transducers, such that each line of wells can be sonicated at a different frequency. To assess the device, 96-well plates were seeded with cells and sonicated using different ultrasonic parameters, with and without doxorubicin. Cell viability was measured by colorimetric MTT assay and the uptake of doxorubicin by cells was also determined. The device proved to be highly viable in preliminary tests; it demonstrated that change in ultrasonic parameters produces different effect on cells. For example, increase in uptake of doxorubicin was demonstrated following ultrasound application. The growing interest in ultrasound-activated TDD emphasizes the need for standardization of the ultrasound device and the one reported here may offer some indications of how that may be achieved. It is planned to further improve the prototype by increasing the number of ultrasonic frequencies and degrees of freedom for each transducer.

  3. Polymer nanostructures synthesized by controlled living polymerization for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine E; Stayton, Patrick S; Pun, Suzie H; Convertine, Anthony J

    2015-12-10

    The development of drug delivery systems based on well-defined polymer nanostructures could lead to significant improvements in the treatment of cancer. The design of these therapeutic nanosystems must account for numerous systemic and circulation obstacles as well as the specific pathophysiology of the tumor. Nanoparticle size and surface charge must also be carefully selected in order to maintain long circulation times, allow tumor penetration, and avoid clearance by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). Targeting ligands such as vitamins, peptides, and antibodies can improve the accumulation of nanoparticle-based therapies in tumor tissue but must be optimized to allow for intratumoral penetration. In this review, we will highlight factors influencing the design of nanoparticle therapies as well as the development of modern controlled "living" polymerization techniques (e.g. ATRP, RAFT, ROMP) that are leading to the creation of sophisticated new polymer architectures with discrete spatially-defined functional modules. These innovative materials (e.g. star polymers, polymer brushes, macrocyclic polymers, and hyperbranched polymers) combine many of the desirable properties of traditional nanoparticle therapies while substantially reducing or eliminating the need for complex formulations. PMID:26342661

  4. Bacterial ghosts as carrier and targeting systems for mucosal antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Jalava, Katri; Eko, Francis O; Riedmann, Eva; Lubitz, Werner

    2003-02-01

    The application of new strategies to develop effective vaccines is essential in modern medicine. The bacterial ghost system is a novel vaccine delivery system endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties. Bacterial ghosts are nonliving gram-negative bacterial cell envelopes devoid of cytoplasmic contents while maintaining their cellular morphology and native surface antigenic structures including bioadhesive properties. They are produced by PhiX174 protein E-mediated lysis of gram-negative bacteria. The intrinsic adjuvant properties of bacterial ghost preparations enhance immune responses against envelope-bound antigens, including T-cell activation and mucosal immunity. Since native and foreign antigens can be expressed in the envelope complex of ghosts before E-mediated lysis, multiple antigens of various origin can be presented to the immune system simultaneously. In addition, the extended bacterial ghost system represents a platform technology for specific targeting of DNA-encoded antigens to primary antigen-presenting cells. The potency, safety and relatively low production cost of bacterial ghosts offer a significant technical advantage, especially when used as combination vaccines. PMID:12901596

  5. (90)Y Radioembolization: Multimodality Imaging Pattern Approach with Angiographic Correlation for Optimized Target Therapy Delivery.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Juan C; Moncayo, Valeria; Kokabi, Nima; Reavey, Hamilton E; Galt, James R; Yamada, Kei; Kies, Darren D; Williams, Roger S; Kim, Hyun S; Schuster, David M

    2015-01-01

    Primary and metastatic liver cancers are responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality, and many patients are not curable at presentation. Therefore, new therapies such as radioembolization with yttrium 90 ((90)Y)-labeled microspheres are an alternative method to treat patients with unresectable primary or secondary liver tumors. Patient selection, treatment technique, and early recognition of potential complications are the keys for successful patient outcomes. The activity of administered (90)Y microspheres depends on multiple variables, including the tumor burden, the volume of the liver lobe to be treated, the type of (90)Y microspheres, and the hepatopulmonary shunt fraction. Preprocedural planning relies on the results of cross-sectional imaging to determine the extent of disease, tumoral and nontumoral liver volumes, patency of the portal vein, and the degree of extrahepatic disease. A multidisciplinary approach that combines expertise in cross-sectional imaging, nuclear medicine, and flow dynamics is critical to adequately target malignant tissue. Preprocedural multimodality imaging, particularly combined single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and computed tomography (CT) imaging (SPECT/CT), may be used to identify nontarget imaging patterns that, if recognized, can potentially be corrected with either branch vessel embolization or catheter repositioning. Postprocedural multimodality imaging is also useful to confirm the appropriate delivery of (90)Y microspheres, enabling early identification of potential complications and the adequacy of microsphere distribution, thereby optimizing planning for subsequent therapies. (©)RSNA, 2015. PMID:26230755

  6. Intrinsically water-stable keratin nanoparticles and their in vivo biodistribution for targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Helan; Shi, Zhen; Reddy, Narendra; Yang, Yiqi

    2014-09-17

    Highly water-stable nanoparticles of around 70 nm and capable of distributing with high uptake in certain organs of mice were developed from feather keratin. Nanoparticles could provide novel veterinary diagnostics and therapeutics to boost efficiency in identification and treatment of livestock diseases to improve protein supply and ensure safety and quality of food. Nanoparticles could penetrate easily into cells and small capillaries, surpass detection of the immune system, and reach targeted organs because of their nanoscale sizes. Proteins with positive and negative charges and hydrophobic domains enable loading of various types of drugs and, hence, are advantageous over synthetic polymers and carbohydrates for drug delivery. In this research, the highly cross-linked keratin was processed into nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm under mild conditions. Keratin nanoparticles were found supportive to cell growth via an in vitro study and highly stable after stored in physiological environments for up to 7 days. At 4 days after injection, up to 18% of the cells in kidneys and 4% of the cells in liver of mice were penetrated by the keratin nanoparticles. PMID:25174826

  7. The Biology of the Sodium Iodide Symporter and its Potential for Targeted Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, M.; Spitzweg, C.; Vassaux, G.; Newbold, K.; Melcher, A.; Pandha, H.; Vile, R.; Harrington, K.

    2013-01-01

    The sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for thyroidal, salivary, gastric, intestinal and mammary iodide uptake. It was first cloned from the rat in 1996 and shortly thereafter from human and mouse tissue. In the intervening years, we have learned a great deal about the biology of NIS. Detailed knowledge of its genomic structure, transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation and pharmacological modulation has underpinned the selection of NIS as an exciting approach for targeted gene delivery. A number of in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the potential of using NIS gene therapy as a means of delivering highly conformal radiation doses selectively to tumours. This strategy is particularly attractive because it can be used with both diagnostic (99mTc, 125I, 124I) and therapeutic (131I, 186Re, 188Re, 211At) radioisotopes and it lends itself to incorporation with standard treatment modalities, such as radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. In this article, we review the biology of NIS and discuss its development for gene therapy. PMID:20201784

  8. Brain-Targeted Delivery of Trans-Activating Transcriptor-Conjugated Magnetic PLGA/Lipid Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-?-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain. PMID:25187980

  9. Cyclodextrin conjugated magnetic colloidal nanoparticles as a nanocarrier for targeted anticancer drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shashwat S.; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2008-07-01

    A novel magnetic nanocarrier (CD-GAMNPs) was fabricated for targeted anticancer drug delivery by grafting cyclodextrin (CD) onto gum arabic modified magnetic nanoparticles (GAMNPs) using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) as a linker. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the product had a mean diameter of 17.1 nm and a mean hydrodynamic diameter of 44.1 nm. The CD grafting was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the amount of CD grafted on the GAMNPs was 16.8 mg g-1. The study on the loading of anticancer drug all-trans-retinoic acid (retinoic acid) revealed that the newly fabricated magnetic nanocarrier possessed a considerably higher adsorption capability as compared to GAMNPs due to the special hydrophobic cavity structure of CD, which could act as a host-guest complex with retinoic acid. Furthermore, it was found that the complexation of CD-GAMNPs with retinoic acid was exothermic and the presence of a surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate) led to the decrease in the inclusion of retinoic acid because the linear structure of sodium dodecyl sulfate made it easier to enter the cavity of CD as compared to less linear retinoic acid. In addition, the in vitro release profile of retinoic acid from CD-GAMNPs was characterized by an initial fast release followed by a delayed release phase.

  10. Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) - A novel concept for ultrasound mediated, targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sontum, Per; Kvåle, Svein; Healey, Andrew John; Skurtveit, Roald; Watanabe, Rira; Matsumura, Manabu; Østensen, Jonny

    2015-11-30

    A novel approach for ultrasound (US) mediated drug delivery - Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) - is proposed, and basic characteristics of the ACT formulation are elucidated. The concept comprises administration of free flowing clusters of negatively charged microbubbles and positively charged microdroplets. The clusters are activated within the target pathology by diagnostic US, undergo an ensuing liquid-to-gas phase shift and transiently deposit 20-30?m large bubbles in the microvasculature, occluding blood flow for ?5-10min. Further application of US will induce biomechanical effects that increases the vascular permeability, leading to a locally enhanced extravasation of components from the vascular compartment (e.g. released or co-administered drugs). Methodologies are detailed for determination of vital in-vitro characteristics of the ACT compound; cluster concentration and size distribution. It is shown how these attributes can be engineered through various formulation parameters, and their significance as predictors of biological behaviour, such as deposit characteristics, is demonstrated by US imaging in a dog model. Furthermore, in-vivo properties of the activated ACT bubbles are studied by intravital microscopy in a rat model, confirming the postulated behaviour of the concept. PMID:26408933

  11. Hyaluronic acid and alginate covalent nanogels by template cross-linking in polyion complex micelle nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    De Santis, Serena; Diociaiuti, Marco; Cametti, Cesare; Masci, Giancarlo

    2014-01-30

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and alginate (AL) covalent nanogels cross-linked with l-lysine ethyl ester were prepared by template chemical cross-linking of the polysaccharide in polyion complex micelle (PIC) nanoreactors. By using this method we were able to prepare HA and AL nanogels without organic solvents. PICs were prepared by using poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly[(3-acrylamidopropyl)-trimethylammonium chloride] (PEO-b-PAMPTMA) or poly[(N-isopropylacrylamide)-block-PAMPTMA] (PNIPAAM-b-PAMPTMA). Only PNIPAAM-b-PAMPTMA block copolymers allowed to prepare PIC with small and controlled size. Short polysaccharide chains (Xn=50 and 63 for AL and HA, respectively, where Xn is the number of monosaccharidic units present in the polysaccharide) where used to optimize PIC formation. The remarkable difference in charge density and rigidity of HA and AL did not have a significant influence on the formation of PICs. PICs with small size (diameter of about 50-80 nm) and low polydispersity were obtained up to 5mg/mL of polymer. After cross-linking with l-lysine ethyl ester, the nanoreactors were dissociated by adding NaCl. The nanogels were easily purified and isolated by dialysis. The dissociation of the nanoreactors and the formation of the nanogels were confirmed by (1)H NMR, DLS, TEM and ?-potential measurements. The size of the smallest nanogels in solution in the swollen state was 50-70 nm in presence of salt and 80-100 nm in water. PMID:24299754

  12. Optimization of the Thermostable Nanogel Systems for High Temperature Reservoir Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Nguyen Phuong; Phong, Nguyen T. Phuong; Duy, Nguyen Hoang; Anh, Nguyen T. Quynh

    We designed experiments to find optimal thermostable nanogel systems that meet the requirements for use in high temperature oilfield reservoirs. The Response Surface Method is used to build second-order regression functions that correlate statistically gel strength and gelation time with the experimental parameters, like clay concentration and crosslinker concentration. Via in situ intercalative free-radical copolymerization, nanogels have been prepared from acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS), acrylamide (AM) (weight ratio of which in nanogel systems equals to 1:1) and montmorillonite-alkyl ammonium clay. The mixture of Hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA)/Phenyl acetate (PhAc) was used as a crosslinking system. The Lagrange multiplier method is used to optimise the resulting statistical model and to determine the maximum value of gel strength with the constraint of gelation time for practical applications. After a gelation time of 10.8 hours and storage for 32 days at 150°C the gel strength can reach up to 96%. The optimal nanogel has a clay concentration of 0.55% and a HMTA/PhAc mixture concentration of 0.80%. The characteristics of these nanogel systems meet the requirements for the use as water isolating materials in the White Tiger basement reservoir and provide a good basis for the further design of similar gels.

  13. Influence of Nanogels on Mechanical, Dynamic Mechanical, and Thermal Properties of Elastomers

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Use of sulfur crosslinked nanogels to improve various properties of virgin elastomers was investigated for the first time. Natural rubber (NR) and styrene butadiene rubber (SBR) nanogels were prepared by prevulcanization of the respective rubber lattices. These nanogels were characterized by dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy (AFM), solvent swelling, mechanical, and dynamic mechanical property measurements. Intermixing of gel and matrix at various ratios was carried out. Addition of NR gels greatly improved the green strength of SBR, whereas presence of SBR nanogels induced greater thermal stability in NR. For example, addition of 16 phr of NR gel increased the maximum tensile stress value of neat SBR by more than 48%. Noticeable increase in glass transition temperature of the gel filled systems was also observed. Morphology of these gel filled elastomers was studied by a combination of energy dispersive X-ray mapping, transmission electron microscopy, and AFM techniques. Particulate filler composite reinforcement models were used to understand the reinforcement mechanism of these nanogels. PMID:20596396

  14. Targeted delivery of the hydroxylase inhibitor DMOG provides enhanced efficacy with reduced systemic exposure in a murine model of colitis.

    PubMed

    Tambuwala, Murtaza M; Manresa, Mario C; Cummins, Eoin P; Aversa, Vincenzo; Coulter, Ivan S; Taylor, Cormac T

    2015-11-10

    Targeting hypoxia-sensitive pathways has recently been proposed as a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of intestinal inflammation. HIF-hydroxylases are enzymes which confer hypoxic-sensitivity upon the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a major regulator of the adaptive response to hypoxia. Previous studies have shown that systemic (intraperitoneal) administration of hydroxylase inhibitors such as dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) is profoundly protective in multiple models of colitis, however the therapeutic potential of this approach is limited due to potential side-effects associated with systemic drug exposure and the fact that orally delivered DMOG is ineffective (likely due to drug inactivation by gastric acid). In order to overcome these issues, we formulated DMOG in a liquid emulsion drug delivery system which, when coated with specific polymer coatings, permits oral delivery of a reduced dose which is released locally throughout the colon. This colon-targeted DMOG formulation demonstrated increased relative colonic bioactivity with reduced systemic exposure and provided a similar degree of protection to systemic (intraperitoneal) administration at a 40-fold lower dose in DSS-induced colitis. In summary, targeted delivery of DMOG to the colon provides local protection resulting in enhanced efficacy with reduced systemic exposure in the treatment of colitis. This novel approach to targeting hydroxylase inhibitors to specific diseased regions of the GI tract may improve it's potential as a new therapeutic in inflammatory bowel diseases such as ulcerative colitis. PMID:26385165

  15. Development of Viral Capsid DNA Aptamer Conjugates as Cell-Targeted Delivery Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Gary Jen-Wei

    The ability to generate semi-synthetic DNA-protein conjugates has become increasingly important in the fields of chemical biology and nanobiotechnology. As applications in these fields become more complex, there is also an increased need for methods of attaching synthetic DNA to protein substrates in a well-defined manner. This work outlines the development of new methods for site-specific DNA-protein bioconjugation, as well as the development of novel viral capsid DNA aptamer conjugates for cell-targeting purposes. In order to generate DNA-protein conjugates in a site-specific manner, chemistries orthogonal to native functional groups present on DNA and proteins were exploited. In one method, the attachment of DNA to proteins was achieved via oxime formation. This strategy involved the in situ deprotection of an allyloxycarbonyl-protected alkoxyamine-bearing DNA in the presence of a protein containing a single ketone group. The utility of this approach was demonstrated in the synthesis of a DNA-GFP conjugate. In addition to the oxime formation route, two oxidative coupling methods were also developed for DNA-protein bioconjugation. The first reaction coupled phenylenediamine-containing DNA to anilines, which had been site-specifically incorporated into proteins, in the presence of NaIO4. These reaction conditions were demonstrated on the proteins bacteriophage MS2 and GFP, and were mild enough for the components to retain both protein structure and DNA base-pairing capabilities. The second oxidative coupling reaction conjugated aniline-containing proteins to DNA bearing an o-aminophenol moiety. This reaction occurred under similarly mild conditions; however, higher coupling yields were achieved on MS2 at shorter reaction times by using this strategy. In all three of these methods, the generation of a singly-modified product was achieved. Using one of our oxidative coupling strategies, MS2-DNA aptamer conjugates were synthesized for the development of multivalent cell-targeting delivery vehicles. These agents were generated by selectively functionalizing the interior and exterior surfaces of MS2 with functional molecules and DNA aptamers, respectively, using orthogonal bioconjugation reactions. Interior surface modification was achieved through the incorporation of a uniquely-reactive cysteine residue, while exterior modification occurred via the introduction of the non-natural amino acid p-aminophenylalanine. MS2 capsids possessing interior fluorophores and exterior DNA aptamers targeted to a Jurkat T cell surface receptor were synthesized using this strategy. In cell-binding experiments, these dual-surface modified capsids were shown to bind target cells in an aptamer-dependent manner. In addition, colocalization experiments using confocal microscopy elucidated their cellular internalization pathway. Following validation of the cell-targeting capabilities of aptamer-MS2 conjugates, a multivalent photodynamic agent was developed for targeted photodynamic therapy. This agent was synthesized by installing singlet oxygen-generating porphyrins on the interior of MS2 capsids possessing DNA aptamers on the exterior. Upon illumination with 415 nm light, these dual-modified capsids were shown to generate cytotoxic singlet oxygen. In cell experiments, these agents were shown to selectively kill Jurkat cells in a heterogeneous cell mixture.

  16. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  17. Development of polysaccharide-based colon targeted drug delivery systems for the treatment of amoebiasis.

    PubMed

    Mundargi, Raghavendra C; Patil, Sangamesh A; Agnihotri, Sunil A; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M

    2007-03-01

    The main focus of this study is to develop colon targeted drug delivery systems for metronidazole (MTZ). Tablets were prepared using various polysaccharides or indigenously developed graft copolymer of methacrylic acid with guar gum (GG) as a carrier. Various polysaccharides such as GG, xanthan gum, pectin, carrageenan, beta-cyclodextrin (CD) or methacrylic acid-g-guar (MAA-g-GG) gum have been selected and evaluated. The prepared tablets were tested in vitro for their suitability as colon-specific drug delivery systems. To further improve the colon specificity, some selected tablet formulations were enteric coated with Eudragit-L 100 to give protection in an acidic environment. Drug release studies were performed in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) for 2 hr followed by simulated intestinal fluid (SIF) at pH 7.4. The dissolution data demonstrate that the rate of drug release is dependent upon the nature and concentration of polysaccharide/polymer used in the formulations. Uncoated tablets containing xanthan gum or mixture of xanthan gum with graft copolymer showed 30-40% drug release during the initial 4-5 hr, whereas for tablets containing GG with the graft copolymer, it was 70%. After enteric coating, the release was drastically reduced to 18-24%. The other polysaccharides were unable to protect drug release under similar conditions. Preparations with xanthan gum as a matrix showed the time-dependent release behavior. Further, in vitro release was performed in the dissolution media with rat caecal contents. Results indicated an enhanced release when compared to formulations studied in dissolution media without rat caecal contents, because of microbial degradation or polymer solubilization. The nature of drug transport was found to be non-Fickian in case of uncoated formulations, whereas for the coated formulations, it was found to be super-Case-II. Statistical analyses of release data indicated that MTZ release is significantly affected by the nature of the polysaccharide used and enteric coating of the tablet. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated the presence of crystalline nature of drug in the formulations. PMID:17454058

  18. Brain-targeted co-delivery of therapeutic gene and peptide by multifunctional nanoparticles in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; An, Sai; Li, Jianfeng; Kuang, Yuyang; He, Xi; Guo, Yubo; Ma, Haojun; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Bin; Jiang, Chen

    2016-02-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers are increasingly promising for disease treatment aimed to regulate multiple pathological dysfunctions and overcome barriers in drug delivery. Here we develop a multifunctional nanocarrier for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment by achieving therapeutic gene and peptide co-delivery to brain based on PEGylated dendrigraft poly-l-lysines (DGLs) via systemic administration. The dendritic amine-rich structure of DGLs provides plenty reaction sites and positive charge for drug loading. Successful co-delivery of drugs overcoming the blood-brain barrier by brain-targeted ligand modification was demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The pharmacodynamics study of the system following multiple-dosing treatment was verified in transgenic AD mice. Down-regulation of the key enzyme in amyloid-? formation was achieved by delivering non-coding RNA plasmid. Simultaneous delivery of the therapeutic peptide into brain leads to reduction of neurofibrillary tangles. Meanwhile, memory loss rescue in AD mice was also observed. Taken together, the multifunctional nanocarrier provides an excellent drug co-delivery platform for brain diseases. PMID:26706474

  19. Bi-directionally selective bone targeting delivery for anabolic and antiresorptive drugs: a novel combined therapy for osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Liu, Jinsong; Zhang, Hualin; Dong, Yiwen; Jin, Yifan; Hu, Xiaohui; Cai, Kaiyong; Ma, Jianfeng; Wu, Gang

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a progressive systemic skeletal disease, in which the equilibrium of bone resorption and bone formation is disturbed. The drugs for osteoporosis can be divided into two categories according to their predominant effects: antiresorptive drugs and anabolic drugs. Antiresorptive drugs are designed to inhibit bone resorption and anabolic drugs are aiming to stimulate bone formation. On the other hand, most antiresorptive drugs usually decrease anabolic activities and reduce bone formation, while anabolic drugs can unintendedly increase bone resorption. Furthermore, both types of drugs show no preferential distribution in bone and can locate generally in the areas of both bone formation and bone resorption. Consequently, the non-specific interaction of these drugs with non-targeting area and cells can lead to a compromised efficacy. Combined therapies of antiresorptive and anabolic drugs do not necessarily yield superiority when compared to monotherapy. Here, basing on the targeting cells of these two kinds of drugs and the spatial distribution of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, we propose a novel drug delivery system of bi-directionally selective targeting in order to facilitate the efficacy of antiresorptive and anabolic drugs in combined therapy. In the system, an antiresorptive drug will be linked with a peptide of the eight repeating sequences of aspartate--(Asp)8 that can preferentially guide the drugs to bone resorption zone; while an anabolic drug linked with a peptide of six repeats of the sequence aspartate, serine, serine--(Asp-Ser-Ser)6 that can favorably guide the drugs to bone formation zone. The novel delivery system will improve the specific interaction between the drugs and their targeting cells. Furthermore, the system will reduce the non-specific interaction of the anabolic and antiresorptive drugs with their respective non-targeting cells, which will maximally reduce their side-effects. Therefore, we postulate that the new bone targeting drug delivery system will be a blessing for osteoporotic patients. PMID:25459136

  20. Supramolecular self-assembly forming a multifunctional synergistic system for targeted co-delivery of gene and drug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Yin, Hui; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    For developing a multifunctional bioreducible targeted and synergistic co-delivery system for anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) and p53 gene for potential cancer therapy, supramolecular self-assembled inclusion complex was prepared from PTX and star-shaped cationic polymer containing ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) and multiple oligoethylenimine (OEI) arms with folic acid (FA) conjugated via a disulfide linker. The inclusion complex, termed as ?-CD-OEI-SS-FA/PTX, was formed between PTX and the hydrophobic cavity of ?-CD core of the star polymer. The ?-CD-OEI-SS-FA/PTX complex further formed polyplexes with pDNA to give positively charged nanoparticles, becoming multifunctional supramolecular self-assembled co-delivery system for PTX and pDNA targeting to cancer cells that overexpress folate receptors (FRs). The results showed that the FA-targeted function induced higher gene transfection efficiency in the FR-positive KB cells. The redox-sensitive disulfide linker in the self-assembly system led to the detachment of the FA groups from the carrier after the FR-mediated endocytosis, which resulted in the release of the bound FRs followed by the recycling of the FRs from the cytosol onto the cell membrane surface, facilitating continuous FR-mediated endocytosis to achieve enhanced gene transfection. In addition, the complexed PTX was co-delivered to the cells with pDNA, which further enhanced the gene transfection even at low N/P ratios in the FR-positive KB cells. Further, the efficient delivery of wild-type p53 gene resulted in large cell population at sub G1 and G2/M phases, inducing significant cell apoptosis. Therefore, the multifunctional ?-CD-OEI-SS-FA/PTX self-assembly system with the synergistic effects of redox-sensitive FA-targeted and PTX-enhanced p53 gene delivery may be promising for cancer therapeutic application. PMID:24189097

  1. Maximizing gene delivery efficiencies of cationic helical polypeptides via balanced membrane penetration and cellular targeting

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Maximizing gene delivery efficiencies of cationic helical polypeptides via balanced membrane: Received 26 July 2013 Accepted 24 September 2013 Available online 7 November 2013 Keywords: Non-viral gene a c t The application of non-viral gene delivery vectors is often accompanied with the poor

  2. An aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system using ``off-on'' graphene oxide wrapped mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yuxia; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Molly Gu; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Shouju; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the ``off-on'' photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer.We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two ``off-on'' switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by ``off-on'' Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the ``off-on'' photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07493a

  3. A Novel Isoquinoline Derivative Anticancer Agent and Its Targeted Delivery to Tumor Cells Using Transferrin-Conjugated Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuewei; Yang, Shuang; Chai, Hongyu; Yang, Zhaogang; Lee, Robert J.; Liao, Weiwei; Teng, Lesheng

    2015-01-01

    We have screened 11 isoquinoline derivatives and ?-methylene-?-butyrolactones using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthi-azol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cytotoxicity assay in HeLa and HEK-293T cells. Compound 2 was identified as potential anticancer agent. To further improve its therapeutic potential, this agent was incorporated into transferrin (Tf)-conjugated liposomes (LPs) for targeted delivery to tumor cells. We have demonstrated Tf-LP-Compound 2 have superior antitumor activity compared to non-targeted controls and the free drug. These data show Tf-LP-Compound 2 to be a promising agent that warrants further evaluation. PMID:26309138

  4. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Power, Chanikarn; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. The method presents new opportunities for the use of drugs and for the study of the brain.

  5. Trends in translational medicine and drug targeting and delivery: new insights on an old concept-targeted drug delivery with antibody-drug conjugates for cancers.

    PubMed

    Ho, Rodney J Y; Chien, Jenny

    2014-01-01

    According to the JPS Drug Delivery Clinical Trials Database (jpharmscidatabase.org), 37,738, 14,104, and 8060 clinical trials are registered to evaluate (1) drug delivery technology, (2) biomolecule platform, and (3) drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic (PK)-pharmacodynamic (PD) interactions. These numbers represent a 19%-29% increase since 2012. Within biomolecules in clinical testing, antibodies constitute the majority and approximately 6% carry drug conjugates. Paul Ehrlich introduced the antibody-drug conjugate or "magic bullet" concept about a century ago. A monoclonal antibody (mAb)-drug conjugate Mylotarg was licensed for treating cancer in 2000 and exhibits significant liver toxicity and immune hypersensitivity. Plasma drug instability and a bacterial-derived drug may be partly to blame. Progress in antibody-drug conjugation chemistry, understanding how biologic systems respond to antibody-drug conjugates, and unwavering efforts of scientists have enabled successful development of highly potent and effective second-generation antibody-drug conjugates. With the approval of Adcetris for lymphoma in 2011 and Kadcyla in 2013, about a twofold to fourfold gain in cancer response rate is attributed to drug conjugates. With a demonstrated higher safety profile, many more antibody-drug conjugates are in development. The clinical success of Adcetris and Kadcyla has raised hope that antibody-guided "drug bullets" may be truly "magical" in leading to a cure for cancer. PMID:24186148

  6. A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system for nuclear-targeted and real-time monitoring of drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wang, Zhuyuan; Zong, Shenfei; Chen, Peng; Zhu, Dan; Wu, Lei; Cui, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system is demonstrated for nuclear-targeted drug delivery, which allows for real-time monitoring of the drug release process through FRET signals. In such a system, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) simultaneously serve as the carriers of drugs and donors of FRET pairs. Additionally, a peptide TAT as the nuclear localization signal is conjugated to GQDs, which facilitates the transportation of the delivery system to the nucleus. We have demonstrated that: (a) both the conjugated TAT and small size of GQDs contribute to targeting the nucleus, which results in a significantly enhanced intranuclear accumulation of drugs; (b) FRET signals being extremely sensitive to the distance between donors and acceptors are capable of real-time monitoring of the separation process of drugs and GQDs, which is more versatile in tracking the drug release dynamics. Our strategy for the assembly of a FRET-based drug delivery system may be unique and universal for monitoring the dynamic release process. This study may give more exciting new opportunities for improving the therapeutic efficacy and tracking precision.A graphene quantum dot-based FRET system is demonstrated for nuclear-targeted drug delivery, which allows for real-time monitoring of the drug release process through FRET signals. In such a system, graphene quantum dots (GQDs) simultaneously serve as the carriers of drugs and donors of FRET pairs. Additionally, a peptide TAT as the nuclear localization signal is conjugated to GQDs, which facilitates the transportation of the delivery system to the nucleus. We have demonstrated that: (a) both the conjugated TAT and small size of GQDs contribute to targeting the nucleus, which results in a significantly enhanced intranuclear accumulation of drugs; (b) FRET signals being extremely sensitive to the distance between donors and acceptors are capable of real-time monitoring of the separation process of drugs and GQDs, which is more versatile in tracking the drug release dynamics. Our strategy for the assembly of a FRET-based drug delivery system may be unique and universal for monitoring the dynamic release process. This study may give more exciting new opportunities for improving the therapeutic efficacy and tracking precision. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03454j

  7. Nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering*

    PubMed Central

    GOLDBERG, MICHAEL; LANGER, ROBERT; JIA, XINQIAO

    2010-01-01

    Research in the areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering has witnessed tremendous progress in recent years due to their unlimited potential to improve human health. Meanwhile, the development of nanotechnology provides opportunities to characterize, manipulate and organize matter systematically at the nanometer scale. Biomaterials with nano-scale organizations have been used as controlled release reservoirs for drug delivery and artificial matrices for tissue engineering. Drug-delivery systems can be synthesized with controlled composition, shape, size and morphology. Their surface properties can be manipulated to increase solubility, immunocompatibility and cellular uptake. The limitations of current drug delivery systems include suboptimal bioavailability, limited effective targeting and potential cytotoxicity. Promising and versatile nano-scale drug-delivery systems include nanoparticles, nanocapsules, nanotubes, nanogels and dendrimers. They can be used to deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of biomacromolecules, such as peptides, proteins, plasmid DNA and synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides. Whereas traditional tissue-engineering scaffolds were based on hydrolytically degradable macroporous materials, current approaches emphasize the control over cell behaviors and tissue formation by nano-scale topography that closely mimics the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). The understanding that the natural ECM is a multifunctional nanocomposite motivated researchers to develop nanofibrous scaffolds through electrospinning or self-assembly. Nanocomposites containing nanocrystals have been shown to elicit active bone growth. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely related fields. In fact, tissue engineering can be viewed as a special case of drug delivery where the goal is to accomplish controlled delivery of mammalian cells. Controlled release of therapeutic factors in turn will enhance the efficacy of tissue engineering. From a materials point of view, both the drug-delivery vehicles and tissue-engineering scaffolds need to be biocompatible and biodegradable. The biological functions of encapsulated drugs and cells can be dramatically enhanced by designing biomaterials with controlled organizations at the nanometer scale. This review summarizes the most recent development in utilizing nanostructured materials for applications in drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:17471764

  8. Water soluble nanoporous nanoparticle for in vivo targeted drug delivery and controlled release in B cells tumor context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Angelis, F.; Pujia, A.; Falcone, C.; Iaccino, E.; Palmieri, C.; Liberale, C.; Mecarini, F.; Candeloro, P.; Luberto, L.; de Laurentiis, A.; Das, G.; Scala, G.; di Fabrizio, E.

    2010-10-01

    Multitasking nanoparticles are gaining great attention for smart drug delivery systems. The exploration of the nano-scale opens new concrete opportunities for revealing new properties and undiscovered cell-particle interactions. Here we present a biodegradable nanoporous silicon nanoparticle that can be successfully employed for in vivo targeted drug delivery and sustained release. The bare nanoporous nanocarriers can be accurately designed and fabricated with an effective control of porosity, surface chemistry and particle size, up to a few nm. The proposed nanoparticles exhibit several remarkable features including high payload, biodegradability, no toxicity, and multiple loading in water without the need of additional chemical reagents at room temperature. The targeting strategy is based on phage display technology that was successfully used to discover cell surface binding peptide for murine B lymphoma A20 cell line. The peptide used in combination with the nanoporous nanoparticles allows an efficient in vivo targeting, a sustained release and a sensible therapeutic effect.Multitasking nanoparticles are gaining great attention for smart drug delivery systems. The exploration of the nano-scale opens new concrete opportunities for revealing new properties and undiscovered cell-particle interactions. Here we present a biodegradable nanoporous silicon nanoparticle that can be successfully employed for in vivo targeted drug delivery and sustained release. The bare nanoporous nanocarriers can be accurately designed and fabricated with an effective control of porosity, surface chemistry and particle size, up to a few nm. The proposed nanoparticles exhibit several remarkable features including high payload, biodegradability, no toxicity, and multiple loading in water without the need of additional chemical reagents at room temperature. The targeting strategy is based on phage display technology that was successfully used to discover cell surface binding peptide for murine B lymphoma A20 cell line. The peptide used in combination with the nanoporous nanoparticles allows an efficient in vivo targeting, a sustained release and a sensible therapeutic effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticles fabrication; payload evaluation; dissolution and release profiles; multivalent loading; targeting specifity on A20 Cells; cell cycle analysis; in vitro cytotoxicity assay; in vivo cytotoxicity assay. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00161a

  9. Targeted delivery of chemically modified anti-miR-221 to hepatocellular carcinoma with negatively charged liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wendian; Peng, Fangqi; Zhou, Taotao; Huang, Yifei; Zhang, Li; Ye, Peng; Lu, Miao; Yang, Guang; Gai, Yongkang; Yang, Tan; Ma, Xiang; Xiang, Guangya

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death. Gene therapy was established as a new strategy for treating HCC. To explore the potential delivery system to support the gene therapy of HCC, negatively charged liposomal delivery system was used to deliver miR-221 antisense oligonucleotide (anti-miR-221) to the transferrin (Tf) receptor over expressed HepG2 cells. The liposome exhibited a mean particle size of 122.5 nm, zeta potential of ?15.74 mV, anti-miR-221 encapsulation efficiency of 70%, and excellent colloidal stability at 4°C. Anti-miR-221-encapsulated Tf-targeted liposome demonstrated a 15-fold higher delivery efficiency compared to nontargeted liposome in HepG2 cells in vitro. Anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome effectively delivered anti-miR-221 to HepG2 cells, upregulated miR-221 target genes PTEN, P27kip1, and TIMP3, and exhibited greater silencing efficiency over nontargeted anti-miR-221 liposome. After intravenous injection into HepG2 tumor-bearing xenografted mice with Cy3-labeled anti-miR-221 Tf-targeted liposome, Cy3-anti-miR-221 was successfully delivered to the tumor site and increased the expressions of PTEN, P27kip1, and TIMP3. Our results demonstrate that the Tf-targeted negatively charged liposome could be a potential therapeutic modality in the gene therapy of human HCC. PMID:26251599

  10. Hydraulic Hybrid and Conventional Parcel Delivery Vehicles' Measured Laboratory Fuel Economy on Targeted Drive Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M. P.; Burton, J.; Sindler, P.; Duran, A.

    2014-10-01

    This research project compares laboratory-measured fuel economy of a medium-duty diesel powered hydraulic hybrid vehicle drivetrain to both a conventional diesel drivetrain and a conventional gasoline drivetrain in a typical commercial parcel delivery application. Vehicles in this study included a model year 2012 Freightliner P100H hybrid compared to a 2012 conventional gasoline P100 and a 2012 conventional diesel parcel delivery van of similar specifications. Drive cycle analysis of 484 days of hybrid parcel delivery van commercial operation from multiple vehicles was used to select three standard laboratory drive cycles as well as to create a custom representative cycle. These four cycles encompass and bracket the range of real world in-use data observed in Baltimore United Parcel Service operations. The NY Composite cycle, the City Suburban Heavy Vehicle Cycle cycle, and the California Air Resources Board Heavy Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck (HHDDT) cycle as well as a custom Baltimore parcel delivery cycle were tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory. Fuel consumption was measured and analyzed for all three vehicles. Vehicle laboratory results are compared on the basis of fuel economy. The hydraulic hybrid parcel delivery van demonstrated 19%-52% better fuel economy than the conventional diesel parcel delivery van and 30%-56% better fuel economy than the conventional gasoline parcel delivery van on cycles other than the highway-oriented HHDDT cycle.

  11. A nanomedicine-promising approach to provide an appropriate colon-targeted drug delivery system for 5-fluorouracil

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sima; Kotla, Niranjan G; Tomar, Sonia; Maddiboyina, Balaji; Webster, Thomas J; Sharma, Dinesh; Sunnapu, Omprakash

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery plays a significant role in disease treatment associated with the colon, affording therapeutic responses for a prolonged period of time with low side effects. Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in both men and women with an estimated 102,480 cases of colon cancer and 40,340 cases of rectal cancer in 2013 as reported by the American Cancer Society. In the present investigation, we developed an improved oral delivery system for existing anticancer drugs meant for colon cancer via prebiotic and probiotic approaches. The system comprises three components, namely, nanoparticles of drug coated with natural materials such as guar gum, xanthan gum (that serve as prebiotics), and probiotics. The natural gums play a dual role of protecting the drug in the gastric as well as intestinal conditions to allow its release only in the colon. In vitro results obtained from these experiments indicated the successful targeted delivery of 5-fluorouracil to the colon. Electron microscopy results demonstrated that the prepared nanoparticles were spherical in shape and 200 nm in size. The in vitro release data indicated that the maximum release occurs at pH 7.2 and 7.4 with 93% of the drug released in the presence of 4% (w/v) of rat cecal content. In vivo results conclude a practical mechanism to maintain the integrity and intactness of the intestinal/colonic microflora, in the face of a “chemical attack” by oral colon-targeted drug delivery for colon cancer treatment. PMID:26648721

  12. One of the main issues with drug delivery is that drugs tend to disperse throughout the entire body, instead of targeting

    E-print Network

    Metlushko, Vitali

    One of the main issues with drug delivery is that drugs tend to disperse throughout the entire body, instead of targeting the specific site (or area) that it is intended to reach. Therefore, drugs candidates for more focused drug delivery systems is magnetic manipulation of nanoparticles

  13. Surface properties of semi-synthetic enteric coating films: Opportunities to develop bio-based enteric coating films for colon- targeted delivery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the surface properties of the semi-synthetic enteric coating materials for potential colon- targeted bioactive delivery. The enteric coating materials were produced by combining nanoscale resistant starch, pectin, and carboxymethylcellulose. The surface properties of the co...

  14. Development and Testing of Simulation (Game) to Illustrate Basic Principles of Integrated Project Delivery and Target Value Design: A First Run Study 

    E-print Network

    Munankami, Manish 1972-

    2012-12-07

    This research is focused on developing a simulation (game) that will help explain the basic principles of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Target Value Design (TVD). The transfer of knowledge about Lean principles ...

  15. Tumor-targeted Chlorotoxin-coupled Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery to Glioblastoma Cells: A Promising System for Glioblastoma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Pedro M; Cardoso, Ana L; Mendonça, Liliana S; Serani, Angelo; Custódia, Carlos; Conceição, Mariana; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João N; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed at the development and application of a lipid-based nanocarrier for targeted delivery of nucleic acids to glioblastoma (GBM). For this purpose, chlorotoxin (CTX), a peptide reported to bind selectively to glioma cells while showing no affinity for non-neoplastic cells, was covalently coupled to liposomes encapsulating antisense oligonucleotides (asOs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The resulting targeted nanoparticles, designated CTX-coupled stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), exhibited excellent features for in vivo application, namely small size (<180?nm) and neutral surface charge. Cellular association and internalization studies revealed that attachment of CTX onto the liposomal surface enhanced particle internalization into glioma cells, whereas no significant internalization was observed in noncancer cells. Moreover, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing in U87 human GBM and GL261 mouse glioma cells resulted in increased levels of the tumor suppressors PTEN and PDCD4, caspase 3/7 activation and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Preliminary in vivo studies revealed that CTX enhances particle internalization into established intracranial tumors. Overall, our results indicate that the developed targeted nanoparticles represent a valuable tool for targeted nucleic acid delivery to cancer cells. Combined with a drug-based therapy, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing constitutes a promising multimodal therapeutic approach towards GBM. PMID:23778499

  16. Tumor-targeted Chlorotoxin-coupled Nanoparticles for Nucleic Acid Delivery to Glioblastoma Cells: A Promising System for Glioblastoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Costa, Pedro M; Cardoso, Ana L; Mendonça, Liliana S; Serani, Angelo; Custódia, Carlos; Conceição, Mariana; Simões, Sérgio; Moreira, João N; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Pedroso de Lima, Maria C

    2013-01-01

    The present work aimed at the development and application of a lipid-based nanocarrier for targeted delivery of nucleic acids to glioblastoma (GBM). For this purpose, chlorotoxin (CTX), a peptide reported to bind selectively to glioma cells while showing no affinity for non-neoplastic cells, was covalently coupled to liposomes encapsulating antisense oligonucleotides (asOs) or small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). The resulting targeted nanoparticles, designated CTX-coupled stable nucleic acid lipid particles (SNALPs), exhibited excellent features for in vivo application, namely small size (<180?nm) and neutral surface charge. Cellular association and internalization studies revealed that attachment of CTX onto the liposomal surface enhanced particle internalization into glioma cells, whereas no significant internalization was observed in noncancer cells. Moreover, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing in U87 human GBM and GL261 mouse glioma cells resulted in increased levels of the tumor suppressors PTEN and PDCD4, caspase 3/7 activation and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Preliminary in vivo studies revealed that CTX enhances particle internalization into established intracranial tumors. Overall, our results indicate that the developed targeted nanoparticles represent a valuable tool for targeted nucleic acid delivery to cancer cells. Combined with a drug-based therapy, nanoparticle-mediated miR-21 silencing constitutes a promising multimodal therapeutic approach towards GBM.Molecular Therapy-Nucleic Acids (2013) 2, e100; doi:10.1038/mtna.2013.30; published online 18 June 2013. PMID:23778499

  17. Numerical optimization of targeted delivery of charged nanoparticles to the ostiomeatal complex for treatment of rhinosinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yuan, Jiayao Eddie; Si, Xiuhua April; Hasbany, James

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the prevalence of rhinosinusitis that affects 10%–15% of the population, current inhalation therapy shows limited efficacy. Standard devices deliver <5% of the drugs to the sinuses due to the complexity of nose structure, secluded location of the sinus, poor ventilation, and lack of control of particle motions inside the nasal cavity. Methods An electric-guided delivery system was developed to guide charged particles to the ostiomeatal complex (OMC). Its performance was numerically assessed in an MRI-based nose–sinus model. Key design variables related to the delivery device, drug particles, and patient breathing were determined using sensitivity analysis. A two-stage optimization of design variables was conducted to obtain the best performance of the delivery system using the Nelder-Mead algorithm. Results and discussion The OMC delivery system exhibited high sensitivity to the applied electric field and electrostatic charges carried by the particles. Through the synthesis of electric guidance and point drug release, the new delivery system eliminated particle deposition in the nasal valve and turbinate regions and significantly enhanced the OMC doses. An OMC delivery efficiency of 72.4% was obtained with the optimized design, which is one order of magnitude higher than the standard nasal devices. Moreover, optimization is imperative to achieve a sound delivery protocol because of the large number of design variables. The OMC dose increased from 45.0% in the baseline model to 72.4% in the optimized system. The optimization framework developed in this study can be easily adapted for the delivery of drugs to other sites in the nose such as the ethmoid sinus and olfactory region. PMID:26257521

  18. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system will find a range of applications.

  19. Optoinjection for efficient targeted delivery of a broad range of compounds and macromolecules into diverse cell types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Imram; Hanania, Elie G.; Stevens, Janine; Gallina, Marijo; Fieck, Annabeth; Brandes, Rolf; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Koller, Manfred R.

    2006-01-01

    Efficient delivery of compounds and macromolecules into living cells is essential in many fields including basic research, applied drug discovery, and clinical gene therapy. Unfortunately, current delivery methods, such as cationic lipids and electroporation, are limited by the types of macromolecules and cells that can be employed, poor efficiency, and/or cell toxicity. To address these issues, novel methods were developed based on laser-mediated delivery of macromolecules into cells through optoinjection. An automated high-throughput instrument, the laser-enabled analysis and processing (LEAPTM) system, was utilized to elucidate and optimize several parameters that influence optoinjection efficiency and toxicity. Techniques employing direct cell irradiation (i.e., targeted to specific cell coordinates) and grid-based irradiation (i.e., without locating individual cells) were both successfully developed. With both techniques, it was determined that multiple, sequential low radiant exposures produced more favorable results than a single high radiant exposure. Various substances were efficiently optoinjected-including ions, small molecules, dextrans, siRNAs (small interfering RNAs), plasmids, proteins, and semiconductor nanocrystals-into numerous cell types. Notably, cells refractory to traditional delivery methods were efficiently optoinjected with lower toxicity. We establish the broad utility of optoinjection, and furthermore, are the first to demonstrate its implementation in an automated, high-throughput manner.

  20. A review on skin targeted delivery of bioactives as ultradeformable vesicles: overcoming the penetration problem.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Karunanidhi; Singh, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Administration of drugs through skin via transdermal route is a non-invasive approach and applicable for systemic delivery but it is not suitable for drugs having higher molecular weight. Various approaches have been used to improve the efficacy of transdermal route such as vesicular system, iontophoresis, microneedles, use of permeation enhancers, etc. Among the several approaches, vesicular delivery is gaining importance in transdermal drug delivery. Transfersomes are one of the vesicular systems and they are best suited for the transdermal delivery of higher molecular weight compounds. Due to the deformable nature of transfersomes, they penetrate into deeper layers of skin, retain their original structure after penetration and finally enter into the systemic circulation. This review focuses mainly on the applications of transfersomes in the field of drug delivery i.e. delivery of analgesics, anti-cancers, proteins and peptides, immunomodulators, steroidal hormones and herbal drugs with increased penetration through skin. In addition, this review also deals with preparation methods available for preparing transfersomes, characterization, mechanism of penetration upon topical application and its kinetic aspects. PMID:24410447

  1. Brain-targeted delivery of protein using chitosan- and RVG peptide-conjugated, pluronic-based nano-carrier.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ja-Young; Choi, Won Il; Kim, Young Ha; Tae, Giyoong

    2013-01-01

    Brain-targeted delivery of drug or imaging agent is hard to achieve efficiently due to the infiltrative nature of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Moreover, delivery of therapeutic proteins to brain tissue is further limited by the size and physic-chemical properties of proteins. In this work, we developed a chitosan-conjugated Pluronic-based nano-carrier with a specific target peptide for the brain (rabies virus glycoprotein; RVG29) and applied for the protein delivery to the brain. The in-vivo brain accumulation of the nano-carrier in mice followed i.v injection was optically monitored with Cy5.5-conjugation to the nano-carrier, and the result showed that the Pluronic-based nano-carrier conjugated with both chitosan and the peptide was very efficient for the accumulation in brain tissue and was remarkably better than the nano-carrier conjugated with the peptide only. ?-galactosidase, a model protein, was also delivered and accumulated efficiently in the brain by loading in the nano-carrier, analyzed by the bio-distribution of ?-galactosidase. The delivered protein in the brain also maintained its bioactivity. Therefore, RVG29- and chitosan-conjugated Pluronic-based nano-carrier could be potentially useful for the diagnosis and therapy of brain diseases. PMID:23122677

  2. Colon-targeted delivery of budesonide using dual pH- and time-dependent polymeric nanoparticles for colitis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Naeem, Muhammad; Choi, Moonjeong; Cao, Jiafu; Lee, Yujeong; Ikram, Muhammad; Yoon, Sik; Lee, Jaewon; Moon, Hyung Ryong; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Yunjin; Yoo, Jin-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Single pH-dependent drug delivery systems have been widely used for colon-targeted delivery, but their efficiency is often hampered by the variation in gut pH. To overcome the limitation of single pH-dependent delivery systems, in this study, we developed and evaluated the therapeutic potential of budesonide-loaded dual pH/time-dependent nanoparticles (NPs) for the treatment of colitis. Eudragit FS30D was used as a pH-dependent polymer, and Eudragit RS100 as a time-dependent controlled release polymer. Single pH-dependent NPs (pH_NPs), single time-dependent NPs (Time_NPs), and dual pH/time-dependent NPs (pH/Time_NPs) were prepared using the oil-in-water emulsion method. The physicochemical properties and drug release profiles of these NPs in gastrointestinal (GI) tract conditions were investigated. The therapeutic potential and in vivo distribution of the NPs were evaluated in a dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mice model. The pH/Time_NPs prevented a burst drug release in acidic pH conditions and showed sustained release at a colonic pH. The in vivo distribution study in the mice GI tract demonstrated that pH/Time_NPs were more efficiently delivered to the inflamed colon than pH_NPs were. Compared to the single pH_NPs-treated group, the pH/Time_NPs-treated group showed increased body weight and colon length and markedly decreased disease activity index, colon weight/length ratios, histological damage, and inflammatory cell infiltration in colon tissue. Our results demonstrate that the dual pH/time-dependent NPs are an effective oral colon-targeted delivery system for colitis therapy. PMID:26229440

  3. Sparsely Cross-Linked "Nanogel" Matrixes as Fluid, Mechanically Stabilized Polymer Networks

    E-print Network

    Barron, Annelise E.

    and microchip electrophoresis. Nanogels were synthesized via inverse emulsion (water-in-oil) copolymerization separation channels densely fabricated on a 6-in. glass wafer. Again, preliminary DNA sequencing results show polymeric separation matrixes is presently the dominant technology for high- throughput sequencing. Hundreds

  4. Synthesis and characterization of transferrin-targeted chemotherapeutic delivery systems prepared via RAFT copolymerization of high molecular weight PEG macromonomers

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debashish; Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Ghosn, Bilal; Lane, Daniel; Braswell, Scott; Stayton, Patrick S; Convertine, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to prepare a nanoparticulate drug delivery system for chemotherapeutics. The nanoparticles contain a PEG “stealth” corona as well as reactive anhydride functionality designed for conjugating targeting proteins. The multifunctional carrier functionality was achieved by controlling the copolymerization of the hydrophobic monomer lauryl methacrylate (LMA), with a reactive anhydride functional methacrylate (TMA), and a large polyethyleneglycol methacrylate monomer (Mn~950 Da) (O950). RAFT polymerization kinetics of O950 were evaluated as a function of target degrees of polymerization (DP), initial chain transfer agent to initiator ratio ([CTA]o/[I]o), and solvent concentration. Excellent control over the polymerization was observed for target DPs of 25 and 50 at [CTA]o/[I]o ratio of 10 as evidenced by narrow and symmetric molecular weight distributions and the ability to prepare block copolymers. The TMA-functional copolymers were conjugated to the tumor targeting protein transferrin (Tf). The targeted copolymer was shown to encapsulate docetaxel at concentrations comparable to the commercial single vial formulation of docetaxel (Taxotere). In vitro cytotoxicity studies conducted in HeLa cells show that the Tf targeting enhances the cancer killing properties relative to the polymer encapsulated docetaxel formulation. PMID:25221630

  5. Dual targeting of integrin ?v?3 and matrix metalloproteinase-2 for optical imaging of tumors and chemotherapeutic delivery

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, Jessica L.; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Glasgow, Heather L.; Ellies, Lesley G.; Whitney, Michael A.; Tsien, Roger. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Activatable cell penetrating peptides (ACPPs) provide a general strategy for molecular targeting by exploiting the extracellular protease activities associated with disease. Previous work used a matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and 9) cleavable sequence in the ACPP to target contrast agents for tumor imaging and fluorescence guided surgery. To improve specificity and sensitivity for MMP-2, an integrin ?v?3 binding domain, cyclic-RGD, was covalently linked to the ACPP. This co-targeting strategy relies on the interaction of MMP-2 with integrin ?v?3, which are known to associate via MMP-2’s hemopexin domain. In U87MG glioblastoma cells in culture, dual targeting greatly improved ACPP uptake compared to either MMP or integrin ?v?3 targeting alone. In vivo, dual-targeted ACPP treatment resulted in tumor contrast of 7.8±1.6, a 10 fold higher tumor fluorescence compared to the negative control peptide, and increased probe penetration into the core of MDA-MB-231 tumors. This platform also significantly improved efficacy of the chemotherapeutic monomethylauristatin E (MMAE) in both MDA-MB-231 orthotopic human and syngeneic Py230 murine breast tumors. Treatment with cyclic-RGD-PLGC(Me)AG-MMAE-ACPP resulted in complete tumor regression in one quarter of MDA-MB-231 tumor bearing mice, compared to no survival in the control groups. This rational mechanism for amplified delivery of imaging and potent chemotherapeutic agents avoids the use of antibodies and may be of considerable generality. PMID:24737028

  6. Lambert targeting for on-orbit delivery of debris remediation dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Healy, Liam

    2012-07-01

    An idea proposed for the elimination of some small debris calls for the deployment of a dust that decreases the energy of the debris, in effect de-orbiting it partway. The delivery of that dust on-orbit is possible by pre-positioning on orbit a vehicle with the intended cargo. If the goal is to reach a specified point in inertial space to precede the return of another vehicle to that point using Lambert targeting, and there is a limit to the amount of delta v available, then some orbits are better choices than others. In the context of dispensing a dust to enhance drag for elimination of debris, I examine the combination of vehicles which gives the most coverage to treat the most populous altitude band of satellites. An idea proposed by Ganguli and coworkers for remediation of on-orbit small debris is to place in orbit a dusty plasma which acts as an artificial atmosphere, bringing down the debris, not immediately, but over months or years. The region of space that should be filled with dust is smaller if it can be applied as soon as possible after the fragmentation event that creates the debris (explosion or collision). It is very time consuming to prepare, launch and deliver a dust-bearing, or ``cleanup'' vehicle, and in that time, the initial delta v from the impact or explosion will spread the fragments over a large volume. If such a vehicle or vehicles are prepared and launched ahead of time, they will need a much shorter time to reach a region filled with debris fragments than a ground launch. The purpose of this study is to determine whether it is practical from an astrodynamics perspective to put a small number of cleanup vehicles on orbit in the most heavily populated neighborhood of low-earth orbit (500-1200 km altitude and 95°-105° inclination) such that if notified a short time after a fragmentation, at least one could reach a significant fraction of the compact debris field before it disperses. Each of the possible sources for orbital debris is assumed to be in this orbital parameter range. For each set of source and cleanup vehicle orbits, maximum delta v, and delay between fragmentation and cleanup vehicle dispatch, we can compute whether the debris is reachable by the cleanup vehicle at the first return of the debris one orbit of the source vehicle after the fragmentation event. Then by sampling over many source vehicle orbits and delays, we can determine for each cleanup vehicle the reachable fraction of source vehicles, with a higher fraction being more desirable. I assume that once a cleanup vehicle reaches its target, it is able to deliver the dust in an appropriate pattern without regard to the relative velocity of the vehicle (in other words, no maneuver is performed at the target point; all the available delta v may be consumed at the departure from original orbit). The next step is to sample many cleanup orbits to find those with the highest reachable fraction. Those orbits may be combined into pairs, triples, etc., corresponding to fleets of cleanup vehicles of two or three or more. The potential advantage of doing so is that much more of the target orbital neighborhood is reachable, at the cost of adding more cleanup vehicles. I use low-discrepancy, or quasi-random, sequences to evenly fill the space of parameters for both source and cleanup vehicles, and find through stepwise increase in the density of the sample, find a limiting value of the number of samples (about 500 for source and 2000 for single cleanup vehicle). The results show that, for example, a fleet of two vehicles with a capacity of 4 km/s could cover 69% of the potential debris sources with a minimum delay of 30 minutes between event and dispatch. While there are other technological problems that must be overcome for this approach to the debris problem to be feasible, this is a plausible number of spacecraft to consider for such a cleanup task.

  7. Fabrication and Characterization of Stable Soy ?-Conglycinin-Dextran Core-Shell Nanogels Prepared via a Self-Assembly Approach at the Isoelectric Point.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ji-Lu; Qi, Jun-Ru; Yin, Shou-Wei; Wang, Jin-Mei; Guo, Jian; Weng, Jing-Yi; Liu, Qian-Ru; Yang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-07-01

    The preparation of soy ?-conglycinin-dextran nanogels (?90 nm) went through two stages, which are safe, facile, and green. First, amphiphilic graft copolymers were formed by dextran covalently attaching to ?-conglycinin via Maillard dry-heating reaction. Second, the synthesized conjugates were heated above the denaturation temperature at the isoelectric point (pH4.8) so as to assemble nanogels. The effects of pH, concentration, heating temperature, and time on the fabrication of nanogels were examined. The morphology study displayed that the nanogels exhibited spherical shape with core-shell structures, which was reconfirmed by zeta-potential investigation. Both circular dichroism spectra and surface hydrophobicity analyses indicated that the conformations of ?-conglycinin in the core of nanogels were changed, and the latter experiment further revealed that the hydrophobic groups of ?-conglycinin were exposed to the surface of protein. The nanogels were stable against various conditions and might be useful to deliver hydrophobic bioactive compounds. PMID:26075494

  8. mRNA-engineered mesenchymal stem cells for targeted delivery of interleukin-10 to sites of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Oren; Zhao, Weian; Mortensen, Luke J.; LeBlanc, Sarah; Tsang, Kyle; Fu, Moyu; Phillips, Joseph A.; Sagar, Vinay; Anandakumaran, Priya; Ngai, Jessica; Cui, Cheryl H.; Eimon, Peter; Angel, Matthew; Lin, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising candidates for cell-based therapy to treat several diseases and are compelling to consider as vehicles for delivery of biological agents. However, MSCs appear to act through a seemingly limited “hit-and-run” mode to quickly exert their therapeutic impact, mediated by several mechanisms, including a potent immunomodulatory secretome. Furthermore, MSC immunomodulatory properties are highly variable and the secretome composition following infusion is uncertain. To determine whether a transiently controlled antiinflammatory MSC secretome could be achieved at target sites of inflammation, we harnessed mRNA transfection to generate MSCs that simultaneously express functional rolling machinery (P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 [PSGL-1] and Sialyl-Lewisx [SLeX]) to rapidly target inflamed tissues and that express the potent immunosuppressive cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10), which is not inherently produced by MSCs. Indeed, triple-transfected PSGL-1/SLeX/IL-10 MSCs transiently increased levels of IL-10 in the inflamed ear and showed a superior antiinflammatory effect in vivo, significantly reducing local inflammation following systemic administration. This was dependent on rapid localization of MSCs to the inflamed site. Overall, this study demonstrates that despite the rapid clearance of MSCs in vivo, engineered MSCs can be harnessed via a “hit-and-run” action for the targeted delivery of potent immunomodulatory factors to treat distant sites of inflammation. PMID:23980067

  9. Targeting delivery of Radix Ophiopogonis polysaccharide to ischemic/reperfused rat myocardium by long-circulating macromolecular and liposomal carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, LiNa; Yao, ChunXia; Wu, Fei; Lin, Xiao; Shen, Lan; Feng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery to ischemic myocardium is an enormous challenge. This work aimed to characterize cardiac delivery behaviors of mono-polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) conjugates and long-circulating liposomes (L-Lps) with Radix Ophiopogonis polysaccharide (ROP) as drug. The results showed that compared to native ROP, 32-, 52-, and 45-fold increases in blood half-life were achieved by 20-kDa PEG mono-modified ROP (P20k-R), 40-kDa PEG mono-modified ROP (P40k-R), and ROP-loaded L-Lp, respectively. With comparable blood pharmacokinetics, ROP-loaded L-Lp showed both significantly higher targeting efficacy and drug exposure in infarcted myocardium than P40k-R. With regard to P20k-R, both its targeting efficacy and its level in infarcted myocardium at 3 hours postdose were comparable to P40k-R, but its level in blood and myocardium reduced obviously faster. As a whole, the results indicate that both loading in L-Lps and mono-PEGylation are effective in targeting drug to ischemic myocardium, but the former appears to induce stronger effects. PMID:26425081

  10. Core-shell nanocarriers with ZnO quantum dots-conjugated Au nanoparticle for tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tong; Zhao, Tong; Wei, Dongfeng; Wei, Yanxia; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Haixia

    2013-02-15

    Core-shell structured multifunctional nanocarriers (NCs) of ZnO quantum dots-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) as core and amphiphilic hyperbranched block copolymer as shell were synthesized for targeted anticancer drug delivery. The amphiphilic hyperbranched block copolymer contained poly(l-lactide) (PLA) inner arm and folate (FA)-conjugated a sulfated polysaccharide from Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino (GPPS-FA) outer arm. The structure and properties of core-shell structured multifunctional nanocarriers were characterized and determined by UV-visible spectra, FT-IR spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), fluorescence spectroscopy and TEM analyses. The release results indicated that camptothecin (CPT) release from NCs at pH 7.4 was much greater than that at pH 5.3. The cytotoxicity studies showed that both the blank NCs and the CPT-loaded NCs provided high anticancer activity against Hela cells. Furthermore, nanocarriers gained specificity to target model cancer cells in this study due to the enhanced cell uptake mediated by FA moiety. The results indicated that the NCs not only had great potential as tumor-targeted drug delivery nanocarrier, but also had an assistant role in the treatment of cancer. PMID:23399137

  11. Nanoparticles inhibit cancer cell invasion and enhance antitumor efficiency by targeted drug delivery via cell surface-related GRP78

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Li, Hongdan; Shi, Yijie; Wang, Guan; Liu, Liwei; Su, Chang; Su, Rongjian

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) which target specific agents could effectively recognize the target cells and increase the stability of chemical agents by encapsulation. As such, NPs have been widely used in cancer treatment research. Recently, over 90% of treatment failure cases in patients with metastatic cancer were attributed to resistance to chemotherapy. Surface-exposed glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa (GRP78) is expressed highly on many tumor cell surfaces in many human cancers and is related to the regulation of invasion and metastasis. Herein, we report that NPs conjugated with antibody against GRP78 (mAb GRP78-NPs) inhibit the adhesion, invasion, and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and promote drug delivery of 5-fluorouracil into GRP78 high-expressed human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Our new findings suggest that mAb GRP78-NPs could enhance drug accumulation by effectively transporting NPs into cell surface GRP78-overexpressed human hepatocellular carcinoma cells and then inhibit cell proliferation and viability and induce cell apoptosis by regulating caspase-3. In brief, mAb GRP78-NPs effectively inhibit cancer cell invasion and enhance antitumor efficiency by targeted drug delivery. PMID:25565817

  12. Phase-shift, stimuli-responsive drug carriers for targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Brian E; Rapoport, Natalya

    2011-01-01

    The intersection of particles and directed energy is a rich source of novel and useful technology that is only recently being realized for medicine. One of the most promising applications is directed drug delivery. This review focuses on phase-shift nanoparticles (that is, particles of submicron size) as well as micron-scale particles whose action depends on an external-energy triggered, first-order phase shift from a liquid to gas state of either the particle itself or of the surrounding medium. These particles have tremendous potential for actively disrupting their environment for altering transport properties and unloading drugs. This review covers in detail ultrasound and laser-activated phase-shift nano- and micro-particles and their use in drug delivery. Phase-shift based drug-delivery mechanisms and competing technologies are discussed. PMID:22059114

  13. Engineering Design and Molecular Dynamics of Mucoadhesive Drug Delivery Systems as Targeting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Laura; Doménech, Josep; Peppas, Nicholas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this critical review is to provide a critical analysis of the chain dynamics responsible for the action of micro- and nanoparticles of mucoadhesive biomaterials. The objective of using bioadhesive controlled drug delivery devices is to prolong their residence at a specific site of delivery, thus enhancing the drug absorption process. These mucoadhesive devices can protect the drug during the absorption process in addition to protecting it on its route to the delivery site. The major emphasis of recent research on mucoadhesive biomaterials has been on the use of adhesion promoters, which would enhance the adhesion between synthetic polymers and mucus. The use of adhesion promoters such as linear or tethered polymer chains is a natural result of the diffusional characteristics of adhesion. Mucoadhesion depends largely on the structure of the synthetic polymer gels used in controlled release applications. PMID:18976706

  14. Automated Modular Synthesis of Aptamer-Drug Conjugates for Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Tan, Weihong

    selectively target and kill disease cells, including cancer cells, with reduced side effects.3 Several ADCs. Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides that can specifically recognize their targets, including live

  15. Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction-Mediated Delivery of a Transcription Factor Decoy Inhibits STAT3 Signaling and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Kopechek, Jonathan A.; Carson, Andrew R.; McTiernan, Charles F.; Chen, Xucai; Hasjim, Bima; Lavery, Linda; Sen, Malabika; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is constitutively activated in many cancers where it acts to promote tumor progression. A STAT3-specific transcription factor decoy has been developed to suppress STAT3 downstream signaling, but a delivery strategy is needed to improve clinical translation. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) has been shown to enhance image-guided local delivery of molecular therapeutics to a target site. The objective of this study was to deliver STAT3 decoy to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumors using UTMD to disrupt STAT3 signaling and inhibit tumor growth. Studies performed demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles inhibited STAT3 signaling in SCC cells in vitro. Studies performed in vivo demonstrated that UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles induced significant tumor growth inhibition (31-51% reduced tumor volume vs. controls, p < 0.05) in mice bearing SCC tumors. Furthermore, expression of STAT3 downstream target genes (Bcl-xL and cyclin D1) was significantly reduced (34-39%, p < 0.05) in tumors receiving UTMD treatment with STAT3 decoy-loaded microbubbles compared to controls. In addition, the quantity of radiolabeled STAT3 decoy detected in tumors eight hours after treatment was significantly higher with UTMD treatment compared to controls (70-150%, p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that UTMD can increase delivery of a transcription factor decoy to tumors in vivo and that the decoy can inhibit STAT3 signaling and tumor growth. These results suggest that UTMD treatment holds potential for clinical use to increase the concentration of a transcription factor signaling inhibitor in the tumor. PMID:26681983

  16. Dual-Enzyme-Loaded Multifunctional Hybrid Nanogel System for Pathological Responsive Ultrasound Imaging and T2-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Niu, Dechao; Li, Pei; Wu, Qing; Bo, Xiaowan; Liu, Boji; Bao, Song; Su, Teng; Xu, Huixiong; Wang, Qigang

    2015-06-23

    A dual-enzyme-loaded multifunctional hybrid nanogel probe (SPIO@GCS/acryl/biotin-CAT/SOD-gel, or SGC) has been developed for dual-modality pathological responsive ultrasound (US) imaging and enhanced T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This probe is composed of functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, a dual enzyme species (catalase and superoxide dismutase), and a polysaccharide cationic polymer glycol chitosan gel. The dual-modality US/MR imaging capabilities of the hybrid nanogel for responsive US imaging and enhanced T2-weighted MR imaging have been evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. These results show that the hybrid nanogel SGC can exhibit efficient dual-enzyme biocatalysis with pathological species for responsive US imaging. SGC also demonstrates increased accumulation in acidic environments for enhanced T2-weighted MR imaging. Further research on these nanogel systems may lead to the development of more efficient US/MR contrast agents. PMID:26035730

  17. Apamin-mediated actively targeted drug delivery for treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just a concept.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Jiang, Hong; Bi, Qiuyan; Luo, Qingsong; Li, Jianjun; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao; Li, Chong

    2014-09-01

    Faced with the complex medical challenge presented by spinal cord injuries (SCI) and considering the lack of any available curative therapy, the development of a novel method of delivering existing drugs or candidate agents can be perceived to be as important as the development of new therapeutic molecules. By combining three ingredients currently in clinical use or undergoing testing, we have designed a central nervous system targeted delivery system based on apamin-modified polymeric micelles (APM). Apamin, one of the major components of honey bee venom, serves as the targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE) serves as the drug-loaded material, and curcumin is used as the therapeutic agent. Apamin was conjugated with NHS (N-hydroxysuccinimide)-PEG-DSPE in a site-specific manner, and APM were prepared by a thin-film hydration method. A formulation comprising 0.5 mol % targeting ligand with 50 nm particle size showed strong targeting efficiency in vivo and was evaluated in pharmacodynamic assays. A 7-day treatment by daily intravenous administration of low doses of APM (corresponding to 5 mg/kg of curcumin) was performed. Significantly enhanced recovery and prolonged survival was found in the SCI mouse model, as compared to sham-treated groups, with no apparent toxicity. A single dose of apamin-conjugated polymers was about 700-fold lower than the LD50 amount, suggesting that APM and apamin have potential for clinical applications as spinal cord targeting ligand for delivery of agents in treatment of diseases of the central nervous system. PMID:25098949

  18. Doxorubicin loaded PEG-b-poly(4-vinylbenzylphosphonate) coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha?upka-Bryl, Magdalena; Bednarowicz, Magdalena; Dobosz, Bernadeta; Krzyminiewski, Ryszard; Zalewski, Tomasz; Wereszczy?ska, Beata; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Jarek, Marcin; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-06-01

    Due to their unique physical properties, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are increasingly used in medical applications. They are very useful carriers for delivering antitumor drugs in targeted cancer treatment. Magnetic nanoparticles with chemiotherapeutic were synthesized by coprecipitation method followed by coating with biocompatible polymer. The aim of this work is to characterize physical and magnetic properties of synthesized nanoparicles. Characterization was carried out using EPR, HRTEM, X-ray diffraction, SQUID and NMR methods. The present findings show that synthesized nanosystem is promising tool for potential magnetic drug delivery.

  19. School Feeding and Educational Access in Rural Ghana: Is Poor Targeting and Delivery Limiting Impact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essuman, Ato; Bosumtwi-Sam, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to address social imbalances and equity in Ghana's education delivery and to achieve her Education for All (EFA) agenda, some pro-poor programmes have been introduced. Among these is the Ghana School Feeding Programme (GSFP) that aims among others, at providing safety nets for the poor, increasing school enrolment in addition to…

  20. Effective gene delivery into human stem cells with a cell-targeting Peptide-modified bioreducible polymer.

    PubMed

    Beloor, Jagadish; Ramakrishna, Suresh; Nam, Kihoon; Seon Choi, Chang; Kim, Jongkil; Kim, Sung Hwa; Cho, Hyong Jin; Shin, HeungSoo; Kim, Hyongbum; Kim, Sung Wan; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Kumar, Priti

    2015-05-01

    Stem cells are poorly permissive to non-viral gene transfection reagents. In this study, we explored the possibility of improving gene delivery into human embryonic (hESC) and mesenchymal (hMSC) stem cells by synergizing the activity of a cell-binding ligand with a polymer that releases nucleic acids in a cytoplasm-responsive manner. A 29 amino acid long peptide, RVG, targeting the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) was identified to bind both hMSC and H9-derived hESC. Conjugating RVG to a redox-sensitive biodegradable dendrimer-type arginine-grafted polymer (PAM-ABP) enabled nanoparticle formation with plasmid DNA without altering the environment-sensitive DNA release property and favorable toxicity profile of the parent polymer. Importantly, RVG-PAM-ABP quantitatively enhanced transfection into both hMSC and hESC compared to commercial transfection reagents like Lipofectamine 2000 and Fugene. ?60% and 50% of hMSC and hESC were respectively transfected, and at increased levels on a per cell basis, without affecting pluripotency marker expression. RVG-PAM-ABP is thus a novel bioreducible, biocompatible, non-toxic, synthetic gene delivery system for nAchR-expressing stem cells. Our data also demonstrates that a cell-binding ligand like RVG can cooperate with a gene delivery system like PAM-ABP to enable transfection of poorly-permissive cells. PMID:25515928