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1

Functionalized nanospheres for targeted delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Targeted delivery of anti-cancer agents to cancer cells is a mature line of investigation that has yet to realize its full potential. In this study we report on the development of a delivery platform with the future goal of merging two thus far parallel methods for selective elimination of cancer cells: targeted nanospheres and pretargeted radioimmunotherapy. Several clinical trials have shown the promise of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy, which leverages the specificity of antibodies for targeted cell populations and delivers a localized dose of a biotinylated radionuclide that is most often administered following binding of a biotinylated antibody and streptavidin (StA) to the target cells. The work presented here describes the development of biotinylated nanospheres based on an ABA-type copolymer comprised of a tyrosine-derived oligomer as the B-block and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) A-blocks. The biotinylated nanospheres encapsulate paclitaxel (PTX) to the same extent as unbiotinylated nanospheres. Efficacy of targeting was shown on CD44 positive cells in the SUM159 breast cancer cell line by incubating the cells sequentially with a biotinylated anti-CD44 antibody, StA and the biotinylated nanospheres encapsulating PTX. Targeted nanospheres achieved the half maximal inhibitory concentration of PTX on SUM159 cells at a 5-10 fold lower concentration than that of PTX applied in either non-targeted nanospheres or free drug approaches. Moreover, targeted nanospheres selectively eliminated CD44 positive SUM159 cells compared to free PTX and untargeted nanospheres. This new generation of nano-sized carrier offers a versatile platform that can be adopted for a wide variety of drug and target specific applications and has the potential to be combined with the clinically emerging method of pretargeted radioimmunotherapy. PMID:23792807

Bushman, Jared; Vaughan, Asa; Sheihet, Larisa; Zhang, Zheng; Costache, Marius; Kohn, Joachim

2013-11-10

2

Tumor-targeted delivery of Paclitaxel using low density lipoprotein-mimetic solid lipid nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Water-insoluble anticancer drugs, including paclitaxel, present severe clinical side effects when administered to patients, primarily associated with the toxicity of reagents used to solubilize the drugs. In efforts to develop alternative formulations of water-insoluble anticancer drugs suitable for intravenous administration, we developed biocompatible anticancer therapeutic solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs), mimicking the structure and composition of natural particles, low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), for tumor-targeted delivery of paclitaxel. These therapeutic nanoparticles contained water-insoluble paclitaxel in the core with tumor-targeting ligand covalently conjugated on the polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified surface (targeted PtSLNs). In preclinical human cancer xenograft mouse model studies, the paclitaxel-containing tumor-targeting SLNs exhibited pronounced in vivo stability and enhanced biocompatibility. Furthermore, these SLNs had superior antitumor activity to in-class nanoparticular therapeutics in clinical use (Taxol and Genexol-PM) and yielded long-term complete responses. The in vivo targeted antitumor activities of the SLN formulations in a mouse tumor model suggest that LDL-mimetic SLN formulations can be utilized as a biocompatible, tumor-targeting platform for the delivery of various anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25686010

Kim, Jin-Ho; Kim, Youngwook; Bae, Ki Hyun; Park, Tae Gwan; Lee, Jung Hee; Park, Keunchil

2015-04-01

3

CD133-targeted paclitaxel delivery inhibits local tumor recurrence in a mouse model of breast cancer.  

PubMed

Expression of the membrane protein CD133 marks a subset of cancer cells with drug resistant phenotype and enhanced tumor initiating ability in xenotransplantation assays. Because drug resistance and tumor relapse are significant problems, approaches to eliminate these cells are urgently needed. As a step towards achieving this goal, we developed polymeric nanoparticles targeting CD133 by conjugating an anti-CD133 monoclonal antibody to nanoparticles formulated using poly(D,L lactide-co-glycolide) polymer. Nanoparticles were loaded with paclitaxel, a microtubule-stabilizing anticancer agent, as well as with 6-coumarin, a fluorescent probe. CD133-targeted nanoparticles (CD133NPs) were efficiently internalized by Caco-2 cells, which abundantly express CD133 (>9-fold higher uptake than non-targeted control nanoparticles). The effectiveness of CD133NPs in reducing tumor initiating cell (TIC) fraction was investigated using mammosphere formation and soft-agar colony formation assays. Free paclitaxel treatment was not effective in decreasing the TIC population relative to untreated control, whereas CD133NPs effectively decreased the number of mammospheres and colonies formed. In vivo studies in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model showed that free paclitaxel was initially effective in inhibiting tumor growth but the tumors rebounded rapidly once the treatment was stopped. Tumor regrowth was significantly lower when paclitaxel was delivered through CD133NPs (tumor volume was 518.6±228 vs. 1370.9±295mm(3) for free paclitaxel at 63days; P<0.05). Our studies thus show that encapsulation of paclitaxel in CD133NPs results in a significant decrease in the TIC population and improved therapeutic efficacy compared to that with free paclitaxel treatment. These results indicate the potential of targeting anticancer therapeutics to CD133+ cells for reducing tumor recurrence. PMID:23871962

Swaminathan, Suresh Kumar; Roger, Emilie; Toti, Udaya; Niu, Lin; Ohlfest, John R; Panyam, Jayanth

2013-11-10

4

Tumor Angiogenesis Therapy Using Targeted Delivery of Paclitaxel to the Vasculature of Breast Cancer Metastases  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer aberrantly expresses tissue factor (TF) in cancer tissues and cancer vascular endothelial cells (VECs). TF plays a central role in cancer angiogenesis, growth, and metastasis and, as such, is a target for therapy and drug delivery. TF is the cognate receptor of factor VIIa (fVIIa). We have coupled PTX (paclitaxel, also named Taxol) with a tripeptide, phenylalanine-phenylalanine-arginine chloromethyl ketone (FFRck) and conjugated it with fVIIa. The key aim of the work is to evaluate the antiangiogenic effects of PTX-FFRck-fVIIa against a PTX-resistant breast cancer cell line. Matrigel mixed with VEGF and MDA-231 was injected subcutaneously into the flank of athymic nude mice. Animals were treated by tail vein injection of the PTX-FFRck-fVIIa conjugate, unconjugated PTX, or PBS. The PTX-FFRck-fVIIa conjugate significantly reduces microvessel density in matrigel (p < 0.01–0.05) compared to PBS and unconjugated PTX. The breast cancer lung metastasis model in athymic nude mice was developed by intravenous injection of MDA-231 cells expressing luciferase. Animals were similarly treated intravenously with the PTX-FFRck-fVIIa conjugate or PBS. The conjugate significantly inhibits lung metastasis as compared to the control, highlighting its potential to antagonize angiogenesis in metastatic carcinoma. In conclusion, PTX conjugated to fVIIa is a promising therapeutic approach for improving selective drug delivery and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:25574399

Kisiel, Walter; Lu, Yang J.; Petersen, Lars C.; Ndungu, John M.; Moore, Terry W.; Parker, Ernest T.; Sun, Aiming; Liotta, Dennis C.; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Brat, Daniel J.; Snyder, James P.; Shoji, Mamoru

2014-01-01

5

Folate-modified lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted paclitaxel delivery  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid–polymer hybrid drug carrier comprised of folate (FA) modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs) for sustained, controlled, and targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). The core-shell NPs consist of 1) a poly(?-caprolactone) hydrophobic core based on self-assembly of poly(?-caprolactone)–poly(ethylene glycol)–poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL) amphiphilic copolymers, 2) a lipid monolayer formed with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG2000), 3) a targeting ligand (FA) on the surface, and were prepared using a thin-film hydration and ultrasonic dispersion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid monolayer on the hydrophobic polymer core. Physicochemical characterizations of PTX-loaded FLPNPs, such as particle size and size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, drug loading content, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release, were also evaluated. Fluorescent microscopy proved the internalization efficiency and targeting ability of the folate conjugated on the lipid monolayer for the EMT6 cancer cells which overexpress folate receptor. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of PTX-loaded FLPNPs was lower than that of Taxol®, but higher than that of PTX-loaded LPNPs (without folate conjugation). In EMT6 breast tumor model, intratumoral administration of PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed similar antitumor efficacy but low toxicity compared to Taxol®. More importantly, PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed greater tumor growth inhibition (65.78%) than the nontargeted PTX-loaded LPNPs (48.38%) (P<0.05). These findings indicated that the PTX loaded-FLPNPs with mixed lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core would be a promising nanosized drug formulation for tumor-targeted therapy.

Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Dong, Xia; Sun, Hongfan; Song, Cunxian; Wang, Chun; Kong, Deling

2015-01-01

6

Preparation, characterization, and in vitro targeted delivery of folate-decorated paclitaxel-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is an important anticancer drug in clinical use for treatment of a variety of cancers. Because of its low solubility, it is formulated in high concentration in Cremophor EL® which induces hypersensitivity reactions. In this study, targeted delivery of paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was prepared by a desolvation procedure, crosslinked on the wall material of bovine serum albumin, and subsequently decorated by folic acid. The characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as amount of folate conjugation, surface morphology, drug entrapment efficiency, drug loading efficiency, and release kinetics were investigated in vitro. The targeting effect was investigated in vitro by cancer cell uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled nanoparticles. The spherical nanoparticles obtained were negatively charged with a zeta potential of about ?30 mV, and characterized around 210 nm with a narrow size distribution. Drug entrapment efficiency and drug loading efficiency were approximately 95.3% and 27.2%, respectively. The amount of folate conjugation was 9.22 ?g/mg of bovine serum albumin. The folate-decorated nanoparticles targeted a human prostate cancer cell line effectively. PMID:20957218

Zhao, Dongmei; Zhao, Xiuhua; Zu, Yuangang; Li, Jialei; Zhang, Yu; Jiang, Ru; Zhang, Zhonghua

2010-01-01

7

Development of EGFR-targeted polymer blend nanocarriers for combination paclitaxel/lonidamine delivery to treat multi-drug resistance in human breast and ovarian tumor cells.  

PubMed

Multi-drug resistant (MDR) cancer is a significant clinical obstacle and is often implicated in cases of recurrent, nonresponsive disease. Targeted nanoparticles were made by synthesizing a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)/poly(ethylene glycol)/epidermal growth factor receptor targeting peptide (PLGA/PEG/EGFR-peptide) construct for incorporation in poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) nanoparticles. MDR was induced in a panel of nine human breast and ovarian cancer cell lines using hypoxia. EGFR-targeted polymer blend nanoparticles were shown to actively target EGFR overexpressing cell lines, especially upon induction of hypoxia. The nanoparticles were capable of sustained drug release. Combination therapy with lonidamine and paclitaxel significantly improved the therapeutic index of both drugs. Treatment with a nanoparticle dose of 1 ?M paclitaxel/10 ?M lonidamine resulted in less than 10% cell viability for all hypoxic/MDR cell lines and less than 5% cell viability for all normoxic cell lines. Comparatively, treatment with 1 ?M paclitaxel alone was the approximate IC?? value of the MDR cells while treatment with lonidamine alone had very little effect. The PLGA/PEG/EGFR-peptide delivery system actively targets a MDR cell by exploiting the expression of EGFR. This system treats MDR by inhibiting the Warburg effect and promoting mitochondrial binding of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins (lonidamine), while hyperstabilizing microtubules (paclitaxel). This nanocarrier system actively targets a MDR associated phenotype (EGFR receptor overexpression), further enhancing the therapeutic index of both drugs and potentiating the use of lonidamine/paclitaxel combination therapy in the treatment of MDR cancer. PMID:20942457

Milane, Lara; Duan, Zhenfeng; Amiji, Mansoor

2011-02-01

8

Targeted delivery of polyamidoamine-paclitaxel conjugate functionalized with anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 trastuzumab  

PubMed Central

Background Antibody-dendrimer conjugates have the potential to improve the targeting and release of chemotherapeutic drugs at the tumor site while reducing adverse side effects caused by drug accumulation in healthy tissues. In this study, trastuzumab (TMAB), which binds to human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), was used as a targeting agent in a TMAB-polyamidoamine (PAMAM) conjugate carrying paclitaxel (PTX) specifically to cells overexpressing HER2. Methods TMAB was covalently linked to a PAMAM dendrimer via bifunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG). PTX was conjugated to PAMAM using succinic anhydride as a cross-linker, yielding TMAB-PEG-PAMAM-PTX. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the conjugates. The cellular uptake and in vivo biodistribution were studied by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and Carestream In Vivo FX, respectively. Results Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrated that PEG, PTX, fluorescein isothiocyanate, and cyanine7 were conjugated to PAMAM. Ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that TMAB was conjugated to PEG-PAMAM. Dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy measurements revealed that the different conjugates ranged in size between 10 and 35 nm and had a spherical shape. In vitro cellular uptake demonstrated that the TMAB-conjugated PAMAM was taken up by HER2-overexpressing BT474 cells more efficiently than MCF-7 cells that expressed lower levels of HER2. Co-localization experiments indicated that TMAB-conjugated PAMAM was located in the cytoplasm. The in vitro cytotoxicity of TMAB-conjugated PAMAM was lower than free PTX due to the slow release of PTX from the conjugate. In vivo targeting further demonstrated that TMAB-conjugated PAMAM accumulated in the BT474 tumor model more efficiently than non-conjugated PAMAM. Conclusion TMAB can serve as an effective targeting agent, and the TMAB-conjugated PAMAM can be exploited as a potential targeted chemotherapeutic drug delivery system for tumors that overexpress HER2.

Ma, Pengkai; Zhang, Xuemei; Ni, Ling; Li, Jinming; Zhang, Fengpu; Wang, Zheng; Lian, Shengnan; Sun, Kaoxiang

2015-01-01

9

Paclitaxel Nano-Delivery Systems: A Comprehensive Review  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs ever developed and is active against a broad range of cancers, such as lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Due to its low water solubility, paclitaxel is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated ethanol (50:50, v/v) a combination known as Taxol. However, Taxol has some severe side effects related to Cremophor EL and ethanol. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative Taxol formulations. The encapsulation of paclitaxel in biodegradable and non-toxic nano-delivery systems can protect the drug from degradation during circulation and in-turn protect the body from toxic side effects of the drug thereby lowering its toxicity, increasing its circulation half-life, exhibiting improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and demonstrating better patient compliance. Also, nanoparticle-based delivery systems can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for passive tumor targeting, therefore, they are promising carriers to improve the therapeutic index and decrease the side effects of paclitaxel. To date, paclitaxel albumin-bound nanoparticles (Abraxane®) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, there are a number of novel paclitaxel nanoparticle formulations in clinical trials. In this comprehensive review, several types of developed paclitaxel nano-delivery systems will be covered and discussed, such as polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based formulations, polymer conjugates, inorganic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystals, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles. PMID:24163786

Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J.

2013-01-01

10

Pharmacologic sensitivity of Paclitaxel to its delivery vehicles drives distinct clinical outcomes of Paclitaxel formulations.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel, an effective antitumor agent, is formulated in various vehicles serving as carriers to deliver the hydrophobic paclitaxel to tissue. The approved formulations in the U.S. are paclitaxel formulated in Cremophor EL (currently known as Kolliphor EL) and nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel). Despite having the same active ingredient (paclitaxel), different formulations produce distinct products with unique efficacy and safety profiles. A semimechanistic model was developed to describe the pharmacologic sensitivity of paclitaxel under different formulations. Circulating paclitaxel concentration data from patients treated with nab-paclitaxel or Cremophor EL-paclitaxel were analyzed in NONMEM using a semimechanistic model with simultaneous disposition of paclitaxel-carrier complexes and the total paclitaxel released from the complexes. The key factors driving paclitaxel exposure in circulation and peripheral tissues were explored via sensitivity analysis. The rapid decline of total paclitaxel concentration following intravenous administration of nab-paclitaxel and Cremophor EL-paclitaxel was attributed to rapid tissue distribution of the paclitaxel-carrier complexes, with minor contribution of free and protein-bound paclitaxel. Distribution of nab-paclitaxel to peripheral tissue was 4-fold faster and 10-fold more extensive than that of Cremophor EL-paclitaxel micelles, resulting in distinct tissue paclitaxel profiles. Sensitivity analyses showed the plasma paclitaxel-time profile was insensitive to the rapid rates of tissue distribution and decomposition of paclitaxel-carrier complexes but that the tissue distribution profile of paclitaxel was highly sensitive. Tissue distribution of paclitaxel is carrier complex system-dependent. Different delivery systems result in distinct tissue paclitaxel profiles but similar paclitaxel concentration-time profiles in plasma or blood, rendering the paclitaxel plasma profile a poor surrogate for its clinical outcome. PMID:25714793

Li, Yan; Chen, Nianhang; Palmisano, Maria; Zhou, Simon

2015-04-01

11

Engineering erythrocytes as a novel carrier for the targeted delivery of the anticancer drug paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (PTX) is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated alcohol. The intravenous administration of this formula is associated with a risk of infection and hypersensitivity reactions. The presence of Cremophor EL as a pharmaceutical vehicle contributes to these effects. Therefore, in this study, we used human erythrocytes, instead of Cremophor, as a pharmaceutical vehicle. PTX was loaded into erythrocytes using the preswelling method. Analysis of the obtained data indicates that 148.8 ?g of PTX was loaded/mL erythrocytes, with an entrapment efficiency of 46.36% and a cell recovery of 75.94%. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase in the mean cell volume values of the erythrocytes, whereas both the mean cell hemoglobin and the mean cell hemoglobin concentration decreased following the loading of PTX. The turbulence fragility index values for unloaded, sham-loaded and PTX-loaded erythrocytes were 3, 2, and 1 h, respectively. Additionally, the erythrocyte glutathione level decreased after PTX loading, whereas lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation increased. The release of PTX from loaded erythrocytes followed first-order kinetics, and about 81% of the loaded drug was released into the plasma after 48 h. The results of the present study revealed that PTX was loaded successfully into human erythrocytes with acceptable loading parameters and with some oxidative modification to the erythrocytes. PMID:25061408

Harisa, Gamaleldin I; Ibrahim, Mohamed F; Alanazi, Fars; Shazly, Gamal A

2014-07-01

12

A mucoadhesive in situ gel delivery system for paclitaxel  

Microsoft Academic Search

MUC1 gene encodes a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein that is overexpressed in human breast cancer and colon cancer. The objective\\u000a of this study was to develop an in situ gel delivery system containing paclitaxel (PTX) and mucoadhesives for sustained and\\u000a targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. The delivery system consisted of chitosan and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) in 0.33M citric\\u000a acid containing PTX.

Saurabh Jauhari; Alekha K. Dash

2006-01-01

13

Choroidal neovascularization reduced by targeted drug delivery with cationic liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel or targeted photodynamic therapy with verteporfin encapsulated in cationic liposomes  

PubMed Central

Purpose Intravitreal antivascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) application has revolutionized the treatment of choroidal neovascularization (CNV), a hallmark of wet age-related macular degeneration. However, additional treatment options are desirable as not all CNV lesions respond to anti-VEGF injections. Here, we assessed the feasibility of targeted delivery of cationic liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel (EndoTAG-1) in treating CNV. Furthermore, we investigated whether a new formulation of verteporfin encapsulated in cationic liposomes (CL-VTP) enhances the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Methods EndoTAG-1, LipoSPA, and CL-VTP were produced by encapsulating paclitaxel, succinyl-paclitaxel, or verteporfin in cationic liposomes (CL). Mice underwent argon laser coagulations at day 0 (D0) to induce CNV. EndoTAG-1 and LipoSPA were injected into the tail vein at D1, D3, D5, D7, and D9. Taxol, CL, or trehalose buffer alone was injected in control animals. At D10, all animals were perfused with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran. Flatmounts comprising the retinal pigment epithelium, choroid, and sclera were prepared for quantifying the CNV by measuring the area of lesions perfused with FITC-dextran. For PDT, mice received an injection with CL-VTP or Visudyne at D10. One eye was treated with PDT while the other served as a control. Evaluation of RPE-choroid-scleral and retinal flatmounts was performed at D12, D14, or D17. Perfusion with FITC-dextran and tetramethylrhodamine-5-(and 6)-isothiocyanate-lectin staining was used to distinguish between perfused and non-perfused choroidal vessels. Results EndoTAG-1 or LipoSPA significantly reduced CNV size to 15% compared to trehalose controls. The mean CNV area of mice treated with CL was reduced (though not significantly) to about one-half of the value of the trehalose control group. The same was observed for paclitaxel. Thus, the reduction in the CNV size between treatment with CL and treatment with EndoTAG-1 or LipoSPA was 40%, which was not significant. PDT using either CL-VTP or Visudyne reduced CNV size to 65% (D17) of trehalose control size. CNV size was further diminished to 56% with Visudyne and 53% with CL-VTP when PDT was repeated twice. Most importantly, PDT-associated retinal damage was less pronounced using CL-VTP compared to Visudyne. Conclusions Systemic intravenous injection of paclitaxel (EndoTAG-1)- or succinyl-paclitaxel (LipoSPA)-loaded CL had a significant antiangiogenic effect in a CNV mouse model. PDT with CL-VTP was as effective as Visudyne in neovascular obliteration but induced less tissue damage. Our data suggest that systemic application of cationic liposome formulations may serve to treat ocular neovascular diseases. This approach may reduce the need for intraocular injections and may benefit patients with neovascular lesions irresponsive to anti-VEGF treatment. PMID:23335851

Gross, Nikolai; Ranjbar, Mahdy; Evers, Charlotte; Hua, Jing; Martin, Gottfried; Schulze, Brita; Michaelis, Uwe; Hansen, Lutz L.

2013-01-01

14

Enhanced drug-loading and therapeutic efficacy of hydrotropic oligomer-conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles for tumor-targeted paclitaxel delivery.  

PubMed

Enhanced drug-loading and therapeutic efficacies are highly essential properties for nanoparticles as tumor-targeting drug carriers. Herein, we developed the glycol chitosan nanoparticles with hydrotropic oligomers (HO-CNPs) as a new tumor targeting drug delivery system. For enhancing drug-loading efficiency of paclitaxel in drug carriers, hydrotropic 2-(4-(vinylbenzyloxy)-N,N-diethylnicotinamide) (VBODENA-COOH) oligomers, that were used for enhancing the aqueous solubility of paclitaxel, were directly conjugated to glycol chitosan polymers. The amphiphilic conjugates readily formed nanoparticle structure (average size=302 ± 22 nm) in aqueous condition. Water-insoluble paclitaxel (PTX) was readily encapsulated into HO-CNPs with a high drug-loading amount up to 24.2 wt.% (2.4 fold higher than other polymeric nanoparticles) by a simple dialysis method. The PTX encapsulated HO-CNPs (PTX-HO-CNPs; average size=343 ± 12 nm) were very stable in aqueous media up to 50 days. Also, PTX-HO-CNPs presented rapid cellular uptake and lower cytotoxicity in cell culture system, compared to Cremophor EL/ethanol formulation of PTX. In tumor-bearing mice, the extravasation and accumulation of PTX-HO-CNPs in tumor tissue were precisely observed by intravital fluorescence imaging techniques. Furthermore, PTX-HO-CNPs showed the higher therapeutic efficacy, compared to Abraxane®, a commercialized PTX-formulation. These overall results demonstrate its potential as a new nano-sized PTX carrier for cancer treatment. PMID:24035978

Koo, Heebeom; Min, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Sang Cheon; Park, Jae Hyung; Park, Kinam; Jeong, Seo Young; Choi, Kuiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

2013-12-28

15

Paclitaxel formulations: challenges and novel delivery options.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (PTX), a taxane plant product, is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anti-cancer agents and approved for the treatment of a variety of cancers including ovarian, breast, lung, head and neck as well as Kaposi's sarcoma. Poor aqueous solubility and serious side effects associated with commercial preparation of PTX (Taxol®) triggered the development of alternative PTX formulations. Over past three decades, plethora of research work has been published towards the development of cremophor free and efficient formulations. Various nanocarrier systems including nanoparticles, liposomes, micelles, bioconjugates and dendrimers have been employed in order to improve PTX solubility and eliminate undesired side effects. These nanocarriers offer the advantage of high degree of encapsulation and cellular uptake, escape from elimination by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediated efflux, and can be explored for targeted drug delivery. The potential of these nanocarriers is reflected by the fact that various nanocarriers of PTX are in different stages of clinical trials and a few have already been commercialized including Abraxane®, Lipusu and Genexol PM®. This review focuses on the various challenges associated with PTX formulation development, limitations of existing formulations and novel approaches for the development of alternative formulations for PTX and also highlights the development of novel formulations in clinical settings. PMID:24909147

Nehate, Chetan; Jain, Sharad; Saneja, Ankit; Khare, Vaibhav; Alam, Noor; Dubey, Ravindra Dhar; Gupta, Prem N

2014-01-01

16

Folate-mediated targeted and intracellular delivery of paclitaxel using a novel deoxycholic acid-O-carboxymethylated chitosan–folic acid micelles  

PubMed Central

Background A critical disadvantage for successful chemotherapy with paclitaxel (PTX) is its nontargeting nature to cancer cells. Folic acid has been employed as a targeting ligand of various anticancer agents to increase their cellular uptake within target cells since the folate receptor is overexpressed on the surface of such tumor cells. In this study, a novel biodegradable deoxycholic acid-O-carboxymethylated chitosan–folic acid conjugate (DOMC-FA) was used to form micelles for encapsulating the anticancer drug PTX. Methods and results The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release and physicochemical properties of PTX-loaded micelles were investigated in detail. In vitro cell culture studies were carried out in MCF-7 cells, a human breast carcinoma cell line, with folate receptor overexpressed on its surface. An increased level of uptake of folate-conjugated micelles compared to plain micelles in MCF-7 cells was observed, and the enhanced uptake of folate-micelles mainly on account of the effective process of folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. The MTT assay, morphological changes, and apoptosis test implied that the folate-conjugated micelles enhanced the cell death by folate-mediated active internalization, and the cytotoxicity of the FA-micellar PTX (DOMC-FA/PTX) to cancer cells was much higher than micelles without folate (DOMC/PTX) or the commercially available injectable preparation of PTX (Taxol). Conclusion Results indicate that the PTX-loaded DOMC-FA micelle is a successful anticancertargeted drug-delivery system for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22287842

Wang, Feihu; Chen, Yuxuan; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Dandan; Hao, Leilei; Liu, Yue; Duan, Cunxian; Jia, Lejiao; Liu, Guangpu

2012-01-01

17

A mucoadhesive in situ gel delivery system for paclitaxel.  

PubMed

MUC1 gene encodes a transmembrane mucin glycoprotein that is overexpressed in human breast cancer and colon cancer. The objective of this study was to develop an in situ gel delivery system containing paclitaxel (PTX) and mucoadhesives for sustained and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. The delivery system consisted of chitosan and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) in 0.33M citric acid containing PTX. The in vitro release of PTX from the gel was performed in presence and absence of Tween 80 at drug loads of 0.18%, 0.30%, and 0.54% (wt/wt), in Sorensen's phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C. Different mucin-producing cell lines (Calu-3>Caco-2) were selected for PTX transport studies. Transport of PTX from solution and gel delivery system was performed in side by side diffusion chambers from apical to basal (A-B) and basal to apical (B-A) directions. In vitro release studies revealed that within 4 hours, only 7.61% +/- 0.19%, 12.0% +/- 0.98%, 31.7% +/- 0.40% of PTX were released from 0.18%, 0.30%, and 0.54% drug-loaded gel formulation, respectively, in absence of Tween 80. However, in presence of surfactant (0.05% wt/vol) in the dissolution medium, percentages of PTX released were 28.1% +/- 4.35%, 44.2% +/- 6.35%, and 97.1% +/- 1.22%, respectively. Paclitaxel has shown a polarized transport in all the cell monolayers with B-A transport 2 to 4 times higher than in the A-B direction. The highest mucin-producing cell line (Calu-3) has shown the lowest percentage of PTX transport from gels as compared with Caco-2 cells. Transport of PTX from mucoadhesive gels was shown to be influenced by the mucin-producing capability of cell. PMID:16796370

Jauhari, Saurabh; Dash, Alekha K

2006-01-01

18

The anticancer efficacy of paclitaxel liposomes modified with mitochondrial targeting conjugate in resistant lung cancer.  

PubMed

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in humans and the multidrug resistance (MDR) is the major obstacle to successful chemotherapy of lung cancer. In this study, a d-?-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate-triphenylphosphine conjugate (TPGS1000-TPP) was synthesized as the mitochondrial targeting molecule, and was incorporated onto the surface of paclitaxel liposomes to treat the drug-resistant lung cancer. Evaluations were performed on the human lung cancer A549 cells, the drug-resistant lung cancer A549/cDDP cells, and the drug-resistant lung cancer A549/cDDP cells xenografted nude mice. The yield of TPGS1000-TPP conjugate synthesized was about 50% and the particle size of targeting paclitaxel liposomes developed was approximately 80 nm. In comparison with taxol and regular paclitaxel liposomes, the targeting paclitaxel liposomes exhibited the strongest anticancer efficacy in vitro and in the drug-resistant A549/cDDP xenografted tumor model. The targeting paclitaxel liposomes could significantly enhance the cellular uptake, be selectively accumulated into the mitochondria, and cause the release of cytochrome C. This targeting delivery of drug initiated a cascade of caspase 9 and 3 reactions, activated the pro-apoptotic Bax and Bid proteins and suppressed the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, thereby enhancing the apoptosis by acting on the mitochondrial signaling pathways. In conclusion, the targeting paclitaxel liposomes have the potential to treat drug-resistant lung cancer. PMID:23422592

Zhou, Jia; Zhao, Wei-Yu; Ma, Xu; Ju, Rui-Jun; Li, Xiu-Ying; Li, Nan; Sun, Meng-Ge; Shi, Ji-Feng; Zhang, Cheng-Xiang; Lu, Wan-Liang

2013-05-01

19

Designing Paclitaxel Drug Delivery Systems Aimed at Improved Patient Outcomes: Current Status and Challenges  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel is one of the most widely used and effective antineoplastic agents derived from natural sources. It has a wide spectrum of antitumor activity, particularly against ovarian cancer, breast cancer, nonsmall cell lung cancer, head and neck tumors, Kaposi's sarcoma, and urologic malignancies. It is a highly lipophilic compound with a log P value of 3.96 and very poor aqueous solubility of less than 0.01?mg/mL. In addition, the compound lacks functional groups that are ionizable which could potentially lead to an increase in its solubility with the alteration in pH. Therefore, the delivery of paclitaxel is associated with substantial challenges. Until the introduction of Abraxane, only commercial formulation was solution of paclitaxel in cremophor, which caused severe side effects. However, in recent years, a number of approaches have been reported to solubilize paclitaxel using cosolvents and inclusion complexes. In addition, innovative approaches have been reported for passive targeting of tumors using nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes, emulsions, micelles, implants, pastes and gels. All approaches for delivery of improved therapeutic outcome have been discussed in this paper. PMID:22934190

Surapaneni, Madhu S.; Das, Sudip K.; Das, Nandita G.

2012-01-01

20

A Novel Nanoparticle Formulation for Sustained Paclitaxel Delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To develop a novel nanoparticle drug delivery system consisting of chitosan and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) for the delivery\\u000a of a wide variety of therapeutics including paclitaxel.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Chitosan\\/GMO nanoparticles were prepared by multiple emulsion (o\\/w\\/o) solvent evaporation methods. Particle size and surface\\u000a charge were determined. The morphological characteristics and cellular adhesion were evaluated with surface or transmission\\u000a electron microscopy methods. The

W. J. Trickler; A. A. Nagvekar; A. K. Dash

2008-01-01

21

Polymeric nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of paclitaxel in lung and breast cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanoparticles are useful for addressing many of the difficulties encountered when administering therapeutic compounds. Nanoparticles are able to increase the solubility of hydrophobic drugs, improve pharmacokinetics through sustained release, alter biodistribution, protect sensitive drugs from low pH environments or enzymatic alteration, and, in some cases, provide targeting of the drug to the desired tissues. The use of functional nanocarriers can also provide controlled intracellular delivery of a drug. To this end, we have developed functional pH-responsive expansile nanoparticles for the intracellular delivery of paclitaxel. The pH-responsiveness of these nanoparticles occurs due to a hydrophobic to hydrophilic transition of the polymer occurring under mildly acidic conditions. These polymeric nanoparticles were systematically evaluated for the delivery of paclitaxel in vitro and in vivo to improve local therapy for lung and breast cancers. Nanoparticles were synthesized using a miniemulsion polymerization process and were subsequently characterized and found to swell when exposed to acidic environments. Paclitaxel was successfully encapsulated within the nanoparticles, and the particles exhibited drug release at pH 5 but not at pH 7.4. In addition, the uptake of nanoparticles was observed using flow cytometry, and the anticancer efficacy of the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was measured using cancer cell lines in vitro. The potency of the paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles was close to that of free drug, demonstrating that the drug was effectively delivered by the particles and that the particles could act as an intracellular drug depot. Following in vitro characterization, murine in vivo studies demonstrated the ability of the paclitaxel-loaded responsive nanoparticles to delay recurrence of lung cancer and to prevent establishment of breast cancer in the mammary fat pads with higher efficacy than paclitaxel alone. In addition, the ability of nanoparticles to migrate up to 40 cm through lymphatic channels to local lymph nodes was demonstrated using near infrared imaging in a large animal model. Continued investigation of functional nanoparticles, like the system described here for lung and breast cancer, will facilitate the development of new materials that meet the varied and demanding needs in chemotherapy, and may afford new treatment options for the local and metastatic control of many forms of cancer.

Zubris, Kimberly Ann Veronica

22

Co-delivery of paclitaxel and gemcitabine via CD44-targeting nanocarriers as a prodrug with synergistic antitumor activity against human biliary cancer.  

PubMed

Multi-drug delivery focuses on different signaling pathways in cancer cells that have synergistic anti-proliferative effects. In this study, we developed multi-prodrug nanocarriers (MPDNCs) consisting of poly (l-lysine)-carboxylate PTX (PLL-PTX) and hyaluronic acid-conjugated GEM (HA-GEM) for CD44-targeted synergistic biliary cancer therapy. An in vitro study of cell viability and mRNA expression levels and an in vivo study showed that MPDNCs more effectively inhibit proliferation in CD44-overexpressing cancer cells (HuCCT1) than in cells with lower CD44 expression (SCK) by synergistically inducing apoptosis. Consequently, these results demonstrate that MPDNCs are prodrugs with synergistic cancer therapeutic efficacy and effective cellular uptake at target cells compared to free drugs, indicating their strong potential as efficient multi-drug-carrying nano-platforms for cancer treatment. PMID:25890771

Noh, Ilkoo; Kim, Hyun-Ouk; Choi, Jihye; Choi, Yuna; Lee, Dong Ki; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

2015-06-01

23

Combined Delivery of Paclitaxel and Tanespimycin via Micellar Nanocarriers: Pharmacokinetics, Efficacy and Metabolomic Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Despite the promising anticancer efficacy observed in preclinical studies, paclitaxel and tanespimycin (17-AAG) combination therapy has yielded meager responses in a phase I clinical trial. One serious problem associated with paclitaxel/17-AAG combination therapy is the employment of large quantities of toxic organic surfactants and solvents for drug solubilization. The goal of this study was to evaluate a micellar formulation for the concurrent delivery of paclitaxel and 17-AAG in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Paclitaxel/17-AAG-loaded micelles were assessed in mice bearing human ovarian tumor xenografts. Compared with the free drugs at equivalent doses, intravenous administration of paclitaxel/17-AAG-loaded micelles led to 3.5- and 1.7-fold increase in the tumor concentrations of paclitaxel and 17-AAG, respectively, without significant altering drug levels in normal organs. The enhanced tumor accumulation of the micellar drugs was further confirmed by the whole-body near infrared imaging using indocyanine green-labeled micelles. Subsequently, the anticancer efficacy of paclitaxel/17-AAG-loaded micelles was examined in comparison with the free drugs (weekly 20 mg/kg paclitaxel, twice-weekly 37.5 mg/kg 17-AAG). We found that paclitaxel/17-AAG-loaded micelles caused near-complete arrest of tumor growth, whereas the free drug-treated tumors experienced rapid growth shortly after the 3-week treatment period ended. Furthermore, comparative metabolomic profiling by proton nuclear magnetic resonance revealed significant decrease in glucose, lactate and alanine with simultaneous increase in glutamine, glutamate, aspartate, choline, creatine and acetate levels in the tumors of mice treated with paclitaxel/17-AAG-loaded micelles. Conclusions/Significance We have demonstrated in the current wok a safe and efficacious nano-sized formulation for the combined delivery of paclitaxel and 17-AAG, and uncovered unique metabolomic signatures in the tumor that correlate with the favorable therapeutic response to paclitaxel/17-AAG combination therapy. PMID:23505544

Wang, Yingzhe; Teng, Quincy; Tan, Chalet

2013-01-01

24

Delivery of paclitaxel using PEGylated graphene oxide as a nanocarrier.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (PTX) is an extensively used potent chemotherapy drug; however, low water solubility, poor bioavailability, and emergence of drug resistance in patients limited its biological application. In this report, we proposed a new drug delivery system for cancer therapy based on graphene oxide (GO), a novel 2D nanomaterial obtained from the oxidation of natural graphite, to improve the utilization rate of PTX. PTX was first connected to biocompatible 6-armed poly(ethylene glycol), followed by covalent introduction into the surface of GO sheets via a facile amidation process under mild conditions, affording the drug delivery system, GO-PEG-PTX (size 50-200 nm). GO-PEG nanosized carrier could quickly enter into human lung cancer A549 and human breast cancer MCF-7 cells verified by inverted fluorescence microscope using fluorescein isothiocyanate as probe. This nanocarrier was nontoxic to A549 and MCF-7 cells without linking with PTX. Nevertheless, GO-PEG-PTX showed remarkably high cytotoxicity to A549 and MCF-7 cells in a broad range of concentration of PTX and time compared to free PTX. This kind of nanoscale drug delivery system based on PEGylated GO may find widespread application in biomedicine. PMID:25546399

Xu, Zhiyuan; Zhu, Shaojia; Wang, Mingwei; Li, Yongjun; Shi, Ping; Huang, Xiaoyu

2015-01-21

25

Polyelectrolyte multilayer nanoshells with hydrophobic nanodomains for delivery of Paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

Efficient and effective delivery of poorly water-soluble drug molecules, which constitute a large part of commercially available drugs, is a major challenge in the field of drug delivery. Several drugs including paclitaxel (PTX) which are used for cancer treatment are hydrophobic, exhibit poor aqueous solubility and need to be delivered using an appropriate carrier. In the present work, we engineered Taxol-loaded polyelectrolyte films and microcapsules by pre-complexing PTX with chemically modified derivative of hyaluronic acid (alkylamino hydrazide) containing hydrophobic nanocavities, and subsequent assembly with either poly(L-lysine) (PLL) or quaternized chitosan (QCHI) as polycations. The PTX loading capacity of the films was found to be dependent on number of layers in the films as well as on the initial concentration of PTX pre-complexed to hydrophobic HA, with a loading capacity up to 5000-fold the initial PTX concentration. The films were stable in physiological medium and were degraded in the presence of hyaluronidase. The PTX-loaded microcapsules were found to decrease the viability and proliferation of MDA MB 231 breast cancer cells, while unloaded microcapsules did not impact cell viability. All together, our results highlight the potential of hyaluronan-based assemblies containing hydrophobic nanodomains for hydrophobic drug delivery. PMID:22300622

Jing, Jing; Guillot, Raphael; Paintrand, Isabelle; Auzely-Velty, Rachel; Picart, Catherine

2014-01-01

26

Localized delivery of paclitaxel using elastic liposomes: formulation development and evaluation.  

PubMed

In the present study an elastic liposomes-based paclitaxel formulation was developed with the objective to remove Cremophor EL. Cremophor EL is currently used for solubilizing paclitaxel in the marketed formulation and is known to produce toxic effects. Elastic liposomal paclitaxel formulation was extensively characterized in vitro, ex-vivo, and in vivo. The results obtained were compared against the marketed paclitaxel formulation. The maximum amount of paclitaxel loaded in the elastic liposomal formulation was found to be 6.0 mg/ml, which is similar to the commercial strength of marketed paclitaxel formulation. In vitro skin permeation and deposition studies showed 10.8-fold enhanced steady state transdermal flux and 15.0-fold enhanced drug deposition in comparison to drug solution. These results further confirmed with the vesicle-skin interaction study using FTIR technique. Results of the hemolytic toxicity assay indicate that elastic liposomal formulation induced only 11.2 ± 0.2% hemolysis in comparison to the commercial formulation which showed 38 ± 3.0%. Further, results of the Draize test showed no skin irritation of paclitaxel elastic liposomal formulation. Findings of the study demonstrate that elastic liposomes as a carrier is an attractive approach for localized delivery of paclitaxel. PMID:21428706

Utreja, Puneet; Jain, Subheet; Tiwary, A K

2011-07-01

27

Paclitaxel and Gemcitabine Combinational Drug-loaded Mucoadhesive Delivery System in the Treatment of Colon Cancers.  

PubMed

The combination of two different types of chemo-therapeutic drugs via nanocarriers is emerged as a promising strategy for treating multiple cancers. Such a co-delivery system will synchronize the drug exposure and synergize the therapeutic effects. Herein, we prepared a paclitaxel (PTX) and gemcitabine (GEM)-loaded N-succinyl chitosan nanoparticles (NSC NP) to target colon cancer. NSC NP showed a pH sensitive swelling at colonic pH and exhibited a sequential release pattern for both the drugs. Binary drug combination exhibited a synergistic cytotoxicity against HT-29 colon cancer cells with a remarkable G2/M phase arrest. Specifically, in vivo antitumor efficacy study showed that NSC NP prolonged the survival time of tumor-bearing mice up to 45 days wherein 50% of mice were still alive. Therefore, these results suggest that co-delivery of drugs with a suitable delivery system could potentially improve the therapeutic efficacy in colon cancers. The study can be further continued by using different types of chemotherapeutic drugs that targets different molecular targets using pH-sensitive nanocarriers. PMID:24941086

Guo, X-Y; Wang, P; Du, Q-G; Han, S; Zhu, S-M; Lv, Y-F; Liu, G-S; Hao, Z-M

2015-04-01

28

Aptamer conjugated paclitaxel and magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Controlled and targeted drug delivery is an essential criterion in cancer therapy to reduce the side effects caused by non-specific drug release and toxicity. Targeted chemotherapy, sustained drug release and optical imaging have been achieved using a multifunctional nanocarrier constructed from poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles (PLGA NPs), an anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX), a fluorescent dye Nile red (NR), magnetic fluid (MF) and aptamers (Apt, AS1411, anti-nucleolin aptamer). The magnetic fluid and paclitaxel loaded fluorescently labeled PLGA NPs (MF-PTX-NR-PLGA NPs) were synthesized by a single-emulsion technique/solvent evaporation method using a chemical cross linker bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) to enable binding of aptamer on to the surface of the nanoparticles. Targeting aptamers were then introduced to the particles through the reaction with the cross linker to target the nucleolin receptors over expressed on the cancer cell surface. Specific binding and uptake of the aptamer conjugated magnetic fluid loaded fluorescently tagged PLGA NPs (Apt-MF-NR-PLGA NPs) to the target cancer cells induced by aptamers was observed using confocal microscopy. Cytotoxicity assay conducted in two cell lines (L929 and MCF-7) confirmed that targeted MCF-7 cancer cells were killed while control cells were unharmed. In addition, aptamer mediated delivery resulting in enhanced binding and uptake to the target cancer cells exhibited increased therapeutic effect of the drug. Moreover, these aptamer conjugated magnetic polymer vehicles apart from actively transporting drugs into specifically targeted tumor regions can also be used to induce hyperthermia or for facilitating magnetic guiding of particles to the tumor regions.

Aravind, Athulya; Nair, Remya; Raveendran, Sreejith; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Fukuda, Takahiro; Hasumura, Takahashi; Morimoto, Hisao; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Sakthi Kumar, D.

2013-10-01

29

Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery.

Chiang, Po-Chang; Gould, Stephen; Nannini, Michelle; Qin, Ann; Deng, Yuzhong; Arrazate, Alfonso; Kam, Kimberly R.; Ran, Yingqing; Wong, Harvey

2014-04-01

30

Nanosuspension delivery of paclitaxel to xenograft mice can alter drug disposition and anti-tumor activity  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel is a common chemotherapeutic agent that is effective against various cancers. The poor aqueous solubility of paclitaxel necessitates a large percentage of Cremophor EL:ethanol (USP) in its commercial formulation which leads to hypersensitivity reactions in patients. We evaluate the use of a crystalline nanosuspension versus the USP formulation to deliver paclitaxel to tumor-bearing xenograft mice. Anti-tumor efficacy was assessed following intravenous administration of three 20 mg/kg doses of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution were evaluated, and differences were observed between the two formulations. Plasma clearance and tissue to plasma ratio of mice that were dosed with the nanosuspension are approximately 33- and 11-fold higher compared to those of mice that were given the USP formulation. Despite a higher tumor to plasma ratio for the nanosuspension treatment group, absolute paclitaxel tumor exposure was higher for the USP group. Accordingly, a higher anti-tumor effect was observed in the xenograft mice that were dosed with the USP formulation (90% versus 42% tumor growth inhibition). This reduction in activity of nanoparticle formulation appeared to result from a slower than anticipated dissolution in vivo. This study illustrates a need for careful consideration of both dose and systemic solubility prior utilizing nanosuspension as a mode of intravenous delivery. PMID:24685243

2014-01-01

31

Vaginal delivery of paclitaxel via nanoparticles with non-mucoadhesive surfaces suppresses cervical tumor growth.  

PubMed

Local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the cervicovaginal tract using nanoparticles may reduce adverse side effects associated with systemic chemotherapy, while improving outcomes for early-stage cervical cancer. It is hypothesized here that drug-loaded nanoparticles that rapidly penetrate cervicovaginal mucus (CVM) lining the female reproductive tract will more effectively deliver their payload to underlying diseased tissues in a uniform and sustained manner compared with nanoparticles that do not efficiently penetrate CVM. Paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles are developed, composed entirely of polymers used in FDA-approved products, which rapidly penetrate human CVM and provide sustained drug release with minimal burst effect. A mouse model is further employed with aggressive cervical tumors established in the cervicovaginal tract to compare paclitaxel-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (conventional particles, or CP) and similar particles coated with Pluronic F127 (mucus-penetrating particles, or MPP). CP are mucoadhesive and, thus, aggregated in mucus, while MPP achieve more uniform distribution and close proximity to cervical tumors. Paclitaxel-MPP suppress tumor growth more effectively and prolong median survival of mice compared with unencapsulated paclitaxel or paclitaxel-CP. Histopathological studies demonstrate minimal toxicity to the cervicovaginal epithelia, suggesting paclitaxel-MPP may be safe for intravaginal use. These results demonstrate the in vivo advantages of polymer-based MPP for treatment of tumors localized to a mucosal surface. PMID:24339398

Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wang, Ying-Ying; Lai, Samuel K; Zeng, Qi; Miao, Bolong; Tang, Benjamin C; Simons, Brian W; Ensign, Laura M; Liu, Guanshu; Chan, Kannie W Y; Juang, Chih-Yin; Mert, Olcay; Wood, Joseph; Fu, Jie; McMahon, Michael T; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

2014-07-01

32

Sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide nanoparticles as paclitaxel vehicles targeting breast carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Targeted nanoparticle (NP) delivery vehicles are emerging technologies, the full potential of which has yet to be realized. Sulfatide is known to bind to extracellular matrix glycoproteins that are highly expressed in breast tumors. In this study, we report for the first time the combination of sulfatide and lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs as a targeted breast cancer delivery vehicle for paclitaxel (PTX). PTX-sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (PTX-SNPs) were prepared using the emulsion/solvent evaporation method. PTX-SNPs exhibited a spherical shape, small particle size, high encapsulation efficiency, and a biphasic release in phosphate-buffered solution. The cytotoxicity study and cell apoptosis assay revealed that blank sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (SNPs) had no cytotoxicity, whereas PTX-SNPs had greater EMT6 cytotoxicity levels than PTX-lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (PTX-NPs) and free PTX. An in vitro cellular uptake study revealed that SNPs can deliver greater amounts of drug with more efficient and immediate access to intracellular targets. In vivo biodistribution measured using high-performance liquid chromatography confirmed that the PTX-SNPs can target breast tumor tissues to increase the accumulation of PTX in these tissues. The in vivo tumor inhibition ability of PTX-SNPs was remarkably higher than PTX-NPs and free PTX. Furthermore, toxicity studies suggested that the blank SNPs had no systemic toxicity. All results suggested that SNPs may serve as efficient PTX delivery vehicles targeting breast carcinoma. PMID:25170267

Li, Xiao; Qin, Fei; Yang, Li; Mo, Liqian; Li, Lei; Hou, Lianbing

2014-01-01

33

Thermosensitive and Mucoadhesive Sol-Gel Composites of Paclitaxel/Dimethyl-?-Cyclodextrin for Buccal Delivery  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to develop a buccal paclitaxel delivery system using the thermosensitive polymer Pluronic F127 (PF127) and the mucoadhesive polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO). The anticancer agent paclitaxel is usually used to treat ovarian, breast, and non-small-cell lung cancer. To improve its aqueous solubility, paclitaxel was incorporated into an inclusion complex with (2,6-di-O-methyl)-?-cyclodextrin (DM?CD). The formation of the paclitaxel inclusion complex was evaluated using various techniques, including x-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogels were prepared using a cold method. Concentrations of 18, 20, and 23% (w/v) PF127 were dissolved in distilled water including paclitaxel and stored overnight in a refrigerator at 4°C. PEO was added at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1% (w/v). Each formulation included paclitaxel (0.5 mg/mL). The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogels was measured using the tube-inverting method. Drug release from the hydrogels was measured using a Franz diffusion cell containing pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) buffer at 37°C. The cytotoxicity of each formulation was measured using the MTT assay with a human oral cancer cell (KB cell). The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogel decreased when PF127 was present and varied according to the presence of mucoadhesive polymers. The in vitro release was sustained and the release rate was slowed by the addition of the mucoadhesive polymer. The cytotoxicity of the blank formulation was low, although the drug-loaded hydrogel showed acceptable cytotoxicity. The results of our study suggest that the combination of a PF 127-based mucoadhesive hydrogel formulation and inclusion complexes improves the in vitro release and cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel. PMID:25275485

Kang, Bong-Seok; Ng, Choon Lian; Davaa, Enkhzaya; Park, Jeong-Sook

2014-01-01

34

Characterization of PEG-iron oxide hydrogel nanocomposites for dual hyperthermia and paclitaxel delivery.  

PubMed

Hyperthermia, the heating of tissue from 41 to 45?°C, has been shown to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy when used in conjunction with irradiation and/or chemotherapy. In this work, hydrogel nanocomposites have been developed that can control the delivery of both heat and a chemotherapeutic agent (e.g. paclitaxel). The nanocomposites studied involve a stealth, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based system comprised of PEG (n?=?1000) methyl ether methacrylate and PEG (n?=?400) dimethacrylate with iron oxide nanoparticles physically entrapped within the hydrogel matrices. The capability of the hydrogel nanocomposites to be heated in an alternating magnetic field was demonstrated. The heating of the hydrogel systems was dependent on the crosslinking of the hydrogel network where hydrogels with lower swelling ratios were found to heat to a greater extent than those with higher ratios. In addition, paclitaxel was shown to exhibit non-Fickian release from the hydrogel systems, with the amount of drug released dependent on the hydrogel network structure. Three cell lines: M059K (glioblastoma), MDA MB 231 (breast carcinoma), and A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) were exposed to paclitaxel only, hyperthermia only, and both paclitaxel and hyperthermia to determine if a synergistic cytotoxic effect was possible for these cell lines. The efficacy of paclitaxel was greater with hyperthermia for the A549 cells; however, the M059K and MDA MB 231 did not show the same response. PMID:23683041

Meenach, Samantha A; Shapiro, Jenna M; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W

2013-01-01

35

nab-Paclitaxel in combination with biologically targeted agents for early and metastatic breast cancer.  

PubMed

Taxanes are highly active chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of early-stage and metastatic breast cancer. Novel formulations have been developed to improve efficacy and decrease toxicity associated with these cytotoxic agents. nab-Paclitaxel is a biologically interactive, solvent-free, 130-nm-sized albumin-bound paclitaxel, developed to avoid the Cremophor vehicle used in solvent-based paclitaxel. Based on a pivotal phase 3 study, nab-paclitaxel was shown to be safely infused at a significantly higher dose of paclitaxel than the doses used with standard paclitaxel therapy, and had a shorter infusion time, no premedication, and higher response rates. It is now approved in the United States for treatment of breast cancer after failure of combination chemotherapy for metastatic disease or relapse within 6 months of adjuvant therapy, and has demonstrated promising efficacy and favorable tolerability. Recently, several phase 2 and 3 studies have suggested a role for nab-paclitaxel in combination with biologically targeted agents for the treatment of early- and late-stage breast cancer. This review will discuss the findings of clinical trials evaluating nab-paclitaxel in combination with biologically targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic settings. PMID:24560997

Megerdichian, Christine; Olimpiadi, Yuliya; Hurvitz, Sara A

2014-06-01

36

Paclitaxel-liposome-microbubble complexes as ultrasound-triggered therapeutic drug delivery carriers.  

PubMed

Liposome-microbubble complexes (LMC) have become a promising therapeutic carrier for ultrasound-triggered drug delivery to treat malignant tumors. However, the efficacy for ultrasound-assisted chemotherapy in vivo and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the feasibility of using paclitaxel-liposome-microbubble complexes (PLMC) as possible ultrasound (US)-triggered targeted chemotherapy against breast cancer. PTX-liposomes (PL) were conjugated to the microbubble (MB) surface through biotin-avidin linkage, increasing the drug-loading efficiency of MBs. The significant increased release of payloads from liposome-microbubble complexes was achieved upon US exposure. We used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as a model drug to show that released QDs were taken up by 4T1 breast cancer cells treated with QD-liposome-microbubble complexes (QLMC) and US, and uptake depended on the exposure time and intensity of insonication. We found that PLMC plus US inhibited tumor growth more effectively than PL plus US or PLMC without US, not only in vitro, but also in vivo. Histologically, the inhibition of tumor growth appeared to result from increased apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis in tumor xenografts. In addition, a significant increase of drug concentration in tumors was observed in comparison to treatment with non-conjugated PL or PLMC without US. The significant increase in an antitumor efficacy of PLMC plus US suggests their potential use as a new targeted US chemotherapeutic approach to inhibit breast cancer growth. PMID:23306023

Yan, Fei; Li, Lu; Deng, Zhiting; Jin, Qiaofeng; Chen, Juanjuan; Yang, Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Wu, Junru; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

2013-03-28

37

Electrospun Micro and Nanofibers for Sustained Delivery of Paclitaxel to Treat C6 Glioma in Vitro  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  The present study aims to develop electrospun PLGA-based micro- and nanofibers as implants for the sustained delivery of anticancer drug to treat C6 glioma in vitro.Methods  PLGA and an anticancer drug—paclitaxel-loaded PLGA micro- and nanofibers were fabricated by electrospinning and the key processing parameters were investigated. The physical and chemical properties of the micro- and nanofibers were characterized by various state-of-the-art

Jingwei Xie; Chi-Hwa Wang

2006-01-01

38

Preparation and characterization of amphiphilic calixarene nanoparticles as delivery carriers for Paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Two types of amphoteric calix[n]arene carboxylic acid (CnCA) derivative, i.e., calix[6]arene hexa-carboxylic acid (C6HCA) and calix[8]arene octo-carboxylic acid (C8OCA), were synthesized by introducing acetoxyls into the hydroxyls of calix[n]arene (n=6, 8). C6HCA and C8OCA nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared successfully using the dialysis method. CnCA NPs had regular spherical shapes with an average diameter of 180-220?nm and possessed negative charges of greater than -30?mV. C6HCA and C8OCA NPs were stable in 4.5% bovine serum albumin solutions and buffers (pH 5-9), with a low critical aggregation concentration value of 5.7?mg·L(-1) and 4.0?mg·L(-1), respectively. C6HCA and C8OCA NPs exhibited good paclitaxel (PTX) loading capacity, with drug loading contents of 7.5% and 8.3%, respectively. The overall in vitro release behavior of PTX from the CnCA NPs was sustained, and C8OCA NPs had a slower release rate compared with C6HCA NPs. These favorable properties of CnCA NPs make them promising nanocarriers for tumor-targeted drug delivery. PMID:25757488

Zhao, Zi-Ming; Wang, Yu; Han, Jin; Zhu, Hui-Dong; An, Lin

2015-01-01

39

"OA02" peptide facilitates the precise targeting of paclitaxel-loaded micellar nanoparticles to ovarian cancer in vivo.  

PubMed

Micellar nanoparticles based on linear polyethylene glycol (PEG) block dendritic cholic acids (CA) copolymers (telodendrimers), for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs in the treatment of cancers, are reported. The micellar nanoparticles have been decorated with a high-affinity "OA02" peptide against ?-3 integrin receptor to improve the tumor-targeting specificity which is overexpressed on the surface of ovarian cancer cells. "Click chemistry" was used to conjugate alkyne-containing OA02 peptide to the azide group at the distal terminus of the PEG chain in a representative PEG(5k)-CA(8) telodendrimer (micelle-forming unit). The conjugation of OA02 peptide had negligible influence on the physicochemical properties of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles and as hypothesized, OA02 peptide dramatically enhanced the uptake efficiency of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles (NP) in SKOV-3 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis, but not in ?-3 integrin-negative K562 leukemia cells. When loaded with paclitaxel, OA02-NPs had significantly higher in vitro cytotoxicity against both SKOV-3 and ES-2 ovarian cancer cells as compared with nontargeted nanoparticles. Furthermore, the in vivo biodistribution study showed OA02 peptide greatly facilitated tumor localization and the intracellular uptake of PEG(5k)-CA(8) nanoparticles into ovarian cancer cells as validated in SKOV3-luc tumor-bearing mice. Finally, paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded OA02-NPs exhibited superior antitumor efficacy and lower systemic toxicity profile in nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumor xenografts, when compared with equivalent doses of nontargeted PTX-NPs as well as clinical paclitaxel formulation (Taxol). Therefore, OA02-targeted telodendrimers loaded with paclitaxel have great potential as a new therapeutic approach for patients with ovarian cancer. PMID:22396491

Xiao, Kai; Li, Yuanpei; Lee, Joyce S; Gonik, Abby M; Dong, Tiffany; Fung, Gabriel; Sanchez, Eduardo; Xing, Li; Cheng, Holland R; Luo, Juntao; Lam, Kit S

2012-04-15

40

Bioresorbable copolymer of L-lactide and ?-caprolactone for controlled paclitaxel delivery.  

PubMed

Bioresorbable, aliphatic polyesters are known in medicine where serve as orthopedic devices (e.g., rods, pins and screws) or sutures and staples in wound closure. Moreover, such materials are extensively stud- ied as scaffolds--three-dimensional structures for tissue engineering but also drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this study was to determine the release profile of paclitaxel, one of the anti-inflammatory, antiprolifera- tive and anti-restenotic agent, from biocompatible copolymer of L-lactide and ?-caprolactone that seems to be very attractive especially for minimally invasive surgery due to its potential shape-memory property. The influ- ence of drug on copolymer hydrolytic degradation was also analyzed. Three types of matrices (3%, 5% of PTX and without drug) were prepared by solvent-casting method and degraded in vitro. The physicochemical changes of copolymer were analyzed by means of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gel per- meation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The amount of drug released into media was monitored with the use of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Similar drug release pro- files were obtained for matrices with paclitaxel. The drug-containing matrices degraded slightly slower than drug free matrices, regardless PTX content. Results of this work may be helpful in designing new bioresorbable paclitaxel delivery system applied in anti-cancer therapy or drug-eluting stents technology. PMID:25745774

Musia?-Kulik, Monika; G?barowska, Katarzyna; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Pastusiak, Ma?gorzata; Janeczek, Henryk; Dobrzy?ski, Piotr

2014-01-01

41

Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery  

E-print Network

Nanoparticles were synthesized and modified for target drug delivery. The research involved the aqueous synthesis of near infrared (NIR) sensitive Au-Au2S nanoparticles. An anti-cancer drug (cis-platin) ...

Chow, Gan-Moog

42

COLON TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Colon targeted drug delivery systems have the potential to deliver drugs for the treatment of a variety of colonic diseases and to deliver proteins and peptides to the colon for their systemic absorption. In recent years, various pharmaceutical approaches have been developed for targeting the drugs to the colon include, formation of prodrugs, coating of pH-sensitive polymers, use of colon

Ceyda Tuba

43

Dual Targeting Biomimetic Liposomes for Paclitaxel/DNA Combination Cancer Treatment  

PubMed Central

Combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs with nucleic acid has shown great promise in cancer therapy. In the present study, paclitaxel (PTX) and DNA were co-loaded in the hyaluronic acid (HA) and folate (FA)-modified liposomes (HA/FA/PPD), to obtain the dual targeting biomimetic nanovector. The prepared HA/FA/PPD exhibited nanosized structure and narrow size distributions (247.4 ± 4.2 nm) with appropriate negative charge of ?25.40 ± 2.7 mV. HA/FA/PD (PTX free HA/FA/PPD) showed almost no toxicity on murine malignant melanoma cell line (B16) and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) (higher than 80% cell viability), demonstrating the safety of the blank nanovector. In comparison with the FA-modified PTX/DNA co-loaded liposomes (FA/PPD), HA/FA/PPD showed significant superiority in protecting the nanoparticles from aggregation in the presence of plasma and degradation by DNase I. Moreover, HA/FA/PPD could also significantly improve the transfection efficiency and cellular internalization rates on B16 cells comparing to that of FA/PPD (p < 0.05) and PPD (p < 0.01), demonstrating the great advantages of dual targeting properties. Furthermore, fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry results showed that PTX and DNA could be effectively co-delivered into the same tumor cell via HA/FA/PPD, contributing to PTX/DNA combination cancer treatment. In conclusion, the obtained HA/FA/PPD in the study could effectively target tumor cells, enhance transfection efficiency and subsequently achieve the co-delivery of PTX and DNA, displaying great potential for optimal combination therapy. PMID:25177862

Liu, Guo-Xia; Fang, Gui-Qing; Xu, Wei

2014-01-01

44

Telodendrimer nanocarrier for co-delivery of paclitaxel and cisplatin: A synergistic combination nanotherapy for ovarian cancer treatment.  

PubMed

Cisplatin (CDDP) and paclitaxel (PTX) are two established chemotherapeutic drugs used in combination for the treatment of many cancers, including ovarian cancer. We have recently developed a three-layered linear-dendritic telodendrimer micelles (TM) by introducing carboxylic acid groups in the adjacent layer via "thio-ene" click chemistry for CDDP complexation and conjugating cholic acids via peptide chemistry in the interior layer of telodendrimer for PTX encapsulation. We hypothesize that the co-delivery of low dosage PTX with CDDP could act synergistically to increase the treatment efficacy and reduce their toxic side effects. This design allowed us to co-deliver PTX and CDDP at various drug ratios to ovarian cancer cells. The in vitro cellular assays revealed strongest synergism in anti-tumor effects when delivered at a 1:2 PTX/CDDP loading ratio. Using the SKOV-3 ovarian cancer xenograft mouse model, we demonstrate that our co-encapsulation approach resulted in an efficient tumor-targeted drug delivery, decreased cytotoxic effects and stronger anti-tumor effect, when compared with free drug combination or the single loading TM formulations. PMID:25453973

Cai, Liqiong; Xu, Gaofei; Shi, Changying; Guo, Dandan; Wang, Xu; Luo, Juntao

2015-01-01

45

Paclitaxel-loaded PEG-PE-based micellar nanopreparations targeted with tumor-specific landscape phage fusion protein enhance apoptosis and efficiently reduce tumors.  

PubMed

In an effort to improve the therapeutic index of cancer chemotherapy, we developed an advanced nanopreparation based on the combination of landscape phage display to obtain new targeting ligands with micellar nanoparticles for tumor targeting of water-insoluble neoplastic agents. With paclitaxel as a drug, this self-assembled nanopreparation composed of MCF-7-specific phage protein and polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) micelles showed selective toxicity to target cancer cells rather than nontarget, non cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, the targeted phage micelles triggered a dramatic tumor reduction and extensive necrosis as a result of improved tumor delivery of paclitaxel. The enhanced anticancer effect was also verified by an enhanced apoptosis and reduced tumor cell proliferation following the treatment with the targeted micellar paclitaxel both in vitro and in vivo. The absence of hepatotoxicity and pathologic changes in tissue sections of vital organs, together with maintenance of overall health of mice following the treatment, further support its translational potential as an effective and safe chemotherapy for improved breast cancer treatment. PMID:25239936

Wang, Tao; Yang, Shenghong; Mei, Leslie A; Parmar, Chirag K; Gillespie, James W; Praveen, Kulkarni P; Petrenko, Valery A; Torchilin, Vladimir P

2014-12-01

46

Enhanced antitumor efficacy of vitamin E TPGS-emulsified PLGA nanoparticles for delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Nanoparticles are efficient delivery vehicles for cancer therapy such as paclitaxel (PTX). In this study, we formulated PTX into PLGA polymeric nanoparticles. Vitamin E TPGS was used as an emulsifier to stabilize the nanoparticle formulation. PTX was encapsulated in TPGS-emulsified polymeric nanoparticles (TENPs) by a nanoprecipitation method in ethanol-water system. The resultant PTX-TENPs showed a very uniform particle size (?100 nm) and high drug encapsulation (>80%). The cytotoxicity of PTX-TENPs was examined in A549 lung cancer cell line. Preferential tumor accumulation of TENPs was observed in the A549 lung cancer xenograft model. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by intravenous injection of PTX-TENPs. Our results suggested that the modified nanoprecipitation method holds great potential for the fabrication of the PTX loaded polymeric nanoparticles. TPGS can be used in the manufacture of polymeric nanoparticles for the controlled release of PTX and other anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25456995

Sun, Yanbin; Yu, Bo; Wang, Guoying; Wu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Yanmin; Tang, Suoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Lee, Robert J; Teng, Lesheng; Xu, Shun

2014-11-01

47

Programmed co-delivery of paclitaxel and doxorubicin boosted by camouflaging with erythrocyte membrane  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Combination chemotherapy has been proven promising for cancer treatment, but unsatisfactory therapeutic data and increased side effects slow down the development in the clinic. In this study, we develop an effective approach to co-encapsulate a hydrophilic-hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drug pair (paclitaxel and doxorubicin) into magnetic O-carboxymethyl-chitosan nanoparticles. To endow them with the ability of programmed delivery, these carriers are further camouflaged with an Arg-Gly-Asp anchored erythrocyte membrane. Compared with the traditional polyethylene glycol coating method, this biomimetic decoration strategy is demonstrated to be superior in prolonging circulation time, improving tumor accumulation, facilitating tumor uptake, and tuning intracellular fate. These outstanding properties enable the as-designed nanodevice to exhibit greater tumor growth inhibition ability and much lower side effects than the combined use of commercial formulations.Combination chemotherapy has been proven promising for cancer treatment, but unsatisfactory therapeutic data and increased side effects slow down the development in the clinic. In this study, we develop an effective approach to co-encapsulate a hydrophilic-hydrophobic chemotherapeutic drug pair (paclitaxel and doxorubicin) into magnetic O-carboxymethyl-chitosan nanoparticles. To endow them with the ability of programmed delivery, these carriers are further camouflaged with an Arg-Gly-Asp anchored erythrocyte membrane. Compared with the traditional polyethylene glycol coating method, this biomimetic decoration strategy is demonstrated to be superior in prolonging circulation time, improving tumor accumulation, facilitating tumor uptake, and tuning intracellular fate. These outstanding properties enable the as-designed nanodevice to exhibit greater tumor growth inhibition ability and much lower side effects than the combined use of commercial formulations. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07027e

Fu, Qiang; Lv, Piping; Chen, Zhongke; Ni, Dezhi; Zhang, Lijun; Yue, Hua; Yue, Zhanguo; Wei, Wei; Ma, Guanghui

2015-02-01

48

Enhanced Oral Absorption of Paclitaxel in a Novel Self-Microemulsifying Drug Delivery System with or Without Concomitant Use of P-Glycoprotein Inhibitors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel in a novel self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) for improved oral administration with or without P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitors.

Shicheng Yang; R. Neslihan Gursoy; Gregory Lambert; Simon Benita

2004-01-01

49

Paclitaxel-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Modified with MCF-7 Cell-Specific Phage Protein: Enhanced Binding to Target Cancer Cells and Increased Cytotoxicity  

PubMed Central

Polymeric micelles are used as pharmaceutical carriers to increase solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Different ligands are used to prepare targeted polymeric micelles. Earlier, we developed the method for use of specific landscape phage fusion coat proteins as targeted delivery ligands and demonstrated the efficiency of this approach with doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes. Here, we describe a MCF-7 cell-specific micellar formulation self-assembled from the mixture of the micelle-forming amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate, MCF-7-specific landscape phage fusion coat protein, and the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel. These micelles demonstrated a very low CMC value and specific binding to target cells. Using an in vitro co-culture model, FACS analysis, and fluorescence microscopy we showed that MCF-7 targeted phage micelles preferential bound to target cells compared to non-target cells. As a result, targeted paclitaxel-loaded phage micelles demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity towards target MCF-7 cells than free drug or non-targeted micelle formulations, but failed to show such a differential toxicity towards non-target C166 cells. Overall, cancer cell-specific phage proteins identified from phage display peptide libraries can serve as targeting ligands (“substitute antibody”) for polymeric micelle-based pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:20518562

Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

2010-01-01

50

TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS  

EPA Science Inventory

ETD-02-047 (Martonen) GPRA # 10108 TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PROTEINS T. B. Martonen1, J. Schroeter2, Z. Zhang3, D. Hwang4, and J. S. Fleming5 1Experimental Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park...

51

Effective Drug Delivery, in vitro and in vivo, By Carbon-Based Nanovectors Non-Covalently Loaded With Unmodified Paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

Many new drugs have low aqueous solubility and high therapeutic efficacy. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a classic example of this type of compound. Here we show that extremely small (<40 nm) hydrophilic carbon clusters (HCCs) that are PEGylated (PEG-HCCs) are effective drug delivery vehicles when simply mixed with paclitaxel. This formulation of PTX sequestered in PEG-HCCs (PTX/PEG-HCCs) is stable for at least twenty weeks. The PTX/PEG-HCCs formulation was as effective as PTX in a clinical formulation in reducing tumor volumes in an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Preliminary toxicity and biodistribution studies suggest that the PEG-HCCs are not acutely toxic and, like many other nanomaterials, are primarily accumulated in the liver and spleen. This work demonstrates that carbon nanomaterials are effective drug delivery vehicles in vivo when non-covalently loaded with an unmodified drug. PMID:20681596

Berlin, Jacob M.; Leonard, Ashley D.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Marcano, Daniela C.; Yan, Shayou; Fiorentino, Stefania; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Katherine Price, B.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca M.; Wen, XiaoXia; Gabriela Raso, M.; Craig, Suzanne L.; Tran, Hai T.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

2010-01-01

52

Covalent functionalization of graphene oxide with biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) for delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Graphene oxide (GO), a novel 2D nanomaterial prepared by the oxidation of natural graphite, has been paid much attention in the area of drug delivery due to good biocompatibility and low toxicity. In the present work, 6-armed poly(ethylene glycol) was covalently introduced into the surface of GO sheets via a facile amidation process under mild conditions, making the modified GO, GO-PEG (PEG: 65 wt %, size: 50-200 nm), stable and biocompatible in physiological solution. This nanosized GO-PEG was found to be nontoxic to human lung cancer A549 and human breast cancer MCF-7 cells via cell viability assay. Furthermore, paclitaxel (PTX), a widely used cancer chemotherapy drug, was conjugated onto GO-PEG via ?-? stacking and hydrophobic interactions to afford a nanocomplex of GO-PEG/PTX with a relatively high loading capacity for PTX (11.2 wt %). This complex could quickly enter into A549 and MCF-7 cells evidenced by inverted fluorescence microscopy using Fluorescein isothiocyanate as a probe, and it also showed remarkably high cytotoxicity to A549 and MCF-7 cells in a broad range of concentration of PTX and time compared to free PTX. This kind of nanoscale drug delivery system on the basis of PEGylated GO may find potential application in biomedicine. PMID:25216036

Xu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Song; Li, Yongjun; Wang, Mingwei; Shi, Ping; Huang, Xiaoyu

2014-10-01

53

Poly(vinyl alcohol)-graft-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles for local delivery of paclitaxel for restenosis treatment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Catheter-based local delivery of biodegradable nanoparticles (NP) with sustained release characteristics represents a therapeutic approach to reduce restenosis. Paclitaxel-loaded NP consisting of poly(vinyl alcohol)-graft-poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PVA-g-PLGA) with varying PLGA chain length as well as poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), were prepared by a solvent evaporation technique. NP of <180 nm in diameter characterized by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force

Ulrich Westedt; Marc Kalinowski; Matthias Wittmar; Thomas Merdan; Florian Unger; Jutta Fuchs; Susann Schäller; Udo Bakowsky; Thomas Kissel

2007-01-01

54

A novel trans-lymphatic drug delivery system: Implantable gelatin sponge impregnated with PLGA–paclitaxel microspheres  

Microsoft Academic Search

A translymphatic drug delivery system which incorporates poly-lactide-co-glycolide–paclitaxel (PLGA–PTX) or PLGA–rhodamine microspheres into gelatin sponge matrix is described. The system combines the sustained release properties of PLGA–PTX with the structural advantages of gelatin matrix that can be implanted directly to the lymphatic site for both therapeutic and prophylactic purposes. The PLGA microspheres were prepared using spray drying technique. The particles

Jiang Liu; Dale Meisner; Elizabeth Kwong; Xiao Y. Wu; Michael R. Johnston

2007-01-01

55

Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-polyphosphoester-graft-paclitaxel Conjugates with Acid-labile Linkages as a pH-Sensitive and Functional Nanoscopic Platform for Paclitaxel Delivery  

PubMed Central

There has been an increasing interest to develop new types of stimuli-responsive drug delivery vehicles with high drug loading and controlled release properties for chemotherapeutics. An acid-labile, polyphosphoester-based degradable, polymeric paclitaxel (PTX) conjugate containing ultra-high levels of PTX loading has been improved significantly, in this second generation development, which involves connection of each PTX molecule to the polymer backbone via a pH-sensitive ?-thiopropionate linkage. The results for this system indicate that it has great potential as an effective anti-cancer agent. Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-polyphosphoester-graft-PTX drug conjugate (PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2) was synthesized by organocatalyst-promoted ring-opening polymerization of 2-(but-3-en-1-yloxy)-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane-2-oxide from a PEO macroinitiator, followed by thermo-promoted thiolene click conjugation of a thiol-functionalized PTX prodrug to the pendant alkene groups of the block copolymer. The PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 formed well-defined nanoparticles in aqueous solution, by direct dissolution into water, with a number-averaged hydrodynamic diameter of 114 ± 31 nm. The conjugate had PTX loading capacity as high as 53 wt%, and a maximum PTX concentration of 0.68 mg/mL in water (vs. 1.7 ?g/mL for free PTX). Although the PTX concentration is ca. 10× less than for our first generation material, its accelerated release allowed for similar free PTX concentrations vs. time. The PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 exhibited accelerated drug release under acidic conditions (~50 wt% PTX released in 8 d) compared to neutral conditions (~20 wt% PTX released in 8 d) and compared to the first generation analog that contained ester linkages between PTX and the polymer backbone (<5 wt% PTX released in 4 d), due to their acid-sensitive hydrolytically-labile ?-thiopropionate linkages between PTX molecules and the polymer backbone. The positive cell-killing activity of PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 against two cancer cell lines was demonstrated, and the presence of pendant reactive functionality provides a powerful platform for future work to involve conjugation of multiple numbers and/or types of targeting ligands, other drugs and imaging agents to achieve chemotherapy and bioimaging. Compared to our previously reported polyphosphoester-based PTX drug conjugates, PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G1 without the ?-thiopropionate linker, the PEO-b-PPE-g-PTX G2 showed pH-triggered drug release property and 5-to-8-fold enhanced in vitro cytotoxcity against two cancer cell lines. PMID:23997013

Zou, Jiong; Zhang, Fuwu; Zhang, Shiyi; Pollack, Stephanie F.; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Fan, Jingwei; Wooley, Karen L.

2013-01-01

56

Dendritic polyglycerol sulfate as a novel platform for paclitaxel delivery: pitfalls of ester linkage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) is evaluated as a delivery platform for the anticancer, tubulin-binding drug paclitaxel (PTX). The conjugation of PTX to dPGS is conducted via a labile ester linkage. A non-sulfated dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) is used as a control, and the labeling with an indocarbocyanine dye (ICC) renders multifunctional conjugates that can be monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The conjugates are characterized by 1H NMR, UV-vis measurements, and RP-HPLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of PTX and dendritic conjugates is evaluated using A549 and A431 cell lines, showing a reduced cytotoxic efficacy of the conjugates compared to PTX. The study of uptake kinetics reveals a linear, non saturable uptake in tumor cells for dPGS-PTX-ICC, while dPG-PTX-ICC is hardly taken up. Despite the marginal uptake of dPG-PTX-ICC, it prompts tubulin polymerization to a comparable extent as PTX. These observations suggest a fast ester hydrolysis and premature drug release, as confirmed by HPLC measurements in the presence of plasma enzymes.In this study, dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) is evaluated as a delivery platform for the anticancer, tubulin-binding drug paclitaxel (PTX). The conjugation of PTX to dPGS is conducted via a labile ester linkage. A non-sulfated dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) is used as a control, and the labeling with an indocarbocyanine dye (ICC) renders multifunctional conjugates that can be monitored by fluorescence microscopy. The conjugates are characterized by 1H NMR, UV-vis measurements, and RP-HPLC. In vitro cytotoxicity of PTX and dendritic conjugates is evaluated using A549 and A431 cell lines, showing a reduced cytotoxic efficacy of the conjugates compared to PTX. The study of uptake kinetics reveals a linear, non saturable uptake in tumor cells for dPGS-PTX-ICC, while dPG-PTX-ICC is hardly taken up. Despite the marginal uptake of dPG-PTX-ICC, it prompts tubulin polymerization to a comparable extent as PTX. These observations suggest a fast ester hydrolysis and premature drug release, as confirmed by HPLC measurements in the presence of plasma enzymes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: 1H NMR spectra of the conjugates, HPLC chromatograms, internalization images of dPGS-PTX-ICC (5), elimination kinetics of dPGS-PTX-ICC (5) and dPGS-ICC (7), comparison of IC50 values of PTX and dPGS-PTX (3) in A431 and A549 cell lines and cell viability of dPGS amine (1). See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04428b

Sousa-Herves, Ana; Würfel, Patrick; Wegner, Nicole; Khandare, Jayant; Licha, Kai; Haag, Rainer; Welker, Pia; Calderón, Marcelo

2015-02-01

57

Biotin-conjugated block copolymeric nanoparticles as tumor-targeted drug delivery systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

To achieve targeted drug delivery for chemotherapy, a ligand-mediated nanoparticulate drug carrier was designed, which could\\u000a identify a specific receptor on the surfaces of tumor cells. Biodegradable poly(ethylene oxide)\\/poly(?-caprolactone) (PEG\\/PCL)\\u000a amphiphilic block copolymers coupled to biotin ligands were synthesized with a variety of PEG\\/PCL compositions. Block copolymeric\\u000a nanoparticles harboring the anticancer drug paclitaxel were prepared via micelle formation in aqueous

So Yeon Kim; Seung Hea Cho; Young Moo Lee; Liang-Yin Chu

2007-01-01

58

Preparation and evaluation of paclitaxel-loaded PEGylated immunoliposome  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sterically stabilized paclitaxel-loaded liposome tailored to target human breast cancer cells was developed, thereby promoting the efficiency of intracellular delivery of paclitaxel through receptor-mediated endocytosis. Results indicated that the targeting moiety (thiolated Herceptin) was successfully coupled to the distal reactive maleimide terminus of the poly (ethylene glycol)-phospholipid conjugate as well as being incorporated in the liposomal bilayers. The particle

Tao Yang; Min-Koo Choi; Fu-De Cui; Jung Sun Kim; Suk-Jae Chung; Chang-Koo Shim; Dae-Duk Kim

2007-01-01

59

Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery  

PubMed Central

Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

2010-01-01

60

Efficacy of poly(sebacic acid-co-ricinoleic acid) biodegradable delivery system for intratumoral delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

The effectiveness of an injectable polymeric formulation, based on poly(sebacic acid-co-ricinoleic acid) and paclitaxel against a heterotopic tumor model was studied. An injectable pasty polymer that releases an incorporated drug over a period of weeks was used. The degradation rate of formulations with paclitaxel was examined in vitro and in vivo. The effectiveness of the polymeric carrier of paclitaxel was investigated using a melanoma heterotopic model in C57BL/6 mice. Tumor bearing animals were injected intratumorally with 0.1 ml of formulations containing 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% paclitaxel. Formulations with 5% and 10% paclitaxel content degraded faster in vivo then in vitro. Changes in tumor progression, survival time, and body weight were observed over a period of 77 days. The highest tumor size was reported for the control groups that did not receive paclitaxel in their treatment regiment: 3.6 g on day 20, while in all groups treated with polymer loaded with paclitaxel the tumor size was much smaller than that in the blank polymer or non treatment groups and ranged from 1.3 g to 0.3 g. Intratumoral injection of paclitaxel loaded in the polymer was found to be an effective treatment for localized tumors. PMID:19343769

Shikanov, Ariella; Vaisman, Boris; Shikanov, Sergey; Domb, Abraham J

2010-03-15

61

Solid lipid nanoparticles of paclitaxel strengthened by hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin as an oral delivery system.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of surface-modified paclitaxel (PTX)-incorporated solid lipid nanoparticles with hydroxypropyl-?-cyclodextrin (smPSH). The smPSH released 89.70 ± 3.99% of its entrapped PTX within 24 h when placed in dissolution medium containing sodium lauryl sulfate. The cellular uptake of PTX from smPSH in Caco-2 cells was 5.3-fold increased compared to a PTX solution based on a Taxol formulation. Moreover, smPSH showed an increased cytotoxicity compared to PTX solution. In addition, AUC (5.43 µg•h/ml) and Cmax (1.44 µg/ml) of smPSH were higher than those (1.81 µg•h/ml and 0.73 µg/ml) of PTX solution. The drug concentration of smPSH (11.12 ± 4.45 ng/mg of lymph tissue) in lymph nodes was higher than that of the PTX solution (0.89 ± 0.75 ng/mg of lymph tissue), suggesting that more PTX was transported to the lymphatic vessels in the form of smPSH. In conclusion, smPSH have a potential as an alternative delivery system for oral administration of PTX. PMID:22859311

Baek, Jong-Suep; So, Jae-Woo; Shin, Sang-Chul; Cho, Cheong-Weon

2012-10-01

62

Liposomal co-delivery of curcumin and albumin/paclitaxel nanoparticle for enhanced synergistic antitumor efficacy.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel (PTX) and curcumin (CUR) are potent chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer. In the present study, hybrid polymer-lipid nanoparticles co-loaded with PTX and CUR were developed to investigate the therapeutic potential of a combination drug regimen. For this purpose, PTX-loaded albumin nanoparticles (APN) were prepared and encapsulated in PEGylated hybrid liposomes containing CUR (CL-APN) via a thin-film hydration technique. CL-APN was nanosized with a uniform spherical morphology. PTX and CUR release was sustained and occurred in a sequential manner, wherein CUR was expected to downregulate the nuclear factor NF-?B and Akt pathways and increase the therapeutic efficacy of PTX. The ratiometric combination of PTX and CUR was significantly more cytotoxic than the individual drugs. Importantly, dual-drug-loaded nanocarriers exhibited a superior cytotoxic effect than a cocktail combination at a lower dose. CL-APN induced significantly higher early and late apoptosis, induced a stronger G2/M arrest, and significantly increased the subG1 cell population. By combining CUR, an effective NF-?B inhibitor, with PTX, a powerful anticancer drug, in a polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticle system, we could improve the therapeutic efficacy in cancer treatments. Our results showed that such co-loaded delivery systems could serve as a promising therapeutic approach to improve clinical outcomes against various malignancies. PMID:25797481

Ruttala, Hima Bindu; Ko, Young Tag

2015-04-01

63

Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles for the Treatment of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Xenografts  

PubMed Central

Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique to facilitate the delivery of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. However, the process typically uses non-specific microbubbles, leading to low tumor-to-normal tissue uptake ratio and adverse side effects. In this study, we synthesized the LHRH receptor targeted and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (TPLMBs) for tumor-specific binding and enhanced therapeutic effect at the tumor site. An ovarian cancer xenograft model was established by injecting A2780/DDP cells intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice. Microscopic imaging of tumor sections after intraperitoneal injection of TPLMBs showed effective binding of the microbubbles with cancer cells. Ultrasound mediated destruction of the intraperitoneally injected TPLMBs yielded a superior therapeutic outcome in comparison with other treatment options. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue further confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediated intraperitoneal administration of the targeted drug-loaded microbubbles may be a useful method for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24237050

Chang, Shufang; Liu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

2014-01-01

64

Anti-tumor activity of paclitaxel through dual-targeting lipoprotein-mimicking nanocarrier.  

PubMed

In the present study, we devised a strategy that paclitaxel (PTX) with lipid and octadecylamine were prepared to lipid nanoparticle (PTX-LNP) with positive charge, folic acid-modified bovine serum albumin (FB)-coated surface of PTX-LNP through electrostatic attraction and generated the lipoprotein-mimicking nanocomplex (FB-PTX-LNP) for dual-targeting therapy. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the protein model due to its specific targeting to tumor by increased transendothelial gp60-mediated transport and increased intratumoral accumulation as a result of the secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)-albumin interaction. The further conjugating folic acid to BSA achieved the dual active targeting. In vitro cytotoxicity tests suggested FB-PTX-LNP and BSA-PTX-LNP exhibited significantly higher cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to PTX-LNP. The cellular uptake experiments indicated that FB-coumarin-6-LNP modified with dual-targeting had a faster and greater cellular uptake when compared to BSA-coumarin-6-LNP and coumarin-6-LNP by MCF-7 cells. Thus, both BSA and FA did play roles in in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake. Furthermore, the targeting ability and therapeutic efficacy of FB-PTX-LNP were assessed in vivo. FB-PTX-LNP produced very marked targeting ability and anti-tumor activity in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate the protein-lipid nanocomplex FB-PTX-LNP is a potential nanocarrier for Paclitaxel dual-targeting to tumor. PMID:25539074

Chen, Conghui; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, Mingxi; Zhao, Xiuli; Wang, Yinjie; Chen, Kang; Chen, Dawei

2015-05-01

65

Local Intracerebral Administration of Paclitaxel with the Paclimer ® Delivery System: Toxicity Study in a Canine Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Introduction: Paclitaxel, a microtubule binding agent with potent anti-glioma activity in vitro, exhibits poor penetrance to the CNS when delivered systemically. To minimize toxicity and reach therapeutic concentrations\\u000a in the CNS, paclitaxel was previously incorporated into biodegradable microspheres (Paclimer®), and the efficacy of Paclimer® was determined in a rat model of malignant glioma. In this study we report the safety

Gustavo Pradilla; Paul P. Wang; Patrik Gabikian; Khan Li; Carolyn A. Magee; Kevin A. Walter; Henry Brem

2006-01-01

66

Improving paclitaxel delivery: in vitro and in vivo characterization of PEGylated polyphosphoester-based nanocarriers.  

PubMed

Nanomaterials have great potential to offer effective treatment against devastating diseases by providing sustained release of high concentrations of therapeutic agents locally, especially when the route of administration allows for direct access to the diseased tissues. Biodegradable polyphosphoester-based polymeric micelles and shell cross-linked knedel-like nanoparticles (SCKs) have been designed from amphiphilic block-graft terpolymers, PEBP-b-PBYP-g-PEG, which effectively incorporate high concentrations of paclitaxel (PTX). Well-dispersed nanoparticles physically loaded with PTX were prepared, exhibiting desirable physiochemical characteristics. Encapsulation of 10 wt% PTX, into either micelles or SCKs, allowed for aqueous suspension of PTX at concentrations up to 4.8 mg/mL, as compared to <2.0 ?g/mL for the aqueous solubility of the drug alone. Drug release studies indicated that PTX released from these nanostructures was defined through a structure-function relationship, whereby the half-life of sustained PTX release was doubled through cross-linking of the micellar structure to form SCKs. In vitro, physically loaded micellar and SCK nanotherapeutics demonstrated IC50 values against osteosarcoma cell lines, known to metastasize to the lungs (CCH-OS-O and SJSA), similar to the pharmaceutical Taxol formulation. Evaluation of these materials in vivo has provided an understanding of the effects of nanoparticle structure-function relationships on intratracheal delivery and related biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. Overall, we have demonstrated the potential of these novel nanotherapeutics toward future sustained release treatments via administration directly to the sites of lung metastases of osteosarcoma. PMID:25629952

Zhang, Fuwu; Zhang, Shiyi; Pollack, Stephanie F; Li, Richen; Gonzalez, Amelia M; Fan, Jingwei; Zou, Jiong; Leininger, Sarah E; Pavía-Sanders, Adriana; Johnson, Rachel; Nelson, Laura D; Raymond, Jeffery E; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Hughes, Dennis M P; Lenox, Mark W; Gustafson, Tiffany P; Wooley, Karen L

2015-02-11

67

Paclitaxel delivery from cobalt-chromium alloy surfaces using self-assembled monolayers.  

PubMed

Polymer-based platforms in drug-eluting stents (DESs) can cause adverse reactions in patients. Hence, the development of a polymer-free drug delivery platform may reduce adverse reactions to DES. In this study, the use of a polymer-free platform, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), is explored for delivering an antiproliferative drug [paclitaxel (PAT)] from a stent material [cobalt-chromium ((Co-Cr) alloy]. Initially, carboxylic acid terminated phosphonic acid SAMs were coated on Co-Cr alloy. Two different doses (25 and 100 ?g/cm²) of PAT were coated on SAM coated Co-Cr surfaces using a microdrop deposition method. Also, control experiments were carried out to coat PAT directly on Co-Cr surfaces with no SAM modification. The PAT coated specimens were characterized using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). FTIR spectra showed the successful deposition of PAT on SAM coated and control-Co-Cr surfaces. SEM images showed islands of high density PAT crystals on SAM coated surfaces, while low density PAT crystals were observed on control-Co-Cr alloy. AFM images showed molecular distribution of PAT on SAM coated as well as control-Co-Cr alloy surfaces. In vitro drug release studies showed that PAT was released from SAM coated Co-Cr surfaces in a biphasic manner (an initial burst release in first 7 days was followed by a slow release for up to 35 days), while the PAT was burst released from control-Co-Cr surfaces within 1-3 days. Thus, this study demonstrated the use of SAMs for delivering PAT from Co-Cr alloy surfaces for potential use in drug-eluting stents. PMID:21721838

Mani, Gopinath; Torres, Nelson; Oh, Sunho

2011-06-01

68

Targeted Retrograde Gene Delivery for Neuronal Protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cellular heterogeneity and complex circuitry of the central nervous system make it difficult to achieve precise delivery of experimental and therapeutic agents. We report here an in vivo retrograde gene delivery strategy to target mature projection neurons using adeno-associated virus, a vector with low toxicity and the capacity for long-term gene expression. Viral delivery to axon terminal fields in

Brian K. Kaspar; Dawn Erickson; David Schaffer; Linda Hinh; Fred H. Gage; Daniel A. Peterson

2002-01-01

69

MDR1 siRNA loaded hyaluronic acid-based CD44 targeted nanoparticle systems circumvent paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer  

PubMed Central

Development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is an almost universal phenomenon in patients with ovarian cancer, and this severely limits the ultimate success of chemotherapy in the clinic. Overexpression of the MDR1 gene and corresponding P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best known MDR mechanisms. MDR1 siRNA based strategies were proposed to circumvent MDR, however, systemic, safe, and effective targeted delivery is still a major challenge. Cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) targeted hyaluronic acid (HA) based nanoparticle has been shown to successfully deliver chemotherapy agents or siRNAs into tumor cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate the ability of HA-PEI/HA-PEG to deliver MDR1 siRNA and the efficacy of the combination of HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA with paclitaxel to suppress growth of ovarian cancer. We observed that HA-PEI/HA-PEG nanoparticles can efficiently deliver MDR1 siRNA into MDR ovarian cancer cells, resulting in down-regulation of MDR1 and Pgp expression. Administration of HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA nanoparticles followed by paclitaxel treatment induced a significant inhibitory effect on the tumor growth, decreased Pgp expression and increased apoptosis in MDR ovarian cancer mice model. Our findings suggest that CD44 targeted HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA nanoparticles can serve as a therapeutic tool with great potentials to circumvent MDR in ovarian cancer. PMID:25687880

Yang, Xiaoqian; lyer, Arun K.; Singh, Amit; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Duan, Zhenfeng

2015-01-01

70

MDR1 siRNA loaded hyaluronic acid-based CD44 targeted nanoparticle systems circumvent paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is an almost universal phenomenon in patients with ovarian cancer, and this severely limits the ultimate success of chemotherapy in the clinic. Overexpression of the MDR1 gene and corresponding P-glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best known MDR mechanisms. MDR1 siRNA based strategies were proposed to circumvent MDR, however, systemic, safe, and effective targeted delivery is still a major challenge. Cluster of differentiation 44 (CD44) targeted hyaluronic acid (HA) based nanoparticle has been shown to successfully deliver chemotherapy agents or siRNAs into tumor cells. The goal of this study is to evaluate the ability of HA-PEI/HA-PEG to deliver MDR1 siRNA and the efficacy of the combination of HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA with paclitaxel to suppress growth of ovarian cancer. We observed that HA-PEI/HA-PEG nanoparticles can efficiently deliver MDR1 siRNA into MDR ovarian cancer cells, resulting in down-regulation of MDR1 and Pgp expression. Administration of HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA nanoparticles followed by paclitaxel treatment induced a significant inhibitory effect on the tumor growth, decreased Pgp expression and increased apoptosis in MDR ovarian cancer mice model. Our findings suggest that CD44 targeted HA-PEI/HA-PEG/MDR1 siRNA nanoparticles can serve as a therapeutic tool with great potentials to circumvent MDR in ovarian cancer.

Yang, Xiaoqian; Lyer, Arun K.; Singh, Amit; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J.; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Duan, Zhenfeng

2015-02-01

71

Biological evaluation of redox-sensitive micelles based on hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid conjugates for tumor-specific delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Tumor-targeted drug delivery and microenvironment-responsive drug release are attractive strategies in cancer treatment. Our previous study demonstrated that redox-sensitive micelles based on hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid (HA-ss-DOCA) conjugates exhibited excellent drug-loading capacities (34.1%) for paclitaxel (PTX) and rapid drug release in response to reducing agent, glutathione. In the present study, the physicochemical and biological properties of PTX-loaded HA-ss-DOCA (PTX-HA-ss-DOCA) micelles were investigated further. The micelles have an average size of about 120nm and a zeta potential of about -36mV. Transmission electron microscopy and wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrated redox-sensitive degradation of micelles in the presence of glutathione. Moreover, the encapsulated payload was effectively released from HA-ss-DOCA micelles into cytoplasm and then rapidly transported into nuclei. In vitro cytotoxicity and cell apoptosis assay further revealed that HA significantly improved the tumor-specific drug delivery of HA-ss-DOCA micelles via receptor-mediated endocytosis, while efficient intracellular drug release and transportation lead to marked inhibition of tumor cell growth, as compared to Taxol(®) and insensitive micelles. More importantly, PTX-HA-ss-DOCA micelles demonstrated superior in vivo antitumor activity compared with Taxol(®) and insensitive control, and decreased systemic toxicity. Herein we present data which provide valuable insight into the design and development of tumor-specific drug delivery systems. PMID:25655715

Li, Jing; Yin, Tingjie; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

2015-04-10

72

Efficient delivery of therapeutic agents by using targeted albumin nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Albumin nanoparticles are one of the most important drug carriers for the delivery of therapeutic drugs, especially for the treatment of malignancies. This potential is due to their high binding capacity for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs and the possibility of surface modification. Accumulation of albumin-bound drugs in the tumor interstitium occurs by the enhanced permeability and retention effect, which is also facilitated by the 60-kDa glycoprotein transcytosis pathway and binding to secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine located in the tumor extracellular matrix. In addition, specific ligands such as monoclonal antibodies, folic acid, transferrin, and peptides can be conjugated to the surface of albumin nanoparticles to actively target the drug to its site of action. The albumin-bound paclitaxel, Abraxane®, is one of the several therapeutic nanocarriers that have been approved for clinical use. By the development of Abraxane® that demonstrates a higher response rate and improved tolerability and therapeutic efficiency in comparison with solvent-based formulation, and with consideration of its commercial success, albumin is attracting the interest of many biotechnological and pharmaceutical companies. This chapter explores the current targeted and nontargeted albumin-based nanoparticles that are in various stages of development for the delivery of therapeutic agents in order to enhance the efficacy of cancer treatment. PMID:25819278

Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Safavi, Maryam Sadat; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas

2015-01-01

73

Folate-mediated targeting of albumin conjugates of paclitaxel obtained through a heterogeneous phase system.  

PubMed

The study developed cytotoxic macromolecular conjugates that specifically target the folate receptor and deliver the drug into cell cytoplasm. The anticancer agent paclitaxel was conjugated to human serum albumin (HSA) and this drug-albumin conjugate was further equipped with folic acid, linked via an extended poly(ethylene glycol) spacer. Preparation was carried out in a heterogeneous phase system exploiting the binding ability of Cibacron Blue dye to HSA. Unreacted reagents were easily removed and, after purification by gel filtration, the conjugate was fully characterized. Binding and in vitro cytotoxicity studies on human nasopharyngeal epidermal carcinoma KB and colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells (as negative control) demonstrated increased selectivity and anti-tumoral activity. PMID:19712735

Dosio, Franco; Arpicco, Silvia; Stella, Barbara; Brusa, Paola; Cattel, Luigi

2009-12-01

74

Bioadhesive Drug Delivery System Using Glyceryl Monooleate for the Intravesical Administration of Paclitaxel  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Many reports have shown that the efficacy of intravesical therapy for bladder cancer is in part limited by the poor penetration of drugs into the urothelium. The present study evaluated the effect of glyceryl monooleate (GMO) on the absorption of intravesically administered paclitaxel in a rabbit model of bladder cancer. Methods: Urine, plasma, and tissue pharmacokinetics were determined in

Seung-Ju Lee; Sae Woong Kim; Hesson Chung; Yeong Taek Park; Young Wook Choi; Yong-Hyun Cho; Moon Soo Yoon

2005-01-01

75

The Effect of Short-term Intra-arterial Delivery of Paclitaxel on Neointimal Hyperplasia and the Local Thrombotic Environment after Angioplasty  

SciTech Connect

PurposeTo evaluate the effects of short-term intra-arterial delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia and the local thrombotic environment after angioplasty.MethodsAn experimental common carotid artery injury model was established in 60 rats, which were divided into experimental groups (40 rats) and controls (20 rats). Local intra-arterial administration of paclitaxel was applied at 2 doses (90 and 180 {mu}g/30 {mu}l), and the effects of short-term delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia and the expression of tissue factor (TF), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) were evaluated at days 15 and 30 by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry.ResultsAt 15 and 30 days after injury, neointimal thickness and area, the ratio of intimal area to medial area and the stenotic rate were all significantly decreased in the group provided the high concentrations (180 {mu}g/30 {mu}l) of paclitaxel for 2 min or 10 min and in the group provided the low concentration (90 {mu}g/30 {mu}l) of paclitaxel for 10 min (p < 0.05). At 30 days after injury, there were no significant changes in TF expression among all experimental groups. PAI-1 expression increased in the neointima of the high concentration 10 min group (p < 0.05), while t-PA expression decreased in the neointima of the high concentration 2 min group (p < 0.05).ConclusionIn the rat common carotid artery injury model, the short-term delivery of paclitaxel could effectively inhibit neointimal hyperplasia in the long term, with very little influence on the local expression of TF and PAI-1.

Yajun, E, E-mail: eyj7681@yahoo.com.cn [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); He Nengshu, E-mail: eyajun@hotmail.com; Fan Hailun, E-mail: mydream510@yahoo.com.cn [Tianjin Institute of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Department of Radiology (China)

2013-08-01

76

Targeted delivery of therapeutics to endothelium  

PubMed Central

The endothelium is a target for therapeutic and diagnostic interventions in a plethora of human disease conditions including ischemia, inflammation, edema, oxidative stress, thrombosis and hemorrhage, and metabolic and oncological diseases. Unfortunately, drugs have no affinity to the endothelium, thereby limiting the localization, timing, specificity, safety, and effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Molecular determinants on the surface of resting and pathologically altered endothelial cells, including cell adhesion molecules, peptidases, and receptors involved in endocytosis, can be used for drug delivery to the endothelial surface and into intracellular compartments. Drug delivery platforms such as protein conjugates, recombinant fusion constructs, targeted liposomes, and stealth polymer carriers have been designed to target drugs and imaging agents to these determinants. We review endothelial target determinants and drug delivery systems, describe parameters that control the binding of drug carriers to the endothelium, and provide examples of the endothelial targeting of therapeutic enzymes designed for the treatment of acute vascular disorders including ischemia, oxidative stress, inflammation, and thrombosis. PMID:18815813

Simone, Eric; Ding, Bi-Sen

2009-01-01

77

Mathematical modelling of magnetically targeted drug delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

A mathematical model for targeted drug delivery using magnetic particles is developed. This includes a diffusive flux of particles arising from interactions between erythrocytes in the microcirculation. The model is used to track particles in a vessel network. Magnetic field design is discussed and we show that it is impossible to specifically target internal regions using an externally applied field.

Andrew D. Grief; Giles Richardson

2005-01-01

78

Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

2011-12-01

79

Amphiphilic N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-chitosan-cholic acid micelles for paclitaxel delivery.  

PubMed

Self-assembled amphiphilic N-(2,3-dihydroxypropyl)-chitosan-cholic acid (DHP-CS-CHO) micelle was prepared as a carrier for paclitaxel. DHP-CS-CHO was synthesized by grafted small molecules cholic acid and glycidol onto primary amine group of chitosan, respectively. The DHP-CS-CHO formed uniform micelles (size=212.4±3.1 nm) with a low critical micelle concentration (0.024 mg/ml) in PBS. Hydrophobic anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), was easily encapsulated into chitosan derivative micelles by a dialysis method with loading efficiency up to 80%. The PTX loaded micelles released the drug in a sustained manner more than a week in PBS containing 0.1% (w/v) Tween 80 at 37°C. In vitro antitumor experiment demonstrated that PTX loaded chitosan derivative micelles could inhibit MCF-7 cell growth and induce its apoptosis. These results suggested that DHP-CS-CHO may be a promising carrier for the anticancer drug PTX. PMID:23544554

Pan, Zheng; Gao, Yunling; Heng, Linseng; Liu, Yi; Yao, Gan; Wang, Yun; Liu, Yuping

2013-04-15

80

A Dicarboxylic Fatty Acid Derivative of Paclitaxel for Albumin Assisted Drug Delivery  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel is a potent chemotherapy for many cancers but it suffers from very poor solubility. Consequently the TAXOL formulation uses copious amounts of the surfactant Cremophor EL to solubilize the drug for injection resulting in severe hypersensitivity and neutropenia. In contrast to Cremophor EL, presented is a way to solubilize paclitaxel (PTX) by conjugation of a dicarboxylic fatty acid for specific binding to the ubiquitous protein, serum albumin. The conjugation chemistry was simplified to a single step using the activated anhydride form of 3-pentadecylglutaric (PDG) acid which is reactive to a variety of nucleophiles. The PDG derivative is less cytotoxic than the parent compound and was found to slowly hydrolyze to PTX (~5% over 72 h) in serum, tumor cytosol, and tumor tissue homogenate. When injected intravenously to tumor bearing mice, [3H]-PTX in the TAXOL formulation was cleared rapidly with a half-life of 7 hours. In the case of the PDG derivative of PTX, the drug is quickly distributed and approximately 20% of the injected dose remained in the vasculature experiencing a 23-h half-life. These improvements from modifying PTX with the PDG fatty acid present the opportunity for PDG to become a generic modification for the improvement of many therapeutics. PMID:22674061

Hackett, Michael J.; Joolakanti, Shyamsunder; Hartranft, Megan E.; Guley, Patrick C.; Cho, Moo J.

2013-01-01

81

The Formulation of Aptamer-Coated Paclitaxel-Polylactide Nanoconjugates and Their Targeting to Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel-polylactide (Ptxl-PLA) conjugate nanoparticles, termed as nanoconjugates (NCs), were prepared through Ptxl/(BDI)ZnN(TMS)2 (BDI = 2-((2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-amido)-4-((2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-imino)-2-pentene)-mediated controlled polymerization of lactide (LA) followed by nanoprecipitation. Nanoprecipitation of Ptxl-PLA resulted in sub-100 nm NCs with monomodal particle distributions and low polydispersities. The sizes of Ptxl-PLA NCs could be precisely controlled by using appropriate water-miscible solvents and by controlling the concentration of Ptxl-PLA during nanoprecipitation. Co-precipitation of a mixture of PLA-PEG-PLA (PLA = 14 kDa; PEG = 5kDa) and Ptxl-PLA in PBS resulted in NCs that could stay non-aggregated in PBS for an extended period of time. To develop solid formulations of NCs, we evaluated a series of lyoprotectants, aiming to identify candidates that could effectively reduce or eliminate NC aggregation during lyophilization. Albumin was found to be an excellent lyoprotectant for the preparation of NCs in solid form, allowing lyophilized NCs to be readily dispersed in PBS without noticeable aggregates. Aptamer-NCs bioconjugates were prepared and found to be able to effectively target prostate-specific membrane antigen in a cell-specific manner. PMID:20122727

Tong, Rong; Yala, Linda; Fan, Timothy M.; Cheng, Jianjun

2011-01-01

82

Amphiphilic carboxymethyl chitosan-quercetin conjugate with P-gp inhibitory properties for oral delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

An amphiphilic carboxymethyl chitosan-quercetin (CQ) conjugate was designed and synthesized for oral delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to improve its oral bioavailability by increasing its water solubility and bypassing the P-gp drug efflux pumps. CQ conjugate had low critical micelle concentration (55.14 ?g/mL), and could self assemble in aqueous condition to form polymeric micelles (PMs). PTX-loaded CQ PMs displayed a particle size of 185.8 ± 4.6 nm and polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.134 ± 0.056. The drug-loading content (DL) and entrapment efficiency (EE) were 33.62 ± 1.34% and 85.63 ± 1.26%, respectively. Moreover, PTX-loaded CQ PMs displayed similar sustained-release profile in simulated gastrointestinal fluids (pH 1.2/pH 6.8) and PBS (pH 7.4). In situ intestinal absorption experiment showed that PTX-loaded CQ PMs significantly improved the effective permeability of PTX as compared to verapamil (P < 0.01). Likewise, PTX-loaded CQ PMs significantly enhanced the oral bioavailability of PTX, resulting in strong antitumor efficacy against tumor xenograft models with better safety profile as compared to Taxol(®) and Taxol(®) with verapamil. Overall, the results implicate that CQ PMs are promising vehicles for the oral delivery of water-insoluble anticancer drugs. PMID:24927684

Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Yihang; Dahmani, Fatima Zohra; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Yao, Jing

2014-08-01

83

Poly(ethylene oxide)-modified poly(?-amino ester) nanoparticles as a pH-sensitive biodegradable system for paclitaxel delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The main objective of this study was to develop and characterize a pH-sensitive biodegradable polymeric nanoparticulate system for tumor-selective paclitaxel delivery. A representative hydrophobic poly(?-amino ester) (poly-1) was synthesized by conjugate addition of 4,4?-trimethyldipiperidine with 1,4-butanediol diacrylate. Poly-1 (Mn 10,000 daltons) nanoparticles were prepared by the controlled solvent displacement method in an ethanol–water system in the presence of Pluronic® F-108,

Anupama Potineni; David M Lynn; Robert Langer; Mansoor M Amiji

2003-01-01

84

A novel biosensor for quantitative monitoring of on-target activity of paclitaxel  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study describes a system for quantifying paclitaxel activity using the C-terminus of ?-tubulin as a biomarker. Following stabilization of microtubules with paclitaxel, a specific detyrosination reaction occurs at the C-terminus of ?-tubulin which could be used to assess efficacy. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based biosensor was synthesized comprising a short peptide that corresponded to the C-terminus of ?-tubulin, a fluorophore (Abz), and a quencher (Dnp). The fluorophore added to the end of the peptide can be released upon enzymatic detyrosination. In addition, a single fluorophore-tagged peptide was also conjugated to mesoporous silica nanoparticles to examine the feasibility of combining the drug with the peptide biomarker. As a proof of concept, we found that the degree of peptide cleavage, and therefore enzymatic activity, was directly correlated with exogenous bovine carboxypeptidase (CPA) an enzyme that mimics endogenous detyrosination. In addition, we show that cell lysates obtained from paclitaxel-treated cancer cells competed with exogenous CPA for biosensor cleavage in a paclitaxel dose-dependent manner. Our work provides strong evidence for the feasibility of combining paclitaxel with a novel biosensor in a multi-load nanoparticle.This study describes a system for quantifying paclitaxel activity using the C-terminus of ?-tubulin as a biomarker. Following stabilization of microtubules with paclitaxel, a specific detyrosination reaction occurs at the C-terminus of ?-tubulin which could be used to assess efficacy. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based biosensor was synthesized comprising a short peptide that corresponded to the C-terminus of ?-tubulin, a fluorophore (Abz), and a quencher (Dnp). The fluorophore added to the end of the peptide can be released upon enzymatic detyrosination. In addition, a single fluorophore-tagged peptide was also conjugated to mesoporous silica nanoparticles to examine the feasibility of combining the drug with the peptide biomarker. As a proof of concept, we found that the degree of peptide cleavage, and therefore enzymatic activity, was directly correlated with exogenous bovine carboxypeptidase (CPA) an enzyme that mimics endogenous detyrosination. In addition, we show that cell lysates obtained from paclitaxel-treated cancer cells competed with exogenous CPA for biosensor cleavage in a paclitaxel dose-dependent manner. Our work provides strong evidence for the feasibility of combining paclitaxel with a novel biosensor in a multi-load nanoparticle. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01105h

Townley, H. E.; Zheng, Y.; Goldsmith, J.; Zheng, Y. Y.; Stratford, M. R. L.; Dobson, P. J.; Ahmed, A. A.

2014-12-01

85

Synergistic co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel by porous PLGA microspheres for pulmonary inhalation treatment.  

PubMed

PLGA porous microspheres loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX) were developed for in situ treatment of metastatic lung cancer. The synergistic effect of the combined drugs was investigated against B16F10 cells to obtain the optimal prescription for in vivo studies. The combination therapy showed great synergism when DOX was the majority in the combination therapy, while they showed moderate antagonism when PTX is in major. The combination of DOX and PTX at a molar ratio of 5/1 showed the best synergistic therapeutic effect in the free form. However, the drugs exhibited more synergism in the PLGA microspheres at a molar ratio of 2/1, due to the difference in drug release rate. The in vivo study verified the synergism of DOX and PTX at the optimal molar ratio. These results suggested that dual encapsulation of DOX and PTX in porous PLGA microspheres would be a promising technology for long effective lung cancer treatment. PMID:25305583

Feng, Tianshi; Tian, Huayu; Xu, Caina; Lin, Lin; Xie, Zhigang; Lam, Michael Hon-Wah; Liang, Haojun; Chen, Xuesi

2014-11-01

86

Delivery of paclitaxel from cobalt–chromium alloy surfaces without polymeric carriers  

PubMed Central

Polymer-based carriers are commonly used to deliver drugs from stents. However, adverse responses to polymer coatings have raised serious concerns. This research is focused on delivering drugs from stents without using polymers or any carriers. Paclitaxel (PAT), an anti-restenotic drug, has strong adhesion towards a variety of material surfaces. In this study, we have utilized such natural adhesion property of PAT to attach these molecules directly to cobalt–chromium (Co–Cr) alloy, an ultra-thin stent strut material. Four different groups of drug coated specimens were prepared by directly adding PAT to Co–Cr alloy surfaces: Group-A (PAT coated, unheated, and ethanol cleaned); Group-B (PAT coated, heat treated, and ethanol cleaned); Group-C (PAT coated, unheated, and not ethanol cleaned); and Group-D (PAT coated, heat treated and not ethanol cleaned). In vitro drug release of these specimens was investigated using high performance liquid chromatography. Groups A and B showed sustained PAT release for up to 56 days. A simple ethanol cleaning procedure after PAT deposition can remove the loosely bound drug crystals from the alloy surfaces and thereby allowing the remaining strongly bound drug molecules to be released at a sustained rate. The heat treatment after PAT coating further improved the stability of PAT on Co–Cr alloy and allowed the drug to be delivered at a much slower rate, especially during the initial 7 days. The specimens which were not cleaned in ethanol, Groups C and D, showed burst release. PAT coated Co–Cr alloy specimens were thoroughly characterized using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These techniques were collectively useful in studying the morphology, distribution, and attachment of PAT molecules on Co–Cr alloy surfaces. Thus, this study suggests the potential for delivering paclitaxel from Co–Cr alloy surfaces without using any carriers. PMID:20398928

Mani, Gopinath; Macias, Celia E.; Feldman, Marc D.; Marton, Denes; Oh, Sunho; Agrawal, C. Mauli

2014-01-01

87

Intranasal drug delivery for brain targeting.  

PubMed

Many drugs are not being effectively and efficiently delivered using conventional drug delivery approach to brain or central nervous system (CNS) due to its complexity. The brain and the central nervous system both have limited accessibility to blood compartment due to a number of barriers. Many advanced and effective approaches to brain delivery of drugs have emerged in recent years. Intranasal drug delivery is one of the focused delivery options for brain targeting, as the brain and nose compartments are connected to each other via the olfactory route and via peripheral circulation. Realization of nose to brain transport and the therapeutic viability of this route can be traced from the ancient times and has been investigated for rapid and effective transport in the last two decades. Various models have been designed and studied by scientists to establish the qualitative and quantitative transport through nasal mucosa to brain. The development of nasal drug products for brain targeting is still faced with enormous challenges. A better understanding in terms of properties of the drug candidate, nose to brain transport mechanism, and transport to and within the brain is of utmost importance. This review will discuss some pertinent issues to be considered and challenges to brain targeted intranasal drug delivery. A few marketed and investigational drug formulations will also be discussed. PMID:16305417

Vyas, Tushar K; Shahiwala, Aliasgar; Marathe, Sudhanva; Misra, Ambikanandan

2005-04-01

88

Magnetizable implants for targeted drug delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The capability to deliver high effective dosages to specific sites in the human body has become the holy grail of drug delivery research. Drugs with proven effectiveness under in vitro investigation often reach a major roadblock under in vivo testing due to a lack of an effective delivery strategy. In addition, many clinical scenarios require delivery of agents that are therapeutic at the desired delivery point, but otherwise systemically toxic. This project proposes a method for targeted drug delivery by applying high magnetic field gradients within the body to an injected superparamagnetic colloidal fluid carrying a drug, with the aid of modest uniform magnetic field. The design involves patterning of endovascular implants, such as coronary stents, with soft magnetic coatings capable of applying high local magnetic field gradients within the body. Examination of the feasibility of the design has been focused around the treatment of coronary restenosis following angioplasty. Drug-eluting stents, which have debuted in hospitals over the past two years, have thus far reduced restenosis rates to below 10%. Our local drug delivery system is a viable alternative or enhancement to drug-eluting stents, offering increased clinician control of dose size, the ability to treat a site repeatedly, and a wide array of applications for treatment of other pathologies. The theoretical models, parallel plate and pipe flow analysis, and cell culture models presented give insight into the use of micron and sub-micron scale magnetic particles for site-specific delivery of pharmaceuticals and magnetically labeled cells.

Forbes, Zachary Graham

89

Design and Characterization of PEG-Derivatized Vitamin E as a Nanomicellar Formulation for Delivery of Paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

Various PEG-Vitamin E conjugates including D-alpha-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate 1000 (TPGS) have been extensively studied as a nonionic surfactant in various drug delivery systems. However, limited information is available about the structure-activity relationship of PEG-Vitamin E conjugates as a micellar formulation for paclitaxel (PTX). In this study, four PEG-Vitamin E conjugates were developed that vary in the molecular weight of PEG (PEG2K vs PEG5K) and the molar ratio of PEG/Vitamin E (1/1 vs 1/2) in the conjugates. These conjugates were systematically characterized with respect to CMC, PTX loading efficiency, stability, and their efficiency in delivery of PTX to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data show that PEG5K-conjugates have lower CMC values and are more effective in PTX loading with respect to both loading capacity and stability. The conjugates with two Vitamin E molecules also worked better than the conjugates with one molecule of Vitamin E, particularly for PEG2K-system. Furthermore, all of the PEG-Vitamin E conjugates can inhibit P-gp function with their activity being comparable to that of TPGS. More importantly, PTX-loaded PEG5K-VE2 resulted in significantly improved tumor growth inhibitory effect in comparison to PTX formulated in PEG2K-VE or PEG2K-VE2, as well as Cremophor EL (Taxol) in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer (4T1.2). Our study suggests that PEG5K-Vitmin E2 may hold promise as an improved micellar formulation for in vivo delivery of anticancer agents such as PTX. PMID:23768151

Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Chen, Yichao; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Li, Song

2013-01-01

90

Self-assembled silk sericin/poloxamer nanoparticles as nanocarriers of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs for targeted delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In recent times self-assembled micellar nanoparticles have been successfully employed in tissue engineering for targeted drug delivery applications. In this review, silk sericin protein from non-mulberry Antheraea mylitta tropical tasar silk cocoons was blended with pluronic F-127 and F-87 in the presence of solvents to achieve self-assembled micellar nanostructures capable of carrying both hydrophilic (FITC-inulin) and hydrophobic (anticancer drug paclitaxel) drugs. The fabricated nanoparticles were subsequently characterized for their size distribution, drug loading capability, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Nanoparticle sizes ranged between 100 and 110 nm in diameter as confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Rapid uptake of these particles into cells was observed in in vitro cellular uptake studies using breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assay using paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles against breast cancer cells showed promising results comparable to free paclitaxel drugs. Drug-encapsulated nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by FACS and confocal microscopic studies using Annexin V staining. Up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cleavage of regulatory protein PARP through Western blot analysis suggested further drug-induced apoptosis in cells. This study projects silk sericin protein as an alternative natural biomaterial for fabrication of self-assembled nanoparticles in the presence of poloxamer for successful delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to target sites.

Mandal, Biman B.; Kundu, S. C.

2009-09-01

91

Therapeutic targeting of erbB3 with MM-121/SAR256212 enhances antitumor activity of paclitaxel against erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Introduction Elevated expression of erbB3 rendered erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells resistant to paclitaxel via PI-3 K/Akt-dependent upregulation of Survivin. It is unclear whether an erbB3-targeted therapy may abrogate erbB2-mediated paclitaxel resistance in breast cancer. Here, we study the antitumor activity of an anti-erbB3 antibody MM-121/SAR256212 in combination with paclitaxel against erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer. Methods Cell growth assays were used to determine cell viability. Cells undergoing apoptosis were quantified by a specific apoptotic ELISA. Western blot analyses were performed to assess the protein expression and activation. Lentiviral vector containing shRNA was used to specifically knockdown Survivin. Tumor xenografts were established by inoculation of BT474-HR20 cells into nude mice. The tumor-bearing mice were treated with paclitaxel and/or MM-121/SAR256212 to determine whether the antibody (Ab) enhances paclitaxel’s antitumor activity. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to study the combinatorial effects on tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis in vivo. Results MM-121 significantly facilitated paclitaxel-mediated anti-proliferative/anti-survival effects on SKBR3 cells transfected with a control vector or erbB3 cDNA. It specifically downregulated Survivin associated with inactivation of erbB2, erbB3, and Akt. MM-121 enhances paclitaxel-induced poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage, activation of caspase-8 and -3, and apoptosis in both paclitaxel-sensitive and -resistant cells. Specific knockdown of Survivin in the trastuzumab-resistant BT474-HR20 cells dramatically enhanced paclitaxel-induced apoptosis, suggesting that increased Survivin caused a cross-resistance to paclitaxel. Furthermore, the studies using a tumor xenograft model-established from BT474-HR20 cells revealed that either MM-121 (10 mg/kg) or low-dose (7.5 mg/kg) paclitaxel had no effect on tumor growth, their combinations significantly inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the combinations of MM-121 and paclitaxel significantly reduced the cells with positive staining for Ki-67 and Survivin, and increased the cells with cleaved caspase-3. Conclusions The combinations of MM-121 and paclitaxel not only inhibit tumor cell proliferation, but also promote erbB2-overexpressing breast cancer cells to undergo apoptosis via downregulation of Survivin in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that inactivation of erbB3 with MM-121 enhances paclitaxel-mediated antitumor activity against erbB2-overexpressing breast cancers. Our data supports further exploration of the combinatorial regimens consisting of MM-121 and paclitaxel in breast cancer patients with erbB2-overexpressing tumors, particularly those resistant to paclitaxel. PMID:24168763

2013-01-01

92

Paclitaxel Injection  

MedlinePLUS

... other medications. Paclitaxel injection manufactured with polyoxyethylated castor oil is used to treat ovarian cancer (cancer that ... and lung cancer. Paclitaxel injection with polyoxyethylated castor oil is also used to treat Kaposi's sarcoma (a ...

93

PEG-Derivatized Embelin as a Dual Functional Carrier for the Delivery of Paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

Embelin, identified primarily from the Embelia ribes plant, has been shown to be a natural small molecule inhibitor of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). It is also a potent inhibitor of NF-?B activation, which makes it a potentially effective suppressor of tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and inflammation. However, embelin itself is insoluble in water, which makes it unsuitable for in vivo applications. In this work, we developed a novel micelle system through conjugating embelin to a hydrophilic polymer, polyethylene glycol 3,500 (PEG3.5K) through an aspartic acid bridge. The PEG3.5k-embelin2 (PEG3.5k-EB2) conjugate readily forms micelles in aqueous solutions with a CMC of 0.0205mg/mL. Furthermore, PEG3.5k-EB2 micelles effectively solubilize paclitaxel (PTX), a model hydrophobic drug used in this study. Both drug-free and drug-loaded micelles were small in sizes (20 ~ 30 nm) with low polydispersity indexes. In vitro cytotoxicity studies with several tumor cell lines showed that PEG3.5k-EB2 is comparable to embelin in antitumor activity and synergizes with PTX at much lower doses. Our results suggest that PEG-derivatized embelin may represent a novel and dual-functional carrier to facilitate the in vivo applications of poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs such as PTX. PMID:22681537

Huang, Yixian; Lu, Jianqin; Gao, Xiang; Li, Jiang; Zhao, Wenchen; Sun, Ming; Stolz, Donna Beer; Venkataramanan, Raman; Rohan, Lisa Cencia; Li, Song

2012-01-01

94

Controlled delivery of paclitaxel from stent coatings using novel styrene maleic anhydride copolymer formulations.  

PubMed

The controlled release of paclitaxel (PTx) from stent coatings comprising an elastomeric polymer blended with a styrene maleic anhydride (SMA) copolymer is described. The coated stents were characterized for morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), and for drug release using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the extent of interaction between the PTx and polymers in the formulation. Coronary stents were coated with blends of poly(b-styrene-b-isobutylene-b-styrene) (SIBS) and SMA containing 7% or 14% maleic anhydride (MA) by weight. SEM examination of the stents showed that the coating did not crack or delaminate either before or after stent expansion. Examination of the coating surface via AFM after elution of the drug indicated that PTx resides primarily in the SMA phase and provided information about the mechanism of PTx release. The addition of SMA altered the release profile of PTx from the base elastomer coatings. In addition, the presence of the SMA enabled tunable release of PTx from the elastomeric stent coatings, while preserving mechanical properties. Thermal analysis reveled no shift in the glass transition temperatures for any of the polymers at all drug loadings studied, indicating that the PTx is not miscible with any component of the polymer blend. An in vivo evaluation indicated that biocompatibility and vascular response results for SMA/SIBS-coated stents (without PTx) are similar to results for SIBS-only-coated and bare stainless steel control stents when implanted in the non-injured coronary arteries of common swine for 30 and 90 days. PMID:18563805

Richard, Robert; Schwarz, Marlene; Chan, Ken; Teigen, Nikolai; Boden, Mark

2009-08-01

95

PEG-Farnesylthiosalicylate Conjugate as a Nanomicellar Carrier for Delivery of Paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

S-trans, trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) is a synthetic small molecule that acts as a potent and especially nontoxic Ras antagonist. It inhibits both oncogenically activated Ras and growth factor receptor-mediated Ras activation, resulting in the inhibition of Ras-dependent tumor growth. In this work, a FTS conjugate with polyethylene glycol (PEG) through a labile ester linkage, PEG5K-FTS2(L), was developed. PEG5K-FTS2 conjugate readily forms micelles in aqueous solutions with a critical micelle concentration of 0.68 ?M and hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel (PTX) could be effectively loaded into these particles. Both drug-free and PTX- loaded micelles were spherical in shape with a uniform size of 20 ~ 30 nm. The release of PTX from PTX-loaded PEG5K-FTS2 micelles was significantly slower than that from Taxol formulation. In vitro cytotoxicity studies with several tumor cell lines showed that PEG5K-FTS2(L) was comparable to FTS in antitumor activity. Western immunoblotting showed that total Ras levels were downregulated in several cancer cell lines treated with FTS or PEG5K-FTS2(L). The micellar formulation of PTX exhibited more in vitro cytotoxic activity against several tumor cell lines compared with free PTX, suggesting a possible synergistic effect between the carrier and the codelivered drug. The anti-tumor activity of the PTX loaded PEG5K-FTS2(L) micelles in a syngeneic murine breast cancer model was found to be significantly higher than that of Taxol, which may be attributed to their preferential tumor accumulation and a possible synergistic effect between PEG5K-FTS2 carrier and loaded PTX. PMID:23425093

Zhang, Xiaolan; Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Sun, Min; Stolz, Donna D.; Zhang, Lin; Li, Song

2013-01-01

96

AS1411 aptamer for targetable photosensitizer delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

A specialized G-quadruplex DNA aptamer with nucleolin targeting ability, AS1411, has been studied for cancer therapy. In this study, we report a novel delivery strategy for chemo-photodynamic combined treatment using AS1411 aptamer conjugated with tetra-(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphine by intercalation and outside binding. Our results show that the apt-TMP complex exhibited higher TMPyP4 accumulation in nucleolin over-expressing MCF-7 breast cancer cells than in

M. J. Shieh; Y. A. Shieh; P. S. Lai

2009-01-01

97

Synthesis and Evaluation of a Backbone Biodegradable Multiblock HPMA Copolymer Nanocarrier for the Systemic Delivery of Paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

The performance and safety of current antineoplastic agents, particularly water-insoluble drugs, are still far from satisfactory. For example, the currently widely used Cremophor EL®-based paclitaxel (PTX) formulation exhibits pharmacokinetic concerns and severe side effects. Thus, the concept of a biodegradable polymeric drug-delivery system, which can significantly improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce side effects is advocated. The present work aims to develop a new-generation of long-circulating, biodegradable carriers for effective delivery of PTX. First, a multiblock backbone biodegradable N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide(HPMA) copolymer- PTX conjugate (mP-PTX) with molecular weight (Mw) of 335 kDa was synthesized by RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer) copolymerization, followed by chain extension. In vitro studies on human ovarian carcinoma A2780 cells were carried out to investigate the cytotoxicity of free PTX, HPMA copolymer-PTX conjugate with Mw of 48 kDa (P-PTX), and mP-PTX. The experiments demonstrated that mP-PTX has a similar cytotoxic effect against A2780 cells as free PTX and P-PTX. To further compare the behavior of this new biodegradable conjugate (mP-PTX) with free PTX and P-PTX in vivo evaluation was performed using female nu/nu mice bearing orthotopic A2780 ovarian tumors. Pharmacokinetics study showed that high Mw mP-PTX was cleared more slowly from the blood than commercial PTX formulation and low Mw P-PTX. SPECT/CT imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated biodegradability as well as elimination of mP-PTX from the body. The tumors in the mP-PTX treated group grew more slowly than those treated with saline, free PTX, and P-PTX (single dose at 20 mg PTX/kg equivalent). Moreover, mice treated with mP-PTX had no obvious ascites and body-weight loss. Histological analysis indicated that mP-PTX had no toxicity in liver and spleen, but induced massive cell death in the tumor. In summary, this biodegradable drug delivery system has a great potential to improve performance and safety of current antineoplastic agents. PMID:23262201

Zhang, Rui; Luo, Kui; Yang, Jiyuan; Sima, Monika; Sun, Yongen; Janát-Amsbury, Margit M.; Kope?ek, Jind?ich

2012-01-01

98

Prophylactic cannabinoid administration blocks the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic nociception during analgesic treatment and following cessation of drug delivery  

PubMed Central

Background Chemotherapeutic treatment results in chronic pain in an estimated 30-40 percent of patients. Limited and often ineffective treatments make the need for new therapeutics an urgent one. We compared the effects of prophylactic cannabinoids as a preventative strategy for suppressing development of paclitaxel-induced nociception. The mixed CB1/CB2 agonist WIN55,212-2 was compared with the cannabilactone CB2-selective agonist AM1710, administered subcutaneously (s.c.), via osmotic mini pumps before, during, and after paclitaxel treatment. Pharmacological specificity was assessed using CB1 (AM251) and CB2 (AM630) antagonists. The impact of chronic drug infusion on transcriptional regulation of mRNA markers of astrocytes (GFAP), microglia (CD11b) and cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2) was assessed in lumbar spinal cords of paclitaxel and vehicle-treated rats. Results Both WIN55,212-2 and AM1710 blocked the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical and cold allodynia; anti-allodynic efficacy persisted for approximately two to three weeks following cessation of drug delivery. WIN55,212-2 (0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg/day s.c.) suppressed the development of both paclitaxel-induced mechanical and cold allodynia. WIN55,212-2-mediated suppression of mechanical hypersensitivity was dominated by CB1 activation whereas suppression of cold allodynia was relatively insensitive to blockade by either CB1 (AM251; 3 mg/kg/day s.c.) or CB2 (AM630; 3 mg/kg/day s.c.) antagonists. AM1710 (0.032 and 3.2 mg/kg /day) suppressed development of mechanical allodynia whereas only the highest dose (3.2 mg/kg/day s.c.) suppressed cold allodynia. Anti-allodynic effects of AM1710 (3.2 mg/kg/day s.c.) were mediated by CB2. Anti-allodynic efficacy of AM1710 outlasted that produced by chronic WIN55,212-2 infusion. mRNA expression levels of the astrocytic marker GFAP was marginally increased by paclitaxel treatment whereas expression of the microglial marker CD11b was unchanged. Both WIN55,212-2 (0.5 mg/kg/day s.c.) and AM1710 (3.2 mg/kg/day s.c.) increased CB1 and CB2 mRNA expression in lumbar spinal cord of paclitaxel-treated rats in a manner blocked by AM630. Conclusions and implications Cannabinoids block development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy and protect against neuropathic allodynia following cessation of drug delivery. Chronic treatment with both mixed CB1/CB2 and CB2 selective cannabinoids increased mRNA expression of cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2) in a CB2-dependent fashion. Our results support the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for suppressing chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in humans. PMID:24742127

2014-01-01

99

Biodistribution and Bioimaging Studies of Hybrid Paclitaxel Nanocrystals: Lessons Learned of the EPR Effect and Image-Guided Drug Delivery  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel (PTX) nanocrystals (200 nm) were produced by crystallization from solution. Antitumor efficacy and toxicity were examined through a survival study in a human HT-29 colon cancer xenograft murine model. The antitumor activity of the nanocrystal treatments was comparable with that by the conventional solubilization formulation (Taxol®), but yielded less toxicity as indicated by the result of survival study. Tritium-labeled PTX nanocrystals were further produced with a near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye physically integrated in the crystal lattice. Biodistribution and tumor accumulation of the tritium-labeled PTX nanocrystals were determined immediately after intravenous administration and up to 48 hours by scintillation counting. Whole-body optical imaging of animals was concurrently carried out; fluorescent intensities were also measured from excised tumors and major organs of euthanized animals. It was found that drug accumulation in the tumor was less than 1% of 20 mg/kg intravenous dose. Qualitatively correlation was identified between the biodistribution determined by using tritium-labeled particles and that using optical imaging, but quantitative divergence existed. The divergent results suggest possible ways to improve the design of hybrid nanocrystals for cancer therapy and diagnosis. The study also raises questions of the general role of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in tumor targeting and the effectiveness of bioimaging, specifically for hybrid nanocrystals, in tracking drug distribution and pharmacokinetics. PMID:23920039

Hollis, Christin P.; Weiss, Heidi L.; Leggas, Markos; Evers, B. Mark; Gemeinhart, Richard A.; Li, Tonglei

2013-01-01

100

Macromolecules in drug delivery Macromolecular targeting agents, carriers, and drugs  

E-print Network

Macromolecules in drug delivery Macromolecular targeting agents, carriers, and drugs 1gauthier@emt.inrs.ca #12;Why macromolecules in drug delivery? 2gauthier@emt.inrs.ca Classic chemotherapy Drug delivery? Targeting A carrier for small drugs A release mechanism (if necessary) Protection of drug cargo #12;How? 3

Barthelat, Francois

101

Tumor-targeted paclitaxel-loaded folate conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide) microparticles produced by supercritical fluid technology.  

PubMed

The new biodegradable diblock copolymers poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide) (PEG-PLLA) were synthesized and were chemically conjugated with folate (FA) in the PEG terminal ends to form FA-PEG-PLLA. Then the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel (PTX) loaded microparticles (PTX/FA-PEG-PLLA) were produced via solution enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids (SEDS). These microparticles exhibited sphere-like shape by scanning electron microscopy observation and showed narrow hydrodynamic size distributions by dynamic light scattering measurement. Drug loading of PTX loaded microparticles was about 7-9% and the encapsulation efficiency of PTX loaded microparticles was about 18-23%. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscope analyses revealed that fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled FA conjugated microparticles presented significantly higher cellular uptake than FA-free group due to the FA-receptor-mediated endocytosis. In vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that FA-PEG-PLLA expressed negligible cytotoxicity to mouse fibroblasts L929 cells. Moreover, PTX/FA-PEG-PLLA microparticles exhibited much higher anti-cancer efficacy than PTX/PEG-PLLA microparticles against human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells. Nude mice xenografted with SKOV3 cells were used in biodistribution studies, the results indicated that an increased amount of PTX was accumulated in the tumor tissue deal with PTX/FA-PEG-PLLA microparticles. These results collectively suggested that PTX/FA-PEG-PLLA microparticles prepared by SEDS would have potential in anti-tumor applications as a tumor-targeted drug delivery formulation. PMID:25649516

Huang, Xiaobei; Zhang, Yanzhi; Yin, Guangfu; Pu, Ximing; Liao, Xiaoming; Huang, Zhongbing; Chen, Xianchun; Yao, Yadong

2015-02-01

102

MiR-16 targets Bcl-2 in paclitaxel-resistant lung cancer cells and overexpression of miR-16 along with miR-17 causes unprecedented sensitivity by simultaneously modulating autophagy and apoptosis.  

PubMed

Non-small cell lung cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers as per as the mortality and occurrence is concerned. Paclitaxel based chemotherapeutic regimes are now used as an important option for the treatment of lung cancer. However, resistance of lung cancer cells to paclitaxel continues to be a major clinical problem nowadays. Despite impressive initial clinical response, most of the patients eventually develop some degree of paclitaxel resistance in the course of treatment. Previously, utilizing miRNA arrays we reported that downregulation of miR-17 is at least partly involved in the development of paclitaxel resistance in lung cancer cells by modulating Beclin-1 expression [1]. In this study, we showed that miR-16 was also significantly downregulated in paclitaxel resistant lung cancer cells. We demonstrated that anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was directly targeted miR-16 in paclitaxel resistant lung cancer cells. Moreover, in this report we showed that the combined overexpression of miR-16 and miR-17 and subsequent paclitaxel treatment greatly sensitized paclitaxel resistant lung cancer cells to paclitaxel by inducing apoptosis via caspase-3 mediated pathway. Combined overexpression of miR-16 and miR-17 greatly reduced Beclin-1 and Bcl-2 expressions respectively. Our results indicated that though miR-17 and miR-16 had no common target, both miR-16 and miR-17 jointly played roles in the development of paclitaxel resistance in lung cancer. miR-17 overexpression reduced cytoprotective autophagy by targeting Beclin-1, whereas overexpression of miR-16 potentiated paclitaxel induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. PMID:25435430

Chatterjee, Abhisek; Chattopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Chakrabarti, Gopal

2015-02-01

103

Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome  

PubMed Central

We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

2013-01-01

104

The Na+ /H+ exchanger (NHE1) as a novel co-adjuvant target in paclitaxel therapy of triple-negative breast cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Dysregulation of Na+ /H+ exchanger isoform one (NHE1) activity is a hallmark of cells undergoing tumorigenesis and metastasis, the leading cause of patient mortality. The acidic tumor microenvironment is thought to facilitate the development of resistance to chemotherapy drugs and to promote extracellular matrix remodeling leading to metastasis. Here, we investigated NHE1 as a co-adjuvant target in paclitaxel chemotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. We generated a stable NHE1-knockout of the highly invasive, triple-negative, MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The NHE1-knockout cells proliferated comparably to parental cells, but had markedly lower rates of migration and invasion in vitro. In vivo xenograft tumor growth in athymic nude mice was also dramatically decreased compared to parental MDA-MB-231 cells. Loss of NHE1 expression also increased the susceptibility of knockout cells to paclitaxel-mediated cell death. NHE1 inhibition, in combination with paclitaxel, resulted in a dramatic decrease in viability, and migratory and invasive potential of triple-negative breast cancer cells, but not in hormone receptor-positive, luminal MCF7 cells. Our data suggest that NHE1 is critical in triple-negative breast cancer metastasis, and its chemical inhibition boosts the efficacy of paclitaxel in vitro, highlighting NHE1 as a novel, potential co-adjuvant target in breast cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25514463

Amith, Schammim Ray; Wilkinson, Jodi Marie; Baksh, Shairaz; Fliegel, Larry

2015-01-01

105

Nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel: a limited improvement under the current therapeutic paradigm of pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab)-paclitaxel is paclitaxel linked to albumin nanoparticles, which makes it soluble and is an example of an application of nanotechnology for cancer treatment. The development of nanotechnology as a delivery system for nab-paclitaxel has improved the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of paclitaxel, in part by decreasing its hydrophobicity. Nab-paclitaxel in combination with gemcitabine has slightly improved survival in pancreatic cancer, compared to gemcitabine alone, as demonstrated in Phase III clinical trials. Cell cycle phase-specific drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel, which target cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, can only have limited efficacy since the vast majority of cells in a tumor are quiescent in G0/G1 phase. Recent advances in our laboratory on how to decoy cancer cells to cycle and then trap them in a sensitive phase of the cell cycle, can, in the hopefully near future, allow drugs such as nab-paclitaxel to have high efficacy, even in a treatment-resistant tumor such as pancreatic cancer. PMID:25887245

Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

2015-05-01

106

Paclitaxel-Conjugated PAMAM Dendrimers Adversely Affect Microtubule Structure through Two Independent Modes of Action  

E-print Network

in cultured cancer cells. Mechanisms of action responsible for this cytotoxicity are unknown, that is, whether is poorly water-soluble, it is currently solubilized in a mixture of polyethoxylated castor oil and ethanol cancer drug,1 making the design of a targeted delivery strategy using a water-soluble form of paclitaxel

Walter, Nils G.

107

Magnetizable implants for targeted drug delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

The capability to deliver high effective dosages to specific sites in the human body has become the holy grail of drug delivery research. Drugs with proven effectiveness under in vitro investigation often reach a major roadblock under in vivo testing due to a lack of an effective delivery strategy. In addition, many clinical scenarios require delivery of agents that are

Zachary Graham Forbes

2005-01-01

108

Nanoparticle-based biocompatible and targeted drug delivery: characterization and in vitro studies.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel nanoparticles (PAX NPs) prepared with the size of 110 ± 10 nm and ? potential of -40 ± 3 mV were encapsulated in synthetic/biomacromolecule shell chitosan, dextran-sulfate using a layer-by-layer self-assembly technique. Zeta potential measurements, analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy confirmed the successful adsorption of each layer. Surface modifications of these core-shell NPs were performed by covalently conjugating with poly(ethylene glycol) (H(2)N-PEG-carboxymethyl, M(w) 3400) and fluorescence labeled wheat germ agglutinin (F-WGA) to build a biocompatible and targeted drug delivery system. 32% of PAX was released from four bilayers of biomacromolecule assembled NPs within 8 h as compared with >85% of the drug released from the bare NPs. Moreover, high cell viability with PEG conjugation and high binding capacity of WGA-modified NPs with Caco-2 cells were observed. This biocompatible and targeted NP-based drug delivery system, therefore, may be considered as a potential candidate for the treatment of colonic cancer and other diseases. PMID:21786828

Yu, Xiao; Pishko, Michael V

2011-09-12

109

Tumor-targeted polydiacetylene micelles for in vivo imaging and drug delivery.  

PubMed

In vivo tumor targeting and drug delivery properties of small polymerized polydiacetylene (PDA) micelles (?10 nm) is investigated in a murine MDA-MB-231 xenograft model of breast cancer. Three micelles with different surface coatings are synthesized and tested for their ability to passively target tumor through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. After injection (24 h), fluorescence diffuse optical tomographic imaging indicates a tumor uptake of nearly 3% of the injected dose for the micelles with a 2 kDa poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-coating (PDA-PEG2000). The uptake of PDA micelles in tumors is confirmed by co-localization with [(18) F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography. Although FDG has a higher diffusion rate in tumors, 40 ± 19% of the retained micelles is co-registered with the tumor volume visualized by FDG. Finally, PDA-PEG2000 micelles are loaded with the hydrophobic anticancer drug paclitaxel and used in vivo to inhibit tumor growth. These findings demonstrate the potential of PDA-PEG2000 micelles for both in vivo tumor imaging and drug delivery applications. PMID:21837631

Mackiewicz, Nicolas; Gravel, Edmond; Garofalakis, Anikitos; Ogier, Julien; John, Jubi; Dupont, Daniel Miotto; Gombert, Karine; Tavitian, Bertrand; Doris, Eric; Ducongé, Frédéric

2011-10-01

110

Delayed onset of paresis in rats with experimental intramedullary spinal cord gliosarcoma following intratumoral administration of the paclitaxel delivery system OncoGel  

PubMed Central

Object Treatment options for anaplastic or malignant intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) remain limited. Paclitaxel has potent cytotoxicity against experimental intracranial gliomas and could be beneficial in the treatment of IMSCTs, but poor CNS penetration and significant toxicity limit its use. Such limitations could be overcome with local intratumoral delivery. Paclitaxel has been previously incorporated into a biodegradable gel depot delivery system (OncoGel) and in this study the authors evaluated the safety of intramedullary injections of OncoGel in rats and its efficacy against an intramedullary rat gliosarcoma. Methods Safety of intramedullary OncoGel was tested in 12 Fischer-344 rats using OncoGel concentrations of 1.5 and 6.0 mg/ml (5 ?l); median survival and functional motor scores (Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan [BBB] scale) were compared with those obtained with placebo (ReGel) and medium-only injections. Efficacy of OncoGel was tested in 61 Fischer-344 rats implanted with an intramedullary injection of 9L gliosarcoma containing 100,000 cells in 5 ?l of medium, and randomized to receive OncoGel administered on the same day (in 32 rats) or 5 days after tumor implantation (in 29 rats) using either 1.5 mg/ml or 3.0 mg/ml doses of paclitaxel. Median survival and BBB scores were compared with those of ReGel-treated and tumor-only rats. Animals were killed after the onset of deficits for histopathological analysis. Results OncoGel was safe for intramedullary injection in rats in doses up to 5 ?l of 3.0 mg/ml of paclitaxel; a dose of 5 ?l of 6.0 mg/ml caused rapid deterioration in BBB scores. OncoGel at concentrations of 1.5 mg/ml and 3.0 mg/ml paclitaxel given on both Day 0 and Day 5 prolonged median survival and preserved BBB scores compared with controls. OncoGel 1.5 mg/ml produced 62.5% long-term survivors when delivered on Day 0. A comparison between the 1.5 mg/ml and the 3.0 mg/ml doses showed higher median survival with the 1.5 mg/ml dose on Day 0, and no differences in median survival or BBB scores after treatment on Day 5. Conclusions OncoGel is safe for intramedullary injection in rats in doses up to 5 ?l of 3.0 mg/ml, prolongs median survival, and increases functional motor scores in rats challenged with an intramedullary gliosarcoma at the doses tested. This study suggests that locally delivered chemotherapeutic agents could be of temporary benefit in the treatment of malignant IMSCTs under experimental settings. PMID:22208429

Tyler, Betty M.; Hdeib, Alia; Caplan, Justin; Legnani, Federico G.; Fowers, Kirk D.; Brem, Henry; Jallo, George; Pradilla, Gustavo

2014-01-01

111

Overcoming drug-resistant lung cancer by paclitaxel loaded dual-functional liposomes with mitochondria targeting and pH-response.  

PubMed

Mitochondrion-orientated transportation of smart liposomes has been developed as a promising strategy to deliver anticancer drugs directly to tumor sites, and these have a tremendous potential for killing cancer cells, especially those with multidrug resistance (MDR). Herein we report a novel dual-functional liposome system possessing both extracellular pH response and mitochondrial targeting properties to enhance drug accumulation in mitochondria and trigger apoptosis of drug-resistant cancer cells. Briefly, peptide D[KLAKLAK]2 (KLA) was modified with 2, 3-dimethylmaleic anhydride (DMA) and combined with 1, 2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DSPE) to yield a DSPE-KLA-DMA (DKD) lipid. This dual-functional DKD was then mixed with other commercially available lipids to fabricate liposomes. In vitro anticancer efficacy of this liposome system was evaluated in human lung cancer A549 cells and drug-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells. At tumor extracellular pH (?6.8), liposomes could reverse their surface charge (negative to positive), facilitating liposome internalization. After cellular uptake, KLA peptide directed delivery-enabled selective accumulation of these liposomes into mitochondria and favored release of their cargo paclitaxel (PTX) into desired sites. Specifically, enhanced apoptosis of MDR cancer cells through mitochondrial signaling pathways was evidenced by release of cytochrome c and increased activity of caspase-9 and -3. These dual-functional liposomes had the greatest efficacy for treating A549 cells and A549/Taxol cells in vitro, and in treating drug-resistant lung cancer A549/Taxol cells xenografted onto nude mice (tumor growth inhibition 86.7%). In conclusion, dual-functional liposomes provide a novel and versatile approach for overcoming MDR in cancer treatment. PMID:25818419

Jiang, Lei; Li, Li; He, Xiaodan; Yi, Qiangying; He, Bin; Cao, Jun; Pan, Weisan; Gu, Zhongwei

2015-06-01

112

Giant Fullerenes for Target Specific Drug Delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Carbon nano-structures, such as giant fullerenes, have a great potential for biological and medical applications. Most of the previous research is dedicated to investigate the use of fullerenes as vehicles for carrying medication which is chemisorbed on the outside surface of the fullerenes. In contrast, using fullerenes as an enclosure was largely abandoned due to the high strength of the carbon-carbon bonds which has been perceived to prevent the rupturing of the fullerene to release their cargo. We performed atomistic computations based on classical force fields that will address this perception. Specifically we explore the physics and chemistry of OH functionalized carbon based giant fullerenes with diameters from 0.72 nm (60 atoms) to 5.7 nm (3840 atoms). The preliminary results show that OH functionalization on these fullerenes is not only viable but also provides a pH sensitive release mechanism. Furthermore our current results show that carbon-carbon bonds can be broken in low energy biological environments in the presence of a flow induced strain field. These insights may have implications for target specific drug delivery in general and cancer treatment in particular.

Courtney, Robert; Kiefer, Boris

2013-03-01

113

Decoration of polymeric micelles with cancer-specific peptide ligands for active targeting of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Polymeric micelles based on poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(?-caprolactone) PEO-b-PCL or poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(?-benzyl carboxylate-?-caprolactone) PEO-b-PBCL block copolymers were prepared and decorated with either c(RGDfK) or p160, a cancer cell-specific peptide ligand, on their surface. The cellular uptake of p160-decorated PEO-b-PBCL micelles containing DiI fluorescent label by MDA-MB-435 cancer cells was assessed and compared to that for c(RGDfK)-decorated micelles. The hydrophobic anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) was physically encapsulated into PEO-b-PCL or PEO-b-PBCL micelles (with and without peptide ligands) using a dialysis technique. The effect of the micellar formulation on the specificity of encapsulated PTX against cancer cells was assessed by investigating the in vitro cytotoxicity of free and encapsulated PTX against MDA-MB-435 cancer cell line versus two normal cells, Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC) and MCF10A cells, using the MTT assay. Our results showed both peptide ligands to facilitate the association of micelles with MDA-MB-435 cells. The p160-micelles, however showed better binding and internalizing in MDA-MB-435 cells than c(RGDfK)-micelles. In general, peptide decoration enhanced the selective cytotoxicity of encapsulated PTX against MDA-MB-435 cells over normal HUVEC and MCF10A cells. The extent of this increase in cancer cell specificity for encapsulated PTX was more for p160-decorated micelles than c(RGDfK)-decorated ones. PMID:21501865

Shahin, Mostafa; Ahmed, Sahar; Kaur, Kamaljit; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

2011-08-01

114

Metronomic Activity of CD44-Targeted Hyaluronic Acid-Paclitaxel in Ovarian Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose Most primary human ovarian tumors and peritoneal implants, as well as tumor vascular endothelial cells, express the CD44 family of cell surface proteoglycans, the natural ligand for which is hyaluronic acid (HA). Metronomic (MET) dosing, the frequent administration of chemotherapeutics at substantially lower than maximum tolerated doses (MTD), has been shown to result in reduced normal tissue toxicity and to minimize “off-treatment” exposure resulting in an improved therapeutic ratio. Experimental Design We tested the hypothesis that HA conjugates of paclitaxel (TXL; HA-TXL) would exert strong anti-tumor effects with MET dosing and induce anti-angiogenic effects superior to those achieved with MTD administration or with free TXL. Female nude mice bearing SKOV3ip1 or HeyA8 ovarian cancer cells were treated intraperitoneally (ip) with MET HA-TXL regimens (or MTD administration to determine therapeutic and biological effects. Results All MET HA-TXL-treated mice and the MTD group revealed significantly reduced tumor weights and nodules compared to controls (all p values < 0.05) in the chemotherapy-sensitive models. However, the MTD HA-TXL-treated mice showed significant weight loss compared to control mice, whereas body weights were not affected in the MET groups in HeyA8-MDR model, reflecting reduced toxicity. In the taxane-resistant HeyA8-MDR model, significant reduction in tumor weight and nodule counts was noted in the MET groups, whereas the response of the MTD group did not achieve significance. While both MTD and MET regimens reduced proliferation (Ki-67) and increased apoptosis (TUNEL), only MET treatment resulted in significant reductions in angiogenesis (CD31, microvessel density). Moreover, MET treatment resulted in substantial increases in thrombospondin-1 (Tsp-1), an inhibitor of angiogenesis. Conclusions This study demonstrated that MET HA-TXL regimens have substantial antitumor activity in ovarian carcinoma, likely via a predominant anti-angiogenic mechanism. PMID:22693353

Lee, Sun Joo; Ghosh, Sukhen C.; Han, Hee Dong; Stone, Rebecca L.; Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Shen, De Yue; Auzenne, Edmond J.; Lopez-Araujo, Alejandro; Lu, Chunhua; Nishimura, Masato; Pecot, Chad V.; Zand, Behrouz; Thanapprapasr, Duangmani; Jennings, Nicholas B; Kang, Yu; Huang, Jie; Hu, Wei; Klostergaard, Jim; Sood, Anil K.

2013-01-01

115

Reversal of lung cancer multidrug resistance by pH-responsive micelleplexes mediating co-delivery of siRNA and paclitaxel.  

PubMed

The recent advances in RNA interference (RNAi) technology provided novel and promising solutions for human cancer treatment. In this study, the application of dual pH-responsive cationic micellar nanoparticles for small interfering RNA (siRNA) and paclitaxel (PTX) co-delivery to overcome cancer multidrug resistance (MDR) is reported. The in vitro siRNA transfection shows that siRNA-luciferase (Luc) loaded micelleplexes efficiently silences Luc expression in various carcinoma cell lines. The Luc knockdown ability of the micelleplexes can be enhanced by choloquine (CQ) co-incubation. However, is abolished by bafilomycin-A1 (Baf-A1) treatment. The micelleplexes are further exploited for co-delivery of siRNA-Bcl-2 and PTX to Bcl-2 overexpressing A549 lung cancer cells (A549-Bcl-2). The experimental results show that the micelleplexes could sensitize A549-Bcl-2 cells to PTX via down-regulation of anti-apoptosis gene of Bcl-2, suggesting that PDMA-b-PDPA micelleplexes are promising nanovectors for siRNA and anti-cancer drug co-delivery to overcome cancer MDR. PMID:23966347

Yu, Haijun; Xu, Zhiai; Chen, Xianzhi; Xu, Leilei; Yin, Qi; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

2014-01-01

116

Nanoparticle albumin-bound-Paclitaxel in the treatment of metastatic urethral adenocarcinoma: the significance of molecular profiling and targeted therapy.  

PubMed

Primary urethral cancer is rare and accounts for only 0.003% of all malignancies arising from the female genitourinary tract. Due to the rarity of this disease, no consensus exists regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of malignancies including metastatic breast, pancreatic, and bladder cancer. We present a 67-year-old woman with advanced metastatic urethral adenocarcinoma resistant to two lines of chemotherapy (ifosfamide/paclitaxel/cisplatin and irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/leucovorin) that showed a dramatic response to nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel. This is the first case report to document the use and efficacy of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in the treatment of unresectable metastatic urethral cancer. PMID:25202467

Abaza, Yasmin M; Alemany, Carlos

2014-01-01

117

Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound-Paclitaxel in the Treatment of Metastatic Urethral Adenocarcinoma: The Significance of Molecular Profiling and Targeted Therapy  

PubMed Central

Primary urethral cancer is rare and accounts for only 0.003% of all malignancies arising from the female genitourinary tract. Due to the rarity of this disease, no consensus exists regarding the optimal therapeutic approach. Nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel has been shown to be effective in the treatment of a number of malignancies including metastatic breast, pancreatic, and bladder cancer. We present a 67-year-old woman with advanced metastatic urethral adenocarcinoma resistant to two lines of chemotherapy (ifosfamide/paclitaxel/cisplatin and irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/leucovorin) that showed a dramatic response to nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel. This is the first case report to document the use and efficacy of nanoparticle albumin-bound-paclitaxel in the treatment of unresectable metastatic urethral cancer. PMID:25202467

Abaza, Yasmin M.; Alemany, Carlos

2014-01-01

118

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Targeted delivery to inflammatory monocytes for  

E-print Network

mouse Ly6Chigh monocyte subset and its human counterpart, defined as CD14+ CD16- , represent a valuablePOSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Targeted delivery to inflammatory monocytes for efficient RNAi evidences for the selective delivery of a siRNA-containing lipid formulation to the Ly-6Chigh monocyte

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

Intraperitoneal delivery of paclitaxel by poly(ether-anhydride) microspheres effectively suppresses tumor growth in a murine metastatic ovarian cancer model.  

PubMed

Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy is more effective than systemic chemotherapy for treating advanced ovarian cancer, but is typically associated with severe complications due to high dose, frequent administration schedule, and use of non-biocompatible excipients/delivery vehicles. Here, we developed paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microspheres composed of di-block copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(sebacic acid) (PEG-PSA) for safe and sustained IP chemotherapy. PEG-PSA microspheres provided efficient loading (~ 13% w/w) and prolonged release (~ 13 days) of PTX. In a murine ovarian cancer model, a single dose of IP PTX/PEG-PSA particles effectively suppressed tumor growth for more than 40 days and extended the median survival time to 75 days compared to treatments with Taxol(®) (47 days) or IP placebo particles (34 days). IP PTX/PEG-PSA was well tolerated, with only minimal to mild inflammation. Our findings support PTX/PEG-PSA microspheres as a promising drug delivery platform for IP therapy of ovarian cancer, and potentially other metastatic peritoneal cancers. PMID:24816829

Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wood, Joseph; Wang, Ying-Ying; Tang, Benjamin C; Zeng, Qi; Simons, Brian W; Fu, Jie; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Lai, Samuel K; Wu, T-C; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

2014-04-01

120

Intraperitoneal delivery of paclitaxel by poly(ether-anhydride) microspheres effectively suppresses tumor growth in a murine metastatic ovarian cancer model  

PubMed Central

Intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy is more effective than systemic chemotherapy for treating advanced ovarian cancer, but is typically associated with severe complications due to high dose, frequent administration schedule, and use of non-biocompatible excipients/delivery vehicles. Here, we developed paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded microspheres composed of di-block copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(sebacic acid) (PEG-PSA) for safe and sustained IP chemotherapy. PEG-PSA microspheres provided efficient loading (~ 13% w/w) and prolonged release (~ 13 days) of PTX. In a murine ovarian cancer model, a single dose of IP PTX/PEG-PSA particles effectively suppressed tumor growth for more than 40 days and extended the median survival time to 75 days compared to treatments with Taxol® (47 days) or IP placebo particles (34 days). IP PTX/PEG-PSA was well tolerated, with only minimal to mild inflammation. Our findings support PTX/PEG–PSA microspheres as a promising drug delivery platform for IP therapy of ovarian cancer, and potentially other metastatic peritoneal cancers. PMID:24816829

Yang, Ming; Yu, Tao; Wood, Joseph; Wang, Ying-Ying; Tang, Benjamin C.; Zeng, Qi; Simons, Brian W.; Fu, Jie; Chuang, Chi-Mu; Lai, Samuel K.; Wu, T.-C.; Hung, Chien-Fu; Hanes, Justin

2014-01-01

121

Targeted Drug Delivery Systems for Cancer Therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

The role of cyclodextrin’s (CD) in drug delivery has advanced in recent years and this may be attributed to its biocompatibility and well established synthesis. Chemical modification of CDs has shown to extend the physicochemical properties and the host capacity for a variety of drugs. ?-CD has been widely used in the early stages of pharmaceutical applications because of its

Antonio Clementi; Christine OConnor; Mary McNamara; A. Mazzaglia; M. C. Aversa; A. Giuffrida

2008-01-01

122

Well-defined polymer-drug conjugate engineered with redox and pH-sensitive release mechanism for efficient delivery of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

The synthesis of polymer-drug conjugate (PDC) capable of convenient preparation and controlled release of therapeutic agents is still an urgent requirement in drug delivery field. Herein, we develop a novel anti-cancer PDC engineered with side groups of disulfide and ester bonds for on-demand delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) with redox and pH dual sensitive behaviors. A simple polymer, 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-lysine) (mPEG-b-P(LL-DTPA)), was synthesized and PTX was directly conjugated to the carboxyl groups of mPEG-b-P(LL-DTPA) to obtain the disulfide-containing polymer-PTX conjugate (P(L-SS-PTX)). Another structural similar polymer-PTX conjugate without disulfide bonds (P(L-PTX)) was also prepared to verify the function of disulfide linkages. The P(L-SS-PTX) micelles showed rapid drug release under tumor-relevant reductive conditions as designed. Interestingly, the PTX release from P(L-SS-PTX) micelles could also be promoted by the increased acidity (pH ? 5). In vitro cytotoxicity study showed that the P(L-SS-PTX) micelles exhibited significantly enhanced cytotoxicity against a variety of tumor cells compared to the non-sensitive P(L-PTX) micelles. The in vivo studies on B16F1 melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice demonstrated the superior antitumor activity of P(L-SS-PTX) over both free PTX and P(L-PTX). This dual-sensitive prodrug provides a useful strategy for anti-tumor drug delivery. PMID:25220162

Lv, Shixian; Tang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Dawei; Song, Wantong; Li, Mingqiang; Lin, Jian; Liu, Huaiyu; Chen, Xuesi

2014-11-28

123

Subcellular targeting strategies for drug design and delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many drug targets are localized to particular subcellular compartments, yet current drug design strategies are focused on bioavailability and tissue targeting and rarely address drug delivery to specific intracellular compartments. Insights into how the cell traffics its constituents to these different cellular locations could improve drug design. In this Review, we explore the fundamentals of membrane trafficking and subcellular organization,

Lawrence Rajendran; Hans-Joachim Knölker; Kai Simons

2010-01-01

124

Tumor Regression by Targeted Gene Delivery to the  

E-print Network

Tumor Regression by Targeted Gene Delivery to the Neovasculature John D. Hood,1 Mark Bednarski,2 to an integrin v 3­targeting ligand can deliver genes selectively to angiogenic blood vessels in tumor factors. Systemic injection of the NP into mice resulted in apoptosis of the tumor- associated endothelium

Gleeson, Joseph G.

125

Targeted Nanomedicine for Suppression of CD44 and Simultaneous Cell Death Induction in Ovarian Cancer: an Optimal Delivery of siRNA and Anticancer Drug  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The proposed project is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of epithelial ovarian cancer treatment and reducing adverse side effects of chemotherapy using nanotechnology. Overexpression of the CD44 membrane receptor results in tumor initiation, growth, tumor stem cells specific behavior, development of drug resistance, and metastases. We hypothesize that a developed cancer targeted delivery system which combines CD44 siRNA with paclitaxel would successfully deliver its payload inside cancer cells, effectively induce cell death, and prevent metastases. Experimental Design: We synthesized, characterized, and tested a nanoscale-based drug delivery system containing a modified Polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer as a carrier; anticancer drug paclitaxel as a cell death inducer; a synthetic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide as a tumor targeting moiety, and siRNA targeted to CD44 mRNA. The proposed NDDS was tested in vitro and in vivo using metastatic ovarian cancer cells isolated from patients with malignant ascites. Results: We found that in contrast to cells isolated from primary tumors, CD44 was highly overexpressed in metastatic cancer cells. Treatment with the proposed tumor-targeted nanoscale-based nucleic acid and drug delivery system led to the suppression of CD44 mRNA and protein, efficient induction of cell death, effective tumor shrinkage, and prevention of adverse side effects on healthy organs. Conclusion: We show a high therapeutic potential for combinatorial treatment of ovarian carcinoma with a novel drug delivery system that effectively transports siRNA targeting to CD44 mRNA simultaneously with cytotoxic agents. PMID:24036854

Shah, Vatsal; Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Taratula, Olena R.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Minko, Tamara

2013-01-01

126

Synthesis and optimization of a novel polymeric micelle based on hyaluronic acid and phospholipids for delivery of paclitaxel, in vitro and in-vivo evaluation.  

PubMed

Novel polymeric micelles were synthesized based on hyaluronic acid (HA) and phospholipids (PEs) including 1,2-dimiristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) and 1,2-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE). The newly developed micelles evaluated for the physicochemical properties including structural analysis by means of FTIR. Micelles were optimized for delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). The D-optimal design was applied in order to reach micelles with high entrapment efficiency (EE %) and minimum size, simultaneously. In this design the independent variables were the co-polymer type, the drug to polymer ratio and the formulation temperature, whereas the dependent variables were EE% and micelle size. The EE% of the optimized micelles was 46.8% and 59.9% for HA-DMPE and HA-DSPE micelles, respectively. The size of the optimized micelles was in the range of around 250 nm. In vitro release study of the optimized micelles showed that PTX was released from HA-DMPE and HA-DSPE micelles as long as 23 h and 34 h, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies showed a conversion of the crystalline PTX molecules into the amorphous form in the micelles. In vivo real time image analysis showed that micellar system was mostly accumulated in the liver, spleen and heart. Accelerated stability studies represented that PTX loaded micelle formulations were stable both physically and chemically at least in 6 months' time. PMID:25148729

Saadat, Ebrahim; Amini, Mohsen; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Dorkoosh, Farid A

2014-11-20

127

Oral delivery of paclitaxel nanocrystal (PNC) with a dual Pgp-CYP3A4 inhibitor: preparation, characterization and antitumor activity.  

PubMed

Several molecular inheritances have severely restrained the peroral delivery of taxanes. The main objective of the present investigation was to develop a paclitaxel (PTX) formulation which can circumvent the hurdles of its extremely poor solubility and permeability, Pgp efflux and high pre-systemic metabolism. Positively charged PTX nanocrystals of 209 nm were prepared by sonoprecipitation with high pressure homogenization technique, wherein an arginine based surfactant was explored as a stabilizer. The BET surface area analysis revealed that the surface area of PNC was 8.53 m(2)/gm, reflecting significant rise in surface area with nanonization of PTX. The DSC and XRD pattern suggested that the PTX is in the form of the most stable dihydrate crystal. The PNC showed very rapid dissolution profile compared to plain PTX in both sinks and non-sink conditions. Clarithromycin (CLM) was evaluated as a better alternative to cyclosporin A in improving PTX permeability. The PNC-CLM showed remarkable enhancement of 453% in relative bioavailability along with maintaining the therapeutic concentration of PTX for 8h. Efficacy data in B16 F10 melanoma tumor bearing mice showed substantial reduction in tumor volume and improvement in percentage survival compared to the control group. PMID:24954663

Patel, Ketan; Patil, Anand; Mehta, Miten; Gota, Vikram; Vavia, Pradeep

2014-09-10

128

Biomineralized anisotropic gold microplate-macrophage interactions reveal frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon: a novel paclitaxel drug delivery vehicle.  

PubMed

This study reports a facile biomineralization route for gold microplates (GMPs) synthesis using bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a reductant and stabilizing agent. Adding BSA to HAuCl4 solution yields spontaneous versatile anisotropic and partially hollow GMPs upon aging. We hypothesize that the instantaneous protein denaturation at low pH enabled access to serine and threonine hydroxyl, and sulfhydryl groups of BSA, which act as a reductant and stabilizer, respectively. This reaction could be hastened by increasing the temperature well beyond 65 °C. Transmission electron microscopy/X-ray diffraction studies revealed highly crystalline and anisotropic structures (triangle, pentagon, and rectangle). Atomic force microscopy/scanning electron microscopy analyses demonstrated unique morphology of microplates with a partially void core and BSA mineralized edge structure. RAW 264.7 mice peritoneal macrophage-microplate interaction studies using live cell confocal imaging reveal that cells are capable of selectively internalizing smaller GMPs. Large GMPs are preferentially picked with sharp vertices but cannot be internalized and exhibit frustrated phagocytosis-like phenomenon. We explored particle phagocytosis as an actin mediated process that recruits phagosome-like acidic organelles, shown by a lysosensor probe technique. The biocompatible GMPs exhibited ?70% paclitaxel (PCL) loading and sustained release of PCL, showing antitumor activity with the MCF-7 cell line, and could be a novel drug carrier for breast cancer therapy. PMID:25046687

Singh, Ajay Vikram; Batuwangala, Madu; Mundra, Ruchir; Mehta, Krunal; Patke, Sanket; Falletta, Ermelinda; Patil, Rajendra; Gade, W N

2014-08-27

129

Comparison of active, passive and magnetic targeting to tumors of multifunctional paclitaxel/SPIO-loaded nanoparticles for tumor imaging and therapy.  

PubMed

Multifunctional nanoparticles combining therapy and imaging have the potential to improve cancer treatment by allowing personalized therapy. Herein, we aimed to compare in vivo different strategies in terms of targeting capabilities: (1) passive targeting via the EPR effect, (2) active targeting of ?v?3 integrin via RGD grafting, (3) magnetic targeting via a magnet placed on the tumor and (4) the combination of magnetic targeting and active targeting of ?v?3 integrin. For a translational approach, PLGA-based nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel and superparamagnetic iron oxides were used. Electron Spin Resonance spectroscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) were used to both quantify and visualize the accumulation of multifunctional nanoparticles into the tumors. We demonstrate that compared to untargeted or single targeted nanoparticles, the combination of both active strategy and magnetic targeting drastically enhanced (i) nanoparticle accumulation into the tumor tissue with an 8-fold increase compared to passive targeting (1.12% and 0.135% of the injected dose, respectively), (ii) contrast in MRI (imaging purpose) and (iii) anti-cancer efficacy with a median survival time of 22 days compared to 13 for the passive targeting (therapeutic purpose). Double targeting of nanoparticles to tumors by different mechanisms could be a promising translational approach for the management of therapeutic treatment and personalized therapy. PMID:25178270

Schleich, Nathalie; Po, Chrystelle; Jacobs, Damien; Ucakar, Bernard; Gallez, Bernard; Danhier, Fabienne; Préat, Véronique

2014-11-28

130

CYCLOSTREPTIN DERIVATIVES SPECIFICALLY TARGET CELLULAR TUBULIN AND FURTHER MAP THE PACLITAXEL SITE†  

PubMed Central

Cyclostreptin is the first microtubule stabilizing agent whose mechanism of action was discovered to involve formation of a covalent bond with tubulin. Treatment of cells with cyclostreptin irreversibly stabilizes their microtubules because cyclostreptin forms a covalent bond to ?-tubulin at either the T220 or the N228 residue, located, respectively, at the microtubule pore and luminal taxoid binding sites. Due to its unique mechanism of action, cyclostreptin overcomes P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in tumor cells. We used a series of reactive cyclostreptin analogues, 6-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, 8-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, and [14C-acetyl]-8-acetyl-cyclostreptin, to characterize the cellular target of the compound and to map the binding site. The three analogues were cytotoxic and stabilized microtubules in both sensitive and multidrug resistant tumor cells. In both types of cells, we identified ?-tubulin as the only or the predominantly labeled cellular protein, indicating that a covalent binding to microtubules is sufficient to prevent drug efflux mediated by P-glycoprotein. 6-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, 8-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin, and 8-acetyl-cyclostreptin labeled both microtubules and unassembled tubulin at a single residue of the same tryptic peptide of ?-tubulin as was labeled by cyclostreptin (219-LTTPTYGDLNHLVSATMSGVTTCLR-243), but labeling with the analogues occurred at different positions of the peptide. 8-Acetyl-cyclostreptin reacted either with T220 or N228, as did the natural product, while 8-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin formed a cross link to C241. Finally 6-chloroacetyl-cyclostreptin reacted with any one of the three residues, thus labeling the pathway for cyclostreptin-like compounds, leading from the pore where these compounds enter the microtubule to the luminal binding pocket. PMID:22148836

Calvo, Enrique; Barasoain, Isabel; Matesanz, Ruth; Pera, Benet; Camafeita, Emilio; Pineda, Oriol; Hamel, Ernest; Vanderwal, Christopher D.; Andreu, José Manuel; López, Juan A.; Díaz, José Fernando

2012-01-01

131

Nanoparticles for oral delivery: Targeted nanoparticles with peptidic ligands for oral protein delivery  

PubMed Central

As the field of biotechnology has advanced, oral protein delivery has also made significant progress. Oral delivery is the most common method of drug administration with high levels of patient acceptance. Despite the preference of oral delivery, administration of therapeutic proteins has been extremely difficult. Increasing the bioavailability of oral protein drugs to the therapeutically acceptable level is still a challenging goal. Poor membrane permeability, high molecular weight, and enzymatic degradation of protein drugs have remained unsolved issues. Among diverse strategies, nanotechnology has provided a glimpse of hope in oral delivery of protein drugs. Nanoparticles have advantages, such as small size, high surface area, and modification using functional groups for high capacity or selectivity. Nanoparticles with peptidic ligands are especially worthy of notice because they can be used for specific targeting in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This article reviews the transport mechanism of the GI tract, barriers to protein absorption, current status and limitations of nanotechnology for oral protein delivery system. PMID:23123292

Yun, Yeonhee; Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Kinam

2012-01-01

132

Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery  

PubMed Central

Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain drug and non-functionalized nanosystems in delivering therapeutic agents to mitochondria. Although the field is in its infancy, studies to date suggest the superior therapeutic activity of functionalized nanosystems for treating mitochondrial defects. PMID:22138492

Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

2011-01-01

133

Colon Targeted Delivery Systems: Review of Polysaccharides for Encapsulation and Delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Colon-targeted delivery of bioactives has recently gained importance in addressing specific needs in the therapy of colon-based diseases. Many approaches have been attempted for the development of colon-specific delivery systems, with not much success in the past. Recent research into the utilization of the metabolic activity and the colonic microenvironment in the lower gastrointestinal tract has attained great value in

Shantha L. Kosaraju

2005-01-01

134

IFE Target Fabrication, Delivery, and Cost Estimates  

E-print Network

development is an essential component of any inertial fusion concept... · Three main IFE concepts - Strong-effective target supply for inertial fusion energy", Nuclear Fusion 44 (2004). 160' 100' QA/QC Lab Control Room- concentricity (NC) is a "wall uniformity" defect 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 % Non

135

PEG-Derivatized Embelin as a Nanomicellar Carrier For Delivery of Paclitaxel to Breast and Prostate Cancers  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for a wide spectrum of cancers, but its therapeutic benefit is often limited by severe side effects. We have developed a micelle-based PTX formulation based on a simple conjugate derived from polyethylene glycol 5000 (PEG5K) and embelin (EB). Embelin is a natural product and exhibits antitumor activity through blocking the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). PEG5K-EB2 conjugate self-assembles to form stable micelles in aqueous solution and efficiently encapsulates hydrophobic drugs such as PTX. PEG5K-EB2 micelles have a relatively low CMC of 0.002mg/mL (0.35?M) with sizes in the range of 20 ~ 30 nm with or without loaded PTX. In vitro cell uptake study showed that the PEG5K-EB2 micelles were efficiently taken up by tumor cells. In vitro release study showed that PTX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles was slowly released over 5 days with much slower release kinetics than that of Taxol formulation. PTX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than Taxol in several cultured tumor cell lines. Total body near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging showed that PEG5K-EB2 micelles were selectively accumulated at tumor site with minimal uptake in major organs including liver and spleen. PTX-loaded PEG5K-EB2 micelles demonstrated an excellent safety profile with a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 100–120 mg PTX/kg in mice, which was significantly higher than that for Taxol (15–20 mg PTX/kg). Finally, PTX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles showed superior anti-tumor activity compared to Taxol in murine models of breast and prostate cancers. PMID:23182923

Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Marquez, Rebecca T.; Meng, Xiaojie; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Zhou; Li, Song

2012-01-01

136

Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle  

DOEpatents

The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

2012-08-28

137

Targeted drug delivery and enhanced intracellular release using functionalized liposomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to target cancer cells using an appropriate drug delivery system can significantly reduce the associated side effects from cancer therapies and can help in improving the overall quality of life, post cancer survival. Integrin alpha5beta1 is expressed on several types of cancer cells, including colon cancer and plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, the

Ashish Garg

2009-01-01

138

Development of colon targeted drug delivery systems for mebendazole  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of the present study is to develop colon targeted drug delivery systems for mebendazole using guar gum as a carrier. Matrix tablets containing various proportions of guar gum were prepared by wet granulation technique using starch paste as a binder. The tablets were evaluated for drug content uniformity, and were subjected to in vitro drug release studies. The

Y. S. R Krishnaiah; P Veer Raju; B Dinesh Kumar; P Bhaskar; V Satyanarayana

2001-01-01

139

Self-Assembling Peptide Amphiphiles for Targeted Drug Delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The systemic delivery of therapeutics is currently limited by off-target side effects and poor drug uptake into the cells that need to be treated. One way to circumvent these issues is to target the delivery and release of therapeutics to the desired location while limiting systemic toxicity. Using self-assembling peptide amphiphiles (PAs), this work has investigated supramolecular nanostructures for the development of targeted therapies. Specifically, the research has focused on the interrelationships between presentation of targeting moeities and the control of nanostructure morphology in the context of systemic delivery for targeting cancer and vascular injuries. The self-assembly region of the PA was systematically altered to achieve control of nanostructure widths, from 100 nm to 10 nm, by the addition of valine-glutamic acid dimers into the chemical structure, subsequently increasing the degree of nanostructure twist. For the targeting of tumors, a homing PA was synthesized to include a dimeric, cyclic peptide sequence known to target the cancer-specific, death receptor 5 (DR5) and initiate apoptosis through the oligomerization of DR5. This PA presented a multivalent display of DR5-binding peptides, resulting in improved binding affinity measured by surface plasmon resonance. The DR5-targeting PA also showed enhanced efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo tumor models relative to non-targeted controls. Alternative modifications to the PA-based antitumor therapies included the use of a cytotoxic, membrane-lytic PA coassembled with a pegylated PA, which showed enhanced biodistribution and in vivo activity after coassembly. The functionalization of the hydrophobic core was also accomplished through the encapsulation of the chemotherapy camptothecin, which was shown to be an effective treatment in vivo. Additionally, a targeted PA nanostructure was designed to bind to the site of vascular intervention by targeting collagen IV. Following balloon angioplasty, targeted PA nanofibers showed enhanced binding by fluorescence relative to spherical micelles with the same targeting sequence, demonstrating the importance of nanostructure shape for vascular binding. Nitric oxide was functionalized onto the PA nanostructure through the S-nitrosylation (SNO) of a cysteine residue. Two weeks after vascular injury, the SNO-functionalized, targeted nanofibers showed significantly decreased levels of restenosis. In all treatment methods described, the control of multivalency through the tuning of supramolecular structure was essential to achieve optimal binding. Understanding the role of dynamic, supramolecular structures for the systemic delivery of peptide therapeutics should be an important focus of future work.

Moyer, Tyson

140

Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery  

SciTech Connect

Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without motion. The BSD plan was also delivered on the phantom that moved with the prescheduled pattern and synchronized with the delivery of each beam. Film dosimetry showed underdose and overdose in the superior and inferior regions of the target, respectively, if the tumor motion is not compensated during the delivery. BSD delivery resulted in a dose distribution very similar to the planned treatments.

Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumant Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2006-11-15

141

Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery.  

PubMed

Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without motion. The BSD plan was also delivered on the phantom that moved with the prescheduled pattern and synchronized with the delivery of each beam. Film dosimetry showed underdose and overdose in the superior and inferior regions of the target, respectively, if the tumor motion is not compensated during the delivery. BSD delivery resulted in a dose distribution very similar to the planned treatments. PMID:17153412

Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang, Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh

2006-11-01

142

Hydrotropic polymeric mixed micelles based on functional hyperbranched polyglycerol copolymers as hepatoma-targeting drug delivery system.  

PubMed

Mixed copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) self-assembled from ?-cyclodextrin-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-CD) and lactobionic acid (LA)-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-LA) were applied as carriers for a hydrophobic antitumor drug, paclitaxel (PTX), achieving hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted delivery. The resulting NPs exhibited high drug loading capacity and substantial stability in aqueous solution. In vitro drug release studies demonstrated a controlled drug release profile with increased release at acidic pH. Remarkably, tumor proliferation assays showed that PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs inhibited asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor positive HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in comparison with ASGP receptor negative BGC-823 cells. Moreover, the competition assay demonstrated that the small molecular LA inhibited the cellular uptake of the PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs, indicating the ASGP receptor-mediated endocytosis in HepG2 cells. In addition, the intracellular uptake tests by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the mixed copolymer NPs were more efficiently taken up by HepG2 cells compared with HPG-g-CD NPs. These results suggest a feasible application of the mixed copolymer NPs as nanocarriers for hepatoma-targeted delivery of potent antitumor drugs. PMID:23132353

Zhang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Xinge; Yu, Peien; Han, Yucai; Li, Yangguang; Li, Chaoxing

2013-01-01

143

Polysaccharide-Gold Nanocluster Supramolecular Conjugates as a Versatile Platform for the Targeted Delivery of Anticancer Drugs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Through the high affinity of the ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.

Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

2014-02-01

144

Polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates as a versatile platform for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs.  

PubMed

Through the high affinity of the ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) cavity for adamantane moieties, novel polysaccharide-gold nanocluster supramolecular conjugates (HACD-AuNPs) were successfully constructed from gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) bearing adamantane moieties and cyclodextrin-grafted hyaluronic acid (HACD). Due to their porous structure, the supramolecular conjugates could serve as a versatile and biocompatible platform for the loading and delivery of various anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX), paclitaxel (PTX), camptothecin (CPT), irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT-11), and topotecan hydrochloride (TPT), by taking advantage of the controlled association/dissociation of drug molecules from the cavities formed by the HACD skeletons and AuNPs cores as well as by harnessing the efficient targeting of cancer cells by hyaluronic acid. Significantly, the release of anticancer drugs from the drug@HACD-AuNPs system was pH-responsive, with more efficient release occurring under a mildly acidic environment, such as that in a cancer cell. Taking the anticancer drug DOX as an example, cell viability experiments revealed that the DOX@HACD-AuNPs system exhibited similar tumor cell inhibition abilities but lower toxicity than free DOX due to the hyaluronic acid reporter-mediated endocytosis. Therefore, the HACD-AuNPs supramolecular conjugates may possess great potential for the targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. PMID:24566666

Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Yang, Yang; Su, Yue; Chen, Jia-Tong; Liu, Yu

2014-01-01

145

Targeted delivery of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Magnetic nanoparticles and their magnetofluorescent analogues have become important tools for in vivo imaging using magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescent optical methods. A number of monodisperse magnetic nanoparticle preparations have been developed over the last decade for angiogenesis imaging, cancer staging, tracking of immune cells (monocyte/macrophage, T cells) and for molecular and cellular targeting. Phage display and data mining have enabled the procurement of novel tissue- or receptor-specific peptides, while high-throughput screening of diversity-oriented synthesis libraries has identified small molecules that permit or prevent uptake by specific cell types. Next-generation magnetic nanoparticles are expected to be truly multifunctional, incorporating therapeutic functionalities and further enhancing an already diverse repertoire of capabilities. PMID:17716118

McCarthy, Jason R; Kelly, Kimberly A; Sun, Eric Y; Weissleder, Ralph

2007-04-01

146

PEG-PE Micelles Loaded with Paclitaxel and Surface-Modified by a PBR-Ligand: Synergistic Anticancer Effect  

Microsoft Academic Search

Selective ligands to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) may induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. An overexpression of PBR in certain cancers allowed us to consider the use of highly selective ligands to PBR for receptor-mediated drug targeting to tumors. With this in mind, we prepared PBR-targeted nanoparticulate drug delivery systems (PEG-PE micelles) loaded with the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PCL)

Tiziana Musacchio; Valentino Laquintana; Andrea Latrofa; Giuseppe Trapani; Vladimir P. Torchilin

2009-01-01

147

Novel self-associating poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) based drug conjugates and nano-containers for paclitaxel delivery.  

PubMed

Poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PEO-b-PCL) copolymers bearing paclitaxel (PTX) side groups on PCL (PEO-b-P(CL-PTX) were synthesized and assembled to particles of 123 nm average diameter. At 20% (w/w) PTX to polymer conjugation, PEO-b-P(CL-PTX) demonstrated only 5.0 and 6.7% PTX release after 72 h incubation at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, but revealed signs of chain cleavage at pH 5.0. The cytotoxicity of PEO-b-P(CL-PTX) against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells increased as incubation time was raised from 72 to 96 h (IC(50) of 680 and 475 ng/mL, respectively), but it was still significantly lower than the cytotoxicity of free PTX (IC(50) of 3.5 ng/mL at 72 h). In further studies, micelles of PEO-b-PCL and those bearing benzyl or PTX on PCL were used for physical encapsulation of PTX, where maximum level of loading was achieved by PEO-b-P(CL-PTX) (2.22%, w/w). The release of PTX from this carrier was rapid; however. The in vitro cytotoxicity of physically loaded PTX was independent of carrier and similar to that of free PTX. This was attributed to the low concentration of polymers which fell below their critical micellar concentration in the cytotoxicity study. The results point to the potential of chemically tailored PEO-b-PCL for optimum PTX solubilization and delivery. PMID:20080163

Shahin, Mostafa; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

2010-04-15

148

Linear-Dendritic Copolymer Composed of Polyethylene Glycol and All-trans-Retinoic Acid as Drug Delivery Platform for Paclitaxel against Breast Cancer.  

PubMed

A new linear-dendritic copolymer composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) was synthesized as the anticancer drug delivery platform (PEG-G3-RA8). It can self-assemble into core-shell micelles with a low critical micelle concentration (CMC) at 3.48 mg/L. Paclitaxel (PTX) was encapsulated into PEG-G3-RA8 to form PEG-G3-RA8/PTX micelles for breast cancer treatment. The optimized formulation had high drug loading efficacy (20% w/w of drug copolymer ratio), nanosized diameter (27.6 nm), and narrow distribution (PDI = 0.103). Compared with Taxol, PEG-G3-RA8/PTX remained highly stable in the serum-containing cell medium and exhibited 4-fold higher cellular uptake. Besides, near-infrared fluorescence (NIR) optical imaging results indicated that fluorescent probe loaded micelle had a preferential accumulation in breast tumors. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution studies (10 mg/kg) showed the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0-?) and mean residence time (MRT0-?) for PEG-G3-RA8/PTX and Taxol were 12.006 ± 0.605 mg/L h, 2.264 ± 0.041 h and 15.966 ± 1.614 mg/L h, 1.726 ± 0.097 h, respectively. The tumor accumulation of PEG-G3-RA8/PTX group was 1.89-fold higher than that of Taxol group 24 h postinjection. With the advantages like efficient cellular uptake and preferential tumor accumulation, PEG-G3-RA8/PTX showed superior therapeutic efficacy on MCF-7 tumor bearing mice compared to Taxol. PMID:25675244

Li, Jianfeng; Jiang, Xutao; Guo, Yubo; An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; Ma, Haojun; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

2015-03-18

149

Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles Induces Proliferation Inhibition and Apoptosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells  

PubMed Central

Although paclitaxel (PTX) is used with platinum as the first line chemotherapy regimen for ovarian cancer, its clinical efficacy is often limited by severe adverse effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique holds a great promise in minimizing the side effects and maximizing the therapeutic efficacy. However, the technique typically uses non-targeted microbubbles with suboptimal efficiency. We synthesized targeted and PTX-loaded microbubbles (MBs) for UTMD mediated chemotherapy in ovarian cancer cells. PTX-loaded lipid MBs were coated with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa) through a biotin-avidin linkage to target the ovarian cancer A2780/DDP cells that express the LHRH receptor. In the cell culture studies, PTX-loaded and LHRHa targeted MBs (TPLMBs) in combination with ultrasound (300 kHz, 0.5 W/cm2, 30 seconds) demonstrated anti-proliferative activities of 41.30 ± 3.93%, 67.76 ± 2.45%, and 75.93 ± 2.81% at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the treatment, respectively. The cell apoptosis ratio at 24 hours after the treatment is 32.6 ± 0.79 %, which is significantly higher than other treatment groups such as PTX only and no-targeted PTX-loaded MBs (NPLMBs) with or without ultrasound mediation. Our experiment verifies the hypothesis that ultrasound mediation of ovarian cancer targeted and drug loaded MBs will enhance the PTX therapeutic efficiency. PMID:24266423

Liu, Hongxia; Chang, Shufang; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Pu, Caixiu; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

2014-01-01

150

Targeted Liposomal Drug Delivery to Monocytes and Macrophages  

PubMed Central

As the role of monocytes and macrophages in a range of diseases is better understood, strategies to target these cell types are of growing importance both scientifically and therapeutically. As particulate carriers, liposomes naturally target cells of the mononuclear phagocytic system (MPS), particularly macrophages. Loading drugs into liposomes can therefore offer an efficient means of drug targeting to MPS cells. Physicochemical properties including size, charge and lipid composition can have a very significant effect on the efficiency with which liposomes target MPS cells. MPS cells express a range of receptors including scavenger receptors, integrins, mannose receptors and Fc-receptors that can be targeted by the addition of ligands to liposome surfaces. These ligands include peptides, antibodies and lectins and have the advantages of increasing target specificity and avoiding the need for cationic lipids to trigger intracellular delivery. The goal for targeting monocytes/macrophages using liposomes includes not only drug delivery but also potentially a role in cell ablation and cell activation for the treatment of conditions including cancer, atherosclerosis, HIV, and chronic inflammation. PMID:21512579

Kelly, Ciara; Jefferies, Caroline; Cryan, Sally-Ann

2011-01-01

151

Micelles of Different Morphologies—Advantages of Worm-like Filomicelles of PEO-PCL in Paclitaxel Delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Worm-like and spherical micelles are both prepared here from the same amphiphilic diblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly (?-caprolactone) (PEO [5 kDa]–PCL [6.5 kDa]) in order to compare loading and delivery of hydrophobic drugs.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  Worm-like micelles of this degradable copolymer are nanometers in cross-section and spontaneously assemble to stable lengths\\u000a of microns, resembling filoviruses in some respects and thus suggesting

Shenshen Cai; Kandaswamy Vijayan; Debbie Cheng; Eliana M. Lima; Dennis E. Discher

2007-01-01

152

Targeted Drug Delivery to Treat Pain and Cerebral Hypoxia  

PubMed Central

Limited drug penetration is an obstacle that is often encountered in treatment of central nervous system (CNS) diseases including pain and cerebral hypoxia. Over the past several years, biochemical characteristics of the brain (i.e., tight junction protein complexes at brain barrier sites, expression of influx and efflux transporters) have been shown to be directly involved in determining CNS permeation of therapeutic agents; however, the vast majority of these studies have focused on understanding those mechanisms that prevent drugs from entering the CNS. Recently, this paradigm has shifted toward identifying and characterizing brain targets that facilitate CNS drug delivery. Such targets include the organic anion–transporting polypeptides (OATPs in humans; Oatps in rodents), a family of sodium-independent transporters that are endogenously expressed in the brain and are involved in drug uptake. OATP/Oatp substrates include drugs that are efficacious in treatment of pain and/or cerebral hypoxia (i.e., opioid analgesic peptides, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors). This clearly suggests that OATP/Oatp isoforms are viable transporter targets that can be exploited for optimization of drug delivery to the brain and, therefore, improved treatment of CNS diseases. This review summarizes recent knowledge in this area and emphasizes the potential that therapeutic targeting of OATP/Oatp isoforms may have in facilitating CNS drug delivery and distribution. Additionally, information presented in this review will point to novel strategies that can be used for treatment of pain and cerebral hypoxia. PMID:23343976

Davis, Thomas P.

2013-01-01

153

Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System  

E-print Network

......................................................... 11 2.2.1 Colon targeting oral drug delivery ....................................................... 11 2.2.2 Polysaccharide based pH sensitive and biodegradable hydrogels ....... 12 2.3 In vitro drug release models... of particles? size and surface charges .................... 20 3.3.1.2 Encapsulation efficiency and stability of PAX NPs in different pH of the aqueous solutions ........................................................ 22 3.3.2 LbL self...

Yu, Xiao

2012-07-16

154

Multifunctional Inorganic Nanoparticles for Imaging, Targeting, and Drug Delivery  

PubMed Central

Drug delivery, magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, magnetic manipulation, and cell targeting are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated inside mesostructured silica spheres that were labeled with fluorescent dye molecules and coated with hydrophilic groups to prevent aggregation. Water-insoluble anticancer drugs were delivered into human cancer cells; surface conjugation with cancer-specific targeting agents increased the uptake into cancer cells relative to that in non-cancerous fibroblasts. The highly versatile multifunctional nanoparticles could potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapeutic applications. PMID:19206485

Liong, Monty; Lu, Jie; Kovochich, Michael; Xia, Tian; Ruehm, Stefan G.; Nel, Andre E.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Zink, Jeffrey I.

2009-01-01

155

Polyethylene Glycol–Phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG–PE)/Vitamin E Micelles for Co-Delivery of Paclitaxel and Curcumin to Overcome Multi-Drug Resistance in Ovarian Cancer  

PubMed Central

The therapeutic potential of mixed micelles, made of PEG-PE and vitamin E co-loaded with curcumin and paclitaxel, was investigated against SK-OV-3 human ovarian adenocarcinoma along with its multi-drug resistant version SK-OV-3-paclitaxel-resistant (TR) cells in vitro and in vivo. The addition of curcumin at various concentrations did not significantly enhance the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel against SK-OV-3 in vitro. However, a clear synergistic effect was observed with the combination treatment against SK-OV-3TR in vitro. In vivo, this combination treatment produced a three-fold tumor inhibition with each of these cell lines. Our results indicate that such co-loaded mixed micelles could have significant clinical advantages for the treatment of resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24440402

Abouzeid, Abraham H.; Patel, Niravkumar R.

2014-01-01

156

Paclitaxel is incorporated by mesenchymal stromal cells and released in exosomes that inhibit in vitro tumor growth: a new approach for drug delivery.  

PubMed

Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have been proposed for delivering anticancer agents because of their ability to home in on tumor microenvironment. We found that MSCs can acquire strong anti-tumor activity after priming with Paclitaxel (PTX) through their capacity to uptake and then release the drug. Because MSCs secrete a high amount of membrane microvesicles (MVs), we here investigated the role of MVs in the releasing mechanism of PTX. The murine SR4987 line was used as MSC model. The release of PTX from SR4987 in the conditioned medium (CM) was checked by HPLC and the anti-tumor activity of both CM and MVs was tested on the human pancreatic cell line CFPAC-1. MVs were isolated by ultracentrifugation, analyzed by transmission (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the presence of PTX by the Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy. SR4987 loaded with PTX (SR4987PTX) secreted a significant amount of PTX and their CM possessed strong anti-proliferative activity on CFPAC-1. At TEM and SEM, SR4987PTX showed an increased number of "vacuole-like" structures and shed a relevant number of MVs, but did not differ from untreated SR4987. However, SR4987PTX-derived-MVs (SR4987PTX-MVs) demonstrated a strong anti proliferative activity on CFPAC-1. FTIR analysis of SR4987PTX-MVs showed the presence of an absorption spectrum in the corresponding regions of the PTX marker, absent in MVs from SR4987. Our work is the first demonstration that MSCs are able to package and deliver active drugs through their MVs, suggesting the possibility of using MSCs as a factory to develop drugs with a higher cell-target specificity. PMID:25084218

Pascucci, Luisa; Coccè, Valentina; Bonomi, Arianna; Ami, Diletta; Ceccarelli, Piero; Ciusani, Emilio; Viganò, Lucia; Locatelli, Alberta; Sisto, Francesca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Parati, Eugenio; Bernardo, Maria Ester; Muraca, Maurizio; Alessandri, Giulio; Bondiolotti, Gianpietro; Pessina, Augusto

2014-10-28

157

Hydrogel Matrix Entrapping PLGA-Paclitaxel Microspheres: Drug Delivery with Near Zero-Order Release and Implantability Advantages for Malignant Brain Tumour Chemotherapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  To develop paclitaxel-delivering PLGA microspheres entrapped in a gel matrix with sustained drug release properties and implantability\\u000a advantages for local glioma chemotherapy.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Paclitaxel-loaded PLGA microspheres were fabricated using electrohydrodynamic atomization and entrapped by electrospray and\\u000a gelation. The physicochemical characterizations were performed using scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning\\u000a calorimetry. The influence of various parameters on the disintegration time was investigated.

Sudhir Hulikal Ranganath; Irene Kee; William B. Krantz; Pierce Kah-Hoe Chow; Chi-Hwa Wang

2009-01-01

158

Targeted drug delivery utilizing protein-like molecular architecture  

PubMed Central

Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (nanoDDSs) have seen recent popularity due to their favorable physical, chemical, and biological properties, and great efforts have been made to target nanoDDSs to specific cellular receptors. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) is among the receptors overexpressed in metastatic melanoma, and the sequence to which it binds within the type IV collagen triple-helix has been identified. A triple-helical “peptide-amphiphile” (?1(IV)1263-1277 PA) which binds CD44/CSPG has been constructed and incorporated into liposomes of differing lipid compositions. Liposomes containing distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) as the major bilayer component, in combination with distearoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DSPG) and cholesterol, were more stable than analogous liposomes containing dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) instead of DSPC. When dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC):DSPG:cholesterol liposomes were prepared, monotectic behavior was observed. The presence of the ?1(IV)1263-1277 PA conferred greater stability to the DPPC liposomal systems and did not affect the stability of the DSPC liposomes. A positive correlation was observed for cellular fluorophore delivery by the ?1(IV)1263-1277 PA liposomes and CD44/CSPG receptor content in metastatic melanoma and fibroblast cell lines. Conversely, non-targeted liposomes delivered minimal fluorophore to these cells regardless of the CD44/CSPG receptor content. When metastatic melanoma cells and fibroblasts were treated with exogeneous ?1(IV)1263-1277, prior to incubation with ?1(IV)1263-1277 PA liposomes, to potentially disrupt receptor/liposome interactions, a dose-dependent decrease in the amount of fluorophore delivered was observed. Overall, our results suggest that PA-targeted liposomes can be constructed and rationally fine-tuned for drug delivery applications based on lipid composition. The selectivity of ?1(IV)1263-1277 PA liposomes for CD44/CSPG-containing cells represents a targeted-Nano-DDS with potential for further development and application. PMID:17397150

Rezler, Evonne M.; Khan, David R.; Lauer-Fields, Janelle; Cudic, Mare; Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Fields, Gregg B.

2008-01-01

159

Transferrin conjugated poly (?-glutamic acid-maleimide-co-L-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine copolymer nanoparticles for targeting drug delivery.  

PubMed

Targeted drug delivery strategies have shown great potential in solving some problems of chemotherapy, such as non-selectivity and severe side effects, thus enhancing the anti-tumor efficiency of chemotherapeutic agents. In this work, we have prepared a novel nanoparticle consisted of amphiphilic poly(?-glutamic acid-maleimide-co-L-lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoylsn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (?-PGA-MAL-PLA-DPPE) copolymer decorated with transferrin (Tf), which can specifically deliver anti-cancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) to the tumor cells for targeting chemotherapy. These nanoparticles (NPs) have preferable particle size, high encapsulation efficiency and a pH-dependent release profile. As expected, The Tf modification mediate specific targeting to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (C666-1) cells and human cervical carcinoma (Hela) cells with the transferrin receptor (TfR) overexpressed and enhance cellular uptake of the NPs, as demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy assays. In vitro cytotoxicity studies reveal that the NPs have excellent biocompatibility, and the presence of Tf enhance the activity of PTX to the targeted cells. All these results prove that Tf modified ?-PGA-MAL-PLA-DPPE NPs could facilitate the tumor-specific therapy. Therefore, such a targeting drug delivery system provides significant advances toward cancer therapy. PMID:25454663

Zhao, Caiyan; Liu, Xiaoguang; Liu, Junxing; Yang, Zhiwei; Rong, Xianghui; Li, Mingjun; Liang, Xingjie; Wu, Yan

2014-11-01

160

Pancreatic Cancer Gene Therapy: From Molecular Targets to Delivery Systems  

PubMed Central

The continuous identification of molecular changes deregulating critical pathways in pancreatic tumor cells provides us with a large number of novel candidates to engineer gene-targeted approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment. Targets—both protein coding and non-coding—are being exploited in gene therapy to influence the deregulated pathways to facilitate cytotoxicity, enhance the immune response or sensitize to current treatments. Delivery vehicles based on viral or non-viral systems as well as cellular vectors with tumor homing characteristics are a critical part of the design of gene therapy strategies. The different behavior of tumoral versus non-tumoral cells inspires vector engineering with the generation of tumor selective products that can prevent potential toxic-associated effects. In the current review, a detailed analysis of the different targets, the delivery vectors, the preclinical approaches and a descriptive update on the conducted clinical trials are presented. Moreover, future possibilities in pancreatic cancer treatment by gene therapy strategies are discussed. PMID:24212620

Fillat, Cristina; Jose, Anabel; Ros, Xavier Bofill-De; Mato-Berciano, Ana; Maliandi, Maria Victoria; Sobrevals, Luciano

2011-01-01

161

Specifically targeted delivery of protein to phagocytic macrophages  

PubMed Central

Macrophages play important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases, and are important potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, macrophages are key antigen-presenting cells and important in vaccine design. In this study, we report on the novel formulation (bovine serum albumin [BSA]-loaded glucan particles [GMP-BSA]) based on ?-glucan particles from cell walls of baker’s yeast for the targeted delivery of protein to macrophages. Using this formulation, chitosan, tripolyphosphate, and alginate were used to fabricate colloidal particles with the model protein BSA via electrostatic interactions, which were caged and incorporated BSA very tightly within the ?-glucan particle shells. The prepared GMP-BSA exhibited good protein-release behavior and avoided protein leakage. The particles were also highly specific to phagocytic macrophages, such as Raw 264.7 cells, primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and peritoneal exudate macrophages, whereas the particles were not taken up by nonphagocytic cells, including NIH3T3, AD293, HeLa, and Caco-2. We hypothesize that these tightly encapsulated protein-loaded glucan particles deliver various types of proteins to macrophages with notably high selectivity, and may have broad applications in targeted drug delivery or vaccine design against macrophages. PMID:25784802

Yu, Min; Chen, Zeming; Guo, Wenjun; Wang, Jin; Feng, Yupeng; Kong, Xiuqi; Hong, Zhangyong

2015-01-01

162

Specifically targeted delivery of protein to phagocytic macrophages.  

PubMed

Macrophages play important roles in the pathogenesis of various diseases, and are important potential therapeutic targets. Furthermore, macrophages are key antigen-presenting cells and important in vaccine design. In this study, we report on the novel formulation (bovine serum albumin [BSA]-loaded glucan particles [GMP-BSA]) based on ?-glucan particles from cell walls of baker's yeast for the targeted delivery of protein to macrophages. Using this formulation, chitosan, tripolyphosphate, and alginate were used to fabricate colloidal particles with the model protein BSA via electrostatic interactions, which were caged and incorporated BSA very tightly within the ?-glucan particle shells. The prepared GMP-BSA exhibited good protein-release behavior and avoided protein leakage. The particles were also highly specific to phagocytic macrophages, such as Raw 264.7 cells, primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and peritoneal exudate macrophages, whereas the particles were not taken up by nonphagocytic cells, including NIH3T3, AD293, HeLa, and Caco-2. We hypothesize that these tightly encapsulated protein-loaded glucan particles deliver various types of proteins to macrophages with notably high selectivity, and may have broad applications in targeted drug delivery or vaccine design against macrophages. PMID:25784802

Yu, Min; Chen, Zeming; Guo, Wenjun; Wang, Jin; Feng, Yupeng; Kong, Xiuqi; Hong, Zhangyong

2015-01-01

163

Enhanced solubility and targeted delivery of curcumin by lipopeptide micelles.  

PubMed

A lipopeptide (LP)-containing KKGRGDS as the hydrophilic heads and lauric acid (C12) as the hydrophobic tails has been designed and prepared by standard solid-phase peptide synthesis technique. LP can self-assemble into spherical micelles with the size of ~30 nm in PBS (phosphate buffer saline) (pH 7.4). Curcumin-loaded LP micelles were prepared in order to increase the water solubility, sustain the releasing rate, and improve the tumor targeted delivery of curcumin. Water solubility, cytotoxicity, in vitro release behavior, and intracellular uptake of curcumin-loaded LP micelles were investigated. The results showed that LP micelles can increase the water solubility of curcumin 1.1 × 10(3) times and sustain the release of curcumin in a low rate. Curcumin-loaded LP micelles showed much higher cell inhibition than free curcumin on human cervix carcinoma (HeLa) and HepG2 cells. When incubating these curcumin-loaded micelles with HeLa and COS7 cells, due to the over-expression of integrins on cancer cells, the micelles can efficiently use the tumor-targeting function of RGD (functionalized peptide sequences: Arg-Gly-Asp) sequence to deliver the drug into HeLa cells, and better efficiency of the self-assembled LP micelles for curcumin delivery than crude curcumin was also confirmed by LCSM (laser confocal scanning microscope) assays. Combined with the enhanced solubility and higher cell inhibition, LP micelles reported in this study may be promising in clinical application for targeted curcumin delivery. PMID:25621942

Liang, Ju; Wu, Wenlan; Lai, Danyu; Li, Junbo; Fang, Cailin

2015-04-01

164

Targeted drug delivery utilizing protein-like molecular architecture.  

PubMed

Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems (nanoDDSs) have seen recent popularity due to their favorable physical, chemical, and biological properties, and great efforts have been made to target nanoDDSs to specific cellular receptors. CD44/chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) is among the receptors overexpressed in metastatic melanoma, and the sequence to which it binds within the type IV collagen triple-helix has been identified. A triple-helical "peptide-amphiphile" (alpha1(IV)1263-1277 PA), which binds CD44/CSPG, has been constructed and incorporated into liposomes of differing lipid compositions. Liposomes containing distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) as the major bilayer component, in combination with distearoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DSPG) and cholesterol, were more stable than analogous liposomes containing dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) instead of DSPC. When dilauroyl phosphatidylcholine (DLPC):DSPG:cholesterol liposomes were prepared, monotectic behavior was observed. The presence of the alpha1(IV)1263-1277 PA conferred greater stability to the DPPC liposomal systems and did not affect the stability of the DSPC liposomes. A positive correlation was observed for cellular fluorophore delivery by the alpha1(IV)1263-1277 PA liposomes and CD44/CSPG receptor content in metastatic melanoma and fibroblast cell lines. Conversely, nontargeted liposomes delivered minimal fluorophore to these cells regardless of the CD44/CSPG receptor content. When metastatic melanoma cells and fibroblasts were treated with exogeneous alpha1(IV)1263-1277, prior to incubation with alpha1(IV)1263-1277 PA liposomes, to potentially disrupt receptor/liposome interactions, a dose-dependent decrease in the amount of fluorophore delivered was observed. Overall, our results suggest that PA-targeted liposomes can be constructed and rationally fine-tuned for drug delivery applications based on lipid composition. The selectivity of alpha1(IV)1263-1277 PA liposomes for CD44/CSPG-containing cells represents a targeted-nanoDDS with potential for further development and application. PMID:17397150

Rezler, Evonne M; Khan, David R; Lauer-Fields, Janelle; Cudic, Mare; Baronas-Lowell, Diane; Fields, Gregg B

2007-04-25

165

Targeted delivery of Doxorubicin by folic acid-decorated dual functional nanocarrier.  

PubMed

Doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the most commonly used antineoplastic agents, but its clinical application is oftentimes coupled with severe side effects. Selective delivery of DOX to tumors via nanosized drug carrier represents an attractive approach to this problem. Previously, we developed a dual functional nanomicellar carrier, PEG5K-embelin2 (PEG5K-EB2), which was able to deliver paclitaxel (PTX) selectively to tumors and to achieve an enhanced therapeutic effect. In the present study, we examined the utility of PEG5K-EB2 to deliver DOX to tumors. In addition, folic acid (FA) was coupled to the surface of the PEG5K-EB2 micelles (FA-PEG5K-EB2) to further improve the selective targetability of the system. DOX-loaded PEG5K-EB2 micelles were uniformly spherical particles with a diameter of approximately 20 nm. Incorporation of FA had minimal effect on the size of the particles. The DOX loading efficiency was as high as 91.7% and 93.5% for PEG5K-EB2 and FA-PEG5K-EB2, respectively. DOX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles (with or without FA decoration) demonstrated sustained kinetics of DOX release compared to free DOX. FA-PEG5K-EB2 significantly facilitated the intracellular uptake of DOX over free DOX and PEGylated liposomal DOX (Doxil) in breast cancer cells, 4T1.2, and drug resistant cells, NCI/ADR-RES. P-gp ATPase assay showed that PEG5K-EB2 significantly inhibited the function of the P-gp efflux pump. The maximum tolerated dose of DOX-loaded PEG5K-EB2 micelles was 15 mg/kg in mice, which was 1.5-fold greater than that for free DOX. Pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution studies showed that both types of DOX-loaded micelles, especially FA-PEG5K-EB2, were able to significantly prolong the blood circulation time of DOX and facilitate its preferential accumulation at the tumor tissue. Finally, DOX/PEG5K-EB2 mixed micelles demonstrated significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibitory effect with minimal toxicity in comparison to free DOX and Doxil and the antitumor activity was further enhanced after the decoration by folic acid. Our data suggest that FA-PEG5K-EB2 micelles represent a promising DOX delivery system that warrants more study in the future. PMID:25265550

Lu, Jianqin; Zhao, Wenchen; Huang, Yixian; Liu, Hao; Marquez, Rebecca; Gibbs, Robert B; Li, Jiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Xu, Liang; Li, Shulin; Li, Song

2014-11-01

166

Multifunctional DNA-gold nanoparticles for targeted doxorubicin delivery.  

PubMed

In this report we describe the synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxic properties of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles having attached folic acid (FA), a thermoresponsive polymer (p), and/or poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) oligomers that could be used to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) in chemotherapy. The FA-DNA oligomer used in the construction of the delivery vehicle was synthesized through the reaction of the isolated folic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester with the amino-DNA and the conjugated DNA product was purified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This approach ultimately allowed control of the amount of FA attached to the surface of the delivery vehicle. Cytotoxicity studies using SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells with drug loaded delivery vehicles were carried out using a variety of exposure times (1-48 h) and recovery times (1-72 h), and in order to access the effects of varying amounts of attached FA, in culture media deficient in FA. DOX loaded delivery vehicles having 50% of the DNA strands with attached FA were more cytotoxic than when all of the strands contained FA. Since FA stimulates cell growth, the reduced cytotoxicity of vehicles fully covered with FA suggests that the stimulatory effects of FA can more than compensate for the cytotoxic effects of the drug on the cell population. While attachment of hexa-ethylene glycol PEG(18) to the surface of the delivery vehicle had no effect on cytotoxicity, 100% FA plus the thermoresponsive polymer resulted in IC50 = 0.48 ± 0.01 for an exposure time of 24 h and a recovery time of 1 h, which is an order of magnitude more cytotoxic than free DOX. Confocal microscopic studies using fluorescence detection showed that SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells exposed to DOX-loaded vehicles have drug accumulation inside the cell and, in the case of vehicles with attached FA and thermoresponsive polymer, the drug appears more concentrated. Since the biological target of DOX is DNA, the latter observation is consistent with the high cytotoxicity of vehicles having both FA and the thermoresponsive polymer. The study highlights the potential of DNA-capped gold nanoparticles as delivery vehicles for doxorubicin in cancer chemotherapy. PMID:24911830

Alexander, Colleen M; Hamner, Kristen L; Maye, Mathew M; Dabrowiak, James C

2014-07-16

167

Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery  

PubMed Central

One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

2012-01-01

168

Pharmaceutical approaches to colon targeted drug delivery systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. Although oral delivery has become a widely accepted route of administration of therapeutic drugs, the gastrointestinal tract presents several formidable barriers to drug delivery. Colonic drug delivery has gained increased importance not just for the delivery of the drugs for the treatment of local diseases associated with the colon but also for its potential for the delivery of proteins

M. K. Chourasia; S. K. Jain

169

Targeted intracellular delivery of proteins with spatial and temporal control.  

PubMed

While a host of methods exist to deliver genetic materials or small molecules to cells, very few are available for protein delivery to the cytosol. We describe a modular, light-activated nanocarrier that transports proteins into cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivers the cargo to the cytosol by light triggered endosomal escape. The platform is based on hollow gold nanoshells (HGN) with polyhistidine tagged proteins attached through an avidity-enhanced, nickel chelation linking layer; here, we used green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a model deliverable cargo. Endosomal uptake of the GFP loaded nanocarrier was mediated by a C-end Rule (CendR) internalizing peptide fused to the GFP. Focused femtosecond pulsed-laser excitation triggered protein release from the nanocarrier and endosome disruption, and the released protein was capable of targeting the nucleoli, a model intracellular organelle. We further demonstrate the generality of the approach by loading and releasing Sox2 and p53. This method for targeting of individual cells, with resolution similar to microinjection, provides spatial and temporal control over protein delivery. PMID:25490248

Morales, Demosthenes P; Braun, Gary B; Pallaoro, Alessia; Chen, Renwei; Huang, Xiao; Zasadzinski, Joseph A; Reich, Norbert O

2015-02-01

170

Targeted biodegradable nanoparticles for drug delivery to smooth muscle cells.  

PubMed

Targeted delivery of therapeutic agents to prevent smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation is important in averting restenosis (a narrowing of blood vessels). Since platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors are over-expressed in proliferating SMCs after injury from cardiovascular interventions, such as angioplasty and stent implantation, our hypothesis is that conjugation of PDGF-BB (platelet-derived growth factor BB (homodimer)) peptides to biodegradable poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) would exhibit an increased uptake of these NPs by proliferating SMCs. In this study, poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles containing dexamethasone were formulated and conjugated with PDGF-BB peptides. These NPs were stable, biocompatible, and exhibited a sustained drug release over 14 days. Various particle uptake studies using HASMCs (human aortic smooth muscle cells) demonstrated that PDGF-BB peptide-conjugated nanoparticles significantly increased cellular uptake and decreased proliferation of HASMCs compared to control nanoparticles (without conjugation of PDGF-BB peptides). These NPs were internalized primarily by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. Our in vitro results suggest that PDGF-BB peptide-conjugated NPs could represent as an effective targeted, sustained therapeutic delivery system to reduce restenosis and neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:22523971

Kona, Soujanya; Specht, Danyel; Rahimi, Maham; Shah, Bhavik P; Gilbertson, Timothy A; Nguyen, Kytai T

2012-01-01

171

Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

2013-03-01

172

Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery  

PubMed Central

Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

2012-01-01

173

Human mutations that confer paclitaxel resistance.  

PubMed

The involvement of tubulin mutations as a cause of clinical drug resistance has been intensely debated in recent years. In the studies described here, we used transfection to test whether beta1-tubulin mutations and polymorphisms found in cancer patients are able to confer resistance to drugs that target microtubules. Three of four mutations (A185T, A248V, R306C, but not G437S) that we tested caused paclitaxel resistance, as indicated by the following observations: (a) essentially 100% of cells selected in paclitaxel contained transfected mutant tubulin; (b) paclitaxel resistance could be turned off using tetracycline to turn off transgene expression; (c) paclitaxel resistance increased as mutant tubulin production increased. All the paclitaxel resistance mutations disrupted microtubule assembly, conferred increased sensitivity to microtubule-disruptive drugs, and produced defects in mitosis. The results are consistent with a mechanism in which tubulin mutations alter microtubule stability in a way that counteracts drug action. These studies show that human tumor cells can acquire spontaneous mutations in beta1-tubulin that cause resistance to paclitaxel, and suggest that patients with some polymorphisms in beta1-tubulin may require higher drug concentrations for effective therapy. PMID:20103599

Yin, Shanghua; Bhattacharya, Rajat; Cabral, Fernando

2010-02-01

174

Src family kinases and paclitaxel sensitivity  

PubMed Central

Src-family Kinases (SFKs) participate in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, autophagy, adhesion, migration, invasion and angiogenesis in normal and cancer cells. Abnormal expression of SFKs has been documented in cancers that arise in breast, colon, ovary, melanocyte, gastric mucosa, head and neck, pancreas, lung and brain. Targeting SFKs in cancer cells has been shown to be a promising therapeutic strategy in solid tumors, particularly in ovarian, colon and breast cancers. Paclitaxel is one of most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the management of ovarian, breast, lung and head and neck cancers. As a microtubule-stabilizing agent, paclitaxel possesses both mitosis-dependent and mitosis-independent activities against cancer cells. A variety of mechanisms such as deregulation of P-glycoprotein, alteration of tubulin isotypes, alteration of microtubule-regulatory proteins, deregulation of apoptotic signaling pathways, mutation of tubulins and overexpression of copper transporters have been implicated in the development of primary or secondary resistance to paclitaxel. By affecting cancer cell survival, proliferation, autophagy, microtubule stability, motility, and/or angiogenesis, SFKs interact with mechanisms that regulate paclitaxel sensitivity. Inhibition of SFKs can potentiate the anti-tumor activity of paclitaxel by enhancing apoptosis, autophagy and microtubule stability. Based on pre-clinical observations, administration of SFK inhibitors in combination with paclitaxel could improve treatment for ovarian, breast, lung and head and neck cancers. Identification and validation of predictive biomarkers could also permit personalization of the therapy. PMID:21646863

2011-01-01

175

Targeted drug delivery and enhanced intracellular release using functionalized liposomes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The ability to target cancer cells using an appropriate drug delivery system can significantly reduce the associated side effects from cancer therapies and can help in improving the overall quality of life, post cancer survival. Integrin alpha5beta1 is expressed on several types of cancer cells, including colon cancer and plays an important role in tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, the ability to target the integrin alpha 5beta1 using an appropriate drug delivery nano-vector can significantly help in inhibiting tumor growth and reducing tumor metastasis. The work in this thesis focuses on designing and optimizing, functionalized stealth liposomes (liposomes covered with polyethylene glycol (PEG)) that specifically target the integrin alpha5beta1. The PEG provides a steric barrier allowing the liposomes to circulate in the blood for longer duration and the functionalizing moiety, PR_b peptide specifically recognizes and binds to integrin alpha5beta1 expressing cells. The work demonstrates that by optimizing the amount of PEG and PR_b on the liposomal interface, nano-vectors can be engineered that bind to CT26.WT colon cancer cells in a specific manner and internalize through alpha 5beta1-mediated endocytosis. To further improve the efficacy of the system, PR_b functionalized pH-sensitive stealth liposomes that exhibit triggered release under mild acidic conditions present in endocytotic vesicles were designed. The study showed that PR_b functionalized pH-sensitive stealth liposomes, undergo destabilization under mildly acidic conditions and incorporation of the PR_b peptide does not significantly affect the pH-sensitivity of the liposomes. PR_b functionalized pH-sensitive stealth liposomes bind to CT26.WT colon carcinoma cells that express integrin alpha5beta 1, undergo cellular internalization, and release their load intracellularly in a short period of time as compared to other formulations. PR_b-targeted pH-sensitive stealth liposomes encapsulating 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) show significantly higher cytotoxicity than the PR_b-targeted inert stealth liposomes and the non-targeted stealth liposomes (both pH-sensitive and inert). The studies demonstrated that optimized PR_b functionalized pH sensitive liposomes have the potential to deliver a payload, such as chemotherapeutic agents, directly to colon cancer cells in an efficient and specific manner.

Garg, Ashish

176

Cubosomes as targeted drug delivery systems - a biopharmaceutical approach.  

PubMed

Cubosomes are reversed bicontinuous cubic phases and possess unique physicochemical properties. These special systems are receiving much attention for the delivery of various hydrophilic, hydrophobic and amphiphilic drugs with enhanced bioavailability and high loading capacity. A wide variety of drugs are applicable for cubosome formulation for various routes of delivery. The lipids used in cubosome formulation are more stable and offer stability to the formulation during shelf-life. The article reviews about the back ground, techniques of cubosome preparation such as high pressure homogenization, probe ultrasonication and automated cubosome preparation; and also methods of cubosomes preparation such as top down, bottom up and other methods with pictorial presentation. This article emphasizes the phase transition and also targeted approaches of cubosomes. The characterization studies for cubosomes such as cryo transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and scanning electron microscopy followed by in-vitro and in-vivo evaluation studies of cubosomes were explained with appropriate examples. Recent applications of cubosomes were explained with reference to flurbiprofen, odorranalectin, diazepam and dexamethasone. The advantages, disadvantages and limitations of cubosomal technology were emphasized. PMID:24836404

Lakshmi, Naga M; Yalavarthi, Prasanna R; Vadlamudi, Harini C; Thanniru, Jyotsna; Yaga, Gowri; K, Haritha

2014-01-01

177

Design, synthesis, and evaluation of dendrimers based on melamine as drug delivery vehicles  

E-print Network

cancer xenografts. A drug delivery vehicle for the anticancer agent paclitaxel is described. This drug delivery vehicle contains sixteen molecules of paclitaxel via acid-labile ester linkage, two Bolton-Hunter groups, and sixteen monochlorotriazine...

Lim, Jong Doo

2009-05-15

178

Lactosylated liposomes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin to hepatocellular carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background N-lactosyl-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Lac-DOPE) was synthesized and evaluated as a liver-specific targeting ligand via asialoglycoprotein receptors for liposomal delivery of doxorubicin. Methods Lactosylated liposomes encapsulating calcein (Lac-L-calcein) or doxorubicin (Lac-L-DOX) composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, monomethoxy polyethylene glycol 2000-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, and Lac-DOPE at 50:35:5:10 (mol/mol) were prepared by polycarbonate membrane extrusion and evaluated in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. Cellular uptake of Lac-L-calcein was monitored by confocal microscopy and by flow cytometry. The cytotoxicity of Lac-L-DOX was evaluated by MTT assay. The pharmacokinetic properties of Lac-L-DOX were studied in normal mice, and its biodistribution and antitumor activity were studied in nude mice with HepG2 xenografts. Results The size of Lac-L-DOX was less than 100 nm and the liposomes demonstrated excellent colloidal stability. In vitro uptake of Lac-L-calcein by HepG2 cells was four times greater than that of non-targeted L-calcein. In the presence of 20 mM lactose, the uptake of Lac-L-calcein was inhibited, suggesting that asialoglycoprotein receptors mediated the observed cellular uptake. Lac-L-DOX exhibited enhanced in vivo cytotoxicity compared with the nontargeted liposomal doxorubicin (L-DOX), and its pharmacokinetic parameters indicate that Lac-L-DOX has a long blood circulation time (t1/2 8.73 hours). Tissue distribution and therapeutic efficacy studies in nude mice bearing HepG2 xenografts show that Lac-L-DOX had significantly stronger tumor inhibitory activity compared with L-DOX and free doxorubicin, along with a higher accumulation of drug within the tumor site and greater cellular uptake by tumor cells. Conclusion These data suggest that lactosylated liposomes are promising drug delivery vehicles for hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23093902

Zhou, Xiaoju; Zhang, Mengzi; Yung, Bryant; Li, Hong; Zhou, Chenguang; Lee, L James; Lee, Robert J

2012-01-01

179

Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches  

Microsoft Academic Search

The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery)

Anil K. Philip; Betty Philip

2010-01-01

180

Physical blends of starch graft copolymers as matrices for colon targeting drug delivery systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Colon targeting drug delivery systems have attracted many researchers due to the distinct advantages they present such as near neutral pH, longer transit time and reduced enzymatic activity. Moreover, in recent studies, colon specific drug delivery systems are gaining importance for use in the treatment of local pathologies of the colon and also for the systemic delivery of protein and

I. Silva; M. Gurruchaga; I. Goñi

2009-01-01

181

Paclitaxel release from micro-porous PLGA disks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Micro-porous biodegradable polymeric foams have potential applications in tissue engineering and drug delivery systems. A two-stage fabrication process combining spray drying and supercritical gas foaming is presented for the encapsulation of paclitaxel in micro-porous PLGA (poly lactic glycolic acid) foams. Encapsulation of paclitaxel in the PLGA polymer matrix was achieved and these foams have potential application as a new type

Lai Yeng Lee; Sudhir Hulikal Ranganath; Yilong Fu; Jasmine Limin Zheng; How Sung Lee; Chi-Hwa Wang; Kenneth A. Smith

2009-01-01

182

Disulfiram targets cancer stem-like cells and reverses resistance and cross-resistance in acquired paclitaxel-resistant triple-negative breast cancer cells  

PubMed Central

Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has significantly worse prognosis. Acquired chemoresistance remains the major cause of therapeutic failure of TNBC. In clinic, the relapsed TNBC is commonly pan-resistant to various drugs with completely different resistant mechanisms. Investigation of the mechanisms and development of new drugs to target pan-chemoresistance will potentially improve the therapeutic outcomes of TNBC patients. Methods: In this study, 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), combination index (CI)–isobologram, western blot, ALDEFLUOR analysis, clonogenic assay and immunocytochemistry were used. Results: The chemoresistant MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are highly cross-resistant to paclitaxel (PAC), cisplatin (CDDP), docetaxel and doxorubicin. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are quiescent with significantly longer doubling time (64.9 vs 31.7?h). This may be caused by high expression of p21Waf1. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells express high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and a panel of embryonic stem cell-related proteins, for example, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and nuclealisation of HIF2? and NF-?Bp65. We have previously reported that disulfiram (DS), an antialcoholism drug, targets cancer stem cells (CSCs) and enhances cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs. Disulfiram abolished CSC characters and completely reversed PAC and CDDP resistance in MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells. Conclusion: Cancer stem cells may be responsible for acquired pan-chemoresistance. As a drug used in clinic, DS may be repurposed as a CSC inhibitor to reverse the acquired pan-chemoresistance. PMID:24008666

Liu, P; Kumar, I S; Brown, S; Kannappan, V; Tawari, P E; Tang, J Z; Jiang, W; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Wang, W

2013-01-01

183

Imaging in targeted delivery of therapy to cancer.  

PubMed

We review the current status of imaging as applied to targeted therapy with particular focus on antibody-based therapeutics. Antibodies have high tumor specificity and can be engineered to optimize delivery to, and retention within, the tumor. Whole antibodies can activate natural immune effector mechanisms and can be conjugated to beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclides, toxins, enzymes, and nanoparticles for enhanced therapeutic effect. Imaging is central to the development of these agents and is used for patient selection, performing dosimetry and assessment of response. gamma- and positron-emitting radionuclides may be used to image the distribution of antibody-targeted therapeutics While some radionuclides such as iodine-131 emit both beta and gamma radiation and are therefore suitable for both imaging and therapy, others are more suited to imaging or therapy alone. Hence for radionuclide therapy of neuroendocrine tumors, patients can be selected for therapy on the basis of gamma-emitting indium-111-octreotide imaging and treated with beta-emitting yttrium-90-octreotate. Positron-emitting radionuclides can give greater sensitivity that gamma-emitters but only a single radionuclide can be imaged at one time and the range of radionuclides is more limited. The multiple options for antibody-based therapeutic molecules, imaging technologies and therapeutic scenarios mean that very large amounts of diverse data are being acquired. This can be most effectively shared and progress accelerated by use of common data standards for imaging, biological, and clinical data. PMID:19838639

Dancey, Gairin; Begent, Richard H; Meyer, Tim

2009-09-01

184

Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery  

PubMed Central

Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

2011-01-01

185

Mannosylated biodegradable polyethyleneimine for targeted DNA delivery to dendritic cells  

PubMed Central

Background To establish a potential gene-delivery system with the ability to deliver plasmid DNA to dendritic cells (DCs) more efficiently and specifically, we designed and synthesized a low-molecular-weight polyethyleneimine and triethyleneglycol polymer (PEI–TEG) and a series of its mannosylated derivatives. Methods PEI–TEG was synthesized from PEI2000 and PEI600 with TEG as the cross-linker. PEI–TEG was then linked to mannose via a phenylisothiocyanate bridge to obtain man-PEI–TEG conjugates. The DNA conveyance abilities of PEI–TEG, man-PEI–TEG, as well as control PEI25k were evaluated by measuring their zeta potential, particle size, and DNA-binding abilities. The in vitro cytotoxicity, cell uptake, and transfection efficiency of these PEI/DNA complexes were examined on the DC2.4 cell line. Finally, a maturation experiment evaluated the effect of costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86 on murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) using flow cytometry. Results PEI–TEG and man-PEI–TEG were successfully synthesized and were shown to retain the excellent properties of PEI25k for condensing DNA. Compared with PEI–TEG as well as PEI25k, the man-PEI–TEG had less cytotoxicity and performed better in both cellular uptake and transfection assays in vitro. The results of the maturation experiment showed that all the PEI/DNA complexes induced an adequate upregulation of surface markers for DC maturation. Conclusion These results demonstrated that man-PEI–TEG can be employed as a DC-targeting gene-delivery system. PMID:22745554

Sun, Xun; Chen, Simu; Han, Jianfeng; Zhang, Zhirong

2012-01-01

186

Targeted Delivery of Proteins across the Blood-Brain Barrier  

Microsoft Academic Search

Treatment of many neuronal degenerative disorders will require delivery of a therapeutic protein to neurons or glial cells across the whole CNS. The presence of the blood-brain barrier hampers the delivery of these proteins from the blood, thus necessitating a new method for delivery. Receptors on the blood-brain barrier bind ligands to facilitate their transport to the CNS; therefore, we

Brian J. Spencer; Inder M. Verma

2007-01-01

187

Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and without any attached support. As composites of aligned nanofibers, yarns potentially combine the inherent advantages of nanofibers with the strength and pliability of larger sized fibers. As such, we became interested in exploring the potential of nanofiber yarns as drug carriers. Our study evolved to accommodate comparative studies between the behavior of traditional nonwoven mats and nanofiber yarns. Throughout the process, we sought to answer the bigger question: Can guar galactomannan nanofibers be used as a new biodegradable platform for drug delivery?

Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

2011-12-01

188

Enhanced oral delivery of paclitaxel using acetylcysteine functionalized chitosan-vitamin E succinate nanomicelles based on a mucus bioadhesion and penetration mechanism.  

PubMed

In addition to being a physiological protective barrier, the gastrointestinal mucosal membrane is also a primary obstacle that hinders the oral absorption of many therapeutic compounds, especially drugs with a poor permeability. In order to resolve this impasse, we have designed multifunctional nanomicelles based on the acetylcysteine functionalized chitosan-vitamin E succinate copolymer (CS-VES-NAC, CVN), which exhibit marked bioadhesion, possess the ability to penetrate mucus, and enhance the oral absorption of a hydrophobic drug with a poor penetrative profile, paclitaxel. The intestinal absorption (Ka = 0.38 ± 0.04 min(-1), Papp = 0.059 cm · min(-1)) of CVN nanomicelles was greatly improved (4.5-fold) in comparison with paclitaxel solution, and CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscope) pictures also showed not only enhanced adhesion to the intestinal surface but improved accumulation within intestinal villi. The in vivo pharmacokinetics indicated that the AUC0-t (586.37 ng/mL · h) of CVN nanomicelles was markedly enhanced compared with PTX solution. In summary, the novel multifunctional CVN nanomicelles appear to be a promising nanocarrier for insoluble and poorly permeable drugs due to their high bioadhesion and permeation-enhancing capability. PMID:23909663

Lian, He; Zhang, Tianhong; Sun, Jin; Liu, Xiaohong; Ren, Guolian; Kou, Longfa; Zhang, Youxi; Han, Xiaopeng; Ding, Wenya; Ai, Xiaoyu; Wu, Chunnuan; Li, Lin; Wang, Yongjun; Sun, Yinghua; Wang, Siling; He, Zhonggui

2013-09-01

189

siRNA specific delivery system for targeting dendritic cells.  

PubMed

siRNA therapy offers immense potential for clinical application. Under physiological conditions, however, siRNA was demonstrated to have a short half-life. Additionally, it may also cause ubiquitous gene silencing as it does not possess a tissue-specific homing mechanism. Thus, the rate-limiting step in the emergence of siRNA as a potential therapeutic agent is the current lack of a safe and tissue- or cell-specific in vivo delivery system. Herein, we propose a novel, cell-specific method for the in vivo delivery of siRNA to dendritic cells (DCs) with the purpose of inducing immune modulation. CD40 siRNA was incorporated within the interior of 86 nm liposomes, which were decorated with surface-bound mAb NLDC-145 as a targeting mechanism. The siRNA encapsulation efficiency was determined to be approximately 7%. CD40 siRNA immunoliposomes (CD40 siILs) were able to specifically bind to DCs and silence CD40 expression in vitro. Furthermore, in vitro CD40-silenced DCs significantly inhibited the proliferation of alloreactive T cells in an MLR. Upon in vivo administration, siIL-encapsulated, Cy3-labeled siRNA exhibited moderate uptake by the liver at an early time point following administration with greater accumulation in the spleen at a later time point. In contrast, naked siRNA primarily accumulated in the kidney immediately after administration and circulated out in a short time period. To address in vivo gene silencing and immune modulation, mice were simultaneously immunized with KLH and subcutaneously injected with DC-specific CD40 siILs, siILs containing negative control siRNA, naked CD40 siRNA, or PBS. A second injection of CD40 siILs, or control treatments, followed 24 h later. Flow cytometry, reverse transcriptase PCR, and quantitative real-time PCR analysis of CD11c(+) DCs from mice treated with CD40 siILs demonstrated reduced expression of CD40, in comparison with control groups. CD11c(-) cells were also analyzed by flow cytometry, but no differences were observed between treatment groups. Furthermore, CD40 siIL-treated mice were found to have an increased proportion of Treg cells (CD4(+)CD25(+) FoxP3(+)), and DCs cells from these mice were able to inhibit T cell proliferation in an antigen-specific recall response. In summary, CD40 siILs were shown to specifically target and deliver CD40 siRNA to DCs, significantly reducing CD40 expression and resulting in DC-mediated immune modulation as well as generation of Treg cells. These findings highlight the therapeutic potential for siRNA-based and DC-mediated immunotherapy in the clinic. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use siILs for targeted delivery of siRNA to DCs and for immune modulation. PMID:20217551

Zheng, Xiufen; Vladau, Costin; Shunner, Aminah; Min, Wei-Ping

2010-01-01

190

Buparvaquone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery in theleriosis  

PubMed Central

Background: Buparvaquone (BPQ), a hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative, has been investigated for the treatment of many infections and is recommended as the gold standard for the treatment of theileriosis. Theileriosis, an intramacrophage infection is localized mainly in reticuloendotheileial system (RES) organs. The present study investigates development of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of BPQ for targeted delivery to the RES. Materials and Methods: BPQ SLN was prepared using melt method by adding a molten mixture into aqueous Lutrol F68 solution (80°C). Larger batches were prepared up to 6 g of BPQ with GMS: BPQ, 2:1. SLN of designed size were obtained using ultraturrax and high pressure homogenizer. A freeze and thaw study was used to optimize type and concentration of cryoprotectant with Sf: Mean particle size, Si: Initial particle size <1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was performed on optimized formulation. Formulation was investigated for in vitro serum stability, hemolysis and cell uptake study. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study was performed in Holtzman rat. Results: Based on solubility in lipid; glyceryl monostearate (GMS) was selected for preparation of BPQ SLN. Batches of BPQ SLN were optimized for average particle size and entrapment efficiency at <100 mg solid content. A combination of Solutol HS-15 and Lutrol F68 at 2% w/v and greater enabled the desired Sf/Si < 1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed decrease in crystallinity of BPQ in BPQ SLN while, scanning electron microscope revealed spherical morphology. BPQ SLN revealed good stability at 4°C and 25°C. Low hemolytic potential (<8%) and in vitro serum stability up to 5 h was observed. Cytotoxicity of SLN to the U937 cell was low. The macrophage cell line revealed high (52%) uptake of BPQ SLN in 1 h suggesting the potential to RES uptake. SLN revealed longer circulation and biodistrbution study confirmed high RES uptake (75%) in RES organs like liver lung spleen etc. Conclusion: The high RES uptake suggests BPQ SLN as a promising approach for targeted and improved delivery in theileriosis. PMID:24459400

Soni, Maheshkumar P.; Shelkar, Nilakash; Gaikwad, Rajiv V.; Vanage, Geeta R.; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V.

2014-01-01

191

Transporter targeted gatifloxacin prodrugs: synthesis, permeability, and topical ocular delivery.  

PubMed

In this work, we aim to design and synthesize prodrugs of gatifloxacin targeting organic cation transporter (OCT), monocarboxylate transporter (MCT), and ATB (0, +) transporters and to identify a prodrug with enhanced delivery to the back of the eye. Dimethylamino-propyl, carboxy-propyl, and amino-propyl(2-methyl) derivatives of gatifloxacin (GFX), DMAP-GFX, CP-GFX, and APM-GFX, were designed and synthesized to target OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. An LC-MS method was developed to analyze drug and prodrug levels in various studies. Solubility and log D (pH 7.4) were measured for prodrugs and the parent drug. The permeability of the prodrugs was determined in the cornea, conjunctiva, and sclera-choroid-retinal pigment epitheluim (SCRPE) and compared with gatifloxacin using an Ussing chamber assembly. Permeability mechanisms were elucidated by determining the transport in the presence of transporter specific inhibitors. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP+), nicotinic acid sodium salt, and ?-methyl-DL-tryptophan were used to inhibit OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. A prodrug selected based on in vitro studies was administered as an eye drop to pigmented rabbits, and the delivery to various eye tissues including vitreous humor was compared with gatifloxacin dosing. DMAP-GFX exhibited 12.8-fold greater solubility than GFX. All prodrugs were more lipophilic, with the measured log D (pH 7.4) values ranging from 0.05 to 1.04, when compared to GFX (log D: -1.15). DMAP-GFX showed 1.4-, 1.8-, and 1.9-fold improvement in permeability across the cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE when compared to GFX. Moreover, it exhibited reduced permeability in the presence of MPP+ (competitive inhibitor of OCT), indicating OCT-mediated transport. CP-GFX showed 1.2-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold improvement in permeability across the cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE, respectively. In the presence of nicotinic acid (competitive inhibitor of MCT), the permeability of CP-GFX was reduced across the conjunctiva. However, the cornea and SCRPE permeability of CP-GFX was not affected by nicotinic acid. APM-GFX did not show any improvement in permeability when compared to GFX across the cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE. Based on solubility and permeability, DMAP-GFX was selected for in vivo studies. DMAP-GFX showed 3.6- and 1.95-fold higher levels in vitreous humor and CRPE compared to that of GFX at 1 h after topical dosing. In vivo conversion of DMAP-GFX prodrug to GFX was quantified in tissues isolated at 1 h after dosing. The parent drug-to-prodrug ratio was 8, 70, 24, 21, 29, 13, 55, and 60% in the cornea, conjunctiva, iris-ciliary body, aqueous humor, sclera, CRPE, retina, and vitreous humor, respectively. In conclusion, DMAP-GFX prodrug enhanced solubility, log D, as well as OCT mediated delivery of gatifloxacin to the back of the eye. PMID:23003105

Vooturi, Sunil K; Kadam, Rajendra S; Kompella, Uday B

2012-11-01

192

Transporter targeted gatifloxacin prodrugs: Synthesis, permeability, and topical ocular delivery  

PubMed Central

Purpose To design and synthesize prodrugs of gatifloxacin targeting OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters and to identify a prodrug with enhanced delivery to the back of the eye. Method Dimethylamino-propyl, carboxy-propyl, and amino-propyl(2-methyl) derivatives of gatifloxacin (GFX), DMAP-GFX, CP-GFX, and APM-GFX, were designed and synthesized to target OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. LC-MS method was developed to analyze drug and prodrug levels in various studies. Solubility and Log D (pH 7.4) were measured for prodrugs and the parent drug. Permeability of the prodrugs was determined in cornea, conjunctiva, and sclera-choroidretinal pigment epitheluim (SCRPE) and compared with gatifloxacin using Ussing chamber assembly. Permeability mechanisms were elucidated by determining the transport in the presence of transporter specific inhibitors. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP+), nicotinic acid sodium salt, and ?-methyl-DL-tryptophan were used to inhibit OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. A prodrug selected based on in vitro studies was administered as an eye drop to pigmented rabbits and the delivery to various eye tissues including vitreous humor was compared with gatifloxacin dosing. Results DMAP-GFX exhibited 12.8-fold greater solubility than GFX. All prodrugs were more lipophilic, with the measured Log D (pH 7.4) values ranging from 0.05 to 1.04, when compared to GFX (Log D: -1.15). DMAP-GFX showed 1.4-, 1.8-, and 1.9-fold improvement in permeability across cornea, conjunctiva, as well as SCRPE when compared to GFX. Moreover, it exhibited reduced permeability in the presence of MPP+ (competitive inhibitor of OCT), indicating OCT-mediated transport. CP-GFX showed 1.2-, 2.3- and 2.5-fold improvement in permeability across cornea, conjunctiva and SCRPE, respectively. In the presence of nicotinic acid (competitive inhibitor of MCT), permeability of CP-GFX was reduced across conjunctiva. However, cornea and SCRPE permeability of CP-GFX was not affected by nicotinic acid. APM-GFX did not show any improvement in permeability when compared to GFX across cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE. Based on solubility and permeability, DMAP-GFX was selected for in vivo studies. DMAP-GFX showed 3.6- and 1.95-fold higher levels in vitreous humor and CRPE compared to that of GFX at 1 hour after topical dosing. In vivo conversion of DMAP-GFX prodrug to GFX was quantified in tissues isolated at 1 hour after dosing. Prodrug-to-parent drug ratio was 8, 70, 24, 21, 29, 13, 55, and 60 % in cornea, conjunctiva, iris-ciliary body, aqueous humor, sclera, CRPE, retina, and vitreous humor, respectively. Conclusions DMAP-GFX prodrug enhanced solubility, Log D, as well as OCT mediated delivery of gatifloxacin to the back of the eye. PMID:23003105

Vooturi, Sunil K.; Kadam, Rajendra S.; Kompella, Uday B.

2013-01-01

193

Mucoadhesive platforms for targeted delivery to the colon.  

PubMed

A novel platform system, comprising a mucoadhesive core and a rapid release carrier, was designed for targeted drug delivery to the colon. Prednisolone pellets containing different carbomers, including Carbopol 971P, Carbopol 974P and Polycarbophil AA-1, with or without organic acids, were produced by extrusion-spheronization. Mucoadhesive pellets were coated with a new enteric double-coating system, which dissolves at pH 7. This system comprises an inner layer of partially neutralized Eudragit S and buffer salt and an outer coating of standard Eudragit S. A single layer of standard Eudragit S was also applied for comparison purposes. Dissolution of the coated pellets was assessed in USP II apparatus in 0.1N HCl followed by Krebs bicarbonate buffer pH 7.4. Visualization of the coating dissolution process was performed by confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluorescent markers in both layers. The mucoadhesive properties of uncoated, single-coated and-double coated pellets were evaluated ex vivo on porcine colonic mucosa. Mucoadhesive pellets coated with a single layer of Eudragit S release its cargo after a lag time of 120 min in Krebs buffer. In contrast, drug release from the double-coated mucoadhesive pellets was significantly accelerated, starting at 75 min. In addition, the mucoadhesive properties of the core of the double coated pellets were higher than those from single-coated pellets after the core had been exposed to the buffer medium. This novel platform technology has the potential to target the colon and overcome the variability in transit and harmonize drug release and bioavailability. PMID:21856393

Varum, Felipe J O; Veiga, Francisco; Sousa, João S; Basit, Abdul W

2011-11-25

194

HSA nanocapsules functionalized with monoclonal antibodies for targeted drug delivery.  

PubMed

The chronic autoimmune disorder rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions of adults and children every year. Chronically activated macrophages secreting enzymes and inflammatory cytokines play a key role in RA. Distinctive marker molecules on the macrophage surface could be used to design a targeted drug delivery device for the treatment of RA without affecting healthy cells and tissues. Here, different methods for covalent attachment of antibodies (mAb) recognizing MHC class II molecules found on macrophages onto human serum albumin (HSA) nanocapsules were compared. HSA nanocapsules were prepared with a hydrodynamic diameter of 500.7 ± 9.4 nm and a narrow size distribution as indicated by a polydispersity index (PDI) of 0.255 ± 0.024. This was achieved by using a sonochemical process avoiding toxic cross linking agents and emulsifiers. Covalent binding of mAb on the surface of HSA nanocapsules was realized using polyethyleneglycol (PEG)3000 as spacer molecule. The presence of mAb was confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Specific binding of mAb-HSA nanocapsules to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry analysis. PMID:24157344

Rollett, Alexandra; Reiter, Tamara; Ohradanova-Repic, Anna; Machacek, Christian; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Stockinger, Hannes; Guebitz, Georg M

2013-12-15

195

Engineering targeted proteins for intracellular delivery of biotherapeutics  

E-print Network

Biotherapeutics have revolutionized medicine with their ability to achieve unprecedented molecular recognition and mediate complex biological responses. The intracellular delivery of biotherapeutics is an unmet scientific ...

Pirie, Christopher M

2011-01-01

196

Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer  

PubMed Central

Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

2013-01-01

197

Hierarchical targeted hepatocyte mitochondrial multifunctional chitosan nanoparticles for anticancer drug delivery.  

PubMed

The overwhelming majority of drugs exert their pharmacological effects after reaching their target sites of action, however, these target sites are mainly located in the cytosol or intracellular organelles. Consequently, delivering drugs to the specific organelle is the key to achieve maximum therapeutic effects and minimum side-effects. In the work reported here, we designed, synthesized, and evaluated a novel mitochondrial-targeted multifunctional nanoparticles (MNPs) based on chitosan derivatives according to the physiological environment of the tumor and the requirement of mitochondrial targeting drug delivery. The intelligent chitosan nanoparticles possess various functions such as stealth, hepatocyte targeting, multistage pH-response, lysosomal escape and mitochondrial targeting, which lead to targeted drug release after the progressively shedding of functional groups, thus realize the efficient intracellular delivery and mitochondrial localization, inhibit the growth of tumor, elevate the antitumor efficacy, and reduce the toxicity of anticancer drugs. It provides a safe and efficient nanocarrier platform for mitochondria targeting anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25818430

Chen, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liujie; Song, Yang; He, Jiayu; Wu, Li; Zhao, Can; Xiao, Yanyu; Li, Wei; Cai, Baochang; Cheng, Haibo; Li, Weidong

2015-06-01

198

Evaluating the role of nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) in women with aggressive metastatic breast cancer.  

PubMed

Nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane(®)) is an albumin-bound form of paclitaxel that utilizes the natural properties of albumin to improve paclitaxel delivery to the tumor. It is licensed for use in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) at a dose of 260 mg/m(2) Q3W based on its superior therapeutic index versus conventional paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) Q3W demonstrated in a Phase III study. In a post-hoc analysis, nab-paclitaxel treatment was associated with rapid and dramatic tumor responses in patients with poor prognostic factors (visceral dominant disease, ?3 metastatic lesions), suggesting it may be a preferred treatment for these patients. Moreover, significant efficacy has been seen with nab-paclitaxel 100 and 150 mg/m(2) QW 3/4, suggesting it may be possible to tailor use of this agent in the future. PMID:24575935

Ciruelos, Eva; Jackisch, Christian

2014-05-01

199

Development of a successive targeting liposome with multi-ligand for efficient targeting gene delivery  

PubMed Central

Background A successful gene delivery system needs to breakthrough several barriers to allow efficient transgenic expression. In the present study, successive targeting liposomes (STL) were constructed by integrating various targeting groups into a nanoparticle to address this issue. Methods Polyethylenimine (PEI) 1800-triamcinolone acetonide (TA) with nuclear targeting capability was synthesized by a two-step reaction. Lactobionic acid was connected with cholesterol to obtain a compound of [(2-lactoylamido) ethylamino]formic acid cholesterol ester (CHEDLA) with hepatocyte-targeting capability. The liposome was modified with PEI 1800-TA and CHEDLA to prepare successive targeting liposome (STL). Its physicochemical properties and transfection efficiency were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Results The diameter of STL was approximately 100 nm with 20 mV of potential. The confocal microscopy observation and potential assay verified that lipid bilayer of STL was decorated with PEI 1800-TA. Cytotoxicity of STL was significantly lower than that of PEI 1800-TA and PEI 25K. The transfection efficiency of 10% CHEDLA STL in HepG2 cells was the higher than of the latter two with serum. Its transfection efficiency was greatly reduced with excessive free galactose, indicating that STL was absorbed via galactose receptor-mediated endocytosis. The in vivo study in mice showed that 10% CHEDLA STL had better transgenic expression in liver than the other carriers. Conclusions STL with multi-ligand was able to overcome the various barriers to target nucleus and special cells and present distinctive transgenic expression. Therefore, it has a great potential for gene therapy as a nonviral carrier. PMID:21574214

Ma, Kun; Shen, Haijun; Shen, Song; Xie, Men; Mao, Chuanbin; Qiu, Liyan; Jin, Yi

2012-01-01

200

Targeted lung cancer therapy: preparation and optimization of transferrin-decorated nanostructured lipid carriers as novel nanomedicine for co-delivery of anticancer drugs and DNA  

PubMed Central

Purpose Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLC) represent an improved generation of lipid nanoparticles. They have specific nanostructures to accommodate drugs/genes, and thus achieve higher loading capacity. The aim of this study was to develop transferrin (Tf)-decorated NLC as multifunctional nanomedicine for co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and enhanced green fluorescence protein plasmid. Methods Firstly, Tf-conjugated ligands were synthesized. Secondly, PTX- and DNA-loaded NLC (PTX-DNA-NLC) was prepared. Finally, Tf-containing ligands were used for the surface decoration of NLC. Their average size, zeta potential, drug, and gene loading were evaluated. Human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line (NCl-H460 cells) was used for the testing of in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo transfection efficiency of NLC was evaluated on mice bearing NCl-H460 cells. Results Tf-decorated PTX and DNA co-encapsulated NLC (Tf-PTX-DNA-NLC) were nano-sized particles with positive zeta potential. Tf-PTX-DNA-NLC displayed low cytotoxicity, high gene transfection efficiency, and enhanced antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion The results demonstrated that Tf-PTX-DNA-NLC can achieve impressive antitumor activity and gene transfection efficiency. Tf decoration also enhanced the active targeting ability of the carriers to NCl-H460 cells. The novel drug and gene delivery system offers a promising strategy for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:25709444

Shao, Zhenyu; Shao, Jingyu; Tan, Bingxu; Guan, Shanghui; Liu, Zhulong; Zhao, Zengjun; He, Fangfang; Zhao, Jian

2015-01-01

201

MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells  

E-print Network

MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells Jagadeesh Setti micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased Rv 6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer

Gao, Jinming

202

Improved genetic immunization via micromechanical disruption of skin-barrier function and targeted epidermal delivery  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skin is an attractive target for delivery of genetic therapies and vaccines. However, new approaches are needed to access this tissue more effectively. Here, we describe a new delivery technology based on arrays of structurally precise, micron-scale silicon projections, which we term microenhancer arrays (MEAs). In a human clinical study, these devices effectively breached the skin barrier, allowing direct access

Jason B. Alarcon; John M. Brittingham; Diane E. Sutter; Ronald J. Pettis; Noel G. Harvey; John A. Mikszta

2002-01-01

203

Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Noncovalently Crosslinked Hydrogels  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method for targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds from hydrogels is presented. The method involves administering to a cell a hydrogel in which a therapeutic compound is noncovalently bound to heparin.

Kiick, Kristi L. (Inventor); Yamaguchi, Nori (Inventor)

2013-01-01

204

Targeted delivery of a cisplatin prodrug for safer and more effective prostate cancer therapy in vivo  

E-print Network

Targeted delivery and controlled release of inactive platinum (Pt) prodrugs may offer a new approach to improve the efficacy and tolerability of the Pt family of drugs, which are used to treat 50% of all cancers today. ...

Dhar, Shanta

205

Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy  

E-print Network

The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery ...

Mortensen, Luke J.

206

A Nonpolycationic Fully Proteinaceous Multiagent System for Potent Targeted Delivery of siRNA  

E-print Network

Protein-based methods of targeted short-interfering RNA (siRNA) delivery have the potential to solve some of the problems faced by nanoparticle-based methods, such as poor pharmacokinetics and biodistribution, low tumor ...

Liu, David V.

207

Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Synthetic nano-low density lipoprotein as targeted drug delivery vehicle for glioblastoma multiforme  

Microsoft Academic Search

The low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor has been shown to be upregulated in GBM tumor cells and is therefore a potential molecular target for the delivery of therapeutic agents. A synthetic nano-LDL (nLDL) particle was developed and tested to determine its utility as a drug delivery vehicle targeted to GBM tumors. nLDL particles were constructed by combining a synthetic peptide

Mina Nikanjam; Eleanor A. Blakely; Kathleen A. Bjornstad; Xiao Shu; Thomas F. Budinger; Trudy M. Forte

208

Polyaspartic acid functionalized gold nanoparticles for tumor targeted doxorubicin delivery.  

PubMed

In this paper, we present polyaspartic acid, a biodegradable polymer as a reducing and functionalizing agent for the synthesis of doxorubicin loaded gold nanoparticles by a green process. Gold nanoparticles were stable to electrolytes and pH. Secondary amino groups of polyaspartic acid enabled reduction of gold chloride to form gold nanoparticles of size 55 +/-10 nm, with face centered cubic crystalline structure as confirmed by UV, TEM, SAED and XRD studies. Cationic doxorubicin was readily loaded onto anionic polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles by ionic complexation. Fluorescence studies confirmed doxorubicin loading while FTIR spectra confirmed ionic complexation. Doxorubicin loading onto polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles was studied at doxorubicin/polyaspartic acid molar ratios 1:10 to 1:1. As the molar ratio tended to unity, although loading up to 60% was achieved, colloidal instability resulted and is attributed to effective covering of negative charges of polyaspartic acid. Stable doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles of 105 +/- 15.1 nm with doxorubicin loading of 23.85% w/w and zeta potential value of -28 +/- 0.77 mV were obtained at doxorubicin/polyaspartic acid molar ratio 1:10. Higher doxorubicin release rate from the doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles in an acid medium (i.e., pH 5.5) as compared to that in pH 7.4 and deionized water is a desirable characteristic for tumor targeted delivery. Enhanced cytotoxicity and 3 fold higher uptake of doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles as compared to doxorubicin solution were seen in MCF-7 breast cancer cells while polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles revealed no cytotoxicity confirming safety. Prominent regression in tumor size in-vivo in fibrosarcoma tumor induced mouse model was observed upto 59 days with doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles while doxorubicin solution treated mice showed regrowth beyond 23rd day. Moreover, a decrease of body weight of 35% indicating severe toxicity with doxorubicin solution as compared to only 20% with gradual recovery after day 30 in case of doxorubicin loaded polyaspartic acid gold nanoparticles confirmed their lower toxicity and enhanced efficacy. PMID:24724506

Khandekar, Sameera V; Kulkarni, M G; Devarajan, Padma V

2014-01-01

209

The role of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery  

PubMed Central

HER2 is highly expressed in a significant proportion of breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and gastric cancer. Since the discovery of its role in tumorigenesis, HER2 has received great attention in cancer research during the past two decades. Successful development of the humanized monoclonal anti-HER2 antibody (Trastuzumab) for the treatment of breast cancer further spurred scientists to develop various HER2 specific antibodies, dimerization inhibitors and kinase inhibitors for cancer therapy. On the other hand, the high expression of HER2 and the accessibility of its extracellular domain make HER2 an ideal target for the targeted delivery of anti-tumor drugs as well as imaging agents. Although there is no natural ligand for HER2, various artificial ligands targeting HER2 have been developed and applied in various targeted drug delivery systems. The emphasis of this review is to elucidate the roles of HER2 in cancer therapy and targeted drug delivery. The structure and signal pathway of HER2 will be briefly described. The role of HER2 in tumorigenesis and its relationship with other tumor markers will be discussed. For the HER2 targeted cancer therapy, numerous strategies including the blockage of receptor dimerization, inhibition of the tyrosine kinase activity, and interruption of the downstream signal pathway will be summarized. For the targeted drug delivery to HER2 positive tumor cells, various targeting ligands and their delivery systems will be described in details. PMID:20385184

Tai, Wanyi; Mahato, Rubi; Cheng, Kun

2010-01-01

210

Transcriptional Profiling of Targets for Combination Therapy of Lung Carcinoma with Paclitaxel and Mitogen-activated Protein\\/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase Inhibitor1  

Microsoft Academic Search

A combination of paclitaxel (Taxol) and mitogen-activated protein\\/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK\\/Erk) inhibitor repre- sents a rational new approach to chemotherapy. We performed Af- fymetrix microarray analysis to understand the global effects of this combination in lung carcinoma. Genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis, adhesion, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis were modu- lated. We observed similar patterns of gene

Debra J. Taxman; Jeffrey P. MacKeigan; Casey Clements; Daniel T. Bergstralh

2003-01-01

211

First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer - specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007) is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel). A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC. PMID:24399877

Gupta, Neha; Hatoum, Hassan; Dy, Grace K

2014-01-01

212

Synthetic aptamer-polymer hybrid constructs for programmed drug delivery into specific target cells.  

PubMed

Viruses have evolved specialized mechanisms to efficiently transport nucleic acids and other biomolecules into specific host cells. They achieve this by performing a coordinated series of complex functions, resulting in delivery that is far more efficient than existing synthetic delivery mechanisms. Inspired by these natural systems, we describe a process for synthesizing chemically defined molecular constructs that likewise achieve targeted delivery through a series of coordinated functions. We employ an efficient "click chemistry" technique to synthesize aptamer-polymer hybrids (APHs), coupling cell-targeting aptamers to block copolymers that secure a therapeutic payload in an inactive state. Upon recognizing the targeted cell-surface marker, the APH enters the host cell via endocytosis, at which point the payload is triggered to be released into the cytoplasm. After visualizing this process with coumarin dye, we demonstrate targeted killing of tumor cells with doxorubicin. Importantly, this process can be generalized to yield APHs that specifically target different surface markers. PMID:25290917

Oh, Seung Soo; Lee, Bongjae F; Leibfarth, Frank A; Eisenstein, Michael; Robb, Maxwell J; Lynd, Nathaniel A; Hawker, Craig J; Soh, H Tom

2014-10-22

213

Calcium-crosslinked LABL-TAT complexes effectively target gene delivery to ICAM-1 expressing cells  

PubMed Central

Targeted gene delivery using non-viral vectors is a highly touted scheme to reduce the potential for toxic or immunological side effects by reducing dose. In previous reports, TAT polyplexes with DNA have shown relatively poor gene delivery. The transfection efficiency has been enhanced by condensing TAT/DNA complexes to a small particle size using calcium. To explore the targetability of these condensed TAT complexes, LABL peptide targeting intercellular cell-adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) was conjugated to TAT peptide using a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer. PEGylation reduced the transfection efficiency of TAT, but TAT complexes targeting ICAM-1 expressing cells regained much of the lost transfection efficiency. Targeted block peptides properly formulated with calcium offer promise for gene delivery to ICAM-1 expressing cells at sites of injury or inflammation. PMID:21473630

Khondee, Supang; Baoum, Abdulgader; Siahaan, Teruna J.; Berkland, Cory

2014-01-01

214

Bacterially-derived nanocells for tumor-targeted delivery of chemotherapeutics and cell cycle inhibitors.  

PubMed

Chemotherapeutic drug therapy in cancer is seriously hampered by severe toxicity primarily due to indiscriminate drug distribution and consequent collateral damage to normal cells. Molecularly targeted drugs such as cell cycle inhibitors are being developed to achieve a higher degree of tumor cell specificity and reduce toxic side effects. Unfortunately, relative to the cytotoxics, many of the molecularly targeted drugs are less potent and the target protein is expressed only at certain stages of the cell cycle thus necessitating regimens like continuous infusion therapy to arrest a significant number of tumor cells in a heterogeneous tumor mass. Here we discuss targeted drug delivery nanovectors and a recently reported bacterially-derived 400 nm sized minicell that can be packaged with therapeutically significant concentrations of chemotherapeutic drugs, targeted to tumor cell surface receptors and effect intracellular drug delivery with highly significant anti-tumor effects in vivo. We also report that molecularly targeted drugs can also be packaged in minicells and targeted to tumor cells with highly significant tumor growth-inhibition and regression in mouse xenografts despite administration of minute amounts of drug. This targeted intracellular drug delivery may overcome many of the hurdles associated with the delivery of cytotoxic and molecularly targeted drugs. PMID:17786046

MacDiarmid, Jennifer A; Madrid-Weiss, Jocelyn; Amaro-Mugridge, Nancy B; Phillips, Leo; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu

2007-09-01

215

Paclitaxel Induces Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells through Different Calcium—Regulating Mechanisms Depending on External Calcium Conditions  

PubMed Central

Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an “Enhanced Calcium Efflux” mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel’s stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. PMID:24549172

Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

2014-01-01

216

Human cancer cell line microRNAs associated with in vitro sensitivity to paclitaxel  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel is a mainstay of treatment for many solid tumors, and frequently, clinical outcome is influenced by paclitaxel sensitivity. Despite this, our understanding of the molecular basis of paclitaxel response is incomplete. Recently, it has been shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) influence messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptional control and can contribute to human carcinogenesis. In the present study, our objective was to identify miRNAs associated with cancer cell line response to paclitaxel and to evaluate these miRNAs as therapeutic targets to increase paclitaxel sensitivity. We measured the expression of 335 unique miRNAs in 40 human cancer cell lines selected from the NCI panel. We then integrated miRNA expression data with publicly available paclitaxel-sensitivity (GI50) data for each of the 40 cell lines to identify miRNAs associated with paclitaxel sensitivity. Ovarian cancer cell lines with differential miRNA expression and paclitaxel sensitivity were transiently transfected with miRNA precursors and inhibitors, and the effects on in vitro cell paclitaxel sensitivity were evaluated. Pearson’s correlation identified 2 miRNAs (miR-367 and miR-30a-5p) associated with the NCI40 cell line in vitro paclitaxel response (P<0.0003). Ovarian cancer cells were selected based on the association between paclitaxel sensitivity and miR-367/miR-30a-5p expression. Overexpression of miR-367 in the paclitaxel-sensitive cells [PA1; IC50, 1.69 nM, high miR-367 (2.997), low miR-30a-5p (?0.323)] further increased paclitaxel sensitivity, whereas miR-367 depletion decreased paclitaxel sensitivity. In contrast, overexpression and depletion of miR-30a-5p in the paclitaxel-resistant cells [OVCAR4; IC50, 17.8 nM, low miR-367 (?0.640), high miR-30a-5p (3.270)] decreased and increased paclitaxel sensitivity, respectively. We identified and successfully targeted miRNAs associated with human cancer cell line response to paclitaxel. Our strategy of integrating in vitro miRNA expression and drug sensitivity data may not only aid in the characterization of determinants of drug response but also in the identification of novel therapeutic targets to increase activity of existing therapeutics. PMID:24220856

CHEN, NING; CHON, HYE SOOK; XIONG, YIN; MARCHION, DOUGLAS C.; JUDSON, PATRICIA L.; HAKAM, ARDESHIR; GONZALEZ-BOSQUET, JESUS; PERMUTH-WEY, JENNIFER; WENHAM, ROBERT M.; APTE, SACHIN M.; CHENG, JIN Q.; SELLERS, THOMAS A.; LANCASTER, JOHNATHAN M.

2014-01-01

217

Prevention of local tumor growth with paclitaxel-loaded microspheres  

E-print Network

Prevention of local tumor growth with paclitaxel- loaded microspheres Solomon M. Azouz, MS,a Joseph. The primary aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a microsphere drug delivery system to locally resection margin. Methods: Poly-(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres loaded

218

Organ-targeted high-throughput in vivo biologics screen identifies materials for RNA delivery.  

PubMed

Therapies based on biologics involving delivery of proteins, DNA, and RNA are currently among the most promising approaches. However, although large combinatorial libraries of biologics and delivery vehicles can be readily synthesized, there are currently no means to rapidly characterize them in vivo using animal models. Here, we demonstrate high-throughput in vivo screening of biologics and delivery vehicles by automated delivery into target tissues of small vertebrates with developed organs. Individual zebrafish larvae are automatically oriented and immobilized within hydrogel droplets in an array format using a microfluidic system, and delivery vehicles are automatically microinjected to target organs with high repeatability and precision. We screened a library of lipid-like delivery vehicles for their ability to facilitate the expression of protein-encoding RNAs in the central nervous system. We discovered delivery vehicles that are effective in both larval zebrafish and rats. Our results showed that the in vivo zebrafish model can be significantly more predictive of both false positives and false negatives in mammals than in vitro mammalian cell culture assays. Our screening results also suggest certain structure-activity relationships, which can potentially be applied to design novel delivery vehicles. PMID:25184623

Chang, Tsung-Yao; Shi, Peng; Steinmeyer, Joseph D; Chatnuntawech, Itthi; Tillberg, Paul; Love, Kevin T; Eimon, Peter M; Anderson, Daniel G; Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

2014-10-01

219

Synthesis and characterization of cisplatin-loaded, EGFR-targeted biopolymer and in vitro evaluation for targeted delivery.  

PubMed

The design of smart targeted drug delivery systems that deliver drugs to specific cancer cells will give rise to cancer treatments with better efficacy and lower toxicity levels. We report the development and characterizations of maleimide-functionalized biopolymer (Mal-PGA-Asp) as an effective targeted drug delivery carrier synthesized from an amidation reaction between aspartylated PGA (PGA-Asp) and N-(maleimidohexanoyl)-ethylenediamine (NME). The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting peptide (TP13) was conjugated to Mal-PGA-Asp to obtain the targeting carrier (TP13-Mal-PGA-Asp). Cisplatin was finally loaded by complexation to form a biocompatible and tumor targeted therapeutic drug (TP13-Mal-PGA-Asp3-Pt). The resultant biopolymer with an average size 87 ± 28 nm showed a sustainable release profile with a half-maximal release time (t(1/2)) of approximately 15 h in physiological saline. Fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry analysis revealed that TP13 significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of TP13-Mal-PGA-Asp3-Pt in the human hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721. The IC(50) value demonstrated the superior anticancer activity of TP13-Mal-PGA-Asp3-Pt over PGA-Asp-Pt. Therefore, the newly developed drug carrier (TP13-Mal-PGA-Asp) obtained in this study may provide an efficient and targeted delivery of anticancer drugs, presenting a promising targeted chemotherapy in EGFR-positive cancers. PMID:22678850

Geng, Xu; Ye, Haifeng; Feng, Zhen; Lao, Xun; Zhang, Li; Huang, Jing; Wu, Zi-Rong

2012-10-01

220

Size matters: gold nanoparticles in targeted cancer drug delivery  

PubMed Central

Cancer is the current leading cause of death worldwide, responsible for approximately one quarter of all deaths in the USA and UK. Nanotechnologies provide tremendous opportunities for multimodal, site-specific drug delivery to these disease sites and Au nanoparticles further offer a particularly unique set of physical, chemical and photonic properties with which to do so. This review will highlight some recent advances, by our laboratory and others, in the use of Au nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery to these malignancies and will also provide insights into their rational design, synthesis, physiological properties and clinical/preclinical applications, as well as strategies and challenges toward the clinical implementation of these constructs moving forward. PMID:22834077

Dreaden, Erik C; Austin, Lauren A; Mackey, Megan A; El-Sayed, Mostafa A

2013-01-01

221

Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents  

PubMed Central

Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

2014-01-01

222

Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

2014-04-01

223

Lipoprotein Nanoplatform for Targeted Delivery of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Agents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) provides a highly versatile natural nanoplatform for delivery of optical and MRI contrast agents,\\u000a photodynamic therapy agents and chemotherapeutic agents to normal and neoplastic cells that over express LDL receptors (LDLR).\\u000a Extension to other lipoproteins ranging in diameter from ~5-10 nm (high density lipoprotein, HDL) to over a micron (chilomicrons)\\u000a is feasible. Loading of contrast or therapeutic

Jerry D. Glickson; Sissel Lund-Katz; Rong Zhou; Hoon Choi; I-Wei Chen; Hui Li; Ian Corbin; Anatoliy V. Popov; Weiguo Cao; Liping Song; Chenze Qi; Diane Marotta; David S. Nelson; Juan Chen; Britton Chance; Gang Zheng

224

Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues  

PubMed Central

Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

2012-01-01

225

Paclitaxel and immune system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chemotherapy remains the mainstay of treatment for both early stage as well as metastatic tumors. Paclitaxel (PTX), a novel anticancer drug, is a prominent taxane which is active against a broad range of tumors that are generally considered to be refractory to conventional chemotherapy, with benefits gained in terms of overall survival and disease-free survival. PTX is initially characterized as

Aqeel Javeed; Muhammad Ashraf; Amjad Riaz; Aamir Ghafoor; Sheryar Afzal; Muhammad Mahmood Mukhtar

2009-01-01

226

Magnetic Targeted Delivery of Dexamethasone Acetate across the Round Window Membrane in Guinea Pigs  

PubMed Central

Hypothesis Magnetically susceptible PLGA nanoparticles will effectively target the round window membrane (RWM) for delivery of dexamethasone-acetate (Dex-Ac) to the scala tympani. Background Targeted delivery of therapeutics to specific tissues can be accomplished using different targeting mechanisms. One technology includes iron oxide nanoparticles, susceptible to external magnetic fields. If a nanocomposite composed of biocompatible polymer (PLGA), magnetite, and Dex-Ac can be pulled into and across the mammalian RWM, drug delivery can be enhanced. Method In vitro targeting and release kinetics of PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac nanoparticles first were measured using a RWM model. Next, these optimized nanocomposites were targeted to the RWM by filling the niche in anesthetized guinea pigs. A permanent magnet was placed opposite the RWM for 1 hour. Cochlear soft tissues, perilymph, and RWM were harvested after euthanasia and steroid levels were measured using HPLC. Results Membrane transport, in vitro, proved optimal targeting using a lower particle magnetite concentration (1 versus 5 or 10 mg/ml). In vivo targeted PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac particles had an average size of 482.8 ± 158 nm (DLS) and an average zeta potential ?19.9 ± 3.3 mV. In 1 hour, there was significantly increased cochlear targeted delivery of Dex or Dex-Ac, compared with diffusion alone. Conclusion Superparamagnetic PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac nanoparticles under an external magnetic field (0.26 mT) for 1 hour significantly increased Dex-Ac delivery to the inner ear. The RWM was not completely permeated and also became loaded with nanocomposites, indicating that delivery to the cochlea would continue for weeks by PLGA degradation and passive diffusion. PMID:23187928

Du, Xiaoping; Chen, Kejian; Kuriyavar, Satish; Kopke, Richard D.; Grady, Brian P.; Bourne, David H.; Li, Wei; Dormer, Kenneth J.

2012-01-01

227

Protein engineering for targeted delivery of radionuclides to tumors  

E-print Network

Traditional cancer treatment strategies include systemic chemotherapy, external beam radiation, and surgical excision. Chemotherapy is nonspecific, and targets all rapidly dividing cells. External beam radiation and surgery ...

Orcutt, Kelly Davis

2010-01-01

228

Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system  

SciTech Connect

The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D[sub 2] or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. (W.J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, CA (United States))

1993-05-01

229

Conceptual design report for the University of Rochester cryogenic target delivery system  

SciTech Connect

The upgrade of the Omega laser at the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) will result in a need for large targets filled with D{sub 2} or Dt and maintained at cryogenic temperatures. This mandates a cryogenic target delivery system capable of filling, layering, characterizing and delivering cryogenic targets to the Omega Upgrade target chamber. The program goal is to design, construct, and test the entire target delivery system by June 1996. When completed (including an operational demonstration), the system will be shipped to Rochester for reassembly and commissioning in time for the Omega Upgrade cryogenic campaign, scheduled to start in 1998. General Atomics has been assigned the task of developing the conceptual design for the cryogenic target delivery system. Design and fabrication activities will be closely coordinated with the University of Rochester, Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), drawing upon their knowledge base in fuel layering and cryogenic characterization. The development of a target delivery system for Omega could also benefit experiments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the other ICF Laboratories in that the same technologies could be applied to NOVA, the National Ignition Facility or the future Laboratory Microfusion Facility.

Fagaly, R.L.; Alexander, N.B.; Bourque, R.F.; Dahms, C.F.; Lindgren, J.R.; Miller, W.J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Bittner, D.N.; Hendricks, C.D. [W.J. Schafer Associates, Livermore, CA (US)

1993-05-01

230

Colon Targeted Drug Delivery Systems: A Review on Primary and Novel Approaches  

PubMed Central

The colon is a site where both local and systemic delivery of drugs can take place. Local delivery allows topical treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. However, treatment can be made effective if the drugs can be targeted directly into the colon, thereby reducing the systemic side effects. This review, mainly compares the primary approaches for CDDS (Colon Specific Drug Delivery) namely prodrugs, pH and time dependent systems, and microbially triggered systems, which achieved limited success and had limitations as compared with newer CDDS namely pressure controlled colonic delivery capsules, CODESTM, and osmotic controlled drug delivery which are unique in terms of achieving in vivo site specificity, and feasibility of manufacturing process. PMID:22125706

Philip, Anil K.; Philip, Betty

2010-01-01

231

Delivery of siRNA into breast cancer cells via phage fusion protein-targeted liposomes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers a unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through

Deepa Bedi; Tiziana Musacchio; Olusegun A. Fagbohun; James W. Gillespie; Patricia Deinnocentes; R. Curtis Bird; Lonnie Bookbinder; Vladimir P. Torchilin; Valery A. Petrenko

2011-01-01

232

In vivo drug release behavior in dogs from a new colon-targeted delivery system  

Microsoft Academic Search

The colon-targeted delivery capsule (CTDC), a new capsule-type dosage form for colonic delivery of drugs, was investigated for the in vivo drug release behavior in dogs. A CTDC formulation with prednisolone as a model drug and theophylline as a marker substance for gastric emptying was prepared for this study. The enteric-coated capsule (ECC) formulation with a similar composition was also

Takashi Ishibashi; Harumi Hatano; Masao Kobayashi; Masakazu Mizobe; Hiroyuki Yoshino

1999-01-01

233

Choline transporter-targeting and co-delivery system for glioma therapy.  

PubMed

Combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy is a promising approach for glioma therapy. In this study, a co-delivery system of plasmid encoding human tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (pORF-hTRAIL, Trail) and doxorubicin (DOX) has been simply constructed in two steps. Firstly, DOX was intercalated into Trail to form a stable complex. Secondly, DOX-Trail complex was condensed by Dendrigraft poly-L-lysine (DGL) to form a nanoscaled co-delivery system. Choline transporters are both expressed on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and glioma, Herein, a choline derivate with high choline transporter affinity was chosen as BBB and glioma dual targeting ligand. Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system showed higher cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity than unmodified co-delivery system in U87 MG cells. In comparison with single medication or unmodified delivery system, Choline-derivate modified co-delivery system induced more apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. The therapeutic efficacy on U87 MG bearing xenografts further confirmed the predominance of this dual targeting and co-delivery system. PMID:23993342

Li, Jianfeng; Guo, Yubo; Kuang, Yuyang; An, Sai; Ma, Haojun; Jiang, Chen

2013-12-01

234

Carboxymethyl starch and lecithin complex as matrix for targeted drug delivery: I. Monolithic mesalamine forms for colon delivery.  

PubMed

For drugs expected to act locally in the colon, and for successful treatment, a delivery device is necessary, in order to limit the systemic absorption which decreases effectiveness and causes important side effects. Various delayed release systems are currently commercialized; most of them based on pH-dependent release which is sensitive to gastrointestinal pH variation. This study proposes a novel excipient for colon delivery. This new preparation consists in the complexation between carboxymethyl starch (CMS) and Lecithin (L). As opposed to existing excipients, the new complex is pH-independent, inexpensive, and easy to manufacture and allows a high drug loading. FTIR, X-ray, and SEM structural analysis all support the hypothesis of the formation of a complex. By minor variation of the excipient content within the tablet, it is possible to modulate the release time and delivery at specific sites of the gastrointestinal tract. This study opens the door to a new pH-independent delivery system for mesalamine targeted administration. Our novel formulation fits well with the posology of mesalamine, used in the treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which requires repeated administrations (1g orally four times a day) to maintain a good quality of life. PMID:23562535

Mihaela Friciu, Maria; Canh Le, Tien; Ispas-Szabo, Pompilia; Mateescu, Mircea Alexandru

2013-11-01

235

Apoptosis induced by paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA–TPGS in Hep-G2 cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Paclitaxel is an important anticancer drug in clinical use for treatment of a variety of cancers. The clinical application of paclitaxel in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In this study paclitaxel-loaded copolymer poly(lactide)–d-?-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA–TPGS) nanoparticles were prepared by a modified solvent extraction/evaporation technique. The characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as surface morphology, size distribution, zeta potential, solubility and apoptosis were investigated in vitro. The obtained spherical nanoparticles were negatively charged with a zeta potential of about ?18 mV with the size around 44 nm and a narrow size distribution. The ability of paclitaxel-loaded PLA–TPGS nanoparticles to induce apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Hep-G2) indicates the possibility of developing paclitaxel nanoparticles as a potential universal cancer chemotherapeutic agent.

Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Tran Thi, Hong Ha; Le Quang, Duong; Nguyen Thi, Toan; Tran Thi, Nhu Hang; Huong Le, Mai; Thu Ha, Phuong

2012-12-01

236

Targeted Delivery System of Nanobiomaterials in Anticancer Therapy: From Cells to Clinics  

PubMed Central

Targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials are necessary to be developed for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Nanobiomaterials can be engineered to recognize cancer-specific receptors at the cellular levels and to deliver anticancer drugs into the diseased sites. In particular, nanobiomaterial-based nanocarriers, so-called nanoplatforms, are the design of the targeted delivery systems such as liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles/micelles, nanoconjugates, norganic materials, carbon-based nanobiomaterials, and bioinspired phage system, which are based on the nanosize of 1–100?nm in diameter. In this review, the design and the application of these nanoplatforms are discussed at the cellular levels as well as in the clinics. We believe that this review can offer recent advances in the targeted delivery systems of nanobiomaterials regarding in vitro and in vivo applications and the translation of nanobiomaterials to nanomedicine in anticancer therapy. PMID:24672796

Jin, Su-Eon; Jin, Hyo-Eon; Hong, Soon-Sun

2014-01-01

237

Targeted nonviral delivery vehicles to neural progenitor cells in the mouse subventricular zone  

PubMed Central

Targeted gene therapy can potentially minimize undesirable off-target toxicity due to specific delivery. Neuron-specific gene delivery in the central nervous system is challenging because neurons are non-dividing and also outnumbered by glial cells. One approach is to transfect dividing neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs and NPCs, respectively). In this work, we demonstrate cell-specific gene delivery to NPCs in the brains of adult mice using a peptide-modified polymeric vector. Tet1, a 12-amino acid peptide which has been shown to bind specifically to neuronal cells, was utilized as a neuronal targeting ligand. The cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) was covalently modified with polyethylene glycol (PEG) for in vivo salt stability and Tet1 for neuron targeting to yield a Tet1-PEG-PEI conjugate. When plasmid DNA encoding the reporter gene luciferase was complexed with Tet1-PEG-PEI and delivered in vivo via an injection into the lateral ventricle, Tet1-PEG-PEI complexes mediated increased luciferase expression levels in brain tissue when compared to unmodified PEI-PEG complexes. In addition, cells transfected by Tet1-PEG-PEI complexes were found to be exclusively adult NPCs whereas untargeted PEG-PEI complexes were found to transfect a heterogenous population of cells. Thus, we have demonstrated targeted, nonviral delivery of nucleic acids to adult NPCs using the Tet1 targeting ligand. These materials could potentially be used to deliver therapeutic genes for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20004466

Kwon, Ester J.; Lasiene, Jurate; Jacobson, Berit; Park, In-Kyu; Horner, Philip J.; Pun, Suzie H.

2009-01-01

238

Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors  

PubMed Central

Introduction Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively con-trolled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics). Conclusion The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent. PMID:23678437

Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

2012-01-01

239

Synthesis and Evaluation of Fluorescent Magnetic Composites as Targeted Drug Delivery Carriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed Fe3O4@ZnS-based fluorescent magnetic composites as targeted drug delivery carriers via a facile route. The results indicated that the composites exhibited both magnetic and fluorescent properties. Fe3O4@ZnS possessed high saturation magnetization (68.25 emu/g) at room temperature. Ultraviolet light can be easily obtained by exposing the microspheres to different excitation wavelengths. The drug loading studies showed that Fe3O4@ZnS-based fluorescent magnetic composites had an excellent drug loading performance. These traits made the composites better for the application of medical imaging and magnetic targeted drug delivery.

Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong; Wu, Juan; Xu, Shanshan; Tian, Renbing

2015-01-01

240

Synthesis and Evaluation of Fluorescent Magnetic Composites as Targeted Drug Delivery Carriers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have developed Fe3O4@ZnS-based fluorescent magnetic composites as targeted drug delivery carriers via a facile route. The results indicated that the composites exhibited both magnetic and fluorescent properties. Fe3O4@ZnS possessed high saturation magnetization (68.25 emu/g) at room temperature. Ultraviolet light can be easily obtained by exposing the microspheres to different excitation wavelengths. The drug loading studies showed that Fe3O4@ZnS-based fluorescent magnetic composites had an excellent drug loading performance. These traits made the composites better for the application of medical imaging and magnetic targeted drug delivery.

Jiang, Wei; Chen, Xiaolong; Wu, Juan; Xu, Shanshan; Tian, Renbing

2015-03-01

241

Preparation, characterization, cytotoxicity and drug release behavior of liposome-enveloped paclitaxel/Fe3O4 nanoparticles.  

PubMed

Phospholipid vesicles encapsulating magnetic nanoparticles (liposome complexes) have been prepared for targeting a drug to a specific organ using a magnetic force, as well as for local hyperthermia therapy. Liposome complexes are also an ideal platform for use as contrast agents of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We describe the preparation and characterization of liposomes containing magnetite. These liposomes were obtained by thin film hydration method and Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method. They were characterized by an electrophoretic light scattering spectrophotometer, the liposome complexes were subsequently coated using chitosan. We have further investigated the ability of the above formulation for drug delivery and MRI applications. We are specifically interested in evaluating our liposome complexes for drug therapy; hence, we selected paclitaxel for the combination study. The amount of paclitaxel was measured at 227 nm using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer. Cytotoxicity of liposome complexes was treated with the various concentrations of paclitaxel in PC3 cell lines. The structure and properties of liposome complexes were analyzed by FT-IR, XRD and VSM. The particle size was analyzed by TEM and DLS. PMID:21446568

Kim, Min-Jung; Jang, Dae-Hwan; Lee, Young-In; Jung, Hyun Sook; Lee, Hak-Jong; Choa, Yong-Ho

2011-01-01

242

Nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers for clinical administration of paclitaxel.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel is one of the best antineoplastic drugs found from nature in the past decades, which has been found effective against a wide spectrum of cancers including ovarian cancer, breast cancer, small and non small cell lung cancer, colon cancer, head and neck cancer, multiple myeloma, melanoma, and Kaposi's sarcoma. Like many other anticancer drugs, it has difficulties in clinical administration due to its poor solubility in water and most pharmaceutical reagents. In its current clinical application, an adjuvant called Cremophor EL has to be employed, which has been found to be responsible for many serious side effects. Nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers can provide an ideal solution to such an adjuvant problem and realize a controlled and targeted delivery of the drug with better efficacy and less side effects. With further development, such as particle size optimization and surface coating, nanoparticle formulation of paclitaxel can promote a new concept of chemotherapy to realize its full efficacy and to improve quality of life of the patients, which includes personalized chemotherapy, local chemotherapy, sustained chemotherapy, oral chemotherapy, chemotherapy across the blood-brain barrier, chemotherapy across the microcirculation barrier, etc. The present research proposes a novel formulation for fabrication of nanoparticles of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) by a modified solvent extraction/evaporation technique, in which natural emulsifiers, such as phospholipids, cholesterol and vitamin E TPGS are creatively applied to achieve high drug encapsulation efficiency, desired drug released kinetics, high cell uptake and high cytotoxicity. The nanoparticles composed of various recipes and manufactured under various conditions were characterized by laser light scattering (LLS) for size and size distribution, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for morphological properties, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) for surface chemistry, zeta-potential for surface charge, and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the thermogram properties. The drug encapsulation efficiency and the drug release kinetics under in vitro conditions were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). It was found that these natural emulsifiers have great advantages for nanoparticle formulation of paclitaxel over the traditional macromolecular emulsifiers, such as polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Nanoparticles of desired small size and narrow size distribution can be obtained. The drug encapsulation efficiency can be achieved as high as 100 %. The released kinetics can be made under control. The HT-29 cancer cell line experiment showed that after 24 hours of incubation, the cell mortality caused by the drug administered by such nanoparticle formulation could be more than 13 times higher than that caused by the free drug under similar conditions. PMID:14965222

Feng, Si-Shen; Mu, Li; Win, Khin Yin; Huang, Guofeng

2004-02-01

243

Polymersomes functionalized via ``click'' chemistry with the fibronectin mimetic peptides PR_b and GRGDSP for targeted delivery to cells with  

E-print Network

specific drug delivery agents, thus highlighting them as a promising model targeted drug delivery system functionalized polymersomes to achieve targeted delivery to colon cancer cells was assessed by studying a drug indiscriminately, targeting strategies promote delivery only to the pathological site

Kokkoli, Efie

244

The application of carbon nanotubes in target drug delivery systems for cancer therapies  

PubMed Central

Among all cancer treatment options, chemotherapy continues to play a major role in killing free cancer cells and removing undetectable tumor micro-focuses. Although chemotherapies are successful in some cases, systemic toxicity may develop at the same time due to lack of selectivity of the drugs for cancer tissues and cells, which often leads to the failure of chemotherapies. Obviously, the therapeutic effects will be revolutionarily improved if human can deliver the anticancer drugs with high selectivity to cancer cells or cancer tissues. This selective delivery of the drugs has been called target treatment. To realize target treatment, the first step of the strategies is to build up effective target drug delivery systems. Generally speaking, such a system is often made up of the carriers and drugs, of which the carriers play the roles of target delivery. An ideal carrier for target drug delivery systems should have three pre-requisites for their functions: (1) they themselves have target effects; (2) they have sufficiently strong adsorptive effects for anticancer drugs to ensure they can transport the drugs to the effect-relevant sites; and (3) they can release the drugs from them in the effect-relevant sites, and only in this way can the treatment effects develop. The transporting capabilities of carbon nanotubes combined with appropriate surface modifications and their unique physicochemical properties show great promise to meet the three pre-requisites. Here, we review the progress in the study on the application of carbon nanotubes as target carriers in drug delivery systems for cancer therapies. PMID:21995320

2011-01-01

245

Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers  

PubMed Central

The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

2012-01-01

246

Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells  

Cancer.gov

Current methods to deliver proteins into cells (e.g., using retrovirus, DNA transfection, protein transduction, microinjection, complexing the protein with lipids, etc.) have many shortcomings, such as lack of target specificity toxicity, or unwanted random integration into the host chromosome.

247

Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of a Novel Amphiphilic Polymer RGD-PEG-Chol for Target Drug Delivery System  

PubMed Central

An amphiphilic polymer RGD-PEG-Chol which can be produced in large scale at a very low cost has been synthesized successfully. The synthesized intermediates and final products were characterized and confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (1H NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The paclitaxel- (PTX-) loaded liposomes based on RGD-PEG-Chol were then prepared by film formation method. The liposomes had a size within 100?nm and significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel to B16F10 cell as demonstrated by MTT test (IC50 = 0.079??g/mL of RGD-modified PTX-loaded liposomes compared to 9.57??g/mL of free PTX). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the cellular uptake of coumarin encapsulated in the RGD-PEG-Chol modified liposome was increased for HUVEC cells. This work provides a reasonable, facile, and economic approach to prepare peptide-modified liposome materials with controllable performances and the obtained linear RGD-modified PTX-loaded liposomes might be attractive as a drug delivery system. PMID:24578646

Zeng, Shi; Li, Bo; Song, Xiangrong; Zheng, Yu; Peng, Cheng; Huang, Wei

2014-01-01

248

Functionalized triazolopeptoids - a novel class for mitochondrial targeted delivery.  

PubMed

Here we introduce linear 1,4-triazolopeptoids as a novel class of cell penetrating peptidomimetics suitable as organ targeting molecular transporters of bioactive cargo. Repetitive triazole moieties with up to three residues were assembled on solid supports using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloadditions (CuAAC) in a submonomer approach. Depending on the lipophilicity of their side chain appendages the 1,4-triazolopeptoids showed either endosomal localization or a strong colocalization with the mitochondria of HeLa cells with moderate toxicity. While the basic triazolopeptoids mainly target the neuromast cells in zebrafish embryos, the lipophilic ones colocalize with either cartilage in the jaws and the blood vessel system. PMID:25739445

Althuon, Daniela; Rönicke, Franziska; Fürniss, Daniel; Quan, Jasmin; Wellhöfer, Isabelle; Jung, Nicole; Schepers, Ute; Bräse, Stefan

2015-04-14

249

Targeted delivery of multivalent phage display vectors into mammalian cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Novel peptide motives targeting endocytosing receptors were isolated from phage display libraries of random peptides by recovering internalized phage from mammalian cells. The peptide-presenting phage selected by internalization in HEp-2 and ECV304 human cells were taken up 1000- to 100?000-fold more efficiently than their parent libraries, and from 10 to 100 times faster than phage particles displaying integrin-binding peptides. A

Vasily V. Ivanenkov; Franco Felici; Anil G. Menon

1999-01-01

250

Targeted Drug Delivery Systems Mediated by a Novel Peptide in Breast Cancer Therapy and Imaging  

PubMed Central

Targeted delivery of drugs to tumors represents a significant advance in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Therefore, development of novel tumor-specific ligands or pharmaceutical nanocarriers is highly desirable. In this study, we utilized phage display to identify a new targeting peptide, SP90, which specifically binds to breast cancer cells, and recognizes tumor tissues from breast cancer patients. We used confocal and electron microscopy to reveal that conjugation of SP90 with liposomes enables efficient delivery of drugs into cancer cells through endocytosis. Furthermore, in vivo fluorescent imaging demonstrated that SP90-conjugated quantum dots possess tumor-targeting properties. In tumor xenograft and orthotopic models, SP90-conjugated liposomal doxorubicin was found to improve the therapeutic index of the chemotherapeutic drug by selectively increasing its accumulation in tumors. We conclude that the targeting peptide SP90 has significant potential in improving the clinical benefits of chemotherapy in the treatment and the diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:23776619

Chiu, Chien-Yu; Lin, Wei-Chuan; Yan, Shin-Long; Wang, Yi-Ping; Kuo, Yuan-Sung; Yeh, Chen-Yun; Lo, Albert; Wu, Han-Chung

2013-01-01

251

Magnetic nanoparticles for targeted therapeutic gene delivery and magnetic-inducing heating on hepatoma  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gene therapy holds great promise for treating cancers, but their clinical applications are being hampered due to uncontrolled gene delivery and expression. To develop a targeted, safe and efficient tumor therapy system, we constructed a tissue-specific suicide gene delivery system by using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as carriers for the combination of gene therapy and hyperthermia on hepatoma. The suicide gene was hepatoma-targeted and hypoxia-enhanced, and the MNPs possessed the ability to elevate temperature to the effective range for tumor hyperthermia as imposed on an alternating magnetic field (AMF). The tumoricidal effects of targeted gene therapy associated with hyperthermia were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The experiment demonstrated that hyperthermia combined with a targeted gene therapy system proffer an effective tool for tumor therapy with high selectivity and the synergistic effect of hepatoma suppression.

Yuan, Chenyan; An, Yanli; Zhang, Jia; Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Dongsheng

2014-08-01

252

Overcoming the stromal barrier for targeted delivery of HPMA copolymers to pancreatic tumors.  

PubMed

Delivery of macromolecules to pancreatic cancer is inhibited by a dense extracellular matrix composed of hyaluronic acid, smooth muscle actin and collagen fibers. Hyaluronic acid causes a high intratumoral fluidic pressure which prevents diffusion and penetration into the pancreatic tumor. This study involves the breaking down of hyaluronic acid by treating CAPAN-1 xenograft tumors in athymic nu/nu mice with targeted N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers radiolabeled with (111)In for single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging. Two targeting strategies were investigated including ?v?3 integrin and HER2 receptors. HPMA copolymers were targeted to these receptors by conjugating short peptide ligands cRGDfK and KCCYSL to the side chains of the copolymer. Results demonstrate that tumor targeting can be achieved in vivo after treatment with hyaluronidase. This approach shows promise for enhanced delivery of polymer-peptide conjugates to solid tumors. PMID:23933441

Buckway, Brandon; Wang, Yongjian; Ray, Abhijit; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

2013-11-01

253

Chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide for targeted delivery of an anticancer drug  

PubMed Central

Current chemotherapy for glioma is rarely satisfactory due to low therapeutic efficiency and systemic side effects. We have developed a glioma-targeted drug delivery system based on graphene oxide. Targeted peptide chlorotoxin-conjugated graphene oxide (CTX-GO) sheets were successfully synthesized and characterized. Doxorubicin was loaded onto CTX-GO (CTX-GO/DOX) with high efficiency (570 mg doxorubicin per gram CTX-GO) via noncovalent interactions. Doxorubicin release was pH-dependent and showed sustained-release properties. Cytotoxicity experiments demonstrated that CTX-GO/DOX mediated the highest rate of death of glioma cells compared with free doxorubicin or graphene oxide loaded with doxorubicin only. Further, conjugation with chlorotoxin enhanced accumulation of doxorubicin within glioma cells. These findings indicate that CTX-GO is a promising platform for drug delivery and provide a rationale for developing a glioma-specific drug delivery system. PMID:24672236

Wang, Hao; Gu, Wei; Xiao, Ning; Ye, Ling; Xu, Qunyuan

2014-01-01

254

Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells  

PubMed Central

There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

2008-01-01

255

Gene delivery targeted to the brain using an Angiopep-conjugated polyethyleneglycol-modified polyamidoamine dendrimer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Angiopep targeting to the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) was identified to exhibit high transcytosis capacity and parenchymal accumulation. In this study, it was exploited as a ligand for effective brain-targeting gene delivery. Polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM) were modified with angiopep through bifunctional PEG, then complexed with DNA, yielding PAMAM–PEG–Angiopep\\/DNA nanoparticles (NPs). The angiopep-modified NPs were observed to be internalized by

Weilun Ke; Kun Shao; Rongqin Huang; Liang Han; Yang Liu; Jianfeng Li; Yuyang Kuang; Liya Ye; Jinning Lou; Chen Jiang

2009-01-01

256

Chimeric nucleolin aptamer with survivin DNAzyme for cancer cell targeted delivery.  

PubMed

A chimeric aptamer-DNAzyme conjugate was generated for the first time using a nucleolin aptamer (NCL-APT) and survivin Dz (Sur_Dz) and exhibited the targeted killing of cancer cells. This proof of concept of using an aptamer for the delivery of DNAzyme can be applied to other cancer types to target survivin in cancer cells in a specific manner. PMID:25797393

Subramanian, Nithya; Kanwar, Jagat R; Akilandeswari, Balachandran; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Khetan, Vikas; Krishnakumar, Subramanian

2015-04-25

257

Targeted delivery of chlorotoxin-modified DNA-loaded nanoparticles to glioma via intravenous administration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gene therapy offers great potential for brain glioma. However, therapeutic genes could not reach glioma spontaneously. A glioma-targeting gene delivery system is highly desired to transfer exogenous genes throughout the tumor focus. In this study, the nanoscopic high-branching dendrimer, polyamidoamine (PAMAM), was selected as the main vector. Chlorotoxin (CTX), which has been demonstrated to bind specifically to receptor expressed in

Rongqin Huang; Weilun Ke; Liang Han; Jianfeng Li; Shuhuan Liu; Chen Jiang

2011-01-01

258

Sodium Dependent Multivitamin Transporter (SMVT): A Potential Target for Drug Delivery  

PubMed Central

Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge, etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22420308

Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K.

2015-01-01

259

TARGETED DELIVERY OF INHALED PHARMACEUTICALS USING AN IN SILICO DOSIMETRY MODEL  

EPA Science Inventory

We present an in silico dosimetry model which can be used for inhalation toxicology (risk assessment of inhaled air pollutants) and aerosol therapy ( targeted delivery of inhaled drugs). This work presents scientific and clinical advances beyond the development of the original in...

260

In vitro studies on guar gum based formulation for the colon targeted delivery of Sennosides  

Microsoft Academic Search

PURPOSE: The objective of the present study is to develop colon targeted drug delivery sys- tems for sennosides using guar gum as a carrier. METHODS: Matrix tablets containing various pro- portions of guar gum were prepared by wet granula- tion technique using starch paste as a binder. The tablets were evaluated for content uniformity and in vitro drug release study

Munira Momin; K. Pundarikakshudu

261

A multi-scale stochastic drug release model for polymer-coated targeted drug delivery systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A multi-scale mathematical model for drug release of oral targeted drug delivery systems was developed and applied to a commercially available delayed release tablet (Asacol®) that delivers 5-aminosalicyclic acid (5-ASA) to the colon. Underlying physical and biochemical principles governing the involved processes (diffusion and dissolution) were employed to develop the mathematical description. Finite element formulation was used to numerically solve

Nahor Haddish-Berhane; Chell Nyquist; Kamyar Haghighi; Carlos Corvalan; Ali Keshavarzian; Osvaldo Campanella; Jenna Rickus; Ashkan Farhadi

2006-01-01

262

Magnetofection: enhancing and targeting gene delivery by magnetic force in vitro and in vivo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Low efficiencies of nonviral gene vectors, the receptor-dependent host tropism of adenoviral or low titers of retroviral vectors limit their utility in gene therapy. To overcome these deficiencies, we associated gene vectors with superparamagnetic nanoparticles and targeted gene delivery by application of a magnetic field. This potentiated the efficacy of any vector up to several hundred-fold, allowed reduction of the

F. Scherer; M. Anton; U. Schillinger; J. Henkel; C. Bergemann; A. Kruger; B. Gansbacher; C. Plank

2002-01-01

263

Application of chitosan-based nanocarriers in tumor-targeted drug delivery.  

PubMed

Cancer is one of the major malignant diseases in the world. Current anti tumor agents are restricted during the chemotherapy due to their poor solubility in aqueous media, multidrug resistance problems, cytotoxicity, and serious side effects to healthy tissues. Development of targeted drug nanocarriers would enhance the undesirable effects of anticancer drugs and also selectively deliver them to cancerous tissues. Variety of nanocarriers such as micelles, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes nanogels, dendrimers, and carbon nanotubes have been used for targeted delivery of anticancer agents. These nanocarriers transfer loaded drugs to desired sites through passive or active efficacy mechanisms. Chitosan and its derivatives, due to their unique properties such as hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability, have attracted attention to be used in nanocarriers. Grafting cancer-specific ligands onto the Chitosan nanoparticles, which leads to ligand-receptor interactions, has been successfully developed as active targeting. Chitosan-conjugated components also respond to external or internal physical and chemical stimulus in targeted tumors that is called environment triggers. In this study, mechanisms of targeted tumor deliveries via nanocarriers were explained; specifically, chitosan-based nanocarriers in tumor-targeting drug delivery were also discussed. PMID:25385004

Ghaz-Jahanian, Mohammad Ali; Abbaspour-Aghdam, Farzin; Anarjan, Navideh; Berenjian, Aydin; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda

2015-03-01

264

Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

2011-02-01

265

Theranostic Nanoparticles Carrying Doxorubicin Attenuate Targeting Ligand Specific Antibody Responses Following Systemic Delivery  

PubMed Central

Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N.; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

2015-01-01

266

Theranostic nanoparticles carrying doxorubicin attenuate targeting ligand specific antibody responses following systemic delivery.  

PubMed

Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

2015-01-01

267

Stimuli-responsive PEGylated prodrugs for targeted doxorubicin delivery.  

PubMed

In recent years, stimuli-sensitive prodrugs have been extensively studied for the rapid "burst" release of antitumor drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficiency. In this study, a novel stimuli-sensitive prodrug containing galactosamine as a targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol)-doxorubicin (PEG-DOX) conjugate, was developed for targeting HepG2 human liver cancer cells. To obtain the PEG-DOX conjugate, both galactosamine-decorated poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (Gal-PEG-CHO) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (mPEG-CHO) were firstly synthesized and functionalized with dithiodipropionate dihydrazide (TPH) through direct reductive amination via Schiff's base formation, and then DOX molecules were chemically conjugated to the hydrazide end groups of TPH-functionalized Gal-/m-PEG chains via pH-sensitive hydrazone linkages. The chemical structures of TPH-functionalized PEG and PEG-DOX prodrug were confirmed by (1)H NMR analysis. The PEG-DOX conjugate could self-assemble into spherical nanomicelles with a mean diameter of 140nm, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The drug loading content and loading efficiency in the prodrug nanomicelles were as high as 20wt.% and 75wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release studies showed that DOX was released rapidly from the prodrug nanomicelles at the intracellular levels of pH and reducing agent. Cellular uptake and MTT experiments demonstrated that the galactosamine-decorated prodrug nanomicelles were more efficiently internalized into HepG2 cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis process and exhibited a higher toxicity, compared with pristine prodrug nanomicelles. These results suggest that the novel Gal-PEG-DOX prodrug nanomicelles have tremendous potential for targeted liver cancer therapy. PMID:25746279

Xu, Minghui; Qian, Junmin; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Ting; Wang, Hongjie

2015-05-01

268

Possible Side Effects of Paclitaxel  

Cancer.gov

Page of 1Possible Side Effects of Paclitaxel (Table Version Date: August 23, 2013) COMMON, SOME MAY BE SERIOUS In 100 people receiving Paclitaxel, more than 20 and up to 100 may have: Anemia which may cause tiredness, or may require blood transfusions Infection,

269

Developing genetically engineered encapsulin protein cage nanoparticles as a targeted delivery nanoplatform.  

PubMed

Protein cage nanoparticles are excellent candidates for use as multifunctional delivery nanoplatforms because they are built from biomaterials and have a well-defined structure. A novel protein cage nanoparticle, encapsulin, isolated from thermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima, is prepared and developed as a versatile template for targeted delivery nanoplatforms through both chemical and genetic engineering. It is pivotal for multifunctional delivery nanoplatforms to have functional plasticity and versatility to acquire targeting ligands, diagnostic probes, and drugs simultaneously. Encapsulin is genetically engineered to have unusual heat stability and to acquire multiple functionalities in a precisely controlled manner. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell binding peptide (SP94-peptide, SFSIIHTPILPL) is chosen as a targeting ligand and displayed on the surface of engineered encapsulin (Encap_loophis42C123) through either chemical conjugation or genetic insertion. The effective and selective targeted delivery of SP94-peptide displaying encapsulin (SP94-Encap_loophis42C123) to HepG2 cells is confirmed by fluorescent microscopy imaging. Aldoxorubicin (AlDox), an anticancer prodrug, is chemically loaded to SP94-Encap_loophis42C123 via thiol-maleimide Michael-type addition, and the efficacy of the delivered drugs is evaluated with a cell viability assay. SP94-Encap_loophis42C123-AlDox shows comparable killing efficacy with that of free drugs without the platform's own cytotoxicity. Functional plasticity and versatility of the engineered encapsulin allow us to introduce targeting ligands, diagnostic probes, and therapeutic reagents simultaneously, providing opportunities to develop multifunctional delivery nanoplatforms. PMID:25180761

Moon, Hyojin; Lee, Jisu; Min, Junseon; Kang, Sebyung

2014-10-13

270

Synthesis of Doxorubicin loaded magnetic chitosan nanoparticles for pH responsive targeted drug delivery.  

PubMed

Targeted drug delivery is a promising alternative to overcome the limitations of classical chemotherapy. In an ideal targeted drug delivery system carrier nanoparticles would be directed to the tumor tissue and selectively release therapeutic molecules. As a novel approach, chitosan coated magnetic nanoparticles (CS MNPs) maintain a pH dependent drug delivery which provides targeting of drugs to the tumor site under a magnetic field. Among various materials, chitosan has a great importance as a pH sensitive, natural, biodegradable, biocompatible and bioadhesive polymer. The aim of this study was to obtain an effective targeted delivery system for Doxorubicin, using chitosan coated MNPs. Different sized CS MNPs were produced by in situ synthesis method. The anti-cancer agent Doxorubicin was loaded onto CS MNPs which were characterized previously. Doxorubicin loading was confirmed by FTIR. Drug loading and release characteristics, and stability of the nanoparticles were investigated. Our results showed that the CS MNPs have pH responsive release characteristics. The cellular internalization of Doxorubicin loaded CS MNPs were visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Doxorubicin loaded CS MNPs are efficiently taken up by MCF-7 (MCF-7/S) and Doxorubicin resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/1 ?M) breast cancer cells, which increases the efficacy of drug and also maintains overcoming the resistance of Doxorubicin in MCF-7/Dox cells. Consequently, CS MNPs synthesized at various sizes can be effectively used for the pH dependent release of Doxorubicin in cancer cells. Results of this study can provide new insights in the development of pH responsive targeted drug delivery systems to overcome the side effects of conventional chemotherapy. PMID:24931189

Unsoy, Gozde; Khodadust, Rouhollah; Yalcin, Serap; Mutlu, Pelin; Gunduz, Ufuk

2014-10-01

271

Prevention of nodal metastases in breast cancer following the lymphatic migration of paclitaxel-loaded expansile nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Although breast cancer patients with localized disease exhibit an excellent long-term prognosis, up to 40% of patients treated with local resection alone may harbor occult nodal metastatic disease leading to increased locoregional recurrence and decreased survival. Given the potential for targeted drug delivery to result in more efficacious locoregional control with less morbidity, the current study assessed the ability of drug-loaded polymeric expansile nanoparticles (eNP) to migrate from the site of tumor to regional lymph nodes, locally deliver a chemotherapeutic payload, and prevent primary tumor growth as well as lymph node metastases. Expansile nanoparticles entered tumor cells and paclitaxel-loaded eNP (Pax-eNP) exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro and significantly decreased tumor doubling time in vivo against human triple negative breast cancer in both microscopic and established murine breast cancer models. Furthermore, migration of Pax-eNP to axillary lymph nodes resulted in higher intranodal paclitaxel concentrations and a significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases. These findings demonstrate that lymphatic migration of drug-loaded eNP provides regionally targeted delivery of chemotherapy to both decrease local tumor growth and strategically prevent the development of nodal metastases within the regional tumor-draining lymph node basin. PMID:23228419

Liu, Rong; Gilmore, Denis M.; Zubris, Kimberly Ann V.; Xu, Xiaoyin; Catalano, Paul J.; Padera, Robert F.; Grinstaff, Mark W.; Colson, Yolonda L.

2012-01-01

272

Doxorubicin loaded magneto-niosomes for targeted drug delivery.  

PubMed

In chemotherapy the magnetic drug targeting to a specific organ or tissue is proposed on the assumption that magnetic fields are harmless to biological systems. In this light we have vehiculated doxorubicin as model drug by novel magneto-niosomes in order to evaluate the physico-chemical properties of the obtained formulations and the in vitro release profile. Tween 60 and Pluronic L64 have been used as surfactants and the formulation cytotoxicity has been performed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolum bromide and trypan blue dye esclusion tests. Results show that niosome dimensions and doxorubicin entrapment efficiencies are influenced by bilayer composition. In addition, formulations are able to control the deliver and release of the drug active form in a retarded manner. No additional toxicity, due to the encapsulation of ferrofluid into niosomes core, has been detected. PMID:23107959

Tavano, Lorena; Vivacqua, Marco; Carito, Valentina; Muzzalupo, Rita; Caroleo, Maria Cristina; Nicoletta, Fiore

2013-02-01

273

Targeted delivery of carbon nanotubes to cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CD22 is broadly expressed on human B cell lymphomas. Monoclonal anti-CD22 antibodies (MAbs) alone, or coupled to toxins, have been used to selectively target these tumors both in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice with xenografted human lymphomas and in patients. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attached to antibodies or peptides represent another approach to targeting cancer cells. CNTs convert absorbed near-infrared (NIR) light into heat, which can thermally ablate cells in the vicinity of the CNTs. We have made MAb-CNT constructs where the MAb was either noncovalently or covalently coupled to CNTs, and investigated their ability to bind specifically to cells and to thermally ablate them after exposure to NIR light. The specific binding of these MAb-CNT constructs to antigen-positive and antigen-negative cells was demonstrated in vitro by using CD22+CD25 - Daudi cells, CD22-CD25+ phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-activated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and CNTs coupled non-covalently or covalently to either anti-CD22 or anti-CD25. We then demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs could bind to tumor cells expressing the relevant antigen but not to cells lacking the antigen. Furthermore we showed that, following exposure to NIR light, the cells could be thermally ablated. We also determined the stability of the MAb-CNTs in conditions designed to mimic the in vivo environment, i.e. mouse serum at 37°C. We then use the intrinsic Raman signature of CNTs to study the circulation and tissue distribution of intravenously injected MAb-CNTs in a murine xenograft model of lymphoma in vivo over a period of 24 hrs. We demonstrated that the MAb-CNTs have a short half-life in blood and that most of them are cleared by the reticuloendothelial system (RES). In the current embodiment, these constructs would therefore be of limited effectiveness in vivo.

Chakravarty, Pavitra

274

Characterization of Magnetic Viral Complexes for Targeted Delivery in Oncology  

PubMed Central

Oncolytic viruses are promising new agents in cancer therapy. Success of tumor lysis is often hampered by low intra-tumoral titers due to a strong anti-viral host immune response and insufficient tumor targeting. Previous work on the co-assembly of oncolytic virus particles (VPs) with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was shown to provide shielding from inactivating immune response and improve targeting by external field gradients. In addition, MNPs are detected by magnet resonance imaging (MRI) enabling non-invasive therapy monitoring. In this study two selected core-shell type iron oxide MNPs were assembled with adenovirus (Ad) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The selected MNPs were characterized by high r2 and r2* relaxivities and thus could be quantified non-invasively by 1.5 and 3.0 tesla MRI with a detection limit below 0.001 mM iron in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Assembly and cell internalization of MNP-VP complexes resulted in 81 - 97 % reduction of r2 and 35 - 82 % increase of r2* compared to free MNPs. The relaxivity changes could be attributed to the clusterization of particles and complexes shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In a proof-of-principle study the non-invasive detection of MNP-VPs by MRI was shown in vivo in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma model. In conclusion, MNP assembly and compartmentalization have a major impact on relaxivities, therefore calibration measurements are required for the correct quantification in biodistribution studies. Furthermore, our study provides first evidence of the in vivo applicability of selected MNP-VPs in cancer therapy.

Almstätter, Isabella; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Settles, Marcus; Altomonte, Jennifer; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Ebert, Oliver; Plank, Christian; Braren, Rickmer

2015-01-01

275

Cutting-edge technologies in colon-targeted drug delivery systems.  

PubMed

Oral colon-targeted drug delivery systems have gained enormous attention among researchers in the last two decades. The significance of this site-specific drug delivery system can be measured by its usefulness for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents, both for the treatment of local diseases or for systemic therapies. With the arrival of newer innovations, a large number of breakthrough technologies have emerged for targeting a drug molecule to the colon. Researchers have attempted various approaches in the development of these formulation technologies, such as pH-dependent, time-dependent and microflora-activated systems. Recently, a number of approaches have been proposed that utilize a novel concept of di-dependent drug delivery systems, that is, the systems in which the drug release is controlled by two factors: pH and time, and pH and microflora of the colon. This Editorial article is not intended to offer a comprehensive review on drug delivery, but shall familiarize the readers with the formulation technologies that have been developed for attaining colon-specific drug delivery. PMID:21933030

Patel, Mayur M

2011-10-01

276

Recent approaches of lipid-based delivery system for lymphatic targeting via oral route.  

PubMed

Lymphatic system is a key target in research field due to its distinctive makeup and huge contributing functions within the body. Intestinal lymphatic drug transport (chylomicron pathway) is intensely described in research field till date because it is considered to be the best for improving oral drug delivery by avoiding first pass metabolism. The lymphatic imaging techniques and potential therapeutic candidates are engaged for evaluating disease states and overcoming these conditions. The novel drug delivery systems such as self-microemulsifying drug delivery system, nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-lipid carriers, solid lipid carriers are employed for delivering drugs through lymphatic system via various routes such as subcutaneous route, intraperitoneal route, pulmonary route, gastric sub-mucosal injection, intrapleural and intradermal. Among these colloidal particles, lipid-based delivery system is considered to be the best for lymphatic delivery. From the last few decades, mesenteric lymph duct cannulation and thoracic lymph duct cannulation are followed to assess lymphatic uptake of drugs. Due to their limitations, chylomicrons inhibitors and in-vitro models are employed, i.e. lipolysis model and permeability model. Currently, research on this topic still continues and drainage system used to deliver the drugs against lymphatic disease as well as targeting other organs by modulating the chylomicron pathway. PMID:25148607

Chaudhary, Shilpa; Garg, Tarun; Murthy, R S R; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

2014-12-01

277

PLGA/polymeric liposome for targeted drug and gene co-delivery.  

PubMed

Chemotherapy is one of the most effective approaches to treat cancers in the clinic, but the problems, such as multidrug resistance (MDR), low bioavailability and toxicity, severely constrain the further application of chemotherapy. Our group recently reported that cationic PLGA/folate coated PEGlated polymeric liposome core-shell nanoparticles (PLGA/FPL NPs). It was self-assembled from a hydrophobic PLGA core and a hydrophilic folate coated PEGlated lipid shell for targeting co-delivery of drug and gene. Hydrophobic drugs can be incorporated into the core and the cationic shell of the drug-loaded nanoparticles can be used to bind DNA. The drug-loaded PLGA/FPL NPs/DNA complexes offer advantages to overcome these problems mentioned above, such as co-delivery of drugs and DNA to improving the chemosensitivity of cancer cells at a gene level, and targeting delivery of drug to the cancer tissue that enhance the bioavailability and reduce the toxicity. The experiment showed that nanoparticles have core-shell structure with nanosize, sustained drug release profile and good DNA-binding ability. Importantly, the core-shell nanoparticles achieve the possibility of co-delivering drugs and genes to the same cells with high gene transfection and drug delivery efficiency. Our data suggest that the PLGA/FPL NPs may be a useful drug and gene co-delivery system. PMID:20727587

Wang, Hanjie; Zhao, Peiqi; Su, Wenya; Wang, Sheng; Liao, Zhenyu; Niu, Ruifang; Chang, Jin

2010-11-01

278

Expert Opinion on Drug Delivery: Strategies for the targeted delivery of therapeutics for osteosarcoma  

PubMed Central

Background Conventional therapy for osteosarcoma has reached a plateau of 60-70%, a five-year survival rate that has changed little in two decades, highlighting the need for new approaches. Objective I wished to review the alternate means of delivering effective therapy for osteosarcoma that reach beyond the central venous catheter. Methods Drawing on my own experiences providing care to high-risk osteosarcoma patients and reviewing the last two decades of literature describing sarcoma therapy, I summarize available information about potential osteosarcoma treatments that deliver therapy by a less conventional route. Results/Conclusions Intra-arterial chemotherapy has a limited impact on survival, but may help achieve a better limb salvage. Intrapleural chemotherapy is important for managing malignant effusions. Development of inhalation therapies, treatments that target new bone formation such as bisphosphonates, chemically targeted radiation and antibody-based therapies all have potential to improve osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:19761419

Hughes, DP

2014-01-01

279

Influence of Red Blood Cells on Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery in Microcirculation  

PubMed Central

Multifunctional nanomedicine holds considerable promise as the next generation of medicine that allows for targeted therapy with minimal toxicity. Most current studies on Nanoparticle (NP) drug delivery consider a Newtonian fluid with suspending NPs. However, blood is a complex biological fluid composed of deformable cells, proteins, platelets, and plasma. For blood flow in capillaries, arterioles and venules, the particulate nature of the blood needs to be considered in the delivery process. The existence of the cell-free-layer and NP-cell interaction will largely influence both the dispersion and binding rates, thus impact targeted delivery efficacy. In this paper, a particle-cell hybrid model is developed to model NP transport, dispersion, and binding dynamics in blood suspension. The motion and deformation of red blood cells is captured through the Immersed Finite Element Method. The motion and adhesion of individual NPs are tracked through Brownian adhesion dynamics. A mapping algorithm and an interaction potential function are introduced to consider the cell-particle collision. NP dispersion and binding rates are derived from the developed model under various rheology conditions. The influence of red blood cells, vascular flow rate, and particle size on NP distribution and delivery efficacy is characterized. A non-uniform NP distribution profile with higher particle concentration near the vessel wall is observed. Such distribution leads to over 50% higher particle binding rate compared to the case without RBC considered. The tumbling motion of RBCs in the core region of the capillary is found to enhance NP dispersion, with dispersion rate increases as shear rate increases. Results from this study contribute to the fundamental understanding and knowledge on how the particulate nature of blood influences NP delivery, which will provide mechanistic insights on the nanomedicine design for targeted drug delivery applications. PMID:22375153

Tan, Jifu; Thomas, Antony; Liu, Yaling

2012-01-01

280

Biodegradable micelles capable of mannose-mediated targeted drug delivery to cancer cells.  

PubMed

A targeted micellar drug delivery system is developed from a biocompatible and biodegradable amphiphilic polyester, poly(Lac-OCA)-b-(poly(Tyr(alkynyl)-OCA)-g-mannose) (PLA-b-(PTA-g-mannose), that is synthesized via controlled ring-opening polymerization of O-carboxyanhydride (OCA) and highly efficient "Click" chemistry. Doxorubicin (DOX), a model lipophilic anticancer drug, can be effectively encapsulated into the micelles, and the mannose moiety allows active targeting of the micelles to cancer cells that specifically express mannose receptors, which thereafter enhances the anticancer efficiency of the drug. Comprised entirely of biodegradable and biocompatible polyesters, this micellar system demonstrates promising potentials for targeted drug delivery and cancer therapy. PMID:25619623

Yin, Lichen; Chen, Yongbing; Zhang, Zhonghai; Yin, Qian; Zheng, Nan; Cheng, Jianjun

2015-03-01

281

Targeted delivery of nano-therapeutics for major disorders of the central nervous system.  

PubMed

Major central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including brain tumors, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and stroke, are significant threats to human health. Although impressive advances in the treatment of CNS disorders have been made during the past few decades, the success rates are still moderate if not poor. The blood–brain barrier (BBB) hampers the access of systemically administered drugs to the brain. The development of nanotechnology provides powerful tools to deliver therapeutics to target sites. Anchoring them with specific ligands can endow the nano-therapeutics with the appropriate properties to circumvent the BBB. In this review, the potential nanotechnology-based targeted drug delivery strategies for different CNS disorders are described. The limitations and future directions of brain-targeted delivery systems are also discussed. PMID:23797465

Gao, Huile; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

2013-10-01

282

Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis  

PubMed Central

The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

2014-01-01

283

Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery  

PubMed Central

A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various “molecularly targeted cancer therapies” have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic “warhead” connected through a “smart” linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a “Trojan Horse” approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic “warheads” to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. 19F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G.; Zuniga, Edison S.; Ojima, Iwao

2013-01-01

284

Fluorine-Containing Taxoid Anticancer Agents and Their Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery.  

PubMed

A long-standing problem of conventional chemotherapy is the lack of tumor-specific treatments. Traditional chemotherapy relies on the premise that rapidly proliferating cancer cells are more likely to be killed by a cytotoxic agent. In reality, however, cytotoxic agents have very little or no specificity, which leads to systemic toxicity, causing undesirable severe side effects. Consequently, various "molecularly targeted cancer therapies" have been developed for use in specific cancers, including tumor-targeting drug delivery systems. In general, such a drug delivery system consists of a tumor recognition moiety and a cytotoxic "warhead" connected through a "smart" linker to form a conjugate. When a multi-functionalized nanomaterial is used as the vehicle, a "Trojan Horse" approach can be used for mass delivery of cytotoxic "warheads" to maximize the efficacy. Exploitation of the special properties of fluorine has proven successful in the development of new and effective biochemical tools as well as therapeutic agents. Fluorinated congeners can also serve as excellent probes for the investigation of biochemical mechanisms. (19)F-NMR can provide unique and powerful tools for mechanistic investigations in chemical biology. This account presents our recent progress, in perspective, on the molecular approaches to the design and development of novel tumor-targeted drug delivery systems for new generation chemotherapy by exploiting the unique nature of fluorine. PMID:23935213

Seitz, Joshua; Vineberg, Jacob G; Zuniga, Edison S; Ojima, Iwao

2013-08-01

285

MSCs: Delivery Routes and Engraftment, Cell-Targeting Strategies, and Immune Modulation  

PubMed Central

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are currently being widely investigated both in the lab and in clinical trials for multiple disease states. The differentiation, trophic, and immunomodulatory characteristics of MSCs contribute to their therapeutic effects. Another often overlooked factor related to efficacy is the degree of engraftment. When reported, engraftment is generally low and transient in nature. MSC delivery methods should be tailored to the lesion being treated, which may be local or systemic, and customized to the mechanism of action of the MSCs, which can also be local or systemic. Engraftment efficiency is enhanced by using intra-arterial delivery instead of intravenous delivery, thus avoiding the “first-pass” accumulation of MSCs in the lung. Several methodologies to target MSCs to specific organs are being developed. These cell targeting methodologies focus on the modification of cell surface molecules through chemical, genetic, and coating techniques to promote selective adherence to particular organs or tissues. Future improvements in targeting and delivery methodologies to improve engraftment are expected to improve therapeutic results, extend the duration of efficacy, and reduce the effective (MSC) therapeutic dose. PMID:24000286

Kean, Thomas J.; Caplan, Arnold I.; Dennis, James E.

2013-01-01

286

Alveolar targeting of aerosol pentamidine. Toward a rational delivery system  

SciTech Connect

Nebulizer systems that deposit a high proportion of aerosolized pentamidine on large airways are likely to be associated with marked adverse side effects, which may lead to premature cessation of treatment. We have measured alveolar deposition and large airway-related side effects (e.g., cough, breathlessness, and effect on pulmonary function) after aerosolization of 150 mg pentamidine isethionate labeled with {sup 99m}Tc-Sn-colloid. Nine patients with AIDS were studied using three nebulizer systems producing different droplet size profiles: the Acorn System 22, Respirgard II, and Respirgard II with the inspiratory baffle removed. Alveolar deposition was greatest and side effects least with the nebulizer producing the smallest droplet size profile (Respirgard II), whereas large airway-related side effects were prominent and alveolar deposition lowest with the nebulizer producing the largest droplet size (Acorn System 22). Values for alveolar deposition and adverse airway effects were intermediate using the Respirgard with inspiratory baffle removed, thus indicating the importance of the baffle valve in determining droplet size. Addition of a similar baffle valve to the Acorn System 22 produced a marked improvement in droplet size profile. Selection of a nebulizer that produces an optimal droplet size range offers the advantage of enhancing alveolar targeting of aerosolized pentamidine while reducing large airway-related side effects.

Simonds, A.K.; Newman, S.P.; Johnson, M.A.; Talaee, N.; Lee, C.A.; Clarke, S.W. (Royal Free Hospital, London (England))

1990-04-01

287

Targeted delivery of curcumin for treating type 2 diabetes.  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which cells have reduced insulin signalling, leading to hyperglycemia and long-term complications, including heart, kidney and liver disease. Macrophages activated by dying or stressed cells, induce the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF and IL-6. These inflammatory macrophages in liver and adipose tissue promote insulin resistance, and medications which reduce inflammation and enhance insulin signalling improve glucose control. Curcumin is an anti-oxidant and nuclear factor kappa-B inhibitor derived from turmeric. A number of studies have shown that dietary curcumin reduces inflammation and delays or prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance and associated complications, including atherosclerosis and immune mediate liver disease. Unfortunately dietary curcumin is poorly absorbed by the digestive system and undergoes glucuronidation and excretion rather than being released into the serum and systemically distributed. This confounds understanding of how dietary curcumin exerts its beneficial effects in type 2 diabetes and associated diseases. New improved methods of delivering curcumin are being developed including nanoparticles and lipid/liposome formulations that increase absorption and bioavailability of curcumin. Development and refinement of these technologies will enable cell-directed targeting of curcumin and improved therapeutic outcome. PMID:23495213

Maradana, Muralidhara Rao; Thomas, Ranjeny; O'Sullivan, Brendan J

2013-09-01

288

Nanomaterials for targeted drug delivery to cancer stem cells.  

PubMed

Recent developments in cancer biology have identified the existence of a sub-poplulation of cells - cancer stem cells (CSC) that are resistant to most traditional therapies (e.g. chemotherapy and radiotherapy) and have the ability to repair their damaged DNA. These findings have necessitated a break with traditional oncology management and encouraged new perspectives concerning cancer treatment. Understanding the functional biology of CSCs - especially the signaling pathways that are involved in their self-renewal mechanisms - is crucial for discovering new forms of treatment. In this review, we highlight current and future prospects for potential cancer therapies based on the use of nano-sized materials. Nanomaterials could revolutionize cancer management because of their distinctive features - unique surface chemistry, strong electronic, optic, and magnetic properties - that are found neither in bulk materials nor in single molecules. Based on these distinct properties, we believe that nanomaterials could be excellent candidates for use in CSC research in order to optimize cancer therapeutics. Moreover, we propose these nanomaterials for the inhibition of the self-renewal pathways of CSCs by focusing on the Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt/?-catenin self-renewal mechanisms. By introducing these methods for the detection, targeting, and destruction of CSCs, an efficient alternative treatment for the incurable disease of cancer could be provided. PMID:24697156

Orza, Anamaria; Casciano, Daniel; Biris, Alexandru

2014-05-01

289

DNA and aptamer stabilized gold nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anticancer therapeutics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells.Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) can be used as carriers of a variety of therapeutics. Ideally, drugs are released in the target cells in response to cell specific intracellular triggers. In this study, GNPs are loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055, using a self-immolative linker which facilitates the release of anticancer therapeutics in malignant cells without modifications of the active compound. An additional modification with the aptamer AS1411 further increases the selectivity of GNPs towards cancer cells. Both modifications increase targeted delivery of therapeutics with GNPs. Whereas GNPs without anticancer drugs do not affect cell viability in all cells tested, AS1411 modified GNPs loaded with doxorubicin or AZD8055 show significant and increased reduction of cell viability in breast cancer and uveal melanoma cell lines. These results highlight that modified GNPs can be functionalized to increase the efficacy of cancer therapeutics and may further reduce toxicity by increasing targeted delivery towards malignant cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00019f

Latorre, Alfonso; Posch, Christian; Garcimartín, Yolanda; Celli, Anna; Sanlorenzo, Martina; Vujic, Igor; Ma, Jeffrey; Zekhtser, Mitchell; Rappersberger, Klemens; Ortiz-Urda, Susana; Somoza, Álvaro

2014-06-01

290

DELIVERY OF siRNA INTO BREAST CANCER CELLS VIA PHAGE FUSION PROTEIN-TARGETED LIPOSOMES  

PubMed Central

Efficacy of siRNAs as potential anticancer therapeutics can be increased by their targeted delivery into cancer cells via tumor-specific ligands. Phage display offers an unique approach to identify highly specific and selective ligands that can deliver nanocarriers to the site of disease. In this study, we proved a novel approach for intracellular delivery of siRNAs into breast cancer cells through their encapsulation into liposomes targeted to the tumor cells with preselected intact phage proteins. The targeted siRNA liposomes were obtained by a fusion of two parental liposomes containing spontaneously inserted siRNA and fusion phage proteins. The presence of pVIII coat protein fused to a MCF-7 cell-targeting peptide DMPGTVLP in the liposomes was confirmed by Western blotting. The novel phage-targeted siRNA-nanopharmaceuticals demonstrate significant down-regulation of PRDM14 gene expression and PRDM14 protein synthesis in the target MCF- 7 cells. This approach offers the potential for development of new anticancer siRNA-based targeted nanomedicines. PMID:21050894

Bedi, Deepa; Musacchio, Tiziana; Fagbohun, Olusegun A.; Gillespie, James W.; Deinnocentes, Patricia; Bird, R. Curtis; Bookbinder, Lonnie; Torchilin, Vladimir P.; Petrenko, Valery A.

2011-01-01

291

Cancer siRNA therapy by tumor selective delivery with ligand-targeted sterically stabilized nanoparticle  

PubMed Central

Potent sequence selective gene inhibition by siRNA ‘targeted’ therapeutics promises the ultimate level of specificity, but siRNA therapeutics is hindered by poor intracellular uptake, limited blood stability and non-specific immune stimulation. To address these problems, ligand-targeted, sterically stabilized nanoparticles have been adapted for siRNA. Self-assembling nanoparticles with siRNA were constructed with polyethyleneimine (PEI) that is PEGylated with an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide ligand attached at the distal end of the polyethylene glycol (PEG), as a means to target tumor neovasculature expressing integrins and used to deliver siRNA inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGF R2) expression and thereby tumor angiogenesis. Cell delivery and activity of PEGylated PEI was found to be siRNA sequence specific and depend on the presence of peptide ligand and could be competed by free peptide. Intravenous administration into tumor-bearing mice gave selective tumor uptake, siRNA sequence-specific inhibition of protein expression within the tumor and inhibition of both tumor angiogenesis and growth rate. The results suggest achievement of two levels of targeting: tumor tissue selective delivery via the nanoparticle ligand and gene pathway selectivity via the siRNA oligonucleotide. This opens the door for better targeted therapeutics with both tissue and gene selectivity, also to improve targeted therapies with less than ideal therapeutic targets. PMID:15520458

Schiffelers, Raymond M.; Ansari, Aslam; Xu, Jun; Zhou, Qin; Tang, Qingquan; Storm, Gert; Molema, Grietje; Lu, Patrick Y.; Scaria, Puthupparampil V.; Woodle, Martin C.

2004-01-01

292

Targeted drug delivery into reversibly injured myocardium with silica nanoparticles: surface functionalization, natural biodistribution, and acute toxicity  

PubMed Central

The clinical outcome of patients with ischemic heart disease can be significantly improved with the implementation of targeted drug delivery into the ischemic myocardium. In this paper, we present our original findings relevant to the problem of therapeutic heart targeting with use of nanoparticles. Experimental approaches included fabrication of carbon and silica nanoparticles, their characterization and surface modification. The acute hemodynamic effects of nanoparticle formulation as well as nanoparticle biodistribution were studied in male Wistar rats. Carbon and silica nanoparticles are nontoxic materials that can be used as carriers for heart-targeted drug delivery. Concepts of passive and active targeting can be applied to the development of targeted drug delivery to the ischemic myocardial cells. Provided that ischemic heart-targeted drug delivery can be proved to be safe and efficient, the results of this research may contribute to the development of new technologies in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:20463939

Galagudza, Michael M; Korolev, Dmitry V; Sonin, Dmitry L; Postnov, Viktor N; Papayan, Garry V; Uskov, Ivan S; Belozertseva, Anastasia V; Shlyakhto, Eugene V

2010-01-01

293

Potential biomarkers for paclitaxel sensitivity in hypopharynx cancer cell.  

PubMed

Paclitaxel has been proved to be active in treatment and larynx preservation of HNSCC, however, the fact that about 20-40% patients do not respond to paclitaxel makes it urgent to figure out the biomarkers for paclitaxel-based treatment in Hypopharynx cancer (HPC) patients to improve the therapy effect. In this work, Fadu cells, treated or untreated with low dose of paclitaxel for 24 h, were applied to DNA microarray chips. The differential expression in mRNAs and miRs was analyzed and the network between expression-altered mRNAs and miRs was constructed. Differentially expressed genes were mainly enriched in superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (ACAT2, MSMO1, LSS, FDFT1 and FDPS etc.), complement system (C3, C1R, C1S, CFR and CFB etc.), interferon signaling (IFIT1, IFIT3, IFITM1 and MX1 etc.), mTOR signaling (MRAS, PRKAA2, PLD1, RND3 and EIF4A1 etc.) and IGF1 signaling (MRAS, IGFBP7, JUN and FOS etc.), most of these pathways are implicated in tumorigenesis or chemotherapy resistance. The first three pathways were predicted to be suppressed, while the last two pathways were predicted to be induced by paclitaxel, suggesting the combination therapy with mTOR inhibition and paclitaxel might be better than single one. The dramatically expression-altered miRs were miR-112, miR-7, miR-1304, miR-222*, miR-29b-1* (these five miRs were upregulated) and miR-210 (downregulated). The 26 putative target genes mediated by the 6 miRs were figured out and the miR-gene network was constructed. Furthermore, immunoblotting assay showed that ERK signaling in Fadu cells was active by low dose of paclitaxel but repressed by high dose of paclitaxel. Collectively, our data would provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for paclitaxel-based therapy in HPC patients. PMID:24294361

Xu, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Run-Jie; Chen, Dong; Sun, Yi-Yuan; Wu, Qing-Wei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Pei-Hua

2013-01-01

294

Potential biomarkers for paclitaxel sensitivity in hypopharynx cancer cell  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel has been proved to be active in treatment and larynx preservation of HNSCC, however, the fact that about 20-40% patients do not respond to paclitaxel makes it urgent to figure out the biomarkers for paclitaxel-based treatment in Hypopharynx cancer (HPC) patients to improve the therapy effect. In this work, Fadu cells, treated or untreated with low dose of paclitaxel for 24 h, were applied to DNA microarray chips. The differential expression in mRNAs and miRs was analyzed and the network between expression-altered mRNAs and miRs was constructed. Differentially expressed genes were mainly enriched in superpathway of cholesterol biosynthesis (ACAT2, MSMO1, LSS, FDFT1 and FDPS etc.), complement system (C3, C1R, C1S, CFR and CFB etc.), interferon signaling (IFIT1, IFIT3, IFITM1 and MX1 etc.), mTOR signaling (MRAS, PRKAA2, PLD1, RND3 and EIF4A1 etc.) and IGF1 signaling (MRAS, IGFBP7, JUN and FOS etc.), most of these pathways are implicated in tumorigenesis or chemotherapy resistance. The first three pathways were predicted to be suppressed, while the last two pathways were predicted to be induced by paclitaxel, suggesting the combination therapy with mTOR inhibition and paclitaxel might be better than single one. The dramatically expression-altered miRs were miR-112, miR-7, miR-1304, miR-222*, miR-29b-1* (these five miRs were upregulated) and miR-210 (downregulated). The 26 putative target genes mediated by the 6 miRs were figured out and the miR-gene network was constructed. Furthermore, immunoblotting assay showed that ERK signaling in Fadu cells was active by low dose of paclitaxel but repressed by high dose of paclitaxel. Collectively, our data would provide potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for paclitaxel-based therapy in HPC patients. PMID:24294361

Xu, Cheng-Zhi; Shi, Run-Jie; Chen, Dong; Sun, Yi-Yuan; Wu, Qing-Wei; Wang, Tao; Wang, Pei-Hua

2013-01-01

295

Radiofrequency-triggered tumor-targeting delivery system for theranostics application.  

PubMed

In this study, a new type of magnetic tumor-targeting PEGylated gold nanoshell drug delivery system (DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG) based on doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive magnetoliposomes was successfully obtained. The reverse-phase evaporation method was used to construct the magnetoliposomes, and then gold nanoshells were coated on the surface of it. The DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG delivery system was synthesized after SH-PEG2000 modification. This multifunction system was combined with a variety of functions, such as radiofrequency-triggered release, chemo-hyperthermia therapy, and dual-mode magnetic resonance/X-ray imaging. Importantly, the DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG complex was found to escape from endosomes after cellular uptake by radiofrequency-induced endosome disruption before lysosomal degradation. All results in vitro and in vivo indicated that DOX-TSMLs-AuNSs-PEG is a promising effective drug delivery system for diagnosis and treatment of tumors. PMID:25706857

Wang, Lei; Zhang, Panpan; Shi, Jinjin; Hao, Yongwei; Meng, Dehui; Zhao, Yalin; Yanyan, Yin; Li, Dong; Chang, Junbiao; Zhang, Zhenzhong

2015-03-18

296

Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy: the other side of antibodies  

PubMed Central

Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (TMA) based therapies for cancer have advanced significantly over the past two decades both in their molecular sophistication and clinical efficacy. Initial development efforts focused mainly on humanizing the antibody protein to overcome problems of immunogenicity and on expanding of the target antigen repertoire. In parallel to naked TMAs, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have been developed for targeted delivery of potent anti-cancer drugs with the aim of bypassing the morbidity common to conventional chemotherapy. This paper first presents a review of TMAs and ADCs approved for clinical use by the FDA and those in development, focusing on hematological malignancies. Despite advances in these areas, both TMAs and ADCs still carry limitations and we highlight the more important ones including cancer cell specificity, conjugation chemistry, tumor penetration, product heterogeneity and manufacturing issues. In view of the recognized importance of targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy, we discuss the advantages of alternative drug carriers and where these should be applied, focusing on peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs), particularly those discovered through combinatorial peptide libraries. By defining the advantages and disadvantages of naked TMAs, ADCs and PDCs it should be possible to develop a more rational approach to the application of targeted drug delivery strategies in different situations and ultimately, to a broader basket of more effective therapies for cancer patients. PMID:23140144

2012-01-01

297

Feasibility of noninvasive ultrasound delivery for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery in the brain  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The objective of our research during the past few years has been to develop multichannel ultrasound phased arrays for noninvasive brain interventions. We have been successful in developing methods for correcting the skull induced beam distortions and thus, are able to produce sharp focusing through human skulls. This method is now being tested for thermal ablation of tumors, with results from animal studies demonstrating feasibility. In addition, the ability of ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) locally has been explored in animal models. The results suggest that the transcranial ultrasound exposures can induce BBB opening such that therapeutic agents can be localized in the brain. This tool is especially powerful since the beam can be guided by MR images, thus providing anatomical or functional targeting. This talk will review our current status in this research, which ultimately aims for the clinical use of this methodology.

Hynynen, Kullervo; McDannold, Nathan; Clement, Greg; White, Jason; Treat, Lisa; Yin, Xiangtao; Jolesz, Ferenc; Sheikov, Nickolai; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

2005-04-01

298

Paclitaxel-Conjugated PAMAM Dendrimers Adversely Affect Microtubule Structure through Two Independent Modes of Action  

PubMed Central

Paclitaxel (Taxol®) is an anti-cancer drug that induces mitotic arrest via microtubule hyperstabilization, but causes side effects due to its hydrophobicity and cellular promiscuity. The targeted cytotoxicity of hydrophilic paclitaxel-conjugated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers has been demonstrated in cultured cancer cells. Mechanisms of action responsible for this cytotoxicity are unknown—i.e., whether the cytotoxicity is due to paclitaxel stabilization of microtubules — as is whether paclitaxel is released intracellularly from the dendrimer. To determine whether the conjugated paclitaxel can bind microtubules, we used a combination of ensemble and single microtubule imaging techniques in vitro. We demonstrate that these conjugates adversely affect microtubules by: (1) promoting the polymerization and stabilization of microtubules in a paclitaxel-dependent manner; and (2) bundling pre-formed microtubules in a paclitaxel-independent manner, potentially due to protonation of tertiary amines in the dendrimer interior. Our results provide mechanistic insights into the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel-conjugated PAMAM dendrimers and uncover unexpected risks of using such conjugates therapeutically. PMID:23391096

Cline, Erika N.; Li, Ming-Hsin; Choi, Seok Ki; Herbstman, Jeffrey F.; Kaul, Neha; Meyhöfer, Edgar; Skiniotis, Georgios; Baker, James R.; Larson, Ronald G.; Walter, Nils G.

2013-01-01

299

Targeted nanoparticle delivery of doxorubicin into placental tissues to treat ectopic pregnancies.  

PubMed

Abnormal trophoblast growth can cause life-threatening disorders such as ectopic pregnancy, choriocarcinoma, and placenta accreta. EnGeneIC Delivery Vehicles (EDVs) are nanocells that can promote tissue-specific delivery of drugs and may be useful to medically treat such disorders. The objective of this study was to determine whether EDVs loaded with the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin and targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, very highly expressed on the placental surface) can regress placental cells in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. In female SCID mice, EGFR-targeted EDVs induced greater inhibition of JEG-3 (choriocarcinoma cells) tumor xenografts, compared with EDVs targeting an irrelevant antigen (nontargeted EDVs) or naked doxorubicin. EGFR-targeted EDVs were more readily taken up by human placental explants ex vivo and induced increased apoptosis (M30 antibody) compared with nontargeted EDVs. In vitro, EGFR-targeted EDVs administered to JEG-3 cells resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell viability, proliferation, and increased apoptosis, a finding confirmed by continuous monitoring by xCELLigence. In conclusion, EGFR-targeted EDVs loaded with doxorubicin significantly inhibited trophoblastic tumor cell growth in vivo and in vitro and induced significant cell death ex vivo, potentially mediated by increasing apoptosis and decreasing proliferation. EDVs may be a novel nanoparticle treatment for ectopic pregnancy and other disorders of trophoblast growth. PMID:23288908

Kaitu'u-Lino, Tu'uhevaha J; Pattison, Scott; Ye, Louie; Tuohey, Laura; Sluka, Pavel; MacDiarmid, Jennifer; Brahmbhatt, Himanshu; Johns, Terrence; Horne, Andrew W; Brown, Jeremy; Tong, Stephen

2013-02-01

300

Gene and doxorubicin co-delivery system for targeting therapy of glioma.  

PubMed

The combination of gene therapy and chemotherapy is a promising treatment strategy for brain gliomas. In this paper, we designed a co-delivery system (DGDPT/pORF-hTRAIL) loading chemotherapeutic drug doxorubicin and gene agent pORF-hTRAIL, and with functions of pH-trigger and cancer targeting. Peptide HAIYPRH (T7), a transferrin receptor-speci?c peptide, was chosen as the ligand to target the co-delivery system to the tumor cells expressing transferrin receptors. T7-modi?ed co-delivery system showed higher ef?ciency in cellular uptake and gene expression than unmodi?ed co-delivery system in U87 MG cells, and accumulated in tumor more ef?ciently in vivo. DOX was covalently conjugated to carrier though pH-trigged hydrazone bond. In vitro incubation of the conjugates in buffers led to a fast DOX release at pH 5.0 (intracellular environment) while at pH 7.4 (blood) the conjugates are relatively stable. The combination treatment resulted in a synergistic growth inhibition (combination index, CI < 1) in U87 MG cells. The synergism effect of DGDPT/pORF-hTRAIL was verified in vitro and in vivo. In vivo anti-glioma ef?cacy study confirmed that DGDPT/pORF-hTRAIL displayed anti-glioma activity but was less toxic. PMID:22484049

Liu, Shuhuan; Guo, Yubo; Huang, Rongqin; Li, Jianfeng; Huang, Shixian; Kuang, Yuyang; Han, Liang; Jiang, Chen

2012-06-01

301

Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) delivery to a target site using in vivo confocal microscopy.  

PubMed

The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery quantification. Here we examine Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) labeled with a series of 4 membrane dyes from which we select the optimal dye combination for pair-wise comparisons of delivery to inflamed tissue in the mouse ear using confocal fluorescence imaging. The use of an optimized dye pair for simultaneous tracking of two cell populations in the same animal enables quantification of a test population that is referenced to an internal control population, thereby eliminating intra-subject variations and variations in injected cell numbers. Consistent results were obtained even when the administered cell number varied by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating an ability to neutralize one of the largest sources of in vivo experimental error and to greatly reduce the number of cells required to evaluate cell delivery. With this method, we are able to show a small but significant increase in the delivery of cytokine pre-treated MSCs (TNF-? & IFN-?) compared to control MSCs. Our results suggest future directions for screening cell strategies using our in vivo cell delivery assay, which may be useful to develop methods to maximize cell therapeutic potential. PMID:24205131

Mortensen, Luke J; Levy, Oren; Phillips, Joseph P; Stratton, Tara; Triana, Brian; Ruiz, Juan P; Gu, Fangqi; Karp, Jeffrey M; Lin, Charles P

2013-01-01

302

Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy  

PubMed Central

The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery quantification. Here we examine Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) labeled with a series of 4 membrane dyes from which we select the optimal dye combination for pair-wise comparisons of delivery to inflamed tissue in the mouse ear using confocal fluorescence imaging. The use of an optimized dye pair for simultaneous tracking of two cell populations in the same animal enables quantification of a test population that is referenced to an internal control population, thereby eliminating intra-subject variations and variations in injected cell numbers. Consistent results were obtained even when the administered cell number varied by more than an order of magnitude, demonstrating an ability to neutralize one of the largest sources of in vivo experimental error and to greatly reduce the number of cells required to evaluate cell delivery. With this method, we are able to show a small but significant increase in the delivery of cytokine pre-treated MSCs (TNF-? & IFN-?) compared to control MSCs. Our results suggest future directions for screening cell strategies using our in vivo cell delivery assay, which may be useful to develop methods to maximize cell therapeutic potential. PMID:24205131

Mortensen, Luke J.; Levy, Oren; Phillips, Joseph P.; Stratton, Tara; Triana, Brian; Ruiz, Juan P.; Gu, Fangqi; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Lin, Charles P.

2013-01-01

303

Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non-transport permissive and intact BBB, we also assessed the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) disruption of the BBB in enhancing permeation of AuNPs across the intact BBB and tumor BBB in vivo. MRgFUS is a novel technique that can transiently increase BBB permeability thereby allowing delivery of therapeutics into the CNS. We demonstrated enhanced delivery of AuNPs with therapeutic potential into the CNS via MRgFUS. Our study was the first to establish a definitive role for MRgFUS in delivering AuNPs into the CNS. In summary, this thesis describes results from a series of research projects that have contributed to our understanding of the influence of design features on AuNP permeation through the BBB and also the potential role of MRgFUS in AuNP permeation across the BBB.

Etame, Arnold B.

304

Development of multiple-layer polymeric particles for targeted and controlled drug delivery  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this work was to develop multilayered particles consisting of a magnetic core and two encompassing shells made up of poly (N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) and poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) for targeted and controlled drug delivery. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that multilayered particles were obtained with PNIPAAm magnetic nanoparticles embedded within the PLGA shell. Factorial analysis studies also showed that the particle size was inversely proportional to the surfactant concentration and sonication power and directly proportional to the PLGA concentration. Drug-release results demonstrated that these multilayer particles produced an initial burst release and a subsequent sustained release of both bovine serum albumin (BSA) and curcumin loaded into the core and shell of the particle, respectively. BSA release was also affected by changes in temperature. In conclusion, our results indicate that the multilayered magnetic particles could be synthesized and used for targeted and controlled delivery of multiple drugs with different release mechanisms. PMID:19699325

Koppolu, Bhanuprasanth; Rahimi, Maham; Nattama, Sivaniarvindpriya; Wadajkar, Aniket; Nguyen, Kytai Truong

2010-01-01

305

Design and development of hydrogel beads for targeted drug delivery to the colon  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this research was to develop and evaluate a multiparticulate system of chitosan hydrogel beads exploiting pH-sensitive\\u000a property and specific biodegradability for colon-targeted delivery of satranidazole. Chitosan hydrogel beads were prepared\\u000a by the cross-linking method followed by enteric coating with Eudragit S100. All formulations were evaluated for particle size,\\u000a encapsulation efficiency, swellability, and in vitro drug release. The

Sanjay K. Jain; Anekant Jain; Yashwant Gupta; Manisha Ahirwar

2007-01-01

306

Transferrin receptors and the targeted delivery of therapeutic agents against cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Traditional cancer therapy can be successful in destroying tumors, but can also cause dangerous side effects. Therefore, many targeted therapies are in development. The transferrin receptor (TfR) functions in cellular iron uptake through its interaction with transferrin. This receptor is an attractive molecule for the targeted therapy of cancer since it is upregulated on the surface of many cancer types and is efficiently internalized. This receptor can be targeted in two ways: 1) for the delivery of therapeutic molecules into malignant cells or 2) to block the natural function of the receptor leading directly to cancer cell death. Scope of review In the present article we discuss the strategies used to target the TfR for the delivery of therapeutic agents into cancer cells. We provide a summary of the vast types of anti-cancer drugs that have been delivered into cancer cells employing a variety of receptor binding molecules including Tf, anti-TfR antibodies, or TfR-binding peptides alone or in combination with carrier molecules including nanoparticles and viruses. Major conclusions Targeting the TfR has been shown to be effective in delivering many different therapeutic agents and causing cytotoxic effects in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. General significance The extensive use of TfR for targeted therapy attests to the versatility of targeting this receptor for therapeutic purposes against malignant cells. More advances in this area are expected to further improve the therapeutic potential of targeting the TfR for cancer therapy leading to an increase in the number of clinical trials of molecules targeting this receptor. PMID:21851850

Daniels, Tracy R.; Bernabeu, Ezequiel; Rodríguez, José A.; Patel, Shabnum; Kozman, Maggie; Chiappetta, Diego A.; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y.; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L.

2012-01-01

307

Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

2013-12-01

308

A functional drug delivery platform for targeting and imaging cancer cells based on Pluronic F127.  

PubMed

Functional polymeric micelles play an important role in the efficient delivery of therapeutic drugs into tumours. In this study, a functional drug delivery platform with ligands for targeting and fluorescent imaging was designed based on Pluronic F127 (PF127). Using folic acid (FA) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) to chemically conjugate with PF127, two functional polymers, Pluronic F127-FA (PF127-FA) and Pluronic F127-FITC (PF127-FITC), were synthesized. Solasodine-loaded micelles were then prepared via the thin-film hydration method. By employing A549 and HeLa cells, the results of in vitro cell assays performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry suggested that the proposed micelles could provide the desired specific targeting and fluorescent imaging functions. In addition, the results of in vitro cytotoxicity experiments showed that the growth inhibition rates of A549 and HeLa cells treated with solasodine-loaded micelles were remarkably higher than those of cells treated with free solasodine. Solasodine-loaded micelles exhibited a more distinct inhibitory effect against HeLa cells than against A549 cells. Thus, an effective drug delivery system for targeting and imaging cancer cells was developed. PMID:25780935

Zhang, Denghao; Tao, Liang; Zhao, Hongli; Yuan, Huihui; Lan, Minbo

2015-06-01

309

Hyaluronic acid conjugated ?-cyclodextrin-oligoethylenimine star polymer for CD44-targeted gene delivery.  

PubMed

A new CD44-targeted gene delivery system, the star-shaped cationic polymer containing a ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) core and multiple branched oligoethylenimine (OEI) arms with conjugated oligomer of hyaluronic acid (HA), was synthesized by reductive amination between ?-CD-OEI star polymer and HA, and was characterized for pDNA condensation and nanoparticle formation, followed by evaluation for targeted gene delivery of luciferase reporter gene and wild type p53 gene in CD44-positive and CD44-negative cell lines. The ?-CD-OEI-HA polymer contained 6 arms of OEI (600Da) and a short HA segment. It could fully condense pDNA to form nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 100 to 200nm at N/P ratios of 8 or higher. The conjugation of HA reduced cytotoxicity of ?-CD-OEI-HA/pDNA polyplexes. It was found that CD44 receptor was highly expressed and localized at the membrane of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line, while no CD44 was found at the membrane of MCF-7 epithelial cell line. Compared with PEI (25kDa) and ?-CD-OEI star polymers, ?-CD-OEI-HA demonstrated significant increased gene transfection efficiency in MDA-MB-231 cells, while such effect was absent in MCF-7 cells. The targeted delivery of wild type p53 gene by ?-CD-OEI-HA in MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in an increased cell cycle arrest at sub-G1 phase. PMID:25681725

Yin, Hui; Zhao, Feng; Zhang, Daohai; Li, Jun

2015-04-10

310

Magnetic Nanoparticles as Intraocular Drug Delivery System to Target Retinal Pigmented Epithelium (RPE)  

PubMed Central

One of the most challenging efforts in drug delivery is the targeting of the eye. The eye structure and barriers render this organ poorly permeable to drugs. Quite recently the entrance of nanoscience in ocular drug delivery has improved the penetration and half-life of drugs, especially in the anterior eye chamber, while targeting the posterior chamber is still an open issue. The retina and the retinal pigment epithelium/choroid tissues, located in the posterior eye chamber, are responsible for the majority of blindness both in childhood and adulthood. In the present study, we used magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) as a nanotool for ocular drug delivery that is capable of specific localization in the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) layer. We demonstrate that, following intraocular injection in Xenopus embryos, MNPs localize specifically in RPE where they are retained for several days. The specificity of the localization did not depend on particle size and surface properties of the MNPs used in this work. Moreover, through similar experiments in zebrafish, we demonstrated that the targeting of RPE by the nanoparticles is not specific for the Xenopus species. PMID:24451140

Giannaccini, Martina; Giannini, Marianna; Calatayud, M. Pilar; Goya, Gerardo F.; Cuschieri, Alfred; Dente, Luciana; Raffa, Vittoria

2014-01-01

311

Bifunctional Coupling Agents for Radiolabeling of Biomolecules and Target-Specific Delivery of Metallic Radionuclides  

PubMed Central

Receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals are of great current interest in early molecular imaging and radiotherapy of cancers, and provide a unique tool for target-specific delivery of radionuclides to the diseased tissues. In general, a target-specific radiopharmaceutical can be divided into four parts: targeting biomolecule (BM), pharmacokinetic modifying (PKM) linker, bifunctional coupling or chelating agent (BFC), and radionuclide. The targeting biomolecule serves as a “carrier” for specific delivery of the radionuclide. PKM linkers are used to modify radiotracer excretion kinetics. BFC is needed for radiolabeling of biomolecules with a metallic radionuclide. Different radiometals have significant difference in their coordination chemistry, and require BFCs with different donor atoms and chelator frameworks. Since the radiometal chelate can have a significant impact on physical and biological properties of the target-specific radiopharmaceutical, its excretion kinetics can be altered by modifying the coordination environment with various chelators or coligand, if needed. This review will focus on the design of BFCs and their coordination chemistry with technetium, copper, gallium, indium, yttrium and lanthanide radiometals. PMID:18538888

Liu, Shuang

2008-01-01

312

‘One-pot’ synthesis of multifunctional GSH-CdTe quantum dots for targeted drug delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel quantum dots-based multifunctional nanovehicle (DOX-QD-PEG-FA) was designed for targeted drug delivery, fluorescent imaging, tracking, and cancer therapy, in which the GSH-CdTe quantum dots play a key role in imaging and drug delivery. To exert curative effects, the antineoplastic drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) was loaded on the GSH-CdTe quantum dots through a condensation reaction. Meanwhile, a polyethylene glycol (PEG) shell was introduced to wrap the DOX-QD, thus stabilizing the structure and preventing clearance and drug release during systemic circulation. To actively target cancer cells and prevent the nanovehicles from being absorbed by normal cells, the nanoparticles were further decorated with folic acid (FA), allowing them to target HeLa cells that express the FA receptor. The multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA conjugates were simply prepared using the ‘one pot’ method. In vitro study demonstrated that this simple, multifunctional nanovehicle can deliver DOX to the targeted cancer cells and localize the nanoparticles. After reaching the tumor cells, the FA on the DOX-QD-PEG surface allowed folate receptor recognition and increased the drug concentration to realize a higher curative effect. This novel, multifunctional DOX-QD-PEG-FA system shows great potential for tumor imaging, targeting, and therapy.

Chen, Xiaoqin; Tang, Yajun; Cai, Bing; Fan, Hongsong

2014-06-01

313

Is a reduction in radiation lung volume and dose necessary with paclitaxel chemotherapy for node-positive breast cancer?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate and quantify the effect of irradiated lung volume, radiation dose, and paclitaxel chemotherapy on the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in breast cancer patients with positive lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: We previously reported the incidence of RP among 41 patients with breast cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT) and adjuvant paclitaxel-containing chemotherapy. We recorded the central lung distance, a measure of the extent of lung included in the RT volume, in these patients. We used this measure and the historical and observed rates of RP in our series to model the lung tolerance to RT in patients receiving chemotherapy (CHT) both with and without paclitaxel. To evaluate the risk factors for the development of RP, we performed a case-control study comparing paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP with those who did not, and a second case-control study comparing patients receiving paclitaxel in addition to standard CHT/RT (n = 41) and controls receiving standard CHT/RT alone (n 192). Results: The actuarial rate of RP in the paclitaxel-treated group was 15.4% compared with 0.9% among breast cancer patients treated with RT and non-paclitaxel-containing CHT. Our mathematical model found that the effective lung tolerance for patients treated with paclitaxel was reduced by approximately 24%. No statistically significant difference was found with regard to the dose delivered to specific radiation fields, dose per fraction, central lung distance, or percentage of lung irradiated in the case-control study of paclitaxel-treated patients who developed RP compared with those who did not. In the comparison of 41 patients receiving RT and CHT with paclitaxel and 192 matched controls receiving RT and CHT without paclitaxel, the only significant differences identified were the more frequent use of a supraclavicular radiation field and a decrease in the RT lung dose among the paclitaxel-treated patients. This finding indicates that the major factor associated with development of RP was paclitaxel treatment. Conclusions: The use of paclitaxel chemotherapy and RT in the primary treatment of node-positive breast cancer is likely to increase the incidence of RP. In patients treated with paclitaxel, reducing the percentage of lung irradiated by 24% should reduce the risk of RP to 1%, according to our calculations of lung tolerance. Future clinical trials using combination CHT that includes paclitaxel and RT should carefully evaluate the incidence and severity of RP and should also accurately monitor the extent of lung included within the RT volume to develop safe guidelines for the delivery of what is becoming standard therapy for node-positive breast cancer.

Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: ataghian@partners.org; Assaad, Sherif I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Floyd, Scott R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2005-06-01

314

J Drug Target . Author manuscript Targeted delivery of a proapoptotic peptide to tumors in vivo  

E-print Network

be expected to provide strong therapeutic benefits with the absence of detrimental side effects, as are seen with conventional chemotherapy. Examples of such targeting have been described for the treatment

Boyer, Edmond

315

Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted immunoliposomes for delivery of celecoxib to cancer cells.  

PubMed

Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is highly expressed in many different cancers. Therefore, the inhibition of the COX-2 pathway by a selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib (CLX), may be an alternative strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. Liposomal drug delivery systems can be used to increase the therapeutic efficacy of CLX while minimizing its side effects. Previous studies have reported the encapsulation of CLX within the non-targeted long circulating liposomes and functional effect of these formulations against colorectal cancer cell lines. However, the selectivity and internalization of CLX-loaded liposomes can further be improved by grafting targeting ligands on their surface. Cetuximab (anti-epidermal growth factor receptor - EGFR - monoclonal antibody) is a promising targeting ligand since EGFR is highly expressed in a wide range of solid tumors. The aim of this study was to develop EGFR-targeted immunoliposomes for enhancing the delivery of CLX to cancer cells and to evaluate the functional effects of these liposomes in cancer cell lines. EGFR-targeted ILs, having an average size of 120nm, could encapsulate 40% of the CLX, while providing a sustained drug release profile. Cell association studies have also shown that the immunoliposome uptake was higher in EGFR-overexpressing cells compared to the non-targeted liposomes. In addition, the CLX-loaded-anti-EGFR immunoliposomes were significantly more toxic compared to the non-targeted ones in cancer cells with EGFR-overexpression but not in the cells with low EGFR expression, regardless of their COX-2 expression status. Thus, selective targeting of CLX with anti-EGFR immunoliposomes appears to be a promising strategy for therapy of tumors that overexpress EGFR. PMID:25595386

Limasale, Yanuar Dwi Putra; Tezcaner, Ay?en; Özen, Can; Keskin, Dilek; Banerjee, Sreeparna

2015-02-20

316

Matrix-specific anchors: a new concept for targeted delivery and retention of therapeutic cells.  

PubMed

Biomedical strategies for tissue engineering and repair utilize specific cells, scaffolds, and growth factors to reconstruct elements of damaged tissue. The cellular element of these strategies is limited, however, by poor efficiency of delivery and retention of therapeutic cells in target sites. We propose that the presence of a cellular anchor that is able to specifically bind a defined element of target tissue will facilitate efficient binding and retention of therapeutic cells, thereby promoting repair of the target site. To do so, we engineered an artificial collagen-specific anchor (ACSA) that is able to specifically bind collagen I. The ACSA was engineered by creating a construct comprising rationally designed consecutive domains. The binding specificity of the ACSA was achieved by employing variable regions of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a unique epitope present in human collagen I. Meanwhile, cell membrane localization of the ACSA was provided by the presence of a transmembrane domain. We determined that the ACSA was localized within cell membranes and interacted with its intended target, that is, collagen I. We have demonstrated that, in comparison to the control, the cells expressing the ACSA attached better to collagen I and exhibited improved retention in sites of seeding. We have also demonstrated that the presence of the ACSA did not interfere with cell proliferation, the biosynthesis of endogenous collagen I, or the biological functions of native collagen receptors. Since the presented cell delivery system utilizes a common characteristic of major connective tissues, namely the presence of collagen I, the findings described here could have a broad positive impact for improving the repair processes of tendon, ligament, bone, intervertebral disc, skin, and other collagen I-rich connective tissues. If successful, the ACSA approach to deliver cells will serve as an outline for developing cell delivery methods that target other elements of extracellular matrices, including other collagen types, laminins, and fibronectins. PMID:25435302

Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Jolanta; Beredjiklian, Pedro; Wang, Mark L; Fertala, Andrzej

2015-04-01

317

Folic acid conjugated nanoparticles of mixed lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core for targeted delivery of Docetaxel  

Microsoft Academic Search

A system of nanoparticles of mixed lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core was developed for targeted delivery of anticancer drugs with Docetaxel as a model drug, which provide targeting versatility with a quantitative control of the targeting effect by adjusting the lipid component ratio of the mixed lipid monolayer, and combine the advantages and avoid disadvantages of polymeric nanoparticles

Yutao Liu; Kai Li; Jie Pan; Bin Liu; Si-Shen Feng

2010-01-01

318

Water soluble nanoporous nanoparticle for in vivo targeted drug delivery and controlled release in B cells tumor context  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multitasking nanoparticles are gaining great attention for smart drug delivery systems. The exploration of the nano-scale opens new concrete opportunities for revealing new properties and undiscovered cell-particle interactions. Here we present a biodegradable nanoporous silicon nanoparticle that can be successfully employed for in vivo targeted drug delivery and sustained release. The bare nanoporous nanocarriers can be accurately designed and fabricated

F. de Angelis; A. Pujia; C. Falcone; E. Iaccino; C. Palmieri; C. Liberale; F. Mecarini; P. Candeloro; L. Luberto; A. de Laurentiis; G. Das; G. Scala; E. di Fabrizio

2010-01-01

319

Targeted Delivery of Vancomycin to Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilms Using a Fibrinogen-Derived Peptide  

PubMed Central

This study reports on the use of a fibrinogen-derived peptide for the specific targeting and delivery of vancomycin to Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms. One method by which S. epidermidis initially adheres to biomaterials uses the plasma protein fibrinogen as an intermediary, where the S. epidermidis surface protein SdrG binds to a short amino acid sequence near the amino terminus of the B? chain of fibrinogen. We mimicked this binding interaction and demonstrated the use of a synthetic fibrinogen-based ?6-20 peptide to target and deliver vancomycin to S. epidermidis in vitro. The ?6-20 peptide was synthesized and labeled with a nanogold probe, and its targeting capabilities were examined through the use of scanning electron microscopy. The Nanogold component was then replaced by vancomycin, utilizing a flexible, variable length poly(ethylene glycol) linker between the peptide and antibiotic to create the targeted vancomycin products, ?6-20-PEGx-VAN. Initial binding to surface adherent S. epidermidis was increased in a concentration-dependent manner relative to vancomycin for all equivalent concentrations ?4 ?g/ml, with targeted vancomcyin content up to 22.9 times that of vancomycin alone. Retention of the targeted antibiotics was measured after an additional 24 hour incubation period, revealing levels 1.3 times that of vancomycin. The results demonstrate the improved targeting and retention of vancomycin within a biofilm due to the incorporation of a specific targeting motif. PMID:22623343

Hofmann, Christopher M.; Anderson, James M.; Marchant, Roger E.

2012-01-01

320

Targeted doxorubicin delivery by chitosan-galactosylated modified polymer microbubbles to hepatocarcinoma cells.  

PubMed

Targeted drug delivery is a main issue in cancer treatment. Taking advantage of recently developed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based microbubbles, which are characterized by chemical versatility of the polymeric surface thereby allowing coating with different ligands, we set up a strategy for the targeted delivery of the anticancer agent doxorubicin to hepatocarcinoma cells. Such microbubbles are exceptionally efficient ultrasound scatterers and thus represent also an option as potential ultrasound contrast agents. Moreover, the oscillation of microbubbles induced by ultrasound could contribute to favor the release of drugs allocated on shell. Specifically, PVA-based microbubbles were reacted with a galactosylated chitosan complex and loaded with doxorubicin to enable the localization and drug delivery to HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells overexpressing asialoglycoprotein receptors. We demonstrated selectivity and greater bioadhesive properties of the functionalized microbubbles for tumor cells than to normal fibroblasts, which were influenced by the degree of galactosylation. The presence of galactosylated chitosan did not modify the rate of doxorubicin release from microbubbles, whichwas almost complete within 48h. Cellular uptake of doxorubicin loaded on functionalized microbubbles was higher in HepG2 than in normal fibroblasts, which do not over express the asialoglycoprotein receptors. In addition, doxorubicin loaded onto functionalized microbubbles fully retained its cytotoxic activity. Cells were also irradiated with ultrasound, immediately after exposure to microbubbles. An early enhancement of doxorubicin release and cellular drug uptake associated to a concomitant increase in cytotoxicity was observed in HepG2 cells. Overall, results of the study indicate that galactosylated chitosan microbubbles represent promising devices for the targeted delivery of antitumor agents to liver cancer cells. PMID:23759384

Villa, Raffaella; Cerroni, Barbara; Viganò, Lucia; Margheritelli, Silvia; Abolafio, Gabriella; Oddo, Letizia; Paradossi, Gaio; Zaffaroni, Nadia

2013-10-01

321

Gene delivery with active targeting to ovarian cancer cells mediated by folate receptor alpha.  

PubMed

Folate receptor alpha (FRalpha) is overexpressed on ovarian cancer cells and is a promising molecular target for ovarian cancer gene therapy, but there was still no related report. In this study, folate modified cationic liposomes (F-PEG-CLPs) for ovarian cancer gene delivery were developed for the first time. Folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-succinate-cholesterol (F-PEG-suc-Chol) was firstly synthesized and then used to prepare folate-targeted cationic liposomes/plasmid DNA complexes (F-targeted lipoplexes). F-targeted lipoplexes were prepared by post-insertion method, and displayed membrane structure by transmission electron microscopy observation with the diameter of 193 nm-200 nm and the zeta potential of 35 mV-38 mV. DNase degradation experiments showed that plasmid DNA could be effectively shielded by F-targeted lipoplexes in vitro. F-targeted lipoplexes could transfer gene into human ovarian carcinoma cell line SKOV-3, and 0.1% F-PEG-CLPs composed by DOTAP/Chol/mPEG-Chol/F-PEG-suc-Chol (50:45:5:0.1, molar ratio) had the highest transfection efficiency. The transfection activity of F-targeted lipoplexes could be competitively inhibited by free folic acid, demonstrating that folate-FRalpha interaction caused high transfection efficiency of F-targeted lipoplexes. The uptake mechanism of F-targeted lipoplexes was further validated on human oral carcinoma cell line KB and human liver carcinoma cell line HepG2. The concentration-dependent and time-dependent cytotoxicity of targeted material F-PEG-suc-Chol was observed by MTT assay on SKOV-3 cell and its application would not increase the cytotoxicity of F-targeted lipoplexes in SKOV-3 cells. All the data indicated that F-PEG-CLPs would be a promising gene vector targeting for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:23802413

He, Zhiyao; Yu, Yiyi; Zhang, Ying; Yan, Yongdong; Zheng, Yu; He, Jun; Xie, Yongmei; He, Gu; Wei, Yuquan; Song, Xiangrong

2013-05-01

322

Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes  

E-print Network

We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

Chau, Ying

2005-01-01

323

Dendrimers in drug delivery and targeting: Drug-dendrimer interactions and toxicity issues  

PubMed Central

Dendrimers are the emerging polymeric architectures that are known for their defined structures, versatility in drug delivery and high functionality whose properties resemble with biomolecules. These nanostructured macromolecules have shown their potential abilities in entrapping and/or conjugating the high molecular weight hydrophilic/hydrophobic entities by host-guest interactions and covalent bonding (prodrug approach) respectively. Moreover, high ratio of surface groups to molecular volume has made them a promising synthetic vector for gene delivery. Owing to these properties dendrimers have fascinated the researchers in the development of new drug carriers and they have been implicated in many therapeutic and biomedical applications. Despite of their extensive applications, their use in biological systems is limited due to toxicity issues associated with them. Considering this, the present review has focused on the different strategies of their synthesis, drug delivery and targeting, gene delivery and other biomedical applications, interactions involved in formation of drug-dendrimer complex along with characterization techniques employed for their evaluation, toxicity problems and associated approaches to alleviate their inherent toxicity. PMID:25035633

Madaan, Kanika; Kumar, Sandeep; Poonia, Neelam; Lather, Viney; Pandita, Deepti

2014-01-01

324

Colon-targeted quercetin delivery using natural polymer to enhance its bioavailability.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study is to develop a polymer (Guar Gum)-based matrix tablet (using quercetin as a model drug) with sufficient mechanical strength, and promising in vitro mouth-to-colon release profile. By definition, an oral colonic delivery system should retard drug release in the stomach and small intestine, and allow complete release in the colon. By drug delivery to the colon would therefore ensure direct treatment at the disease site, lower dosing, and fewer systemic side effects. Quercetin is antioxidant in nature and used to treat colon cancer, but they have poor absorption in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). As a site for drug delivery, the colon offers a near neutral pH, reduced digestive enzymatic activity, a long transit time, and an increased responsiveness to absorption enhancers. By achieving a colon-targeted drug delivery system, the absorption of quercetin may be increased, which leads to better bioactivity in fewer doses. PMID:21731393

Singhal, Anil; Jain, H; Singhal, Vipin; Elias, Edwin J; Showkat, Ahmad

2011-01-01

325

Cargo-towing fuel-free magnetic nanoswimmers for targeted drug delivery.  

PubMed

Fuel-free nanomotors are essential for future in-vivo biomedical transport and drug-delivery applications. Herein, the first example of directed delivery of drug-loaded magnetic polymeric particles using magnetically driven flexible nanoswimmers is described. It is demonstrated that flexible magnetic nickel-silver nanoswimmers (5-6 ?m in length and 200 nm in diameter) are able to transport micrometer particles at high speeds of more than 10 ?m s(-1) (more than 0.2 body lengths per revolution in dimensionless speed). The fundamental mechanism of the cargo-towing ability of these magnetic (fuel-free) nanowire motors is modelled, and the hydrodynamic features of these cargo-loaded motors discussed. The effect of the cargo size on swimming performance is evaluated experimentally and compared to a theoretical model, emphasizing the interplay between hydrodynamic drag forces and boundary actuation. The latter leads to an unusual increase of the propulsion speed at an intermediate particle size. Potential applications of these cargo-towing nanoswimmers are demonstrated by using the directed delivery of drug-loaded microparticles to HeLa cancer cells in biological media. Transport of the drug carriers through a microchannel from the pick-up zone to the release microwell is further illustrated. It is expected that magnetically driven nanoswimmers will provide a new approach for the rapid delivery of target-specific drug carriers to predetermined destinations. PMID:22174121

Gao, Wei; Kagan, Daniel; Pak, On Shun; Clawson, Corbin; Campuzano, Susana; Chuluun-Erdene, Erdembileg; Shipton, Erik; Fullerton, Eric E; Zhang, Liangfang; Lauga, Eric; Wang, Joseph

2012-02-01

326

Biodegradable poly(amine-co-ester) terpolymers for targeted gene delivery  

PubMed Central

Many synthetic polycationic vectors for non-viral gene delivery show high efficiency in vitro, but their usually excessive charge density makes them toxic for in vivo applications. Here we describe the synthesis of a series of high molecular weight terpolymers with low charge density, and show that they exhibit efficient gene delivery, some surpassing the efficiency of the commercial transfection reagents Polyethylenimine and Lipofectamine 2000. The terpolymers were synthesized via enzyme-catalyzed copolymerization of lactone with dialkyl diester and amino diol, and their hydrophobicity adjusted by varying the lactone content and by selecting a lactone comonomer of specific ring size. Targeted delivery of the pro-apoptotic TRAIL gene to tumour xenografts by one of the terpolymers results in significant inhibition of tumour growth, with minimal toxicity both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest that the gene delivery ability of the terpolymers stems from their high molecular weight and increased hydrophobicity, which compensates for their low charge density. PMID:22138789

Zhou, Jiangbing; Liu, Jie; Cheng, Christopher J.; Patel, Toral R.; Weller, Caroline E.; Piepmeier, Joseph M.; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Saltzman, W. Mark

2014-01-01

327

Bacillus-shape design of polymer based drug delivery systems with janus-faced function for synergistic targeted drug delivery and more effective cancer therapy.  

PubMed

The particle shape of the drug delivery systems had a strong impact on their in vitro and in vivo performance, but there was limited availability of techniques to produce the specific shaped drug carriers. In this article, the novel methotrexate (MTX) decorated MPEG-PLA nanobacillus (MPEG-PLA-MTX NB) was prepared by the self-assembly technique followed by the extrusion through SPG membrane with high N2 pressure for targeted drug delivery, in which Janus-like MTX was not only used as a specific anticancer drug but could also be served as a tumor-targeting ligand. The MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs demonstrated much higher in vitro and in vivo targeting efficiency compared to the MPEG-PLA-MTX nanospheres (MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs) and MPEG-PLA nanospheres (MPEG-PLA NSs). In addition, the MPEG-PLA-MTX NBs also displayed much more excellent in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity than the MPEG-PLA-MTX NSs and free MTX injection. To our knowledge, this work provided the first example of the integration of the shape design (which mediated an early phase tumor accumulation and a late-phase cell internalization) and Janus-faced function (which mediated an early phase active targeting effect and a late-phase anticancer effect) on the basis of nanoscaled drug delivery systems. The highly convergent and cooperative drug delivery strategy opens the door to more drug delivery systems with new shapes and functions for cancer therapy. PMID:25710590

Cui, Fei; Lin, Jinyan; Li, Yang; Li, Yanxiu; Wu, Hongjie; Yu, Fei; Jia, Mengmeng; Yang, Xiangrui; Wu, Shichao; Xie, Liya; Ye, Shefang; Luo, Fanghong; Hou, Zhenqing

2015-04-01

328

Cancer Nanotheranostics: Improving Imaging and Therapy by Targeted Delivery across Biological Barriers  

PubMed Central

Cancer nanotheranostics aims to combine imaging and therapy of cancer through use of nanotechnology. The ability to engineer nanomaterials to interact with cancer cells at the molecular level can significantly improve the effectiveness and specificity of therapy to cancers that are currently difficult to treat. In particular, metastatic cancers, drug-resistant cancers, and cancer stem cells impose the greatest therapeutic challenge that requires targeted therapy to treat effectively. Targeted therapy can be achieved with appropriate designed drug delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles, adult stem cells, or T cells in immunotherapy. In this article, we first review the different types of materials commonly used to synthesize nanotheranostic particles and their use in imaging. We then discuss biological barriers that these nanoparticles encounter and must bypass to reach the target cancer cells, including the blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, and particularly the blood-brain barrier. We then review how nanotheranostics can be used to improve targeted delivery and treatment of cancer cells using nanoparticles, adult stem cells, and T cells in immunotherapy. Finally, we discuss development of nanoparticles to overcome current limitations in cancer therapy. PMID:21842473

Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin

2012-01-01

329

Targeted Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics With Endogenous and Exogenous Ligand-Based Mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) have proven to be highly efficient carriers of short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to hepatocytes in vivo; however, the precise mechanism by which this efficient delivery occurs has yet to be elucidated. We found that apolipoprotein E (apoE), which plays a major role in the clearance and hepatocellular uptake of physiological lipoproteins, also acts as an endogenous targeting ligand for ionizable LNPs (iLNPs), but not cationic LNPs (cLNPs). The role of apoE was investigated using both in vitro studies employing recombinant apoE and in vivo studies in wild-type and apoE?/? mice. Receptor dependence was explored in vitro and in vivo using low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR?/?)–deficient mice. As an alternative to endogenous apoE-based targeting, we developed a targeting approach using an exogenous ligand containing a multivalent N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-cluster, which binds with high affinity to the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR) expressed on hepatocytes. Both apoE-based endogenous and GalNAc-based exogenous targeting appear to be highly effective strategies for the delivery of iLNPs to liver. PMID:20461061

Akinc, Akin; Querbes, William; De, Soma; Qin, June; Frank-Kamenetsky, Maria; Jayaprakash, K. Narayanannair; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Cantley, William L; Dorkin, J Robert; Butler, James S; Qin, LiuLiang; Racie, Timothy; Sprague, Andrew; Fava, Eugenio; Zeigerer, Anja; Hope, Michael J; Zerial, Marino; Sah, Dinah WY; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Tracy, Mark A; Manoharan, Muthiah; Koteliansky, Victor; Fougerolles, Antonin de; Maier, Martin A

2010-01-01

330

The Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Cytochrome-C Protein to Tumors Using Lipid-Apolipoprotein Nanoparticles  

PubMed Central

Intracellular-acting therapeutic proteins offer a promising clinical alternative to extracellular-acting agents, but are limited in efficacy by their low permeability into the cell cytoplasm. We have developed a nanoparticle (NP) composed of lipid (DOTAP/DOPE) and apolipoprotein (APO A-I) to mediate the targeted delivery of intracellular-acting protein drugs to non-small cell lung tumors. NPs were produced with either GFP, a fluorescent model protein, or cytochrome C (cytC), an inducer of apoptosis in cancer cells. GFP and cytC were separately conjugated with a membrane permeable sequence (MPS) peptide and were admixed with DOPE/DOTAP nanoparticle formulations (NPs) to enable successful protein loading. Protein-loaded NPs were modified with DSPE-PEG-Anisamide to enable specific NP targeting to the tumor site in a xenograft model. The resulting particle was 20–30 nm in size and exhibited a 64–75% loading efficiency. H460 cells treated with the PEGylated MPS-cytC-NPs exhibited massive apoptosis. When MPS-GFP-NPs or MPS-cytC-NPs were intravenously administered in H460 tumor bearing mice, a specific tumor targeting effect with low NP accumulation in the liver was observed. In addition, MPS-cytC-NP treatment provoked a tumor growth retardation effect in H460 xenograft mice. We conclude that our NP enables targeted, efficacious therapeutic protein delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:22365810

Kim, Sang Kyoon; Foote, Michael B.; Huang, Leaf

2012-01-01

331

Analytical methods for brain targeted delivery system in vivo: perspectives on imaging modalities and microdialysis.  

PubMed

Since the introduction of microdialysis in 1974, the semi-invasive analytical method has grown exponentially. Microdialysis is one of the most potential analysis technologies of pharmacological drug delivery to the brain. In recent decades, analysis of chemicals targeting the brain has led to many improvements. It seems likely that fluorescence imaging was limited to ex vivo and in vitro applications with the exception of several intravital microscopy and photographic imaging approaches. X-ray computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET) have been commonly utilized for visualization of distribution and therapeutic effects of drugs. The efficient analytical methods for studies of brain-targeting delivery system is a major challenge in detecting the disposition as well as the variances of the factors that regulate the substances delivery into the brain. In this review, we highlight some of the ongoing trends in imaging modalities and the most recent developments in the field of microdialysis of live animals and present insights into exploiting brain disease for therapeutic and diagnostics purpose. PMID:22088476

Zhang, Xingguo; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Xiangyi; Ma, Kuifen; Rao, Yuefeng; Zhao, Qingwei; Li, Fanzhu

2012-02-01

332

Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System.  

PubMed

Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

Ucisik, Mehmet H; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

2015-01-01

333

Hepatocellular carcinoma dually-targeted nanoparticles for reduction triggered intracellular delivery of doxorubicin.  

PubMed

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) dual targeted stimuli responsive nanoparticles (NPs) for intracellular delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) were developed based on a reduction cleavable hyaluronic acid-glycyrrhetinic acid conjugate (HA-Cyst-GA). HA-Cyst-GA conjugate readily formed NPs in aqueous milieu and exhibited a high drug loading capacity (33.9%). The NPs redox responsiveness evaluation showed a tendency to lose their structural integrity in response to a reductive stimulus while remaining stable at physiological conditions, and that drug release was dramatically accelerated in presence of an intracellular level of glutathione. Moreover, cellular uptake studies highlighted the affinity of hepatoma cells (HepG2) toward the NPs as compared to breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). HA-Cyst-GA DOX-NPs displayed an increased cytotoxic potency over their non-responsive counterparts and free DOX with IC50 of 5.75, 9.33 and 10.23?g/mL, respectively. CLSM observations showed that HA-Cyst-GA DOX-NPs mediated a faster intracellular release and nuclear delivery of DOX as compared to the insensitive control. In vivo imaging study performed on H22 tumor bearing mice revealed a selective accumulation of DiR labeled NPs in the tumor and liver upon systemic administration. The antitumor efficacy was evaluated in HepG2 tumor xenograft model. Overall HA-Cyst-GA NPs appear as a potential HCC targeted intracellular delivery platform for DOX. PMID:25455765

Mezghrani, Omar; Tang, Yue; Ke, Xue; Chen, Yi; Hu, Danrong; Tu, Jiasheng; Zhao, Li; Bourkaib, Nadia

2015-01-30

334

Chitosan-DNA nanoparticles delivered by intrabiliary infusion enhance liver-targeted gene delivery  

PubMed Central

The goal of this study was to examine the efficacy of liver-targeted gene delivery by chitosan-DNA nanoparticles through retrograde intrabiliary infusion (RII). The transfection efficiency of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles, as compared with PEI-DNA nanoparticles or naked DNA, was evaluated in Wistar rats by infusion into the common bile duct, portal vein, or tail vein. Chitosan-DNA nanoparticles administrated through the portal vein or tail vein did not produce detectable luciferase expression. In contrast, rats that received chitosan-DNA nanoparticles showed more than 500 times higher luciferase expression in the liver 3 days after RII; and transgene expression levels decreased gradually over 14 days. Luciferase expression in the kidney, lung, spleen, and heart was negligible compared with that in the liver. RII of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles did not yield significant toxicity and damage to the liver and biliary tree as evidenced by liver function analysis and histopathological examination. Luciferase expression by RII of PEI-DNA nanoparticles was 17-fold lower than that of chitosan-DNA nanoparticles on day 3, but it increased slightly over time. These results suggest that RII is a promising routine to achieve liver-targeted gene delivery by non-viral nanoparticles; and both gene carrier characteristics and mode of administration significantly influence gene delivery efficiency. PMID:17369870

Dai, Hui; Jiang, Xuan; Tan, Geoffrey CY; Chen, Yong; Torbenson, Michael; Leong, Kam W; Mao, Hai-Quan

2006-01-01

335

Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells.  

PubMed

In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors. PMID:23076766

Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

2013-01-01

336

A multifunctional mesoporous silica nanocomposite for targeted delivery, controlled release of doxorubicin and bioimaging.  

PubMed

In this study, a targeting drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) was successfully developed for anti-cancer drug delivery and bioimaging. Carboxyl functionalized MSN (MSN/COOH) was firstly prepared and then modified with folate as the cancer targeting moiety and a near infrared fluorescent dye as labeling segment. Folate was conjugated to MSN/COOH via functional polyethyleneglycol (PEG), constructing the vector MSN/COOH-PEG-FA. The functionalization with carboxyl caused the pore surface of the nanocarrier more negative than native MSN, which could provide attractive forces between the nanoparticles and positively charged doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX). Meanwhile, the folate modification significantly enhanced the cellular uptake of the delivery system compared to unmodified counterparts. Furthermore, the introduction of PEG increased the water dispersibility. Besides, the modification with the near infrared fluorescent dye Cy5 made the system effective for live cell and in vivo imaging. Therefore, the Cy5-MSN/COOH-PEG-FA system could be a promising nanocarrier for simultaneous diagnosis and treatment of diseases. PMID:23711784

Xie, Meng; Shi, Hui; Li, Zhen; Shen, Haijun; Ma, Kun; Li, Bo; Shen, Song; Jin, Yi

2013-10-01

337

Mechanistic study of IR-780 dye as a potential tumor targeting and drug delivery agent.  

PubMed

IR-780 iodide, a near-infrared fluorescent heptamethine dye, has been recently characterized to exhibit preferential accumulation property in the mitochondria of tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanisms for its tumor selective activity and its potential as a drug delivery carrier. Results showed that the energy-dependent uptake of IR-780 iodide into the mitochondria of tumor cells was affected by glycolysis and plasma membrane potential. Moreover, OATP1B3 subtype of organic anion transporter peptides (OATPs) may play a dominant role in the transportation of IR-780 iodide into tumor cells, while cellular endocytosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and the ATP-binding cassette transporters did not show significant influence to its accumulation. We further evaluated the potential of IR-780 iodide as a drug delivery carrier by covalent conjugation of IR-780 with nitrogen mustard (IR-780NM). In vivo imaging showed that IR-780NM remained the tumor targeting property, indicating that IR-780 iodide could be potentially applied as a drug delivery agent for cancer targeted imaging and therapy. PMID:24148240

Zhang, Erlong; Luo, Shenglin; Tan, Xu; Shi, Chunmeng

2014-01-01

338

A novel liposomal formulation of FTY720 (Fingolimod) for promising enhanced targeted delivery  

PubMed Central

We describe here the development and characterization of the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel liposomal formulation for FTY720 delivery, LP-FTY720. The mean diameter of LP-FTY720 was ~157 nm, and the FTY720 entrapment efficiency was ~85%. The liposomal formulation protected FTY720 from degradation in aqueous buffer and showed toxicity in CLL patient B cells comparable to that of free FTY720. Following intravenous injection in ICR mice, LP-FTY720 had an increased elimination phase half-life (~28 vs. ~19 hr) and decreased clearance (235 vs. 778 mL/h/kg) compared to the free drug. Antibodies against CD19, CD20 and CD37 were incorporated into LP-FTY720, which provided targeted delivery to CLL patient B cells and thus achieved higher killing efficacy. The novel liposomal carrier of FTY720 demonstrated improved pharmacokinetic properties, comparable activity, and a potential platform for targeted delivery to CLL by overcoming the limited application of free FTY720 to B malignancy treatment. PMID:23969101

Mao, Yicheng; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Yun; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Chen, Ching-Shih; Byrd, John C.; Lee, Robert J.; Phelps, Mitch A.; Lee, L. James; Muthusamy, Natarajan

2014-01-01

339

Hyaluronic acid modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to CD44-overexpressing cancer cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a targeted drug delivery system has been developed based on hyaluronic acid (HA) modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). HA-MSNs possess a specific affinity to CD44 over-expressed on the surface of a specific cancer cell line, HCT-116 (human colon cancer cells). The cellular uptake performance of fluorescently labelled MSNs with and without HA modification has been evaluated by confocal microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS) analysis. Compared to bare MSNs, HA-MSNs exhibit a higher cellular uptake via HA receptor mediated endocytosis. An anticancer drug, doxorubicin hydrochloride (Dox), has been loaded into MSNs and HA-MSNs as drug delivery vehicles. Dox loaded HA-MSNs show greater cytotoxicity to HCT-116 cells than free Dox and Dox-MSNs due to the enhanced cell internalization behavior of HA-MSNs. It is expected that HA-MSNs have a great potential in targeted delivery of anticancer drugs to CD44 over-expressing tumors.

Yu, Meihua; Jambhrunkar, Siddharth; Thorn, Peter; Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yu, Chengzhong

2012-12-01

340

Focusing of photomechanical waves with an optical lens for depth-targeted molecular delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have been developing molecular delivery systems based on photomechanical waves (PMWs), which are generated by the irradiation of a laser absorbing material with nanosecond laser pulses. This method enables highly site-specific delivery in the horizontal plane of the tissue. However, targeting in the vertical direction is a remaining challenge. In this study, we developed a novel PMW focusing device for deeper tissue targeting. A commercial optical concave lens and black natural rubber sheet (laser absorber) were attached to the top and bottom end of a cylindrical spacer, respectively, which was filled with water. A laser pulse was transmitted through the lens and water and hit the rubber sheet to induce a plasma, generating a PMW. The PMW was propagated both downward and upward. The downward wave (1st wave) was diffused, while the upward (2nd wave) wave was reflected with the concave surface of the lens and focused at a depth determined by the geometrical parameters. To attenuate the 1st wave, a small-diameter silicon sponge rubber disk was adhered just under the rubber sheet concentrically with the laser axis. With the lens of f = -40 mm, the 2nd wave was focused to a diameter of 5.7 mm at a targeted depth of 20 mm, which was well agreed with the result of calculation by ray tracing. At a laser fluence of 5.1 J/cm2, peak pressure of the PMW reached ~40 MPa at the depth of 20 mm. Under this condition, we examined depth-targeted gene delivery to the rat skin.

Shimada, Takuichirou; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

2014-02-01

341

Synthesis and Characterization of Polymer Nanocarriers for the Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Enzymes  

PubMed Central

Protein drugs, such as recombinant enzymes useful for detoxification and replacement therapies, have extraordinary specificity and potency. However, inherently inadequate delivery to target sites and rapid inactivation limit their medical utility. Using chaperone polymeric particles designed within an injectible size range (sub-micron) may help solve these shortcomings. Such nanocarriers would (i) prevent premature inactivation of encapsulated therapeutic protein cargoes, (ii) provide a carrier that can be surface decorated by targeting ligands, and (iii) optimize sub-cellular localization of the drug. This chapter describes the techniques successfully employed for the preparation of polymer nanocarriers (PNC) loaded with the antioxidant enzyme, catalase, and targeted to endothelial cells. Methods of PNC synthesis, loading with catalase, characterization, coupling of a targeting moiety, and in vitro testing of the enzymatic and targeting activities are provided here. Advantages and disadvantages of specific designs are discussed. Due to the modular nature of the targeting methodology employed, it is believed that these protocols will provide a solid foundation for the formulation of a wide variety of enzymatic drug targeting strategies. PMID:20013177

Simone, Eric; Dziubla, Thomas; Shuvaev, Vladimir; Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

2011-01-01

342

Pharmacokinetic and efficacy study of cisplatin and paclitaxel formulated in a new injectable poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid) polymer.  

PubMed

Injectable biodegradable polymer poly(sebacic-co-ricinoleic acid), P(SA-RA) is currently under development for intratumoral (IT) delivery of drugs for treating solid tumors. This study presents formulation development, pharmacokinetic and efficacy studies of two anticancer drugs (cisplatin and paclitaxel) formulated with P(SA-RA) polymer. In pharmacokinetic study, systemic exposure and pharmacokinetic parameters of cisplatin/paclitaxel following single intravenous (IV) or subcutaneous (SC) doses of cisplatin/paclitaxel was compared with intramuscular (IM) or SC doses of cisplatin/paclitaxel formulated with P(SA-RA) polymer in male CD rat. Simultaneously, the tumor reduction effect and toxicity for these formulations were evaluated in human FaDu head and neck tumor xenograft subcutaneous nude mouse model. Pharmacokinetic data reflect the lower maximal concentrations and sustained release of polymer-cisplatin/paclitaxel formulations compared to standard cisplatin/paclitaxel administration. Regarding efficacy study, a single IT or near the tumor injection (NT) of polymer-paclitaxel or polymer-cisplatin formulation significantly reduced the tumor size, compared to the standard paclitaxel or cisplatin treatments. No death or toxicity and no effect on body weight as well as macroscopic and/or microscopic changes in or near the injected area were observed, proving biocompatibility and acceptability of polymer-formulations. In conclusion, the developed formulation demonstrated controlled release and significant efficacy in delivering these agents and exhibit potential for further clinical development. PMID:22732267

Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Khan, Wahid; Pawar, Rajendra P; Tabakman, Rinat; Naftali, Esmira; Winkler, Ilan; Kaufman, Olga; Klapper, Leah; Domb, Abraham J

2012-09-01

343

Formulation/Preparation of Functionalized Nanoparticles for In Vivo Targeted Drug Delivery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Targeted cancer therapy allows the delivery of therapeutic agents to cancer cells without incurring undesirable side effects on the neighboring healthy tissues. Over the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in the development of advanced cancer therapeutics using targeted nanoparticles. Here we describe the preparation of drug-encapsulated nanoparticles formulated with biocompatible and biodegradable poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) copolymer and surface functionalized with the A10 2-fluoropyrimidine ribonucleic acid aptamers that recognize the extracellular domain of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA), a well-characterized antigen expressed on the surface of prostate cancer cells. We show that the self-assembled nanoparticles can selectively bind to PSMA-targeted prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. This formulation method may contribute to the development of highly selective and effective cancer therapeutic and diagnostic devices.

Gu, Frank; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

344

Investigation of strategies for drug delivery by combination targeting of nanocarriers to multiple epitopes or receptors  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Development of drug delivery systems (ie. nanocarriers) with controllable composition, architecture, and functionalities is heavily investigated in the field of drug delivery in order to improve clinical interventions. Designing drug nanocarriers which possess targeting properties is critical to enable them to reach the intended site of intervention in the body. To achieve this goal, the surface of drug nanocarriers can be modified with targeting moieties (antibodies, peptides, etc.) addressed to cell surface molecules expressed on the diseased tissues and cells. If these molecules are receptors capable of internalizing bound ligands via endocytosis, targeting can then enable drug transport into cells or across cellular barriers in the body. Yet, addressing nanocarriers to single targets presents limited control over cellular interactions and biodistribution. Since most cell-surface markers are not exclusively expressed in a precise site in vivo, high affinity of targeted nanocarriers may lead to non-desired accumulation in regions of the body associated with low expression. Modification of nanocarriers to achieve combined-targeting (binding to more than one cell-surface receptor) may help modulate binding to cells and also endocytosis, since cell receptors possess distinct functions and features affecting these parameters, such as their expression, location on the plasmalemma, activation in disease, mechanism of endocytosis, etc. Further, targeting nanocarriers to multiple epitopes of the same receptor, a strategy which has never been tested, may also modulate these parameters since they are highly epitope specific. In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of targeting model polymer nanocarriers to: (1) multiple receptors of similar function (intercellular-, platelet-endothelial-, and/or vascular-cell adhesion molecules), (2) multiple receptors of different function (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and transferrin receptor), or (3) multiple epitopes of the same receptor (transferrin receptor epitopes 8D3 and R17). Binding to cells, endocytosis within cells, and biodistribution in mice were tested. Results indicate that combination targeting enhanced performance of nanocarriers with regard to these three parameters as compared to non-targeted nanocarriers and modulated their outcome relative to single-targeted nanocarriers. This modulation was observed as enhanced, intermediate, or diminished interaction with cells, accumulation in particular organs, and specificity for diseased sites relative to single-targeted nanocarriers. These results were general to strategies 1--3 and were difficult to foresee a priori due to the complex nature of said interactions. Importantly, outcomes depended on the multiplicity (dual- vs. triple-targeting) and/or combination of affinity moieties displayed on the nanocarrier surface, as well as the physiological/pathological state of cells and tissues. Modulation of the delivery of a model therapeutic cargo in mice relative to single-targeted nanocarriers demonstrated the potential of these strategies to control the biodistribution of therapeutic agents. Therefore, these findings illustrate that combination-targeting enables modulation over cellular interactions and biodistribution of nanocarriers, which may aid the development of nanocarriers tailored for particular therapeutic needs.

Papademetriou, Iason Titos

345

Drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction: A promising therapy method  

PubMed Central

The nano-microcapsules drug delivery system is currently a promising method for the treatment of many types of diseases, particularly tumors. However, the drug delivery efficiency does not reach a satisfactory level to meet treatment demands. Therefore, the effectiveness of delivery needs to be improved. Based on the alterations in the structure and modification of nano-microcapsules, ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), a safe physical targeted method, may increase tissue penetration and cell membrane permeability, aiding the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules ingress the interior of targeted tissues and cells. The effectiveness and exact mechanism of action of the drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system mediated by UTMD have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, the latest advancement in UTMD-mediated drug loaded nano-microcapsules system technology was reviewed and the hindrances of UTMD-mediated drug delivery were assessed, in combination with a prospective study. The findings suggested that the drug delivery efficiency of nano-microcapsules mediated by UTMD was distinctly improved. Thus, the UTMD-mediated drug-loaded nano-microcapsules delivery system may significantly improve the efficiency of drug delivery, which may be a promising new therapeutic method. PMID:24648976

MA, JING; DU, LIAN FANG; CHEN, MING; WANG, HANG HUI; XING, LING XI; JING, LI FANG; LI, YUN HUA

2013-01-01

346

Tumor-targeted liposomal drug delivery mediated by a diseleno bond-stabilized cyclic peptide  

PubMed Central

Peptide ligands have played an important role in tumor-targeted drug delivery as targeting moieties. The in vivo fate of peptide-mediated drug delivery systems and the following antitumor effects may greatly depend on the stability of the peptide ligand. In the current study, a tumor-targeting cyclic peptide screened by phage display, Lyp-1 (a peptide that specifically binds to tumor and endothelial cells of tumor lymphatics in certain tumors), was structurally modified by replacement of the original intramolecular disulfide bond with a diseleno bond. The produced analog Syp-1 (seleno derivative of Lyp-1) maintained specific binding ability to the target protein p32 (Kd = 18.54 nM), which is similar to that of Lyp-1 (Kd = 10.59 nM), indicated by surface plasmon resonance assay. Compared with Lyp-1, Syp-1 showed significantly improved stability against serum. After the peptide attached onto the surface of fluorophore-encapsulating liposomes, the more efficient tumor uptake of liposomal fluorophore mediated by Syp-1 was observed. Furthermore, Syp-1 modified liposomal doxorubicin presented the most potent tumor growth inhibitory ability among all the therapeutic groups, with a low half maximal inhibitory concentration of 588 nM against MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro and a high tumor inhibition rate of 73.5% in vivo. These findings clearly indicated that Syp-1 was a stable and effective tumor targeting ligand and suggest that the sulfur-to-selenium replacement strategy may help stabilize the phage-displayed cyclic peptide containing disulfide-bond under physiological conditions and strongly support the validity of peptide-mediated drug targeting. PMID:23515368

Li, Chong; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Xiaolin; Deng, Li; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhangbao

2013-01-01

347

Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery  

SciTech Connect

A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

2008-11-14

348

Enhanced Endothelial Delivery and Biochemical Effects of ?-Galactosidase by ICAM-1-Targeted Nanocarriers for Fabry Disease  

PubMed Central

Fabry disease due to deficiency of ?-galactosidase A (?-Gal) causes lysosomal accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) in multiple tissues and prominently in the vascular endothelium. Although enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) by injection of recombinant ?-Gal improves the disease outcome, effects on the vasculopathy associated to life-threatening cerebrovascular, cardiac and renal complications are still limited. We designed a strategy to enhance delivery of ?-Gal to organs and endothelial cells (ECs). We targeted ?-Gal to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), a protein expressed on ECs throughout the vasculature, by loading this enzyme on nanocarriers coated with anti-ICAM (anti-ICAM/?-Gal NCs). In vitro radioisotope tracing showed efficient loading of ?-Gal on anti-ICAM NCs, stability of this formulation under storage and in model physiological fluids, and enzyme release in response to lysosome environmental conditions. In mice, delivery of 125I-?-Gal was markedly enhanced by anti-ICAM/125I-?-Gal NCs in brain, kidney, heart, liver, lung, and spleen, and transmission electron microscopy showed anti-ICAM/?-Gal NCs attached to and internalized into the vascular endothelium. Fluorescence microscopy proved targeting, endocytosis and lysosomal transport of anti-ICAM/?-Gal NCs in macro- and micro-vascular ECs, and a marked enhancement of Gb3 degradation. Therefore, ICAM-1-targeting strategy may help improve the efficacy of therapeutic enzymes for Fabry disease. PMID:21047542

Hsu, Janet; Serrano, Daniel; Bhowmick, Tridib; Kumar, Kishan; Shen, Yang; Kuo, Yuan Chia; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

2010-01-01

349

Haptic guided virtual reality simulation for targeted drug delivery using nano-containers manipulation.  

PubMed

When dealing with nano targeted drug delivery process the significant area of virtual reality application can be visualizing real time process and simulating it at nano-scale, since the effectiveness of a drug primarily depends on the affected cell and targeted doze. This paper proposes virtual reality (VR) as a tool to analyze and simulate nanoparticles (NPs) manipulation, in this paper amorphous NPs are analyzed and simulated in virtual environment. Haptic guides virtualizing the atomic force microscope (AFM) is applied in the virtual environment which allows the operators to sense and touch the NPs when evaluating its structure, drug release time, and behavioral study. Cisplatin was loaded as a modal drug to the self-assembled amorphous copolymer P(3HV-co-4HB)-b-mPEG NPs, where the efficiency and bioavailability of Cisplatin was further investigated. The prepared NPs when simulated in virtual environment proved to show good biocompatibility. Results showed that amorphous polymeric NPs could be efficient vehicles for the constant and targeted delivery of toxic anticancer drugs. PMID:23909133

Hassan, Syed; Shah, Mohsin; Yoon, Sung Chul; Ullah, Ikram; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

2013-07-01

350

Membrane domain formation—a key factor for targeted intracellular drug delivery  

PubMed Central

Protein molecules, toxins and viruses internalize into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) using specific proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane. The plasma membrane is a barrier for many pharmaceutical agents to enter into the cytoplasm of target cells. In the case of cancer cells, tissue-specific biomarkers in the plasma membrane, like cancer-specific growth factor receptors, could be excellent candidates for RME-dependent drug delivery. Recent data suggest that agent binding to these receptors at the cell surface, resulting in membrane domain formation by receptor clustering, can be used for the initiation of RME. As a result, these pharmaceutical agents are internalized into the cells and follow different routes until they reach their final intracellular targets like lysosomes or Golgi. We propose that clustering induced formation of plasma membrane microdomains enriched in receptors, sphingolipids, and inositol lipids, leads to membrane bending which functions as the onset of RME. In this review we will focus on the role of domain formation in RME and discuss potential applications for targeted intracellular drug delivery. PMID:25520666

Popov-?eleketi?, Dušan; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M. P.

2014-01-01

351

A double-targeted magnetic nanocarrier with potential application in hydrophobic drug delivery.  

PubMed

A double-targeted magnetic nanocarrier based with potential applications in the delivery of hydrophobic drugs has been developed. It consists of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles encapsulated in self-assembled micelles of the amphiphilic copolymer MPEG-PLGA [methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-poly (d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)], and was fabricated using the solvent-evaporation technique. The magnetic nanocarrier has a very stable core-shell structure and is superparamagnetic. Its cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay with three cell lines-HeLa, MCF-7, and HT1080; it exhibited no cytotoxicity against any tested line at concentrations of up to 400 ?g/mL after incubation for 24 h. Its cellular uptake was studied by Prussian blue staining and by fluorescence microscopy after encapsulating a fluorescent probe (hydrophobic quantum dots) into the nanocarrier. Finally, the magnetic targeting property of the magnetic nanocarrier was confirmed by an in vitro test. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate the potential of the double-targeted nanocarrier for the intracellular delivery of hydrophobic drugs. PMID:22088760

Ding, Guobin; Guo, Yi; Lv, Yanyun; Liu, Xiaofeng; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xuezhong

2012-03-01

352

Receptor binding peptides for target-selective delivery of nanoparticles encapsulated drugs  

PubMed Central

Active targeting by means of drug encapsulated nanoparticles decorated with targeting bioactive moieties represents the next frontier in drug delivery; it reduces drug side effects and increases the therapeutic index. Peptides, based on their chemical and biological properties, could have a prevalent role to direct drug encapsulated nanoparticles, such as liposomes, micelles, or hard nanoparticles, toward the tumor tissues. A considerable number of molecular targets for peptides are either exclusively expressed or overexpressed on both cancer vasculature and cancer cells. They can be classified into three wide categories: integrins; growth factor receptors (GFRs); and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Therapeutic agents based on nanovectors decorated with peptides targeting membrane receptors belonging to the GPCR family overexpressed by cancer cells are reviewed in this article. The most studied targeting membrane receptors are considered: somatostatin receptors; cholecystokinin receptors; receptors associated with the Bombesin like peptides family; luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors; and neurotensin receptors. Nanovectors of different sizes and shapes (micelles, liposomes, or hard nanoparticles) loaded with doxorubicin or other cytotoxic drugs and externally functionalized with natural or synthetic peptides are able to target the overexpressed receptors and are described based on their formulation and in vitro and in vivo behaviors. PMID:24741304

Accardo, Antonella; Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morelli, Giancarlo; Tesauro, Diego

2014-01-01

353

Raft-Dependent Endocytosis of Autocrine Motility Factor/Phosphoglucose Isomerase: A Potential Drug Delivery Route for Tumor Cells  

PubMed Central

Background Autocrine motility factor/phosphoglucose isomerase (AMF/PGI) is the extracellular ligand for the gp78/AMFR receptor overexpressed in a variety of human cancers. We showed previously that raft-dependent internalization of AMF/PGI is elevated in metastatic MDA-435 cells, but not metastatic, caveolin-1-expressing MDA-231 cells, relative to non-metastatic MCF7 and dysplastic MCF10A cells suggesting that it might represent a tumor cell-specific endocytic pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Similarly, using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF/PGI is increased in metastatic HT29 cancer cells expressing low levels of caveolin-1 relative to metastatic, caveolin-1-expressing, HCT116 colon cells and non-metastatic Caco-2 cells. Therefore, we exploited the raft-dependent internalization of AMF/PGI as a potential tumor-cell specific targeting mechanism. We synthesized an AMF/PGI-paclitaxel conjugate and found it to be as efficient as free paclitaxel in inducing cytotoxicity and apoptosis in tumor cells that readily internalize AMF/PGI compared to tumor cells that poorly internalize AMF/PGI. Murine K1735-M1 and B16-F1 melanoma cells internalize FITC-conjugated AMF/PGI and are acutely sensitive to AMF/PGI-paclitaxel mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, following in vivo intratumoral injection, FITC-conjugated AMF/PGI is internalized in K1735-M1 tumors. Intratumoral injection of AMF/PGI-paclitaxel induced significantly higher tumor regression compared to free paclitaxel, even in B16-F1 cells, known to be resistant to taxol treatment. Treatment with AMF/PGI-paclitaxel significantly prolonged the median survival time of tumor bearing mice. Free AMF/PGI exhibited a pro-survival role, reducing the cytotoxic effect of both AMF/PGI-paclitaxel and free paclitaxel suggesting that AMF/PGI-paclitaxel targets a pathway associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. AMF/PGI-FITC uptake by normal murine spleen and thymus cells was negligible both in vitro and following intravenous injection in vivo where AMF/PGI-FITC was selectively internalized by subcutaneous B16-F1 tumor cells. Conclusions/Significance The raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF/PGI may therefore represent a tumor cell specific endocytic pathway of potential value for drug delivery to tumor cells. PMID:18974847

Kojic, Liliana D.; Wiseman, Sam M.; Ghaidi, Fariba; Joshi, Bharat; Nedev, Hinyu; Saragovi, H. Uri; Nabi, Ivan R.

2008-01-01

354

Urokinase Plasminogen Activator System Targeted Delivery of Nanobins as a Novel Ovarian Cancer Therapeutics  

PubMed Central

The urokinase system is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer (OvCa) cells and is expressed at low levels in normal cells. To develop a platform for intracellular and targeted delivery of therapeutics in OvCa, we conjugated urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) antibodies to liposomal nanobins. The arsenic trioxide loaded nanobins had favorable physicochemical properties and the ability to bind specifically to uPA. Confocal microscopy showed that the uPA targeted nanobins were internalized by OvCa cells, while both ICP-MS and FACS analyses confirmed >4-fold higher uptake of targeted nanobins when compared to untargeted nanobins. In a co-culture assay, the targeted nanobins showed efficient uptake in OvCa cells but not in the normal primary omental mesothelial cells. Moreover, this uptake could be blocked by either down-regulating uPA receptor expression in the OvCa cells using shRNA or by competition with free uPA or uPA antibody. In proof-of-concept experiments, mice bearing orthotopic ovarian tumors showed a greater reduction in tumor burden when treated with targeted nanobins than with untargeted nanobins (47% versus 27%; p<0.001). The targeted nanobins more effectively inhibited tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo compared to untargeted nanobins, inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis and impairing stem cell marker, ALDH1A1, expression. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumors and organs corroborated these results, showing preferential localization of the targeted nanobins to the tumor. These findings suggest that uPA targeted nanobins capable of specifically and efficiently delivering payloads to cancer cells could serve as the foundation for a new targeted cancer therapy utilizing protease receptors. PMID:24061648

Zhang, Yilin; Kenny, Hilary A.; Swindell, Elden P.; Mitra, Anirban K.; Hankins, Patrick L.; Ahn, Richard W.; Gwin, Katja; Mazar, Andrew P.; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Lengyel, Ernst

2013-01-01

355

GEN | News Highlights: Scientists Develop High-Capacity Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery of Drug Cocktails http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/scientists-develop-high-capacity-nanoparticles-for-targeted-delivery-of-drug-cocktails/81245016/[4/  

E-print Network

GEN | News Highlights: Scientists Develop High-Capacity Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery of Drug Cocktails http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/scientists-develop-high-capacity-nanoparticles-for-targeted Magazine CurrentIssue View Larger Image Past Issues Adlink Subscription ADVERTISEMENT Comments Email

Brinker, C. Jeffrey

356

Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme  

SciTech Connect

This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

2006-06-14

357

A pH-dependent colon targeted oral drug delivery system using methacrylic acid copolymers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lactose-based placebo tablets were coated using various combinations of two methacrylic acid copolymers, Eudragit® L100-55 and Eudragit® S100, by spraying from aqueous systems. The Eudragit® L100-55–Eudragit® S100 combinations (w\\/w) studied were 1:0, 4:1, 3:2, 1:1, 2:3, 1:4, 1:5 and 0:1. The coated tablets were tested in vitro for their suitability for pH dependent colon targeted oral drug delivery. The same

M. Zahirul I Khan; Željko Prebeg; Nevenka Kurjakovi?

1999-01-01

358

Targeted Delivery of PSC-RANTES for HIV1 Prevention using Biodegradable Nanoparticles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose  Nanoparticles formulated from the biodegradable co-polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), were investigated as a drug\\u000a delivery system to enhance tissue uptake, permeation, and targeting for PSC-RANTES anti-HIV-1 activity.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Materials and Methods  PSC-RANTES nanoparticles formulated via a double emulsion process and characterized in both in vitro and ex vivo systems to determine PSC-RANTES release rate, nanoparticle tissue permeation, and anti-HIV bioactivity.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  Spherical, monodisperse

Anthony S. Ham; Alexandra B. Sassi; Charlene S. Dezzutti; Lisa Cencia Rohan

2009-01-01

359

Second-generation aptamer-conjugated PSMA-targeted delivery system for prostate cancer therapy  

PubMed Central

Background: miR-15a and miR-16-1 have been identified as tumor suppressor genes in prostate cancer, but their safe and effective delivery to target cells is key to the successful use of this therapeutic strategy. RNA aptamer A10 has been used as a ligand, targeting prostate cancer cells that express prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). Compared with A10, the binding of the second-generation RNA aptamer, A10-3.2, to PSMA is more efficient. Methods: A10-3.2 was investigated as a PSMA-targeting ligand in the design of a polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-based microRNA (miR-15a and miR-16-1) vector to prostate cancer cells. Using polyethyleneglycol (PEG) as a spacer, PAMAM was conjugated to aptamer (PAMAM-PEG-APT) and used as a vehicle for miRNA target delivery. Results: Luciferase assays of pGL-3 expression against PC3 (PSMA?) and LNCaP (PSMA+) cells demonstrated that the transfection efficiency of the synthesized DNA/PAMAM-PEG-APT complex was higher than that of the DNA/PAMAM-PEG complex. In addition, cell viability assays of LNCaP (PSMA+) cells showed that, with a N/P ratio of 15:1, the IC50 value of miRNA/PAMAM-PEG-APT was approximately 4.7-fold lower than that of miRNA/PAMAM-PEG. Conclusion: This PSMA-targeted system may prove useful in widening the therapeutic window and allow for selective killing of prostate cancer cells. PMID:21980237

Wu, Xin; Ding, Baoyue; Gao, Jing; Wang, Huanyun; Fan, Wei; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Ye, Lihua; Zhang, Min; Ding, Xueying; Liu, Jiyong; Zhu, Quangang; Gao, Shen

2011-01-01

360

Odorranalectin Is a Small Peptide Lectin with Potential for Drug Delivery and Targeting  

PubMed Central

Background Lectins are sugar-binding proteins that specifically recognize sugar complexes. Based on the specificity of protein–sugar interactions, different lectins could be used as carrier molecules to target drugs specifically to different cells which express different glycan arrays. In spite of lectin's interesting biological potential for drug targeting and delivery, a potential disadvantage of natural lectins may be large size molecules that results in immunogenicity and toxicity. Smaller peptides which can mimic the function of lectins are promising candidates for drug targeting. Principal Findings Small peptide with lectin-like behavior was screened from amphibian skin secretions and its structure and function were studied by NMR, NMR-titration, SPR and mutant analysis. A lectin-like peptide named odorranalectin was identified from skin secretions of Odorrana grahami. It was composed of 17 aa with a sequence of YASPKCFRYPNGVLACT. L-fucose could specifically inhibit the haemagglutination induced by odorranalectin. 125I-odorranalectin was stable in mice plasma. In experimental mouse models, odorranalectin was proved to mainly conjugate to liver, spleen and lung after i.v. administration. Odorranalectin showed extremely low toxicity and immunogenicity in mice. The small size and single disulfide bridge of odorranalectin make it easy to manipulate for developing as a drug targeting system. The cyclic peptide of odorranalectin disclosed by solution NMR study adopts a ?-turn conformation stabilized by one intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys6-Cys16 and three hydrogen bonds between Phe7-Ala15, Tyr9-Val13, Tyr9-Gly12. Residues K5, C6, F7, C16 and T17 consist of the binding site of L-fucose on odorranalectin determined by NMR titration and mutant analysis. The structure of odorranalectin in bound form is more stable than in free form. Conclusion These findings identify the smallest lectin so far, and show the application potential of odorranalectin for drug delivery and targeting. It also disclosed a new strategy of amphibian anti-infection. PMID:18584053

Xu, Xueqing; Yang, Hailong; Wu, Bingxian; Wang, Yipeng; Zhu, Jianhua; Lai, Ren; Jiang, Xinguo; Lin, Donghai; Prescott, Mark C.; Rees, Huw H.

2008-01-01

361

Poly( d, l-lactide-co-glycolide)\\/montmorillonite nanoparticles for oral delivery of anticancer drugs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research developed a novel bioadhesive drug delivery system, poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide)\\/montmorillonite (PLGA\\/MMT) nanoparticles, for oral delivery of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel-loaded PLGA\\/MMT nanoparticles were prepared by the emulsion\\/solvent evaporation method. MMT was incorporated in the formulation as a matrix material component, which also plays the role of a co-emulsifier in the nanoparticle preparation process. Paclitaxel-loaded PLGA\\/MMT nanoparticles were found to be of spherical

Yuancai Dong; Si-Shen Feng

2005-01-01

362

Engineering RNA for Targeted siRNA Delivery and Medical Application  

PubMed Central

RNA engineering for nanotechnology and medical applications is an exciting emerging research field. RNA has intrinsically defined features on the nanometer scale and is a particularly interesting candidate for such applications due to its amazing diversity, flexibility and versatility in structure and function. Specifically, the current use of siRNA to silence target genes involved in disease has generated much excitement in the scientific community. The intrinsic ability to sequence-specifically down-regulate gene expression in a temporally- and spatially-controlled fashion has led to heightened interest and rapid development of siRNA-based therapeutics. Though methods for gene silencing with high efficacy and specificity have been achieved in vitro, the effective delivery of nucleic acids to specific cells in vivo has been a hurdle for RNA therapeutics. This review covers different RNA-based approaches for diagnosis, prevention and treatment of human disease, with a focus on the latest developments of nonviral carriers of siRNA for delivery in vivo. The applications and challenges of siRNA therapy, as well as potential solutions to these problems, the approaches for using phi29 pRNA-based vectors as polyvalent vehicles for specific delivery of siRNA, ribozymes, drugs or other therapeutic agents to specific cells for therapy will also be addressed. PMID:20230868

Guo, Peixuan; Coban, Oana; Snead, Nick; Trebley, Joe; Hoeprich, Steve; Guo, Songchuan; Shu, Yi

2010-01-01

363

PEI-derivatized fullerene drug delivery using folate as a homing device targeting to tumor.  

PubMed

Fullerene (C60) has shown great potential in drug delivery. In this study, firstly, amine-functionalized C60 (C60-NH(2)) was achieved by introducing ethylenediamine onto the surface of C60, and then PEI-derivatized C60 (C60-PEI) was performed via a cationic polymerization of aziridine on the surface of C60-NH(2); FT-IR and TGA results verified the structure of water-soluble C60-PEI. C60-PEI was encapsulated with folic acid (FA) through an amide linker, and then docetaxel (DTX) was conjugated to C60-PEI-FA and obtained a drug delivery system, C60-PEI-FA/DTX. Compared with free DTX, the tumor targeting drug delivery could efficiently cross cell membranes, lead to more apoptosis and afford higher antitumor efficacy in a cultured PC3 cells in vitro. Furthermore, compared with free DTX in an in vivo murine tumor model, C60-PEI-FA/DTX afforded higher antitumor efficacy without obvious toxic effects to normal organs owing to its prolonged blood circulation and 7.5-fold higher DTX uptake of tumor, demonstrating that C60-PEI-FA/DTX may be promising for high treatment efficacy with minimal side effects in future therapy. PMID:23069706

Shi, Jinjin; Zhang, Hongling; Wang, Lei; Li, Lulu; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Zhenzhen; Li, Zhi; Chen, Chengqun; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Chaofeng; Zhang, Zhenzhong

2013-01-01

364

Ultrasound Targeted Microbubble Destruction Stimulates Cellular Endocytosis in Facilitation of Adeno-Associated Virus Delivery  

PubMed Central

The generally accepted mechanism for ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) to enhance drug and gene delivery is through sonoporation. However, passive uptake of adeno-associated virus (AAV) into cells following sonoporation does not adequately explain observations of enhanced transduction by UTMD. This study investigated alternative mechanisms of UTMD enhancement in AAV delivery. UTMD significantly enhanced transduction efficiency of AAV in a dose-dependent manner. UTMD stimulated a persistent uptake of AAV into the cytoplasm and nucleus. This phenomenon occurred over several hours, suggesting that some viral particles are endocytosed by cells rather than exclusively passing through pores created by sonoporation. Additionally, UTMD enhanced clathrin expression and accumulation at the plasma membrane suggesting greater clathrin-mediated endocytosis following UTMD. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that UTMD stimulated formation of clathrin-coated pits (CPs) and uncoated pits (nCPs). Furthermore, inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis partially blocked the enhancement of AAV uptake following UTMD. The results of this study implicate endocytosis as a mechanism that contributes to UTMD-enhanced AAV delivery. PMID:23652832

Jin, Li-Fang; Li, Fan; Wang, Hui-Ping; Wei, Fang; Qin, Peng; Du, Lian-Fang

2013-01-01

365

Biomaterials-based nanofiber scaffold: targeted and controlled carrier for cell and drug delivery.  

PubMed

Abstract Nanofiber scaffold formulations (diameter less than 1000?nm) were successfully used to deliver the drug/cell/gene into the body organs through different routes for an effective treatment of various diseases. Various fabrication methods like drawing, template synthesis, fiber-mesh, phase separation, fiber-bonding, self-assembly, melt-blown, and electrospinning are successfully used for fabrication of nanofibers. These formulations are widely used in various fields such as tissue engineering, drug delivery, cosmetics, as filter media, protective clothing, wound dressing, homeostatic, sensor devices, etc. The present review gives a detailed account on the need of the nanofiber scaffold formulation development along with the biomaterials and techniques implemented for fabrication of the same against innumerable diseases. At present, there is a huge extent of research being performed worldwide on all aspects of biomolecules delivery. The unique characteristics of nanofibers such as higher loading efficiency, superior mechanical performance (stiffness and tensile strength), controlled release behavior, and excellent stability helps in the delivery of plasmid DNA, large protein drugs, genetic materials, and autologous stem-cell to the target site in the future. PMID:25539071

Garg, Tarun; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

2015-04-01

366

Targeted Delivery of GDNF through the Blood–Brain Barrier by MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound  

PubMed Central

Neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), are promising therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the application of GDNF to treat these diseases effectively is limited because the blood–brain barrier (BBB) prevents the local delivery of macromolecular therapeutic agents from entering the central nervous system (CNS). Focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles (MBs) using appropriate parameters has been previously demonstrated to be able to open the BBB locally and noninvasively. This study investigated the targeted delivery of GDNF MBs through the BBB by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound. Evans Blue extravasation and histological examination were used to determine the optimum focused ultrasound parameters. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to verify the effects of GDNF bound on MBs using a biotin–avidin bridging chemistry method to promote GDNF delivery into the brain. The results showed that GDNF can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the CNS through the BBB using MRI-guided focused ultrasound combined with MBs under optimum parameters. MBs that bind GDNF combined with MRI-guided focused ultrasound may be an effective way of delivering neurotrophic factors directly into the CNS. The method described herein provides a potential means of treating patients with CNS diseases. PMID:23300823

Lu, Lin; Liu, Li; Cai, Youli; Zheng, Hairong; Liu, Xin; Yan, Fei; Zou, Chao; Sun, Chengyu; Shi, Jie; Lu, Shukun; Chen, Yun

2012-01-01

367

Hyaluronic acid-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes for targeted delivery of doxorubicin into cancer cells.  

PubMed

Development of novel drug carriers for targeted cancer therapy with high efficiency and specificity is of paramount importance and has been one of the major topics in current nanomedicine. Here we report a general approach to using multifunctional multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a platform to encapsulate an anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) for targeted cancer therapy. In this approach, polyethyleneimine (PEI)-modified MWCNTs were covalently conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FI) and hyaluronic acid (HA). The formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA conjugates were characterized via different techniques and were used as a new carrier system to encapsulate the anticancer drug doxorubicin for targeted delivery to cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors. We show that the formed MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes with a drug loading percentage of 72% are water soluble and stable. In vitro release studies show that the drug release rate under an acidic condition (pH 5.8, tumor cell microenvironment) is higher than that under physiological condition (pH 7.4). Cell viability assay demonstrates that the carrier material has good biocompatibility in the tested concentration range, and the MWCNT/PEI-FI-HA/DOX complexes can specifically target cancer cells overexpressing CD44 receptors and exert growth inhibition effect to the cancer cells. The developed HA-modified MWCNTs hold a great promise to be used as an efficient anticancer drug carrier for tumor-targeted chemotherapy. PMID:25500334

Cao, Xueyan; Tao, Lei; Wen, Shihui; Hou, Wenxiu; Shi, Xiangyang

2015-03-20

368

Brain-targeting delivery for RNAi neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury.  

PubMed

Nanoparticles (NPs) with modification of brain-targeting molecules have been extensively exploited for therapeutic gene delivery across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). As one of the effective RNA interference (RNAi) approaches, short hairpin RNA (shRNA) has been proved to be promising in the field of gene therapy. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (Ask1) has been reported to be an important target for gene therapy against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. In this study, dendrigraft poly-l-lysine (DGL) was decorated by dermorphin (a ?-opiate receptor agonist) through PEG for efficient brain-targeting, then complexed with anti-Ask1 shRNA plasmid DNA, yielding the DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs. The DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs were characterized and estimated the brain-targeting ability. In vitro, increased cellular uptake and transfection efficiency were explored; in vivo, preferable accumulation and gene transfection in brain were showed in images. The DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs also revealed high efficiency of neuroprotection. As a result of RNAi, corresponding mRNA was distinctly degraded, expression of Ask1 protein was obviously suppressed, apoptotic cell death was apparently decreased and cerebral infarct area was significantly reduced. Above all, DGL-PEG-dermorphin/shRNA NPs were proved to be efficient and safe for brain-targeting RNAi neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury. PMID:23968852

An, Sai; Kuang, Yuyang; Shen, Teng; Li, Jianfeng; Ma, Haojun; Guo, Yubo; He, Xi; Jiang, Chen

2013-11-01

369

Novel tumor-targeting, self-assembling peptide nanofiber as a carrier for effective curcumin delivery  

PubMed Central

The poor aqueous solubility and low bioavailability of curcumin restrict its clinical application for cancer treatment. In this study, a novel tumor-targeting nanofiber carrier was developed to improve the solubility and tumor-targeting ability of curcumin using a self-assembled Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide. The morphologies of the peptide nanofiber and the curcumin-encapsulated nanofiber were visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The tumor-targeting activity of the curcumin-encapsulated Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide nanofiber (f-RGD-Cur) was studied in vitro and in vivo, using Nap-GFFYG-RGE peptide nanofiber (f-RGE-Cur) as the control. Curcumin was encapsulated into the peptide nanofiber, which had a diameter of approximately 10–20 nm. Curcumin showed sustained-release behavior from the nanofibers in vitro. f-RGD-Cur showed much higher cellular uptake in ?v?3 integrin-positive HepG2 liver carcinoma cells than did non-targeted f-RGE-Cur, thereby leading to significantly higher cytotoxicity. Ex vivo studies further demonstrated that curcumin could accumulate markedly in mouse tumors after administration of f-RGD-Cur via the tail vein. These results indicate that Nap-GFFYG-RGD peptide self-assembled nanofibers are a promising hydrophobic drug delivery system for targeted treatment of cancer. PMID:24399876

Liu, Jianfeng; Liu, Jinjian; Xu, Hongyan; Zhang, Yumin; Chu, Liping; Liu, Qingfen; Song, Naling; Yang, Cuihong

2014-01-01

370

Folated Synperonic-Cholesteryl Hemisuccinate Polymeric Micelles for the Targeted Delivery of Docetaxel in Melanoma  

PubMed Central

The objective of this study was the synthesis of folic acid- (FA-) targeted polymeric micelles of Synperonic PE/F 127-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (PF127-Chol) for specific delivery of docetaxel (DTX). Targeted or nontargeted micelles loaded with DTX were prepared via dialysis method. The effects of processing variables on the physicochemical properties of targeted micelles were evaluated using a full factorial design. After the optimization of the polymer/drug ratio, the organic solvent type used for the preparation of the micelles, and the temperature of dialyzing medium, the in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of the optimized micelles were studied on B16F10 melanoma cells by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. The anticancer efficacy of DTX-loaded FA-PF127-Chol was evaluated in mice bearing melanoma tumor. Optimized targeted micelles had the particle size of 171.3?nm, zeta potential of ?7.8?mV, PDI of 0.325, and a high encapsulation efficiency that released the drug within 144?h. The MTT assay indicated that targeted micelles carrying DTX were significantly more cytotoxic, had higher cellular uptake, and reduced the tumor volume significantly more than the nontargeted micelles and the free drug. FA-PF127-Chol could be, therefore, a promising biomaterial for tumors overexpressing folate receptors.

Varshosaz, Jaleh; Taymouri, Somayeh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Haghjooy Javanmard, Shaghayegh; Rostami, Mahboobeh

2015-01-01

371

Insights into EPR effect versus lectin-mediated targeted delivery: biodegradable polycarbonate micellar nanoparticles with and without galactose surface decoration.  

PubMed

Polymeric micelles with and without galactose are synthesized to study liver targeting ability in an orthotopic HCC rat model. Micelles with galactose accumulate more in the healthy liver tissue instead of HCC, while micelles without galactose amass in HCC by the EPR effect. These micelles show great potential as drug delivery carriers to target either the liver or HCC. PMID:25091699

Ebrahim Attia, Amalina Binte; Oh, Pamela; Yang, Chuan; Tan, Jeremy Pang Kern; Rao, Nithya; Hedrick, James L; Yang, Yi Yan; Ge, Ruowen

2014-11-12

372

Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery of  

E-print Network

Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery States of America Abstract Background: Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous

Summa, Christopher M.

373

Intracellular Delivery of a Cell-Penetrating SOCS1 that Targets IFN-? Signaling  

PubMed Central

Suppressor of cytokine signaling–1 (SOCS1) is an intracellular inhibitor of the Janus kinase–signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) pathway that couples interferon-? (IFN-?) signaling to the nucleus. Because several inflammatory diseases are associated with uncontrolled IFN-? signaling, we engineered a recombinant cell-penetrating SOCS1 (CP-SOCS1) to target this pathway. Here, we show that CP-SOCS1, analogous to endogenous SOCS1, interacted with components of the IFN-? signaling complex and functionally attenuated the phosphorylation of STAT1, which resulted in the subsequent inhibition of the production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines. Thus, controlled, intracellular delivery of recombinant CP-SOCS1 boosted the anti-inflammatory potential of the cell by restoring the homeostatic balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling. This approach to controlling signal transduction has potential use for therapeutic targeting of signaling pathways associated with inflammatory diseases. PMID:19622834

DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Wylezinski, Lukasz S.; Hawiger, Jacek

2009-01-01

374

[Characteristics of JC virus VLP-Z for targeting gene delivery].  

PubMed

The characteristics of virus-like particle (VLP) of JC virus (JCV) as a vector for targeting gene delivery was determined. The exogenous DNA (PUC19) packaged in VLP-Z was resistant to DNase I. VLP-Z was able to deliver a reporter plasmid pEGFP-N1 into HeLa cells and the green fluorescent reporter protein was expressed in these cells. VLP-Z was also able to bind IgG by interaction with the Z fragment of VLP-Z and IgG. These results suggested that VLP-Z might be used as a vector to deliver therapeutic genes to target cells with incorporating IgG antibodies. PMID:23865321

Zeng, Junyan; Qu, Qiumin

2013-06-01

375

Homing of mesenchymal stem cells: mechanistic or stochastic? Implications for targeted delivery in arthritis.  

PubMed

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with the capacity to undergo chondrogenic differentiation. Systemically administered MSCs have been shown to preferentially accumulate at sites of tissue damage and inflammation, thus MSC-based therapy holds great promise for the treatment of inflammatory diseases such as RA. Modulation of MSC homing may allow targeted delivery of systemically administered MSCs to damaged articular cartilage, where they can suppress immune-mediated cartilage destruction and contribute to cartilage repair via a combination of chondrogenic differentiation and paracrine stimulation of intrinsic residual repair. To harness the potential of MSC homing, a thorough understanding of the mechanism is key. This review discusses current knowledge of the mechanism of MSC homing to injured/inflamed tissue and its implications for targeted MSC-based therapy in arthritis. PMID:25288785

Eseonu, Onyedikachi I; De Bari, Cosimo

2015-02-01

376

Sirolimus- or paclitaxel-eluting stents to prevent coronary artery restenosis.  

PubMed

The restenosis rate is lower with stent implantation than with balloon angioplasty. Nevertheless, even with the use of stenting, restenosis still occurs in approximately one-third of patients with diabetes, small coronary vessels, and long lesions. The two drugs commonly used in eluting stents are sirolimus and paclitaxel. Systemically administered sirolimus decreased vascular proliferation in animal models. After preliminary trials showing benefit with sirolimus-eluting stents in de novo coronary lesions, the large-scale SIRIUS (Sirolomus-coated Bx Velocity balloon-expandable stent in the treatment of patients with de novo coronary artery lesions) trial was undertaken. SIRIUS showed that sirolimus reduced restenosis and target vessel revascularisation, compared to bare stents. These benefits were also apparent in the diabetic, and small- and long vessel subgroups. The RESEARCH (Rapamycin-eluting Stent Evaluated At Rotterdam Cardiology Hospital) registry have established that sirolimus-eluting stents are superior to bare stents in practice. Thus, the benefits of sirolimus-eluting stents over bare stents have been clearly established, and sirolimus can be considered the benchmark eluting agent for the prevention of coronary artery restenosis. Animal studies with paclitaxel-eluting stents, mainly in endothelium denuded normal vessels, have shown that paclitaxel reduces restenosis in the short-term, and that this may be a delay, rather than a prevention of restenosis. In clinical trials, stents eluting the paclitaxel derivative 7-hexanolytaxol, or paclitaxel without a polymer, delay rather than prevent restenosis. Slowing the release of paclitaxel with a polymer base in the TAXUS (Taxol(trade mark) [paclitaxel]-eluting stent) series of clinical trials reduced the revascularisation rate at 12 and 18 months, indicating that polymer-based paclitaxel is effective for longer. The results of the REALITY trial comparing the sirolimus- and paclitaxel-eluting stents in diabetics and other high-risk patients are eagerly awaited. PMID:15500367

Doggrell, Sheila A

2004-11-01

377

Targeted delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible gold nanoparticles into cancer cell nucleus  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Nucleus remains a significant target for nanoparticles with diagnostic and therapeutic applications because both genetic information of the cell and transcription machinery reside there. Novel therapeutic strategies (for example, gene therapy), enabled by safe and efficient delivery of nanoparticles and drug molecules into the nucleus, are heralded by many as the ultimate treatment for severe and intractable diseases. However, most nanomaterials and macromolecules are incapable of reaching the cell nucleus on their own, because of biological barriers carefully honed by evolution including cellular membrane and nuclear envelope. In this paper, we have demonstrated an approach of fabrication of biocompatible gold nanoparticle (Au NP)-based vehicles which can entering into cancer cell nucleus by modifying Au NPs with both PEG 5000 and two different peptides (RGD and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide). The Au NPs used were fabricated via femtosecond laser ablation of Au bulk target in deionized water. The Au NPs produced by this method provide chemical free, virgin surface, which allows us to carry out "Sequential Conjugation" to modify their surface with PEG 5000, RGD, and NLS. "Sequential Conjugation" described in this presentation is very critical for the fabrication of Au NP-based vehicles capable of entering into cancer cell nucleus as it enables the engineering and tuning surface chemistries of Au NPs by independently adjusting amounts of PEG and peptides bound onto surface of Au NPs so as to maximize their nuclear targeting performance and biocompatibility regarding the cell line of interest. Both optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to confirm the in vitro targeted nuclear delivery of peptide-conjugated biocompatible Au NPs by showing their presence in the cancer cell nucleus.

Qian, Wei; Curry, Taeyjuana; Che, Yong; Kopelman, Raoul

2013-02-01

378

Paclitaxel-hyaluronic nanoconjugates prolong overall survival in a preclinical brain metastases of breast cancer model.  

PubMed

Brain (central nervous system; CNS) metastases pose a life-threatening problem for women with advanced metastatic breast cancer. It has recently been shown that the vasculature within preclinical brain metastasis model markedly restricts paclitaxel delivery in approximately 90% of CNS lesions. Therefore to improve efficacy, we have developed an ultra-small hyaluronic acid (HA) paclitaxel nanoconjugate (?5 kDa) that can passively diffuse across the leaky blood-tumor barrier and then be taken up into cancer cells (MDA-MB-231Br) via CD44 receptor-mediated endocytocis. Using CD44 receptor-mediated endocytosis as an uptake mechanism, HA-paclitaxel was able to bypass p-glycoprotein-mediated efflux on the surface of the cancer cells. In vitro cytoxicity of the conjugate and free paclitaxel were similar in that they (i) both caused cell-cycle arrest in the G2-M phase, (ii) showed similar degrees of apoptosis induction (cleaved caspase), and (iii) had similar IC50 values when compared with paclitaxel in MTT assay. A preclinical model of brain metastases of breast cancer using intracardiac injections of Luc-2 transfected MDA-MB-231Br cells was used to evaluate in vivo efficacy of the nanoconjugate. The animals administered with HA-paclitaxel nanoconjugate had significantly longer overall survival compared with the control and the paclitaxel-treated group (P < 0.05). This study suggests that the small molecular weight HA-paclitaxel nanoconjugates can improve standard chemotherapeutic drug efficacy in a preclinical model of brain metastases of breast cancer. PMID:24002934

Mittapalli, Rajendar K; Liu, Xinli; Adkins, Chris E; Nounou, Mohamed I; Bohn, Kaci A; Terrell, Tori B; Qhattal, Hussaini S; Geldenhuys, Werner J; Palmieri, Diane; Steeg, Patricia S; Smith, Quentin R; Lockman, Paul R

2013-11-01

379

Chitosan nanoparticles for targeting and sustaining minoxidil sulphate delivery to hair follicles.  

PubMed

This work developed minoxidil sulphate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (MXS-NP) for targeted delivery to hair follicles, which could sustain drug release and improve the topical treatment of alopecia. Chitosan nanoparticles were obtained using low-molecular weight chitosan and tripolyphosphate as crosslink agent. MXS-NP presented a monomodal distribution with hydrodynamic diameter of 235.5±99.9nm (PDI of 0.31±0.01) and positive zeta potential (+38.6±6.0mV). SEM analysis confirmed nanoparticles average size and spherical shape. A drug loading efficiency of 73.0±0.3% was obtained with polymer:drug ratio of 1:1 (w/w). Drug release through cellulose acetate membranes from MXS-NP was sustained in about 5 times in comparison to the diffusion rate of MXS from the solution (188.9±6.0?g/cm(2)/h and 35.4±1.8?g/cm(2)/h). Drug permeation studies through the skin in vitro, followed by selective recovery of MXS from the hair follicles, showed that MXS-NP application resulted in a two-fold MXS increase into hair follicles after 6h in comparison to the control solution (5.9±0.6?g/cm(2) and 2.9±0.8?g/cm(2)). MXS-loading in nanoparticles appears as a promising and easy strategy to target and sustain drug delivery to hair follicles, which may improve the topical treatment of alopecia. PMID:25647618

Matos, Breno Noronha; Reis, Thaiene Avila; Gratieri, Taís; Gelfuso, Guilherme Martins

2015-04-01

380

Formulation, Evaluation and Optimization of Pectin- Bora Rice Beads for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery System  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The purpose of this research was to established new polysaccharide for the colon targeted drug delivery system, its formulation and in vitro and in vivo evaluation. Methods: Microspheres containing pectin and bora rice were prepared by ionotropic gelation technique using zinc acetate as cross linking agent and model drug used was glipizide. A 32 full factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables, polymer to drug ratio (A), and concentration of cross linking agent (B) on dependent variables, particle size, swelling index, drug entrapment efficiency and percentage drug release. Results: Results of trial batches indicated that polymer to drug ratio and concentration of cross linking agent affects characteristics of beads. Beads were discrete, spherical and free flowing. Beads exhibited small particle size and showed higher percentage of drug entrapment efficiency. The optimized batch P2 exhibited satisfactory drug entrapment efficiency 68% and drug release was also controlled for more than 24 hours. The polymer to drug ratio had a more significant effect on the dependent variables. In vivo gamma scintigraphy study of optimized pectin-bora rice beads demonstrated degradation of beads whenever they reached to the colon. Conclusion: Bora rice is potential polysaccharide for colon targeted drug delivery system. PMID:24511481

Ramteke, Kuldeep Hemraj; Nath, Lilakant

2014-01-01