Sample records for targeted paclitaxel delivery

  1. Nanoparticle-mediated simultaneous and targeted delivery of paclitaxel and tariquidar overcomes tumor drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Patil, Yogesh; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Ma, Linan; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-05-21

    Drug resistance is a major obstacle to the success of cancer chemotherapy. Overexpression of the drug-efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key factor contributing to tumor drug resistance. Third generation P-gp inhibitors like tariquidar have shown promising efficacy in early clinical trials. However, for maximum efficacy, it is important to limit the exposure of normal cells and tissues to the efflux inhibitor and the anticancer drug, and temporally colocalize the drug-inhibitor combination in the tumor cells. In this study, we investigated simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel, with P-gp modulator, tariquidar, using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to overcome tumor drug resistance. Nanoparticles were surface functionalized with biotin for active tumor targeting. Dual agent nanoparticles encapsulating the combination of paclitaxel and tariquidar showed significantly higher cytotoxicity in vitro than nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel alone. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent nanoparticles could be correlated with increased accumulation of paclitaxel in drug-resistant tumor cells. In vivo studies in a mouse model of drug-resistant tumor demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with biotin-functionalized nanoparticles encapsulating both paclitaxel and tariquidar at a paclitaxel dose that was ineffective in the absence of tariquidar. Taken together, these results suggest that the use of targeted, dual agent nanoparticles delivering a combination of P-gp modulator and anticancer drug is a very promising approach to overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:19331851

  2. HFT-T, a targeting nanoparticle, enhances specific delivery of paclitaxel to folate receptor-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Li, Jun; Wang, Yiqing; Cho, Kwang Jae; Kim, Gloria; Gjyrezi, Ada; Koenig, Lydia; Giannakakou, Paraskevi; Shin, Hyung Ju C; Tighiouart, Mourad; Nie, Shuming; Chen, Zhuo Georgia; Shin, Dong M

    2009-10-27

    Nonspecific distribution of chemotherapeutic drugs (such as paclitaxel) is a major factor contributing to side effects and poor clinical outcomes in the treatment of human head and neck cancer. To develop novel drug delivery systems with enhanced efficacy and minimized adverse effects, we synthesized a ternary conjugate heparin-folic acid-paclitaxel (HFT), loaded with additional paclitaxel (T). The resulting nanoparticle, HFT-T, is expected to retain the antitumor activity of paclitaxel and specifically target folate receptor (FR)-expressing tumors, thereby increasing the bioavailability and efficacy of paclitaxel. In vitro experiments found that HFT-T selectively recognizes FR-positive human head and neck cancer cell line KB-3-1, displaying higher cytotoxicity compared to the free form of paclitaxel. In a subcutaneous KB-3-1 xenograft model, HFT-T administration enhanced the specific delivery of paclitaxel into tumor tissues and remarkably improved antitumor efficacy of paclitaxel. The average tumor volume in the HFT-T treatment group was 92.9 +/- 78.2 mm(3) vs 1670.3 +/- 286.1 mm(3) in the mice treated with free paclitaxel. Furthermore, paclitaxel tumors showed a resurgence of growth after several weeks of treatment, but this was not observed with HFT-T. This indicates that HFT-T could be more effective in preventing tumors from developing drug resistance. No significant acute in vivo toxicity was observed. These results indicate that specific delivery of paclitaxel with a ternary structured nanoparticle (HFT-T) targeting FR-positive tumor is a promising strategy to enhance chemotherapy efficacy and minimize adverse effects. PMID:19761191

  3. A targeting drug delivery system for ovarian carcinoma: transferrin modified lipid coated paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Zhang, Q; Wang, X-y; Chen, X-g; He, Y-x; Yang, W-y; Yang, X

    2014-10-01

    The transferring modified lipid coated PLGA nanoparticles, as a targetable vector, were developed for the targeting delivery of anticancer drugs with paclitaxel (PTX) as a model drug to the ovarian carcinoma, which combines the advantages and avoids disadvantages of polymeric nanoparticles and liposomes in drug delivery. A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the lipid coating on the polymeric core. Physicochemical characterizations of TFLPs, such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro PTX release, were also evaluated. In the cellular uptake study, the TFLPs were more efficiently endocytosed by the A2780 cells with high expression of transferrin receptors than HUVEC cells without the transferrin receptors. Furthermore, the anticancer efficacy of TFLPs on the tumor spheroids was stronger than that of lipid coated PLGA nanoparticles (LPs) and PLGA nanoparticles. In the in vivo study, the TFLPs showed the best inhibition effect of the tumor growth for the ovarian carcinoma-bearing mice. In brief, the TFLPs were proved to be an efficient targeting drug delivery system for ovarian carcinoma. PMID:24443309

  4. Folate-modified lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles for targeted paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Linhua; Zhu, Dunwan; Dong, Xia; Sun, Hongfan; Song, Cunxian; Wang, Chun; Kong, Deling

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel lipid-polymer hybrid drug carrier comprised of folate (FA) modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs) for sustained, controlled, and targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). The core-shell NPs consist of 1) a poly(?-caprolactone) hydrophobic core based on self-assembly of poly(?-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL) amphiphilic copolymers, 2) a lipid monolayer formed with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy (polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DSPE-PEG2000), 3) a targeting ligand (FA) on the surface, and were prepared using a thin-film hydration and ultrasonic dispersion method. Transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid monolayer on the hydrophobic polymer core. Physicochemical characterizations of PTX-loaded FLPNPs, such as particle size and size distribution, zeta potential, morphology, drug loading content, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro drug release, were also evaluated. Fluorescent microscopy proved the internalization efficiency and targeting ability of the folate conjugated on the lipid monolayer for the EMT6 cancer cells which overexpress folate receptor. In vitro cytotoxicity assay demonstrated that the cytotoxic effect of PTX-loaded FLPNPs was lower than that of Taxol(®), but higher than that of PTX-loaded LPNPs (without folate conjugation). In EMT6 breast tumor model, intratumoral administration of PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed similar antitumor efficacy but low toxicity compared to Taxol(®). More importantly, PTX-loaded FLPNPs showed greater tumor growth inhibition (65.78%) than the nontargeted PTX-loaded LPNPs (48.38%) (P<0.05). These findings indicated that the PTX loaded-FLPNPs with mixed lipid monolayer shell and biodegradable polymer core would be a promising nanosized drug formulation for tumor-targeted therapy. PMID:25844039

  5. Targeted delivery of paclitaxel using folate-decorated poly(lactide)–vitamin E TPGS nanoparticles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jie Pan; Si-Shen Feng

    2008-01-01

    We synthesized nanoparticles (NPs) of the blend of two-component copolymers for targeted chemotherapy with paclitaxel used as model drug. One component is poly(lactide)–d-?-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol succinate (PLA–TPGS), which is of desired hydrophobic–lipophilic balance, and another is TPGS–COOH, which facilitates the folate conjugation for targeting. The nanoparticles of the two-copolymer blend at various component ratio were prepared by the solvent extraction\\/evaporation

  6. Folate-modified pluronic-polyethylenimine and cholic acid polyion complex micelles as targeted drug delivery system for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Li, Yimu; Zhou, Yi; De, Bai; Li, Lingbing

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to construct a type of polyion complex micelles made of PF127-PEI copolymer and cholic acid (CA) and to evaluate the potential of this type of micelles as a targeted drug delivery system for paclitaxel (PTX). To further improve the targeting capability of micelles, folate was also incorporated into micelles. The characteristics and anti-tumour activity in vitro were investigated. Enhanced solubility of PTX was achieved by incorporating into the micelles. The capability of the polyion complex micelles containing rhodamine 123 to increase the level of intracellular delivery was also observed using fluorescence microscopy. The cytotoxicity of PTX-loaded micelles against cancer cell in vitro was remarkably higher than that of free drug and was better when folate was incorporated into the micelles. These properties such as specificity towards the folate receptor and the low toxicity render folate-modified polyion complex micelles promising candidate for targeted PTX delivery. PMID:25090590

  7. PEG-farnesyl thiosalicylic acid telodendrimer micelles as an improved formulation for targeted delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Chen, Yichao; Zhang, Peng; Li, Jiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Li, Song

    2014-08-01

    We have recently designed and developed a dual-functional drug carrier that is based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-derivatized farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS, a nontoxic Ras antagonist). PEG5K-FTS2 readily form micelles (20-30 nm) and hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel (PTX) could be effectively loaded into these micelles. PTX formulated in PEG5K-FTS2 micelles showed an antitumor activity that was more efficacious than Taxol in a syngeneic mouse model of breast cancer (4T1.2). In order to further improve our PEG-FTS micellar system, four PEG-FTS conjugates were developed that vary in the molecular weight of PEG (PEG2K vs PEG5K) and the molar ratio of PEG/FTS (1/2 vs 1/4) in the conjugates. These conjugates were characterized including CMC, drug loading capacity, stability, and their efficacy in delivery of anticancer drug PTX to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data showed that the conjugates with four FTS molecules were more effective than the conjugates with two molecules of FTS and that FTS conjugates with PEG5K were more effective than the counterparts with PEG2K in forming stable mixed micelles. PTX formulated in PEG5K-FTS4 micelles was the most effective formulation in inhibiting the tumor growth in vivo. PMID:24987803

  8. Antibody conjugated PLGA nanoparticles for targeted delivery of paclitaxel palmitate: efficacy and biofate in a lung cancer mouse model.

    PubMed

    Karra, Nour; Nassar, Taher; Ripin, Alina Nemirovski; Schwob, Ouri; Borlak, Jürgen; Benita, Simon

    2013-12-20

    Aberrant signaling of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is common to a variety of human cancers and is also found to be over-expressed in most cases of non-small cell lung cancer. For the development of a molecularly targeted therapy, cetuximab-conjugated nanoparticles (immunonanoparticles, INPs) are designed and loaded with the lipophilic paclitaxel palmitate (pcpl) prodrug. Oleyl cysteineamide (OCA) is synthesized whereby its amphiphilic nature enables interfacial anchoring and thiol surface functionalization of PLGA NPs, facilitating bioconjugation to cetuximab by thioether bonds. It is demonstrated that the in vitro targeting efficiency and improved cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of this targeted delivery system in lung cancer cells over-expressing EGFR. A quantitative measure of the high binding affinity of INPs to EGFR is demonstrated using surface plasmon resonance. In vivo tolerability and enhanced efficacy of cetuximab pcpl INPs in a metastatic lung cancer model are reported. Its therapeutic efficacy in A549-luc-C8 lung tumors is shown using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging. Intravenous administration of cetuximab pcpl INPs to mice results in significantly higher inhibition of tumor growth and increased survival rates as compared to the non-targeted drug solution, drug-loaded nanoparticles or blank INPs. Pharmacokinetics and organ biodistribution of the prodrug and parent drug are evaluated by LC-MS/MS in lung tumor bearing mice. No enhanced total accumulation of nanoparticles or INPs is found at the tumor tissue. However, persistent pcpl levels with sustained conversion and release of paclitaxel are observed for the encapsulated prodrug possibly suggesting the formation of a drug reservoir. The overall results indicate the potential of this promising targeted platform for the improved treatment of lung cancer and other EGFR positive tumors. PMID:23873835

  9. Paclitaxel Nano-Delivery Systems: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ping; Mumper, Russell J

    2013-02-18

    Paclitaxel is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs ever developed and is active against a broad range of cancers, such as lung, ovarian, and breast cancers. Due to its low water solubility, paclitaxel is formulated in a mixture of Cremophor EL and dehydrated ethanol (50:50, v/v) a combination known as Taxol. However, Taxol has some severe side effects related to Cremophor EL and ethanol. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of alternative Taxol formulations. The encapsulation of paclitaxel in biodegradable and non-toxic nano-delivery systems can protect the drug from degradation during circulation and in-turn protect the body from toxic side effects of the drug thereby lowering its toxicity, increasing its circulation half-life, exhibiting improved pharmacokinetic profiles, and demonstrating better patient compliance. Also, nanoparticle-based delivery systems can take advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect for passive tumor targeting, therefore, they are promising carriers to improve the therapeutic index and decrease the side effects of paclitaxel. To date, paclitaxel albumin-bound nanoparticles (Abraxane®) have been approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In addition, there are a number of novel paclitaxel nanoparticle formulations in clinical trials. In this comprehensive review, several types of developed paclitaxel nano-delivery systems will be covered and discussed, such as polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based formulations, polymer conjugates, inorganic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, nanocrystals, and cyclodextrin nanoparticles. PMID:24163786

  10. Enhanced drug-loading and therapeutic efficacy of hydrotropic oligomer-conjugated glycol chitosan nanoparticles for tumor-targeted paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Koo, Heebeom; Min, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Sang Cheon; Park, Jae Hyung; Park, Kinam; Jeong, Seo Young; Choi, Kuiwon; Kwon, Ick Chan; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2013-12-28

    Enhanced drug-loading and therapeutic efficacies are highly essential properties for nanoparticles as tumor-targeting drug carriers. Herein, we developed the glycol chitosan nanoparticles with hydrotropic oligomers (HO-CNPs) as a new tumor targeting drug delivery system. For enhancing drug-loading efficiency of paclitaxel in drug carriers, hydrotropic 2-(4-(vinylbenzyloxy)-N,N-diethylnicotinamide) (VBODENA-COOH) oligomers, that were used for enhancing the aqueous solubility of paclitaxel, were directly conjugated to glycol chitosan polymers. The amphiphilic conjugates readily formed nanoparticle structure (average size=302 ± 22 nm) in aqueous condition. Water-insoluble paclitaxel (PTX) was readily encapsulated into HO-CNPs with a high drug-loading amount up to 24.2 wt.% (2.4 fold higher than other polymeric nanoparticles) by a simple dialysis method. The PTX encapsulated HO-CNPs (PTX-HO-CNPs; average size=343 ± 12 nm) were very stable in aqueous media up to 50 days. Also, PTX-HO-CNPs presented rapid cellular uptake and lower cytotoxicity in cell culture system, compared to Cremophor EL/ethanol formulation of PTX. In tumor-bearing mice, the extravasation and accumulation of PTX-HO-CNPs in tumor tissue were precisely observed by intravital fluorescence imaging techniques. Furthermore, PTX-HO-CNPs showed the higher therapeutic efficacy, compared to Abraxane®, a commercialized PTX-formulation. These overall results demonstrate its potential as a new nano-sized PTX carrier for cancer treatment. PMID:24035978

  11. Stabilized micelles as delivery vehicles for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Yoncheva, Krassimira; Calleja, Patricia; Agüeros, Maite; Petrov, Petar; Miladinova, Ivanka; Tsvetanov, Christo; Irache, Juan M

    2012-10-15

    Paclitaxel is an antineoplastic drug used against a variety of tumors, but its low aqueous solubility and active removal caused by P-glycoprotein in the intestinal cells hinder its oral administration. In our study, new type of stabilized Pluronic micelles were developed and evaluated as carriers for paclitaxel delivery via oral or intravenous route. The pre-stabilized micelles were loaded with paclitaxel by simple solvent/evaporation technique achieving high encapsulation efficiency of approximately 70%. Gastrointestinal transit of the developed micelles was evaluated by oral administration of rhodamine-labeled micelles in rats. Our results showed prolonged gastrointestinal residence of the marker encapsulated into micelles, compared to a solution containing free marker. Further, the oral administration of micelles in mice showed high area under curve of micellar paclitaxel (similar to the area of i.v. Taxol(®)), longer mean residence time (9-times longer than i.v. Taxol(®)) and high distribution volume (2-fold higher than i.v. Taxol(®)) indicating an efficient oral absorption of paclitaxel delivered by micelles. Intravenous administration of micelles also showed a significant improvement of pharmacokinetic parameters of micellar paclitaxel vs. Taxol(®), in particular higher area under curve (1.2-fold), 5-times longer mean residence time and lower clearance, indicating longer systemic circulation of the micelles. PMID:22721848

  12. Peptide-conjugated biodegradable nanoparticles as a carrier to target paclitaxel to tumor neovasculature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    De-Hong Yu; Qin Lu; Jing Xie; Chao Fang; Hong-Zhuan Chen

    2010-01-01

    Antiangiogenic cancer therapy can be achieved through the targeted delivery of antiangiogenic agents to the endothelial cells of tumor neovasculature. In the present study, we developed a drug delivery system (DDS), nanoparticles conjugated with K237-(HTMYYHHYQHHL) peptides for tumor neovasculature targeting drug delivery. Paclitaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent with potent antiangiogenic activity, was used as a prototype drug. We synthesized the aldehyde

  13. Folate-mediated targeted and intracellular delivery of paclitaxel using a novel deoxycholic acid-O-carboxymethylated chitosan–folic acid micelles

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feihu; Chen, Yuxuan; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang; Zheng, Dandan; Hao, Leilei; Liu, Yue; Duan, Cunxian; Jia, Lejiao; Liu, Guangpu

    2012-01-01

    Background A critical disadvantage for successful chemotherapy with paclitaxel (PTX) is its nontargeting nature to cancer cells. Folic acid has been employed as a targeting ligand of various anticancer agents to increase their cellular uptake within target cells since the folate receptor is overexpressed on the surface of such tumor cells. In this study, a novel biodegradable deoxycholic acid-O-carboxymethylated chitosan–folic acid conjugate (DOMC-FA) was used to form micelles for encapsulating the anticancer drug PTX. Methods and results The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro drug release and physicochemical properties of PTX-loaded micelles were investigated in detail. In vitro cell culture studies were carried out in MCF-7 cells, a human breast carcinoma cell line, with folate receptor overexpressed on its surface. An increased level of uptake of folate-conjugated micelles compared to plain micelles in MCF-7 cells was observed, and the enhanced uptake of folate-micelles mainly on account of the effective process of folate receptor-mediated endocytosis. The MTT assay, morphological changes, and apoptosis test implied that the folate-conjugated micelles enhanced the cell death by folate-mediated active internalization, and the cytotoxicity of the FA-micellar PTX (DOMC-FA/PTX) to cancer cells was much higher than micelles without folate (DOMC/PTX) or the commercially available injectable preparation of PTX (Taxol). Conclusion Results indicate that the PTX-loaded DOMC-FA micelle is a successful anticancertargeted drug-delivery system for effective cancer chemotherapy. PMID:22287842

  14. Doxorubicin and paclitaxel loaded microbubbles for ultrasound triggered drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, Michael C.; Eisenbrey, John; Ouma, Richard O.; Soulen, Michael; Wheatley, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    A polymer ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) developed in our lab has been shown to greatly reduce in size when exposed to ultrasound, resulting in nanoparticles less than 400 nm in diameter capable of escaping the leaky vasculature of a tumor to provide a sustained release of drug. Previous studies with the hydrophilic drug doxorubicin (DOX) demonstrated enhanced drug delivery to tumors when triggered with ultrasound. However the therapeutic potential has been limited due to the relatively low payload of DOX. This study compares the effects of loading the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel (PTX) on the agent’s acoustic properties, drug payload, tumoricidal activity, and the ability to deliver drugs through 400 nm pores. A maximum payload of 129.46 ± 1.80 ?g PTX/mg UCA (encapsulation efficiency 71.92 ± 0.99 %) was achieved, 20 times greater than the maximum payload of DOX (6.2 ?g/mg), while maintaining the acoustic properties. In vitro, the tumoricidal activity of paclitaxel loaded UCA exposed to ultrasound was significantly greater than controls not exposed to ultrasound (p<0.0016). This study has shown that PTX loaded UCA triggered with focused ultrasound have the potential to provide a targeted and sustained delivery of drug to tumors. PMID:21609756

  15. Integrin-targeted paclitaxel nanoliposomes for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shuyan; Su, Bo; Li, Wei; Ding, Yongmei; Tang, Liang; Zhou, Wei; Song, Yin; Caicun, Zhou

    2011-12-01

    A neovessel-targeted PEGylated liposomal formulation of paclitaxel was prepared with the purpose of improving the solubility of paclitaxel and specific targeting ability of this drug to tumor vasculature. AlphaV integrins overexpressed on the surface of new formed tumor vessels were selected to be the targets and their specific ligand, a 12-mer peptide containing a cyclic RGD sequence was used to achieve the goal. After coupled with a KGG-Palmitic acid conjugate, the RGD containing peptide was successfully integrated to the lipid bilayers. Mean particle size of the liposomes was under 100 nm and the drug entrapment efficiency was greater than 95%. Release study showed a much lower release rate of paclitaxel from liposomal formulation than from Cremophor EL-based formulation which indicated that this drug was stable in an entrapped form in vitro. Plasma distribution study showed that liposomal paclitaxel-treated groups obtained higher paclitaxel concentration than Taxol-treated group after 6 h injection. Greater cellular uptake was also found in the integrin-targeted liposomal paclitaxel-treated group compared with Taxol-treated group. Treatment of mice bearing A549 tumors with the integrin-targeted paclitaxel liposomes resulted in a lower tumor microvessel density than Taxol-treated group. Therefore, RGD-based strategy could be used to enhance tumor-specific recognition of nanocarriers. Neovessel-targeted PEGylated paclitaxel liposomes developed in present study might be a more promising drug for cancer treatment. PMID:20645030

  16. Stepwise orthogonal click chemistry toward fabrication of paclitaxel/galactose functionalized fluorescent nanoparticles for HepG2 cell targeting and delivery.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chian-Hui; Chang, Tsung-Che; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Tzou, Der-Lii; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2013-10-16

    In this report, we used stepwise orthogonal click chemistry (SOCC) involving strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) and microwave-assisted Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) to assemble an anticancer drug (paclitaxel, PTX) and a targeting ligand (trivalent galactoside, TGal) on a fluorescent silicon oxide nanoparticle (NP) by using dialkyne linker 8 as a bridge. The fluorescent NH2@Cy3SiO2NP was fabricated using a competition method to incorporate Cy3 without loss of the original surface amine density on the NPs. The concept of SOCC was first investigated in a solution-phase model study that showed quantitative reaction yield. In the fabrication of TGal-PTX@Cy3SiO2NP, the expensive compound azido-functionalized PTX 12 used in SPAAC can be easily recovered due to the absence of other reagents in the reaction mixture. High loading of the sugar ligand on the NP surface serves a targeting function and also overcomes the low water solubility of PTX. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and cytotoxicity assay showed that TGal-PTX@Cy3SiO2NP was taken up by HepG2 cells and was affected by the microtubule skeleton in these cells and inhibited the proliferation of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of a fluorescent probe, a targeting ligand, and an anticancer drug on the multifunctional TGal-PTX@Cy3SiO2NP allows for real-time imaging, specific cancer-cell targeting, and the cell-killing effect which is better than free PTX. PMID:23987828

  17. Designing Paclitaxel Drug Delivery Systems Aimed at Improved Patient Outcomes: Current Status and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Surapaneni, Madhu S.; Das, Sudip K.; Das, Nandita G.

    2012-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most widely used and effective antineoplastic agents derived from natural sources. It has a wide spectrum of antitumor activity, particularly against ovarian cancer, breast cancer, nonsmall cell lung cancer, head and neck tumors, Kaposi's sarcoma, and urologic malignancies. It is a highly lipophilic compound with a log P value of 3.96 and very poor aqueous solubility of less than 0.01?mg/mL. In addition, the compound lacks functional groups that are ionizable which could potentially lead to an increase in its solubility with the alteration in pH. Therefore, the delivery of paclitaxel is associated with substantial challenges. Until the introduction of Abraxane, only commercial formulation was solution of paclitaxel in cremophor, which caused severe side effects. However, in recent years, a number of approaches have been reported to solubilize paclitaxel using cosolvents and inclusion complexes. In addition, innovative approaches have been reported for passive targeting of tumors using nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes, emulsions, micelles, implants, pastes and gels. All approaches for delivery of improved therapeutic outcome have been discussed in this paper. PMID:22934190

  18. Designing Paclitaxel drug delivery systems aimed at improved patient outcomes: current status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Surapaneni, Madhu S; Das, Sudip K; Das, Nandita G

    2012-01-01

    Paclitaxel is one of the most widely used and effective antineoplastic agents derived from natural sources. It has a wide spectrum of antitumor activity, particularly against ovarian cancer, breast cancer, nonsmall cell lung cancer, head and neck tumors, Kaposi's sarcoma, and urologic malignancies. It is a highly lipophilic compound with a log P value of 3.96 and very poor aqueous solubility of less than 0.01?mg/mL. In addition, the compound lacks functional groups that are ionizable which could potentially lead to an increase in its solubility with the alteration in pH. Therefore, the delivery of paclitaxel is associated with substantial challenges. Until the introduction of Abraxane, only commercial formulation was solution of paclitaxel in cremophor, which caused severe side effects. However, in recent years, a number of approaches have been reported to solubilize paclitaxel using cosolvents and inclusion complexes. In addition, innovative approaches have been reported for passive targeting of tumors using nanoparticles, nanosuspensions, liposomes, emulsions, micelles, implants, pastes and gels. All approaches for delivery of improved therapeutic outcome have been discussed in this paper. PMID:22934190

  19. Carboxymethyl-chitosan-tethered lipid vesicles: hybrid nanoblanket for oral delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Nitin; Saha, Rama; Shanmugam, Thanigaivel; Balakrishnan, Biji; More, Prachi; Banerjee, Rinti

    2013-07-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a hybrid lipopolymeric system comprising carboxymethyl chitosan (CMC), covalently tethered to phosphatidylethanolamine units on the surface of lipid nanovesicles, for oral delivery of paclitaxel. The bioploymer is intended to act as a blanket, thereby shielding the drug from harsh gastrointestinal conditions, whereas the lipid nanovesicle ensures high encapsulation efficiency of paclitaxel and its passive targeting to tumor. CMC-tethered nanovesicles (LN-C-PTX) in the size range of 200-300 nm improved the gastrointestinal resistance and mucoadhesion properties as compared with unmodified lipid nanovesicles (LN-PTX). Conjugation of CMC did not compromise the cytotoxic potential of paclitaxel yet facilitated the interaction and uptake of the nanovesicles by murine melanoma (B16F10) cells through an ATP-dependent process. CMC-conjugated nanovesicles, upon oral administration in rats, improved the plasma concentration profile of paclitaxel, with 1.5 fold increase in its bioavailability and 5.5 folds increase in elimination half life in comparison with Taxol. We also found that CMC in addition to providing a gastric resistant coating also imparted stealth character to the nanovesicles, thereby reducing their reticuloendothelial system (RES)-mediated uptake by liver and spleen and bypassing the need for PEGylation. In vivo efficacy in subcutaneous model of B16F10 showed significantly improved tumor growth inhibition and survival with CMC-tethered nanovesicles as compared with unmodified nanovesicles, both administered orally. LN-C-PTX exhibited therapeutic efficacy comparable to Taxol and Abraxane and also showed reduced toxicity and improved survival. Overall, these results suggest the therapeutic potential of CMC tethered nanovesicles as a platform for oral administration of paclitaxel and also unravel the ability of CMC to impart stealth character to the nanoparticles, thereby preventing their RES clearance. PMID:23721348

  20. Pathological Analysis of Local Delivery of Paclitaxel Via a Polymer-Coated Stent

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew Farb; Phillip F. Heller; Sweta Shroff; Linda Cheng; Frank D. Kolodgie; Andrew J. Carter; Douglas S. Scott; Jeffrey Froehlich; Renu Virmani

    2010-01-01

    Background—Paclitaxel can inhibit vascular smooth muscle proliferation in vitro, and early studies suggest that paclitaxel may be useful in preventing restenosis. Early and late intimal growth and local vascular pathological changes associated with paclitaxel delivered via stents have not been fully explored. Methods and Results—Localized drug delivery was accomplished with balloon-expandable stainless steel stents coated with a cross-linked biodegradable polymer,

  1. The enhanced longevity and liver targetability of Paclitaxel by hybrid liposomes encapsulating Paclitaxel-conjugated gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bao, Quan-Ying; Zhang, Ning; Geng, Dong-Dong; Xue, Jing-Wei; Merritt, Mackenzie; Zhang, Can; Ding, Ya

    2014-12-30

    Organic and inorganic drug delivery systems both demonstrate their own advantages and challenges in practical applications. Combining these two drug delivery strategies in one system is expected to solve their current issues and achieve desirable functions. In this paper, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and liposomes have been chosen as the model systems to construct a hybrid system and investigate its performance for the tumor therapy of Paclitaxel (PTX). The thiol-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG400)-PTX derivative has been covalently modified on the surface of GNPs, followed by the encapsulation of PTX-conjugated GNPs (PTX-PEG400@GNPs) in liposomes. The hybrid liposomes solve the solubility and stability problems of gold conjugates and show high drug loading capacity. In vitro PTX release from the hybrid system maintains the similar sustained behavior demonstrated in its conjugates. Under the protection of a biocompatible liposome shell, encapsulated PTX shows enhanced circulation longevity and liver targetability compared to Taxol(®) and PTX-PEG400@GNPs suspension in the pharmacokinetic and biodistribution studies. These indicate that encapsulating drug-conjugated inorganic nanoparticles inside organic carriers maintains the superiority of both vehicles and improves the performance of hybrid systems. Although these attributes of hybrid liposomes lead to a better therapeutic capacity in a murine liver cancer model than that of the comparison groups, it shows no significant difference from Taxol(®) and conjugate suspension. This result could be due to the delayed and sustained drug release from the system. However, it indicates the promising potential for these hybrid liposomes will allow further construction of a compound preparation with improved performance that is based on their enhanced longevity and liver targetability of Paclitaxel. PMID:25455782

  2. Molecular mechanism of local drug delivery with Paclitaxel-eluting membranes in biliary and pancreatic cancer: new application for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sookhee; Jang, Sung Ill; Lee, Su Yeon; Baek, Yi-Yong; Yun, Jieun; Oh, Soo Jin; Lee, Chang Woo; Jo, Eun Ae; Na, Kun; Yang, Sugeun; Lee, Don Haeng; Lee, Dong Ki

    2015-01-01

    Implantation of self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is palliation for patients suffering from inoperable malignant obstructions associated with biliary and pancreatic cancers. Chemotherapeutic agent-eluting stents have been developed because SEMS are susceptible to occlusion by tumor in-growth. We reported recently that paclitaxel-eluting SEMS provide enhanced local drug delivery in an animal model. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which paclitaxel-eluting stents attenuate tumor growth. We investigated the signal transduction pathways underlying the antiproliferative effects of a paclitaxel-eluting membrane (PEM) implanted in pancreatic/cholangiocarcinoma tumor bearing nude mice. Molecular and cellular alterations were analyzed in the PEM-implanted pancreatic/cholangiocarcinoma xenograft tumors by Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunofluorescence. The quantities of paclitaxel released into the tumor and plasma were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy. Paclitaxel from the PEM and its diffusion into the tumor inhibited angiogenesis, which involved suppression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) through regulation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1) and increased apoptosis. Moreover, implantation of the PEM inhibited tumor-stromal interaction-related expression of proteins such as CD44, SPARC, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and vimentin. Local delivery of paclitaxel from a PEM inhibited growth of pancreatic/cholangiocarcinoma tumors in nude mice by suppressing angiogenesis via the mTOR and inducing apoptosis signal pathway. PMID:25983747

  3. Polymeric complex micelles with double drug-loading strategies for folate-mediated paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Liu, Yongjun; Feng, Lixia; Liu, Fengxi; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Na

    2015-07-01

    Drug loading is a key procedure in the preparation of drug-loaded nano-carriers. In this study, the paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded polymeric complex micelles (FA-P123-PTX/PTX micelles) with double drug-loading strategies were designed and prepared to improve the drug loading percentage of carriers and its anti-tumor efficiency. PTX was simultaneously conjugated to pluronic P123 (P123) polymer and encapsulated inside the P123 complex micelle. Folate (FA) was linked to the surface of micelles for the active target delivery of micelles to tumor cells. The FA-P123-PTX/PTX micelles showed spherical shaped with high drug loading of 18.08±0.64%. The results of cellular uptake studies suggested that FA could promote the internalization of micelles into the FR positive cells. FA-P123-PTX/PTX micelles showed significant higher anti-tumor activity against FR positive tumor cells compared to Taxol(®) (p<0.05). Moreover, the FA-P123-PTX/PTX micelles exhibited higher anti-tumor efficacy in B16 bearing mice with better safety property compared with Taxol(®). These results suggested that FA-P123-PTX/PTX micelles with double drug-loading strategies showed great potential for targeted delivery of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25988283

  4. Thermosensitive and biodegradable polymeric micelles for paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Soga, Osamu; van Nostrum, Cornelus F; Fens, Marcel; Rijcken, Cristianne J F; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Storm, Gert; Hennink, Wim E

    2005-03-21

    The preparation, release and in vitro cytotoxicity of a novel polymeric micellar formulation of paclitaxel (PTX) were investigated. The micelles consisted of an AB block copolymer of poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide lactate) and poly(ethylene glycol) (pHPMAmDL-b-PEG). Taking advantage of the thermosensitivity of pHPMAmDL-b-PEG, the loading was done by simply mixing of a small volume of a concentrated PTX solution in ethanol and an aqueous polymer solution and subsequent heating of the resulting solution above the critical micelle temperature of the polymer. PTX could be almost quantitatively loaded in the micelles up to 2 mg/mL. By dynamic light scattering and cryo-transmission electron microscopy, it was shown that PTX-loaded micelles have a mean size around 60 nm with narrow size distribution. At pH 8.8 and 37 degrees C, PTX-loaded micelles destabilized within 10 h due to the hydrolysis of the lactic acid side group of the pHPMAmDL. Because the hydrolysis of the lactic acid side groups is first order in hydroxyl ion concentration, the micelles were stable for about 200 h at physiological conditions. The presence of serum proteins did not have an adverse effect on the stability of the micelles during at least 15 h. Interestingly, the dissolution kinetics of pHPMAmDL-b-PEG micelles was retarded by incorporation of PTX, indicating a strong interaction between PTX and the pHPMAmDL block. The PTX-loaded micelles showed a release of the incorporated 70% of PTX during 20 h at 37 degrees C and at pH 7.4. PTX-loaded pHPMAmDL-b-PEG micelles showed comparable in vitro cytotoxicity against B16F10 cells compared to the Taxol standard formulation containing Cremophor EL, while pHPMAmDL-b-PEG micelles without PTX were far less toxic than the Cremophor EL vehicle. Confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) and fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis of fluorescently labelled micelles showed that pHPMAmDL-b-PEG micelles were internalized by the B16F10 cells. The present results suggest that pHPMAmDL-b-PEG block copolymer micelles are a promising delivery system for the parenteral administration of PTX. PMID:15763618

  5. Sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide nanoparticles as paclitaxel vehicles targeting breast carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Qin, Fei; Yang, Li; Mo, Liqian; Li, Lei; Hou, Lianbing

    2014-01-01

    Targeted nanoparticle (NP) delivery vehicles are emerging technologies, the full potential of which has yet to be realized. Sulfatide is known to bind to extracellular matrix glycoproteins that are highly expressed in breast tumors. In this study, we report for the first time the combination of sulfatide and lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs as a targeted breast cancer delivery vehicle for paclitaxel (PTX). PTX-sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (PTX-SNPs) were prepared using the emulsion/solvent evaporation method. PTX-SNPs exhibited a spherical shape, small particle size, high encapsulation efficiency, and a biphasic release in phosphate-buffered solution. The cytotoxicity study and cell apoptosis assay revealed that blank sulfatide-containing lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (SNPs) had no cytotoxicity, whereas PTX-SNPs had greater EMT6 cytotoxicity levels than PTX-lipid perfluorooctylbromide NPs (PTX-NPs) and free PTX. An in vitro cellular uptake study revealed that SNPs can deliver greater amounts of drug with more efficient and immediate access to intracellular targets. In vivo biodistribution measured using high-performance liquid chromatography confirmed that the PTX-SNPs can target breast tumor tissues to increase the accumulation of PTX in these tissues. The in vivo tumor inhibition ability of PTX-SNPs was remarkably higher than PTX-NPs and free PTX. Furthermore, toxicity studies suggested that the blank SNPs had no systemic toxicity. All results suggested that SNPs may serve as efficient PTX delivery vehicles targeting breast carcinoma. PMID:25170267

  6. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(?-caprolactone) micelles for combination drug delivery: evaluation of paclitaxel, cyclopamine and gossypol in intraperitoneal xenograft models of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunah; Lai, Tsz Chung; Kwon, Glen S

    2013-02-28

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecological malignancy, characterized by a high rate of chemoresistance. Current treatment strategies for ovarian cancer focus on novel drug combinations of cytotoxic agents and molecular targeted agents or novel drug delivery strategies that often involve intraperitoneal (IP) injection. Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(?-caprolactone) (PEG-b-PCL) micelles were loaded with paclitaxel (cytotoxic agent), cyclopamine (hedgehog inhibitor), and gossypol (Bcl-2 inhibitor). After physicochemical studies focusing on combination drug solubilization, 3-drug PEG-b-PCL micelles were evaluated in vitro in 2-D and 3-D cell culture and in vivo in xenograft models of ovarian cancer, tracking bioluminescence signals from ES-2 and SKOV3 human ovarian cancer cell lines after IP injection. 3-Drug PEG-b-PCL micelles were not significantly more potent in 2-D cell culture in comparison to paclitaxel; however, they disaggregated ES-2 tumor spheroids, whereas single drugs or 2-drug combinations only slowed growth of ES-2 tumor spheroids or had no noticeable effects. In ES-2 and SKOV3 xenograft models, 3-drug PEG-b-PCL micelles had significantly less tumor burden than paclitaxel based on bioluminescence imaging, 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) PET imaging, and overall survival. (18)F-FLT-PET images clearly showed that 3-drug PEG-b-PCL micelles dramatically reduce tumor volumes over paclitaxel and vehicle controls. In summary, PEG-b-PCL micelles enable the IP combination drug delivery of paclitaxel, cyclopamine and gossypol, resulting in tumor growth inhibition and prolonged survival over paclitaxel alone. These results validate a novel treatment strategy for ovarian cancer based on drug combinations of cytotoxic agents and molecular targeted agents, delivered concurrently by a nanoscale drug delivery system, e.g. PEG-b-PCL micelles. PMID:23246471

  7. Effect of integrin receptor-targeted liposomal paclitaxel for hepatocellular carcinoma targeting and therapy

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, LIYU; LIU, YANBIN; WANG, WEIYA; LIU, KAI

    2015-01-01

    The major aim of the present study was to develop an integrin receptor-targeted liposomal paclitaxel (PTX) to enhance the targeting specificity and therapeutic effect of PTX on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The specific Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) ligand was conjugated to 1,2-distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine-polyethylene glycol 2000 to prepare the RGD-modified liposomes (RGD-LP). Furthermore, physicochemical characteristics of RGD-LP, including particle size, ? potential, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro PTX release, were evaluated. RGD-modified liposomes were selected as the carrier for the present study, as they exhibit good biocompatibility and are easy to modify using RGD. The cellular uptake efficacy of RGD-LP by HepG2 cells was 3.3-fold higher than that of liposomes without RGD, indicating that RGD-LP may specifically target HepG2 cells by overexpressing integrin ?v?3 receptors. The RGD modification appeared to enhance the anti-proliferative activity of LP-PTX against HepG2 cells, with the extent of anti-proliferative activity dependent on the concentration of PTX and the incubation time. Additionally, evaluation of the homing specificity and anticancer efficacy of RGD-LP on the tumor spheroids indicated that solid tumor penetration was enhanced by the modification of RGD. In agreement with these in vitro findings, in vivo investigations demonstrated that RGD-LP-PTX exhibited a greater inhibitory effect on tumor growth in HepG2-bearing mice than LP-PTX or free PTX. Thus, RGD-LPs may represent an efficient targeted PTX delivery system for the treatment of patients with HCC. PMID:26170980

  8. Delivery of paclitaxel and berbamine by polymeric carriers to cure gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lingjun; Zhang, Bin; Lu, Xiaowei; Shu, Yongqian; Liu, Baorui

    2013-01-01

    Successful chemotherapy needs to reduce the toxic side effects against normal tissues and avoid the detriments caused by intolerable solvents. Drug delivery systems using soluble polymeric nanoparticles tend to be the focus. In the current study, core-shell structure nanoparticles were prepared from block copolymer of methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-polycaprolactone (mPE-PCL). Paclitaxel (PTX) and berbamine (BA) were incorporated into mPEG-PCL nanoparticles. It was found in our study that PTX and BA can be incorporated into the nanoparticles with high encapsulation efficiency. In vitro release study showed that PTX and BA were released from nanoparticles in a sustained manner. In vitro cytotoxicity studies indicated that PTX/BA coloaded nanoparticles (PTX/BA-np) show dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity again BGC823 cells. Furthermore, intratumoral administration was applied to improve the tumor-targeted delivery in the in vivo evaluation. Compared with free drugs, PTX/BA-np exhibited superior antitumor effect by delaying tumor growth when delivered intratumorally. These results suggest that PTX/BA-np are effective to inhibit the growth of human gastric cancer and merit more research to evaluate the feasibility of clinical application. PMID:23879166

  9. Efficient drug delivery of Paclitaxel glycoside: a novel solubility gradient encapsulation into liposomes coupled with immunoliposomes preparation.

    PubMed

    Shigehiro, Tsukasa; Kasai, Tomonari; Murakami, Masaharu; Sekhar, Sreeja C; Tominaga, Yuki; Okada, Masashi; Kudoh, Takayuki; Mizutani, Akifumi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Salomon, David S; Mikuni, Katsuhiko; Mandai, Tadakatsu; Hamada, Hiroki; Seno, Masaharu

    2014-01-01

    Although the encapsulation of paclitaxel into liposomes has been extensively studied, its significant hydrophobic and uncharged character has generated substantial difficulties concerning its efficient encapsulation into the inner water core of liposomes. We found that a more hydrophilic paclitaxel molecule, 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel, retained tubulin polymerization stabilization activity. The hydrophilic nature of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel allowed its efficient encapsulation into the inner water core of liposomes, which was successfully accomplished using a remote loading method with a solubility gradient between 40% ethylene glycol and Cremophor EL/ethanol in PBS. Trastuzumab was then conjugated onto the surface of liposomes as immunoliposomes to selectively target human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2)-overexpressing cancer cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assays revealed that the immunoliposomes enhanced the toxicity of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel in HER2-overexpressing cancer cells and showed more rapid suppression of cell growth. The immunoliposomes strongly inhibited the tumor growth of HT-29 cells xenografted in nude mice. Notably, mice survived when treated with the immunoliposomes formulation, even when administered at a lethal dose of 7-glucosyloxyacetylpaclitaxel in vivo. This data successfully demonstrates immunoliposomes as a promising candidate for the efficient delivery of paclitaxel glycoside. PMID:25264848

  10. Thermosensitive and Mucoadhesive Sol-Gel Composites of Paclitaxel/Dimethyl-?-Cyclodextrin for Buccal Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bong-Seok; Ng, Choon Lian; Davaa, Enkhzaya; Park, Jeong-Sook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a buccal paclitaxel delivery system using the thermosensitive polymer Pluronic F127 (PF127) and the mucoadhesive polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO). The anticancer agent paclitaxel is usually used to treat ovarian, breast, and non-small-cell lung cancer. To improve its aqueous solubility, paclitaxel was incorporated into an inclusion complex with (2,6-di-O-methyl)-?-cyclodextrin (DM?CD). The formation of the paclitaxel inclusion complex was evaluated using various techniques, including x-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogels were prepared using a cold method. Concentrations of 18, 20, and 23% (w/v) PF127 were dissolved in distilled water including paclitaxel and stored overnight in a refrigerator at 4°C. PEO was added at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1% (w/v). Each formulation included paclitaxel (0.5 mg/mL). The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogels was measured using the tube-inverting method. Drug release from the hydrogels was measured using a Franz diffusion cell containing pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) buffer at 37°C. The cytotoxicity of each formulation was measured using the MTT assay with a human oral cancer cell (KB cell). The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogel decreased when PF127 was present and varied according to the presence of mucoadhesive polymers. The in vitro release was sustained and the release rate was slowed by the addition of the mucoadhesive polymer. The cytotoxicity of the blank formulation was low, although the drug-loaded hydrogel showed acceptable cytotoxicity. The results of our study suggest that the combination of a PF 127-based mucoadhesive hydrogel formulation and inclusion complexes improves the in vitro release and cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel. PMID:25275485

  11. Thermosensitive and mucoadhesive sol-gel composites of paclitaxel/dimethyl-?-cyclodextrin for buccal delivery.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soon Gil; Lee, Sang-Eun; Kang, Bong-Seok; Ng, Choon Lian; Davaa, Enkhzaya; Park, Jeong-Sook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a buccal paclitaxel delivery system using the thermosensitive polymer Pluronic F127 (PF127) and the mucoadhesive polymer polyethylene oxide (PEO). The anticancer agent paclitaxel is usually used to treat ovarian, breast, and non-small-cell lung cancer. To improve its aqueous solubility, paclitaxel was incorporated into an inclusion complex with (2,6-di-O-methyl)-?-cyclodextrin (DM?CD). The formation of the paclitaxel inclusion complex was evaluated using various techniques, including x-ray diffractometry (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrophotometry, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogels were prepared using a cold method. Concentrations of 18, 20, and 23% (w/v) PF127 were dissolved in distilled water including paclitaxel and stored overnight in a refrigerator at 4 °C. PEO was added at concentrations of 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, and 1% (w/v). Each formulation included paclitaxel (0.5 mg/mL). The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogels was measured using the tube-inverting method. Drug release from the hydrogels was measured using a Franz diffusion cell containing pH 7.4 phosphate-buffered solution (PBS) buffer at 37 °C. The cytotoxicity of each formulation was measured using the MTT assay with a human oral cancer cell (KB cell). The sol-gel transition temperature of the hydrogel decreased when PF127 was present and varied according to the presence of mucoadhesive polymers. The in vitro release was sustained and the release rate was slowed by the addition of the mucoadhesive polymer. The cytotoxicity of the blank formulation was low, although the drug-loaded hydrogel showed acceptable cytotoxicity. The results of our study suggest that the combination of a PF 127-based mucoadhesive hydrogel formulation and inclusion complexes improves the in vitro release and cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel. PMID:25275485

  12. Characterization of PEG-iron oxide hydrogel nanocomposites for dual hyperthermia and paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Meenach, Samantha A; Shapiro, Jenna M; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W

    2013-01-01

    Hyperthermia, the heating of tissue from 41 to 45?°C, has been shown to improve the efficacy of cancer therapy when used in conjunction with irradiation and/or chemotherapy. In this work, hydrogel nanocomposites have been developed that can control the delivery of both heat and a chemotherapeutic agent (e.g. paclitaxel). The nanocomposites studied involve a stealth, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based system comprised of PEG (n?=?1000) methyl ether methacrylate and PEG (n?=?400) dimethacrylate with iron oxide nanoparticles physically entrapped within the hydrogel matrices. The capability of the hydrogel nanocomposites to be heated in an alternating magnetic field was demonstrated. The heating of the hydrogel systems was dependent on the crosslinking of the hydrogel network where hydrogels with lower swelling ratios were found to heat to a greater extent than those with higher ratios. In addition, paclitaxel was shown to exhibit non-Fickian release from the hydrogel systems, with the amount of drug released dependent on the hydrogel network structure. Three cell lines: M059K (glioblastoma), MDA MB 231 (breast carcinoma), and A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) were exposed to paclitaxel only, hyperthermia only, and both paclitaxel and hyperthermia to determine if a synergistic cytotoxic effect was possible for these cell lines. The efficacy of paclitaxel was greater with hyperthermia for the A549 cells; however, the M059K and MDA MB 231 did not show the same response. PMID:23683041

  13. Paclitaxel-liposome-microbubble complexes as ultrasound-triggered therapeutic drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fei; Li, Lu; Deng, Zhiting; Jin, Qiaofeng; Chen, Juanjuan; Yang, Wei; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Wu, Junru; Shandas, Robin; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Hairong

    2013-03-28

    Liposome-microbubble complexes (LMC) have become a promising therapeutic carrier for ultrasound-triggered drug delivery to treat malignant tumors. However, the efficacy for ultrasound-assisted chemotherapy in vivo and the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated the feasibility of using paclitaxel-liposome-microbubble complexes (PLMC) as possible ultrasound (US)-triggered targeted chemotherapy against breast cancer. PTX-liposomes (PL) were conjugated to the microbubble (MB) surface through biotin-avidin linkage, increasing the drug-loading efficiency of MBs. The significant increased release of payloads from liposome-microbubble complexes was achieved upon US exposure. We used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as a model drug to show that released QDs were taken up by 4T1 breast cancer cells treated with QD-liposome-microbubble complexes (QLMC) and US, and uptake depended on the exposure time and intensity of insonication. We found that PLMC plus US inhibited tumor growth more effectively than PL plus US or PLMC without US, not only in vitro, but also in vivo. Histologically, the inhibition of tumor growth appeared to result from increased apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis in tumor xenografts. In addition, a significant increase of drug concentration in tumors was observed in comparison to treatment with non-conjugated PL or PLMC without US. The significant increase in an antitumor efficacy of PLMC plus US suggests their potential use as a new targeted US chemotherapeutic approach to inhibit breast cancer growth. PMID:23306023

  14. A thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogel for the local delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Ruel-Gariépy, Eve; Shive, Matthew; Bichara, Ali; Berrada, Mohammed; Le Garrec, Dorothée; Chenite, Abdellatif; Leroux, Jean-Christophe

    2004-01-01

    A novel injectable thermosensitive in situ gelling hydrogel has been developed. The system, which falls under the BST-Gel platform technology developed at Biosyntech Inc. (Laval, QC, Canada), consists of a chitosan solution (C) neutralized with beta-glycerophosphate (GP) that is liquid at room temperature but gels when heated to body temperature. We propose to use this thermosensitive hydrogel for the sustained release of paclitaxel at tumor resection sites in order to prevent local tumor recurrence. The in vitro release profiles demonstrated controlled delivery over 1 month. The initial drug loading substantially affected the release. Local delivery of paclitaxel from the formulation injected intratumorally was investigated using EMT-6 tumors implanted subcutaneously on Balb/c mice. These experiments showed that one intratumoral injection of the thermosensitive hydrogel containing paclitaxel was as efficacious as four intravenous injections of Taxol in inhibiting the growth of EMT-6 cancer cells in mice, but in a less toxic manner. Further histological analysis revealed that while the proportion of necrotic areas was similar for the C/GP/paclitaxel and the Taxol-treated tumors, a disparity between tumor-associated inflammatory cell populations may suggest differing anti-tumor mechanisms. PMID:14729080

  15. Preparation and characterization of amphiphilic calixarene nanoparticles as delivery carriers for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Wang, Yu; Han, Jin; Zhu, Hui-Dong; An, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Two types of amphoteric calix[n]arene carboxylic acid (CnCA) derivative, i.e., calix[6]arene hexa-carboxylic acid (C6HCA) and calix[8]arene octo-carboxylic acid (C8OCA), were synthesized by introducing acetoxyls into the hydroxyls of calix[n]arene (n=6, 8). C6HCA and C8OCA nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared successfully using the dialysis method. CnCA NPs had regular spherical shapes with an average diameter of 180-220?nm and possessed negative charges of greater than -30?mV. C6HCA and C8OCA NPs were stable in 4.5% bovine serum albumin solutions and buffers (pH 5-9), with a low critical aggregation concentration value of 5.7?mg·L(-1) and 4.0?mg·L(-1), respectively. C6HCA and C8OCA NPs exhibited good paclitaxel (PTX) loading capacity, with drug loading contents of 7.5% and 8.3%, respectively. The overall in vitro release behavior of PTX from the CnCA NPs was sustained, and C8OCA NPs had a slower release rate compared with C6HCA NPs. These favorable properties of CnCA NPs make them promising nanocarriers for tumor-targeted drug delivery. PMID:25757488

  16. Stable and efficient Paclitaxel nanoparticles for targeted glioblastoma therapy.

    PubMed

    Mu, Qingxin; Jeon, Mike; Hsiao, Meng-Hsuan; Patton, Victoria K; Wang, Kui; Press, Oliver W; Zhang, Miqin

    2015-06-01

    Development of efficient nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy remains a challenge. NPs are required to have high stability, uniform size, sufficient drug loading, targeting capability, and ability to overcome drug resistance. In this study, the development of a NP formulation that can meet all these challenging requirements for targeted glioblastoma multiform (GBM) therapy is reported. This multifunctional NP is composed of a polyethylene glycol-coated magnetic iron oxide NP conjugated with cyclodextrin and chlorotoxin (CTX) and loaded with fluorescein and paclitaxel (PTX) (IONP-PTX-CTX-FL). The physicochemical properties of the IONP-PTX-CTX-FL are characterized by transmission electron microscope, dynamic light scattering, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The cellular uptake of NPs is studied using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Cell viability and apoptosis are assessed with the Alamar Blue viability assay and flow cytometry, respectively. The IONP-PTX-CTX-FL had a uniform size of ?44 nm and high stability in cell culture medium. Importantly, the presence of CTX on NPs enhanced the uptake of the NPs by GBM cells and improved the efficacy of PTX in killing both GBM and GBM drug-resistant cells. The IONP-PTX-CTX-FL demonstrated its great potential for brain cancer therapy and may also be used to deliver PTX to treat other cancers. PMID:25761648

  17. Somatostatin receptor-mediated specific delivery of Paclitaxel prodrugs for efficient cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Huo, Meirong; Zhu, Qinnv; Wu, Qu; Yin, Tingjie; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    In this study, a novel PTX prodrug, octreotide(Phe)-polyethene glycol-paclitaxel [OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX], was successfully synthesized and used for targeted cancer therapy. A nontargeting conjugate, mPEG-PTX, was also synthesized and used as a control. Chemical structures of OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX and mPEG-PTX were confirmed using (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism. The drug contents in both the conjugates were 12.0% and 14.0%, respectively. Compared with the parent drug (PTX), OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX, and mPEG-PTX prodrugs showed a 20,000- and 30,000-fold increase in water solubility, respectively. PTX release from mPEG-PTX and OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX exhibited a pH-dependent profile. Moreover, compared with mPEG-PTX, OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX exhibited significantly stronger cytotoxicity against NCI-H446 cells (SSTR overexpression) but comparable cytotoxicity against WI-38 cells (no SSTR expression). Results of confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that the targeting prodrug labeled with fluorescence probe was selectively taken into tumor cells via SSTR-mediated endocytosis. In vivo investigation of prodrugs in nude mice bearing NCI-H446 cancer xenografts confirmed that OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX prodrug exhibited stronger antitumor efficacy and lower systemic toxicity than mPEG-PTX and commercial Taxol. These results suggested that OCT(Phe)-PEG-PTX is a promising anticancer drug delivery system for targeted cancer therapy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:2018-2028, 2015. PMID:25820241

  18. Bioresorbable copolymer of L-lactide and ?-caprolactone for controlled paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Musia?-Kulik, Monika; G?barowska, Katarzyna; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Pastusiak, Ma?gorzata; Janeczek, Henryk; Dobrzy?ski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Bioresorbable, aliphatic polyesters are known in medicine where serve as orthopedic devices (e.g., rods, pins and screws) or sutures and staples in wound closure. Moreover, such materials are extensively stud- ied as scaffolds--three-dimensional structures for tissue engineering but also drug delivery systems (DDS). The aim of this study was to determine the release profile of paclitaxel, one of the anti-inflammatory, antiprolifera- tive and anti-restenotic agent, from biocompatible copolymer of L-lactide and ?-caprolactone that seems to be very attractive especially for minimally invasive surgery due to its potential shape-memory property. The influ- ence of drug on copolymer hydrolytic degradation was also analyzed. Three types of matrices (3%, 5% of PTX and without drug) were prepared by solvent-casting method and degraded in vitro. The physicochemical changes of copolymer were analyzed by means of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gel per- meation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The amount of drug released into media was monitored with the use of high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Similar drug release pro- files were obtained for matrices with paclitaxel. The drug-containing matrices degraded slightly slower than drug free matrices, regardless PTX content. Results of this work may be helpful in designing new bioresorbable paclitaxel delivery system applied in anti-cancer therapy or drug-eluting stents technology. PMID:25745774

  19. Bioavailability enhancement of paclitaxel via a novel oral drug delivery system: paclitaxel-loaded glycyrrhizic acid micelles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fu-Heng; Zhang, Qing; Liang, Qian-Ying; Wang, Sheng-Qi; Zhao, Bo-Xin; Wang, Ya-Tian; Cai, Yun; Li, Guo-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX, taxol), a classical antitumor drug against a wide range of tumors, shows poor oral bioavailability. In order to improve the oral bioavailability of PTX, glycyrrhizic acid (GA) was used as the carrier in this study. This was the first report on the preparation, characterization and the pharmacokinetic study in rats of PTX-loaded GA micelles The PTX-loaded micelles, prepared with ultrasonic dispersion method, displayed small particle sizes and spherical shapes. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) thermograms indicated that PTX was entrapped in the GA micelles and existed as an amorphous state. The encapsulation efficiency was about 90%, and the drug loading rate could reach up to 7.90%. PTX-loaded GA micelles displayed a delayed drug release compared to Taxol in the in vitro release experiment. In pharmacokinetic study via oral administration, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0?24 h) of PTX-loaded GA micelles was about six times higher than that of Taxol (p < 0.05). The significant oral absorption enhancement of PTX from PTX-loaded GA micelles could be largely due to the increased absorption in jejunum and colon intestine. All these results suggested that GA would be a promising carrier for the oral delivery of PTX. PMID:25756651

  20. Nanoparticles for Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Chow, Gan-Moog

    Nanoparticles were synthesized and modified for target drug delivery. The research involved the aqueous synthesis of near infrared (NIR) sensitive Au-Au2S nanoparticles. An anti-cancer drug (cis-platin) ...

  1. Double layer paclitaxel delivery systems based on bioresorbable terpolymer with shape memory properties.

    PubMed

    Musia?-Kulik, Monika; Kasperczyk, Janusz; Smola, Anna; Dobrzy?ski, Piotr

    2014-04-25

    The growing interest in the bioresorbable polymers contributed to developing a number of commercially available controlled drug delivery systems. Due to a variety of drugs and their physicochemical properties, there is a necessity of choosing an appropriate drug carrier. Terpolymer with shape memory properties was used to obtain double layer matrices composed of drug free matrix and paclitaxel containing layer. The in vitro degradation and drug release study were conducted at 37 °C in PBS (pH 7.4). The investigated materials were characterized by GPC (gel permeation chromatography) and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry). HPLC (high-pressure liquid chromatography) was applied to analyze the amount of released paclitaxel. The main purpose of this work was to determine the usefulness of the studied terpolymer as an anti-restenotic drug vehicle. Based on the obtained results it was established that polymer's degradation proceeded regularly and provided even paclitaxel release profiles. Double layer systems allowed to modify the amount of released drug which may be considered while developing the self-expanding drug-eluting stents tailoring different clinical indications. PMID:24491529

  2. Facile preparation of paclitaxel loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles for enhanced antitumor efficacy by locoregional drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Puyuan; Liu, Qin; Li, Rutian; Wang, Jing; Zhen, Xu; Yue, Guofeng; Wang, Huiyu; Cui, Fangbo; Wu, Fenglei; Yang, Mi; Qian, Xiaoping; Yu, Lixia; Jiang, Xiqun; Liu, Baorui

    2013-12-11

    Non-toxic, safe materials and preparation methods are among the most important factors when designing nanoparticles (NPs) for future clinical application. Here we report a novel and facile method encapsulating anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) into silk fibroin (SF), a biocompatible and biodegradable natural polymer, without adding any toxic organic solvents, surfactants or other toxic agents. The paclitaxel loaded silk fibroin nanoparticles (PTX-SF-NPs) with a diameter of 130 nm were formed in an aqueous solution at room temperature by self-assembling of SF protein, which demonstrated mainly silk I conformation in the NPs. In cellular uptake experiments, coumarin-6 loaded SF NPs were taken up efficiently by two human gastric cancer cell lines BGC-823 and SGC-7901. In vitro cytotoxicity studies demonstrated that PTX kept its pharmacological activity when incorporating into PTX-SF-NPs, while SF showed no cytotoxicity to cells. The in vivo antitumor effects of PTX-SF-NPs were evaluated on gastric cancer nude mice exnograft model. We found that locoregional delivery of PTX-SF-NPs demonstrated superior antitumor efficacy by delaying tumor growth and reducing tumor weights compared with systemic administration. Furthermore, the organs of mice in NP treated groups didn't show obvious toxicity, indicating the in vivo safety of SF NPs. These results suggest that SF NPs are promising drug delivery carriers, and locoregional delivery of SF NPs could be a potential future clinical cancer treatment regimen. PMID:24274601

  3. Polymer nanoparticles--a novel strategy for administration of Paclitaxel in cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Deepa, G; Ashwanikumar, N; Pillai, J J; Kumar, G S V

    2012-01-01

    The main challenge encountered while treating using Paclitaxel (PTX) is its poor solubility in aqueous solutions. The cremophor used in the formulation can cause various side effects such as hypersensitivity, myelosuppression and neurotoxicity and also leads to non-specific distribution in tumor and normal tissues. Since the structure of Paclitaxel does not possess a functional group, it is not easy to manipulate to enhance the solubility. Such limitations can be overcome by delivering Paclitaxel with the aid of drug delivery systems such as polymeric micelles, nanoparticles, hydrogels and liposomes. The review discusses various approaches of Paclitaxel delivery via polymeric nanoparticles. It focuses on the passive and active targeting of Paclitaxel. PMID:22834822

  4. Design, Synthesis and Bio-evaluation of an EphA2-based Targeted Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Barile, Elisa; Wang, Si; Das, Swadesh K.; Noberini, Roberta; Dahl, Russell; Stebbins, John L.; Pasquale, Elena B.; Fisher, Paul B.; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    We recently described a new targeted delivery system based on specific EphA2 receptor targeting peptides conjugated with the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. In this manuscript we investigate the chemical determinants responsible for the stability and degradation of these agents in plasma. Introducing modifications in both the peptide and the linker between the peptide and paclitaxel, resulted in drug conjugates that are both long-lived in rat plasma and that markedly reduced tumor size in a prostate cancer xenograft model compared to paclitaxel alone treatment. These studies identify critical rate-limiting degradation sites on the peptide-drug conjugates, enabling the design of agents with increased stability and efficacy. These results provide support for our central hypothesis that peptide-drug conjugates targeting the EphA2 receptor represent an innovative and potentially effective strategy to selectively deliver cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. PMID:24677792

  5. Delivery of baicalein and paclitaxel using self-assembled nanoparticles: synergistic antitumor effect in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Xi, Mei; Duan, Xuezhong; Wang, Yong; Kong, Fansheng

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Combination anticancer therapy is promising to generate synergistic anticancer effects to maximize the treatment effect and overcome multidrug resistance. The aim of the study reported here was to develop multifunctional, dual-ligand, modified, self-assembled nanoparticles (NPs) for the combination delivery of baicalein (BCL) and paclitaxel (PTX) prodrugs. Methods Prodrug of PTX and prodrug of BCL, containing dual-targeted ligands of folate (FA) and hyaluronic acid (HA), were synthesized. Multifunctional self-assembled NPs for combination delivery of PTX prodrug and BCL prodrug (PTX-BCL) were prepared and the synergistic antitumor effect was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro transfection efficiency of the novel modified vectors was evaluated in human lung cancer A549 cells and drug-resistant lung cancer A549/PTX cells. The in vivo antitumor efficiency and systemic toxicity of different formulations were further investigated in mice bearing A549/PTX drug-resistant human lung cancer xenografts. Results The size of the PTX-BCL NPs was approximately 90 nm, with a positive zeta potential of +3.3. The PTX-BCL NPs displayed remarkably better antitumor activity over a wide range of drug concentrations, and showed an obvious synergism effect with CI50 values of 0.707 and 0.513, indicating that double-ligand modification and the co-delivery of PTX and BCL prodrugs with self-assembled NPs had remarkable superiority over other formulations. Conclusion The prepared PTX-BCL NP drug-delivery system was proven efficient by its targeting of drug-resistant human lung cancer cells and delivering of BCL and PTX prodrugs. Enhanced synergistic anticancer effects were achieved by PTX-BCL NPs, and multidrug resistance of PTX was overcome by this promising targeted nanomedicine.

  6. Excipient effects on in vitro cytotoxicity of a novel paclitaxel self-emulsifying drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Gursoy, Neslihan; Garrigue, Jean-Sebastien; Razafindratsita, Alain; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2003-12-01

    Paclitaxel is a potent chemotherapeutic agent currently administered intravenously in polyoxyethylated castor oil (Cremophor EL) and dehydrated ethanol (1:1) for the treatment of solid tumors. The objective of this work was to develop a novel self-emulsifying drug delivery system (SEDDS) devoid of cremophor for the i.v./oral delivery of paclitaxel and to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity of the combined excipients. The SEDDS formulations were characterized in terms of droplet size using a ternary phase diagram. The Caco-2 cell line was used to monitor the cytotoxicity of the excipients. Cell viability was determined colorimetrically at 570 nm utilizing the MTT assay. The distribution of the formulations on the phase diagram indicated the presence of macroemulsions ( approximately 1 microm), submicron emulsions (50-200 nm), and microemulsions (below 10 nm). An increase in the sodium deoxycholate excipient content led to an increase in physical stability but caused more chemical degradation of the drug and more cytotoxicity. The drug in the novel SEDDS was chemically stable for at least 1 year when kept as a two-part formulation. The drug loading was increased by approximately fivefold compared to the marketed i.v. formulation; the excipients presented a significantly reduced cytotoxicity and led to a stable microemulsion. PMID:14603486

  7. Dual Targeting Biomimetic Liposomes for Paclitaxel/DNA Combination Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guo-Xia; Fang, Gui-Qing; Xu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Combinations of chemotherapeutic drugs with nucleic acid has shown great promise in cancer therapy. In the present study, paclitaxel (PTX) and DNA were co-loaded in the hyaluronic acid (HA) and folate (FA)-modified liposomes (HA/FA/PPD), to obtain the dual targeting biomimetic nanovector. The prepared HA/FA/PPD exhibited nanosized structure and narrow size distributions (247.4 ± 4.2 nm) with appropriate negative charge of ?25.40 ± 2.7 mV. HA/FA/PD (PTX free HA/FA/PPD) showed almost no toxicity on murine malignant melanoma cell line (B16) and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) (higher than 80% cell viability), demonstrating the safety of the blank nanovector. In comparison with the FA-modified PTX/DNA co-loaded liposomes (FA/PPD), HA/FA/PPD showed significant superiority in protecting the nanoparticles from aggregation in the presence of plasma and degradation by DNase I. Moreover, HA/FA/PPD could also significantly improve the transfection efficiency and cellular internalization rates on B16 cells comparing to that of FA/PPD (p < 0.05) and PPD (p < 0.01), demonstrating the great advantages of dual targeting properties. Furthermore, fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry results showed that PTX and DNA could be effectively co-delivered into the same tumor cell via HA/FA/PPD, contributing to PTX/DNA combination cancer treatment. In conclusion, the obtained HA/FA/PPD in the study could effectively target tumor cells, enhance transfection efficiency and subsequently achieve the co-delivery of PTX and DNA, displaying great potential for optimal combination therapy. PMID:25177862

  8. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of vitamin E TPGS-emulsified PLGA nanoparticles for delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanbin; Yu, Bo; Wang, Guoying; Wu, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xiaomin; Chen, Yanmin; Tang, Suoqing; Yuan, Yuan; Lee, Robert J; Teng, Lesheng; Xu, Shun

    2014-11-01

    Nanoparticles are efficient delivery vehicles for cancer therapy such as paclitaxel (PTX). In this study, we formulated PTX into PLGA polymeric nanoparticles. Vitamin E TPGS was used as an emulsifier to stabilize the nanoparticle formulation. PTX was encapsulated in TPGS-emulsified polymeric nanoparticles (TENPs) by a nanoprecipitation method in ethanol-water system. The resultant PTX-TENPs showed a very uniform particle size (?100 nm) and high drug encapsulation (>80%). The cytotoxicity of PTX-TENPs was examined in A549 lung cancer cell line. Preferential tumor accumulation of TENPs was observed in the A549 lung cancer xenograft model. Tumor growth was significantly inhibited by intravenous injection of PTX-TENPs. Our results suggested that the modified nanoprecipitation method holds great potential for the fabrication of the PTX loaded polymeric nanoparticles. TPGS can be used in the manufacture of polymeric nanoparticles for the controlled release of PTX and other anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25456995

  9. Paclitaxel-Loaded Polymeric Micelles Modified with MCF-7 Cell-Specific Phage Protein: Enhanced Binding to Target Cancer Cells and Increased Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Petrenko, Valery A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micelles are used as pharmaceutical carriers to increase solubility and bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs. Different ligands are used to prepare targeted polymeric micelles. Earlier, we developed the method for use of specific landscape phage fusion coat proteins as targeted delivery ligands and demonstrated the efficiency of this approach with doxorubicin-loaded PEGylated liposomes. Here, we describe a MCF-7 cell-specific micellar formulation self-assembled from the mixture of the micelle-forming amphiphilic polyethylene glycol-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) conjugate, MCF-7-specific landscape phage fusion coat protein, and the hydrophobic drug paclitaxel. These micelles demonstrated a very low CMC value and specific binding to target cells. Using an in vitro co-culture model, FACS analysis, and fluorescence microscopy we showed that MCF-7 targeted phage micelles preferential bound to target cells compared to non-target cells. As a result, targeted paclitaxel-loaded phage micelles demonstrated a significantly higher cytotoxicity towards target MCF-7 cells than free drug or non-targeted micelle formulations, but failed to show such a differential toxicity towards non-target C166 cells. Overall, cancer cell-specific phage proteins identified from phage display peptide libraries can serve as targeting ligands (“substitute antibody”) for polymeric micelle-based pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:20518562

  10. Paclitaxel-Loaded, Folic-Acid-Targeted and TAT-Peptide-Conjugated Polymeric Liposomes: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peiqi Zhao; Hanjie Wang; Man Yu; Shuzhen Cao; Fei Zhang; Jin Chang; Ruifang Niu

    2010-01-01

    Objective  Folic acid and TAT peptide were conjugated on the octadecyl-quaternized, lysine-modified chitosan-cholesterol polymeric liposomes\\u000a (FA-TATp-PLs) to investigate their potential feasibility for tumor-targeted drug delivery.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  FA-TATp-PLs encapsulating paclitaxel or calcein were synthesized and characterized. Cellular uptake of PLs, FA-PLs, TATp-PLs\\u000a and FA-TATp-PLs was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in folate receptor (FR)-positive KB nasopharyngeal\\u000a epidermal carcinoma cells and FR-deficient

  11. O -(2-[ 18 F]fluoroethyl)- l -tyrosine PET for monitoring the effects of convection-enhanced delivery of paclitaxel in patients with recurrent glioblastoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Pöpperl; R. Goldbrunner; F. J. Gildehaus; F. W. Kreth; P. Tanner; M. Holtmannspötter; J. C. Tonn; K. Tatsch

    2005-01-01

    Purpose  Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of paclitaxel is a new locoregional approach for patients with recurrent glioblastoma. The aim of this study was to evaluate O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) positron emission tomography (PET) in monitoring the effects of this type of direct drug delivery.Methods  Eight patients with recurrent glioblastoma underwent CED of paclitaxel, which was infused over stereotactically placed catheters into the tumour. FET PET

  12. Multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and tetrandrine for overcoming multidrug resistance.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lejiao; Li, Zhenyu; Shen, Jingyi; Zheng, Dandan; Tian, Xiaona; Guo, Hejian; Chang, Ping

    2015-07-15

    The objective of the study is to fabricate multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticles for achieving co-delivery of conventional antitumor drug paclitaxel (PTX) and the multidrug resistance reversal agent tetrandrine (TET) expecting to overcome multidrug resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells. The nanoparticles were facile to prepare by self-assemble in situ drug loading approach. Namely, PTX and TET were solubilized in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micelles and simultaneously silica resources hydrolyze and condense to form nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles, denoted as PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN, exhibited pH-responsive release property with more easily released in the weak acidic environment. Studies on cellular uptake of nanoparticles demonstrated TET could markedly increase intracellular accumulation of nanoparticles. Furthermore, the PTX/TET-CTAB@MSN suppressed tumor cells growth more efficiently than only delivery of PTX (PTX-CTAB@MSN) or the free PTX. Moreover, the nanoparticle loading drugs with a PTX/TET molar ratio of 4.4:1 completely reversed the resistance of MCF-7/ADR cells to PTX and the resistance reversion index was 72.3. Mechanism research showed that both TET and CTAB could arrest MCF-7/ADR cells at G1 phase; and besides PTX arrested cells at G2 phase. This nanocarrier might have important potential in clinical implications for co-delivery of multiple drugs to overcome MDR. PMID:25956050

  13. Well-defined, size-tunable, multi-functional micelles for efficient paclitaxel delivery for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Juntao; Xiao, Kai; Li, Yuanpei; Lee, Joyce S.; Shi, Lifang; Tan, Yih-Horng; Xing, Li; Cheng, R. Holland; Liu, Gang-Yu; Lam, Kit S.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a well-defined and biocompatible amphiphilic telodendrimer system (PEG-b-dendritic oligo-cholic acid) which can self-assemble into multifunctional micelles in aqueous solution for efficient delivery of hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel. In this telodendrimer system, cholic acid is essential for the formation of stable micelles with high drug loading capacity, owing to its facial amphiphilicity. A series of telodendrimers with variable length of PEG chain and number of cholic acid in the dendritic blocks were synthesized. The structure and molecular weight of each of these telodendrimers were characterized, and their critical micellization concentration (CMC), drug-loading properties, particle sizes and cytotoxicity were examined and evaluated for further optimization for anticancer drug delivery. The sizes of the micelles, with and without paclitaxel loading, could be tuned from 11.5 to 21 nm and from 15 to 141 nm, respectively. Optical imaging studies in xenograft models demonstrated preferential uptakes of the smaller paclitaxel-loaded micelles (17–60 nm) by the tumor, and the larger micelles (150 nm) by the liver and lung. The toxicity and anti-tumor efficacy profiles of these paclitaxel-loaded micelles in xenograft models were found to be superior to those of Taxol® and Abraxane®. PMID:20536174

  14. Effective Drug Delivery, in vitro and in vivo, By Carbon-Based Nanovectors Non-Covalently Loaded With Unmodified Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Jacob M.; Leonard, Ashley D.; Pham, Tam T.; Sano, Daisuke; Marcano, Daniela C.; Yan, Shayou; Fiorentino, Stefania; Milas, Zvonimir L.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.; Katherine Price, B.; Lucente-Schultz, Rebecca M.; Wen, XiaoXia; Gabriela Raso, M.; Craig, Suzanne L.; Tran, Hai T.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Tour, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Many new drugs have low aqueous solubility and high therapeutic efficacy. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a classic example of this type of compound. Here we show that extremely small (<40 nm) hydrophilic carbon clusters (HCCs) that are PEGylated (PEG-HCCs) are effective drug delivery vehicles when simply mixed with paclitaxel. This formulation of PTX sequestered in PEG-HCCs (PTX/PEG-HCCs) is stable for at least twenty weeks. The PTX/PEG-HCCs formulation was as effective as PTX in a clinical formulation in reducing tumor volumes in an orthotopic murine model of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Preliminary toxicity and biodistribution studies suggest that the PEG-HCCs are not acutely toxic and, like many other nanomaterials, are primarily accumulated in the liver and spleen. This work demonstrates that carbon nanomaterials are effective drug delivery vehicles in vivo when non-covalently loaded with an unmodified drug. PMID:20681596

  15. Aptamers for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Partha; White, Rebekah R.

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers are a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that form specific three-dimensional structures that are dictated by their sequences. They are typically generated by an iterative screening process of complex nucleic acid libraries employing a process termed Systemic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment (SELEX). SELEX has traditionally been performed using purified proteins, and cell surface receptors may be challenging to purify in their properly folded and modified conformations. Therefore, relatively few aptamers have been generated that bind cell surface receptors. However, improvements in recombinant fusion protein technology have increased the availability of receptor extracellular domains as purified protein targets, and the development of cell-based selection techniques has allowed selection against surface proteins in their native configuration on the cell surface. With cell-based selection, a specific protein target is not always chosen, but selection is performed against a target cell type with the goal of letting the aptamer choose the target. Several studies have demonstrated that aptamers that bind cell surface receptors may have functions other than just blocking receptor-ligand interactions. All cell surface proteins cycle intracellularly to some extent, and many surface receptors are actively internalized in response to ligand binding. Therefore, aptamers that bind cell surface receptors have been exploited for the delivery of a variety of cargoes into cells. This review focuses on recent progress and current challenges in the field of aptamer-mediated delivery.

  16. Layer-by-layer assembly of chitosan stabilized multilayered liposomes for paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meng-Xia; Li, Bai-Kun; Yin, Deng-Ke; Liang, Jie; Li, Shan-Shan; Peng, Dai-Yin

    2014-10-13

    Paclitaxel (PTX) loaded multilayered liposomes were prepared using layer-by-layer assembly in an effort to improve the stabilization of the liposomal compositions for PTX delivery. Stearyl amine was used to provide positive charge to the PTX-liposomes, and subsequently coated with anionic polyacrylic acid (PAA) followed by cationic chitosan. Various process variables were optimized and the optimum formulation was found to have particle size of 215 ± 17 nm, zeta potential of +27.9 ± 3.4 mV and encapsulation efficiency of 70.93 ± 2.39%. The lyophilized chitosan-PAA-PTX-liposomes formulation was stable in simulated gastrointestinal fluids and at different environmental conditions (4 °C and 25 °C). In vitro drug release experiments demonstrated that chitosan-PAA-PTX-liposomes formulation exhibited obvious sustained release behaviors compared to PTX-liposomes. Furthermore, chitosan-PAA-PTX-liposomes formulation revealed enhanced PTX induced cytotoxicity in human cervical cancer cell culture experiments compared to PTX-liposomes. In conclusion, the approach presented herein will provide a promising solution for PTX delivery. PMID:25037355

  17. Formulation and pharmacokinetic evaluation of a paclitaxel nanosuspension for intravenous delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming; Wang, Liyao; Xu, Yuanlong; Cheng, Xiaodan; Wei, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a diterpenoid isolated from Taxus brevifolia. It is effective for various cancers, especially ovarian and breast cancer. Due to its aqueous insolubility, it is administered dissolved in ethanol and Cremophor® EL (BASF, Ludwigshafen, Germany), which can cause serious allergic reactions. In order to eliminate Cremophor EL, paclitaxel was formulated as a nanosuspension by high-pressure homogenization. The nanosuspension was lyophilized to obtain the dry paclitaxel nanoparticles (average size, 214.4 ± 15.03 nm), which enhanced both the physical and chemical stability of paclitaxel nanoparticles. Paclitaxel dissolution was also enhanced by the nanosuspension. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the crystallinity of paclitaxel was preserved during the high-pressure homogenization process. The pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of paclitaxel were compared after intravenous administration of paclitaxel nanosuspension and paclitaxel injection. In rat plasma, paclitaxel nanosuspension exhibited a significantly (P < 0.01) reduced area under the concentration curve (AUC)0–? (20.343 ± 9.119 ?g · h · mL?1 vs 5.196 ± 1.426 ?g · h · mL?1), greater clearance (2.050 ± 0.616 L · kg?1 · h?1 vs 0.556 ± 0.190 L · kg?1 · h?1), and shorter elimination half-life (5.646 ± 2.941 vs 3.774 ± 1.352 hours) compared with the paclitaxel solution. In contrast, the paclitaxel nanosuspension resulted in a significantly greater AUC0–? in liver, lung, and spleen (all P < 0.01), but not in heart or kidney. PMID:21796250

  18. THE USE OF NANOPARTICLE-MEDIATED TARGETED GENE SILENCING AND DRUG DELIVERY TO OVERCOME TUMOR DRUG RESISTANCE

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Yogesh; Swaminathan, Suresh; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Ma, Linan; Panyam, Jayanth

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) enables cancer cells to develop resistance to multiple anticancer drugs. Functional inhibitors of P-gp have shown promising efficacy in early clinical trials, but their long-term safety is yet to be established. A novel approach to overcome drug resistance is to use siRNA-mediated RNA interference to silence the expression of the efflux transporter. Because P-gp plays an important role in the physiological regulation of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds in the body, it is important to deliver P-gp targeted siRNA and anticancer drug specifically to tumor cells. Further, for optimal synergy, both the drug and siRNA may need to be temporally colocalized in the tumor cells. In the current study, we investigated the effectiveness of simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel, along with P-gp targeted siRNA, using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles to overcome tumor drug resistance. Nanoparticles were surface functionalized with biotin for active tumor targeting. Dual agent nanoparticles encapsulating the combination of paclitaxel and P-gp targeted siRNA showed significantly higher cytotoxicity in vitro than nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel alone. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent nanoparticles could be correlated with effective silencing of the MDR1 gene that encodes for P-gp and with increased accumulation of paclitaxel in drug-resistant tumor cells. In vivo studies in a mouse model of drug-resistant tumor demonstrated significantly greater inhibition of tumor growth following treatment with biotin-functionalized nanoparticles encapsulating both paclitaxel and P-gp targeted siRNA at a paclitaxel dose that was ineffective in the absence of gene silencing. These results suggest that that the combination of P-gp gene silencing and cytotoxic drug delivery using targeted nanoparticles can overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:19800114

  19. Co-delivery of hydrophobic paclitaxel and hydrophilic AURKA specific siRNA by redox-sensitive micelles for effective treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tingjie; Wang, Lei; Yin, Lifang; Zhou, Jianping; Huo, Meirong

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a novel redox-sensitive micellar system constructed from a hyaluronic acid-based amphiphilic conjugate (HA-ss-(OA-g-bPEI), HSOP) was successfully developed for tumor-targeted co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and AURKA specific siRNA (si-AURKA). HSOP exhibited excellent loading capacities for both PTX and siRNA with adjustable dosing ratios and desirable redox-sensitivity independently verified by morphological changes of micelles alongside in vitro release of both drugs in different reducing environments. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy analysis confirmed that HSOP micelles were capable of simultaneously delivering PTX and siRNA into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells via HA-receptor mediated endocytosis followed by rapid transport of cargoes into the cytosol. Successful delivery and transport amplified the synergistic effects between the drugs while leading to substantially greater antitumor efficacy when compared with single drug-loaded micelles and non-sensitive co-loaded micelles. In vivo investigation demonstrated that HSOP micelles could effectively accumulate in tumor sites and possessed the greatest antitumor efficacy over non-sensitive co-delivery control and redox-sensitive single-drug controls. These findings indicated that redox-sensitive HSOP co-delivery system holds great promise for combined drug/gene treatment for targeted cancer therapy. PMID:25996409

  20. Controlled preparation and antitumor efficacy of vitamin E TPGS-functionalized PLGA nanoparticles for delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Yu, Bo; Wu, Yuequn; Huang, Baolin; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Chang Sheng

    2013-03-25

    Vitamin E TPGS-functionalized polymeric nanoparticles have been developed as a promising drug delivery platform in recent years. Obtaining reproducible monodisperse TPGS/polymeric nanoparticles with high encapsulation efficiency (EE%) still remains a big challenge. In this study, an inverse-phase nanoprecipitation method was developed to synthesize TPGS-functionalized PLGA nanoparticles (TPNs) for controlled release of paclitaxel (PTX). To take advantages of lipids, a part of TPGS in the TPNs was replaced by lipids. The results showed that with weight ratio of TPGS-to-PLGA of 2-3 and a molar replacement of lecithin ratio of 30%, the PTX-loaded TPNs (PTPNs) and PTX-loaded lipid-containing TPNs (PLTPNs) exhibited controllable and nearly uniform size of 130-150nm and EE% of over 80%. Compared to Taxol(®), both the PTPNs and PLTPNs significantly increased the intracellular uptake and exerted strong inhibitory effect on human lung cancer A549 model cells. Furthermore, a selective accumulation to tumor site and significant antitumor efficacy of TPNs in the A549 lung cancer xenografted nude mice were observed by intravenous administration, especially for the PTPNs group. Our data suggested that the inverse-phase nanoprecipitation method holds great potential for the fabrication of the paclitaxel-loaded TPNs and the TPNs prepared here is a promising controllable delivery system for paclitaxel. PMID:23402977

  1. Tumor targeting by conjugation of DHA to paclitaxel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. O Bradley; C. S Swindell; F. H Anthony; P. A Witman; P Devanesan; N. L Webb; S. D Baker; A. C Wolff; R. C Donehower

    2001-01-01

    Targeting an anti-cancer drug to tumors should increase the Area Under the drug concentration–time Curve (AUC) in tumors while decreasing the AUC in normal cells and should therefore increase the therapeutic index of that drug. Anti-tumor drugs typically have half-lives far shorter than the cell cycle transit times of most tumor cells. Tumor targeting, with concomitant long tumor exposure times,

  2. Thermosensitive micelles-hydrogel hybrid system based on poloxamer 407 for localized delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Ju, Caoyun; Sun, Juan; Zi, Peng; Jin, Xiang; Zhang, Can

    2013-08-01

    A thermosensitive micelles-hydrogel hybrid system based on Poloxamer 407 (P407) was prepared to resolve the fast erosion and low loading capability of lipophilic drug of P407 gels for local chemotherapy. Different amounts of glutaraldehyde (GA) were applied to generate cross-linked networks with carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) interpenetrated in P407 gels, in which paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded N-octyl-O-sulfate chitosan micelles (PTX-M) were dispersed uniformly. The in vitro characteristics of CMCS-modified P407 gels (PTX-M-MG) were performed by examining the viscosity, swelling ratio, mechanical property, and drug release, while the in vivo evaluation included tissue distribution and anticancer efficacy through intratumoral administration in hepatoma solidity cell (Heps) tumor-bearing mice. The results showed that PTX-M-MG containing 0.05% (w/v) GA possessed lower viscosity, higher swelling ratio, stronger mechanical property, and longer term drug release, in which the loading efficiency of PTX was enlarged by the introduction of PTX-M. Moreover, PTX-M-MG revealed a prolonged retention at tumor sites, lasting for 20 days, and a superior tumor inhibition rate (64.27%) with reduced toxicity compared with Taxol(®) , PTX-M, and PTX-M loaded unmodified P407 gels (PTX-M-P407). It can be concluded that PTX-M-MG is a promising local delivery system for hydrophobic drug in cancer therapy, providing both improved efficacy and relieved side effects. PMID:23839931

  3. Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles for the Treatment of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shufang; Liu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique to facilitate the delivery of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. However, the process typically uses non-specific microbubbles, leading to low tumor-to-normal tissue uptake ratio and adverse side effects. In this study, we synthesized the LHRH receptor targeted and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (TPLMBs) for tumor-specific binding and enhanced therapeutic effect at the tumor site. An ovarian cancer xenograft model was established by injecting A2780/DDP cells intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice. Microscopic imaging of tumor sections after intraperitoneal injection of TPLMBs showed effective binding of the microbubbles with cancer cells. Ultrasound mediated destruction of the intraperitoneally injected TPLMBs yielded a superior therapeutic outcome in comparison with other treatment options. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue further confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediated intraperitoneal administration of the targeted drug-loaded microbubbles may be a useful method for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24237050

  4. Intratumoral delivery of paclitaxel using a thermosensitive hydrogel in human tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Joo-Ho; Kim, Kwang-Suck; Na, Kun; Song, Soo-Chang; Lee, Jaehwi; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Poly(organophosphazene), a novel thermosensitive hydrogel, is an injectable drug delivery system (DDS) that transforms from sol to gel at body temperature. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a mitotic inhibitor used in the treatment of various solid tumors. Due to its poor solubility in water and efflux systems in the gastrointestinal tract, PTX is a good candidate for local DDS. Here, we evaluated the penetration kinetics of PTX released from the PTX-poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel mixture in multicellular layers (MCLs) of human cancer cells. We also investigated the tumor pharmacokinetics of PTX (60 mg/kg) when administered as an intratumoral injection using poly(organophosphazene) in mice with human tumor xenografts. When PTX was formulated at 0.6 % w/w into a 10 % w/w hydrogel, the in vitro and in vivo release were found to be 40 and 90 % of the dose, respectively, in a sustained manner over 4 weeks. Exposure of MCLs to PTX-hydrogel showed time-dependent drug penetration and accumulation. In mice, the hydrogel mass was well retained over 6 weeks, and the PTX concentration in the tumor tissue was maximal at 14 days, which rapidly decreased and coincided with rebound tumor growth after 14 days of suppression. These data indicate that PTX-hydrogel should be intratumorally injected every 14 days, or drug release duration should be prolonged in order to achieve a long-term antitumor effect. Overall, poly(organophosphazene) represents a novel thermosensitive DDS for intratumoral delivery of PTX, which can accommodate a large dose of the drug in addition to reducing its systemic exposure by restricting biodistribution to tumor tissue alone. PMID:23371803

  5. Multifunctional hierarchically assembled nanostructures as complex stage-wise dual-delivery systems for coincidental yet differential trafficking of siRNA and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Shrestha, Ritu; Clark, Corrie; Taylor, Sara; Leonard, Jeffrey; Wooley, Karen L

    2013-05-01

    Development of multifunctional nanostructures that can be tuned to codeliver multiple drugs and diagnostic agents to diseased tissues is of great importance. Hierarchically assembled theranostic (HAT) nanostructures based on anionic cylindrical shell cross-linked nanoparticles and cationic shell cross-linked knedel-like nanoparticles (cSCKs) have recently been developed by our group to deliver siRNA intracellularly and to undergo radiolabeling. In the current study, paclitaxel, a hydrophobic anticancer drug, and siRNA have been successfully loaded into the cylindrical and spherical components of the hierarchical assemblies, respectively. Cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and intracellular delivery mechanism of the HAT nanostructures and their individual components have been investigated. Decoration of nanoparticles with F3-tumor homing peptide was shown to enhance the selective cellular uptake of the spherical particles, whereas the HAT nanoassemblies underwent an interesting disassembly process in contact with either OVCAR-3 or RAW 264.7 cell lines. The HAT nanostructures were found to "stick" to the cell membrane and "trigger" the release of spherical cSCKs templated onto their surfaces intracellularly, while retaining the cylindrical part on the cell surface. Combination of paclitaxel and cell-death siRNA (siRNA that induces cell death) into the HAT nanostructures resulted in greater reduction in cell viability than siRNA complexed with Lipofectamine and the assemblies loaded with the individual drugs. In addition, a shape-dependent immunotoxicity was observed for both spherical and cylindrical nanoparticles with the latter being highly immunotoxic. Supramolecular assembly of the two nanoparticles into the HAT nanostructures significantly reduced the immunotoxicity of both cSCKs and cylinders. HAT nanostructures decorated with targeting moieties, loaded with nucleic acids, hydrophobic drugs, radiolabels, and fluorophores, with control over their toxicity, immunotoxicity, and intracellular delivery might have great potential for biomedical delivery applications. PMID:23574430

  6. Poly-cyclodextrin and poly-paclitaxel nano-assembly for anticancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namgung, Ran; Mi Lee, Yeong; Kim, Jihoon; Jang, Yuna; Lee, Byung-Heon; Kim, In-San; Sokkar, Pandian; Rhee, Young Min; Hoffman, Allan S.; Kim, Won Jong

    2014-05-01

    Effective anticancer therapy can be achieved by designing a targeted drug-delivery system with high stability during circulation and efficient uptake by the target tumour cancer cells. We report here a novel nano-assembled drug-delivery system, formed by multivalent host-guest interactions between a polymer-cyclodextrin conjugate and a polymer-paclitaxel conjugate. The multivalent inclusion complexes confer high stability to the nano-assembly, which efficiently delivers paclitaxel into the targeted cancer cells via both passive and active targeting mechanisms. The ester linkages between paclitaxel and the polymer backbone permit efficient release of paclitaxel within the cell by degradation. This novel targeted nano-assembly exhibits significant antitumour activity in a mouse tumour model. The strategy established in this study also provides knowledge for the development of advanced anticancer drug delivery.

  7. Integrin-assisted drug delivery of nano-scaled polymer therapeutics bearing paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Eldar-Boock, Anat; Miller, Keren; Sanchis, Joaquin; Lupu, Ruth; Vicent, María J.; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a prominent role in cancer progression. Anti-angiogenic therapy therefore, either alone or in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapy, offers a promising therapeutic approach. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a widely-used potent cytotoxic drug that also exhibits anti-angiogenic effects at low doses. However, its use, at its full potential, is limited by severe side effects. Here we designed and synthesized a targeted conjugate of PTX, a polymer and an integrin-targeted moiety resulting in a polyglutamic acid (PGA)-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)2] nano-scaled conjugate. Polymer conjugation converted PTX to a macromolecule, which passively targets the tumor tissue exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention effect, while extravasating via the leaky tumor neovasculature. The cyclic RGD peptidomimetic enhanced the effects previously seen for PGA-PTX alone, utilizing the additional active targeting to the ?v?3 integrin overexpressed on tumor endothelial and epithelial cells. This strategy is particularly valuable when tumors are well-vascularized, but they present poor vascular permeability. We show that PGA is enzymatically-degradable leading to PTX release under lysosomal acidic pH. PGA-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)2] inhibited the growth of proliferating ?v?3-expressing endothelial cells and several cancer cells. We also showed that PGA-PTX-E-[c(RGDfK)2] blocked endothelial cells migration towards vascular endothelial growth factor; blocked capillary-like tube formation; and inhibited endothelial cells attachment to fibrinogen. Orthotopic studies in mice demonstrated preferential tumor accumulation of the RGD-bearing conjugate, leading to enhanced antitumor efficacy and a marked decrease in toxicity as compared with free PTX-treated mice. PMID:21376390

  8. Aptamer-targeted Antigen Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wengerter, Brian C; Katakowski, Joseph A; Rosenberg, Jacob M; Park, Chae Gyu; Almo, Steven C; Palliser, Deborah; Levy, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapeutic vaccines often require activation of T cell-mediated immunity. Robust T cell activation, including CD8 T cell responses, can be achieved using antibodies or antibody fragments to direct antigens of interest to professional antigen presenting cells. This approach represents an important advance in enhancing vaccine efficacy. Nucleic acid aptamers present a promising alternative to protein-based targeting approaches. We have selected aptamers that specifically bind the murine receptor, DEC205, a C-type lectin expressed predominantly on the surface of CD8?+ dendritic cells (DCs) that has been shown to be efficient at facilitating antigen crosspresentation and subsequent CD8+ T cell activation. Using a minimized aptamer conjugated to the model antigen ovalbumin (OVA), DEC205-targeted antigen crosspresentation was verified in vitro and in vivo by proliferation and cytokine production by primary murine CD8+ T cells expressing a T cell receptor specific for the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I-restricted OVA257–264 peptide SIINFEKL. Compared with a nonspecific ribonucleic acid (RNA) of similar length, DEC205 aptamer-OVA-mediated antigen delivery stimulated strong proliferation and production of interferon (IFN)-? and interleukin (IL)-2. The immune responses elicited by aptamer-OVA conjugates were sufficient to inhibit the growth of established OVA-expressing B16 tumor cells. Our results demonstrate a new application of aptamer technology for the development of effective T cell-mediated vaccines. PMID:24682172

  9. Specific tumor delivery of paclitaxel using glycolipid-like polymer micelles containing gold nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    You, Jian; Wang, Zuhua; Du, Yongzhong; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Peizun; Zhou, Jialin; Liu, Fei; Li, Chun; Hu, Fuqiang

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult for most of drug delivery system to really display a temporal and spatial release of entrapped drug once the systems are iv administrated. We hypothesized that the photothermal effect, mediated by a near-infrared (NIR) laser and hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS), can modulate paclitaxel (PTX) release from polymer micelles, and further result in the enhanced antitumor activity of the micelles. We loaded PTX and HAuNS, which display strong plasmon absorption in the NIR region, into glycolipid-like polymer micelles with an excellent cell internalization capability. The surface of the micelles was conjugated successfully with a peptide, which has the specific-binding with EphB4, a member of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases overexpressed on cell membrane of numerous tumors, to increase the delivery of PTX into tumor cells. Rapid and repetitive drug release from our polymer (HP-TCS) micelles could be readily achieved upon NIR laser irradiation. Our data demonstrated the specific-delivery of HPTCS micelles into positive-EphB4 tumors using a duel-tumor model after iv administration during the whole experiment process (1-48h). Interestingly, significantly higher uptake of the micelles by SKOV3 tumors (positive-EphB4) than A549 tumors (negtive-EphB4) was observed, with increased ratio on experiment time. However, the specific cell uptake was observed only during the short incubation time (1-4h) in vitro. Our data also indicated the treatment of tumor cells with the micelles followed by NIR laser irradiation showed significantly greater toxicity activity than the treatment with the micelles alone, free PTX and the micelles (without PTX loading) plus NIR laser irradiation. The enhanced toxicity activity to tumor cells should be attributed to the enhanced drug cellular uptake mediated by the glycolipid-like micelles, chemical toxicity of the released drug from the micelles due to the trigger of NIR laser, and the photothermal ablation under NIR laser irradiation. PMID:23510855

  10. Anti-tumor activity of paclitaxel through dual-targeting lipoprotein-mimicking nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Chen, Conghui; Hu, Haiyang; Qiao, Mingxi; Zhao, Xiuli; Wang, Yinjie; Chen, Kang; Chen, Dawei

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, we devised a strategy that paclitaxel (PTX) with lipid and octadecylamine were prepared to lipid nanoparticle (PTX-LNP) with positive charge, folic acid-modified bovine serum albumin (FB)-coated surface of PTX-LNP through electrostatic attraction and generated the lipoprotein-mimicking nanocomplex (FB-PTX-LNP) for dual-targeting therapy. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the protein model due to its specific targeting to tumor by increased transendothelial gp60-mediated transport and increased intratumoral accumulation as a result of the secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC)-albumin interaction. The further conjugating folic acid to BSA achieved the dual active targeting. In vitro cytotoxicity tests suggested FB-PTX-LNP and BSA-PTX-LNP exhibited significantly higher cytotoxic activity against MCF-7 and HepG2 cells compared to PTX-LNP. The cellular uptake experiments indicated that FB-coumarin-6-LNP modified with dual-targeting had a faster and greater cellular uptake when compared to BSA-coumarin-6-LNP and coumarin-6-LNP by MCF-7 cells. Thus, both BSA and FA did play roles in in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake. Furthermore, the targeting ability and therapeutic efficacy of FB-PTX-LNP were assessed in vivo. FB-PTX-LNP produced very marked targeting ability and anti-tumor activity in MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate the protein-lipid nanocomplex FB-PTX-LNP is a potential nanocarrier for Paclitaxel dual-targeting to tumor. PMID:25539074

  11. Paclitaxel delivery from cobalt-chromium alloy surfaces using self-assembled monolayers.

    PubMed

    Mani, Gopinath; Torres, Nelson; Oh, Sunho

    2011-06-01

    Polymer-based platforms in drug-eluting stents (DESs) can cause adverse reactions in patients. Hence, the development of a polymer-free drug delivery platform may reduce adverse reactions to DES. In this study, the use of a polymer-free platform, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), is explored for delivering an antiproliferative drug [paclitaxel (PAT)] from a stent material [cobalt-chromium ((Co-Cr) alloy]. Initially, carboxylic acid terminated phosphonic acid SAMs were coated on Co-Cr alloy. Two different doses (25 and 100 ?g/cm²) of PAT were coated on SAM coated Co-Cr surfaces using a microdrop deposition method. Also, control experiments were carried out to coat PAT directly on Co-Cr surfaces with no SAM modification. The PAT coated specimens were characterized using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). FTIR spectra showed the successful deposition of PAT on SAM coated and control-Co-Cr surfaces. SEM images showed islands of high density PAT crystals on SAM coated surfaces, while low density PAT crystals were observed on control-Co-Cr alloy. AFM images showed molecular distribution of PAT on SAM coated as well as control-Co-Cr alloy surfaces. In vitro drug release studies showed that PAT was released from SAM coated Co-Cr surfaces in a biphasic manner (an initial burst release in first 7 days was followed by a slow release for up to 35 days), while the PAT was burst released from control-Co-Cr surfaces within 1-3 days. Thus, this study demonstrated the use of SAMs for delivering PAT from Co-Cr alloy surfaces for potential use in drug-eluting stents. PMID:21721838

  12. Reduction-sensitive dual functional nanomicelles for improved delivery of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Liu, Ke; Huang, Yixian; Xu, Jieni; Li, Jiang; Ma, Xiaochao; Li, Song

    2014-09-17

    We have developed a dual-functional nanocarrier composed of a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a hydrophobic farnesylthiosalicylate (FTS, a nontoxic Ras antagonist), which is effective in delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX). To facilitate the retention of the therapeutic activity of the carrier, FTS was coupled to PEG via a reduction-sensitive disulfide linkage (PEG5k-S-S-FTS2). PEG5k-S-S-FTS2 conjugate formed uniform micelles with very small size (?30 nm) and the hydrophobic drug PTX could be readily incorporated into the micelles. Interestingly, inclusion of a disulfide linkage into the PEG5k-FTS2 micellar system resulted in a 4-fold decrease in the critical micelle concentration (CMC). In addition, the PTX loading capacity and colloidal stability of PTX-loaded micelles were improved. HPLC-MS showed that parent FTS could be more effectively released from PEG5k-S-S-FTS2 conjugate in tumor cells/tissues compared to PEG5k-FTS2 conjugate in vitro and in vivo. PEG5k-S-S-FTS2 exhibited a higher level of cytotoxicity toward tumor cells than PEG5k-FTS2 without a disulfide linkage. Furthermore, PTX-loaded PEG5k-S-S-FTS2 micelles were more effective in inhibiting the proliferation of cultured tumor cells compared to Taxol and PTX loaded in PEG5k-FTS2 micelles. More importantly, PTX-loaded PEG5k-S-S-FTS2 micelles demonstrated superior antitumor activity compared to Taxol and PTX formulated in PEG5k-FTS2 micelles in an aggressive murine breast cancer model (4T1.2). PMID:25121577

  13. Improving paclitaxel delivery: in vitro and in vivo characterization of PEGylated polyphosphoester-based nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fuwu; Zhang, Shiyi; Pollack, Stephanie F; Li, Richen; Gonzalez, Amelia M; Fan, Jingwei; Zou, Jiong; Leininger, Sarah E; Pavía-Sanders, Adriana; Johnson, Rachel; Nelson, Laura D; Raymond, Jeffery E; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Hughes, Dennis M P; Lenox, Mark W; Gustafson, Tiffany P; Wooley, Karen L

    2015-02-11

    Nanomaterials have great potential to offer effective treatment against devastating diseases by providing sustained release of high concentrations of therapeutic agents locally, especially when the route of administration allows for direct access to the diseased tissues. Biodegradable polyphosphoester-based polymeric micelles and shell cross-linked knedel-like nanoparticles (SCKs) have been designed from amphiphilic block-graft terpolymers, PEBP-b-PBYP-g-PEG, which effectively incorporate high concentrations of paclitaxel (PTX). Well-dispersed nanoparticles physically loaded with PTX were prepared, exhibiting desirable physiochemical characteristics. Encapsulation of 10 wt% PTX, into either micelles or SCKs, allowed for aqueous suspension of PTX at concentrations up to 4.8 mg/mL, as compared to <2.0 ?g/mL for the aqueous solubility of the drug alone. Drug release studies indicated that PTX released from these nanostructures was defined through a structure-function relationship, whereby the half-life of sustained PTX release was doubled through cross-linking of the micellar structure to form SCKs. In vitro, physically loaded micellar and SCK nanotherapeutics demonstrated IC50 values against osteosarcoma cell lines, known to metastasize to the lungs (CCH-OS-O and SJSA), similar to the pharmaceutical Taxol formulation. Evaluation of these materials in vivo has provided an understanding of the effects of nanoparticle structure-function relationships on intratracheal delivery and related biodistribution and pharmacokinetics. Overall, we have demonstrated the potential of these novel nanotherapeutics toward future sustained release treatments via administration directly to the sites of lung metastases of osteosarcoma. PMID:25629952

  14. Design, synthesis and bioevaluation of an EphA2 receptor-based targeted delivery system.

    PubMed

    Barile, Elisa; Wang, Si; Das, Swadesh K; Noberini, Roberta; Dahl, Russell; Stebbins, John L; Pasquale, Elena B; Fisher, Paul B; Pellecchia, Maurizio

    2014-07-01

    Because of its overexpression in a range of solid tumors, the EphA2 receptor is a validated target for cancer therapeutics. We recently described a new targeted delivery system based on specific EphA2-targeting peptides conjugated with the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. Here, we investigate the chemical determinants responsible for the stability and degradation of these agents in plasma. Introducing modifications in both the peptide and the linker between the peptide and paclitaxel resulted in drug conjugates that are both long-lived in rat plasma and that markedly decrease tumor size in a prostate cancer xenograft model compared with paclitaxel alone treatment. These studies identify critical rate-limiting degradation sites on the peptide-drug conjugates, enabling the design of agents with increased stability and efficacy. These results provide support for our central hypothesis that peptide-drug conjugates targeting EphA2 represent an innovative and potentially effective strategy to selectively deliver cytotoxic drugs to cancer cells. PMID:24677792

  15. Fate of paclitaxel lipid nanocapsules in intestinal mucus in view of their oral delivery

    PubMed Central

    Groo, Anne-Claire; Saulnier, Patrick; Gimel, Jean-Christophe; Gravier, Julien; Ailhas, Caroline; Benoit, Jean-Pierre; Lagarce, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    The bioavailability of paclitaxel (Ptx) has previously been improved via its encapsulation in lipid nanocapsules (LNCs). In this work, the interactions between LNCs and intestinal mucus are studied because they are viewed as an important barrier to successful oral delivery. The rheological properties of different batches of pig intestinal mucus were studied under different conditions (the effect of hydration and the presence of LNCs). Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to study the stability of LNCs in mucus at 37°C for at least 3 hours. Diffusion through 223, 446, and 893 ?m mucus layers of 8.4, 16.8, and 42 ?g/mL Ptx formulated as Taxol® (Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France) or encapsulated in LNCs (Ptx-LNCs) were investigated. The effect of the size of the LNCs on their diffusion was also investigated (range, 25–110 nm in diameter). Mucus behaves as a non-Newtonian gel with rheofluidifying properties and a flow threshold. The viscous (G?) and elastic (G?) moduli and flow threshold of the two mucus batches varied with water content, but G? remained below G?. LNCs had no effect on mucus viscosity and flow threshold. The FRET efficiency remained at 78% after 3 hours. Because the destruction of the LNCs would lead to a FRET efficiency below 25%, these results suggest only a slight modification of LNCs after their contact with mucus. The diffusion of Taxol® and Ptx-LNCs in mucus decreases if the mucus layer is thicker. Interestingly, the apparent permeability across mucus is higher for Ptx-LNCs than for Taxol® for drug concentrations of 16.8 and 42 ?g/mL Ptx (P<0.05). The diffusion of Ptx-LNCs through mucus is not size-dependent. This study shows that LNCs are stable in mucus, do not change mucus rheological properties, and improve Ptx diffusion at low concentrations, thus making these systems good candidates for Ptx oral delivery. The study of the physicochemical interaction between the LNC surface and its diffusion in mucus is now envisioned. PMID:24235827

  16. Synergistic co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel using multi-functional micelles for cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Duong, Hoang Hanh Phuoc; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2013-09-15

    The main purposes of this study are to demonstrate the synergistic anticancer drug systems with the combined doxorubicin (D) and paclitaxel (P) via the aid of cell penetrating and cell targeting moieties for enhancing the cancer therapeutic effect. Firstly, the synergistic effect of combined free drugs (D/P) was investigated to obtain the suitable dose combination for subsequent studies. The combination of free drugs D/P at molar ratio of 1/0.2 shows synergistic therapeutic effect compared with the treatment of a free single drug D or P. Secondly, sustainable release systems of two single drug-loaded micelles, (i) co-delivered D-FOL micelle & P-FOL micelle system and (ii) co-delivered D-TAT/FOL micelle & P-TAT/FOL micelle system, at D/P molar ratio of 1/0.2 were investigated. The results show synergistic effect with the higher efficacy of the TAT/FOL system compared to FOL only system. Finally, a dual D/P-loaded system with sustainable release rate, synergistic drug interaction, selective targeting to cancer cells and high cell penetrating ability was designed. The D/P-TAT/FOL micelles exhibit an IC50 value of 0.172 ?M D/0.043 ?M P, which is much lower than the IC50 values of the single drug-loaded micelles without functionalization (3.873 ?M for D-micelles and 0.790 ?M for P-micelles). Overall, this newly developed dual encapsulation of D and P in the multifunctional carrier would be a promising technology for cancer treatment. PMID:23792465

  17. Targeted Delivery Systems for Oligonucleotide Therapeutics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Yu; Xiaobin Zhao; L. James Lee; Robert J. Lee

    2009-01-01

    Oligonucleotides including antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA are emerging as promising therapeutic agents against a variety\\u000a of diseases. Effective delivery of these molecules is critical to their successful clinical application. Targeted systems\\u000a can greatly improve the efficiency and specificity of oligonucleotides delivery. Meanwhile, an effective delivery system must\\u000a successfully overcome a multitude of biological barriers to enable the oligonucleotides to reach

  18. Polymers for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajpurohit, H.; Sharma, P.; Sharma, S.; Bhandari, A.

    2010-01-01

    The colon targeted drug delivery has a number of important implications in the field of pharmacotherapy. Oral colon targeted drug delivery systems have recently gained importance for delivering a variety of therapeutic agents for both local and systemic administration. Targeting of drugs to the colon via oral administration protect the drug from degradation or release in the stomach and small intestine. It also ensures abrupt or controlled release of the drug in the proximal colon. Various drug delivery systems have been designed that deliver the drug quantitatively to the colon and then trigger the release of drug. This review will cover different types of polymers which can be used in formulation of colon targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:21969739

  19. MRI-visible liposome nanovehicles for potential tumor-targeted delivery of multimodal therapies.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lili; Chen, Shizhen; Li, Haidong; Zhang, Zhiying; Ye, Chaohui; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2015-07-23

    Real-time diagnosis and monitoring of disease development, and therapeutic responses to treatment, are possible by theranostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Here we report the synthesis of a multifunctional liposome, which contains Gd-DOTA (an MRI probe), paclitaxel and c(RGDyk) (a targeted peptide). This nanoparticle overcame the insolubility of paclitaxel, reduced the side effects of FDA-approved formulation of PTX-Cre (Taxol®) and improved drug delivery efficiency to the tumor. c(RGDyk) modification greatly enhanced the cytotoxicity of the drug in tumor cells A549. The T1 relaxivity in tumor cells treated with the targeted liposome formulation was increased 16-fold when compared with the non-targeted group. In vivo, the tumors in mice were visualized using T1-weighted imaging after administration of the liposome. Also the tumor growth could be inhibited well after the treatment. Fluorescence images in vitro and ex vivo also showed the targeting effect of this liposome in tumor cells, indicating that this nanovehicle could limit the off-target side effects of anticancer drugs and contrast agents. These findings lay the foundation for further tumor inhibition study and application of this delivery vehicle in cancer therapy settings. PMID:26022345

  20. Feasibility studies of dermal delivery of paclitaxel with binary combinations of ethanol and isopropyl myristate: role of solubility, partitioning and lipid bilayer perturbation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ramesh Panchagnula; Hariraghuram Desu; Amit Jain; Sateesh Khandavilli

    2005-01-01

    In the current investigation, paclitaxel (PCL) delivery into the different layers of skin, vehicle optimization and relationship between vehicle composition and the relative contribution of solubility, partition and diffusion towards drug transport has been outlined. Saturation solubility of PCL was determined in ethanol (EtOH), isopropyl myristate (IPM) and their binary combinations, and partition studies performed to study the probability of

  1. Design and development of paclitaxel-loaded bovine serum albumin nanoparticles for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Amit; Kapoor, Deepak N; Kapil, Rishi; Chhabra, Neha; Dhawan, Sanju

    2011-06-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles loaded with paclitaxel (PTX) were prepared using a desolvation technique. A 32 full factorial design (FFD) was employed to formulate nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized for particle size by photon correlation spectroscopy and surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Encapsulation efficiency, zeta potential and particle yield were also determined. Response surface linear modelling (RSLM) was used to predict the optimal formulation. Various models were applied to determine the release mechanism from PTX nanoparticles. The effect of drug-polymer ratio on the release profile of formulations was observed and was applied to determine the suitability of the predicted optimal formulation. A preliminary study to determine the feasibility of targeting the prepared nanoparticles to brain was also carried out using mice as in vivo models. PMID:21684843

  2. Delivery of paclitaxel from cobalt–chromium alloy surfaces without polymeric carriers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gopinath Mani; Celia E. Macias; Marc D. Feldman; Denes Marton; Sunho Oh; C. Mauli Agrawal

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-based carriers are commonly used to deliver drugs from stents. However, adverse responses to polymer coatings have raised serious concerns. This research is focused on delivering drugs from stents without using polymers or any carriers. Paclitaxel (PAT), an anti-restenotic drug, has strong adhesion towards a variety of material surfaces. In this study, we have utilized such natural adhesion property of

  3. The Effect of Short-term Intra-arterial Delivery of Paclitaxel on Neointimal Hyperplasia and the Local Thrombotic Environment after Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Yajun, E, E-mail: eyj7681@yahoo.com.cn [Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University, Department of Interventional Radiology (China); He Nengshu, E-mail: eyajun@hotmail.com; Fan Hailun, E-mail: mydream510@yahoo.com.cn [Tianjin Institute of Radiology, General Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Department of Radiology (China)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo evaluate the effects of short-term intra-arterial delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia and the local thrombotic environment after angioplasty.MethodsAn experimental common carotid artery injury model was established in 60 rats, which were divided into experimental groups (40 rats) and controls (20 rats). Local intra-arterial administration of paclitaxel was applied at 2 doses (90 and 180 {mu}g/30 {mu}l), and the effects of short-term delivery of paclitaxel on neointimal hyperplasia and the expression of tissue factor (TF), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) were evaluated at days 15 and 30 by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry.ResultsAt 15 and 30 days after injury, neointimal thickness and area, the ratio of intimal area to medial area and the stenotic rate were all significantly decreased in the group provided the high concentrations (180 {mu}g/30 {mu}l) of paclitaxel for 2 min or 10 min and in the group provided the low concentration (90 {mu}g/30 {mu}l) of paclitaxel for 10 min (p < 0.05). At 30 days after injury, there were no significant changes in TF expression among all experimental groups. PAI-1 expression increased in the neointima of the high concentration 10 min group (p < 0.05), while t-PA expression decreased in the neointima of the high concentration 2 min group (p < 0.05).ConclusionIn the rat common carotid artery injury model, the short-term delivery of paclitaxel could effectively inhibit neointimal hyperplasia in the long term, with very little influence on the local expression of TF and PAI-1.

  4. Co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel by PEG-polypeptide nanovehicle for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lv, Shixian; Tang, Zhaohui; Li, Mingqiang; Lin, Jian; Song, Wantong; Liu, Huaiyu; Huang, Yubin; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-07-01

    Despite progress, combination therapy of different functional drugs to increase the efficiency of anticancer treatment still remains challenges. An amphiphilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(l-glutamic acid)-b-poly(l-lysine) triblock copolymer decorated with deoxycholate (mPEsG-b-PLG-b-PLL/DOCA) was synthesized and developed as a nanovehicle for the co-delivery of anticancer drugs: doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX). The amphiphilic copolymer spontaneously self-assembled into micellar-type nanoparticles in aqueous solutions and the blank nanoparticles possessed excellent stability. Three different domains of the copolymer performed distinct functions: PEG outer corona provided prolonged circulation, middle biodegradable and hydrophilic PLG shell was designed for DOX loading through electrostatic interactions, and hydrophobic deoxycholate modified PLL served as the container for PTX. In vitro cytotoxicity assays against A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line demonstrated that the DOX + PTX co-delivered nanoparticles (Co-NPs) exhibited synergistic effect in inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging revealed that Co-NPs had highly efficient targeting and accumulation at the implanted site of A549 xenograft tumor in vivo. Co-NPs exhibited significantly higher antitumor efficiency in reducing tumor size compared to free drug combination or single drug-loaded nanoparticles, while no obvious side effects were observed during the treatment, indicating this co-delivery system with different functional antitumor drugs provides the clinical potential in cancer therapy. PMID:24794923

  5. Nanoparticle mediated co-delivery of paclitaxel and a TLR-4 agonist results in tumor regression and enhanced immune response in the tumor microenvironment of a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Roy, Aniruddha; Singh, Manu Smriti; Upadhyay, Pramod; Bhaskar, Sangeeta

    2013-03-10

    Inefficiency of cancer chemotherapy to improve life expectancy in majority of patients raises serious concern and warrants development of novel therapeutic strategies. Immunotherapy in combination with chemotherapy has shown promising outcomes in recent years. Herein, we report better tumor regression and enhancement of antitumor immune response at the tumor microenvironment by co-delivery of paclitaxel and a TLR4 agonist through a PLGA based nanoparticle preparation (TLNP). Particle characterization showed high encapsulation of both components and retention of their biological activities. In vivo tumor regression studies demonstrated clear benefit of TLNP over the paclitaxel. The mean tumor volume of the TLNP treated animals was found to be 40% less than that of the Paclitaxel treated animals. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor infiltrating immune cells indicated activation of antigen presenting cells and T-cells providing evidence of Th1 immune response. In vivo results are promising and could pave way for novel chemo-immunotherapeutic treatment modality. PMID:23376226

  6. ENDOCYTIC MECHANISMS FOR TARGETED DRUG DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Bareford, Lisa M.; Swaan, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Advances in the delivery of targeted drug systems have evolved to enable highly regulated site specific localization to subcellular organelles. Targeting therapeutics to individual intracellular compartments has resulted in benefits to therapies associated with these unique organelles. Endocytosis, a mechanism common to all cells in the body, internalizes macromolecules and retains them in transport vesicles which traffic along the endolysosomal scaffold. An array of vesicular internalization mechanisms exist, therefore understanding the key players specific to each pathway has allowed researchers to bioengineer macromolecular complexes for highly specialized delivery. Membrane specific receptors most frequently enter the cell through endocytosis following the binding of a high affinity ligand. High affinity ligands interact with membrane receptors, internalize in membrane bound vesicles, and traffic through cells in different manners to allow for accumulation in early endosomal fractions or lysosomally associated fractions. Although most drug delivery complexes aim to avoid lysosomal degradation, more recent studies have shown the clinical utility in directed protein delivery to this environment for the enzymatic release of therapeutics. Targeting nanomedicine complexes to the endolysosomal pathway have serious potential for improving drug delivery for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. Although several issues remain for receptor specific targeting, current work is investigating a synthetic receptor approach for high affinity binding of targeted macromolecules. PMID:17659804

  7. Nanoparticles for intracellular-targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulo, Cristiana S. O.; Pires das Neves, Ricardo; Ferreira, Lino S.

    2011-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are very promising for the intracellular delivery of anticancer and immunomodulatory drugs, stem cell differentiation biomolecules and cell activity modulators. Although initial studies in the area of intracellular drug delivery have been performed in the delivery of DNA, there is an increasing interest in the use of other molecules to modulate cell activity. Herein, we review the latest advances in the intracellular-targeted delivery of short interference RNA, proteins and small molecules using NPs. In most cases, the drugs act at different cellular organelles and therefore the drug-containing NPs should be directed to precise locations within the cell. This will lead to the desired magnitude and duration of the drug effects. The spatial control in the intracellular delivery might open new avenues to modulate cell activity while avoiding side-effects.

  8. Integrin-assisted drug delivery of nano-scaled polymer therapeutics bearing paclitaxel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anat Eldar-Boock; Keren Miller; Joaquin Sanchis; Ruth Lupu; María J. Vicent; Ronit Satchi-Fainaro

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a prominent role in cancer progression. Anti-angiogenic therapy therefore, either alone or in combination with conventional cytotoxic therapy, offers a promising therapeutic approach. Paclitaxel (PTX) is a widely-used potent cytotoxic drug that also exhibits anti-angiogenic effects at low doses. However, its use, at its full potential, is limited by severe side effects. Here we designed and synthesized a

  9. Positive-charged solid lipid nanoparticles as paclitaxel drug delivery system in glioblastoma treatment.

    PubMed

    Chirio, Daniela; Gallarate, Marina; Peira, Elena; Battaglia, Luigi; Muntoni, Elisabetta; Riganti, Chiara; Biasibetti, Elena; Capucchio, Maria Teresa; Valazza, Alberto; Panciani, Pierpaolo; Lanotte, Michele; Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Filice, Gaetano; Corona, Silvia; Schiffer, Davide

    2014-11-01

    Paclitaxel loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of behenic acid were prepared with the coacervation technique. Generally, spherical shaped SLN with mean diameters in the range 300–600 nm were obtained. The introduction of charged molecules, such as stearylamine and glycol chitosan into the formulation allowed to obtain positive SLN with Zeta potential in the 8-20 mV range and encapsulation efficiency in the 25–90% range.Blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability, tested in vitro through hCMEC/D3 cells monolayer, showed a significantly increase in the permeation of Coumarin-6, used as model drug, when vehicled in SLN. Positive-charged SLN do not seem to enhance permeation although stearylamine-positive SLN resulted the best permeable formulation after 24 h.Cytotoxicity studies on NO3 glioblastoma cell line demonstrated the maintenance of cytotoxic activity of all paclitaxel-loaded SLN that was always unmodified or greater compared with free drug. No difference in cytotoxicity was noted between neutral and charged SLN.Co-culture experiments with hCMEC/D3 and different glioblastoma cells evidenced that, when delivered in SLN, paclitaxel increased its cytotoxicity towards glioblastoma cells. PMID:25445304

  10. A thermally responsive biopolymer conjugated to an acid-sensitive derivative of paclitaxel stabilizes microtubules, arrests cell cycle, and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Moktan, Shama; Ryppa, Claudia; Kratz, Felix; Raucher, Drazen

    2012-02-01

    Poor aqueous solubility limits the therapeutic index of paclitaxel as an anti-cancer drug. Synthesis of soluble prodrugs of paclitaxel, or conjugation of the drug to macromolecular carriers have been reported to increase its water-solubility. Macromolecular drug carriers have an added advantage of targeting the drug to the tumor site due to the abnormal tumor blood and lymphatic vasculature. This study describes a thermally responsive macromolecular carrier, elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) for the delivery of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel was bound to ELP by conjugation with the 6-maleimidocaproyl hydrazone derivative of paclitaxel, an acid-sensitive paclitaxel prodrug, for the potential treatment of breast cancer. Focused hyperthermia above a specific transition temperature at the site of a tumor causes ELP to aggregate and accumulate, thereby increasing the local concentration of the drug cargo. The paclitaxel prodrug described here bears an acid-sensitive linker that is cleavable at the lysosomal/endosomal pH, which allows a controlled intracellular release of the drug. The ELP-delivered paclitaxel in the presence of hyperthermia inhibits MCF-7 cell proliferation by stabilizing the microtubule structures, arresting the cells at the G2/M stage, and inducing apoptosis in a manner similar to conventional paclitaxel. It also inhibits proliferation of a paclitaxel resistant MCF-7 cell line. These data provide an in vitro proof of concept for the use of ELP as a delivery vehicle of paclitaxel. PMID:20938714

  11. Implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in delivery and targeting tubulin binding agent, noscapine in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Ramesh; Madan, Jitender; Singh, Prashant; Chandra, Ankush; Kumar, Pradeep; Tomar, Vartika; Dass, Sujata K

    2012-12-01

    Noscapine, a tubulin binding anticancer agent undergoing Phase I/II clinical trials, inhibits tumor growth in nude mice bearing human xenografts of breast, lung, ovarian, brain, and prostrate origin. The analogues of noscapine like 9-bromonoscapine (EM011) are 5 to 10-fold more active than parent compound, noscapine. Noscapinoids inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells that are resistant to paclitaxel and epothilone. Noscapine also potentiated the anticancer activity of doxorubicin in a synergistic manner against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, physicochemical and pharmacokinetic (ED50˜300-600 mg/kg bodyweight) limitations of noscapine present hurdle in development of commercial anticancer formulations. Therefore, objectives of the present review are to summarize the chemotherapeutic potential of noscapine and implications of nanoscale based drug delivery systems in enhancing the therapeutic efficacy of noscapine in cancer cells. We have constructed noscapine-enveloped gelatin nanoparticles, NPs and poly (ethylene glycol) grafted gelatin NPs as well as inclusion complex of noscapine in ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) and evaluated their physicochemical characteristics. The Fe3O4 NPs were also used to incorporate noscapine in its polymeric nanomatrix system where molecular weight of the polymer governed the encapsulation efficiency of drug. The enhanced noscapine delivery using ?PAR-targeted optical-MR imaging trackable NPs offer a great potential for image directed targeted delivery of noscapine. Human Serum Albumin NPs (150-300 nm) as efficient noscapine drug delivery systems have also been developed for potential use in breast cancer. PMID:22571485

  12. Targeted drug delivery via the folate receptor

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Sudimack; Robert J Lee

    2000-01-01

    The folate receptor is a highly selective tumor marker overexpressed in greater than 90% of ovarian carcinomas. Two general strategies have been developed for the targeted delivery of drugs to folate receptor-positive tumor cells: by coupling to a monoclonal antibody against the receptor and by coupling to a high affinity ligand, folic acid. First, antibodies against the folate receptor, including

  13. A Dicarboxylic Fatty Acid Derivative of Paclitaxel for Albumin Assisted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Michael J.; Joolakanti, Shyamsunder; Hartranft, Megan E.; Guley, Patrick C.; Cho, Moo J.

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a potent chemotherapy for many cancers but it suffers from very poor solubility. Consequently the TAXOL formulation uses copious amounts of the surfactant Cremophor EL to solubilize the drug for injection resulting in severe hypersensitivity and neutropenia. In contrast to Cremophor EL, presented is a way to solubilize paclitaxel (PTX) by conjugation of a dicarboxylic fatty acid for specific binding to the ubiquitous protein, serum albumin. The conjugation chemistry was simplified to a single step using the activated anhydride form of 3-pentadecylglutaric (PDG) acid which is reactive to a variety of nucleophiles. The PDG derivative is less cytotoxic than the parent compound and was found to slowly hydrolyze to PTX (~5% over 72 h) in serum, tumor cytosol, and tumor tissue homogenate. When injected intravenously to tumor bearing mice, [3H]-PTX in the TAXOL formulation was cleared rapidly with a half-life of 7 hours. In the case of the PDG derivative of PTX, the drug is quickly distributed and approximately 20% of the injected dose remained in the vasculature experiencing a 23-h half-life. These improvements from modifying PTX with the PDG fatty acid present the opportunity for PDG to become a generic modification for the improvement of many therapeutics. PMID:22674061

  14. Synergistic effect of folate-mediated targeting and verapamil-mediated P-gp inhibition with paclitaxel -polymer micelles to overcome multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feihu; Zhang, Dianrui; Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Yuxuan; Zheng, Dandan; Hao, Leilei; Duan, Cunxian; Jia, Lejiao; Liu, Guangpu; Liu, Yue

    2011-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumor cells is a significant obstacle for successful cancer chemotherapy. Overexpression of drug efflux transporters such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a key factor contributing to the development of tumor drug resistance. Verapamil (VRP), a P-gp inhibitor, has been reported to be able to reverse completely the resistance caused by P-gp. For optimal synergy, the drug and inhibitor combination may need to be temporally colocalized in the tumor cells. Herein, we investigated the effectiveness of simultaneous and targeted delivery of anticancer drug, paclitaxel (PTX), along with VRP, using DOMC-FA micelles to overcome tumor drug resistance. The floate-functionalized dual agent loaded micelles resulted in the similar cytotoxicity to PTX-loaded micelles/free VRP combination and co-administration of two single-agent loaded micelles, which was higher than that of PTX-loaded micelles. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy of dual agent micelles could be ascribe to increased accumulation of PTX in drug-resistant tumor cells. We suggest that the synergistic effect of folate receptor-mediated internalization and VRP-mediated overcoming MDR could be beneficial in treatment of MDR solid tumors by targeting delivery of micellar PTX into tumor cells. As a result, the difunctional micelle systems is a very promising approach to overcome tumor drug resistance. PMID:21903258

  15. Polymeric nanoparticles based on chitooligosaccharide as drug carriers for co-delivery of all-trans-retinoic acid and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xiuli; Jiang, Jing; Xu, Maolei; Zhang, Daolai; Han, Jingtian

    2015-09-20

    An amphiphilic all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA)-chitooligosaccharide (RCOS) conjugate was synthesized to form self-assembled polymeric nanoparticles to facilitate the co-delivery of ATRA and paclitaxel (PTX). The blank RCOS nanoparticles possessed low hemolytic activity and cytotoxicity, and could efficiently load PTX with a drug loading of 22.2% and a high encapsulation efficiency of 71.3%. PTX-loaded RCOS nanoparticles displayed a higher cytotoxicity to HepG2 cells compared to PTX plus ATRA solution when corrected by the accumulated drug release. Cellular uptake profiles of RCOS nanoparticles were evaluated via confocal laser scanning microscope and flow cytometry with FITC as a fluorescent mark. The RCOS nanoparticles could be rapidly and continuously taken up by HepG2 cells via endocytosis and transported into the nucleus, and the uptake rates increased with particle concentration. These results revealed the promising potential of RCOS nanoparticles as drug carriers for co-delivery of ATRA and PTX or other hydrophobic therapeutic agents. PMID:26050884

  16. Self-assembled silk sericin/poloxamer nanoparticles as nanocarriers of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs for targeted delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Biman B.; Kundu, S. C.

    2009-09-01

    In recent times self-assembled micellar nanoparticles have been successfully employed in tissue engineering for targeted drug delivery applications. In this review, silk sericin protein from non-mulberry Antheraea mylitta tropical tasar silk cocoons was blended with pluronic F-127 and F-87 in the presence of solvents to achieve self-assembled micellar nanostructures capable of carrying both hydrophilic (FITC-inulin) and hydrophobic (anticancer drug paclitaxel) drugs. The fabricated nanoparticles were subsequently characterized for their size distribution, drug loading capability, cellular uptake and cytotoxicity. Nanoparticle sizes ranged between 100 and 110 nm in diameter as confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Rapid uptake of these particles into cells was observed in in vitro cellular uptake studies using breast cancer MCF-7 cells. In vitro cytotoxicity assay using paclitaxel-loaded nanoparticles against breast cancer cells showed promising results comparable to free paclitaxel drugs. Drug-encapsulated nanoparticle-induced apoptosis in MCF-7 cells was confirmed by FACS and confocal microscopic studies using Annexin V staining. Up-regulation of pro-apoptotic protein Bax, down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and cleavage of regulatory protein PARP through Western blot analysis suggested further drug-induced apoptosis in cells. This study projects silk sericin protein as an alternative natural biomaterial for fabrication of self-assembled nanoparticles in the presence of poloxamer for successful delivery of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to target sites.

  17. A novel biosensor for quantitative monitoring of on-target activity of paclitaxel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townley, H. E.; Zheng, Y.; Goldsmith, J.; Zheng, Y. Y.; Stratford, M. R. L.; Dobson, P. J.; Ahmed, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    This study describes a system for quantifying paclitaxel activity using the C-terminus of ?-tubulin as a biomarker. Following stabilization of microtubules with paclitaxel, a specific detyrosination reaction occurs at the C-terminus of ?-tubulin which could be used to assess efficacy. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based biosensor was synthesized comprising a short peptide that corresponded to the C-terminus of ?-tubulin, a fluorophore (Abz), and a quencher (Dnp). The fluorophore added to the end of the peptide can be released upon enzymatic detyrosination. In addition, a single fluorophore-tagged peptide was also conjugated to mesoporous silica nanoparticles to examine the feasibility of combining the drug with the peptide biomarker. As a proof of concept, we found that the degree of peptide cleavage, and therefore enzymatic activity, was directly correlated with exogenous bovine carboxypeptidase (CPA) an enzyme that mimics endogenous detyrosination. In addition, we show that cell lysates obtained from paclitaxel-treated cancer cells competed with exogenous CPA for biosensor cleavage in a paclitaxel dose-dependent manner. Our work provides strong evidence for the feasibility of combining paclitaxel with a novel biosensor in a multi-load nanoparticle.This study describes a system for quantifying paclitaxel activity using the C-terminus of ?-tubulin as a biomarker. Following stabilization of microtubules with paclitaxel, a specific detyrosination reaction occurs at the C-terminus of ?-tubulin which could be used to assess efficacy. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) based biosensor was synthesized comprising a short peptide that corresponded to the C-terminus of ?-tubulin, a fluorophore (Abz), and a quencher (Dnp). The fluorophore added to the end of the peptide can be released upon enzymatic detyrosination. In addition, a single fluorophore-tagged peptide was also conjugated to mesoporous silica nanoparticles to examine the feasibility of combining the drug with the peptide biomarker. As a proof of concept, we found that the degree of peptide cleavage, and therefore enzymatic activity, was directly correlated with exogenous bovine carboxypeptidase (CPA) an enzyme that mimics endogenous detyrosination. In addition, we show that cell lysates obtained from paclitaxel-treated cancer cells competed with exogenous CPA for biosensor cleavage in a paclitaxel dose-dependent manner. Our work provides strong evidence for the feasibility of combining paclitaxel with a novel biosensor in a multi-load nanoparticle. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01105h

  18. Expression of sorafenib targets in melanoma patients treated with carboplatin, paclitaxel and sorafenib

    PubMed Central

    Jilaveanu, Lucia; Zito, Christopher; Lee, Sandra J.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Camp, Robert L.; Rimm, David L.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Kluger, Harriet M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sorafenib, a multi-target kinase inhibitor, inhibits members of the MAPK pathway and receptor tyrosine kinases, including VEGF-R2. Sorafenib, carboplatin and paclitaxel (SCP) has anti-tumor activity in melanoma patients, but no association was found between response and activating B-RafV600E mutations. We assessed expression of sorafenib targets in SCP-treated patient specimens and evaluated the association with response and progression free survival. Experimental Design Using Automated QUantitative Analysis (AQUA®), we quantified expression of VEGF-R1, VEGF-R2, VEGF-R3, FGF-R1, PDGF-R?, c-Kit, B-Raf, C-Raf, MEK1 and ERK1/2 in pre-treatment specimens from 46 patients. Furthermore, we assessed ERK1/2 expression in 429 archival melanomas. Results VEGF-R2 expression was significantly higher in patients with a complete or partial response (P=0.0435), whereas ERK1/2 was higher in patients who did not respond (P=0.0417). High ERK1/2 was an independent predictor of poor survival. High ERK1/2 was associated with decreased survival in the archival melanoma cohort, suggesting that high ERK1/2 expressing tumors are biologically more aggressive. All of the six patients with both high VEGF-R2 and low ERK1/2 responded to SCP. Conclusions High VEGF-R2 expression is associated with response to SCP in melanoma, whereas high ERK1/2 is associated with resistance. Collection of specimens from SCP-treated melanoma patients in a cooperative group phase III trial comparing this regimen to the chemotherapy alone is ongoing, and confirmation of these findings is necessary. These markers might be useful for predicting response to sorafenib when given with other chemotherapies and in other diseases, resulting in possible elimination of unnecessary treatment of patients unlikely to respond. PMID:19188183

  19. miR-145 sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to paclitaxel by targeting Sp1 and Cdk6.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaolan; Li, Yuefeng; Xie, Chanjuan; Yin, Xinming; Liu, Yueqin; Cao, Yuan; Fang, Yue; Lin, Xin; Xu, Yao; Xu, Wenlin; Shen, Huiling; Wen, Jian

    2014-09-15

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major obstacle to effective chemotherapy treatment in ovarian cancer. In our study, paclitaxel-resistant ovarian cancer patients and cell lines had decreased miR-145 levels and expressed high levels of Sp1 and Cdk6. Introducing miR-145 into SKOV3/PTX and A2780/PTX cells led to a reduction in Cdk6 and Sp1 along with downregulation of P-gp and pRb. These changes resulted in increased accumulation of antineoplastic drugs and G1 cell cycle arrest, which rendered the cells more sensitive to paclitaxel in vitro and in vivo. These effects could be reversed by reintroducing Sp1 or Cdk6 into cells expressing high levels of miR-145, resulting in restoration of P-gp and pRb levels. Furthermore, we confirmed that both Cdk6 and Sp1 are targets of miR-145. Intriguingly, demethylation with 5-aza-dC led to reactivation of miR-145 expression in drug-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, which also resulted in increased sensitivity to paclitaxel. Collectively, these findings begin to elucidate the role of miR-145 as an important regulator of chemoresistance in ovarian cancer by controlling both Cdk6 and Sp1. PMID:24510775

  20. Anti-HIF-1alpha antibody-conjugated pluronic triblock copolymers encapsulated with Paclitaxel for tumor targeting therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Hua; He, Rong; Wang, Kan; Ruan, Jing; Bao, Chenchen; Li, Na; Ji, Jiajia; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-03-01

    Targeted uptake of nanoscale controlled release polymer micelles encapsulated with drugs represents a potential powerful therapeutic technology. Herein we reported the development of anti-HIF-1alpha antibody-conjugated unimolecular polymer nano micelles filled with Paclitaxel for cancer targeting therapy. Pluronic triblock copolymers(Poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol), PEO-block-PPO-block-PEO) P123 were functionalized with terminal carboxylic groups, and were characterized by infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC). The amphiphilic copolymer nano micelles encapsulated with Paclitaxel were fabricated by self-assembly means, and then were conjugated with anti-HIF-1alpha antibody, the resultant anti-HIF-1alpha conjugated nano micelles filled with PTX (anti-HIF-1alpha-NMs-PTX nanocomposites) were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and incubated with stomach cancer MGC-803 cells and HDF fibroblast cells, these treated cells were analyzed by MTT and cell-ELISA. The nanocomposites composed of anti-HIF-1alpha conjugated nano micelles filled with CdTe quantum dots were also prepared, and incubated with stomach cancer MGC-803 cells and HDF fibroblast cells for 24 h, then were observed by fluorescent microscope. Results showed that the anti-HIF-1alpha-NMs-PTX nanocomposites were successfully prepared, bound with stomach cancer MGC-803 cells specifically, were internalized, and released PTX inside cancer cells, and selectively killed cancer cells. In conclusion, unique anti-HIF-1alpha antibody-conjugated nano micelles filled with Paclitaxel can target and selectively kill cancer cells with over-expression of HIF-1alpha, and has great potential in clinical tumor targeting imaging and therapy. PMID:20004970

  1. Paclitaxel loaded folic acid targeted nanoparticles of mixed lipid-shell and polymer-core: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peiqi; Wang, Hanjie; Yu, Man; Liao, Zhenyu; Wang, Xianhuo; Zhang, Fei; Ji, Wei; Wu, Bing; Han, Jinghua; Zhang, Haichang; Wang, Huaqing; Chang, Jin; Niu, Ruifang

    2012-06-01

    A functional drug carrier comprised of folic acid modified lipid-shell and polymer-core nanoparticles (FLPNPs) including poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) core, PEGylated octadecyl-quaternized lysine modified chitosan (PEG-OQLCS) as lipid-shell, folic acid as targeting ligand and cholesterol was prepared and evaluated for targeted delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). Confocal microscopy analysis confirmed the coating of the lipid-shell on the polymer-core. Physicochemical characterizations of FLPNPs, such as particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro PTX release, were also evaluated. The internalization efficiency and targeting ability of FLPNPs were demonstrated by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. PTX loaded FLPNPs showed a significantly higher cytotoxicity than the commercial PTX formulation (Taxol®). The intravenous administration of PTX encapsulated FLPNPs led to tumor regression and improvement of animal survival in a murine model, compared with that observed with Taxol® and biodistribution study showed that PTX concentration in tumor for PTX encapsulated FLPNPs was higher than other PTX formulations. Our data indicate that PTX loaded FLPNPs are a promising nano-sized drug formulation for cancer therapy. PMID:22446630

  2. A dicarboxylic fatty acid derivative of paclitaxel for albumin-assisted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Michael J; Joolakanti, Shyamsunder; Hartranft, Megan E; Guley, Patrick C; Cho, Moo J

    2012-09-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is a potent chemotherapy for many cancers but it suffers from very poor solubility. Consequently, the TAXOL formulation uses copious amounts of the surfactant Cremophor EL to solubilize the drug for injection, resulting in severe hypersensitivity and neutropenia. In contrast to Cremophor EL, presented is a way to solubilize PTX by conjugation of a dicarboxylic fatty acid for specific binding to the ubiquitous protein, serum albumin. The conjugation chemistry was simplified to a single step using the activated anhydride form of 3-pentadecylglutaric (PDG) acid, which is reactive to a variety of nucleophiles. The PDG derivative is less cytotoxic than the parent compound and was found to slowly hydrolyze to PTX (? 5% over 72 h) in serum, tumor cytosol, and tumor tissue homogenate. When injected intravenously to tumor-bearing mice, [(3) H]-PTX in the TAXOL formulation was cleared rapidly with a half-life of 7 h. In the case of the PDG derivative of PTX, the drug is quickly distributed and approximately 20% of the injected dose remained in the vasculature experiencing a 23 h half-life. These improvements from modifying PTX with the PDG fatty acid present the opportunity for PDG to become a generic modification for the improvement of many therapeutics. PMID:22674061

  3. Solid-Nanoemulsion Preconcentrate for Oral Delivery of Paclitaxel: Formulation Design, Biodistribution, and ? Scintigraphy Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Javed; Mir, Showkat R.; Kohli, Kanchan; Chuttani, Krishna; Mishra, Anil K.; Panda, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    Aim of present study was to develop a solid nanoemulsion preconcentrate of paclitaxel (PAC) using oil [propylene glycol monocaprylate/glycerol monooleate, 4?:?1?w/w], surfactant [polyoxyethylene 20 sorbitan monooleate/polyoxyl 15 hydroxystearate, 1?:?1?w/w], and cosurfactant [diethylene glycol monoethyl ether/polyethylene glycol 300, 1?:?1?w/w] to form stable nanocarrier. The prepared formulation was characterized for droplet size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) were used to assess surface morphology and drug encapsulation and its integrity. Cumulative drug release of prepared formulation through dialysis bag and permeability coefficient through everted gut sac were found to be remarkably higher than the pure drug suspension and commercial intravenous product (Intaxel), respectively. Solid nanoemulsion preconcentrate of PAC exhibited strong inhibitory effect on proliferation of MCF-7 cells in MTT assay. In vivo systemic exposure of prepared formulation through oral administration was comparable to that of Intaxel in ? scintigraphy imaging. Our findings suggest that the prepared solid nanoemulsion preconcentrate can be used as an effective oral solid dosage form to improve dissolution and bioavailability of PAC. PMID:25114933

  4. Pluronic-based functional polymeric mixed micelles for co-delivery of doxorubicin and paclitaxel to multidrug resistant tumor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yanzuo; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yukun; Gao, Feng; Sha, Xianyi; Fang, Xiaoling

    2015-07-01

    Although doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX) are widely used in clinic as chemotherapeutics, both drug substances are found to be glycoprotein P (P-gp) substrates which are liable to develop the multidrug resistance (MDR). Additionally, the use of single chemotherapeutic drug has known limitations such as high toxicity profile due to the relatively high doses and limited regimen of clinical application. To this end, Pluronic P105-DOX conjugate was successfully designed and developed which can be further used as a hydrophobic core to entrap another anti-cancer drug PTX with Pluronic F127 to form the dual drug-loaded mixed micelles (PF-DP) in our study, which would offer great advantages over conventional micelles, including easy fabrication, high loading capacity, and co-delivery of hydrophilic DOX and hydrophobic PTX to achieve synergistic effect of these two drug substances. Results showed that PF-DP possessed a good polydispersity and sustained release profile for both DOX and PTX in vitro. Studies on cellular uptake demonstrated both anti-cancer drugs in PF-DP can effectively accumulate in MDR cancer cells. Furthermore, in vitro cytotoxicity, cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest studies indicated that PF-DP had better antitumor efficacy in MDR cancer cells compared to those of single-drug loaded micelles. It was also found that PF-DP can suppress the growth of tumor cells more efficiently than single drug formulations at the equivalent drug concentrations, suggesting synergistic effect could be achieved. More importantly, a much stronger antitumor efficacy in MCF-7/ADR tumor-bearing mice was observed in PF-DP group than that of combined administration of free DOX and PTX. Collectively, the dual drug-loaded Pluronic-based functional mixed micelles developed in this study might be a potential nano-drug delivery system for MDR cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25899286

  5. PEG-Farnesylthiosalicylate Conjugate as a Nanomicellar Carrier for Delivery of Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Sun, Min; Stolz, Donna D.; Zhang, Lin; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    S-trans, trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) is a synthetic small molecule that acts as a potent and especially nontoxic Ras antagonist. It inhibits both oncogenically activated Ras and growth factor receptor-mediated Ras activation, resulting in the inhibition of Ras-dependent tumor growth. In this work, a FTS conjugate with polyethylene glycol (PEG) through a labile ester linkage, PEG5K-FTS2(L), was developed. PEG5K-FTS2 conjugate readily forms micelles in aqueous solutions with a critical micelle concentration of 0.68 ?M and hydrophobic drugs such as paclitaxel (PTX) could be effectively loaded into these particles. Both drug-free and PTX- loaded micelles were spherical in shape with a uniform size of 20 ~ 30 nm. The release of PTX from PTX-loaded PEG5K-FTS2 micelles was significantly slower than that from Taxol formulation. In vitro cytotoxicity studies with several tumor cell lines showed that PEG5K-FTS2(L) was comparable to FTS in antitumor activity. Western immunoblotting showed that total Ras levels were downregulated in several cancer cell lines treated with FTS or PEG5K-FTS2(L). The micellar formulation of PTX exhibited more in vitro cytotoxic activity against several tumor cell lines compared with free PTX, suggesting a possible synergistic effect between the carrier and the codelivered drug. The anti-tumor activity of the PTX loaded PEG5K-FTS2(L) micelles in a syngeneic murine breast cancer model was found to be significantly higher than that of Taxol, which may be attributed to their preferential tumor accumulation and a possible synergistic effect between PEG5K-FTS2 carrier and loaded PTX. PMID:23425093

  6. Macromolecules in drug delivery Macromolecular targeting agents, carriers, and drugs

    E-print Network

    Barthelat, Francois

    Macromolecules in drug delivery Macromolecular targeting agents, carriers, and drugs 1gauthier@emt.inrs.ca #12;Why macromolecules in drug delivery? 2gauthier@emt.inrs.ca Classic chemotherapy Drug delivery? Targeting A carrier for small drugs A release mechanism (if necessary) Protection of drug cargo #12;How? 3

  7. Prophylactic cannabinoid administration blocks the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic nociception during analgesic treatment and following cessation of drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chemotherapeutic treatment results in chronic pain in an estimated 30-40 percent of patients. Limited and often ineffective treatments make the need for new therapeutics an urgent one. We compared the effects of prophylactic cannabinoids as a preventative strategy for suppressing development of paclitaxel-induced nociception. The mixed CB1/CB2 agonist WIN55,212-2 was compared with the cannabilactone CB2-selective agonist AM1710, administered subcutaneously (s.c.), via osmotic mini pumps before, during, and after paclitaxel treatment. Pharmacological specificity was assessed using CB1 (AM251) and CB2 (AM630) antagonists. The impact of chronic drug infusion on transcriptional regulation of mRNA markers of astrocytes (GFAP), microglia (CD11b) and cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2) was assessed in lumbar spinal cords of paclitaxel and vehicle-treated rats. Results Both WIN55,212-2 and AM1710 blocked the development of paclitaxel-induced mechanical and cold allodynia; anti-allodynic efficacy persisted for approximately two to three weeks following cessation of drug delivery. WIN55,212-2 (0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg/day s.c.) suppressed the development of both paclitaxel-induced mechanical and cold allodynia. WIN55,212-2-mediated suppression of mechanical hypersensitivity was dominated by CB1 activation whereas suppression of cold allodynia was relatively insensitive to blockade by either CB1 (AM251; 3 mg/kg/day s.c.) or CB2 (AM630; 3 mg/kg/day s.c.) antagonists. AM1710 (0.032 and 3.2 mg/kg /day) suppressed development of mechanical allodynia whereas only the highest dose (3.2 mg/kg/day s.c.) suppressed cold allodynia. Anti-allodynic effects of AM1710 (3.2 mg/kg/day s.c.) were mediated by CB2. Anti-allodynic efficacy of AM1710 outlasted that produced by chronic WIN55,212-2 infusion. mRNA expression levels of the astrocytic marker GFAP was marginally increased by paclitaxel treatment whereas expression of the microglial marker CD11b was unchanged. Both WIN55,212-2 (0.5 mg/kg/day s.c.) and AM1710 (3.2 mg/kg/day s.c.) increased CB1 and CB2 mRNA expression in lumbar spinal cord of paclitaxel-treated rats in a manner blocked by AM630. Conclusions and implications Cannabinoids block development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy and protect against neuropathic allodynia following cessation of drug delivery. Chronic treatment with both mixed CB1/CB2 and CB2 selective cannabinoids increased mRNA expression of cannabinoid receptors (CB1, CB2) in a CB2-dependent fashion. Our results support the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for suppressing chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in humans. PMID:24742127

  8. Intraperitoneal delivery of a novel liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel redirects metabolic reprogramming and effectively inhibits cancer stem cells in Taxol®-resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao-An; Li, Wai-Hou; Chen, Po-Hung; He, Chun-Lin; Chang, Yen-Hou; Chuang, Chi-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Taxol® remained as the mainstay therapeutic agent in the treatment of ovarian cancer, however recurrence rate is still high. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a subset of cells in the bulk of tumors and play a central role in inducing drug resistance and recurrence. Furthermore, cancer metabolism has been an area under intensive investigation, since accumulating evidence has shown that CSCs and cancer metabolism are closely linked, an effect named as metabolic reprogramming. In this work, we aimed to investigate the impacts of a novel liposome-encapsulated paclitaxel (Nano-Taxol) on the stemness phenotype and metabolic reprogramming. A paclitaxel-resistant cell line (TR) was established at first. Tumor growth was induced in the mice peritoneal cavity by inoculation of TR cells. A 2x2 factorial experiment was designed to test the therapeutic efficacy in which factor 1 represented the comparison of drugs (Taxol® versus Nano-Taxol), while factor 2 represented the delivery route (intravenous versus intraperitoneal delivery). In this work, we found that intraperitoneal delivery of Nano-Taxol redirects metabolic reprogramming, from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation, and effectively suppresses cancer stem cells. Also, intraperitoneal delivery of Nano-Taxol led to a significantly better control of tumor growth compared with intravenous delivery of Taxol® (current standard treatment). This translational research may serve as a novel pathway for the drug development of nanomedicine. In the future, this treatment modality may be extended to treat several relevant cancers that have been proved to be suitable for the loco-regional delivery of therapeutic agents, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, and pancreatic cancer. PMID:26175846

  9. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2012-12-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1-targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1-estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  10. Targeted estrogen delivery reverses the metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finan, Brian; Yang, Bin; Ottaway, Nickki; Stemmer, Kerstin; Müller, Timo D; Yi, Chun-Xia; Habegger, Kirk; Schriever, Sonja C; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Kabra, Dhiraj G; Hembree, Jazzminn; Holland, Jenna; Raver, Christine; Seeley, Randy J; Hans, Wolfgang; Irmler, Martin; Beckers, Johannes; de Angelis, Martin Hrab?; Tiano, Joseph P; Mauvais-Jarvis, Franck; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Pfluger, Paul; Zhang, Lianshan; Gelfanov, Vasily; DiMarchi, Richard D; Tschöp, Matthias H

    2013-01-01

    We report the development of a new combinatorial approach that allows for peptide-mediated selective tissue targeting of nuclear hormone pharmacology while eliminating adverse effects in other tissues. Specifically, we report the development of a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-estrogen conjugate that has superior sex-independent efficacy over either of the individual hormones alone to correct obesity, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia in mice. The therapeutic benefits are driven by pleiotropic dual hormone action to improve energy, glucose and lipid metabolism, as shown by loss-of-function models and genetic action profiling. Notably, the peptide-based targeting strategy also prevents hallmark side effects of estrogen in male and female mice, such as reproductive endocrine toxicity and oncogenicity. Collectively, selective activation of estrogen receptors in GLP-1–targeted tissues produces unprecedented efficacy to enhance the metabolic benefits of GLP-1 agonism. This example of targeting the metabolic syndrome represents the discovery of a new class of therapeutics that enables synergistic co-agonism through peptide-based selective delivery of small molecules. Although our observations with the GLP-1–estrogen conjugate justify translational studies for diabetes and obesity, the multitude of other possible combinations of peptides and small molecules may offer equal promise for other diseases. PMID:23142820

  11. In vitro and in vivo anticancer activity of surface modified paclitaxel attached hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Venkatasubbu, G Devanand; Ramasamy, S; Reddy, G Pramod; Kumar, J

    2013-08-01

    Targeted drug delivery using nanocrystalline materials delivers the drug at the diseased site. This increases the efficacy of the drug in killing the cancer cells. Surface modifications were done to target the drug to a particular receptor on the cell surface. This paper reports synthesis of hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles and modification of their surface with polyethylene glycol (PEG) followed by folic acid (FA). Paclitaxel, an anticancer drug, is attached to functionalized hydroxyapatite and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. The pure and functionalised nanoparticles are characterised with XRD, TEM and UV spectroscopy. Anticancer analysis was carried out in DEN induced hepatocarcinoma animals. Biochemical, hematological and histopathological analysis show that the surface modified paclitaxel attached nanoparticles have an higher anticancer activity than the pure paclitaxel and surface modified nanoparticles without paclitaxel. This is due to the targeting of the drug to the folate receptor in the cancer cells. PMID:23615724

  12. Tumor hypoxia, the Warburg effect, and multidrug resistance: Modulation of hypoxia induced MDR using EGFR-targeted polymer blend nanocarriers for combination paclitaxel/lonidamine therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabr-Milane, Lara Scheherazade

    Multi-drug resistant (MDR) cancer is a significant clinical obstacle and is often implicated in cases of recurrent, non-responsive disease. The biological focus of this work is to explore the relationship between the hypoxic microenvironment of a tumor, the development of MDR, and the energetic profile characteristic of the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis). The therapeutic aim of this research is to develop an EGFR-targeted nanocarrier system for combination (paclitaxel/lonidamine) therapy for the treatment of MDR cancer. The stability of the nanocarrier formulation was validated in vitro and the system was characterized for drug release kinetics, size, surface modification, and EGFR-targeting ability. An orthotopic animal model of hypoxic, MDR breast cancer was developed for the pre-clinical evaluation of this system. The EGFR-targeted nanoparticles loaded with lonidamine and paclitaxel demonstrated superior pharmacokinetic parameters relative to non-targeted nanoparticles and drug solution. Combination therapy with lonidamine and paclitaxel, in solution and EGFR-targeted nanoparticle form, was more effective at suppressing tumor growth than single agent treatment. However, combination therapy with EGFR-targeted nanoparticles was less toxic than treatment with drug solution. Combination therapy did change the MDR and hypoxic character of the tumors as demonstrated by a decrease in marker proteins. This EGFR-targeted combination nanocarrier therapy has the potential to make the successful treatment of MDR a clinical reality.

  13. Mitochondrial biology, targets, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Milane, Lara; Trivedi, Malav; Singh, Amit; Talekar, Meghna; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-06-10

    In recent years, mitochondrial medicine has emerged as a new discipline resting at the intersection of mitochondrial biology, pathology, and pharmaceutics. The central role of mitochondria in critical cellular processes such as metabolism and apoptosis has placed mitochondria at the forefront of cell science. Advances in mitochondrial biology have revealed that these organelles continually undergo fusion and fission while functioning independently and in complex cellular networks, establishing direct membrane contacts with each other and with other organelles. Understanding the diverse cellular functions of mitochondria has contributed to understanding mitochondrial dysfunction in disease states. Polyplasmy and heteroplasmy contribute to mitochondrial phenotypes and associated dysfunction. Residing at the center of cell biology, cellular functions, and disease pathology and being laden with receptors and targets, mitochondria are beacons for pharmaceutical modification. This review presents the current state of mitochondrial medicine with a focus on mitochondrial function, dysfunction, and common disease; mitochondrial receptors, targets, and substrates; and mitochondrial drug design and drug delivery with a focus on the application of nanotechnology to mitochondrial medicine. Mitochondrial medicine is at the precipice of clinical translation; the objective of this review is to aid in the advancement of mitochondrial medicine from infancy to application. PMID:25841699

  14. Hybrid-polymerase chain reaction to identify novel target genes of miR-134 in paclitaxel resistant human ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SHUANG, TING; WANG, MIN; CHANG, SHUANG

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has shown that miR-134 is involved in the promotion of tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. However, whether miR-134 participates in ovarian cancer chemoresistance and its functional targets still remains unclear. The objective of this study was to apply hybrid-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to screen target genes of miR-134 in ovarian carcinoma paclitaxel resistant SKOV3-TR30 cells, and to provide a number of novel targets of miR-134 for further study of ovarian cancer paclitaxel resistance. The current study found that miR-134 was decreased in SKOV3-TR30 cells compared with the parental SKOV3 cell line. By applying hybrid-PCR, 8 putative target genes of miR-134 in SKOV3-TR30 cells were identified, including C16orf72, PNAS-105, SRM, VIM, F-box protein 2, GAPDH, PRPF6 and RPL41. Notably, the target sites of VIM and PRPF6 were not located in 3?untranslated region, but rather in the coding sequence region. By conducting a luciferase reporter assay, miR-134 was demonstrated to recognize the putative binding sites of these target genes including VIM and PRPF6. Transfecting SKOV3-TR30 cells with miR-134 mimic and performing reverse transcription-PCR in addition to western blot analysis confirmed that miR-134 regulates vimentin expression at a post transcriptional level. This finding provides a novel perspective for studying the mechanism of miR-134/mRNA interaction. In conclusion, this study was the first to apply an effective method of hybrid-PCR to screen putative target mRNAs of miR-134 in paclitaxel resistant SKOV3-TR30 cells and indicate that miR-134 may contribute to the induction of SKOV3-TR30 paclitaxel resistance by targeting these genes. PMID:26137169

  15. miR-23a Targets Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 and Modulates Cellular Proliferation and Paclitaxel-Induced Apoptosis in Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li-hua; Liu, Min; Li, Xin; Tang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs that function as key regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In our previous research, we found that miR-23a was significantly up-regulated in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells. In the current study, we demonstrate that miR-23a suppresses paclitaxel-induced apoptosis and promotes the cell proliferation and colony formation ability of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. We have identified tumor suppressor interferon regulator factor 1 (IRF1) as a direct target gene of miR-23a. We performed a fluorescent reporter assay to confirm that miR-23a bound to the IRF1 mRNA 3?UTR directly and specifically. The ectopic expression of IRF1 markedly promoted paclitaxel-induced apoptosis and inhibited cell viability and colony formation ability, whereas the knockdown of IRF1 had the opposite effects. The restoration of IRF1 expression counteracted the effects of miR-23a on the paclitaxel-induced apoptosis and cell proliferation of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that miR-23a is frequently up-regulated in gastric adenocarcinoma tissues, whereas IRF1 is down-regulated in cancer tissues. Altogether, these results indicate that miR-23a suppresses paclitaxel-induced apoptosis and promotes cell viability and the colony formation ability of gastric adenocarcinoma cells by targeting IRF1 at the post-transcriptional level. PMID:23785404

  16. Toward Intracellular Targeted Delivery of Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Debinski, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    A number of anti-cancer drugs have their targets localized to particular intracellular compartments. These drugs reach the targets mainly through diffusion, dependent on biophysical and biochemical forces that allow cell penetration. This means that both cancer cells and normal cells will be subjected to such diffusion; hence many of these drugs, like chemotherapeutics, are potentially toxic and the concentration achieved at the site of their action is often suboptimal. The same relates to radiation that indiscriminately affects normal and diseased cells. However, nature-designed systems enable compounds present in the extracellular environment to end up inside the cell and even travel to more specific intracellular compartments. For example, viruses and bacterial toxins can more or less specifically recognize eukaryotic cells, enter these cells, and direct some protein portions to designated intracellular areas. These phenomena have led to creative thinking, such as employing viruses or bacterial toxins for cargo delivery to cells and, more specifically, to cancer cells. Proteins can be genetically engineered in order to not only mimic what viruses and bacterial toxins can do, but also to add new functions, extending or changing the intracellular routes. It is possible to make conjugates or, more preferably, single-chain proteins that recognize cancer cells and deliver cargo inside the cells, even to the desired subcellular compartment. These findings offer new opportunities to deliver drugs/labels only to cancer cells and only to their site of action within the cells. The development of such dual-specificity vectors for targeting cancer cells is an attractive and potentially safer and more efficacious way of delivering drugs. We provide examples of this approach for delivering brain cancer therapeutics, using a specific biomarker on glioblastoma tumor cells. PMID:22671766

  17. Nanoparticles of star-like copolymer mannitol-functionalized poly(lactide)-vitamin E TPGS for delivery of paclitaxel to prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kebing; Guo, Longhua; Xiong, Wei; Sun, Leilei; Zheng, Yi

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop novel nanoparticles (NPs) of star-like copolymer mannitol-functionalized poly(lactide)-vitamin E TPGS (M-PLA-TPGS) for paclitaxel delivery for prostate cancer treatment, and evaluate their therapeutic effects in prostate cancer cell line and animal model in comparison with the linear PLGA NPs and poly(lactide)-vitamin E TPGS (PLA-TPGS) NPs. The paclitaxel-loaded M-PLA-TPGS NPs, prepared by a modified nano-precipitation method, were observed by FESEM to be near-spherical shape with narrow size distribution. The drug-loaded NPs were further characterized in terms of size, surface charge, drug content, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release. The results showed that the M-PLA-TPGS NPs were found to be stable, showing almost no change in particle size and surface charge during the three-month storage period. In vitro drug release exhibited biphasic pattern with initial burst release followed by slow and continuous release. The cellular uptake level of M-PLA-TPGS NPs was demonstrated higher than linear PLGA NPs and PLA-TPGS NPs in PC-3 cells. The data also showed that the paclitaxel-loaded M-PLA-TPGS nanoparticles have higher antitumor efficacy than that of linear PLA-TPGS nanoparticles and PLGA nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo. In summary, the star-like copolymer M-PLA-TPGS could be used as a potential and promising molecular biomaterial in developing novel nanoformulation for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24621530

  18. Nanoparticle-based targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Lillard, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology could be defined as the technology that has allowed for the control, manipulation, study, and manufacture of structures and devices in the “nanometer” size range. These nano-sized objects, e.g., “nanoparticles”, take on novel properties and functions that differ markedly from those seen from items made of identical materials. The small size, customized surface, improved solubility, and multi-functionality of nanoparticles will continue to open many doors and create new biomedical applications. Indeed, the novel properties of nanoparticles offer the ability to interact with complex cellular functions in new ways. This rapidly growing field requires cross-disciplinary research and provides opportunities to design and develop multifunctional devices that can target, diagnose, and treat devastating diseases such as cancer. This article presents an overview of nanotechnology for the biologist and discusses the attributes of our novel XPclad© nanoparticle formulation that has shown efficacy in treating solid tumors, for single dose vaccination, and oral delivery of therapeutic proteins. PMID:19186176

  19. Novel ZnO hollow-nanocarriers containing paclitaxel targeting folate-receptors in a malignant pH-microenvironment for effective monitoring and promoting breast tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Rajput, Shashi; Kumar, B.N. Prashanth; Sarkar, Siddik; Konar, Suraj; Brunt, Keith R.; Rao, Raj R.; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Das, Swadesh K.; Basu, Ranadhir; Fisher, Paul B.; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Low pH in the tumor micromilieu is a recognized pathological feature of cancer. This attribute of cancerous cells has been targeted herein for the controlled release of chemotherapeutics at the tumour site, while sparing healthy tissues. To this end, pH-sensitive, hollow ZnO-nanocarriers loaded with paclitaxel were synthesized and their efficacy studied in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The nanocarriers were surface functionalized with folate using click-chemistry to improve targeted uptake by the malignant cells that over-express folate-receptors. The nanocarriers released ~75% of the paclitaxel payload within six hours in acidic pH, which was accompanied by switching of fluorescence from blue to green and a 10-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence-switching phenomenon is due to structural collapse of the nanocarriers in the endolysosome. Energy dispersion X-ray mapping and whole animal fluorescent imaging studies were carried out to show that combined pH and folate-receptor targeting reduces off-target accumulation of the nanocarriers. Further, a dual cell-specific and pH-sensitive nanocarrier greatly improved the efficacy of paclitaxel to regress subcutaneous tumors in vivo. These nanocarriers could improve chemotherapy tolerance and increase anti-tumor efficacy, while also providing a novel diagnostic read-out through fluorescent switching that is proportional to drug release in malignant tissues. PMID:26145450

  20. Novel ZnO hollow-nanocarriers containing paclitaxel targeting folate-receptors in a malignant pH-microenvironment for effective monitoring and promoting breast tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Puvvada, Nagaprasad; Rajput, Shashi; Kumar, B N Prashanth; Sarkar, Siddik; Konar, Suraj; Brunt, Keith R; Rao, Raj R; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Das, Swadesh K; Basu, Ranadhir; Fisher, Paul B; Mandal, Mahitosh; Pathak, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Low pH in the tumor micromilieu is a recognized pathological feature of cancer. This attribute of cancerous cells has been targeted herein for the controlled release of chemotherapeutics at the tumour site, while sparing healthy tissues. To this end, pH-sensitive, hollow ZnO-nanocarriers loaded with paclitaxel were synthesized and their efficacy studied in breast cancer in vitro and in vivo. The nanocarriers were surface functionalized with folate using click-chemistry to improve targeted uptake by the malignant cells that over-express folate-receptors. The nanocarriers released ~75% of the paclitaxel payload within six hours in acidic pH, which was accompanied by switching of fluorescence from blue to green and a 10-fold increase in the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence-switching phenomenon is due to structural collapse of the nanocarriers in the endolysosome. Energy dispersion X-ray mapping and whole animal fluorescent imaging studies were carried out to show that combined pH and folate-receptor targeting reduces off-target accumulation of the nanocarriers. Further, a dual cell-specific and pH-sensitive nanocarrier greatly improved the efficacy of paclitaxel to regress subcutaneous tumors in vivo. These nanocarriers could improve chemotherapy tolerance and increase anti-tumor efficacy, while also providing a novel diagnostic read-out through fluorescent switching that is proportional to drug release in malignant tissues. PMID:26145450

  1. Poly(ethylene glycol)-paclitaxel-alendronate self-assembled micelles for the targeted treatment of breast cancer bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Keren; Clementi, Chiara; Polyak, Dina; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Benayoun, Liat; Barshack, Iris; Shaked, Yuval; Pasut, Gianfranco; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2013-05-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) and alendronate (ALN) are effective drugs used for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastases. Growing evidence suggests that low-dose taxanes and bisphosphonates possess anti-angiogenic properties. However, PTX is water-insoluble and toxic, even if administered at anti-angiogenic dosing schedule. Polymer conjugation of PTX will increase water-solubility and improve its pharmacokinetic profile directing it to the tumor site. We further propose to combine it with ALN for active bone targeting. We conjugated ALN and PTX with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) forming self-assembled micelles where PTX molecules are located at the inner core and the water-soluble ALN molecules at the outer shell. PTX-PEG-ALN micelles exhibited similar in vitro cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic activity as the free drugs. Biodistribution analysis demonstrated preferential tumor accumulation of FITC-labeled PTX-PEG-ALN micelles. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed longer t1/2 of the conjugate than free PTX. PTX-PEG-ALN micelles achieved improved efficacy and safety profiles over free PTX in syngeneic and xenogeneic mouse models of mCherry-infected mammary adenocarcinoma in the tibia, as monitored intravitally non-invasively by a fluorescence imaging system. The described data warrants the potential use of PTX-PEG-ALN as bone-targeted anticancer and anti-angiogenic therapy for breast cancer bone metastases. PMID:23434349

  2. Targeted Therapeutics and Nanodevices for Vascular Drug Delivery: Quo Vadis?

    PubMed Central

    Muzykantov, Vladimir R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary This issue of the journal is dedicated to targeted delivery of therapeutics in the vasculature, an approach that holds promise to optimize treatment of diverse pathological conditions ranging from ischemia and tumor growth to metabolic and genetic diseases. From the standpoint of drug delivery, circulation system represents the natural route to the targets, whereas its components (blood and vascular cells) represent targets, carriers or barriers for drug delivery. Diverse nanodevices and targeted therapeutic agents that are designed and tested in animal and early clinical studies to achieve optimal and precise spatiotemporal control of the pharmacokinetics, destination, metabolism and effect of pharmacological agents will be discussed in this introductory essay and subsequent critical reviews in this series. PMID:21721101

  3. Targeting strategies for delivery of anti-HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Ramana, Lakshmi Narashimhan; Anand, Appakkudal R; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2014-10-28

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection remains a significant cause of mortality globally. Though antiretroviral therapy has significantly reduced AIDS-related morbidity and mortality, there are several drawbacks in the current therapy, including toxicity, drug-drug interactions, development of drug resistance, necessity for long-term drug therapy, poor bio-availability and lack of access to tissues and reservoirs. To circumvent these problems, recent anti-HIV therapeutic research has focused on improving drug delivery systems through drug delivery targeted specifically to host cells infected with HIV or could potentially get infected with HIV. In this regard, several surface molecules of both viral and host cell origin have been described in recent years, that would enable targeted drug delivery in HIV infection. In the present review, we provide a comprehensive overview of the need for novel drug delivery systems, and the successes and challenges in the identification of novel viral and host-cell molecules for the targeted drug delivery of anti-HIV drugs. Such targeted anti-retroviral drug delivery approaches could pave the way for effective treatment and eradication of HIV from the body. PMID:25119469

  4. Feedback-regulated paclitaxel delivery based on poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl

    E-print Network

    Auguste, Debra T.

    H-sensitive polymers for oral drug deliv- ery [11e13], gene delivery [14], and insulin delivery [15], where(DMAEMA) microgels have been synthesized with other co-monomers (i.e. polystyrene [21], acrylamide [22 insulin delivery system based on poly(DMAEMA- co-HEMA) hydrogels within in vivo conditions. Hydrogel

  5. Targeted Nanomedicine for Suppression of CD44 and Simultaneous Cell Death Induction in Ovarian Cancer: an Optimal Delivery of siRNA and Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vatsal; Taratula, Oleh; Garbuzenko, Olga B.; Taratula, Olena R.; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Minko, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The proposed project is aimed at enhancing the efficiency of epithelial ovarian cancer treatment and reducing adverse side effects of chemotherapy using nanotechnology. Overexpression of the CD44 membrane receptor results in tumor initiation, growth, tumor stem cells specific behavior, development of drug resistance, and metastases. We hypothesize that a developed cancer targeted delivery system which combines CD44 siRNA with paclitaxel would successfully deliver its payload inside cancer cells, effectively induce cell death, and prevent metastases. Experimental Design: We synthesized, characterized, and tested a nanoscale-based drug delivery system containing a modified Polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimer as a carrier; anticancer drug paclitaxel as a cell death inducer; a synthetic analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptide as a tumor targeting moiety, and siRNA targeted to CD44 mRNA. The proposed NDDS was tested in vitro and in vivo using metastatic ovarian cancer cells isolated from patients with malignant ascites. Results: We found that in contrast to cells isolated from primary tumors, CD44 was highly overexpressed in metastatic cancer cells. Treatment with the proposed tumor-targeted nanoscale-based nucleic acid and drug delivery system led to the suppression of CD44 mRNA and protein, efficient induction of cell death, effective tumor shrinkage, and prevention of adverse side effects on healthy organs. Conclusion: We show a high therapeutic potential for combinatorial treatment of ovarian carcinoma with a novel drug delivery system that effectively transports siRNA targeting to CD44 mRNA simultaneously with cytotoxic agents. PMID:24036854

  6. Nanoparticles for oral delivery: Targeted nanoparticles with peptidic ligands for oral protein delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Yeonhee; Cho, Yong Woo; Park, Kinam

    2012-01-01

    As the field of biotechnology has advanced, oral protein delivery has also made significant progress. Oral delivery is the most common method of drug administration with high levels of patient acceptance. Despite the preference of oral delivery, administration of therapeutic proteins has been extremely difficult. Increasing the bioavailability of oral protein drugs to the therapeutically acceptable level is still a challenging goal. Poor membrane permeability, high molecular weight, and enzymatic degradation of protein drugs have remained unsolved issues. Among diverse strategies, nanotechnology has provided a glimpse of hope in oral delivery of protein drugs. Nanoparticles have advantages, such as small size, high surface area, and modification using functional groups for high capacity or selectivity. Nanoparticles with peptidic ligands are especially worthy of notice because they can be used for specific targeting in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. This article reviews the transport mechanism of the GI tract, barriers to protein absorption, current status and limitations of nanotechnology for oral protein delivery system. PMID:23123292

  7. Functionalized Nanosystems for Targeted Mitochondrial Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Durazo, Shelley A.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction including oxidative stress and DNA mutations underlies the pathology of various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes, necessitating the development of mitochondria targeted therapeutic agents. Nanotechnology offers unique tools and materials to target therapeutic agents to mitochondria. As discussed in this paper, a variety of functionalized nanosystems including polymeric and metallic nanoparticles as well as liposomes are more effective than plain drug and non-functionalized nanosystems in delivering therapeutic agents to mitochondria. Although the field is in its infancy, studies to date suggest the superior therapeutic activity of functionalized nanosystems for treating mitochondrial defects. PMID:22138492

  8. 'Smart' non-viral delivery systems for targeted delivery of RNAi to the lungs.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joanne M; Hibbitts, Alan; Barlow, James; Kelly, Ciara; Sivadas, Neeraj; Cryan, Sally-Ann

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of RNAi offers a potentially exciting new therapeutic paradigm for respiratory diseases. However, effective delivery remains a key requirement for their translation into the clinic and has been a major factor in the limited clinical success seen to date. Inhalation offers tissue-specific targeting of the RNAi to treat respiratory diseases and a diminished risk of off-target effects. In order to deliver RNAi directly to the respiratory tract via inhalation, 'smart' non-viral carriers are required to protect the RNAi during delivery/aerosolization and enhance cell-specific uptake to target cells. Here, we review the state-of-the-art in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering, and specifically non-viral siRNA delivery platforms, for delivery via inhalation. This includes developments in inhaler device engineering and particle engineering, including manufacturing methods and excipients used in therapeutic aerosol bioengineering that underpin the development of smart, cell type-specific delivery systems to target siRNA to respiratory epithelial cells and/or alveolar macrophages. PMID:23323781

  9. Use of a Lipid-Coated Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle Platform for Synergistic Gemcitabine and Paclitaxel Delivery to Human Pancreatic Cancer in Mice

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a commercial albumin-bound paclitaxel (PTX) nanocarrier (Abraxane) was approved as the first new drug for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in almost a decade. PTX improves the pharmaceutical efficacy of the first-line pancreatic cancer drug, gemcitabine (GEM), through suppression of the tumor stroma and inhibiting the expression of the GEM-inactivating enzyme, cytidine deaminase (CDA). We asked, therefore, whether it was possible to develop a mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSNP) carrier for pancreatic cancer to co-deliver a synergistic GEM/PTX combination. High drug loading was achieved by a custom-designed coated lipid film technique to encapsulate a calculated dose of GEM (40 wt %) by using a supported lipid bilayer (LB). The uniform coating of the 65 nm nanoparticles by a lipid membrane allowed incorporation of a sublethal amount of hydrophobic PTX, which could be co-delivered with GEM in pancreatic cells and tumors. We demonstrate that ratiometric PTX incorporation and delivery by our LB-MSNP could suppress CDA expression, contemporaneous with induction of oxidative stress as the operating principle for PTX synergy. To demonstrate the in vivo efficacy, mice carrying subcutaneous PANC-1 xenografts received intravenous (IV) injection of PTX/GEM-loaded LB-MSNP. Drug co-delivery provided more effective tumor shrinkage than GEM-loaded LB-MSNP, free GEM, or free GEM plus Abraxane. Comparable tumor shrinkage required coadministration of 12 times the amount of free Abraxane. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of tumor-associated GEM metabolites confirmed that, compared to free GEM, MSNP co-delivery increased the phosphorylated DNA-interactive GEM metabolite 13-fold and decreased the inactivated and deaminated metabolite 4-fold. IV injection of MSNP-delivered PTX/GEM in a PANC-1 orthotopic model effectively inhibited primary tumor growth and eliminated metastatic foci. The enhanced in vivo efficacy of the dual delivery carrier could be achieved with no evidence of local or systemic toxicity. In summary, we demonstrate the development of an effective LB-MSNP nanocarrier for synergistic PTX/GEM delivery in pancreatic cancer. PMID:25776964

  10. Synthetic LDL as targeted drug delivery vehicle

    DOEpatents

    Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA); Nikanjam, Mina (Richmond, CA)

    2012-08-28

    The present invention provides a synthetic LDL nanoparticle comprising a lipid moiety and a synthetic chimeric peptide so as to be capable of binding the LDL receptor. The synthetic LDL nanoparticle of the present invention is capable of incorporating and targeting therapeutics to cells expressing the LDL receptor for diseases associated with the expression of the LDL receptor such as central nervous system diseases. The invention further provides methods of using such synthetic LDL nanoparticles.

  11. Oral delivery of paclitaxel nanocrystal (PNC) with a dual Pgp-CYP3A4 inhibitor: preparation, characterization and antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ketan; Patil, Anand; Mehta, Miten; Gota, Vikram; Vavia, Pradeep

    2014-09-10

    Several molecular inheritances have severely restrained the peroral delivery of taxanes. The main objective of the present investigation was to develop a paclitaxel (PTX) formulation which can circumvent the hurdles of its extremely poor solubility and permeability, Pgp efflux and high pre-systemic metabolism. Positively charged PTX nanocrystals of 209 nm were prepared by sonoprecipitation with high pressure homogenization technique, wherein an arginine based surfactant was explored as a stabilizer. The BET surface area analysis revealed that the surface area of PNC was 8.53 m(2)/gm, reflecting significant rise in surface area with nanonization of PTX. The DSC and XRD pattern suggested that the PTX is in the form of the most stable dihydrate crystal. The PNC showed very rapid dissolution profile compared to plain PTX in both sinks and non-sink conditions. Clarithromycin (CLM) was evaluated as a better alternative to cyclosporin A in improving PTX permeability. The PNC-CLM showed remarkable enhancement of 453% in relative bioavailability along with maintaining the therapeutic concentration of PTX for 8h. Efficacy data in B16 F10 melanoma tumor bearing mice showed substantial reduction in tumor volume and improvement in percentage survival compared to the control group. PMID:24954663

  12. Heat-treated emulsions with cross-linking bovine serum albumin interfacial films and different dextran surfaces: effect of paclitaxel delivery.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jianing; Huang, Chong; He, Fen; Yao, Ping

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a type of biocompatible and biodegradable oil-in-water emulsion for hydrophobic drug delivery was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-dextran conjugates with different dextran molecular weights and different conjugation degrees were used as the emulsifier and stabilizer. Paclitaxel (PTX), a hydrophobic antitumor drug, was effectively loaded inside the oil droplets via high-pressure homogenization. The emulsions were heated at 90°C for 1?h to eliminate the anaphylaxis of BSA. By virtue of the cross-linked BSA films at the oil-water interfaces produced by the heat treatment and the hydrophilic dextran surfaces, the emulsions are stable in blood serum, as well as stable against long-term storage. In vitro cytotoxicity study verifies that the unloaded emulsions are biocompatible and the PTX-loaded emulsions have similar antitumor activity as PTX solution. In vivo investigation of murine ascites hepatoma H22-tumor-bearing mice demonstrates that the PTX-loaded emulsion with shorter and denser dextran surface has better tumor inhibition and survivability efficacy than the commercial PTX injection. PMID:23389967

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a novel polydepsipeptide contained tri-block copolymer (mPEG-PLLA-PMMD) as self-assembly micelle delivery system for paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanlei; Li, Juan; Yu, Hua; Wang, Guangji; Liu, Wen

    2012-07-01

    A series of biodegradable polydepsipeptides based new triblock copolymers, poly (ethylene glycol)-poly(L-lactide)-poly(3(S)-methyl-morpholine-2,5-dione) (mPEG-PLLA-PMMD) have been synthesized and characterized as self-assembly micelle delivery system for paclitaxel (PTX). Compared to the mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000) diblock copolymers, the triblock copolymers present more benefits such as lower CMC value, positive-shifted zeta potential, better drug loading efficiency and stability. Among the triblock polymers, mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000)-PMMD(1400) micelles present low cytotoxicity and promote the anti-cancer activity of PTX on A-549 and HCT-116cells. In addition, mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000)-PMMD(1400) micelles prolongs the circulation time of PTX in rat after i.v. injection (5 mg/kg) than that of mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000) micelles and Taxol. The half life (t(1/2?)), mean residence time (MRT), AUC(0-?) and clearance (CL) for PTX-loaded mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000)-PMMD(1400) micelles are determined to be 1.941 h, 2.683 h, 5.220 ?g/m Lh (1.8-fold to mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000) group), 0.967 L/h kg(-1), respectively. In conclusion, mPEG(2000)-PLLA(2000)-PMMD(1400) copolymer could be developed as one of the promising vectors to anti-cancer agents for chemotherapeutics. PMID:22484705

  14. A co-delivery system based on paclitaxel grafted mPEG-b-PLG loaded with doxorubicin: preparation, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Lv, Shixian; Tang, Zhaohui; Liu, Muhua; Zhang, Dawei; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xuesi

    2014-08-25

    Herein, we develop a co-delivery system of paclitaxel (PTX) and doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX·HCl) based on methoxypoly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-glutamic acid) (mPEG-b-PLG) for cancer treatment. PTX was grafted to the mPEG-b-PLG by esterification to give mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX. DOX·HCl was encapsulated via electrostatic interaction and hydrophobic stack between the DOX·HCl and mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX in aqueous solution. The release rate of DOX·HCl from the drug-loaded nanoparticles (mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX-DOX) was slow at blood pH (pH 7.4), but obviously increased at endosome pH (pH 5.4). The mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX-DOX exhibited slight synergistic effect in inhibition of proliferation of A549 and MCF-7 human cancer cells. For in vivo treatment of xenograft human breast tumor (MCF-7), the mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX-DOX nanoparticles exhibited remarkable tumor inhibition effect with a 95.5% tumor-suppression-rate which was significantly higher than those of related single anticancer agents such as free DOX·HCl and mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX. These results indicated that the mPEG-b-PLG-g-PTX-DOX would have great potential in cancer therapy. PMID:24905776

  15. Co-delivery of paclitaxel and ?-tocopherol succinate by novel chitosan-based polymeric micelles for improving micellar stability and efficacious combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Emami, Jaber; Rezazadeh, Mahboubeh; Rostami, Mahboubeh; Hassanzadeh, Farshid; Sadeghi, Hojjat; Mostafavi, Abolfazl; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop chitosan derivative polymeric micelles for co-delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) and ?-tocopherol succinate (?-TS) to the cancer cells to improve the therapeutic efficiency and reduce side effects of PTX. In this study, amphiphilic tocopheryl succinate-grafted chitosan oligosaccharide was synthesized and physically loaded by PTX and ?-TS with entrapment efficiency of 67.9% and 73.2%, respectively. Physical incorporation of ?-TS into the micelles increased the hydrophobic interaction between PTX and the micelles core, which improved micelle stability, reduced the micelle size and also sustained the PTX release from the micelles. The mean particle size and zeta potential of ?TS/PTX-loaded micelles were about 133?nm and +25.2?mV, respectively, and PTX release was completed during 6-9?d from the micelles. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity of ?-TS/PTX-loaded micelles against human ovarian cancer cell line cancer cell in vitro was higher than that of PTX-loaded micelles and the free drug solution. Half maximal inhibitory concentration values of PTX after 48-h exposure of the cells to the PTX-loaded micelles modified and unmodified with ?-TS were 110 and 188?ng/ml, respectively. PMID:25019502

  16. Untethered magnetic millirobot for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Iacovacci, Veronica; Lucarini, Gioia; Ricotti, Leonardo; Dario, Paolo; Dupont, Pierre E; Menciassi, Arianna

    2015-06-01

    This paper reports the design and development of a novel millimeter-sized robotic system for targeted therapy. The proposed medical robot is conceived to perform therapy in relatively small diameter body canals (spine, urinary system, ovary, etc.), and to release several kinds of therapeutics, depending on the pathology to be treated. The robot is a nearly-buoyant bi-component system consisting of a carrier, in which the therapeutic agent is embedded, and a piston. The piston, by exploiting magnetic effects, docks with the carrier and compresses a drug-loaded hydrogel, thus activating the release mechanism. External magnetic fields are exploited to propel the robot towards the target region, while intermagnetic forces are exploited to trigger drug release. After designing and fabricating the robot, the system has been tested in vitro with an anticancer drug (doxorubicin) embedded in the carrier. The efficiency of the drug release mechanism has been demonstrated by both quantifying the amount of drug released and by assessing the efficacy of this therapeutic procedure on human bladder cancer cells. PMID:26009273

  17. Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery.

    PubMed

    Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang, Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh

    2006-11-01

    Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without motion. The BSD plan was also delivered on the phantom that moved with the prescheduled pattern and synchronized with the delivery of each beam. Film dosimetry showed underdose and overdose in the superior and inferior regions of the target, respectively, if the tumor motion is not compensated during the delivery. BSD delivery resulted in a dose distribution very similar to the planned treatments. PMID:17153412

  18. Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Tewatia, Dinesh; Zhang Tiezhi; Tome, Wolfgang; Paliwal, Bhudatt; Metha, Minesh [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumant Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan 48073 (United States); Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

    2006-11-15

    Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without motion. The BSD plan was also delivered on the phantom that moved with the prescheduled pattern and synchronized with the delivery of each beam. Film dosimetry showed underdose and overdose in the superior and inferior regions of the target, respectively, if the tumor motion is not compensated during the delivery. BSD delivery resulted in a dose distribution very similar to the planned treatments.

  19. Delivery of Polymeric Nanoparticles to Target Vascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Agyare, Edward; Kandimalla, Karunyna

    2015-01-01

    Current advances in nanotechnology have paved the way for the early detection, prevention and treatment of various diseases such as vascular disorders and cancer. These advances have provided novel approaches or modalities of incorporating or adsorbing therapeutic, biosensor and targeting agents into/on nanoparticles. With significant progress, nanomedicine for vascular therapy has shown significant advantages over traditional medicine because of its ability to selectively target the disease site and reduce adverse side effects. Targeted delivery of nanoparticles to vascular endothelial cells or the vascular wall provides an effective and more efficient way for early detection and/or treatment of vascular diseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis and Cerebrovascular Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA). Clinical applications of biocompatible and biodegradable polymers in areas such as vascular graft, implantable drug delivery, stent devices and tissue engineering scaffolds have advanced the candidature of polymers as potential nano-carriers for vascular-targeted delivery of diagnostic agents and drugs. This review focuses on the basic aspects of the vasculature and its associated diseases and relates them to polymeric nanoparticle-based strategies for targeting therapeutic agents to diseased vascular site.

  20. Hydrotropic polymeric mixed micelles based on functional hyperbranched polyglycerol copolymers as hepatoma-targeting drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuejiao; Zhang, Xinge; Yu, Peien; Han, Yucai; Li, Yangguang; Li, Chaoxing

    2013-01-01

    Mixed copolymer nanoparticles (NPs) self-assembled from ?-cyclodextrin-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-CD) and lactobionic acid (LA)-grafted hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG-g-LA) were applied as carriers for a hydrophobic antitumor drug, paclitaxel (PTX), achieving hepatocellular carcinoma-targeted delivery. The resulting NPs exhibited high drug loading capacity and substantial stability in aqueous solution. In vitro drug release studies demonstrated a controlled drug release profile with increased release at acidic pH. Remarkably, tumor proliferation assays showed that PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs inhibited asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor positive HepG2 cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in comparison with ASGP receptor negative BGC-823 cells. Moreover, the competition assay demonstrated that the small molecular LA inhibited the cellular uptake of the PTX-loaded mixed copolymer NPs, indicating the ASGP receptor-mediated endocytosis in HepG2 cells. In addition, the intracellular uptake tests by confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the mixed copolymer NPs were more efficiently taken up by HepG2 cells compared with HPG-g-CD NPs. These results suggest a feasible application of the mixed copolymer NPs as nanocarriers for hepatoma-targeted delivery of potent antitumor drugs. PMID:23132353

  1. MiR-125b regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition via targeting Sema4C in paclitaxel-resistant breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zunlan; Zhu, Lihua; Chen, Sulian; Wu, Qiong; Chen, Changjie; Wang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRNA) play a critical role in chemotherapy-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer. However, the underlying mechanism of chemotherapy-mediated EMT has not been fully understood. To address this concern, we explored the role of miR-125b in regulation of EMT in stable paclitaxel-resistant (PR) breast cancer cells, namely MCF-7 PR and SKBR3 PR, which have displayed mesenchymal features. Our results illustrated that miR-125b was significantly downregulated in PR cells. Moreover, ectopic expression of miR-125b by its mimics reversed the phenotype of EMT in PR cells. Furthermore, we found that miR-125b governed PR-mediate EMT partly due to governing its target Sema4C. More importantly, overexpression of miR-125b or depletion of Sema4C sensitized PR cells to paclitaxel. These findings suggest that up-regulation of miR-125b or targeting Sema4C could serve as novel approaches to reverse chemotherapy resistance in breast cancers. PMID:25605244

  2. PEG-Derivatized Embelin as a Nanomicellar Carrier For Delivery of Paclitaxel to Breast and Prostate Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Zhao, Wenchen; Marquez, Rebecca T.; Meng, Xiaojie; Li, Jiang; Gao, Xiang; Venkataramanan, Raman; Wang, Zhou; Li, Song

    2012-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for a wide spectrum of cancers, but its therapeutic benefit is often limited by severe side effects. We have developed a micelle-based PTX formulation based on a simple conjugate derived from polyethylene glycol 5000 (PEG5K) and embelin (EB). Embelin is a natural product and exhibits antitumor activity through blocking the activity of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP). PEG5K-EB2 conjugate self-assembles to form stable micelles in aqueous solution and efficiently encapsulates hydrophobic drugs such as PTX. PEG5K-EB2 micelles have a relatively low CMC of 0.002mg/mL (0.35?M) with sizes in the range of 20 ~ 30 nm with or without loaded PTX. In vitro cell uptake study showed that the PEG5K-EB2 micelles were efficiently taken up by tumor cells. In vitro release study showed that PTX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles was slowly released over 5 days with much slower release kinetics than that of Taxol formulation. PTX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles exhibited more potent cytotoxicity than Taxol in several cultured tumor cell lines. Total body near infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging showed that PEG5K-EB2 micelles were selectively accumulated at tumor site with minimal uptake in major organs including liver and spleen. PTX-loaded PEG5K-EB2 micelles demonstrated an excellent safety profile with a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of 100–120 mg PTX/kg in mice, which was significantly higher than that for Taxol (15–20 mg PTX/kg). Finally, PTX formulated in PEG5K-EB2 micelles showed superior anti-tumor activity compared to Taxol in murine models of breast and prostate cancers. PMID:23182923

  3. Targeted Cellular Drug Delivery using Tailored Dendritic Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kolhe, Parag; Kannan, Sujatha; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2002-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers possess highly branched architectures, with a large number of controllable, tailorble, ‘peripheral’ functionalities. Since the surface chemistry of these materials can be modified with relative ease, these materials have tremendous potential in targeted drug and gene delivery. The large number of end groups can also be tailored to create special affinity to targeted cells, and can also encapsulate drugs and deliver them in a controlled manner. We are developing tailor-modified dendritic systems for drug delivery. Synthesis, in-vitro drug loading, in-vitro drug delivery, and the targeting efficiency to the cell are being studied systematically using a wide variety of experimental tools. Polyamidoamine and Polyol dendrimers, with different generations and end-groups are studied, with drugs such as Ibuprofen and Methotrexate. Our results indicate that a large number of drug molecules can be encapsulated/attached to the dendrimers, depending on the end groups. The drug-encapsulated dendrimer is able to enter the cells rapidly and deliver the drug. Targeting strategies being explored

  4. Targeted Delivery of NK007 to Macrophages to Treat Colitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siming; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Hao; Guo, Wenjun; Yu, Min; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Zhenzhou; Zhao, Liqing; Yin, Zhinan; Hong, Zhangyong

    2015-07-01

    Macrophages are important therapeutic targets for various disorders, including infectious diseases, inflammatory diseases, metabolic diseases, and cancer. In this study, we report a novel oral delivery system for the targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory therapeutics to macrophages. Using this formulation, the model drug tylophorine malate (NK007) was tightly incorporated inside beta-glucan particle shells by the formation of colloidal particles with chitosan, tripolyphosphate, and alginate via electrostatic interactions. This formulation specifically delivered NK007 to macrophages in vivo after oral gavage and effectively cured colitis in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced murine colitis model, highlighting the utility of beta-glucan particles as an oral anti-inflammation drug delivery system by targeting macrophages. In this work, NK007 was selected as the model drug. However, this novel oral carrier system has the potential to be applied as a platform for the treatment of many other diseases for which macrophages are the therapeutic targets. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:2276-2284, 2015. PMID:25964181

  5. Pharmacokinetics of Interstitial Delivery of Carmustine, 4-Hydroperoxycyclophosphamide, and Paclitaxel from a Biodegradable Polymer Implant in the Monkey Brain1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lawrence K. Fung; Matthew G. Ewend; Allen Sills; Eric P. Sipos; Reid Thompson; Mark Watts

    Polymeric interstitial chemotherapy increases survival of humans with recurrent gliomas and animals with transplanted tumors in the brain, but the relationship between rates of drug release from polymer implants and drug concentration in brain tissue is unknown. This work presents a pharmacokinetic framework for application of this new modality of chem otherapy delivery in primates. Either | 'II Inimiiistiur. 4-hydroperoxycy-

  6. Nanostructured materials for selective recognition and targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrotsiou, O.; Kotti, K.; Dini, E.; Kammona, O.; Kiparissides, C.

    2005-01-01

    Selective recognition requires the introduction of a molecular memory into a polymer matrix in order to make it capable of rebinding an analyte with a very high specificity. In addition, targeted drug delivery requires drug-loaded vesicles which preferentially localize to the sites of injury and avoid uptake into uninvolved tissues. The rapid evolution of nanotechnology is aiming to fulfill the goal of selective recognition and optimal drug delivery through the development of molecularly imprinted polymeric (MIP) nanoparticles, tailor-made for a diverse range of analytes (e.g., pharmaceuticals, pesticides, amino acids, etc.) and of nanostructured targeted drug carriers (e.g., liposomes and micelles) with increased circulation lifetimes. In the present study, PLGA microparticles containing multilamellar vesicles (MLVs), and MIP nanoparticles were synthesized to be employed as drug carriers and synthetic receptors respectively.

  7. Microrough cobalt-chromium alloy surfaces for paclitaxel delivery: preparation, characterization, and in vitro drug release studies.

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Susan; Kakade, Sandeep; Mani, Gopinath

    2012-08-01

    Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) alloys have extensive biomedical applications including drug-eluting stents (DES). This study investigates the use of eight different microrough Co-Cr alloy surfaces for delivering paclitaxel (PAT) for potential use in DES. The eight different surfaces include four bare microrough and four self-assembled monolayer (SAM) coated microrough surfaces. The bare microrough surfaces were prepared by grit blasting Co-Cr with glass beads (50 and 100 ?m in size) and Al(2)O(3) (50 and 110 ?m). The SAM coated surfaces were prepared by depositing a -COOH terminated phosphonic acid monolayer on the different microrough surfaces. PAT was then deposited on all the bare and SAM coated microrough surfaces. The surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), 3D optical profilometry, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). SEM showed the different morphologies of microrough surfaces without and with PAT coating. An optical profiler showed the 3D topography of the different surfaces and the changes in surface roughness and surface area after SAM and PAT deposition. FTIR showed ordered SAMs were formed on glass bead grit blasted surfaces, while the molecules were disordered on Al(2)O(3) grit blasted surfaces. Also, FTIR showed the successful deposition of PAT on these surfaces. The PAT release was investigated for up to two weeks using high performance liquid chromatography. Al(2)O(3) grit blasted bare microrough surfaces showed sustained release profiles, while the glass bead grit blasted surfaces showed burst release profiles. All SAM coated surfaces showed biphasic drug release profiles, which is an initial burst release followed by a slow and sustained release. SAM coated Al(2)O(3) grit blasted surfaces prolonged the sustained release of PAT in a significant amount during the second week of drug elution studies, while this behavior was not observed for any other surfaces used in this study. Thus, this study demonstrates the use of different microrough Co-Cr alloy surfaces for delivering PAT for potential applications in DES and other medical devices. PMID:22720656

  8. Nanofabricated biomimetic structures for smart targeting and drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alma Dudia; Johannes S. Kanger; Vinod Subramaniam

    2005-01-01

    We present a new approach to hybrid artificial cells (AC) designed for specific targeting and active drug delivery by combining\\u000a an impermeable non-biological scaffold with an artificial bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) that supports the functioning bio-molecules\\u000a required to provide AC functionality. We report on the fabrication of the scaffold using nanotechnology, as well as on loading\\u000a of the scaffold and

  9. Progress toward a Colon Targeting Nanoparticle Based Drug Delivery System 

    E-print Network

    Yu, Xiao

    2012-07-16

    ......................................................... 11 2.2.1 Colon targeting oral drug delivery ....................................................... 11 2.2.2 Polysaccharide based pH sensitive and biodegradable hydrogels ....... 12 2.3 In vitro drug release models... of particles? size and surface charges .................... 20 3.3.1.2 Encapsulation efficiency and stability of PAX NPs in different pH of the aqueous solutions ........................................................ 22 3.3.2 LbL self...

  10. Magnetically Targeted Stem Cell Delivery for Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cores, Jhon; Caranasos, Thomas G; Cheng, Ke

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells play a special role in the body as agents of self-renewal and auto-reparation for tissues and organs. Stem cell therapies represent a promising alternative strategy to regenerate damaged tissue when natural repairing and conventional pharmacological intervention fail to do so. A fundamental impediment for the evolution of stem cell therapies has been the difficulty of effectively targeting administered stem cells to the disease foci. Biocompatible magnetically responsive nanoparticles are being utilized for the targeted delivery of stem cells in order to enhance their retention in the desired treatment site. This noninvasive treatment-localization strategy has shown promising results and has the potential to mitigate the problem of poor long-term stem cell engraftment in a number of organ systems post-delivery. In addition, these same nanoparticles can be used to track and monitor the cells in vivo, using magnetic resonance imaging. In the present review we underline the principles of magnetic targeting for stem cell delivery, with a look at the logic behind magnetic nanoparticle systems, their manufacturing and design variants, and their applications in various pathological models. PMID:26133387

  11. Multifunctional inorganic nanoparticles for imaging, targeting, and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Liong, Monty; Lu, Jie; Kovochich, Michael; Xia, Tian; Ruehm, Stefan G; Nel, Andre E; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Zink, Jeffrey I

    2008-05-01

    Drug delivery, magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging, magnetic manipulation, and cell targeting are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals were encapsulated inside mesostructured silica spheres that were labeled with fluorescent dye molecules and coated with hydrophilic groups to prevent aggregation. Water-insoluble anticancer drugs were delivered into human cancer cells; surface conjugation with cancer-specific targeting agents increased the uptake into cancer cells relative to that in non-cancerous fibroblasts. The highly versatile multifunctional nanoparticles could potentially be used for simultaneous imaging and therapeutic applications. PMID:19206485

  12. Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles Induces Proliferation Inhibition and Apoptosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongxia; Chang, Shufang; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Pu, Caixiu; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-01-01

    Although paclitaxel (PTX) is used with platinum as the first line chemotherapy regimen for ovarian cancer, its clinical efficacy is often limited by severe adverse effects. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique holds a great promise in minimizing the side effects and maximizing the therapeutic efficacy. However, the technique typically uses non-targeted microbubbles with suboptimal efficiency. We synthesized targeted and PTX-loaded microbubbles (MBs) for UTMD mediated chemotherapy in ovarian cancer cells. PTX-loaded lipid MBs were coated with a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogue (LHRHa) through a biotin-avidin linkage to target the ovarian cancer A2780/DDP cells that express the LHRH receptor. In the cell culture studies, PTX-loaded and LHRHa targeted MBs (TPLMBs) in combination with ultrasound (300 kHz, 0.5 W/cm2, 30 seconds) demonstrated anti-proliferative activities of 41.30 ± 3.93%, 67.76 ± 2.45%, and 75.93 ± 2.81% at 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after the treatment, respectively. The cell apoptosis ratio at 24 hours after the treatment is 32.6 ± 0.79 %, which is significantly higher than other treatment groups such as PTX only and no-targeted PTX-loaded MBs (NPLMBs) with or without ultrasound mediation. Our experiment verifies the hypothesis that ultrasound mediation of ovarian cancer targeted and drug loaded MBs will enhance the PTX therapeutic efficiency. PMID:24266423

  13. Chlorotoxin Labeled Magnetic Nanovectors for Targeted Gene Delivery to Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Veiseh, Omid; Fang, Chen; Bhattarai, Narayan; Lee, Donghoon; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2010-01-01

    Glioma accounts for 80% of brain tumors, and currently remains one of the most lethal forms of cancers. Gene therapy could potentially improve the dismal prognosis of patients with glioma, but this treatment modality has not yet reached the bedside from the laboratory due to the lack of safe and effective gene delivery vehicles. In this study we investigate targeted gene delivery to C6 glioma cells in a xenograft mouse model using chlorotoxin (CTX) labeled nanoparticles. The developed nanovector consists of an iron oxide nanoparticle core, coated with a copolymer of chitosan, polyethylene glycol (PEG) and polyethylenimine (PEI). Green fluorescent protein (GFP) encoding DNA was bound to these nanoparticles, and CTX was then attached using a short PEG linker. Nanoparticles without CTX were also prepared as a control. Mice bearing C6 xenograft tumors were injected intravenously with the DNA bound nanoparticles. Nanoparticle accumulation in the tumor site was monitored using magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed by histology, and GFP gene expression was monitored through Xenogen IVIS fluorescence imaging and confocal fluorescence microscopy. Interestingly, the CTX did not affect the accumulation of nanoparticles at the tumor site, but specifically enhanced their uptake into cancer cells as evidenced by higher gene expression. These results indicate that this targeted gene delivery system may potentially improve treatment outcome of gene therapy for glioma and other deadly cancers. PMID:20731441

  14. Liver-targeted gene delivery through retrograde intrabiliary infusion.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuan; Ren, Yong; Williford, John-Michael; Li, Zhiping; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde intrabiliary infusion (RII) has recently been characterized as a safe and effective administration route for liver-targeted gene delivery. Efficient transgene expression in the liver has been achieved by infusing a variety of gene vectors including adenovirus, retrovirus, lipoplexes, polyplexes, and naked DNA through the common bile duct. Here, we describe the RII technique and key infusion parameters for delivering plasmid DNA and DNA nanoparticles to the rat liver. After RII of plasmid DNA, the level of transgene expression in rat liver is comparable to that achieved by hydrodynamic injection of plasmid DNA, which is considered to be "gold standard" for liver-targeted gene delivery. RII has also been shown to significantly enhance the gene delivery efficiency by polymer/DNA nanoparticles in comparison with intravenous and intraportal infusions. This method induces minimal level of cytotoxicity and damage to the liver and bile duct. Due to these advantages, RII has the potential to be used for delivering various gene vectors in clinical setting through the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure. PMID:23070777

  15. Delivery and targeting of nanoparticles into hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chia-Lang; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2014-09-01

    It has been demonstrated that nanoparticles used for follicular delivery provide some advantages over conventional pathways, including improved skin bioavailability, enhanced penetration depth, prolonged residence duration, fast transport into the skin and tissue targeting. This review describes recent developments using nanotechnology approaches for drug delivery into the follicles. Different types of nanosystems may be employed for management of follicular permeation, such as polymeric nanoparticles, metallic nanocrystals, liposomes, and lipid nanoparticles. This review systematically introduces the mechanisms of follicles for nanoparticulate penetration, highlighting the therapeutic potential of drug-loaded nanoparticles for treating skin diseases. Special attention is paid to the use of nanoparticles in treating appendage-related disorders, in particular, nanomedical strategies for treating alopecia, acne, and transcutaneous immunization. PMID:25375342

  16. Targeting and delivery of platinum-based anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyong; Guo, Zijian

    2013-01-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs occupy a crucial role in the treatment of various malignant tumours. However, the efficacy and applicability of platinum drugs are heavily restricted by severe systemic toxicities and drug resistance. Different drug targeting and delivery (DTD) strategies have been developed to prevent the shortcomings of platinum-based chemotherapy. These approaches can be roughly categorized into two groups; namely, active and passive tactics. Active DTD is realized through specific molecular interactions between the drugs and cell or tissue elements, while passive DTD is achieved by exploiting the enhanced permeability and retention effect in tumour tissues. The principal methods for active DTD include conjugation of platinum drugs with selective targeting moieties or encapsulation of platinum drugs in host molecules. Bioactive substances such as hormones, carbohydrates, bisphosphonates, peptides and proteins are commonly used in active DTD. Passive DTD generally involves the fabrication of functionalized polymers or nanoparticles and the subsequent conjugation of platinum drugs with such entities. Polymeric micelles, liposomes, nanotubes and nanoparticles are frequently used in passive DTD. In some cases, both active and passive mechanisms are involved in one DTD system. This review concentrates on various targeting and delivery techniques for improving the efficacy and reducing the side effects of platinum-based anticancer drugs. The content covers most of the related literatures published since 2006. These innovative tactics represent current state-of-the-art developments in platinum-based anticancer drugs. PMID:23042411

  17. DNA Nuclear Targeting Sequences for Non-Viral Gene Delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ethlinn V. B. van Gaal; Ronald S. Oosting; Roel van Eijk; Marta Bakowska; Dries Feyen; Robbert Jan Kok; Wim E. Hennink; Daan J. A. Crommelin; Enrico Mastrobattista

    2011-01-01

    Purpose  To evaluate if introduction of DNA nuclear Targeting Sequences (DTS; i.e. recognition sequences for endogenous DNA-binding\\u000a proteins) in plasmid DNA (pDNA) leads to increased transfection efficiency of non-viral gene delivery by virtue of enhanced\\u000a nuclear import of the pDNA.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  A set of DTS was identified and cloned into EGFP-reporter plasmids controlled by the CMV-promoter. These pDNA constructs were\\u000a delivered into

  18. An Efficient Targeted Drug Delivery through Apotransferrin Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Golla; Kondapi, Anand Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Background Cancerous state is a highly stimulated environment of metabolically active cells. The cells under these conditions over express selective receptors for assimilation of factors essential for growth and transformation. Such receptors would serve as potential targets for the specific ligand mediated transport of pharmaceutically active molecules. The present study demonstrates the specificity and efficacy of protein nanoparticle of apotransferrin for targeted delivery of doxorubicin. Methodology/Principal Findings Apotransferrin nanoparticles were developed by sol-oil chemistry. A comparative analysis of efficiency of drug delivery in conjugated and non-conjugated forms of doxorubicin to apotransferrin nanoparticle is presented. The spherical shaped apotransferrin nanoparticles (nano) have diameters of 25–50 ?m, which increase to 60–80 ?m upon direct loading of drug (direct-nano), and showed further increase in dimension (75–95 ?m) in conjugated nanoparticles (conj-nano). The competitive experiments with the transferrin receptor specific antibody showed the entry of both conj-nano and direct-nano into the cells through transferrin receptor mediated endocytosis. Results of various studies conducted clearly establish the superiority of the direct-nano over conj-nano viz. (a) localization studies showed complete release of drug very early, even as early as 30 min after treatment, with the drug localizing in the target organelle (nucleus) (b) pharmacokinetic studies showed enhanced drug concentrations, in circulation with sustainable half-life (c) the studies also demonstrated efficient drug delivery, and an enhanced inhibition of proliferation in cancer cells. Tissue distribution analysis showed intravenous administration of direct nano lead to higher drug localization in liver, and blood as compared to relatively lesser localization in heart, kidney and spleen. Experiments using rat cancer model confirmed the efficacy of the formulation in regression of hepatocellular carcinoma with negligible toxicity to kidney and liver. Conclusions The present study thus demonstrates that the direct-nano is highly efficacious in delivery of drug in a target specific manner with lower toxicity to heart, liver and kidney. PMID:19806207

  19. Modular Nanotransporters for Targeted Intracellular Delivery of Drugs: Folate Receptors as Potential Targets

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A.; Rosenkranz, Andrey A.; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Sobolev, Alexander S.

    2015-01-01

    The review is devoted to a subcellular drug delivery system, modular nanotransporters (MNT) that can penetrate into target cells and deliver a therapeutic into their subcellular compartments, particularly into the nucleus. The therapeutics which need such type of delivery belong to two groups: (i) those that exert their effect only when delivered into a certain cell compartment (like DNA delivered into the nucleus); and (ii) those drugs that are capable of exerting their effect in different parts of the cells, however there can be found a cell compartment that is the most sensitive to their effect. A particular interest attract such cytotoxic agents as Auger electron emitters which are known to be ineffective outside the cell nucleus, whereas they possess high cytotoxicity in the vicinity of nuclear DNA through the induction of non-reparable double-strand DNA breaks. The review discusses main approaches permitting to choose internalizable receptors permitting both recognition of target cells and penetration into them. Special interest attract folate receptors which become accessible to blood circulating therapeutics after malignant transformation or on activated macrophages which makes them an attractive target for both several oncological and inflammatory diseases, like atherosclerosis. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that MNT is a promising platform for targeted delivery of different therapeutics into the nuclei of target cells. PMID:25312738

  20. Tumor Regression by Targeted Gene Delivery to the Neovasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, John D.; Bednarski, Mark; Frausto, Ricardo; Guccione, Samira; Reisfeld, Ralph A.; Xiang, Rong; Cheresh, David A.

    2002-06-01

    Efforts to influence the biology of blood vessels by gene delivery have been hampered by a lack of targeting vectors specific for endothelial cells in diseased tissues. Here we show that a cationic nanoparticle (NP) coupled to an integrin ?v?3-targeting ligand can deliver genes selectively to angiogenic blood vessels in tumor-bearing mice. The therapeutic efficacy of this approach was tested by generating NPs conjugated to a mutant Raf gene, ATP?-Raf, which blocks endothelial signaling and angiogenesis in response to multiple growth factors. Systemic injection of the NP into mice resulted in apoptosis of the tumor-associated endothelium, ultimately leading to tumor cell apoptosis and sustained regression of established primary and metastatic tumors.

  1. Nanostructured porous Si-based nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Herranz, Barbara; Santos, Hélder A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the backbones in nanomedicine is to deliver drugs specifically to unhealthy cells. Drug nanocarriers can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, which after proper surface biofunctionalization can enhance cell specificity for cancer therapy. Recent developments have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica (PSiO2) and silicon (PSi) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery. In this review, we outline and discuss the most recent advances on the applications and developments of cancer therapies by means of PSiO2 and PSi nanomaterials. Bio-engineering and fine tuning of anti-cancer drug vehicles, high flexibility and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for “smart” cancer therapies. As a result of their physicochemical properties they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting. The main emphasis of this review will be on the in vitro and in vivo studies. PMID:23507894

  2. Polyelectrolyte Nanogels Decorated with Monoclonal Antibody for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Nukolova, Nataliya V.; Yang, Zigang; Kim, Jong Oh; Kabanov, Alexander V.; Bronich, Tatiana K.

    2010-01-01

    Novel surface-functionalized cross-linked nanogels were developed as a platform to allow conjugation of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) for targeted drug delivery. Well-defined diblock copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEG-b-PMA) with PEG terminal aldehyde functionality were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and characterized by GPC and 1H NMR. These copolymers were used to prepare nanogels via condensation of PEG-b-PMA with Ca2+ ions into micelle-like aggregates, cross-linking of the PMA/Ca2+ cores and removal of Ca2+ ions. The resulting nanogels represent highly swollen spherical polyelectrolyte particles with free terminal aldehyde functionalities at the nonionic PEG chains. A reductive amination reaction between aldehyde groups and amino groups of mAb resulted in effective conjugation to the nanogels of mAb CC49 against tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG-72). The mAb retained the binding affinity to bovine submaxillary mucin after conjugation as shown by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Therefore, aldehyde functionalized nanogels can be linked to mAb using a simple, one-step approach. They may have potential for targeted delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to tumors. PMID:21503276

  3. Potential application of functional porous TiO2 nanoparticles in light-controlled drug release and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tianyi; Jiang, Haitao; Wan, Long; Zhao, Qinfu; Jiang, Tongying; Wang, Bing; Wang, Siling

    2015-02-01

    Novel multifunctional porous titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles modified with polyethylenimine (PEI) were developed to explore the feasibility of exploiting the photocatalytic property of titanium dioxide to achieve ultraviolet (UV) light triggered drug release. Additionally, in order to further realize targeting delivery, folic acid, which chemically conjugated to the surface of the functionalized multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles through amide linkage with free amine groups of PEI, was used as a cancer-targeting agent to effectively promote cancer-cell-specific uptake through receptor-mediated endocytosis. And a typical poorly water-soluble anti-cancer drug, paclitaxel, was encapsulated in multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles. The PEI on the surface of multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles could effectively block the channel to prevent premature drug release, thus providing enough circulation time to target cancer cells. Following UV light radiation, PEI molecules on the surface were cut off by the free radicals (OH? and O2-) that TiO2 produced, and then the drug loaded in the carrier was released rapidly into the cytoplasm. Importantly, the amount of drug released from multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticles can be regulated by the UV-light radiation time to further control the anti-cancer effect. This multifunctional porous TiO2 nanoparticle exhibits a combination of stimuli-triggered drug release and cancer cell targeting. The authors believe that the present study will provide important information for the use of porous TiO2 nanomaterials in light-controlled drug release and targeted therapy. PMID:25462846

  4. Potential of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hung-Wei; Hua, Mu-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) play an important role in the molecular diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of therapeutic outcomes in various diseases. Their nanoscale size, large surface area, unique capabilities, and negligible side effects make NPs highly effective for biomedical applications such as cancer therapy, thrombolysis, and molecular imaging. In particular, nontoxic superparamagnetic magnetic NPs (MNPs) with functionalized surface coatings can conjugate chemotherapeutic drugs or be used to target ligands/proteins, making them useful for drug delivery, targeted therapy, magnetic resonance imaging, transfection, and cell/protein/DNA separation. To optimize the therapeutic efficacy of MNPs for a specific application, three issues must be addressed. First, the efficacy of magnetic targeting/guidance is dependent on particle magnetization, which can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions during synthesis. Second, the tendency of MNPs to aggregate limits their therapeutic use in vivo; surface modifications to produce high positive or negative charges can reduce this tendency. Finally, the surface of MNPs can be coated with drugs which can be rapidly released after injection, resulting in targeting of low doses of the drug. Drugs therefore need to be conjugated to MNPs such that their release is delayed and their thermal stability enhanced. This chapter describes the creation of nanocarriers with a high drug-loading capacity comprised of a high-magnetization MNP core and a shell of aqueous, stable, conducting polyaniline derivatives and their applications in cancer therapy. It further summarizes some newly developed methods to synthesize and modify the surfaces of MNPs and their biomedical applications. PMID:24198498

  5. Targeted and heat-triggered doxorubicin delivery to tumors by dual targeted cationic thermosensitive liposomes.

    PubMed

    Dicheva, Bilyana M; ten Hagen, Timo L M; Schipper, Debby; Seynhaeve, Ann L B; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Eggermont, Alexander M M; Koning, Gerben A

    2014-12-10

    Liposomal nanoparticles can circumvent toxicity of encapsulated chemotherapeutic drugs, but fall short in tumor-specific and efficient intracellular drug delivery. To overcome these shortcomings, we designed a multifunctional dual targeted, heat-responsive nanocarrier encapsulating doxorubicin (Dox) as a chemotherapeutic content. Dox-loaded cationic thermosensitive liposomes (Dox-CTSL) carry targeting functions addressing tumor cells and tumor vasculature and have a heat-responsive lipid bilayer. Targeted Dox-CTSL demonstrated superior uptake by and toxicity to different tumor cell lines and endothelial cells compared to non-targeted TSL. Heat triggered intracellular Dox release in acidic cell compartments was visualized as fluorescent Dox nanobursts by live cell confocal microscopy. In vivo, using high resolution intravital microscopy, we demonstrated that Dox-CTSL upon an external heat-trigger delivered 3-fold higher Dox quantity to tumors than TSL. Dox-CTSL bound specifically to tumor vasculature, which in combination with the heat-triggered drug release caused significant tumor vessel damage, which was not observed when non-targeted TSL were administered. Therefore, Dox-CTSL have strong potency to increase drug efficacy due to targeted delivery and heat-triggered drug release in tumors. PMID:25176578

  6. [Nab-paclitaxel].

    PubMed

    Lopez-Trabada Ataz, Daniel; Dumont, Sarah; André, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    Paclitaxel is conventionally used in a wide range of oncology indications. Nab-paclitaxel is synthesized by a process of high pressure homogenization of paclitaxel in the presence of human albumin and it was originally developed to reduce the toxicity usually associated with cremophor in soluble paclitaxel and to increase its penetration in tumor tissues. After the trials that led to its approval in first-line treatment of metastatic pancreatic carcinomas and in second line therapy for metastatic breast cancer, nab-paclitaxel is being tested for many other situations in oncology due to its profile of security and its good tolerance. Different lines of research are being developed about the possible biomarkers that could predict the effect of nab-paclitaxel. This review summarizes the results of trials that led to the approval of the nab-paclitaxel in advanced breast cancer and pancreatic cancer, and also resumes the lines of research to the future development of the drug. PMID:26008630

  7. Characterization, pharmacokinetics and disposition of novel nanoscale preparations of paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Yingjing; Wang, Yujun; Fan, Min; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2011-07-29

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential application in achieving targeted delivery of anticancer drugs. Paclitaxel (PTX) loaded NPs were developed using biodegradable methoxy poly (ethylene glycol)-poly (?-caprolactone) (MPEG-PCL) diblock copolymer by solid dispersion technique without toxic organic solvent. The lyophilized powder has been stored at room temperature for more than six months and still unchanged. PTX-loaded MPEG-PCL nanoparticles (PTX-NPs) displayed that the highest drug loading of PTX was about 25.6% and entrapment efficiency was over 98%, and the optimized average diameter and polydispersity index (PDI) were about 27.6 ± 0.1 nm and 0.05, respectively. Moreover, experimental results shown PTX-NPs had sustained-release effects and its curve fitting followed the Higuchi model. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of PTX-NPs after single dose in Balb/c mice was above 80 mg PTX/kg body weight (b.w), which was 2.6-fold higher than that of Taxol(®) (30 mg PTX/kg b.w). The levels of PTX administrated PTX-NPs had obvious distinction to Taxol(®) in plasma, liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, heart and tumor. Especially, the concentration of PTX in tumor administrated PTX-NPs was higher than administration of Taxol(®). All results suggested that we had contrived a simple, biodegradable, effective and controllable drug delivery system for paclitaxel. PMID:21596124

  8. Conatumumab (AMG 655) coated nanoparticles for targeted pro-apoptotic drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Francois Fay; Kirsty M. McLaughlin; Donna M. Small; Dean A. Fennell; Patrick G. Johnston; Daniel B. Longley; Christopher J. Scott

    2011-01-01

    Colloidal nanoparticle drug delivery systems have attracted much interest for their ability to enable effective formulation and delivery of therapeutic agents. The selective delivery of these nanoparticles to the disease site can be enhanced by coating the surface of the nanoparticles with targeting moieties, such as antibodies. In this current work, we demonstrate that antibodies on the surface of the

  9. Targeted Spinal Cord Therapeutics Delivery: Stabilized Platform and Microelectrode Recording Guidance Validation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Riley; John Butler; Kenneth B. Baker; Shearwood McClelland III; Qingshan Teng; Jun Yang; Mary Garrity-Moses; Thais Federici; Nicholas M. Boulis

    2008-01-01

    Background\\/Aims: No validated delivery technique exists for accurate, reproducible delivery of biological therapies to discrete spinal cord targets. To address this unmet need, we have constructed a stabilized platform capable of supporting physiologic mapping, through microelectrode recording, and cellular or viral payload delivery to the ventral horn. Methods: A porcine animal model (n = 7) has been chosen based upon

  10. Paclitaxel chemotherapy: from empiricism to a mechanism-based formulation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Scripture, Charity D; Figg, William D; Sparreboom, Alex

    2005-01-01

    Paclitaxel is an anticancer agent effective for the treatment of breast, ovarian, lung, and head and neck cancer. Because of water insolubility, paclitaxel is formulated with the micelle-forming vehicle Cremophor EL to enhance drug solubility. However, the addition of Cremophor EL results in hypersensitivity reactions, neurotoxicity, and altered pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel. To circumvent these unfavorable effects resulting from the addition of Cremophor EL, efforts have been made to develop new delivery systems for paclitaxel administration. For example, ABI-007 is a Cremophor-free, albumin-stabilized, nanoparticle paclitaxel formulation that was found to have significantly less toxicity than Cremophor-containing paclitaxel in mice. Pharmacokinetic studies indicate that in contrast to Cremophor-containing paclitaxel, ABI-007 displays linear pharmacokinetics over the clinically relevant dose range of 135–300 mg/m2. In a phase III study conducted in patients with metastatic breast cancer, patients treated with ABI-007 achieved a significantly higher objective response rate and time to progression than those treated with Cremophor-containing paclitaxel. Together these findings suggest that nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel may enable clinicians to administer paclitaxel at higher doses with less toxicity than is seen with Cremophor-containing paclitaxel. The role of this novel paclitaxel formulation in combination therapy with other antineoplastic agents needs to be determined. PMID:18360550

  11. Targeting blood-brain barrier sphingolipid signaling reduces basal P-glycoprotein activity and improves drug delivery to the brain.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Ronald E; Peart, John C; Hawkins, Brian T; Campos, Christopher R; Miller, David S

    2012-09-25

    P-glycoprotein, an ATP-driven drug efflux pump, is a major obstacle to the delivery of small-molecule drugs across the blood-brain barrier and into the CNS. Here we test a unique signaling-based strategy to overcome this obstacle. We used a confocal microscopy-based assay with isolated rat brain capillaries to map a signaling pathway that within minutes abolishes P-glycoprotein transport activity without altering transporter protein expression or tight junction permeability. This pathway encompasses elements of proinflammatory- (TNF-?) and sphingolipid-based signaling. Critical to this pathway was signaling through sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1). In brain capillaries, S1P acted through S1PR1 to rapidly and reversibly reduce P-glycoprotein transport activity. Sphingosine reduced transport by a sphingosine kinase-dependent mechanism. Importantly, fingolimod (FTY720), a S1P analog recently approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, also rapidly reduced P-glycoprotein activity; similar effects were found with the active, phosphorylated metabolite (FTY720P). We validated these findings in vivo using in situ brain perfusion in rats. Administration of S1P, FTY720, or FTY729P increased brain uptake of three radiolabeled P-glycoprotein substrates, (3)H-verapamil (threefold increase), (3)H-loperamide (fivefold increase), and (3)H-paclitaxel (fivefold increase); blocking S1PR1 abolished this effect. Tight junctional permeability, measured as brain (14)C-sucrose accumulation, was not altered. Therefore, targeting signaling through S1PR1 at the blood-brain barrier with the sphingolipid-based drugs, FTY720 or FTY720P, can rapidly and reversibly reduce basal P-glycoprotein activity and thus improve delivery of small-molecule therapeutics to the brain. PMID:22949658

  12. Role of nanotechnology in targeted drug delivery and imaging: a concise review

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Otilia M. Koo; Israel Rubinstein; Hayat Onyuksel

    2005-01-01

    The use of nanotechnology in drug delivery and imaging in vivo is a rapidly expanding field. The emphases of this review are on biophysical attributes of the drug delivery and imaging platforms as well as the biological aspects that enable targeting of these platforms to injured and diseased tissues and cells. The principles of passive and active targeting of nanosized

  13. Src family kinases and paclitaxel sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Le, Xiao-Feng; Bast, Robert C

    2011-08-15

    Src-family Kinases (SFKs) participate in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, autophagy, adhesion, migration, invasion and angiogenesis in normal and cancer cells. Abnormal expression of SFKs has been documented in cancers that arise in breast, colon, ovary, melanocyte, gastric mucosa, head and neck, pancreas, lung, and brain. Targeting SFKs in cancer cells has been shown to be a promising therapeutic strategy in solid tumors, particularly in ovarian, colon and breast cancers. Paclitaxel is one of most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the management of ovarian, breast, lung and head/neck cancers. As a microtubule-stabilizing agent, paclitaxel possesses both mitosis-dependent and mitosis-independent activities against cancer cells. A variety of mechanisms such as deregulation of P-glycoprotein, alteration of tubulin isotypes, alteration of microtubule-regulatory proteins, deregulation of apoptotic signaling pathways, mutation of tubulins and overexpression of copper transporters have been implicated in the development of primary or secondary resistance to paclitaxel. By affecting cancer cell survival, proliferation, autophagy, microtubule stability, motility, and/or angiogenesis, SFKs interact with mechanisms that regulate paclitaxel sensitivity. Inhibition of SFKs can potentiate the anti-tumor activity of paclitaxel by enhancing apoptosis, autophagy and microtubule stability. Based on pre-clinical observations, administration of SFK inhibitors in combination with paclitaxel could improve treatment for ovarian, breast, lung and head/neck cancers. Identification and validation of predictive biomarkers could also permit personalization of the therapy. PMID:21646863

  14. Chimeric aptamers in cancer cell-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Kanwar, Jagat R; Roy, Kislay; Kanwar, Rupinder K

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are single-stranded structured oligonucleotides (DNA or RNA) that can bind to a wide range of targets ("apatopes") with high affinity and specificity. These nucleic acid ligands, generated from pools of random-sequence by an in vitro selection process referred to as systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX), have now been identified as excellent tools for chemical biology, therapeutic delivery, diagnosis, research, and monitoring therapy in real-time imaging. Today, aptamers represent an interesting class of modern Pharmaceuticals which with their low immunogenic potential mimic extend many of the properties of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics, research, and therapeutics. More recently, chimeric aptamer approach employing many different possible types of chimerization strategies has generated more stable and efficient chimeric aptamers with aptamer-aptamer, aptamer-nonaptamer biomacromolecules (siRNAs, proteins) and aptamer-nanoparticle chimeras. These chimeric aptamers when conjugated with various biomacromolecules like locked nucleic acid (LNA) to potentiate their stability, biodistribution, and targeting efficiency, have facilitated the accurate targeting in preclinical trials. We developed LNA-aptamer (anti-nucleolin and EpCAM) complexes which were loaded in iron-saturated bovine lactofeerin (Fe-blf)-coated dopamine modified surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (SPIONs). This complex was used to deliver the specific aptamers in tumor cells in a co-culture model of normal and cancer cells. This review focuses on the chimeric aptamers, currently in development that are likely to find future practical applications in concert with other therapeutic molecules and modalities. PMID:21955150

  15. Construction of paclitaxel-loaded poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-g-poly (lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine copolymer nanoparticle delivery system and evaluation of its anticancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowei; Wang, Huan; Jin, Shubin; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need to develop drug-loaded biocompatible nanoscale packages with improved therapeutic efficacy for effective clinical treatment. To address this need, a novel poly (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-poly (lactide)-1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine [PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE)] copolymer was designed and synthesized to enable these nanoparticles to be pH responsive under pathological conditions. Methods The structural properties and thermal stability of the copolymer was measured and confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, and thermogravimetric analysis. In order to evaluate its feasibility as a drug carrier, paclitaxel-loaded PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles were prepared using the emulsion-solvent evaporation method. Results The PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles could be efficiently loaded with paclitaxel and controlled to release the drug gradually and effectively. In vitro release experiments demonstrated that drug release was faster at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.4. The anticancer activity of the PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles was measured in breast cancer MCF-7 cells in vivo and in vitro. In comparison with the free drug, the paclitaxel-loaded PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles could induce more significant tumor regression. Conclusion This study indicates that PHEMA-g-(PLA-DPPE) nanoparticles are promising carriers for hydrophobic drugs. This system can passively target cancer tissue and release drugs in a controllable manner, as determined by the pH value of the area in which the drug accumulates. PMID:22419875

  16. Electrospun Nanofibers of Guar Galactomannan for Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hsiao Mei Annie

    2011-12-01

    Guar galactomannan is a biodegradable polysaccharide used widely in the food industry but also in the cosmetics, pharmaceutical, oil drilling, textile and paper industries. Guar consists of a mannose backbone and galactose side groups that are both susceptible to enzyme degradation, a unique property that can be explored for targeted drug delivery especially since those enzymes are naturally secreted by the microflora in human colon. The present study can be divided into three parts. In the first part, we discuss ways to modify guar to produce nanofibers by electrospinning, a process that involves the application of an electric field to a polymer solution or melt to facilitate production of fibers in the sub-micron range. Nanofibers are currently being explored as the next generation of drug carriers due to its many advantages, none more important than the fact that nanofibers are on a size scale that is a fraction of a hair's width and have large surface-to-volume ratio. The incorporation and controlled release of nano-sized drugs is one way in which nanofibers are being utilized in drug delivery. In the second part of the study, we explore various methods to crosslink guar nanofibers as a means to promote water-resistance in a potential drug carrier. The scope and utility of water-resistant guar nanofibers can only be fully appreciated when subsequent drug release studies are carried out. To that end, the third part of our study focuses on understanding the kinetics and diffusion mechanisms of a model drug, Rhodamine B, through moderately-swelling (crosslinked) hydrogel nanofibers in comparison to rapidly-swelling (non-crosslinked) nanofibers. Along the way, our investigations led us to a novel electrospinning set-up that has a unique collector designed to capture aligned nanofibers. These aligned nanofiber bundles can then be twisted to hold them together like yarn. From a practical standpoint, these yarns are advantageous because they come freely suspended and without any attached support. As composites of aligned nanofibers, yarns potentially combine the inherent advantages of nanofibers with the strength and pliability of larger sized fibers. As such, we became interested in exploring the potential of nanofiber yarns as drug carriers. Our study evolved to accommodate comparative studies between the behavior of traditional nonwoven mats and nanofiber yarns. Throughout the process, we sought to answer the bigger question: Can guar galactomannan nanofibers be used as a new biodegradable platform for drug delivery?

  17. Glycyrrhetinic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)-glycyrrhetinic acid tri-block conjugates based self-assembled micelles for hepatic targeted delivery of poorly water soluble drug.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengbo; Xu, Ting; Liu, Chi; Chen, Can; Song, Xiangrong; Zheng, Yu; He, Gu

    2013-01-01

    The triblock 18?-glycyrrhetinic acid-poly(ethylene glycol)18?-glycyrrhetinic acid conjugates (GA-PEG-GA) based self-assembled micelles were synthesized and characterized by FTIR, NMR, transmission electron microscopy, and particle size analysis. The GA-PEG-GA conjugates having the critical micelle concentration of 6 × 10(-5) M were used to form nanosized micelles, with mean diameters of 159.21 ± 2.2 nm, and then paclitaxel (PTX) was incorporated into GA-PEG-GA micelles by self-assembly method. The physicochemical properties of the PTX loaded GA-PEG-GA micelles were evaluated including in vitro cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, drug release profile, and in vivo tissue distribution. The results demonstrate that the GA-PEG-GA micelles had low cytotoxicity and good ability of selectively delivering drug to hepatic cells in vitro and in vivo by the targeting moiety glycyrrhetinic acid. In conclusion, the GA-PEG-GA conjugates have potential medical applications for targeted delivery of poor soluble drug delivery. PMID:24376388

  18. Buparvaquone loaded solid lipid nanoparticles for targeted delivery in theleriosis

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Maheshkumar P.; Shelkar, Nilakash; Gaikwad, Rajiv V.; Vanage, Geeta R.; Samad, Abdul; Devarajan, Padma V.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Buparvaquone (BPQ), a hydroxynaphthoquinone derivative, has been investigated for the treatment of many infections and is recommended as the gold standard for the treatment of theileriosis. Theileriosis, an intramacrophage infection is localized mainly in reticuloendotheileial system (RES) organs. The present study investigates development of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) of BPQ for targeted delivery to the RES. Materials and Methods: BPQ SLN was prepared using melt method by adding a molten mixture into aqueous Lutrol F68 solution (80°C). Larger batches were prepared up to 6 g of BPQ with GMS: BPQ, 2:1. SLN of designed size were obtained using ultraturrax and high pressure homogenizer. A freeze and thaw study was used to optimize type and concentration of cryoprotectant with Sf: Mean particle size, Si: Initial particle size <1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) study was performed on optimized formulation. Formulation was investigated for in vitro serum stability, hemolysis and cell uptake study. Pharmacokinetic and biodistribution study was performed in Holtzman rat. Results: Based on solubility in lipid; glyceryl monostearate (GMS) was selected for preparation of BPQ SLN. Batches of BPQ SLN were optimized for average particle size and entrapment efficiency at <100 mg solid content. A combination of Solutol HS-15 and Lutrol F68 at 2% w/v and greater enabled the desired Sf/Si < 1.3. Differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction revealed decrease in crystallinity of BPQ in BPQ SLN while, scanning electron microscope revealed spherical morphology. BPQ SLN revealed good stability at 4°C and 25°C. Low hemolytic potential (<8%) and in vitro serum stability up to 5 h was observed. Cytotoxicity of SLN to the U937 cell was low. The macrophage cell line revealed high (52%) uptake of BPQ SLN in 1 h suggesting the potential to RES uptake. SLN revealed longer circulation and biodistrbution study confirmed high RES uptake (75%) in RES organs like liver lung spleen etc. Conclusion: The high RES uptake suggests BPQ SLN as a promising approach for targeted and improved delivery in theileriosis. PMID:24459400

  19. Transporter targeted gatifloxacin prodrugs: Synthesis, permeability, and topical ocular delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vooturi, Sunil K.; Kadam, Rajendra S.; Kompella, Uday B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design and synthesize prodrugs of gatifloxacin targeting OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters and to identify a prodrug with enhanced delivery to the back of the eye. Method Dimethylamino-propyl, carboxy-propyl, and amino-propyl(2-methyl) derivatives of gatifloxacin (GFX), DMAP-GFX, CP-GFX, and APM-GFX, were designed and synthesized to target OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. LC-MS method was developed to analyze drug and prodrug levels in various studies. Solubility and Log D (pH 7.4) were measured for prodrugs and the parent drug. Permeability of the prodrugs was determined in cornea, conjunctiva, and sclera-choroidretinal pigment epitheluim (SCRPE) and compared with gatifloxacin using Ussing chamber assembly. Permeability mechanisms were elucidated by determining the transport in the presence of transporter specific inhibitors. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium iodide (MPP+), nicotinic acid sodium salt, and ?-methyl-DL-tryptophan were used to inhibit OCT, MCT, and ATB (0, +) transporters, respectively. A prodrug selected based on in vitro studies was administered as an eye drop to pigmented rabbits and the delivery to various eye tissues including vitreous humor was compared with gatifloxacin dosing. Results DMAP-GFX exhibited 12.8-fold greater solubility than GFX. All prodrugs were more lipophilic, with the measured Log D (pH 7.4) values ranging from 0.05 to 1.04, when compared to GFX (Log D: -1.15). DMAP-GFX showed 1.4-, 1.8-, and 1.9-fold improvement in permeability across cornea, conjunctiva, as well as SCRPE when compared to GFX. Moreover, it exhibited reduced permeability in the presence of MPP+ (competitive inhibitor of OCT), indicating OCT-mediated transport. CP-GFX showed 1.2-, 2.3- and 2.5-fold improvement in permeability across cornea, conjunctiva and SCRPE, respectively. In the presence of nicotinic acid (competitive inhibitor of MCT), permeability of CP-GFX was reduced across conjunctiva. However, cornea and SCRPE permeability of CP-GFX was not affected by nicotinic acid. APM-GFX did not show any improvement in permeability when compared to GFX across cornea, conjunctiva, and SCRPE. Based on solubility and permeability, DMAP-GFX was selected for in vivo studies. DMAP-GFX showed 3.6- and 1.95-fold higher levels in vitreous humor and CRPE compared to that of GFX at 1 hour after topical dosing. In vivo conversion of DMAP-GFX prodrug to GFX was quantified in tissues isolated at 1 hour after dosing. Prodrug-to-parent drug ratio was 8, 70, 24, 21, 29, 13, 55, and 60 % in cornea, conjunctiva, iris-ciliary body, aqueous humor, sclera, CRPE, retina, and vitreous humor, respectively. Conclusions DMAP-GFX prodrug enhanced solubility, Log D, as well as OCT mediated delivery of gatifloxacin to the back of the eye. PMID:23003105

  20. Disulfiram targets cancer stem-like cells and reverses resistance and cross-resistance in acquired paclitaxel-resistant triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Kumar, I S; Brown, S; Kannappan, V; Tawari, P E; Tang, J Z; Jiang, W; Armesilla, A L; Darling, J L; Wang, W

    2013-01-01

    Background: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has significantly worse prognosis. Acquired chemoresistance remains the major cause of therapeutic failure of TNBC. In clinic, the relapsed TNBC is commonly pan-resistant to various drugs with completely different resistant mechanisms. Investigation of the mechanisms and development of new drugs to target pan-chemoresistance will potentially improve the therapeutic outcomes of TNBC patients. Methods: In this study, 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT), combination index (CI)–isobologram, western blot, ALDEFLUOR analysis, clonogenic assay and immunocytochemistry were used. Results: The chemoresistant MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are highly cross-resistant to paclitaxel (PAC), cisplatin (CDDP), docetaxel and doxorubicin. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells are quiescent with significantly longer doubling time (64.9 vs 31.7?h). This may be caused by high expression of p21Waf1. The MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells express high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity and a panel of embryonic stem cell-related proteins, for example, Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and nuclealisation of HIF2? and NF-?Bp65. We have previously reported that disulfiram (DS), an antialcoholism drug, targets cancer stem cells (CSCs) and enhances cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs. Disulfiram abolished CSC characters and completely reversed PAC and CDDP resistance in MDA-MB-231PAC10 cells. Conclusion: Cancer stem cells may be responsible for acquired pan-chemoresistance. As a drug used in clinic, DS may be repurposed as a CSC inhibitor to reverse the acquired pan-chemoresistance. PMID:24008666

  1. Folate conjugated silk fibroin nanocarriers for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Subia, Bano; Chandra, Sourov; Talukdar, Sarmistha; Kundu, Subhas C

    2014-02-01

    Disease treatment processes mainly focus on the development of nontoxic, biodegradable, non-immunogenic, biocompatible materials capable of controlled and long-term release of biomolecules. In this work silk protein fibroin from non-mulberry tropical tasar silkworm, Antheraea mylitta, is used to prepare nanoparticles as a drug delivery system. Folate is a vitamin, which is brought into healthy and cancerous cells by folate receptors. The efficiency of silk fibroin-folate nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin was evaluated by analysing the cell viability, proliferation and endocytosis. Consequently the effects of pro-inflammatory responses by cytokines such as TNF-?, IL-1? and nitric oxide were checked by stimulating the macrophages with folate conjugated silk fibroin nanoparticles. The fibroin-folate nanocarriers are nontoxic, easily taken up by cells and capable of sustained drug release. Nanoparticles loaded with anticancer drug doxorubicin target cancer cells. The results show that silk fibroin-folate nanoparticles may serve as promising nanocarriers for different biomedical and nanotechnology applications in cancer research. PMID:24345855

  2. Inhibitory Effect of Paclitaxel on Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Migration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hua Li; Li-jun Zhang; Bai-hua Chen; Xuan Zhou; Ke Su; Wen-tao Shi; Jun-zhu Wu; Hong Yu; Lei Wei

    2010-01-01

    The long-term success of percutaneous coronary interventions has been limited by restenosis. Therefore, local delivery of paclitaxel, an antiproliferative agent, using drug-eluting stents has been applied to prevent in-stent restenosis. However, paclitaxel not only inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, but also delays re-endothelialization of the damaged site, which may cause potentially life-threatening cardiovascular adverse events, especially late and very late

  3. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

  4. Engineering targeted proteins for intracellular delivery of biotherapeutics

    E-print Network

    Pirie, Christopher M

    2011-01-01

    Biotherapeutics have revolutionized medicine with their ability to achieve unprecedented molecular recognition and mediate complex biological responses. The intracellular delivery of biotherapeutics is an unmet scientific ...

  5. Convection-enhanced delivery for glioblastoma: targeted delivery of antitumor therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ung, Timothy H; Malone, Hani; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N

    2015-07-01

    SUMMARY? Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults and carries a dismal prognosis despite advancements in treatment. Diffuse tumor infiltration precludes curative surgical resection and necessitates advancements in drug delivery mechanisms. Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) enables continuous local drug delivery for a diverse population of antitumor agents. Importantly, CED circumvents therapeutic challenges posed by the blood-brain barrier by facilitating concentrated local therapeutic drug delivery with limited systemic effects. Here, we present a concise review of properties essential for safe and efficient convection-enhanced drug delivery, as well as a focused review of clinical studies evaluating CED in the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26103989

  6. Anisamide-Decorated pH-Sensitive Degradable Chimaeric Polymersomes Mediate Potent and Targeted Protein Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ling; Zou, Yan; Yang, Weijing; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, Chao; Cheng, Ru; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2015-06-01

    In spite of their high potency and specificity, few protein drugs have advanced to the clinical settings due to lack of safe and efficient delivery vehicles. Here, novel anisamide-decorated pH-sensitive degradable chimaeric polymersomes (Anis-CPs) were designed, prepared, and investigated for efficient and targeted delivery of apoptotic protein, granzyme B (GrB), to lung cancer cells. Anis-CPs were readily prepared with varying Anis surface densities from anisamide end-capped poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(2,4,6- trimethoxybenzylidene-1,1,1-tris(hydroxymethyl)ethane methacrylate)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (Anis-PEG-PTTMA-PAA) and PEG-PTTMA-PAA copolymers. Using cytochrome C (CC) as a model protein, Anis-CPs displayed high protein loading efficiencies (40.5-100%) and loading contents (up to 16.8 wt %). CC-loaded Anis-CPs had narrow distribution (PDI 0.04-0.13) and small sizes ranging from 152 to 171 nm, which increased with increasing CC contents. Notably, the release of proteins from Anis-CPs was accelerated under mildly acidic conditions, due to the hydrolysis of acetal bonds in PTTMA. MTT assays showed that GrB-loaded Anis-CPs (GrB-Anis-CPs) displayed high targetability to sigma receptor overexpressing cancer cells such as H460 and PC-3 cells. For example, GrB-Anis-CPs exhibited increasing antitumor efficacy to H460 cells with increasing Anis contents from 0 to 80%. The antitumor activity of GrB-Anis-CPs was significantly reduced upon pretreating H460 cells with haloperidol (a competitive antagonist). Notably, the half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of GrB-Anis70-CPs were determined to be 6.25 and 5.94 nM for H460 and PC-3 cells, respectively, which were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower than that of chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel. Flow cytometry studies demonstrated that GrB-Anis70-CPs induced widespread apoptosis of H460 cells. The confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) experiments using FITC-labeled CC-loaded Anis-CPs confirmed fast internalization and intracellular protein release into H460 cells. GrB-Anis-CPs with high potency and specificity are particularly interesting for targeted therapy of lung cancers. PMID:25938556

  7. Multifunctional magnetic silica nanotubes for MR imaging and targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Wei; Hu, Dehong; Sheng, Zonghai; Su, Wu

    2015-03-01

    A multifunctional drug delivery vehicle consisting of a tubular shaped silica host, a compact superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layer and a hyaluronic acid surface coating was developed as a theranostic platform, for in vivo MR imaging and magnetically guided/cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:25656155

  8. Improved genetic immunization via micromechanical disruption of skin-barrier function and targeted epidermal delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason B. Alarcon; John M. Brittingham; Diane E. Sutter; Ronald J. Pettis; Noel G. Harvey; John A. Mikszta

    2002-01-01

    Skin is an attractive target for delivery of genetic therapies and vaccines. However, new approaches are needed to access this tissue more effectively. Here, we describe a new delivery technology based on arrays of structurally precise, micron-scale silicon projections, which we term microenhancer arrays (MEAs). In a human clinical study, these devices effectively breached the skin barrier, allowing direct access

  9. Quantification of Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC) Delivery to a Target Site Using In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    E-print Network

    Mortensen, Luke J.

    The ability to deliver cells to appropriate target tissues is a prerequisite for successful cell-based therapy. To optimize cell therapy it is therefore necessary to develop a robust method of in vivo cell delivery ...

  10. Poly(Ethylene Oxide)-Modified Poly(?-Amino Ester) Nanoparticles as a pH-Sensitive System for Tumor-Targeted Delivery of Hydrophobic Drugs: Part I. In Vitro Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Dinesh; Little, Steven; Langer, Robert; Amiji, Mansoor

    2005-01-01

    A representative poly(?-amino ester) (PbAE) with biodegradable and pH-sensitive properties was used to formulate nanoparticle-based dosage form for tumor-targeted paclitaxel delivery. The polymer undergoes rapid dissolution when the pH of the medium is less than 6.5, and hence is expected to release its contents at once within the acidic tumor microenvironment and endo/lysosome compartments of cells. PbAE nanoparticles were prepared by solvent displacement method and characterized for particle size, charge, and surface morphology. Pluronic® F-108, a triblock copolymer of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) and poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) was blended with PbAE to induce surface modification of the nanoparticles. In vitro cellular uptake of tritiated [3H] paclitaxel in solution form and as nanoparticulate formulation was studied in MDA-MB-231 human breast adenocarcinoma cells grown in 12-well plates. We also examined the intracellular degradation pattern of the formulations within the cells by estimating the drug release profile. Cytotoxicity assay was performed on the formulations at different doses and time intervals. Nanoparticles prepared from poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL) that do not display pH-sensitive release behavior were used as control. Spherical nanoparticles having positive zeta potential (~ 40 mV) were obtained in the size range of 150–200 nm with PbAE. The PEO chains of the Pluronic® were well-anchored within the nanomatrix as determined by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). The intracellular accumulation of paclitaxel within tumor cells was significantly higher when administered in the nanoparticle formulations as compared to aqueous solution. Qualitative fluorescent microscopy confirmed the rapid release of the payload in case of PbAE nanoparticles into the cytosol, while the PCL nanoparticles integrity remained intact. The cytotoxicity assay results showed significantly higher tumoricidal activity of paclitaxel when administered in the nanoparticle formulations. The cell-kill effect was maximal for paclitaxel-loaded PbAE nanoparticles when normalized with respect to intracellular drug concentrations. Thus, PEO-modified PbAE nanoparticles show tremendous potential as novel carriers of cytotoxic agents for achieving improved drug disposition and enhanced efficacy. PMID:16196488

  11. Inhibitory effect of paclitaxel on endothelial cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Zhang, Li-jun; Chen, Bai-hua; Zhou, Xuan; Su, Ke; Shi, Wen-tao; Wu, Jun-zhu; Yu, Hong; Wei, Lei

    2010-01-01

    The long-term success of percutaneous coronary interventions has been limited by restenosis. Therefore, local delivery of paclitaxel, an antiproliferative agent, using drug-eluting stents has been applied to prevent in-stent restenosis. However, paclitaxel not only inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, but also delays re-endothelialization of the damaged site, which may cause potentially life-threatening cardiovascular adverse events, especially late and very late stent thrombosis. We investigated the role of paclitaxel in endothelial cell line ECV304 adhesion and migration. Accordingly, changes in vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein protein (VASP) phosphorylation and cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity during ECV304 cell detachment and reattachment were investigated as well. The results showed that the decrease in VASP phosphorylation paralleled the inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in the presence of paclitaxel (10 microg/l). Cell adhesion assay and two- and three-dimensional cell migration assays were performed to determine the effect of paclitaxel on the adhesion and migration of ECV304 cells. Paclitaxel significantly suppresses the adhesion (p < 0.05) and migration of ECV304 cells (p < 0.05). These data suggest that the inhibitory effect of paclitaxel may be produced by decreasing the phosphorylation of VASP via inhibition of PKA activity during ECV304 cell adhesion and migration. PMID:20145425

  12. Development of paclitaxel-TyroSpheres for topical skin treatment.

    PubMed

    Kilfoyle, Brian E; Sheihet, Larisa; Zhang, Zheng; Laohoo, Marissa; Kohn, Joachim; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B

    2012-10-10

    A potential topical psoriasis therapy has been developed consisting of tyrosine-derived nanospheres (TyroSpheres) with encapsulated anti-proliferative paclitaxel. TyroSpheres provide enhancement of paclitaxel solubility (almost 4000 times greater than PBS) by effective encapsulation and enable sustained, dose-controlled release over 72 h under conditions mimicking skin permeation. TyroSpheres offer potential in the treatment of psoriasis, a disease resulting from over-proliferation of keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, by (a) enabling delivery of paclitaxel into the epidermis at concentrations >100 ng/cm(2) of skin surface area and (b) enhancing the cytotoxicity of loaded paclitaxel to human keratinocytes (IC(50) of paclitaxel-TyroSpheres was approximately 45% lower than that of free paclitaxel). TyroSpheres were incorporated into a gel-like viscous formulation to improve their flow characteristics with no impact on homogeneity, release or skin distribution of the payload. The findings reported here confirm that the TyroSpheres provide a platform for paclitaxel topical administration allowing skin drug localization and minimal systemic escape. PMID:22732474

  13. Targeted delivery of a poorly water-soluble compound to hair follicles using polymeric nanoparticle suspensions.

    PubMed

    Morgen, Michael; Lu, Guang Wei; Du, Daniel; Stehle, Randall; Lembke, Franz; Cervantes, Jessica; Ciotti, Susan; Haskell, Roy; Smithey, Dan; Haley, Kevin; Fan, Conglin

    2011-09-15

    This study explored the utility of topically applied polymeric nanoparticle suspensions to target delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs to hair follicles. Several formulations of amorphous drug/polymer nanoparticles were prepared from ethyl cellulose and UK-157,147 (systematic name (3S,4R)-[6-(3-hydroxyphenyl)sulfonyl]-2,2,3-trimethyl-4-(2-methyl-3-oxo-2,3-dihydropyridazin-6-yloxy)-3-chromanol), a potassium channel opener, using sodium glycocholate (NaGC) as a surface stabilizer. Nanoparticle suspensions were evaluated to determine if targeted drug delivery to sebaceous glands and hair follicles could be achieved. In in vitro testing with rabbit ear tissue, delivery of UK-157,147 to the follicles was demonstrated with limited distribution to the surrounding dermis. Delivery to hair follicles was also demonstrated in vivo, based on stimulation of hair growth in tests of 100-nm nanoparticles with a C3H mouse model. The nanoparticles were well-tolerated, with no visible skin irritation. In vivo tests of smaller nanoparticles with a hamster ear model also indicated targeted delivery to sebaceous glands. The nanoparticles released drug rapidly in in vitro nonsink dissolution tests and were stable in suspension for 3 months. The present results show selective drug delivery to the follicle by follicular transport of nanoparticles and rapid release of a poorly water-soluble drug. Thus, nanoparticles represent a promising approach for targeted topical delivery of low-solubility compounds to hair follicles. PMID:21722722

  14. Coupled Particulate and Continuum Model for Nanoparticle Targeted Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jifu; Wang, Shunqiang; Yang, Jie; Liu, Yaling

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of nanoparticle (NP) distribution in a vasculature involves transport phenomena at various scales and is crucial for the evaluation of NP delivery efficiency. A combined particulate and continuum model is developed to model NP transport and delivery processes. In the particulate model ligand-receptor binding kinetics is coupled with Brownian dynamics to study NP binding on a microscale. An analytical formula is derived to link molecular level binding parameters to particulate level adhesion and detachment rates. The obtained NP adhesion rates are then coupled with a convection-diffusion-reaction model to study NP transport and delivery at macroscale. The binding results of the continuum model agree well with those from the particulate model. The effects of shear rate, particle size and vascular geometry on NP adhesion are investigated. Attachment rates predicted by the analytical formula also agree reasonably well with the experimental data reported in literature. The developed coupled model that links ligand-receptor binding dynamics to NP adhesion rate along with macroscale transport and delivery processes may serve as a faster evaluation and prediction tool to determine NP distribution in complex vascular networks. PMID:23729869

  15. Targeted Delivery of siRNA-Generating DNA Nanocassettes Using Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Y.-S.; Lee, G. Y.; Sajja, H. K.; Qian, W.; Cao, Z.; He, W.; Karna, P.; Chen, X.; Mao, H.; Wang, Y. A.; Yang, L.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular therapy using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) has shown promise in the development of novel therapeutics. Various formulations have been used for in vivo delivery of siRNAs. However, the stability of short double-stranded RNA molecules in the blood and efficiency of siRNA delivery into target organs or tissues following systemic administration have been the major issues that limit applications of siRNA in human patients. In this study, multifunctional siRNA delivery nanoparticles are developed that combine imaging capability of nanoparticles with urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-targeted delivery of siRNA expressing DNA nanocassettes. This theranostic nanoparticle platform consists of a nanoparticle conjugated with targeting ligands and double-stranded DNA nanocassettes containing a U6 promoter and a shRNA gene for in vivo siRNA expression. Targeted delivery and gene silencing efficiency of firefly luciferase siRNA nanogenerators are demonstrated in tumor cells and in animal tumor models. Delivery of survivin siRNA expressing nanocassettes into tumor cells induces apoptotic cell death and sensitizes cells to chemotherapy drugs. The ability of expression of siRNAs from multiple nanocassettes conjugated to a single nanoparticle following receptor-mediated internalization should enhance the therapeutic effect of the siRNA-mediated cancer therapy. PMID:23292656

  16. Magnetic Targeted Delivery of Dexamethasone Acetate across the Round Window Membrane in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaoping; Chen, Kejian; Kuriyavar, Satish; Kopke, Richard D.; Grady, Brian P.; Bourne, David H.; Li, Wei; Dormer, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis Magnetically susceptible PLGA nanoparticles will effectively target the round window membrane (RWM) for delivery of dexamethasone-acetate (Dex-Ac) to the scala tympani. Background Targeted delivery of therapeutics to specific tissues can be accomplished using different targeting mechanisms. One technology includes iron oxide nanoparticles, susceptible to external magnetic fields. If a nanocomposite composed of biocompatible polymer (PLGA), magnetite, and Dex-Ac can be pulled into and across the mammalian RWM, drug delivery can be enhanced. Method In vitro targeting and release kinetics of PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac nanoparticles first were measured using a RWM model. Next, these optimized nanocomposites were targeted to the RWM by filling the niche in anesthetized guinea pigs. A permanent magnet was placed opposite the RWM for 1 hour. Cochlear soft tissues, perilymph, and RWM were harvested after euthanasia and steroid levels were measured using HPLC. Results Membrane transport, in vitro, proved optimal targeting using a lower particle magnetite concentration (1 versus 5 or 10 mg/ml). In vivo targeted PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac particles had an average size of 482.8 ± 158 nm (DLS) and an average zeta potential ?19.9 ± 3.3 mV. In 1 hour, there was significantly increased cochlear targeted delivery of Dex or Dex-Ac, compared with diffusion alone. Conclusion Superparamagnetic PLGA-magnetite-Dex-Ac nanoparticles under an external magnetic field (0.26 mT) for 1 hour significantly increased Dex-Ac delivery to the inner ear. The RWM was not completely permeated and also became loaded with nanocomposites, indicating that delivery to the cochlea would continue for weeks by PLGA degradation and passive diffusion. PMID:23187928

  17. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10-100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors' recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  18. Nanomicellar carriers for targeted delivery of anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-01-01

    Clinical application of anticancer drugs is limited by problems such as low water solubility, lack of tissue-specificity and toxicity. Formulation development represents an important approach to these problems. Among the many delivery systems studied, polymeric micelles have gained considerable attention owing to ease in preparation, small sizes (10–100 nm), and ability to solubilize water-insoluble anticancer drugs and accumulate specifically at the tumors. This article provides a brief review of several promising micellar systems and their applications in tumor therapy. The emphasis is placed on the discussion of the authors’ recent work on several nanomicellar systems that have both a delivery function and antitumor activity, named dual-function drug carriers. PMID:24341817

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle drug delivery systems for targeting tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mody, Vicky V.; Cox, Arthur; Shah, Samit; Singh, Ajay; Bevins, Wesley; Parihar, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Tumor hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a result of disordered vasculature that lead to distinctive hypoxic microenvironments not found in normal tissues. Many traditional anti-cancer agents are not able to penetrate into these hypoxic zones, whereas, conventional cancer therapies that work by blocking cell division are not effective to treat tumors within hypoxic zones. Under these circumstances the use of magnetic nanoparticles as a drug delivering agent system under the influence of external magnetic field has received much attention, based on their simplicity, ease of preparation, and ability to tailor their properties for specific biological applications. Hence in this review article we have reviewed current magnetic drug delivery systems, along with their application and clinical status in the field of magnetic drug delivery.

  20. Protein engineering for targeted delivery of radionuclides to tumors

    E-print Network

    Orcutt, Kelly Davis

    2010-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatment strategies include systemic chemotherapy, external beam radiation, and surgical excision. Chemotherapy is nonspecific, and targets all rapidly dividing cells. External beam radiation and surgery ...

  1. Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

  2. Transcriptional Profiling of Targets for Combination Therapy of Lung Carcinoma with Paclitaxel and Mitogen-activated Protein\\/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase Inhibitor1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Debra J. Taxman; Jeffrey P. MacKeigan; Casey Clements; Daniel T. Bergstralh

    2003-01-01

    A combination of paclitaxel (Taxol) and mitogen-activated protein\\/ extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK\\/Erk) inhibitor repre- sents a rational new approach to chemotherapy. We performed Af- fymetrix microarray analysis to understand the global effects of this combination in lung carcinoma. Genes involved in cell cycle control, apoptosis, adhesion, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis were modu- lated. We observed similar patterns of gene

  3. Claudin 4-targeted protein incorporated into PLGA nanoparticles can mediate M cell targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Rajapaksa, Thejani E.; Stover-Hamer, Mary; Fernandez, Xiomara; Eckelhoefer, Holly A.; Lo, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-based microparticles are in clinical use mainly for their ability to provide controlled release of peptides and compounds, but they are also being explored for their potential to deliver vaccines and drugs as suspensions directly into mucosal sites. It is generally assumed that uptake is mediated by epithelial M cells, but this is often not directly measured. To study the potential for optimizing M cell uptake of polymer microparticles in vivo, we produced sub-micron size PLGA particles incorporating a recombinant protein. This recombinant protein was produced with or without a c-terminal peptide previously shown to have high affinity binding to Claudin 4, a protein associated with M cell endocytosis. While the PLGA nanoparticles incorporate the protein throughout the matrix, much of the protein was also displayed on the surface, allowing us to take advantage of the binding activity of the targeting peptide. Accordingly, we found that instillation of these nanoparticles into the nasal passages or stomach of mice was found to significantly enhance their uptake by upper airway and intestinal M cells. Our results suggest that a reasonably simple nanoparticle manufacture method can provide insight into developing an effective needle-free delivery system. PMID:19896996

  4. Targeted delivery of oligodeoxynucleotides to parenchymal liver cells in vivo

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erik A. L. BIESSEN; Helene VIETSCH; Erik T. RUMP; Kees FLUITER; Johan KUIPER; Martin K. BIJSTERBOSCH; Theo J. C. VAN BERKEL

    1999-01-01

    Anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) hold great promise for correcting the biosynthesis of clinically relevant proteins. The potential of ODNs for modulating liver-specific genes might be increased by preventing untimely elimination and by improving the local bioavailability of ODNs in the target tissue. In the present study we have assessed whether the local ODN con- centration can be enhanced by the targeted

  5. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer - specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neha; Hatoum, Hassan; Dy, Grace K

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007) is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel). A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC. PMID:24399877

  6. Aptamer-targeted DNA nanostructures for therapeutic delivery.

    PubMed

    Charoenphol, Phapanin; Bermudez, Harry

    2014-05-01

    DNA-based nanostructures have been widely used in various applications due to their structural diversity, programmability, and uniform structures. Their intrinsic biocompatibility and biodegradability further motivates the investigation of DNA-based nanostructures as delivery vehicles. Incorporating AS1411 aptamers into DNA pyramids leads to enhanced intracellular uptake and selectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells, achieved without the use of transfection reagents. Furthermore, aptamer-displaying pyramids are found to be substantially more resistant to nuclease degradation than single-stranded aptamers. These findings, along with their modularity, reinforce the potential of DNA-based nanostructures for therapeutic applications. PMID:24739136

  7. Polymeric micelles: nanocarriers for cancer-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifei; Huang, Yixian; Li, Song

    2014-08-01

    Polymeric micelles represent an effective delivery system for poorly water-soluble anticancer drugs. With small size (10-100 nm) and hydrophilic shell of PEG, polymeric micelles exhibit prolonged circulation time in the blood and enhanced tumor accumulation. In this review, the importance of rational design was highlighted by summarizing the recent progress on the development of micellar formulations. Emphasis is placed on the new strategies to enhance the drug/carrier interaction for improved drug-loading capacity. In addition, the micelle-forming drug-polymer conjugates are also discussed which have both drug-loading function and antitumor activity. PMID:24700296

  8. Aptamer-Targeted DNA Nanostructures for Therapeutic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    DNA-based nanostructures have been widely used in various applications due to their structural diversity, programmability, and uniform structures. Their intrinsic biocompatibility and biodegradability further motivates the investigation of DNA-based nanostructures as delivery vehicles. Incorporating AS1411 aptamers into DNA pyramids leads to enhanced intracellular uptake and selectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells, achieved without the use of transfection reagents. Furthermore, aptamer-displaying pyramids are found to be substantially more resistant to nuclease degradation than single-stranded aptamers. These findings, along with their modularity, reinforce the potential of DNA-based nanostructures for therapeutic applications. PMID:24739136

  9. Challenges in design and characterization of ligand-targeted drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Muro, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Targeting of therapeutic agents to molecular markers expressed on the surface of cells requiring clinical intervention holds promise to improve specificity of delivery, enhancing therapeutic effects while decreasing potential damage to healthy tissues. Drug targeting to cellular receptors involved in endocytic transport facilitates intracellular delivery, a requirement for a number of therapeutic goals. However, after several decades of experimental design, there is still considerable controversy on the practical outcome of drug targeting strategies. The plethora of factors contributing to the relative efficacy of targeting makes the success of these approaches hardly predictable. Lack of fully specific targets, along with selection of targets with spatial and temporal expression well aligned to interventional requirements, pose difficulties to this process. Selection of adequate sub-molecular target epitopes determines accessibility for anchoring of drug conjugates and bulkier drug carriers, as well as proper signaling for uptake within the cell. Targeting design must adapt to physiological variables of blood flow, disease status, and tissue architecture by accommodating physicochemical parameters such as carrier composition, functionalization, geometry, and avidity. In many cases, opposite features need to meet a balance, e.g., sustained circulation versus efficient targeting, penetration through tissues versus uptake within cells, internalization within endocytic compartment to avoid efflux pumps versus accessibility to molecular targets within the cytosol, etc. Detailed characterization of these complex physiological factors and design parameters, along with a deep understanding of the mechanisms governing the interaction of targeted drugs and carriers with the biological environment, are necessary steps toward achieving efficient drug targeting systems. PMID:22709588

  10. Challenges in design and characterization of ligand-targeted drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Muro, Silvia

    2012-12-10

    Targeting of therapeutic agents to molecular markers expressed on the surface of cells requiring clinical intervention holds promise to improve specificity of delivery, enhancing therapeutic effects while decreasing potential damage to healthy tissues. Drug targeting to cellular receptors involved in endocytic transport facilitates intracellular delivery, a requirement for a number of therapeutic goals. However, after several decades of experimental design, there is still considerable controversy on the practical outcome of drug targeting strategies. The plethora of factors contributing to the relative efficacy of targeting makes the success of these approaches hardly predictable. Lack of fully specific targets, along with selection of targets with spatial and temporal expression well aligned to interventional requirements, pose difficulties to this process. Selection of adequate sub-molecular target epitopes determines accessibility for anchoring of drug conjugates and bulkier drug carriers, as well as proper signaling for uptake within the cell. Targeting design must adapt to physiological variables of blood flow, disease status, and tissue architecture by accommodating physicochemical parameters such as carrier composition, functionalization, geometry, and avidity. In many cases, opposite features need to meet a balance, e.g., sustained circulation versus efficient targeting, penetration through tissues versus uptake within cells, internalization within endocytic compartment to avoid efflux pumps versus accessibility to molecular targets within the cytosol, etc. Detailed characterization of these complex physiological factors and design parameters, along with a deep understanding of the mechanisms governing the interaction of targeted drugs and carriers with the biological environment, are necessary steps toward achieving efficient drug targeting systems. PMID:22709588

  11. Targeted delivery of Tet1 peptide functionalized polymersomes to the rat cochlear nerve

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Weikai; Johnston, Alexander H; Newman, Tracey A; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Polymersomes are nanosized vesicles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, and have been identified as potential drug delivery vehicles to the inner ear. The aim of this study was to provide targeting to specific cells within the inner ear by functionalizing the polymersome surface with Tet1 peptide sequence. Tet1 peptide specifically binds to the trisialoganglioside clostridial toxin receptor on neurons and was expected to target the polymersomes toward the cochlear nerve. The Tet1 functionalized PEG-b-PCL polymersomes were administered using routine drug delivery routes: transtympanic injection and cochleostomy. Delivery via cochleostomy of Tet1 functionalized polymersomes resulted in cochlear nerve targeting; in contrast this was not seen after transtympanic injection. PMID:22403485

  12. Targeted delivery of Tet1 peptide functionalized polymersomes to the rat cochlear nerve.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ya; Zhang, Weikai; Johnston, Alexander H; Newman, Tracey A; Pyykkö, Ilmari; Zou, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Polymersomes are nanosized vesicles formed from amphiphilic block copolymers, and have been identified as potential drug delivery vehicles to the inner ear. The aim of this study was to provide targeting to specific cells within the inner ear by functionalizing the polymersome surface with Tet1 peptide sequence. Tet1 peptide specifically binds to the trisialoganglioside clostridial toxin receptor on neurons and was expected to target the polymersomes toward the cochlear nerve. The Tet1 functionalized PEG-b-PCL polymersomes were administered using routine drug delivery routes: transtympanic injection and cochleostomy. Delivery via cochleostomy of Tet1 functionalized polymersomes resulted in cochlear nerve targeting; in contrast this was not seen after transtympanic injection. PMID:22403485

  13. Expert Review Functionalized Micellar Systems for Cancer Targeted Drug Delivery

    E-print Network

    Gao, Jinming

    nanomedicine platform for cancer therapeutic applications due to their small size (10Y100 nm), in vivo targeting; cancer nanomedicine; micelle pharmacokinetics; polymer micelles; responsive drug release. INTRODUCTION Recently, polymer micelles have gained considerable attention as a versatile nanomedicine platform

  14. Impacts of Blood-Brain Barrier in Drug Delivery and Targeting of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Omidi, Yadollah; Barar, Jaleh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Entry of blood circulating agents into the brain is highly selectively con-trolled by specific transport machineries at the blood brain barrier (BBB), whose excellent barrier restrictiveness make brain drug delivery and targeting very challenging. Methods Essential information on BBB cellular microenvironment were reviewed and discussed towards impacts of BBB on brain drug delivery and targeting. Results Brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) form unique biological structure and architecture in association with astrocytes and pericytes, in which microenvironment the BCECs express restrictive tight junctional complexes that block the paracellular inward/outward traverse of biomolecules/compounds. These cells selectively/specifically control the transportation process through carrier and/or receptor mediated transport machineries that can also be exploited for the delivery of pharmaceuticals into the brain. Intelligent molecular therapies should be designed using such transport machineries for the efficient delivery of designated drugs into the brain. For better clinical outcomes, these smart pharmaceuticals should be engineered as seamless nanosystems to provide simultaneous imaging and therapy (multimodal theranostics). Conclusion The exceptional functional presence of BBB selectively controls inward and outward transportation mechanisms, thus advanced smart multifunctional nanomedicines are needed for the effective brain drug delivery and targeting. Fully understanding the biofunctions of BBB appears to be a central step for engineering of intelligent seamless therapeutics consisting of homing device for targeting, imaging moiety for detecting, and stimuli responsive device for on-demand liberation of therapeutic agent. PMID:23678437

  15. Tuning pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a targeted drug delivery system through incorporation of a passive targeting component.

    PubMed

    Kudgus, Rachel A; Walden, Chad A; McGovern, Renee M; Reid, Joel M; Robertson, J David; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Major challenges in the development of drug delivery systems (DDSs) have been the short half-life, poor bioavailability, insufficient accumulation and penetration of the DDSs into the tumor tissue. Understanding the pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of the DDS is essential to overcome these challenges. Herein we investigate how surface chemistry affects the PK profile and organ distribution of a gold nanoparticle-based DDS containing both a passive and active targeting moiety via two common routes of administration: intravenous and intraperitoneal injections. Using LC/MS/MS, ELISA and INAA we report the half-life, peak plasma concentrations, area under the curve, ability to cross the peritoneal barrier and biodistribution of the nanoconjugates. The results highlight the design criteria for fine-tuning the PK parameters of a targeted drug delivery system that exploits the benefits of both active and passive targeting. PMID:25011609

  16. Dendritic polymer-based nanodevices for targeted drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, R. M.; Kolhe, Parag; Gurdag, Sezen; Khandare, Jayant; Lieh-Lai, Mary

    2004-03-01

    Dendrimers and hyperbranched polymers are unimolecular micellar nanostructures, characterized by globular shape ( ˜ 20 nm) and large density of functional groups at periphery. The tailorable end groups make them ideal for conjugation with drugs, ligands, and imagining agents, making them an attractive molecular nanodevices for drug delivery. Compared to linear polymers and nanoparticles, these nanodevices enter cells rapidly, carrying drugs and delivering them inside cells. Performance of nanodevices prepared for asthma and cancer drug delivery will be discussed. Our conjugation procedure produced very high drug payloads. Dendritic polymer-drug conjugates were very effective in transporting methotrexate (a chemotherapy drug) into both sensitive (CCRF-CEM cell line) and resistant cell line (CEM-MTX). The conjugate nanodevice was 3 times more effective than free drug in the sensitive line, and 9 times more effective in the resistant cell line (based on IC50). The physics of cell entry and drug release from these nanodevices are being investigated. The conjugates appear to enter cells through endocytosis, with the rate of entry dependent on end-group, molecular weight, the pH of the medium, and the cancerous nature of the cells.

  17. Tumor Vasculature Targeted Photodynamic Therapy for Enhanced Delivery of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Delivery of nanoparticle drugs to tumors relies heavily on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. While many consider the effect to be equally effective on all tumors, it varies drastically among the tumors’ origins, stages, and organs, owing much to differences in vessel leakiness. Suboptimal EPR effect represents a major problem in the translation of nanomedicine to the clinic. In the present study, we introduce a photodynamic therapy (PDT)-based EPR enhancement technology. The method uses RGD-modified ferritin (RFRT) as “smart” carriers that site-specifically deliver 1O2 to the tumor endothelium. The photodynamic stimulus can cause permeabilized tumor vessels that facilitate extravasation of nanoparticles at the sites. The method has proven to be safe, selective, and effective. Increased tumor uptake was observed with a wide range of nanoparticles by as much as 20.08-fold. It is expected that the methodology can find wide applications in the area of nanomedicine. PMID:24806291

  18. New approaches to targeted drug delivery to tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severin, E. S.

    2015-01-01

    Basic approaches to the design of targeted drugs for the treatment of human malignant tumours have been considered. The stages of the development of these approaches have been described in detail and theoretically substantiated, and basic experimental results have been reported. Considerable attention is paid to the general characteristic of nanopharmacological drugs and to the description of mechanisms of cellular interactions with nanodrugs. The potentialities and limitations of application of nanodrugs for cancer therapy and treatment of other diseases have been considered. The use of nanodrugs conjugated with vector molecules seems to be the most promising trend of targeted therapy of malignant tumours. The bibliography includes 122 references.

  19. Delivery of Small Interfering RNA by Peptide-Targeted Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Epler, Katharine E.; Padilla, David P.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Castillo, Robert E.; Wilkinson, Dan C.; Wilkinson, Brian S.; Burgard, Cameron A.; Sewell, Robin M.; Townson, Jason L.; Chackerian, Bryce; Willman, Cheryl L.; Peabody, David S.; Wharton, Walker; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is severely limited by the availability of delivery platforms that protect siRNA from degradation, deliver it to the target cell with high specificity and efficiency, and promote its endosomal escape and cytosolic dispersion. Here we report that mesoporous silica nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (or ‘protocells’), exhibit multiple properties that overcome many of the limitations of existing delivery platforms. Protocells have a 10- to 100-fold greater capacity for siRNA than corresponding lipid nanoparticles and are markedly more stable when incubated under physiological conditions. Protocells loaded with a cocktail of siRNAs bind to cells in a manner dependent on the presence of an appropriate targeting peptide and, through an endocytic pathway followed by endosomal disruption, promote delivery of the silencing nucleotides to the cytoplasm. The expression of each of the genes targeted by the siRNAs was shown to be repressed at the protein level, resulting in a potent induction of growth arrest and apoptosis. Incubation of control cells that lack expression of the antigen recognized by the targeting peptide with siRNA-loaded protocells induced neither repression of protein expression nor apoptosis, indicating the precise specificity of cytotoxic activity. In terms of loading capacity, targeting capabilities, and potency of action, protocells provide unique attributes as a delivery platform for therapeutic oligonucleotides. PMID:22309035

  20. An Evolved Adeno-associated Viral Variant Enhances Gene Delivery and Gene Targeting in Neural Stem Cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jae-Hyung Jang; James T Koerber; Jung-Suk Kim; Prashanth Asuri; Tandis Vazin; Melissa Bartel; Albert Keung; Inchan Kwon; Kook In Park; David V Schaffer

    2011-01-01

    Gene delivery to, and gene targeting in, stem cells would be a highly enabling technology for basic science and biomedical application. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have demonstrated the capacity for efficient delivery to numerous cells, but their application to stem cells has been limited by low transduction efficiency. Due to their considerable advantages, however, engineering AAV delivery systems to enhance

  1. Click conjugated polymeric immuno-nanoparticles for targeted siRNA and antisense oligonucleotide delivery.

    PubMed

    Chan, Dianna P Y; Deleavey, Glen F; Owen, Shawn C; Damha, Masad J; Shoichet, Molly S

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and targeted cellular delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) is a major challenge facing oligonucleotide-based therapeutics. The majority of current delivery strategies employ either conjugated ligands or oligonucleotide encapsulation within delivery vehicles to facilitate cellular uptake. Chemical modification of the oligonucleotides (ONs) can improve potency and duration of activity, usually as a result of improved nuclease resistance. Here we take advantage of innovations in both polymeric delivery vehicles and ON stabilization to achieve receptor-mediated targeted delivery of siRNAs or AONs for gene silencing. Polymeric nanoparticles comprised of poly(lactide-co-2-methyl, 2-carboxytrimethylene carbonate)-g-polyethylene glycol-furan/azide are click-modified with both anti-HER2 antibodies and nucleic acids on the exterior PEG corona. Phosphorothioate (PS), 2'F-ANA, and 2'F-RNA backbone chemical modifications improve siRNA and AON potency and duration of activity. Importantly, delivery of these nucleic acids on the exterior of the polymeric immuno-nanoparticles are as efficient in gene silencing as lipofectamine transfection without the associated potential toxicity of the latter. PMID:23932248

  2. Liposome technology. Volume III: Targeted drug delivery and biological interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Gregoriadis, G.

    1984-01-01

    These three volumes cover liposome technology in pharmacology and medicine. Contributors emphasize methodology used in their own laboratories, and include a brief introduction, coverage of relevant literature, applications and critical evaluations for the methods they describe. In Volume III, the growing variety of techniques yielding targeted liposomes and approaches of studying liposomal behavior both in vitro and in vivo are discussed.

  3. Tetanus toxin C fragment-conjugated nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery to neurons.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Seth A; Evrony, Gilad D; Gu, Frank X; Schulz, Martin P; Brown, Robert H; Langer, Robert

    2007-12-01

    The use of nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery is often facilitated by specific conjugation of functional targeting molecules to the nanoparticle surface. We compared different biotin-binding proteins (avidin, streptavidin, or neutravidin) as crosslinkers to conjugate proteins to biodegradable nanoparticles prepared from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-polyethylene glycol (PEG)-biotin polymers. Avidin gave the highest levels of overall protein conjugation, whereas neutravidin minimized protein non-specific binding to the polymer. The tetanus toxin C fragment (TTC), which is efficiently retrogradely transported in neurons and binds to neurons with high specificity and affinity, retained the ability to bind to neuroblastoma cells following amine group modifications. TTC was conjugated to nanoparticles using neutravidin, and the resulting nanoparticles were shown to selectively target neuroblastoma cells in vitro. TTC-conjugated nanoparticles have the potential to serve as drug delivery vehicles targeted to the central nervous system. PMID:17854886

  4. Colon-targeted delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics including microencapsulated live bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Satya; Malgorzata Urbanska, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    There has been an ample interest in delivery of therapeutic molecules using live cells. Oral delivery has been stipulated as best way to deliver live cells to humans for therapy. Colon, in particular, is a part of gastrointestinal (GI) tract that has been proposed to be an oral targeted site. The main objective of these oral therapy procedures is to deliver live cells not only to treat diseases like colorectal cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, and other GI tract diseases like intestinal obstruction and gastritis, but also to deliver therapeutic molecules for overall therapy in various diseases such as renal failure, coronary heart disease, hypertension, and others. This review provides a comprehensive summary of recent advancement in colon targeted live bacterial cell biotherapeutics. Current status of bacterial cell therapy, principles of artificial cells and its potentials in oral delivery of live bacterial cell biotherapeutics for clinical applications as well as biotherapeutic future perspectives are also discussed in our review. PMID:19707368

  5. Biomolecular Corona on Nanoparticles: A Survey of Recent Literature and its Implications in Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Ryan; Juettner, Vanessa; Hong, Seungpyo

    2014-11-01

    Achieving controlled cellular responses of nanoparticles (NP) is critical for the successful development and translation of NP-based drug delivery systems. However, precise control over the physicochemical and biological properties of NPs could become convoluted, diminished, or completely lost as a result of the adsorption of biomolecules to their surfaces. Characterization of the formation of the ‘biomolecular’ corona has thus received increased attention due to its impact on NP and protein structure as well as its negative effect on NP-based targeted drug delivery. This review presents a concise survey of the recent literature concerning the importance of the NP-biomolecule corona and how it can be utilized to improve the in vivo efficacy of targeted delivery systems.

  6. Targeting blood–brain barrier changes during inflammatory pain: an opportunity for optimizing CNS drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ronaldson, Patrick T; Davis, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is the most significant obstacle to effective CNS drug delivery. It possesses structural and biochemical features (i.e., tight-junction protein complexes and, influx and efflux transporters) that restrict xenobiotic permeation. Pathophysiological stressors (i.e., peripheral inflammatory pain) can alter BBB tight junctions and transporters, which leads to drug-permeation changes. This is especially critical for opioids, which require precise CNS concentrations to be safe and effective analgesics. Recent studies have identified molecular targets (i.e., endogenous transporters and intracellular signaling systems) that can be exploited for optimization of CNS drug delivery. This article summarizes current knowledge in this area and emphasizes those targets that present the greatest opportunity for controlling drug permeation and/or drug transport across the BBB in an effort to achieve optimal CNS opioid delivery. PMID:22468221

  7. Biomolecular corona on nanoparticles: a survey of recent literature and its implications in targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Ryan M.; Juettner, Vanessa V.; Hong, Seungpyo

    2014-01-01

    Achieving controlled cellular responses of nanoparticles (NP) is critical for the successful development and translation of NP-based drug delivery systems. However, precise control over the physicochemical and biological properties of NPs could become convoluted, diminished, or completely lost as a result of the adsorption of biomolecules to their surfaces. Characterization of the formation of the “biomolecular” corona has thus received increased attention due to its impact on NP and protein structure as well as its negative effect on NP-based targeted drug delivery. This review presents a concise survey of the recent literature concerning the importance of the NP-biomolecule corona and how it can be utilized to improve the in vivo efficacy of targeted delivery systems. PMID:25506050

  8. Evaluation of transferrin-polyethylenimine conjugate for targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Man; Kim, In Sook; Lee, Yong Bok; Shin, Sang Chul; Lee, Kang Choon; Oh, In Joon

    2005-06-01

    With the aim to improve the specificity and to reduce the cytotoxicity of polyethylenimine (PEI), we have synthesized the conjugates of the branched PEI (25 kDa) with transferrin. The transferrin-PEI (TP) conjugates with five compositions were synthesized using periodate oxidation method and confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography. The free amine contents of TP conjugates, which were able to condense and deliver DNA, increased as the amount of PEI increased. TP/DNA polyplexes were characterized by measuring gel electrophoresis, ethidium bromide fluorescence quenching, particle size and zeta potential of complexes. Complete complexation of the polyplexes was observed above the N/P ratio of 5 in TP/ DNA, and above 3 in PEI/DNA, respectively. The zeta potential of the complexes decreased as the amount of transferrin in TP conjugates increased. Transfection efficiency of TP conjugates was evaluated in HeLa cell and Jurkat cell systems. Among the five compositions of TP conjugates, TP-2 system mediated a higher beta-galactosidase gene expression than PEI system in Jurkat cell which was known to express elevated numbers of transferrin receptors. From the results of the cell viability based on MTT assay, TP conjugates showed lower cytotoxicity compared with the PEI system. We expect that the TP conjugate can be used efficiently as a nonviral gene delivery vector. PMID:16042083

  9. Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT): a potential target for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-06-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22420308

  10. Sodium Dependent Multivitamin Transporter (SMVT): A Potential Target for Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2015-01-01

    Sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT; product of the SLC5A6 gene) is an important transmembrane protein responsible for translocation of vitamins and other essential cofactors such as biotin, pantothenic acid and lipoic acid. Hydropathy plot (Kyte-Dolittle algorithm) revealed that human SMVT protein consists of 635 amino acids and 12 transmembrane domains with both amino and carboxyl termini oriented towards the cytoplasm. SMVT is expressed in various tissues such as placenta, intestine, brain, liver, lung, kidney, cornea, retina and heart. This transporter displays broad substrate specificity and excellent capacity for utilization in drug delivery. Drug absorption is often limited by the presence of physiological (epithelial tight junctions), biochemical (efflux transporters and enzymatic degradation) and chemical (size, lipophilicity, molecular weight, charge, etc.) barriers. These barriers may cause many potential therapeutics to be dropped from the preliminary screening portfolio and subsequent entry into the market. Transporter targeted delivery has become a powerful approach to deliver drugs to target tissues because of the ability of the transporter to translocate the drug to intracellular organelles at a higher rate. This review highlights studies employing SMVT transporter as a target for drug delivery to improve bioavailability and investigate the feasibility of developing SMVT targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22420308

  11. Use of Microsphere Technology for Targeted Delivery of Rifampin to Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Macrophages

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ESTHER L. W. BARROW; GARY A. WINCHESTER; JAY K. STAAS; DEBRA C. QUENELLE; WILLIAM W. BARROW

    1998-01-01

    Microsphere technology was used to develop formulations of rifampin for targeted delivery to host macro- phages. These formulations were prepared by using biocompatible polymeric excipients of lactide and glycolide copolymers. Release characteristics were examined in vitro and also in two monocytic cell lines, the murine J774 and the human Mono Mac 6 cell lines. Bioassay assessment of cell culture supernatants

  12. Peptide-mediated cell penetration and targeted delivery of gold nanoparticles into lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Dekiwadia, Chaitali D; Lawrie, Ann C; Fecondo, John V

    2012-08-01

    There is considerable interest in the sub-cellular targeting and delivery of biomolecules, therapeutic and imaging agents, and nanoparticles and nanoparticle conjugates into organelles for therapeutic and imaging purposes. To date, a number of studies have used sorting peptides for targeted delivery of cargo into different cell organelles but not into lysosomes. In this study, the delivery of 13-nm gold nanoparticles across the cell membrane followed by targeted localisation into the lysosomes of a mammalian cell line was examined using novel combinations of cell-penetrating peptides and lysosomal sorting peptides conjugated to the nanoparticles. Using a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques, we show that these nanoconjugates were efficiently and selectively delivered into the lysosomes with minimal cytotoxic effects. This novel targeted delivery system may underpin the development of a new strategy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases by exploiting the large surface area of nanoparticles to deliver drugs or replacement enzymes directly to the lysosomes. PMID:22764089

  13. Synthetic Aptamer-Polymer Hybrid Constructs for Programmed Drug Delivery into Specific Target Cells

    E-print Network

    Akhmedov, Azer

    more efficient than existing synthetic delivery mechanisms. Inspired by these natural systems, we. After visualizing this process with coumarin dye, we demonstrate targeted killing of tumor cells considerable effort to devise synthetic systems that mimic these natural molecular machines to achieve more

  14. Towards multifunctional, targeted drug delivery systems using mesoporous silica nanoparticles - opportunities & challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholm, Jessica M.; Sahlgren, Cecilia; Lindén, Mika

    2010-10-01

    One of the big challenges of medicine today is to deliver drugs specifically to defected cells. Nanoparticulate drug carriers have the potential to answer to this call, as nanoparticles can cross physiological barriers and access different tissues, and also be provided in a targetable form aimed at enhancing cell specificity of the carrier. Recent developments within material science and strong collaborative efforts crossing disciplinary borders have highlighted the potential of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for such targeted drug delivery. Here we outline recent advances which in this sense push MSNs to the forefront of drug delivery development. Relatively straightforward inside-out tuning of the vehicles, high flexibility, and potential for sophisticated release mechanisms make these nanostructures promising candidates for targeted drug delivery such as `smart' cancer therapies. Moreover, due to the large surface area and the controllable surface functionality of MSNs, they can be controllably loaded with large amounts of drugs and coupled to homing molecules to facilitate active targeting, simultaneously carrying traceable (fluorescent or magnetically active) modalities, also making them highly interesting as theragnostic agents. However, the increased relative surface area and small size, and flexible surface functionalization which is beneficially exploited in nanomedicine, consequently also includes potential risks in their interactions with biological systems. Therefore, we also discuss some safety issues regarding MSNs and highlight how different features of the drug delivery platform influence their behaviour in a biological setting. Addressing these burning questions will facilitate the application of MSNs in nanomedicine.

  15. Self-assembled hybrid nanoparticles for targeted co-delivery of two drugs into cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Fujian; You, Mingxu; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Guizhi; Liang, Haojun; Tan, Weihong

    2014-03-21

    A therapeutic aptamer-lipid-poly(lactide-co-glycolic acid) hybrid nanoparticle-based drug delivery system was prepared and characterized. This system can co-deliver two different drugs with distinct solubility and different anticancer mechanisms to target cancer cells with high specificity and efficiency. PMID:24516863

  16. Theranostic Nanoparticles Carrying Doxorubicin Attenuate Targeting Ligand Specific Antibody Responses Following Systemic Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Emmy; Qian, Weiping; Cao, Zehong; Wang, Liya; Bozeman, Erica N.; Ward, Christina; Yang, Bin; Selvaraj, Periasamy; Lipowska, Malgorzata; Wang, Y. Andrew; Mao, Hui; Yang, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of immune responses on targeted delivery of nanoparticles is important for clinical translations of new cancer imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles. In this study, we found that repeated administrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) conjugated with mouse or human derived targeting ligands induced high levels of ligand specific antibody responses in normal and tumor bearing mice while injections of unconjugated mouse ligands were weakly immunogenic and induced a very low level of antibody response in mice. Mice that received intravenous injections of targeted and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated IONPs further increased the ligand specific antibody production due to differential uptake of PEG-coated nanoparticles by macrophages and dendritic cells. However, the production of ligand specific antibodies was markedly inhibited following systemic delivery of theranostic nanoparticles carrying a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin. Targeted imaging and histological analysis revealed that lack of the ligand specific antibodies led to an increase in intratumoral delivery of targeted nanoparticles. Results of this study support the potential of further development of targeted theranostic nanoparticles for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:25553097

  17. Application of chitosan-based nanocarriers in tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ghaz-Jahanian, Mohammad Ali; Abbaspour-Aghdam, Farzin; Anarjan, Navideh; Berenjian, Aydin; Jafarizadeh-Malmiri, Hoda

    2015-03-01

    Cancer is one of the major malignant diseases in the world. Current anti tumor agents are restricted during the chemotherapy due to their poor solubility in aqueous media, multidrug resistance problems, cytotoxicity, and serious side effects to healthy tissues. Development of targeted drug nanocarriers would enhance the undesirable effects of anticancer drugs and also selectively deliver them to cancerous tissues. Variety of nanocarriers such as micelles, polymeric nanoparticles, liposomes nanogels, dendrimers, and carbon nanotubes have been used for targeted delivery of anticancer agents. These nanocarriers transfer loaded drugs to desired sites through passive or active efficacy mechanisms. Chitosan and its derivatives, due to their unique properties such as hydrophilicity, biocompatibility, and biodegradability, have attracted attention to be used in nanocarriers. Grafting cancer-specific ligands onto the Chitosan nanoparticles, which leads to ligand-receptor interactions, has been successfully developed as active targeting. Chitosan-conjugated components also respond to external or internal physical and chemical stimulus in targeted tumors that is called environment triggers. In this study, mechanisms of targeted tumor deliveries via nanocarriers were explained; specifically, chitosan-based nanocarriers in tumor-targeting drug delivery were also discussed. PMID:25385004

  18. Depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery by using annular-shaped photomechanical waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Takuya; Sato, Shunichi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2011-02-01

    Laser-based drug delivery is attractive for the targeting capability due to high spatial controllability of laser energy. Recently, we found that photomechanical waves (PMWs) can transiently increase the permeability of blood vessels in skin, muscle and brain of rats. In this study, we examined the use of annular-shaped PMWs to increase pressure at target depths due to superposition effect of pressure waves. This can increase the permeability of blood vessels located in the specific depth regions, enabling depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery. Annular PMWs were produced by irradiating a laser-absorbing material with annular-shaped pulsed laser beams that were produced by using an axicon lens. We first examined propagation and pressure characteristics of annular PMWs in tissue phantoms and confirmed an increased pressure at a target depth, which can be controlled by changing laser parameters. We injected Evans blue (EB) into a rat tail vein, and annular PMWs (inner diameter, 3 mm; outer diameter, 5 mm) were applied from the myofascial surface of the anterior tibialis muscle. After perfusion fixation, we observed fluorescence originating from EB in the tissue. We observed intense fluorescence at a target depth region of around 5 mm. These results demonstrate the capability of annular PMWs for depth-targeted transvascular drug delivery.

  19. Inhibition of Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Potentiates Paclitaxel-Induced Cytotoxicity in Ovarian Cancer Cells by Stabilizing Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Gaillard, Stephanie; Phillip, Jude M; Huang, Tai-Chung; Pinto, Sneha M; Tessarollo, Nayara G; Zhang, Zhen; Pandey, Akhilesh; Wirtz, Denis; Ayhan, Ayse; Davidson, Ben; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2015-07-13

    Resistance to chemotherapy represents a major obstacle for long-term remission, and effective strategies to overcome drug resistance would have significant clinical impact. We report that recurrent ovarian carcinomas after paclitaxel/carboplatin treatment have higher levels of spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) and phospho-SYK. In vitro, paclitaxel-resistant cells expressed higher SYK, and the ratio of phospho-SYK/SYK positively associated with paclitaxel resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Inactivation of SYK by inhibitors or gene knockdown sensitized paclitaxel cytotoxicity in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of the phosphotyrosine proteome in paclitaxel-resistant tumor cells revealed that SYK phosphorylates tubulins and microtubule-associated proteins. Inhibition of SYK enhanced microtubule stability in paclitaxel-resistant tumor cells that were otherwise insensitive. Thus, targeting SYK pathway is a promising strategy to enhance paclitaxel response. PMID:26096845

  20. Synthesis, Characterization, and Evaluation of a Novel Amphiphilic Polymer RGD-PEG-Chol for Target Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shi; Li, Bo; Song, Xiangrong; Zheng, Yu; Peng, Cheng; Huang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    An amphiphilic polymer RGD-PEG-Chol which can be produced in large scale at a very low cost has been synthesized successfully. The synthesized intermediates and final products were characterized and confirmed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (1H NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). The paclitaxel- (PTX-) loaded liposomes based on RGD-PEG-Chol were then prepared by film formation method. The liposomes had a size within 100?nm and significantly enhanced the cytotoxicity of paclitaxel to B16F10 cell as demonstrated by MTT test (IC50 = 0.079??g/mL of RGD-modified PTX-loaded liposomes compared to 9.57??g/mL of free PTX). Flow cytometry analysis revealed that the cellular uptake of coumarin encapsulated in the RGD-PEG-Chol modified liposome was increased for HUVEC cells. This work provides a reasonable, facile, and economic approach to prepare peptide-modified liposome materials with controllable performances and the obtained linear RGD-modified PTX-loaded liposomes might be attractive as a drug delivery system. PMID:24578646

  1. Targeted Polymersome Delivery of siRNA Induces Cell Death of Breast Cancer Cells Dependent upon Orai3 Protein Expression

    E-print Network

    Kokkoli, Efie

    Targeted Polymersome Delivery of siRNA Induces Cell Death of Breast Cancer Cells Dependent upon 55455, United States ABSTRACT: Polymersomes, polymeric vesicles that self-assemble in aqueous solutions. Past work has highlighted peptide- functionalized polymersomes as a highly promising targeted delivery

  2. MSN-mediated sequential vascular-to-cell nuclear-targeted drug delivery for efficient tumor regression.

    PubMed

    Pan, Limin; Liu, Jianan; He, Qianjun; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-10-22

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles functionalized with peptides are developed for sequential drug delivery. The RGD peptide is used for vasculature/cell membrane targeting and the TAT peptide for nuclear targeting. Using this delivery strategy, a tumor in a murine xenograft model is successfully regressed. PMID:25159109

  3. Stimuli-responsive PEGylated prodrugs for targeted doxorubicin delivery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Qian, Junmin; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Ting; Wang, Hongjie

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, stimuli-sensitive prodrugs have been extensively studied for the rapid "burst" release of antitumor drugs to enhance chemotherapeutic efficiency. In this study, a novel stimuli-sensitive prodrug containing galactosamine as a targeting moiety, poly(ethylene glycol)-doxorubicin (PEG-DOX) conjugate, was developed for targeting HepG2 human liver cancer cells. To obtain the PEG-DOX conjugate, both galactosamine-decorated poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (Gal-PEG-CHO) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) aldehyde (mPEG-CHO) were firstly synthesized and functionalized with dithiodipropionate dihydrazide (TPH) through direct reductive amination via Schiff's base formation, and then DOX molecules were chemically conjugated to the hydrazide end groups of TPH-functionalized Gal-/m-PEG chains via pH-sensitive hydrazone linkages. The chemical structures of TPH-functionalized PEG and PEG-DOX prodrug were confirmed by (1)H NMR analysis. The PEG-DOX conjugate could self-assemble into spherical nanomicelles with a mean diameter of 140 nm, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The drug loading content and loading efficiency in the prodrug nanomicelles were as high as 20 wt.% and 75 wt.%, respectively. In vitro drug release studies showed that DOX was released rapidly from the prodrug nanomicelles at the intracellular levels of pH and reducing agent. Cellular uptake and MTT experiments demonstrated that the galactosamine-decorated prodrug nanomicelles were more efficiently internalized into HepG2 cells via a receptor-mediated endocytosis process and exhibited a higher toxicity, compared with pristine prodrug nanomicelles. These results suggest that the novel Gal-PEG-DOX prodrug nanomicelles have tremendous potential for targeted liver cancer therapy. PMID:25746279

  4. Apoptosis induced by paclitaxel-loaded copolymer PLA–TPGS in Hep-G2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Tran Thi, Hong Ha; Le Quang, Duong; Nguyen Thi, Toan; Tran Thi, Nhu Hang; Huong Le, Mai; Thu Ha, Phuong

    2012-12-01

    Paclitaxel is an important anticancer drug in clinical use for treatment of a variety of cancers. The clinical application of paclitaxel in cancer treatment is considerably limited due to its serious poor delivery characteristics. In this study paclitaxel-loaded copolymer poly(lactide)–d-?-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (PLA–TPGS) nanoparticles were prepared by a modified solvent extraction/evaporation technique. The characteristics of the nanoparticles, such as surface morphology, size distribution, zeta potential, solubility and apoptosis were investigated in vitro. The obtained spherical nanoparticles were negatively charged with a zeta potential of about ?18 mV with the size around 44 nm and a narrow size distribution. The ability of paclitaxel-loaded PLA–TPGS nanoparticles to induce apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (Hep-G2) indicates the possibility of developing paclitaxel nanoparticles as a potential universal cancer chemotherapeutic agent.

  5. Synthesis of Doxorubicin loaded magnetic chitosan nanoparticles for pH responsive targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Unsoy, Gozde; Khodadust, Rouhollah; Yalcin, Serap; Mutlu, Pelin; Gunduz, Ufuk

    2014-10-01

    Targeted drug delivery is a promising alternative to overcome the limitations of classical chemotherapy. In an ideal targeted drug delivery system carrier nanoparticles would be directed to the tumor tissue and selectively release therapeutic molecules. As a novel approach, chitosan coated magnetic nanoparticles (CS MNPs) maintain a pH dependent drug delivery which provides targeting of drugs to the tumor site under a magnetic field. Among various materials, chitosan has a great importance as a pH sensitive, natural, biodegradable, biocompatible and bioadhesive polymer. The aim of this study was to obtain an effective targeted delivery system for Doxorubicin, using chitosan coated MNPs. Different sized CS MNPs were produced by in situ synthesis method. The anti-cancer agent Doxorubicin was loaded onto CS MNPs which were characterized previously. Doxorubicin loading was confirmed by FTIR. Drug loading and release characteristics, and stability of the nanoparticles were investigated. Our results showed that the CS MNPs have pH responsive release characteristics. The cellular internalization of Doxorubicin loaded CS MNPs were visualized by fluorescent microscopy. Doxorubicin loaded CS MNPs are efficiently taken up by MCF-7 (MCF-7/S) and Doxorubicin resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/1 ?M) breast cancer cells, which increases the efficacy of drug and also maintains overcoming the resistance of Doxorubicin in MCF-7/Dox cells. Consequently, CS MNPs synthesized at various sizes can be effectively used for the pH dependent release of Doxorubicin in cancer cells. Results of this study can provide new insights in the development of pH responsive targeted drug delivery systems to overcome the side effects of conventional chemotherapy. PMID:24931189

  6. Recent approaches of lipid-based delivery system for lymphatic targeting via oral route.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Shilpa; Garg, Tarun; Murthy, R S R; Rath, Goutam; Goyal, Amit K

    2014-12-01

    Lymphatic system is a key target in research field due to its distinctive makeup and huge contributing functions within the body. Intestinal lymphatic drug transport (chylomicron pathway) is intensely described in research field till date because it is considered to be the best for improving oral drug delivery by avoiding first pass metabolism. The lymphatic imaging techniques and potential therapeutic candidates are engaged for evaluating disease states and overcoming these conditions. The novel drug delivery systems such as self-microemulsifying drug delivery system, nanoparticles, liposomes, nano-lipid carriers, solid lipid carriers are employed for delivering drugs through lymphatic system via various routes such as subcutaneous route, intraperitoneal route, pulmonary route, gastric sub-mucosal injection, intrapleural and intradermal. Among these colloidal particles, lipid-based delivery system is considered to be the best for lymphatic delivery. From the last few decades, mesenteric lymph duct cannulation and thoracic lymph duct cannulation are followed to assess lymphatic uptake of drugs. Due to their limitations, chylomicrons inhibitors and in-vitro models are employed, i.e. lipolysis model and permeability model. Currently, research on this topic still continues and drainage system used to deliver the drugs against lymphatic disease as well as targeting other organs by modulating the chylomicron pathway. PMID:25148607

  7. Characterization of Magnetic Viral Complexes for Targeted Delivery in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Almstätter, Isabella; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Settles, Marcus; Altomonte, Jennifer; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Ebert, Oliver; Plank, Christian; Braren, Rickmer

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses are promising new agents in cancer therapy. Success of tumor lysis is often hampered by low intra-tumoral titers due to a strong anti-viral host immune response and insufficient tumor targeting. Previous work on the co-assembly of oncolytic virus particles (VPs) with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was shown to provide shielding from inactivating immune response and improve targeting by external field gradients. In addition, MNPs are detected by magnet resonance imaging (MRI) enabling non-invasive therapy monitoring. In this study two selected core-shell type iron oxide MNPs were assembled with adenovirus (Ad) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The selected MNPs were characterized by high r2 and r2* relaxivities and thus could be quantified non-invasively by 1.5 and 3.0 tesla MRI with a detection limit below 0.001 mM iron in tissue-mimicking phantoms. Assembly and cell internalization of MNP-VP complexes resulted in 81 - 97 % reduction of r2 and 35 - 82 % increase of r2* compared to free MNPs. The relaxivity changes could be attributed to the clusterization of particles and complexes shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In a proof-of-principle study the non-invasive detection of MNP-VPs by MRI was shown in vivo in an orthotopic rat hepatocellular carcinoma model. In conclusion, MNP assembly and compartmentalization have a major impact on relaxivities, therefore calibration measurements are required for the correct quantification in biodistribution studies. Furthermore, our study provides first evidence of the in vivo applicability of selected MNP-VPs in cancer therapy. PMID:25897333

  8. The implications of recent advances in carboxymethyl chitosan based targeted drug delivery and tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Laxmi; Singh, Jay; Agarwal, Vishnu; Tewari, Ravi Prakash

    2014-07-28

    Over the last decade carboxymethyl chitosan (CMCS) has emerged as a promising biopolymer for the development of new drug delivery systems and improved scaffolds along with other tissue engineering devices for regenerative medicine that is currently one of the most rapidly growing fields in the life sciences. CMCS is amphiprotic ether, derived from chitosan, exhibiting enhanced aqueous solubility, excellent biocompatibility, controllable biodegradability, osteogenesis ability and numerous other outstanding physicochemical and biological properties. More strikingly, it can load hydrophobic drugs and displays strong bioactivity which highlight its suitability and extensive usage for preparing different drug delivery and tissue engineering formulations respectively. This review provides a comprehensive introduction to various types of CMCS based formulations for delivery of therapeutic agents and tissue regeneration and further describes their preparation procedures and applications in different tissues/organs. Detailed information of CMCS based nano/micro systems for targeted delivery of drugs with emphasis on cancer specific and organ specific drug delivery have been described. Further, we have discussed various CMCS based tissue engineering biomaterials along with their preparation procedures and applications in different tissues/organs. The article then, gives a brief account of therapy combining drug delivery and tissue engineering. Finally, identification of major challenges and opportunities for current and ongoing application of CMCS based systems in the field are summarised. PMID:24806482

  9. Recent advances in lymphatic targeted drug delivery system for tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yu; Lu, Wei-Yue

    2014-12-01

    The lymphatic system has an important defensive role in the human body. The metastasis of most tumors initially spreads through the surrounding lymphatic tissue and eventually forms lymphatic metastatic tumors; the tumor cells may even transfer to other organs to form other types of tumors. Clinically, lymphatic metastatic tumors develop rapidly. Given the limitations of surgical resection and the low effectiveness of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the treatment of lymphatic metastatic tumors remains a great challenge. Lymph node metastasis may lead to the further spread of tumors and may be predictive of the endpoint event. Under these circumstances, novel and effective lymphatic targeted drug delivery systems have been explored to improve the specificity of anticancer drugs to tumor cells in lymph nodes. In this review, we summarize the principles of lymphatic targeted drug delivery and discuss recent advances in the development of lymphatic targeted carriers. PMID:25610710

  10. nab-Paclitaxel dose and schedule in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    nab-Paclitaxel is approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer on an every-3-week schedule based on positive findings from a pivotal phase III trial in which nab-paclitaxel 260 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks was superior to solvent-based paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks for the primary endpoint of overall response rate (33 % vs 19 %; P?=?0.001). Subsequently, a number of trials have examined different schedules, doses, and combinations in efforts to optimize nab-paclitaxel-based therapy for metastatic and early-stage breast cancer. The goal of this review is to evaluate the clinical experiences to date with nab-paclitaxel as a single agent or in combination with targeted agents in different treatment settings - with a focus on the feasibility of administration, adverse event profile, and standard efficacy endpoints, such as overall survival, progression-free survival, overall response rate, and pathologic complete response rate. In general, weekly dosing during the first 3 of 4 weeks appears to achieve the best clinical benefit in both the metastatic and early-stage settings. Furthermore, the data suggest that high doses of nab-paclitaxel, such as 150 mg/m(2) during first 3 of 4 weeks or 260 mg/m(2) every 2 weeks, may be more feasible and appropriate for treatment of early-stage disease compared with metastatic disease. Intense regimens of nab-paclitaxel may not be the best treatment approach for unselected patients with metastatic breast cancer, but may suit a subset of patients for whom immediate disease control is required. The growing number of nab-paclitaxel trials in breast cancer will lead to greater refinements in tailoring therapy to patients based on their individual disease and patient characteristics. PMID:26067995

  11. Colon-Targeted Oral Drug Delivery Systems: Design Trends and Approaches.

    PubMed

    Amidon, Seth; Brown, Jack E; Dave, Vivek S

    2015-08-01

    Colon-specific drug delivery systems (CDDS) are desirable for the treatment of a range of local diseases such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pancreatitis, and colonic cancer. In addition, the colon can be a potential site for the systemic absorption of several drugs to treat non-colonic conditions. Drugs such as proteins and peptides that are known to degrade in the extreme gastric pH, if delivered to the colon intact, can be systemically absorbed by colonic mucosa. In order to achieve effective therapeutic outcomes, it is imperative that the designed delivery system specifically targets the drugs into the colon. Several formulation approaches have been explored in the development colon-targeted drug delivery systems. These approaches involve the use of formulation components that interact with one or more aspects of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, such as the difference in the pH along the GI tract, the presence of colonic microflora, and enzymes, to achieve colon targeting. This article highlights the factors influencing colon-specific drug delivery and colonic bioavailability, and the limitations associated with CDDS. Further, the review provides a systematic discussion of various conventional, as well as relatively newer formulation approaches/technologies currently being utilized for the development of CDDS. PMID:26070545

  12. A smart polymeric platform for multistage nucleus-targeted anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jiaju; Li, Lian; Zhu, Xi; Guan, Shan; Yang, Qingqing; Zhou, Zhou; Zhang, Zhirong; Huang, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell nucleus-targeted delivery of antitumor agents is of great interest in cancer therapy, since the nucleus is one of the most frequent targets of drug action. Here we report a smart polymeric conjugate platform, which utilizes stimulus-responsive strategies to achieve multistage nuclear drug delivery upon systemic administration. The conjugates composed of a backbone based on N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer and detachable nucleus transport sub-units that sensitive to lysosomal enzyme. The sub-units possess a biforked structure with one end conjugated with the model drug, H1 peptide, and the other end conjugated with a novel pH-responsive targeting peptide (R8NLS) that combining the strength of cell penetrating peptide and nuclear localization sequence. The conjugates exhibited prolonged circulation time and excellent tumor homing ability. And the activation of R8NLS in acidic tumor microenvironment facilitated tissue penetration and cellular internalization. Once internalized into the cell, the sub-units were unleashed for nuclear transport through nuclear pore complex. The unique features resulted in 50-fold increase of nuclear drug accumulation relative to the original polymer-drug conjugates in vitro, and excellent in vivo nuclear drug delivery efficiency. Our report provides a strategy in systemic nuclear drug delivery by combining the microenvironment-responsive structure and detachable sub-units. PMID:26142775

  13. Dual-Modality Monitoring of Targeted Intraarterial Delivery of Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transient Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Walczak, Piotr; Zhang, Jian; Gilad, Assaf A.; Kedziorek, Dorota A.; Ruiz-Cabello, Jesus; Young, Randell G.; Pittenger, Mark F.; van Zijl, Peter C.M.; Huang, Judy; Bulte, Jeff W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose In animal models of stroke, functional improvement has been obtained after stem cell transplantation. Successful therapy depends largely on achieving a robust and targeted cell engraftment, with intraarterial (IA) injection being a potentially attractive route of administration. We assessed the suitability of laser Doppler flow (LDF) signal measurements and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for noninvasive dual monitoring of targeted IA cell delivery. Methods Transient cerebral ischemia was induced in adult Wistar rats (n = 25) followed by IA or intravenous (IV) injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide. Cell infusion was monitored in real time with transcranial laser Doppler flowmetry while cellular delivery was assessed with MRI in vivo (4.7T) and ex vivo (9.4T). Results Successful delivery of magnetically labeled MSCs could be readily visualized with MRI after IA but not IV injection. IA stem cell injection during acute stroke resulted in a high variability of cerebral engraftment. The amount of LDF reduction during cell infusion (up to 80%) was found to correlate well with the degree of intracerebral engraftment, with low LDF values being associated with significant morbidity. Conclusions High cerebral engraftment rates are associated with impeded cerebral blood flow. Noninvasive dual-modality imaging enables monitoring of targeted cell delivery, and through interactive adjustment may improve the safety and efficacy of stem cell therapy. PMID:18323495

  14. Single-Antibody, Targeted Nanoparticle Delivery of Camptothecin

    PubMed Central

    Han, Han; Davis, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new method for assembling targeted nanoparticles that utilizes the complexation between targeting agents that contain boronic acids and polymer-drug conjugates that possess diols. Here, we report the first in vivo, antitumor results of a nanoparticle formed via this new assembly methodology. A nanoparticle consisting of a mucic acid polymer conjugate of camptothecin (CPT), MAP-CPT; and containing on average one Herceptin antibody is investigated in nude mice bearing HER2 overexpressing BT-474 human breast cancer tumors. Nontargeted MAP-CPT and antibody-containing MAP-CPT nanoparticles of ca. 30–40 nm diameter and slightly negative zeta potential show prolonged in vivo circulation and similar biodistributions after intravenous tail vein injections in mice. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of the nontargeted and Herceptin-containing MAP-CPT nanoparticles are found to be 10 and 8 mg CPT/kg, respectively, in mice. Mice bearing BT-474 human breast tumors treated with nontargeted MAP-CPT nanoparticles at 8 mg CPT/kg show significant tumor growth inhibition (mean tumor volume of 63 mm3) when compared to Irinotecan at 80 mg/kg (mean tumor volume of 575 mm3) and CPT at 8 mg/kg (mean tumor volume of 808 mm3) at the end of the study. Herceptin antibody treatment at 5.9 mg/kg results in complete tumor regressions in 5 out of 8 mice, with a mean tumor volume of 60 mm3 at the end of the study. Mice treated with MAP-CPT nanoparticles at 1 mg CPT/kg do not show tumor inhibition. However, all mice receiving administrations of MAP-CPT nanoparticles (1 mg CPT/kg) that contain on average a single Herceptin molecule per nanoparticle (5.9 mg Herceptin equivalent/kg) show complete tumor regression by the end of the study. These results demonstrate that the antitumor efficacy of nanoparticles carrying anticancer drugs can be enhanced by incorporating on average a single antibody. PMID:23676007

  15. Polymeric particulate technologies for oral drug delivery and targeting: a pathophysiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A Christy; Elsom, Jacqueline; Wibroe, Peter P; Moghimi, S Moein

    2012-09-01

    The oral route for delivery of pharmaceuticals is the most widely used and accepted. Nanoparticles and microparticles are increasingly being applied within this arena to optimize drug targeting and bioavailability. Frequently the carrier systems used are either constructed from or contain polymeric materials. Examples of these nanocarriers include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanocarriers, self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems and nanocrystals. It is the purpose of this review to describe these cutting edge technologies and specifically focus on the interaction and fate of these polymers within the gastrointestinal system. PMID:22709523

  16. Polymeric particulate technologies for oral drug delivery and targeting: a pathophysiological perspective.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A Christy; Elsom, Jacqueline; Wibroe, Peter P; Moghimi, S Moein

    2012-09-01

    The oral route for delivery of pharmaceuticals is the most widely used and accepted. Nanoparticles and microparticles are increasingly being applied within this arena to optimize drug targeting and bioavailability. Frequently the carrier systems used are either constructed from or contain polymeric materials. Examples of these nanocarriers include polymeric nanoparticles, solid lipid nanocarriers, self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems and nanocrystals. It is the purpose of this review to describe these cutting edge technologies and specifically focus on the interaction and fate of these polymers within the gastrointestinal system. PMID:22846372

  17. Cell-targeting and cell-penetrating peptides for delivery of therapeutic and imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Rudolph L; Alam, Rowshon; Dixit, Vidula; Kang, Hyun Min

    2009-01-01

    This review will discuss the basic concepts concerning the use of cell-targeting peptides (CTPs) and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) in the context of nanocarrier technology. It deals with the discovery and subsequent evolution of CTPs and CPPs, issues concerning their interactions with cells and their biodistribution in vivo, and their potential advantages and disadvantages as delivery agents. The article also briefly discusses several specific examples of the use of CTPs or CPPs to assist in the delivery of nanoparticles, liposomes, and other nanocarriers. PMID:20049800

  18. Targeted delivery of curcumin for treating type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Maradana, Muralidhara Rao; Thomas, Ranjeny; O'Sullivan, Brendan J

    2013-09-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a chronic condition in which cells have reduced insulin signalling, leading to hyperglycemia and long-term complications, including heart, kidney and liver disease. Macrophages activated by dying or stressed cells, induce the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa-B leading to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines including TNF and IL-6. These inflammatory macrophages in liver and adipose tissue promote insulin resistance, and medications which reduce inflammation and enhance insulin signalling improve glucose control. Curcumin is an anti-oxidant and nuclear factor kappa-B inhibitor derived from turmeric. A number of studies have shown that dietary curcumin reduces inflammation and delays or prevents obesity-induced insulin resistance and associated complications, including atherosclerosis and immune mediate liver disease. Unfortunately dietary curcumin is poorly absorbed by the digestive system and undergoes glucuronidation and excretion rather than being released into the serum and systemically distributed. This confounds understanding of how dietary curcumin exerts its beneficial effects in type 2 diabetes and associated diseases. New improved methods of delivering curcumin are being developed including nanoparticles and lipid/liposome formulations that increase absorption and bioavailability of curcumin. Development and refinement of these technologies will enable cell-directed targeting of curcumin and improved therapeutic outcome. PMID:23495213

  19. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that functional proteins can be delivered intracellularly in vitro using nanoparticles and used to target key signaling proteins and regulate cell signaling pathways. The same concept of naturally occurring protein-protein interactions can also be implemented to selectively bring intracellular protein targets in close proximity to proteasomal degradation machinery in cells and effect their depletion from the cellular compartments. This approach will be able to not only target entire pool of proteins to ubiquitination-mediated degradation, but also to specific sub-pools of posttranslationally modified proteins in the cell, provided peptides having distinct binding affinities are identified for posttranslational modifications. This system can then be tested for intracellular protein delivery using nanoparticle carriers to identify roles of different posttranslational modifications on the protein's activity. In future work, we propose to develop a cellular detection system, based on GFP complementation, which can be used to evaluate the efficiency of different protein delivery carriers to internalize proteins into the cell cytosol. We envision the application of nanoscale materials as intracellular protein delivery vehicles to target diverse cell signaling pathways at the posttranslational level, and subsequent metabolic manipulation, which may have interesting therapeutic properties and can potentially target stem cell fate.

  20. Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy: the other side of antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (TMA) based therapies for cancer have advanced significantly over the past two decades both in their molecular sophistication and clinical efficacy. Initial development efforts focused mainly on humanizing the antibody protein to overcome problems of immunogenicity and on expanding of the target antigen repertoire. In parallel to naked TMAs, antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) have been developed for targeted delivery of potent anti-cancer drugs with the aim of bypassing the morbidity common to conventional chemotherapy. This paper first presents a review of TMAs and ADCs approved for clinical use by the FDA and those in development, focusing on hematological malignancies. Despite advances in these areas, both TMAs and ADCs still carry limitations and we highlight the more important ones including cancer cell specificity, conjugation chemistry, tumor penetration, product heterogeneity and manufacturing issues. In view of the recognized importance of targeted drug delivery strategies for cancer therapy, we discuss the advantages of alternative drug carriers and where these should be applied, focusing on peptide-drug conjugates (PDCs), particularly those discovered through combinatorial peptide libraries. By defining the advantages and disadvantages of naked TMAs, ADCs and PDCs it should be possible to develop a more rational approach to the application of targeted drug delivery strategies in different situations and ultimately, to a broader basket of more effective therapies for cancer patients. PMID:23140144

  1. Vorinostat-polymer conjugate nanoparticles for Acid-responsive delivery and passive tumor targeting.

    PubMed

    Denis, Iza; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Collette, Floraine; Delatouche, Régis; Gueugnon, Fabien; Pouliquen, Daniel; Pichavant, Loic; Héroguez, Valérie; Grégoire, Marc; Bertrand, Philippe; Blanquart, Christophe

    2014-12-01

    In vivo histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition by vorinostat under clinically acceptable dosing is limited by its poor pharmacokinetics properties. A new type of nontoxic pH-responsive delivery system has been synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization, allowing for the selective distribution of vorinostat in mesothelioma tumors in vivo and subsequent histone reacetylation. The delivery system is synthesized by generic click chemistry, possesses native stealth properties for passive tumor targeting, and does not need additional chemistry for cellular internalization. Although vorinostat alone at 50 mg/kg in mice showed no effect, our new delivery system with 2 mg/kg vorinostat promoted histone reacetylation in tumors without side effects, demonstrating that our strategy improves the activity of this HDAC inihibitor in vivo. PMID:25333409

  2. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Crosslinked Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hye; Kiick, Kristi L

    2010-07-15

    We have previously reported a novel polymeric delivery vehicle that is assembled via interaction between heparin and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here, the cell-responsiveness of this hydrogel-including the delivery of VEGF in response to VEGFR-2 overexpressing PAE/KDR cells (porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE) equipped with the transcript for the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR)), consequent erosion of the hydrogel matrix, and cellular response-are highlighted. The release of VEGF and hydrogel erosion reached 100% only in the presence of PAE/KDR. The [PEG-LMWH/VEGF] hydrogel (PEG?=?poly(ethylene glycol), LMWH?=?low molecular weight heparin) correspondingly prompted increases in VEGFR-2 phosphorylation and proliferation of PAE/KDR cells. This study proves that growth factor-crosslinked hydrogels can liberate VEGF in response to specific receptors, causing gel erosion and desired cell responses. The promise of these approaches in therapeutic applications, including targeted delivery, is suggested. PMID:21567519

  3. Cell-mediated Delivery and Targeted Erosion of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Crosslinked Hydrogelsa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hye; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously reported a novel polymeric delivery vehicle that is assembled via interaction between heparin and the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Here, the cell-responsiveness of this hydrogel — including the delivery of VEGF in response to VEGFR-2 overexpressing PAE/KDR cells (porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE) equipped with the transcript for the kinase insert domain receptor (KDR)), consequent erosion of the hydrogel matrix, and cellular response — are highlighted. The release of VEGF and hydrogel erosion reached 100% only in the presence of PAE/KDR. The [PEG-LMWH/VEGF] hydrogel (PEG = poly(ethylene glycol), LMWH = low molecular weight heparin) correspondingly prompted increases in VEGFR-2 phosphorylation and proliferation of PAE/KDR cells. This study proves that growth factor-crosslinked hydrogels can liberate VEGF in response to specific receptors, causing gel erosion and desired cell responses. The promise of these approaches in therapeutic applications, including targeted delivery, is suggested. PMID:21567519

  4. Targeted Delivery of Antiglaucoma Drugs to the Supraciliary Space Using Microneedles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo C.; Edelhauser, Henry F.; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. In this work, we tested the hypothesis that highly targeted delivery of antiglaucoma drugs to the supraciliary space by using a hollow microneedle allows dramatic dose sparing of the drug compared to topical eye drops. The supraciliary space is the most anterior portion of the suprachoroidal space, located below the sclera and above the choroid and ciliary body. Methods. A single, hollow 33-gauge microneedle, 700 to 800 ?m in length, was inserted into the sclera and used to infuse antiglaucoma drugs into the supraciliary space of New Zealand white rabbits (N = 3–6 per group). Sulprostone, a prostaglandin analog, and brimonidine, an ?2-adrenergic agonist, were delivered via supraciliary and topical administration at various doses. The drugs were delivered unilaterally, and intraocular pressure (IOP) of both eyes was measured by rebound tonometry for 9 hours after injection to assess the pharmacodynamic responses. To assess safety of the supraciliary injection, IOP change immediately after intravitreal and supraciliary injection were compared. Results. Supraciliary delivery of both sulprostone and brimonidine reduced IOP by as much as 3 mm Hg bilaterally in a dose-related response; comparison with topical administration at the conventional human dose showed approximately 100-fold dose sparing by supraciliary injection for both drugs. A safety study showed that the kinetics of IOP elevation immediately after supraciliary and intravitreal injection of placebo formulations were similar. Conclusions. This study introduced the use of targeted drug delivery to the supraciliary space by using a microneedle and demonstrated dramatic dose sparing of antiglaucoma therapeutic agents compared to topical eye drops. Targeted delivery in this way can increase safety by reducing side effects and could allow a single injection to contain enough drug for long-term sustained delivery. PMID:25212782

  5. Paclitaxel-loaded PLGA nanoparticles: preparation, physicochemical characterization and in vitro anti-tumoral activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cristina Fonseca; Sérgio Simões; Rogério Gaspar

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to develop a polymeric drug delivery system for paclitaxel, intended to be intravenously administered, capable of improving the therapeutic index of the drug and devoid of the adverse effects of Cremophor® EL. To achieve this goal paclitaxel (Ptx)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (Ptx-PLGA-Nps) were prepared by the interfacial deposition method. The influence of

  6. Enhanced Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Potential for Targeting Human Brain Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etame, Arnold B.

    The blood brain barrier (BBB) remains a major challenge to the advancement and application of systemic anti-cancer therapeutics into the central nervous system. The structural and physiological delivery constraints of the BBB significantly limit the effectiveness of conventional chemotherapy, thereby making systemic administration a non-viable option for the vast majority of chemotherapy agents. Furthermore, the lack of specificity of conventional systemic chemotherapy when applied towards malignant brain tumors remains a major shortcoming. Hence novel therapeutic strategies that focus both on targeted and enhanced delivery across the BBB are warranted. In recent years nanoparticles (NPs) have emerged as attractive vehicles for efficient delivery of targeted anti-cancer therapeutics. In particular, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have gained prominence in several targeting applications involving systemic cancers. Their enhanced permeation and retention within permissive tumor microvasculature provide a selective advantage for targeting. Malignant brain tumors also exhibit transport-permissive microvasculature secondary to blood brain barrier disruption. Hence AuNPs may have potential relevance for brain tumor targeting. However, the permeation of AuNPs across the BBB has not been well characterized, and hence is a potential limitation for successful application of AuNP-based therapeutics within the central nervous system (CNS). In this dissertation, we designed and characterized AuNPs and assessed the role of polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the physical and biological properties of AuNPs. We established a size-dependent permeation profile with respect to core size as well as PEG length when AuNPs were assessed through a transport-permissive in-vitro BBB. This study was the first of its kind to systematically examine the influence of design on permeation of AuNPs through transport-permissive BBB. Given the significant delivery limitations through the non-transport permissive and intact BBB, we also assessed the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) disruption of the BBB in enhancing permeation of AuNPs across the intact BBB and tumor BBB in vivo. MRgFUS is a novel technique that can transiently increase BBB permeability thereby allowing delivery of therapeutics into the CNS. We demonstrated enhanced delivery of AuNPs with therapeutic potential into the CNS via MRgFUS. Our study was the first to establish a definitive role for MRgFUS in delivering AuNPs into the CNS. In summary, this thesis describes results from a series of research projects that have contributed to our understanding of the influence of design features on AuNP permeation through the BBB and also the potential role of MRgFUS in AuNP permeation across the BBB.

  7. DMLC IMRT delivery to targets moving in 2D in Beam's Eye View

    SciTech Connect

    Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Papiez, Lech [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States)

    2008-08-15

    The goal of this article is to present the algorithm for DMLC leaf control capable of delivering IMRT to tumors that experience motion in two dimensions in the beams eye view (BEV) plane. The generic, two-dimensional (2D) motion of the projection of the rigid target on BEV plane can be divided into two components. The first component describes the motion of the projection of the target along the x axis (parallel to the MLC leaf motions) and the other describes the motion of the target projection on the y axis (perpendicular to the leaf motion direction). First, time optimal leaf trajectories are calculated independently for each leaf pair of the MLC assembly to compensate the x-axis component of the 2D motion of the target on the BEV. These leaf trajectories are then synchronized following the mid time (MT) synchronization procedure. To compensate for the y-axis component of the motion of the target projection on the BEV plane, the procedure of ''switching'' leaf pair trajectories in the upward (or downward) direction is executed when the target's BEV projection moves upward (or downward) from its equilibrium position along the y axis. When the intensity function is a 2D histogram, the error between the intended and delivered intensity in 2D DMLC IMRT delivery will depend on the shape of the intensity map and on the MLC physical constraint (leaf width and maximum admissible leaf speed). The MT synchronization of leaf trajectories decreases the impact of above constraints on the error in 2D DMLC IMRT intensity map delivery. The proof is provided, that if hardware constraints in the 2D DMLC IMRT delivery strategy are removed, the errors between planned and delivered 2D intensity maps are entirely eliminated. Examples of 2D DMLC IMRT delivery to rigid targets moving along elliptical orbits on BEV planes are calculated and analyzed for 20 clinical fluence maps. The comparisons between the intensity delivered without motion correction, with motion correction along x axis only, and with motion correction for full 2D motion of the target are calculated and quantitatively evaluated. The fluence maps were normalized to 100 MU and the rms difference between the desired and delivered fluence was 12 MU for no motion compensation, 11.18 MU for 1D compensation, and 4.73 MU for 2D motion compensations. The advantage of correcting for full 2D motion of target projected on the BEV plane is demonstrated.

  8. Collagen Coated Nanoliposome as a Targeted and Controlled Drug Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, G.; Stephen, P.; Prabhu, M.; Sehgal, P. K.; Sadulla, S.

    2010-10-01

    The collagen coated nanoliposome (CCNL) have been prepared and characterized in order to develop a targeted and controlled drug delivery system. The zeta potential (ZP) measurement, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Cell viability assay data showed that the collagen coated nanoliposome particle size and charges, structural interaction and surface morphology and high bio-cyto-compatibility of collagen coated nanoliposome. The particle sizes of nanoliposome (NL) and collagen coated nanoliposome are 20-300 nm and 0.1-10 ?m respectively. The introduction of triple helical, coiled coil and fibrous protein of collagen into nanoliposome can improves the stability of nanoliposome, resistant to phospholipase activities and decreasing the phagocytosis of liposomes by reticuloendothelial system. The collagen coated nanoliposome is expected to be used as for targeted and controlled drug delivery system, and tissue engineering application.

  9. Surface modified dendrimers: synthesis and characterization for cancer targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anupama; Gautam, Surya Prakash; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2011-06-01

    Dendrimers represents a highly branched three-dimensional structure that provides a high degree of surface functionality and versatility. PAMAM dendrimers are used as well-defined nanocontainers to conjugate, complex or encapsulate therapeutic drugs or imaging moieties. Star-burst [PAMAM] dendrimers represent a superior carrier platform for drug delivery. The present study was aimed at synthesis of a surface modified dendrimer for cancer targeted drug delivery system. For this 4.0 G PAMAM dendrimer was conjugated with Gallic acid [GA] and characterized through UV, IR, ¹H NMR and mass spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity study of dendrimer conjugate was carried out against MCF-7 cell line using MTT assay. The study revealed that the conjugate is active against MCF-7 cell line and might act synergistically with anti-cancer drug and gallic acid-dendrimer conjugate might be a promising nano-platform for cancer targeting and cancer diagnosis. PMID:21570304

  10. Targeted Delivery of Immunotoxin by Antibody to Ganglioside GD3: A Novel Drug Delivery Route for Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Torres Demichelis, Vanina; Vilcaes, Aldo A.; Iglesias-Bartolomé, Ramiro; Ruggiero, Fernando M.; Daniotti, Jose L.

    2013-01-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids expressed on plasma membranes from nearly all vertebrate cells. The expression of ganglioside GD3, which plays essential roles in normal brain development, decreases in adults but is up regulated in neuroectodermal and epithelial derived cancers. R24 antibody, directed against ganglioside GD3, is a validated tumor target which is specifically endocytosed and accumulated in endosomes. Here, we exploit the internalization feature of the R24 antibody for the selective delivery of saporin, a ribosome-inactivating protein, to GD3-expressing cells [human (SK-Mel-28) and mouse (B16) melanoma cells and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells]. This immunotoxin showed a specific cytotoxicity on tumor cells grew on 2D monolayers, which was further evident by the lack of any effect on GD3-negative cells. To estimate the potential antitumor activity of R24-saporin complex, we also evaluated the effect of the immunotoxin on the clonogenic growth of SK-Mel-28 and CHO-K1GD3+ cells cultured in attachment-free conditions. A drastic growth inhibition (>80–90%) of the cell colonies was reached after 3 days of immunotoxin treatment. By the contrary, colonies continue to growth at the same concentration of the immuntoxin, but in the absence of R24 antibody, or in the absence of both immunotoxin and R24, undoubtedly indicating the specificity of the effect observed. Thus, the ganglioside GD3 emerge as a novel and attractive class of cell surface molecule for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents and, therefore, provides a rationale for future therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:23383146

  11. FoxM1 Mediates Resistance to Herceptin and Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Janai R.; Park, Hyun Jung; Wang, Zebin; Kiefer, Megan M.; Raychaudhuri, Pradip

    2010-01-01

    Inherent and acquired therapeutic resistance in breast cancer remains a major clinical challenge. In human breast cancer samples, overexpression of the oncogenic transcription factor FoxM1 has been suggested to be a marker of poor prognosis. In this study, we report that FoxM1 overexpression confers resistance to the HER2 monoclonal antibody Herceptin and microtubule-stabilizing drug paclitaxel, both as single agents and in combination. FoxM1 altered microtubule dynamics in order to protect tumor cells from paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the tubulin destabilizing protein Stathmin, whose expression also confers resistance to paclitaxel, is a direct transcriptional target of FoxM1. Significantly, attenuating FoxM1 expression by siRNA or an ARF-derived peptide inhibitor increased therapeutic sensitivity. Our findings indicate that targeting FoxM1 could relieve therapeutic resistance in breast cancer. PMID:20530690

  12. Preparation and biological activity of a paclitaxel-single-walled carbon nanotube complex.

    PubMed

    Fu, X D; Zhang, Y Y; Wang, X J; Shou, J X; Zhang, Z Z; Song, L J

    2014-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have unique transmembrane abilities. The huge superficial area and abundance of ? electrons confer SWCNTs perfect absorptive capability toward proteins, nucleates, and many drugs. These characteristics make SWCNTs a new and efficient drug carrier. The purpose of this study was to disperse SWCNTs in water and have paclitaxel absorbed onto them in order to construct an asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR)-SWCNT-Paclitaxel complex as a targeting nanoparticle system. The NGR-SWCNT-Paclitaxel complex was systematically studied, and analytical methods, including spectrophotometry for SWCNTs and high-performance liquid chromatography for paclitaxel, were employed. The preparation and the prescription of the NGR-SWCNT-Paclitaxel complex lyophilized powder were investigated. MCF-7 cancer cells, Sprague-Dawley rats, and S180 tumor-bearing mice were used as experimental subjects to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo activity of NGR-SWCNT-Paclitaxel complex dispersion. The complex dispersion showed obvious inhibition activity against MCF-7 cancer cells. Within 1 h, the NGR-SWCNT-Paclitaxel complex could be transferred to cells, and sustained the release of drugs. In addition, the tumor and liver targeting and improved therapeutic effects of the NGR-SWCNT-Paclitaxel complex were confirmed. PMID:24668633

  13. Surface modified dendrimers: Synthesis and characterization for cancer targeted drug delivery

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anupama Sharma; Surya Prakash Gautam; Arun Kumar Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Dendrimers represents a highly branched three-dimensional structure that provides a high degree of surface functionality and versatility. PAMAM dendrimers are used as well-defined nanocontainers to conjugate, complex or encapsulate therapeutic drugs or imaging moieties. Star-burst [PAMAM] dendrimers represent a superior carrier platform for drug delivery. The present study was aimed at synthesis of a surface modified dendrimer for cancer targeted

  14. Particle shape: a new design parameter for passive targeting in splenotropic drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Padma V; Jindal, Anil B; Patil, Rajesh R; Mulla, Fernaz; Gaikwad, Rajiv V; Samad, Abdul

    2010-06-01

    The role of particle size and surface modification on biodistribution of nanocarriers is widely reported. We report for the first time the role of nanoparticle shape on biodistribution. Our study demonstrates that irregular shaped polymer lipid nanoparticles (LIPOMER) evade kupffer cells and localize in the spleen. We also demonstrate the macrophage-evading characteristic of the irregular-shaped LIPOMER. Our results suggest particle shape as an important tool for passive targeting of nanocarriers in splenotropic drug delivery. PMID:20091830

  15. Dual surface-functionalized Janus nanocomposites for targeted stimulus responsive drug delivery.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng; Wang, Yilong; Pauletti, Giovanni; Shi, Donglu

    2014-03-01

    A novel superparamagnetic Janus nanocomposite (SJNC) of polystyrene/Fe3O4@SiO2 was designed and developed for the first time using a miniemulsion method. Both surfaces were readily functionalized for bio-medical application. Folic acid (FA) and doxorubicin (DOX) were conjugated stepwise to the surfaces. It was found that SJNCs achieved cell-targeted drug delivery in a pH-responsive manner.

  16. Translational Nano-Medicines: Targeted Therapeutic Delivery for Cancer and Inflammatory Diseases.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Meghna; Tran, Thanh-Huyen; Amiji, Mansoor

    2015-07-01

    With the advent of novel and personalized therapeutic approaches for cancer and inflammatory diseases, there is a growing demand for designing delivery systems that circumvent some of the limitation with the current therapeutic strategies. Nanoparticle-based delivery of drugs has provided means of overcoming some of these limitations by ensuring the drug payload is directed to the disease site and insuring reduced off-target activity. This review highlights the challenges posed by the solid tumor microenvironment and the systemic limitations for effective chemotherapy. It then assesses the basis of nanoparticle-based targeting to the tumor tissues, which helps to overcome some of the microenvironmental and systemic limitations to therapy. We have extensively focused on some of the tumor multidrug resistance mechanisms (e.g., hypoxia and aerobic glycolysis) that contribute to the development of multidrug resistance and how targeted nano-approaches can be adopted to overcome drug resistance. Finally, we assess the combinatorial approach and how this platform has been used to develop multifunctional delivery systems for cancer therapy. The review article also focuses on inflammatory diseases, the biological therapies available for its treatment, and the concept of macrophage repolarization for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25921939

  17. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy. PMID:24096200

  18. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  19. Realizing the Clinical Potential of Cancer Nanotechnology by Minimizing Toxicological and Targeted Delivery Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and loading combinations of cooperating agents into a single nano-sized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles needs to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. PMID:23139207

  20. Realizing the clinical potential of cancer nanotechnology by minimizing toxicologic and targeted delivery concerns.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjay; Sharma, Arati; Robertson, Gavin P

    2012-11-15

    Nanotechnology has the potential to make smart drugs that would be capable of targeting cancer but not normal cells and to load combinations of cooperating agents into a single nanosized particle to more effectively treat this disease. However, to realize the full potential of this technology, the negative aspects associated with these nanoparticles need to be overcome. This review discusses concerns in the field limiting realization of the full clinical potential of this technology, which are toxicity and targeted delivery. Strategies to overcome these hurdles are also reviewed, which could lead to attainment of the full clinical potential of this exciting technology. PMID:23139207

  1. AS1411 aptamer tagged PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles for tumor cell targeting and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Aravind, Athulya; Jeyamohan, Prashanti; Nair, Remya; Veeranarayanan, Srivani; Nagaoka, Yutaka; Yoshida, Yasuhiko; Maekawa, Toru; Kumar, D Sakthi

    2012-11-01

    Liposomes and polymers are widely used drug carriers for controlled release since they offer many advantages like increased treatment effectiveness, reduced toxicity and are of biodegradable nature. In this work, anticancer drug-loaded PLGA-lecithin-PEG nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and were functionalized with AS1411 anti-nucleolin aptamers for site-specific targeting against tumor cells which over expresses nucleolin receptors. The particles were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The drug-loading efficiency, encapsulation efficiency and in vitro drug release studies were conducted using UV spectroscopy. Cytotoxicity studies were carried out in two different cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and GI-1 cells and two different normal cells, L929 cells and HMEC cells. Confocal microscopy and flowcytometry confirmed the cellular uptake of particles and targeted drug delivery. The morphology analysis of the NPs proved that the particles were smooth and spherical in shape with a size ranging from 60 to 110?nm. Drug-loading studies indicated that under the same drug loading, the aptamer-targeted NPs show enhanced cancer killing effect compared to the corresponding non-targeted NPs. In addition, the PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs exhibited high encapsulation efficiency and superior sustained drug release than the drug loaded in plain PLGA NPs. The results confirmed that AS1411 aptamer-PLGA-lecithin-PEG NPs are potential carrier candidates for differential targeted drug delivery. PMID:22615073

  2. Stathmin Potentiates Vinflunine and Inhibits Paclitaxel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malesinski, Soazig; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kruczynski, Anna; Peyrot, Vincent; Devred, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs). In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB) binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency. PMID:26030092

  3. Phototriggerable 2?,7-Caged Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Gropeanu, Radu A.; Baumann, Hella; Ritz, Sandra; Mailänder, Volker; Surrey, Thomas; del Campo, Aránzazu

    2012-01-01

    Three different variants of photoactivatable caged paclitaxel (PTX) have been synthesized and their bioactivity was characterized in in vitro assays and in living cells. The caged PTXs contain the photoremovable chromophore 4,5-dimethoxy-2-nitrobenzyloxycarbonyl (Nvoc) attached to position C7, C2' and to both of these positions via a carbonate bond. Single caged PTXs remained biologically active even at low dosages. Double caging was necessary in order to fully inhibit its activity and to obtain a phototriggerable PTX that can be applied successfully at commonly used concentrations. Irradiation of solutions containing the double caged PTX allowed dose-dependent delivery of functional PTX. Light-triggered stabilization of microtubule assemblies in vitro and in vivo by controlled light exposure of tubulin solutions or cell cultures containing caged PTX was demonstrated. Short light exposure under a fluorescence microscope allowed controlled delivery of free PTX during imaging. PMID:22970137

  4. Matrix-specific anchors: a new concept for targeted delivery and retention of therapeutic cells.

    PubMed

    Steplewski, Andrzej; Fertala, Jolanta; Beredjiklian, Pedro; Wang, Mark L; Fertala, Andrzej

    2015-04-01

    Biomedical strategies for tissue engineering and repair utilize specific cells, scaffolds, and growth factors to reconstruct elements of damaged tissue. The cellular element of these strategies is limited, however, by poor efficiency of delivery and retention of therapeutic cells in target sites. We propose that the presence of a cellular anchor that is able to specifically bind a defined element of target tissue will facilitate efficient binding and retention of therapeutic cells, thereby promoting repair of the target site. To do so, we engineered an artificial collagen-specific anchor (ACSA) that is able to specifically bind collagen I. The ACSA was engineered by creating a construct comprising rationally designed consecutive domains. The binding specificity of the ACSA was achieved by employing variable regions of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes a unique epitope present in human collagen I. Meanwhile, cell membrane localization of the ACSA was provided by the presence of a transmembrane domain. We determined that the ACSA was localized within cell membranes and interacted with its intended target, that is, collagen I. We have demonstrated that, in comparison to the control, the cells expressing the ACSA attached better to collagen I and exhibited improved retention in sites of seeding. We have also demonstrated that the presence of the ACSA did not interfere with cell proliferation, the biosynthesis of endogenous collagen I, or the biological functions of native collagen receptors. Since the presented cell delivery system utilizes a common characteristic of major connective tissues, namely the presence of collagen I, the findings described here could have a broad positive impact for improving the repair processes of tendon, ligament, bone, intervertebral disc, skin, and other collagen I-rich connective tissues. If successful, the ACSA approach to deliver cells will serve as an outline for developing cell delivery methods that target other elements of extracellular matrices, including other collagen types, laminins, and fibronectins. PMID:25435302

  5. Extracellularly activated nanocarriers: A new paradigm of tumor targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gullotti, Emily; Yeo, Yoon

    2009-01-01

    One of the main goals of nanomedicine is to develop a nanocarrier that can selectively deliver anti-cancer drugs to the targeted tumors. Extensive efforts have resulted in several tumor-targeted nanocarriers, some of which are approved for clinical use. Most nanocarriers achieve tumor-selective accumulation through the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Targeting molecules such as antibodies, peptides, ligands, or nucleic acids attached to the nanocarriers further enhance their recognition and internalization by the target tissues. While both the stealth and targeting features are important for effective and selective drug delivery to the tumors, achieving both features simultaneously is often found to be difficult. Some of the recent targeting strategies have the potential to overcome this challenge. These strategies utilize the unique extracellular environment of tumors to change the long-circulating nanocarriers to release the drug or interact with cells in a tumor-specific manner. This review discusses the new targeting strategies with recent examples, which utilize the environmental stimuli to activate the nanocarriers. Traditional strategies for tumor-targeted nanocarriers are briefly discussed with an emphasis on their achievements and challenges. PMID:19366234

  6. Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor, SLPI, Antagonizes Paclitaxel in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Nabila; LaRochelle, William; Zhong, Haihong; Ara, Gulshan; Cohen, Joshua; Kohn, Elise C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Ovarian cancer (OvCa) recurrence with development of paclitaxel resistance is an obstacle to long term survival. We demonstrated that secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a survival factor for OvCa. We hypothesize SLPI may antagonize paclitaxel injury. Experimental design Differential SLPI induction in response to paclitaxel, and response to stable forced expression of SLPI was demonstrated in A2780-1A9 cells and their paclitaxel-resistant sublines, PTX10 and PTX22 and confirmed with HEY-A8 cells. SLPI-mediated survival was reduced by the MEK inhibitor, U0126 and a humanized neutralizing monoclonal anti-SLPI antibody, CR012. OVCAR3 xenographs tested the role of CR012 in vivo. Results SLPI expression was lower in A2780-1A9 OvCa cells than PTX10 and PTX22 and SLPI was induced by paclitaxel exposure. Stable SLPI expression yielded a proliferation advantage (p=0.01); expression of and response to SLPI in OVCAR3 cells was abrogated by exposure to CR012. SLPI reduced paclitaxel susceptibility of 1A9 and HEY-A8 cells (p?0.05) and SLPI expression did not increase resistance of PTX10 and ?22 cells. Both paclitaxel and SLPI overexpression induced ERK activation. Inhibition of MEK with U0126 increased paclitaxel injury and overcame SLPI-mediated cell protection. It did not reinstate PTX10 sensitivity to paclitaxel, which was associated with AKT activation. Significant inhibition of OVCAR3 xenograft growth was observed with CR012 and paclitaxel, over single agents (p?0.001). Conclusions A two-pronged approach confirmed SLPI overcomes paclitaxel in part through activation of ERK1/2. These results credential SLPI as a molecular target for OvCa and suggest CR012 as a tool for proof of concept. PMID:20068074

  7. A novel lactoferrin-modified ?-cyclodextrin nanocarrier for brain-targeting drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yajing; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Hongli; Lan, Minbo; Gao, Feng; Song, Chao; Lou, Kaiyan; Li, Hao; Wang, Wei

    2013-12-15

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) restricts the transfer and delivery of most drug substances to brain. In this study, a novel nano-drug delivery system for brain-targeting was developed and investigated in vitro and in vivo. Lactoferrin (Lf) was selected as a brain-targeting ligand and conjugated to ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) via the heterobifunctional polyethyleneglycol (PEG) linker NHS-PEG-MAL, yielding Lf conjugated ?-cyclodextrin (Lf-CD). UV-vis, FTIR, NMR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques clearly demonstrated the successful synthesis of Lf-CD nanoparticles with the average diameter of 92.9 ± 16.5 nm. Using near-infrared fluorescent dye IR-775 chloride (IR) as a model compound of poorly water-soluble drugs, IR-loaded Lf-CD nanoparticles (Lf-CD/IR) were successfully prepared with a high entrapment efficiency of 98.1 ± 4.8%. Biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of Lf-CD/IR were evaluated in KM mice after intravenous administration. The results of tissue distribution studies revealed that Lf-CD/IR treatment showed greatly improved BBB transport efficiency. In addition, AUC0-2h of IR in brain after Lf-CD/IR treatment was seven fold higher compared with that of IR treatment without Lf-CD nano-carriers, demonstrating that the introduction of Lf-CD drug-delivery system positively resulted in a higher AUC located in brain tissue. These results provide evidence that Lf-CD nanoparticles could be exploited as a potential brain-targeting drug delivery system for hydrophobic drugs and diagnostic reagents which normally fail to pass through the BBB. PMID:24126038

  8. Impact of ?-Targeted Radiation Therapy on Gene Expression in a Pre-Clinical Model for Disseminated Peritoneal Disease when Combined with Paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the molecular basis of the enhanced cell killing effected by the combined modality of paclitaxel and 212Pb-trastuzumab (Pac/212Pb-trastuzumab), gene expression in LS-174T i.p. xenografts was investigated 24 h after treatment. Employing a real time quantitative PCR array (qRT-PCR array), 84 DNA damage response genes were quantified. Differentially expressed genes following therapy with Pac/212Pb-trastuzumab included those involved in apoptosis (BRCA1, CIDEA, GADD45?, GADD45?, GML, IP6K3, PCBP4, PPP1R15A, RAD21, and p73), cell cycle (BRCA1, CHK1, CHK2, GADD45?, GML, GTSE1, NBN, PCBP4, PPP1R15A, RAD9A, and SESN1), and damaged DNA repair (ATRX, BTG2, EXO1, FEN1, IGHMBP2, OGG1, MSH2, MUTYH, NBN, PRKDC, RAD21, and p73). This report demonstrates that the increased stressful growth arrest conditions induced by the Pac/212Pb-trastuzumab treatment suppresses cell proliferation through the regulation of genes which are involved in apoptosis and damaged DNA repair including single and double strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that 212Pb-trastuzumab potentiation of cell killing efficacy results from the perturbation of genes related to the mitotic spindle checkpoint and BASC (BRCA1-associated genome surveillance complex), suggesting cross-talk between DNA damage repair and the spindle damage response. PMID:25268703

  9. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of siRNA targeting Parp1 extends survival of mice bearing tumors

    E-print Network

    Bhatia, Sangeeta

    Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of siRNA targeting Parp1 extends survival of mice bearing tumors the survival of mice bearing tumors derived from Brca1-deficient ovarian cancer cells but not from Brca1 wild

  10. Targeted drug delivery by novel polymer-drug conjugates containing linkers cleavable by disease-associated enzymes

    E-print Network

    Chau, Ying

    2005-01-01

    We have conceptualized a new class of polymer-linker-drug conjugates to achieve targeted drug delivery for the systemic treatment of cancer and other inflammatory diseases. The physiochemical properties of the polymer allow ...

  11. Molecularly self-assembled nucleic acid nanoparticles for targeted in vivo siRNA delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyukjin; Lytton-Jean, Abigail K. R.; Chen, Yi; Love, Kevin T.; Park, Angela I.; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D.; Sehgal, Alfica; Querbes, William; Zurenko, Christopher S.; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; Peng, Chang G.; Charisse, Klaus; Borodovsky, Anna; Manoharan, Muthiah; Donahoe, Jessica S.; Truelove, Jessica; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.

    2012-06-01

    Nanoparticles are used for delivering therapeutics into cells. However, size, shape, surface chemistry and the presentation of targeting ligands on the surface of nanoparticles can affect circulation half-life and biodistribution, cell-specific internalization, excretion, toxicity and efficacy. A variety of materials have been explored for delivering small interfering RNAs (siRNAs)--a therapeutic agent that suppresses the expression of targeted genes. However, conventional delivery nanoparticles such as liposomes and polymeric systems are heterogeneous in size, composition and surface chemistry, and this can lead to suboptimal performance, a lack of tissue specificity and potential toxicity. Here, we show that self-assembled DNA tetrahedral nanoparticles with a well-defined size can deliver siRNAs into cells and silence target genes in tumours. Monodisperse nanoparticles are prepared through the self-assembly of complementary DNA strands. Because the DNA strands are easily programmable, the size of the nanoparticles and the spatial orientation and density of cancer-targeting ligands (such as peptides and folate) on the nanoparticle surface can be controlled precisely. We show that at least three folate molecules per nanoparticle are required for optimal delivery of the siRNAs into cells and, gene silencing occurs only when the ligands are in the appropriate spatial orientation. In vivo, these nanoparticles showed a longer blood circulation time (t1/2 ~ 24.2 min) than the parent siRNA (t1/2 ~ 6 min).

  12. Cancer Nanotheranostics: Improving Imaging and Therapy by Targeted Delivery across Biological Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Kievit, Forrest M.; Zhang, Miqin

    2012-01-01

    Cancer nanotheranostics aims to combine imaging and therapy of cancer through use of nanotechnology. The ability to engineer nanomaterials to interact with cancer cells at the molecular level can significantly improve the effectiveness and specificity of therapy to cancers that are currently difficult to treat. In particular, metastatic cancers, drug-resistant cancers, and cancer stem cells impose the greatest therapeutic challenge that requires targeted therapy to treat effectively. Targeted therapy can be achieved with appropriate designed drug delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles, adult stem cells, or T cells in immunotherapy. In this article, we first review the different types of materials commonly used to synthesize nanotheranostic particles and their use in imaging. We then discuss biological barriers that these nanoparticles encounter and must bypass to reach the target cancer cells, including the blood, liver, kidneys, spleen, and particularly the blood-brain barrier. We then review how nanotheranostics can be used to improve targeted delivery and treatment of cancer cells using nanoparticles, adult stem cells, and T cells in immunotherapy. Finally, we discuss development of nanoparticles to overcome current limitations in cancer therapy. PMID:21842473

  13. A novel liposomal formulation of FTY720 (Fingolimod) for promising enhanced targeted delivery

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yicheng; Wang, Jiang; Zhao, Yuan; Wu, Yun; Kwak, Kwang Joo; Chen, Ching-Shih; Byrd, John C.; Lee, Robert J.; Phelps, Mitch A.; Lee, L. James; Muthusamy, Natarajan

    2014-01-01

    We describe here the development and characterization of the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel liposomal formulation for FTY720 delivery, LP-FTY720. The mean diameter of LP-FTY720 was ~157 nm, and the FTY720 entrapment efficiency was ~85%. The liposomal formulation protected FTY720 from degradation in aqueous buffer and showed toxicity in CLL patient B cells comparable to that of free FTY720. Following intravenous injection in ICR mice, LP-FTY720 had an increased elimination phase half-life (~28 vs. ~19 hr) and decreased clearance (235 vs. 778 mL/h/kg) compared to the free drug. Antibodies against CD19, CD20 and CD37 were incorporated into LP-FTY720, which provided targeted delivery to CLL patient B cells and thus achieved higher killing efficacy. The novel liposomal carrier of FTY720 demonstrated improved pharmacokinetic properties, comparable activity, and a potential platform for targeted delivery to CLL by overcoming the limited application of free FTY720 to B malignancy treatment. PMID:23969101

  14. Emulsomes Meet S-layer Proteins: An Emerging Targeted Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Ucisik, Mehmet H.; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  15. Emulsomes meet S-layer proteins: an emerging targeted drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Ucisik, Mehmet H; Sleytr, Uwe B; Schuster, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Here, the use of emulsomes as a drug delivery system is reviewed and compared with other similar lipidic nanoformulations. In particular, we look at surface modification of emulsomes using S-layer proteins, which are self-assembling proteins that cover the surface of many prokaryotic organisms. It has been shown that covering emulsomes with a crystalline S-layer lattice can protect cells from oxidative stress and membrane damage. In the future, the capability to recrystallize S-layer fusion proteins on lipidic nanoformulations may allow the presentation of binding functions or homing protein domains to achieve highly specific targeted delivery of drug-loaded emulsomes. Besides the discussion on several designs and advantages of composite emulsomes, the success of emulsomes for the delivery of drugs to fight against viral and fungal infections, dermal therapy, cancer, and autoimmunity is summarized. Further research might lead to smart, biocompatible emulsomes, which are able to protect and reduce the side effects caused by the drug, but at the same time are equipped with specific targeting molecules to find the desired site of action. PMID:25697368

  16. Design and fabrication of magnetic nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Omid; Gunn, Jonathan; Zhang, Miqin

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a class of non-invasive imaging agents that have been developed for magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. These MNPs have traditionally been used for disease imaging via passive targeting, but recent advances have opened the door to cellular-specific targeting, drug delivery, and multi-modal imaging by these nanoparticles. As more elaborate MNPs are envisioned, adherence to proper design criteria (e.g. size, coating, molecular functionalization) becomes even more essential. This review summarizes the design parameters that affect MNP performance in vivo, including the physicochemical properties and nanoparticle surface modifications, such as MNP coating and targeting ligand functionalizations that can enhance MNP management of biological barriers. A careful review of the chemistries used to modify the surfaces of MNPs is also given, with attention paid to optimizing the activity of bound ligands while maintaining favorable physicochemical properties. PMID:19909778

  17. Automated Modular Synthesis of Aptamer–Drug Conjugates for Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aptamer–drug conjugates (ApDCs) are promising targeted drug delivery systems for reducing toxicity while increasing the efficacy of chemotherapy. However, current ApDC technologies suffer from problems caused by the complicated preparation and low controllability of drug–aptamer conjugation. To solve such problems, we have designed and synthesized a therapeutic module for solid phase synthesis, which is a phosphoramdite containing an anticancer drug moiety and a photocleavable linker. Using this module, we have realized automated and modular synthesis of ApDCs, and multiple drugs were efficiently incorporated into ApDCs at predesigned positions. The ApDCs not only recognize target cancer cells specifically, but also release drugs in a photocontrollable manner. We demonstrated the potential of automated and modular ApDC technology for applications in targeted cancer therapy. PMID:24483627

  18. Catalytic Janus motors on microfluidic chip: deterministic motion for targeted cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Baraban, Larysa; Makarov, Denys; Streubel, Robert; Mönch, Ingolf; Grimm, Daniel; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2012-04-24

    We fabricated self-powered colloidal Janus motors combining catalytic and magnetic cap structures, and demonstrated their performance for manipulation (uploading, transportation, delivery) and sorting of microobjects on microfluidic chips. The specific magnetic properties of the Janus motors are provided by ultrathin multilayer films that are designed to align the magnetic moment along the main symmetry axis of the cap. This unique property allows a deterministic motion of the Janus particles at a large scale when guided in an external magnetic field. The observed directional control of the motion combined with extensive functionality of the colloidal Janus motors conceptually opens a straightforward route for targeted delivery of species, which are relevant in the field of chemistry, biology, and medicine. PMID:22424213

  19. A peptide-mediated targeting gene delivery system for malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuanwei; Ning, Liping; Wang, Hongwei; Lu, Zaijun; Li, Xingang; Fan, Xiaoyong; Wang, Xuping; Liu, Yuguang

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant glioma. Although there has been considerable progress in treatment strategies, the prognosis of many patients with GBM remains poor. In this work, polyethylenimine (PEI) and the VTWTPQAWFQWV (VTW) peptide were modified and synthesized into GBM-targeting nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of U-87 (human glioblastoma) cells was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell internalization was investigated to verify the nanoparticle delivery into the cytoplasm. Results showed that the methods of polymer conjugation and the amount of VTW peptide were important factors to polymer synthesis and transfection. The PEI-VTW20 nanoparticles increased the transfection efficiency significantly. This report describes the use of VTW peptide-based PEI nanoparticles for intracellular gene delivery in a GBM cell-specific manner. PMID:24101872

  20. Targeting hepatocytes for drug and gene delivery: emerging novel approaches and applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Nantz, Michael H; Zern, Mark A

    2002-03-01

    The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) on mammalian hepatocytes provides a unique means for the development of liver-specific carriers, such as liposomes, recombinant lipoproteins, and polymers for drug or gene delivery to the liver, especially to hepatocytes. The abundant receptors on the cells specifically recognize ligands with terminal galactose or N-acetylgalactosamine residues, and endocytose the ligands for an intracellular degradation process. The use of its natural ligand, i.e. asialofetuin, or synthetic ligands with galactosylated or lactosylated residues, such as galactosylated cholesterol, glycolipids, or galactosylated polymers has achieved significant targeting efficacy to the liver. There are several examples of successful targeted therapy for acute liver injury with asialofetuin-labeled and vitamin E-associated liposomes or with a caspase inhibitor loaded in sugar-carrying polymer particles, as well as for the delivery of a new antiviral agent, 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine. Liposome-mediated gene delivery to the liver is more difficult than to other organs, such as to lungs. It is still in its infancy due to difficulties in solving general issues, such as the circulatory stability of liposome-DNA complexes, and lysosomal or endosomal degradation of plasmid DNA. In spite of these existing concerns, several new approaches offer some reason for optimism, for example; intravenous injection of asialofetuin- or galactosylated cholesterol-labeled cationic liposomes has led to high transgene expression in the liver. In addition, specific antisense oligonucleotides against woodchuck hepatitis viruses incorporated into sialoorosomucoid-poly-L-lysine significantly inhibited viral replication in the liver. Finally, galactosylated polymers are promising for gene delivery, but require further studies to verify their potential applications. PMID:11861224

  1. Tumor-targeted delivery of liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin by use of a peptide that selectively binds to irradiated tumors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amanda Lowery; Halina Onishko; Dennis E. Hallahan; Zhaozhong Han

    2011-01-01

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery improves anti-tumor efficacy and reduces systemic toxicity by limiting bioavailability of cytotoxic drugs to within tumors. Targeting reagents, such as peptides or antibodies recognizing molecular targets over-expressed within tumors, have been used to improve liposome-encapsulated drug accumulation within tumors and resulted in enhanced tumor growth control. In this report, we expand the scope of targeting reagents by

  2. Dendrimer-based targeted delivery of an apoptotic sensor in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Myc, Andrzej; Majoros, István J; Thomas, Thommey P; Baker, James R

    2007-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated the applicability of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers as a platform for the targeted delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs both in vitro and in vivo. To monitor the rate and extent of cell-killing caused by the delivered chemotherapeutic drug, we wished to analyze the degree of apoptosis in targeted cells on a real-time basis. As the apoptosis-regulating caspases are activated during the apoptotic process, several caspase-hydrolyzable, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based substrates have been marketed for the detection of apoptosis. However, the applicability of these agents is limited because of their nonspecificity and the consequent high background fluorescence in tissues. Here we show the synthesis, characterization, and in vitro targeting of an engineered PAMAM nanodevice in which folic acid (FA) is conjugated as the targeting molecule and a caspase-specific FRET-based agent (PhiPhiLux G1D2) is conjugated as the apoptosis-detecting agent. This conjugate specifically targets FA-receptor-positive, KB cells. In these cells, the apoptosis-inducing agent staurosporine caused a 5-fold increase in the cellular fluorescence. These results show, for the first time, the potential applicability of a targeted apoptosis-measuring nanodevice, which could be used for simultaneously monitoring the apoptotic potential of a delivered drug. PMID:17206782

  3. Functionalized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as Rationally Designed Vehicles for Tumor-Targeted Drug Delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Chen,J.; Wong,S.; Chen, S.; Zhao, X.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; and Ojima, I.

    2008-11-14

    A novel single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-based tumor-targeted drug delivery system (DDS) has been developed, which consists of a functionalized SWNT linked to tumor-targeting modules as well as prodrug modules. There are three key features of this nanoscale DDS: (a) use of functionalized SWNTs as a biocompatible platform for the delivery of therapeutic drugs or diagnostics, (b) conjugation of prodrug modules of an anticancer agent (taxoid with a cleavable linker) that is activated to its cytotoxic form inside the tumor cells upon internalization and in situ drug release, and (c) attachment of tumor-recognition modules (biotin and a spacer) to the nanotube surface. To prove the efficacy of this DDS, three fluorescent and fluorogenic molecular probes were designed, synthesized, characterized, and subjected to the analysis of the receptor-mediated endocytosis and drug release inside the cancer cells (L1210FR leukemia cell line) by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The specificity and cytotoxicity of the conjugate have also been assessed and compared with L1210 and human noncancerous cell lines. Then, it has unambiguously been proven that this tumor-targeting DDS works exactly as designed and shows high potency toward specific cancer cell lines, thereby forming a solid foundation for further development.

  4. Haptic guided virtual reality simulation for targeted drug delivery using nano-containers manipulation.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Syed; Shah, Mohsin; Yoon, Sung Chul; Ullah, Ikram; Kim, Myeong Ok; Yoon, Jungwon

    2013-07-01

    When dealing with nano targeted drug delivery process the significant area of virtual reality application can be visualizing real time process and simulating it at nano-scale, since the effectiveness of a drug primarily depends on the affected cell and targeted doze. This paper proposes virtual reality (VR) as a tool to analyze and simulate nanoparticles (NPs) manipulation, in this paper amorphous NPs are analyzed and simulated in virtual environment. Haptic guides virtualizing the atomic force microscope (AFM) is applied in the virtual environment which allows the operators to sense and touch the NPs when evaluating its structure, drug release time, and behavioral study. Cisplatin was loaded as a modal drug to the self-assembled amorphous copolymer P(3HV-co-4HB)-b-mPEG NPs, where the efficiency and bioavailability of Cisplatin was further investigated. The prepared NPs when simulated in virtual environment proved to show good biocompatibility. Results showed that amorphous polymeric NPs could be efficient vehicles for the constant and targeted delivery of toxic anticancer drugs. PMID:23909133

  5. A D-peptide ligand of nicotine acetylcholine receptors for brain-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoli; Zhan, Changyou; Shen, Qing; Fu, Wei; Xie, Cao; Gao, Jie; Peng, Chunmei; Zheng, Ping; Lu, Weiyue

    2015-03-01

    Lysosomes of brain capillary endothelial cells are implicated in nicotine acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated transcytosis and act as an enzymatic barrier for the transport of peptide ligands to the brain. A D-peptide ligand of nAChRs (termed (D)CDX), which binds to nAChRs with an IC50 value of 84.5?nM, was developed by retro-inverso isomerization. (D)CDX displayed exceptional stability in lysosomal homogenate and serum, and demonstrated significantly higher transcytosis efficiency in an in?vitro blood-brain barrier monolayer compared with the parent L-peptide. When modified on liposomal surface, (D)CDX facilitated significant brain-targeted delivery of liposomes. As a result, brain-targeted delivery of (D)CDX modified liposomes enhanced therapeutic efficiency of encapsulated doxorubicin for glioblastoma. This study illustrates the importance of ligand stability in nAChRs-mediated transcytosis, and paves the way for developing stable brain-targeted entities. PMID:25600241

  6. Polymeric nanocarriers for magnetic targeted drug delivery: preparation, characterization, and in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Licciardi, Mariano; Scialabba, Cinzia; Fiorica, Calogero; Cavallaro, Gennara; Cassata, Giovanni; Giammona, Gaetano

    2013-12-01

    In this paper the preparation of magnetic nanocarriers (MNCs), containing superparamagnetic domains, is reported, useful as potential magnetically targeted drug delivery systems. The preparation of MNCs was performed by using the PHEA-IB-p(BMA) graft copolymer as coating material through the homogenization-solvent evaporation method. Magnetic and nonmagnetic nanocarriers containing flutamide (FLU-MNCs) were prepared. The prepared nanocarriers have been exhaustively characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and magnetic measurements. Biological evaluation was performed by in vitro cytotoxicity and cell uptake tests and in vivo biodistribution studies. Magnetic nanocarriers showed dimensions of about 300 nm with a narrow size distribution, an amount of loaded FLU of 20% (w/w), and a superparamagnetic behavior. Cell culture experiments performed on prostate cancer cell line LNCaP demonstrated the cytotoxic effect of FLU-MNCs. In vivo biodistribution studies carried out by the application of an external magnetic field in rats demonstrated the effect of the external magnet on modifying the biodistribution of FLU-MNCs. FLU-MNCs resulted efficiently internalized by tumor cells and susceptible to magnetic targeting by application of an external magnetic field. The proposed nanocarriers can represent a very promising approach to obtain an efficient magnetically targeted anticancer drug delivery system. PMID:24168360

  7. Preparation and characterization of vinculin-targeted polymer-lipid nanoparticle as intracellular delivery vehicle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junping; Ornek-Ballanco, Ceren; Xu, Jiahua; Yang, Weiguo; Yu, Xiaojun

    2013-01-01

    Intracellular delivery vehicles have been extensively investigated as these can serve as an effective tool in studying the cellular mechanism, by delivering functional protein to specific locations of the cells. In the current study, a polymer-lipid nanoparticle (PLN) system was developed as an intracellular delivery vehicle specifically targeting vinculin, a focal adhesion protein associated with cellular adhesive structures, such as focal adhesions and adherens junctions. The PLNs possessed an average size of 106 nm and had a positively charged surface. With a lower encapsulation efficiency 32% compared with poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) nanoparticles (46%), the PLNs showed the sustained release profile of model drug BSA, while PLGA nanoparticles demonstrated an initial burst-release property. Cell-uptake experiments using mouse embryonic fibroblasts cultured in fibrin-fibronectin gels observed, under confocal microscope, that the anti-vinculin conjugated PLNs could successfully ship the cargo to the cytoplasm of fibroblasts, adhered to fibronectin-fibrin. With the use of cationic lipid, the unconjugated PLNs were shown to have high gene transfection efficiency. Furthermore, the unconjugated PLNs had nuclear-targeting capability in the absence of nuclear-localization signals. Therefore, the PLNs could be manipulated easily via different type of targeting ligands and could potentially be used as a powerful tool for cellular mechanism study, by delivering drugs to specific cellular organelles. PMID:23293518

  8. Silk-fibroin-coated liposomes for long-term and targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Gobin, Andrea S; Rhea, Robyn; Newman, Robert A; Mathur, Anshu B

    2006-01-01

    Many barriers to drug delivery into a tumor site require careful consideration when designing a new drug. In this study, the adhesive targeting and drug specificity of modified liposomal vesicles on human-scar-producing cells, keloid fibroblasts, were investigated. Keloids express abundant levels of mucopolysaccharides and receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK). In this report, the structural properties, drug release kinetics, and therapeutic availability of silk-fibroin-coated, emodin-loaded liposomes (SF-ELP), compared with uncoated, emodin-loaded liposomes (ELP), were investigated. SF-ELP had a highly organized lamellae structure, which contributed to 55% of the liposomal diameter. This modified liposomal structure decreased emodin release rates by changing the release kinetics from a swelling and diffusional process to a purely diffusional process, probably due to steric hindrance. SF-ELP also increased adhesion targeting to keloid fibroblasts. Increased retention of SF-ELP is most likely due to the interaction of the fibrous protein coating around the ELP with the pericellular molecules around the cell. SF-ELP also decreased survival rate of keloids that expressed high levels of RTK. These results demonstrated that SF-ELP enhanced emodin delivery by improved diffusion kinetics and specific cell targeting. PMID:17722265

  9. Urokinase plasminogen activator system-targeted delivery of nanobins as a novel ovarian cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yilin; Kenny, Hilary A; Swindell, Elden P; Mitra, Anirban K; Hankins, Patrick L; Ahn, Richard W; Gwin, Katja; Mazar, Andrew P; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Lengyel, Ernst

    2013-12-01

    The urokinase system is overexpressed in epithelial ovarian cancer cells and is expressed at low levels in normal cells. To develop a platform for intracellular and targeted delivery of therapeutics in ovarian cancer, we conjugated urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) antibodies to liposomal nanobins. The arsenic trioxide-loaded nanobins had favorable physicochemical properties and the ability to bind specifically to uPA. Confocal microscopy showed that the uPA-targeted nanobins were internalized by ovarian cancer cells, whereas both inductively coupled plasma optical mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analyses confirmed more than four-fold higher uptake of targeted nanobins when compared with untargeted nanobins. In a coculture assay, the targeted nanobins showed efficient uptake in ovarian cancer cells but not in the normal primary omental mesothelial cells. Moreover, this uptake could be blocked by either downregulating uPA receptor expression in the ovarian cancer cells using short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) or by competition with free uPA or uPA antibody. In proof-of-concept experiments, mice bearing orthotopic ovarian tumors showed a greater reduction in tumor burden when treated with targeted nanobins than with untargeted nanobins (47% vs. 27%; P < 0.001). The targeted nanobins more effectively inhibited tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo compared with untargeted nanobins, inducing caspase-mediated apoptosis and impairing stem cell marker, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1A1 (ALDH1A1), expression. Ex vivo fluorescence imaging of tumors and organs corroborated these results, showing preferential localization of the targeted nanobins to the tumor. These findings suggest that uPA-targeted nanobins capable of specifically and efficiently delivering payloads to cancer cells could serve as the foundation for a new targeted cancer therapy using protease receptors. PMID:24061648

  10. Synthetic Nano-Low Density Lipoprotein as Targeted Drug DeliveryVehicle for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Nikanjam, Mina; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Shu,Xiao; Budinger, Thomas F.; Forte, Trudy M.

    2006-06-14

    This paper discribes a synthetic low density lipoprotein(LDL) made by complexing a 29 amino acid that consists of a lipid bindingdomain and the LDL receptor binding domain with a lipid microemulsion.The nano-LDL particles were intermdiate in size between LDL and HDL andbound to LDL receptors on GBM brain tumor cells. Synthetic nano-LDLuptake by GBM cells was LDL receptor specific and dependent on cellreceptor number. It is suggested that these synthetic particles can serveas a delivery vehicle for hydophobic anti-tumor drugs by targeting theLDL receptor.

  11. Macromolecular prodrugs based on synthetic polyaminoacids: drug delivery and drug targeting in antitumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Gennara; Pitarresi, Giovanna; Giammona, Gaetano

    2011-01-01

    In the last twenty years a depth study on potential pharmaceutical applications of synthetic polymers at proteinlike structure as carrier for macromolecular prodrug production has been performed in academia and in industry. In particular ?,?-poly(N-2-hydroxyethyl)-DL-aspartamide (PHEA), ?,?-polyaspartylhydrazide (PAHy), poly(glutamic acid) (PGA), poly(aspartic acid) (PAA) and polylysine (PLL) have been extensively studied in this field. In the present review, the use of PHEA, PAHy, PGA as starting materials to prepare macromolecular prodrugs is reported and drug delivery and targeting aspects have been considered. PMID:21671863

  12. Nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Sarabjeet Singh; Fenniri, Hicham; Singh, Baljit

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles hold tremendous potential as an effective drug delivery system. In this review we discussed recent developments in nanotechnology for drug delivery. To overcome the problems of gene and drug delivery, nanotechnology has gained interest in recent years. Nanosystems with different compositions and biological properties have been extensively investigated for drug and gene delivery applications. To achieve efficient drug delivery it is important to understand the interactions of nanomaterials with the biological environment, targeting cell-surface receptors, drug release, multiple drug administration, stability of therapeutic agents and molecular mechanisms of cell signalling involved in pathobiology of the disease under consideration. Several anti-cancer drugs including paclitaxel, doxorubicin, 5-fluorouracil and dexamethasone have been successfully formulated using nanomaterials. Quantom dots, chitosan, Polylactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) and PLGA-based nanoparticles have also been used for in vitro RNAi delivery. Brain cancer is one of the most difficult malignancies to detect and treat mainly because of the difficulty in getting imaging and therapeutic agents past the blood-brain barrier and into the brain. Anti-cancer drugs such as loperamide and doxorubicin bound to nanomaterials have been shown to cross the intact blood-brain barrier and released at therapeutic concentrations in the brain. The use of nanomaterials including peptide-based nanotubes to target the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor and cell adhesion molecules like integrins, cadherins and selectins, is a new approach to control disease progression. PMID:18053152

  13. Targeted delivery of brain-derived neurotrophic factor for the treatment of blindness and deafness

    PubMed Central

    Khalin, Igor; Alyautdin, Renad; Kocherga, Ganna; Bakar, Muhamad Abu

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative causes of blindness and deafness possess a major challenge in their clinical management as proper treatment guidelines have not yet been found. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been established as a promising therapy against neurodegenerative disorders including hearing and visual loss. Unfortunately, the blood–retinal barrier and blood–cochlear barrier, which have a comparable structure to the blood–brain barrier prevent molecules of larger sizes (such as BDNF) from exiting the circulation and reaching the targeted cells. Anatomical features of the eye and ear allow use of local administration, bypassing histo-hematic barriers. This paper focuses on highlighting a variety of strategies proposed for the local administration of the BDNF, like direct delivery, viral gene therapy, and cell-based therapy, which have been shown to successfully improve development, survival, and function of spiral and retinal ganglion cells. The similarities and controversies for BDNF treatment of posterior eye diseases and inner ear diseases have been analyzed and compared. In this review, we also focus on the possibility of translation of this knowledge into clinical practice. And finally, we suggest that using nanoparticulate drug-delivery systems may substantially contribute to the development of clinically viable techniques for BDNF delivery into the cochlea or posterior eye segment, which, ultimately, can lead to a long-term or permanent rescue of auditory and optic neurons from degeneration. PMID:25995632

  14. Synthesis of Bisethylnorspermine Lipid Prodrug as Gene Delivery Vector Targeting Polyamine Metabolism in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yanmei; Zhu, Yu; Li, Jing; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Wu, Chao; Oupický, David

    2013-01-01

    Progress in the development of nonviral gene delivery vectors continues to be hampered by low transfection activity and toxicity. Here we proposed to develop a lipid prodrug based on a polyamine analogue bisethylnorspermine (BSP) that can function dually as gene delivery vector and, after intracellular degradation, as active anticancer agent targeting dysregulated polyamine metabolism. We synthesized a prodrug of BSP (LS-BSP) capable of intracellular release of BSP using thiolytically sensitive dithiobenzyl carbamate linker. Biodegradability of LS-BSP contributed to decreased toxicity compared with nondegradable control L-BSP. BSP showed a strong synergistic enhancement of cytotoxic activity of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in human breast cancer cells. Decreased enhancement of TRAIL activity was observed for LS-BSP when compared with BSP. LS-BSP formed complexes with plasmid DNA and mediated transfection activity comparable to DOTAP and L-BSP. Our results show that BSP-based vectors are promising candidates for combination drug/gene delivery. PMID:22545813

  15. Targeted Delivery of GDNF through the Blood–Brain Barrier by MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Lin; Liu, Li; Cai, Youli; Zheng, Hairong; Liu, Xin; Yan, Fei; Zou, Chao; Sun, Chengyu; Shi, Jie; Lu, Shukun; Chen, Yun

    2012-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors, such as glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), are promising therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases. However, the application of GDNF to treat these diseases effectively is limited because the blood–brain barrier (BBB) prevents the local delivery of macromolecular therapeutic agents from entering the central nervous system (CNS). Focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles (MBs) using appropriate parameters has been previously demonstrated to be able to open the BBB locally and noninvasively. This study investigated the targeted delivery of GDNF MBs through the BBB by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound. Evans Blue extravasation and histological examination were used to determine the optimum focused ultrasound parameters. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was performed to verify the effects of GDNF bound on MBs using a biotin–avidin bridging chemistry method to promote GDNF delivery into the brain. The results showed that GDNF can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the CNS through the BBB using MRI-guided focused ultrasound combined with MBs under optimum parameters. MBs that bind GDNF combined with MRI-guided focused ultrasound may be an effective way of delivering neurotrophic factors directly into the CNS. The method described herein provides a potential means of treating patients with CNS diseases. PMID:23300823

  16. Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery of

    E-print Network

    Summa, Christopher M.

    Anti-HIV Double Variable Domain Immunoglobulins Binding Both gp41 and gp120 for Targeted Delivery States of America Abstract Background: Anti-HIV immunoconjugates targeted to the HIV envelope protein may be used to eradicate the latent reservoir of HIV infection using activate-and-purge protocols. Previous

  17. Targeted polymersome delivery of siRNA induces cell death of breast cancer cells dependent upon Orai3 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Pangburn, Todd O; Georgiou, Katerina; Bates, Frank S; Kokkoli, Efrosini

    2012-09-01

    Polymersomes, polymeric vesicles that self-assemble in aqueous solutions from block copolymers, have been avidly investigated in recent years as potential drug delivery agents. Past work has highlighted peptide-functionalized polymersomes as a highly promising targeted delivery system. However, few reports have investigated the ability of polymersomes to operate as gene delivery agents. In this study, we report on the encapsulation and delivery of siRNA inside of peptide-functionalized polymersomes composed of poly(1,2-butadiene)-b-poly(ethylene oxide). In particular, PR_b peptide-functionalized polymer vesicles are shown to be a promising system for siRNA delivery. PR_b is a fibronectin mimetic peptide targeting specifically the ?(5)?(1) integrin. The Orai3 gene was targeted for siRNA knockdown, and PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles encapsulating siRNA were found to specifically decrease cell viability of T47D breast cancer cells to a certain extent, while preserving viability of noncancerous MCF10A breast cells. siRNA delivery by PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles was compared to that of a current commercial siRNA transfection agent, and produced less dramatic decreases in cancer cell viability, but compared favorably in regards to the relative toxicity of the delivery systems. Finally, delivery and vesicle release of a fluorescent encapsulate by PR_b-functionalized polymer vesicles was visualized by confocal microscopy, and colocalization with cellular endosomes and lysosomes was assessed by organelle staining. Polymersomes were observed to primarily release their encapsulate in the early endosomal intracellular compartments, and data may suggest some escape to the cytosol. These results represent a promising first generation model system for targeted delivery of siRNA. PMID:22827285

  18. Pyroelectric Adaptive Nanodispenser (PYRANA) microrobot for liquid delivery on a target.

    PubMed

    Vespini, Veronica; Coppola, Sara; Grilli, Simonetta; Paturzo, Melania; Ferraro, Pietro

    2011-09-21

    Manipulation of micro-sized objects in lab-on-a-chip and microfluidic environments is essential for different experiments and procedures ranging from chemical to biological applications and for experimental biotechnologies. For example polymeric particles, useful as targets for encapsulating or for being covered by drug vaccines, can be manipulated and controlled with the aim of releasing them to specific sites. Here we show a novel ElectroHydroDynamic tool able to control and manipulate dielectric micro-targets by a touch-less approach. This approach allows one to manipulate liquids and nano-particles simultaneously for specific delivery applications (i.e. decoration and coating). Thus a sort of EHD micro-robot is proposed. This flexible tool provides a new and powerful way to operate various tasks as demonstrated by the experiments reported here. PMID:21811716

  19. Improved and targeted delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with magnetic layer-by-layer assembled microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, Anton M.; Gabriel, Samantha A.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.; Gould, David J.

    2015-05-01

    Despite our increasing knowledge of cell biology and the recognition of an increasing repertoire of druggable intracellular therapeutic targets, there remain a limited number of approaches to deliver bioactive molecules to cells and even fewer that enable targeted delivery. Layer-by-layer (LbL) microcapsules are assembled using alternate layers of oppositely charged molecules and are potential cell delivery vehicles for applications in nanomedicine. There are a wide variety of charged molecules that can be included in the microcapsule structure including metal nanoparticles that introduce physical attributes. Delivery of bioactive molecules to cells with LbL microcapsules has recently been demonstrated, so in this study we explore the delivery of bioactive molecules (luciferase enzyme and plasmid DNA) to cells using biodegradable microcapsules containing a layer of magnetite nanoparticles. Interestingly, significantly improved intracellular luciferase enzyme activity (25 fold) and increased transfection efficiency with plasmid DNA (3.4 fold) was observed with magnetic microcapsules. The use of a neodymium magnet enabled efficient targeting of magnetic microcapsules which further improved the delivery efficiency of the cargoes as a consequence of increased microcapsule concentration at the magnetic site. Microcapsules were well tolerated by cells in these experiments and only displayed signs of toxicity at a capsule : cell ratio of 100 : 1 and with extended exposure. These studies illustrate how multi-functionalization of LbL microcapsules can improve and target delivery of bioactive molecules to cells.

  20. Cisplatin-alginate conjugate liposomes for targeted delivery to EGFR-positive ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunfei; Zhou, Jinhua; Qiu, Lihua; Wang, Xinran; Chen, Lilan; Liu, Ting; Di, Wen

    2014-05-01

    Systemic side effects and low aqueous solubility have limited the clinical use of cisplatin (CDDP) in ovarian carcinoma and have contributed to failures in developing effective drug delivery systems. In order to develop a novel drug delivery system with enhanced efficacy and minimal adverse effects, we exploited the properties of sodium alginate (SA) to synthesize CDDP-SA conjugate (CS), which is highly soluble and readily incorporated into liposomes (CS-PEG-Lip). Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is overexpressed in many ovarian cancers, therefore we modified EGF on the liposomes (CS-EGF-Lip) to specifically target EGFR-expressing tumors, thereby increasing the bioavailability and efficacy of CDDP. In vitro experiments confirmed that EGF-Lip selectively recognized EGFR-positive SKOV3 cells and effectively penetrated tumor spheroids. We demonstrated that CS-EGF-Lip possessed satisfactory size distribution and exhibited significantly improved encapsulation and loading efficiency. Furthermore, CS-EGF-Lip sustained release of CDDP in vitro, suggesting that CS-EGF-Lip may retain the antitumor activity of CDDP. Inhibition of proliferation and migration was also greater with CS-EGF-Lip compared to CDDP. In vivo xenograft experiments revealed that administration of CS-EGF-Lip enhanced delivery of CDDP into ovarian tumor tissues and improved the antitumor efficacy of CDDP, while reducing nephrotoxicity and body weight loss in mice. These results suggest that CS-EGF-Lip may offer a promising strategy for CDDP delivery in the treatment of EGFR-positive ovarian carcinoma or similar tumors, with enhanced efficacy and fewer adverse effects. PMID:24565522

  1. Mammaglobin as a potential molecular target for breast cancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Lian; Li, Ly; Wang, Qian; Fleming, Timothy P; You, Shaojin

    2009-01-01

    Background Mammaglobin (MAM) has been used as a specific molecular marker for breast cancer diagnosis. Recently, several groups of researchers proposed a number of therapeutic strategies targeting this molecule. Some of the strategies are based upon an essential but not demonstrated hypothesis – mammaglobin is associated with the surface of breast cancer cells, which strongly disputes the therapeutic strategies. Results We conducted a computer-based predictive analysis and identified a small fragment at the N-end of MAM as a potential transmembrane domain. We provided several evidences to demonstrate the presence of the membrane-associated MAM. We isolated the membrane protein components from known MAM positive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB361 and MDA-MB415). We showed that about 22–64% of MAM proteins, depending upon the types of the cancer cells, directly attached on the membrane of breast cancer cells, by Western blotting assays. To directly visualize the presence of the membrane-bound MAM protein, we incubated the MAM positive cancer cells with FITC labeled anti-MAM antibody, and observed clear fluorescent signals on the surface of the cells. In studying the MAM protein distribution in human breast cancer tissues, we first identified two immunostain patterns that are associated with the membrane-bound MAM: the membrane stain pattern and luminary surface stain pattern. To test whether the membrane-associated MAM can serve as a molecular target for drug delivery, we conjugated anti-MAM antibody to human low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and loaded doxorubicin (Dox) in the core of LDL. Specific binding and cytotoxicity of the MAM targeted and Dox loaded LDL was tested in the MAM positive breast cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion We first showed that some of MAM protein directly associated with the surface of breast cancer cells. The membrane-associated MAM protein may be utilized as a useful molecular marker for breast cancer targeted drug delivery. PMID:19309500

  2. MRI-Visible Micellar Nanomedicine for Targeted Drug Delivery to Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guthi, Jagadeesh Setti; Yang, Su-Geun; Huang, Gang; Li, Shunzi; Khemtong, Chalermchai; Kessinger, Chase W.; Peyton, Michael; Minna, John D.; Brown, Kathlynn C.; Gao, Jinming

    2010-01-01

    Polymeric micelles are emerging as a highly integrated nanoplatform for cancer targeting, drug delivery and tumor imaging applications. In this study, we describe a multifunctional micelle (MFM) system that is encoded with a lung cancer-targeting peptide (LCP), and encapsulated with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and doxorubicin (Doxo) for MR imaging and therapeutic delivery, respectively. The LCP-encoded MFM showed significantly increased ?v?6-dependent cell targeting in H2009 lung cancer cells over a scrambled peptide (SP)-encoded MFM control as well as in an ?v?6-negative H460 cell control. 3H-Labeled MFM nanoparticles were used to quantify the time- and dose-dependent cell uptake of MFM nanoparticles with different peptide encoding (LCP vs SP) and surface densities (20% and 40%) in H2009 cells. LCP functionalization of the micelle surface increased uptake of the MFM by more than 3-fold compared to the SP control. These results were confirmed by confocal laser scanning microscopy, which further demonstrated the successful Doxo release from MFM and accumulation in the nucleus. SPIO clustering inside the micelle core resulted in high T2 relaxivity (>400 Fe mM?1 s?1) of the resulting MFM nanoparticles. T2-weighted MRI images showed clear contrast differences between H2009 cells incubated with LCP-encoded MFM over the SP-encoded MFM control. An ATP activity assay showed increased cytotoxicity of LCP-encoded MFM over SP-encoded MFM in H2009 cells (IC50 values were 28.3 ± 6.4 nM and 73.6 ± 6.3 nM, respectively; p < 0.005). The integrated diagnostic and therapeutic design of MFM nanomedicine potentially allows for image-guided, target-specific treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19708690

  3. Nanotechnology in the targeted drug delivery for bone diseases and bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wenyi; Wu, Chengtie; Chen, Jiezhong; Xiao, Yin

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a vigorous research area and one of its important applications is in biomedical sciences. Among biomedical applications, targeted drug delivery is one of the most extensively studied subjects. Nanostructured particles and scaffolds have been widely studied for increasing treatment efficacy and specificity of present treatment approaches. Similarly, this technique has been used for treating bone diseases including bone regeneration. In this review, we have summarized and highlighted the recent advancement of nanostructured particles and scaffolds for the treatment of cancer bone metastasis, osteosarcoma, bone infections and inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, as well as for bone regeneration. Nanoparticles used to deliver deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid molecules to specific bone sites for gene therapies are also included. The investigation of the implications of nanoparticles in bone diseases have just begun, and has already shown some promising potential. Further studies have to be conducted, aimed specifically at assessing targeted delivery and bioactive scaffolds to further improve their efficacy before they can be used clinically. PMID:23836972

  4. Systematic Studies of Phase Transitions in Thermo-Responsive Polymers Used in Targeted Drug Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Janae; Denmark, Daniel; Witanachchi, Sarath

    2015-03-01

    Thermo-responsive polymers such as poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) can undergo reversible phase transitions in aqueous solutions under varying temperatures. They are ideal candidates for the polymer shell of a targeted drug delivery capsule. Concentration and pH can affect the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the PNIPAM polymer and its physical properties. In this work, a systematic study of the factors that influence the LCST of the PNIPAM polymer mixed with Fe3O4 nanoparticles (MNPs) during thermal bath heating is presented. A series of PNIPAM solutions with varying concentrations of PNIPAM with MNPs were prepared and characterized using scanning electron microscopy. In-situ transmission measurements were used to determine the LCST of PNIPAM concentrations. A systematic decrease in the LCST was observed as the concentration of PNIPAM was increased. In addition, the impact of pH on the LCST of PNIPAM was examined by increasing the basicity of the PNIPAM solutions by adding adjusted KOH pellets. An increase in the thermal stability of the LCST was observed when the basicity of the PNIPAM solution was increased. The results from this study provide valuable information towards using these thermo-responsive polymers in targeted drug delivery. Principal Investigator

  5. Maximizing gene delivery efficiencies of cationic helical polypeptides via balanced membrane penetration and cellular targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Yin, Lichen; Song, Ziyuan; Ma, Liang; Tang, Haoyu; Gabrielson, Nathan P.; Lu, Hua; Cheng, Jianjun

    2014-01-01

    The application of non-viral gene delivery vectors is often accompanied with the poor correlation between transfection efficiency and the safety profiles of vectors: vectors with high transfection efficiencies often suffer from high toxicities, making it unlikely to improve their efficiencies by increasing the DNA dosage. In the current study, we developed a ternary complex system which consisted of a highly membrane-active cationic helical polypeptide (PVBLG-8), a low-toxic, membrane-inactive cationic helical polypeptide (PVBLG-7) capable of mediating mannose receptor targeting, and DNA. The PVBLG-7 moiety notably enhanced the cellular uptake and transfection efficiency of PVBLG-8 in a variety of mannose receptor-expressing cell types (HeLa, COS-7, and Raw 264.7), while it did not compromise the membrane permeability of PVBLG-8 or bring additional cytotoxicities. Because of the simplicity and adjustability of the self-assembly approach, optimal formulations of the ternary complexes with a proper balance between membrane activity and targeting capability were easily identified in each specific cell type. The optimal ternary complexes displayed desired cell tolerability and markedly outperformed the PVBLG-8/DNA binary complexes as well as commercial reagent Lipofectamine™ 2000 in terms of transfection efficiency. This study therefore provides an effective and facile strategy to overcome the efficiency-toxicity poor correlation of non-viral vectors, which contributes insights into the design strategy of effective and safe non-viral gene delivery vectors. PMID:24211080

  6. Targeted delivery of antiprotease to the epithelial surface of human tracheal xenografts.

    PubMed

    Ferkol, Thomas; Cohn, Leah A; Phillips, Thomas E; Smith, Arnold; Davis, Pamela B

    2003-05-15

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) lung is uniquely susceptible to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and infection with this organism incites an intense, compartmentalized inflammatory response that leads to chronic airway obstruction and bronchiectasis. Neutrophils migrate into the airway, and released neutrophil elastase contributes to the progression of the lung disease characteristic of CF. We have developed a strategy that permits the delivery of antiproteases to the inaccessible CF airways by targeting the respiratory epithelium via the human polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (hpIgR). A fusion protein consisting of a single-chain Fv directed against secretory component, the extracellular portion of the pIgR, linked to human alpha1-antitrypsin is effectively ferried across human tracheal xenografts and delivers the antiprotease to the apical surface to a much greater extent than occurs by passive diffusion of human alpha1-antitrypsin alone. Targeted antiprotease delivery paralleled hpIgR expression in the respiratory epithelium in vivo and was not increased by escalating dose, so airway penetration was receptor-dependent, not dose-dependent. Thus, this approach provides us with the ability to deliver therapeutics, like antiproteases, specifically to the lumenal surface of the respiratory epithelium, within the airway surface fluid, where it will be in highest concentration at this site. PMID:12615618

  7. Solute carrier transporters as targets for drug delivery and pharmacological intervention for chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2011-09-01

    Many solute carrier transporters that interact with anticancer agents and contribute to their pharmacokinetics have been shown to be differentially upregulated in cancer cells as a result of adaptive response to altered nutritional requirements. This review focuses on pathophysiological function of membrane transporters responsible for the influx of physiological substances including oligopeptides, amino acids, and organic cations and anions, and summarizes the recent knowledge regarding mechanisms in their gene expressions. Broad substrate specificity of enhanced oligopeptide H(+) /peptide cotransporter 1 activity in cancer cells is useful for tumor tissue-specific delivery of chemotherapeutic agents and positron emission tomography diagnostic probes. Amino acid transporters such as LAT1 and ASCT2 are upregulated in human cancer cells and are thought to stimulate tumor growth by regulating mammalian target of rapamycin through nutrient pathway. Especially, LAT1 could be a molecular target to deprive cancer cells of amino acids in combination with aminopeptidase inhibitors. As organic anion transporting polypeptides carry estrone-3-sulfate that is intracellularly hydrolyzed to estrone, their overexpression may provide a pharmacological merit to treat hormone-responsive breast tumors. Therefore, it is important to understand the pathophysiological significance and gene expression in cancer to develop new rationales for drug delivery and pharmacological interventions for chemotherapy. PMID:21630275

  8. Targeted Delivery of PSC-RANTES for HIV-1 Prevention using Biodegradable Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Anthony S.; Cost, Marilyn R.; Sassi, Alexandra B.; Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Rohan, Lisa Cencia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Nanoparticles formulated from the biodegradable co-polymer poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), were investigated as a drug delivery system to enhance tissue uptake, permeation, and targeting for PSC-RANTES anti-HIV-1 activity. Materials and Methods PSC-RANTES nanoparticles formulated via a double emulsion process and characterized in both in vitro and ex vivo systems to determine PSC-RANTES release rate, nanoparticle tissue permeation, and anti-HIV bioactivity. Results Spherical, monodisperse (PDI = 0.098 ± 0.054) PSC-RANTES nanoparticles (d = 256.58 ± 19.57 nm) with an encapsulation efficiency of 82.23 ± 8.35% were manufactured. In vitro release studies demonstrated a controlled release profile of PSC-RANTES (71.48 ± 5.25% release). PSC-RANTES nanoparticle maintained comparable anti-HIV activity with unformulated PSC-RANTES in a HeLa cell-based system with an IC50 of approximately 1pM. In an ex vivo cervical tissue model, PSC-RANTES nanoparticles displayed a fivefold increase in tissue uptake, enhanced tissue permeation, and significant localization at the basal layers of the epithelium over unformulated PSC-RANTES. Conclusions These results indicate that PSC-RANTES can readily be encapsulated into a PLGA nanoparticle drug delivery system, retain its anti-HIV-1 activity, and deliver PSC-RANTES to the target tissue. This is crucial for the success of this drug candidate as a topical microbicide product. PMID:19002569

  9. Self-assembly of morphology-tunable architectures from tetraarylmethane derivatives for targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinhua; Jeong, Young-Il; Moon, Byeong Kyu; Zhang, Lidong; Kang, Dae Hwan; Kim, Il

    2013-03-12

    Tetraarylmethane compounds consisting of two pyrogallol and two aniline units, namely, Ar2CAr'2 {Ar = 3,4,5-C6H2(OH)3 and Ar' = 3,5-R2-4-C6H2NH2 [R = Me (1), iPr (2)]} exhibit excellent self-assembly behavior. Compound 1 yields size-tunable hollow nanospheres (HNSs) with a narrow size distribution, and 2 yields various morphologies ranging from microtubules to microrods via self-assembly induced by hydrogen bonding and ?-? stacking interactions. On the basis of the experimental results, a plausible mechanism for morphology tunability was proposed. As a means of utilizing the self-assembled HNSs for targeting controlled drug delivery, folic acid (FA) and rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) were grafted onto compound 1 to yield the FA-Rh6G-1 complex. The HNSs fabricated with FA-Rh6G-1 showed low cytotoxicity against human embryonic kidney 293T cells and CT26 colon carcinoma cells and good doxorubicin (DOX) loading capacity (9.6 wt %). The FA receptor-mediated endocytosis of FA-Rh6G-1 HNSs examined by using a confocal laser scanning microscope and a flow cytometer revealed that the uptake of FA-Rh6G-1 HNSs into CT26 cells was induced by FA receptor-mediated endocytosis. In vitro drug delivery tests showed that the DOX molecules were released from the resulting HNSs in a sustainable and pH-dependent manner, demonstrating a potential application for HNSs in targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy. PMID:23425332

  10. Novel therapeutic approaches for pulmonary arterial hypertension: Unique molecular targets to site-specific drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Gupta, Vivek

    2015-08-10

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiopulmonary disorder characterized by increased blood pressure in the small arterioles supplying blood to lungs for oxygenation. Advances in understanding of molecular and cellular biology techniques have led to the findings that PAH is indeed a cascade of diseases exploiting multi-faceted complex pathophysiology, with cellular proliferation and vascular remodeling being the key pathogenic events along with several cellular pathways involved. While current therapies for PAH do provide for amelioration of disease symptoms and acute survival benefits, their full therapeutic potential is hindered by patient incompliance and off-target side effects. To overcome the issues related with current therapy and to devise a more selective therapy, various novel pathways are being investigated for PAH treatment. In addition, inability to deliver anti-PAH drugs to the disease site i.e., distal pulmonary arterioles has been one of the major challenges in achieving improved patient outcomes and improved therapeutic efficacy. Several novel carriers have been explored to increase the selectivity of currently approved anti-PAH drugs and to act as suitable carriers for the delivery of investigational drugs. In the present review, we have discussed potential of various novel molecular pathways/targets including RhoA/Rho kinase, tyrosine kinase, endothelial progenitor cells, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and miRNA in PAH therapeutics. We have also discussed various techniques for site-specific drug delivery of anti-PAH therapeutics so as to improve the efficacy of approved and investigational drugs. This review will provide gainful insights into current advances in PAH therapeutics with an emphasis on site-specific drug payload delivery. PMID:26036906

  11. A novel folate-modified self-microemulsifying drug delivery system of curcumin for colon targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Weiwei; Yang, Chunfen; Guo, Hongxia; Yu, Aihua; Ji, Jianbo; Gao, Yan; Sun, Min; Zhai, Guangxi

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and evaluate a folate-modified self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (FSMEDDS) with the aim to improve the solubility of curcumin and its delivery to the colon, facilitating endocytosis of FSMEDDS mediated by folate receptors on colon cancer cells. Methods Ternary phase diagrams were constructed in order to obtain the most efficient self-emulsification region, and the formulation of curcumin-loaded SMEDDS was optimized by a simplex lattice experiment design. Then, three lipophilic folate derivatives (folate-polyethylene glycol-distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine, folate-polyethylene glycol-cholesteryl hemisuccinate, and folate-polyethylene glycol-cholesterol) used as a surfactant were added to curcumin-loaded SMEDDS formulations. An in situ colon perfusion method in rats was used to optimize the formulation of FSMEDDS. Curcumin-loaded FSMEDDS was then filled into colon-targeted capsules and the in vitro release was investigated. Cytotoxicity studies and cellular uptake studies was used in this research. Results The optimal formulation of FSMEDDS obtained with the established in situ colon perfusion method in rats was comprised of 57.5% Cremophor® EL, 32.5% Transcutol® HP, 10% Capryol™ 90, and a small amount of folate-polyethylene glycol-cholesteryl hemisuccinate (the weight ratio of folate materials to Cremophor EL was 1:100). The in vitro release results indicated that the obtained formulation of curcumin could reach the colon efficiently and release the drug immediately. Cellular uptake studies analyzed with fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry indicated that the FSMEDDS formulation could efficiently bind with the folate receptors on the surface of positive folate receptors cell lines. In addition, FSMEDDS showed greater cytotoxicity than SMEDDS in the above two cells. Conclusion FSMEDDS-filled colon-targeted capsules are a potential carrier for colon delivery of curcumin. PMID:22275831

  12. Targeting the neonatal Fc receptor for antigen delivery using engineered Fc fragments1

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Wentao; Wanjie, Sylvia; Lo, Su-Tang; Gan, Zhuo; Pickl-Herk, Beatrix; Ober, Raimund J.; Ward, E. Sally

    2009-01-01

    The development of approaches for antigen delivery to the appropriate subcellular compartments of APCs and the optimization of antigen persistence are both of central relevance for the induction of protective immunity or tolerance. The expression of the Fc receptor, FcRn, in APCs and its localization to the endosomal system suggest that it might serve as a target for antigen delivery using engineered Fc fragment-epitope fusions. The impact of FcRn binding characteristics of an Fc fragment on in vivo persistence allows this property to also be modulated. We have therefore generated recombinant Fc (mouse IgG1-derived) fusions containing the N-terminal epitope of myelin basic protein that is associated with EAE in H-2u mice. The Fc fragments have distinct binding properties for FcRn that result in differences in intracellular trafficking and in vivo half-lives, allowing the impact of these characteristics on CD4+ T cell responses to be evaluated. To dissect the relative roles of FcRn and the ‘classical’ Fc?Rs in antigen delivery, analogous aglycosylated Fc-MBP fusions have been generated. We show that engineered Fc fragments with increased affinities for FcRn at pH 6.0–7.4 are more effective in delivering antigen to FcRn-expressing APCs in vitro relative to their lower affinity counterparts. However, higher affinity of the FcRn-Fc interaction at near neutral pH results in decreased in vivo persistence. The trade-off between improved FcRn targeting efficiency and lower half-life becomes apparent during analyses of T cell proliferative responses in mice, particularly when Fc-MBP fusions with both FcRn and Fc?R binding activity are used. PMID:19017944

  13. Galactosylated chitosan-g-PEI/DNA complexes-loaded poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel as a hepatocyte targeting gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, You-Kyoung; Lee, Sun-Mi; Park, Mi-Ran; Kim, Eun-Mi; Jin, Yong-Mei; Arote, Rohidas; Jeong, Hwan-Jeong; Song, Soo-Chang; Cho, Myung-Haing; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-04-01

    Hydrogels are widely used in drug delivery systems because they can control the release and thereby enhance the efficiency of locally delivered bioactive molecules such as therapeutic drugs, proteins, or genes. For gene delivery, localized release of plasmid DNA or polymer/DNA complexes can transfect cells and produce sustained protein production. We tested the galactosylated chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (GC-g-PEI)/DNA complexes-loaded poly(organophosphazene) thermosensitive biodegradable hydrogel as a hepatocyte targeting gene delivery system. The poly(organophosphazene) hydrogel loaded with GC-g-PEI/DNA complexes showed low cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency than PEI/DNA complexes, as well as good hepatocyte specificity in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that poly(organophosphazene) hydrogels loaded with GC-g-PEI/DNA complexes may be a safe and efficient hepatocyte targeting gene delivery system. PMID:20422364

  14. A Review of Paclitaxel and Novel Formulations Including Those Suitable for Use in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Khanna, C; Rosenberg, M; Vail, D M

    2015-07-01

    Paclitaxel is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent with a broad spectrum of activity against cancers in humans. In 1992, paclitaxel was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as Taxol(®) for use in advanced ovarian cancer. Two years later, it was approved for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Paclitaxel was originally isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, Taxus brevifolia in 1971. Taxanes are a family of microtubule inhibitors. As a member of this family, paclitaxel suppresses spindle microtubule dynamics. This activity results in the blockage of the metaphase-anaphase transitions, and ultimately in the inhibition of mitosis, and induction of apoptosis in a wide spectrum of cancer cells. Additional anticancer activities of paclitaxel have been defined that are independent of these effects on the microtubules and may include the suppression of cell proliferation as well as antiangiogenic effects. Based on its targeting of a fundamental feature of the cancer phenotype, the mitotic complex, it is not surprising that paclitaxel has been found to be active in a wide variety of cancers in humans. This review summarizes the evidence in support of paclitaxel's broad anticancer activity and introduces the rationale for, and the progress in development of novel formulations of paclitaxel that may preferentially target cancers and that are not associated with the risks for hypersensitivity in dogs. Of note, a novel nanoparticle formulation of paclitaxel that substantially limits hypersensitivity was recently given conditional approval by the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine for use in dogs with resectable and nonresectable squamous cell carcinoma and nonresectable stage III, IV and V mammary carcinoma. PMID:26179168

  15. PR_b-targeted delivery of tumor necrosis factor-? by polymersomes for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Döne Demirgöz; Todd O. Pangburn; Kevin P. Davis; Sangwoo Lee; Frank S. Bates; Efrosini Kokkoli

    2009-01-01

    Targeted delivery of therapeutics is an active area of research with cancer being an important target because of the necessity for new and better cancer therapies. In this study we design and assess peptide functionalized polymer vesicles, or polymersomes, self assembled from poly(ethylene oxide)-b- poly(butadiene) (PEO-PBD) diblock copolymers for the treatment of prostate cancer. PR_b, a highly effective a5b1 targeting

  16. The Targeted Delivery of Multicomponent Cargos to Cancer Cells via Nanoporous Particle-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Carlee E.; Carnes, Eric C.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Padilla, David; Durfee, Paul N.; Brown, Page A.; Hanna, Tracey N.; Liu, Juewen; Phillips, Brandy; Carter, Mark B.; Carroll, Nick J.; Jiang, Xingmao; Dunphy, Darren R.; Willman, Cheryl L.; Petsev, Dimiter N.; Evans, Deborah G.; Parikh, Atul N.; Chackerian, Bryce; Wharton, Walker; Peabody, David S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulation of drugs within nanocarriers that selectively target malignant cells promises to mitigate side effects of conventional chemotherapy and to enable delivery of the unique drug combinations needed for personalized medicine. To realize this potential, however, targeted nanocarriers must simultaneously overcome multiple challenges, including specificity, stability, and a high capacity for disparate cargos. Here we report porous nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) that synergistically combine properties of liposomes and nanoporous particles. Protocells modified with a targeting peptide that binds to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) exhibit a 10,000-fold greater affinity for HCC than for hepatocytes, endothelial cells, and immune cells. Furthermore, protocells can be loaded with combinations of therapeutic (drugs, siRNA, and toxins) and diagnostic (quantum dots) agents and modified to promote endosomal escape and nuclear accumulation of selected cargos. The enormous capacity of the high-surface-area nanoporous core combined with the enhanced targeting efficacy enabled by the fluid supported lipid bilayer allow a single protocell loaded with a drug cocktail to kill a drug-resistant HCC cell, representing a 106-fold improvement over comparable liposomes. PMID:21499315

  17. Targeted drug delivery to lymphocytes: a route to site-specific immunomodulation?

    PubMed

    Trevaskis, Natalie L; Charman, William N; Porter, Christopher J H

    2010-12-01

    Lymphocytes are central to the progression of autoimmune disease, transplant rejection, leukemia, lymphoma and lymphocyte-resident viral diseases such as HIV/AIDs. Strategies to target drug treatments to lymphocytes, therefore, represent an opportunity to enhance therapeutic outcomes in disease states where many current treatment regimes are incompletely effective and promote significant toxicities. Here we demonstrate that highly lipophilic drug candidates that preferentially access the intestinal lymphatics after oral administration show significantly enhanced access to lymphocytes leading to improved immunomodulatory activity. When coadministered with such drugs, lipids enhance lymphocyte targeting via a three tiered action: promotion of drug absorption from the gastrointestinal tract, enhancement of lymphatic drug transport and stimulation of lymphocyte recruitment into the lymphatics. This strategy has been exemplified using a highly lipophilic immunosuppressant (JWH015) where coadministration with selected lipids led to significant increases in lymphatic transport, lymphocyte targeting and IL-4 and IL-10 expression in CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes after ex vivo mitogen stimulation. In contrast, administration of a 2.5-fold higher dose of JWH015 in a formulation that did not stimulate lymph transport had no effect on antiinflammatory cytokine levels, in spite of equivalent drug exposure in the blood. The current data suggest that complementary drug design and delivery strategies that combine highly lipophilic, lymphotropic drug candidates with lymph-directing formulations provide enhanced selectivity, potency and therapeutic potential for drug candidates with lymphocyte associated targets. PMID:20958081

  18. Preparation of Quantum Dot/Drug Nanoparticle Formulations for Traceable Targeted Delivery and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ken-Tye; Wang, Yucheng; Roy, Indrajit; Rui, Hu; Swihart, Mark T.; Law, Wing-Cheung; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Ye, Ling; Liu, Jianwei; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Reynolds, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are luminescent nanocrystals with rich surface chemistry and unique optical properties that make them useful as probes or carriers for traceable targeted delivery and therapy applications. QDs can be functionalized to target specific cells or tissues by conjugating them with targeting ligands. Recent advancement in making biocompatible QD formulations has made these nanocrystals suitable for in vivo applications. This review provides an overview of the preparation of QDs and their use as probes or carriers for traceable, targeted therapy of diseases in vitro and in vivo. More specifically, recent advances in the integration of QDs with drug formulations for therapy and their potential toxicity in vitro and in vivo are highlighted. The current findings and challenges for optimizing QD/drug formulations with respect to optimal size and stability, short-term and long-term toxicity, and in vivo applications are described. Lastly, we attempt to predict key trends in QD/drug formulation development over the next few years and highlight areas of therapy where their use may provide breakthrough results in the near future. PMID:22896770

  19. Targeted Drug Delivery with Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Using Acoustically-Activated Nanodroplets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cherry C.; Sheeran, Paul S.; Wu, Shih-Ying; Olumolade, Oluyemi O.; Dayton, Paul A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of systemically administered microbubbles has been shown to locally, transiently and reversibly increase the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), thus allowing targeted delivery of therapeutic agents in the brain for the treatment of central nervous system diseases. Currently, microbubbles are the only agents that have been used to facilitate the FUS-induced BBB opening. However, they are constrained within the intravascular space due to their micron-size diameters, limiting the delivery effect at or near the microvessels. In the present study, acoustically-activated nanodroplets were used as a new class of contrast agents to mediate FUS-induced BBB opening in order to study the feasibility of utilizing these nanoscale phase-shift particles for targeted drug delivery in the brain. Significant dextran delivery was achieved in the mouse hippocampus using nanodroplets at clinically relevant pressures. Passive cavitation detection was used in the attempt to establish a correlation between the amount of dextran delivered in the brain and the acoustic emission recorded during sonication. Conventional microbubbles with the same lipid shell composition and perfluorobutane core as the nanodroplets were also used to compare the efficiency of FUS-induced dextran delivery. It was found that nanodroplets had a higher BBB opening pressure threshold but a lower stable cavitation threshold than microbubbles, suggesting that contrast agent-dependent acoustic emission monitoring was needed. More homogeneous dextran delivery within the targeted hippocampus was achieved using nanodroplets without inducing inertial cavitation or compromising safety. Our results offered a new means of developing the FUS-induced BBB opening technology for potential extravascular targeted drug delivery in the brain, extending the potential drug delivery region beyond the cerebral vasculature. PMID:24096019

  20. Effective gene transfer to solid tumors using different nonviral gene delivery techniques: Electroporation, liposomes, and integrin-targeted vector

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maja Cemazar; Gregor Sersa; John Wilson; Gillian M Tozer; Stephen L Hart; Alenka Grosel; Gabi U Dachs

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we measured transfection efficiency in vitro and in vivo using the following nonviral approaches of gene delivery: injection of plasmid DNA, electroporation-assisted, liposome-enhanced, and integrin-targeted gene delivery, as well as the combination of these methods. Four histologically different tumor models were transfected with a plasmid encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) (B16 mouse melanoma, P22 rat carcinosarcoma,

  1. A comparative study of folate receptor-targeted doxorubicin delivery systems: Dosing regimens and therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Scomparin, Anna; Salmaso, Stefano; Eldar-Boock, Anat; Ben-Shushan, Dikla; Ferber, Shiran; Tiram, Galia; Shmeeda, Hilary; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Leor, Jonathan; Caliceti, Paolo; Gabizon, Alberto; Satchi-Fainaro, Ronit

    2015-06-28

    Ligand-receptor mediated targeting may affect differently the performance of supramolecular drug carriers depending on the nature of the nanocarrier. In this study, we compare the selectivity, safety and activity of doxorubicin (Dox) entrapped in liposomes versus Dox conjugated to polymeric nanocarriers in the presence or absence of a folic acid (FA)-targeting ligand to cancer cells that overexpress the folate receptor (FR). Two pullulan (Pull)-based conjugates of Dox were synthesized, (FA-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox) and (NH2-PEG)-Pull-(Cyst-Dox). The other delivery systems are Dox loaded PEGylated liposomes (PLD, Doxil®) and the FR-targeted version (PLD-FA) obtained by ligand post-insertion into the commercial formulation. Both receptor-targeted drug delivery systems (DDS) were shown to interact in vitro specifically with cells via the folate ligand. Treatment of FR-overexpressing human cervical carcinoma KB tumor-bearing mice with three-weekly injections resulted in slightly enhanced anticancer activity of PLD-FA compared to PLD and no activity for both pullulan-based conjugates. When the DDS were administered intravenously every other day, the folated-Pull conjugate and the non-folated-Pull conjugate displayed similar and low antitumor activity as free Dox. At this dosing regimen, the liposome-based formulations displayed enhanced antitumor activity with an advantage to the non-folated liposome. However, both liposomal formulations suffered from toxicity that was reversible following treatment discontinuation. Using a daily dosing schedule, with higher cumulative dose, the folated-Pull conjugate strongly inhibited tumor growth while free Dox was toxic at this regimen. For polymeric constructs, increasing dose intensity and cumulative dose strongly affects the therapeutic index and reveals a major therapeutic advantage for the FR-targeted formulation. All DDS were able to abrogate doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. This study constitutes the first side-by-side comparison of two receptor-targeted ligand-bearing systems, polymer therapeutics versus nanoparticulate systems, evaluated in the same mouse tumor model at several dosing regimens. PMID:25869964

  2. A folate-integrated magnetic polymer micelle for MRI and dual targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Lijiao; Wang, Bi; Liu, Peng; Huang, Liang; Yue, Caixia; Gao, Duyang; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Wu

    2014-08-01

    This paper devotes a novel micellar structure for cancer theranostics by incorporating magnetic and therapeutic functionalities into a natural sourced targeting polymer vehicle. Heparin-folic acid micelles taking advantage of both excellent loading capability and cancer targeting ability have been employed to simultaneously incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and doxorubicin through an ultrasonication-assisted microemulsion method. In this system, folic acids not only take the responsibility of micelle construction, but also facilitate cellular uptake due to their specific reorganization by MCF-7 cells over-expressing folate receptors. The obtained micelles exhibit good colloidal stability, a high magnetic content, considerable drug loading and sustained in vitro drug release. These clustered SPIONs exhibited high r2 relaxivity (243.65 mM-1 s-1) and further served as efficient probes for MR imaging. Notably, the transport efficiency of these micelles could be significantly improved under an external magnetic field, owing to their quick magnetic response. As a result, the as-proposed micelle shows great potential in multimodal theranostics, including active targeting, MRI diagnosis and drug delivery.This paper devotes a novel micellar structure for cancer theranostics by incorporating magnetic and therapeutic functionalities into a natural sourced targeting polymer vehicle. Heparin-folic acid micelles taking advantage of both excellent loading capability and cancer targeting ability have been employed to simultaneously incorporate superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and doxorubicin through an ultrasonication-assisted microemulsion method. In this system, folic acids not only take the responsibility of micelle construction, but also facilitate cellular uptake due to their specific reorganization by MCF-7 cells over-expressing folate receptors. The obtained micelles exhibit good colloidal stability, a high magnetic content, considerable drug loading and sustained in vitro drug release. These clustered SPIONs exhibited high r2 relaxivity (243.65 mM-1 s-1) and further served as efficient probes for MR imaging. Notably, the transport efficiency of these micelles could be significantly improved under an external magnetic field, owing to their quick magnetic response. As a result, the as-proposed micelle shows great potential in multimodal theranostics, including active targeting, MRI diagnosis and drug delivery. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr02484b

  3. Multifunctional polymer-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for pH-responsive targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermayer, Stefan; Weiss, Veronika; Herrmann, Annika; Schmidt, Alexandra; Datz, Stefan; Müller, Katharina; Wagner, Ernst; Bein, Thomas; Bräuchle, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    A highly stable modular platform, based on the sequential covalent attachment of different functionalities to the surface of core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery is presented. A reversible pH-responsive cap system based on covalently attached poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was developed as drug release mechanism. Our platform offers (i) tuneable interactions and release kinetics with the cargo drug in the mesopores based on chemically orthogonal core-shell design, (ii) an extremely robust and reversible closure and release mechanism based on endosomal acidification of the covalently attached PVP polymer block, (iii) high colloidal stability due to a covalently coupled PEG shell, and (iv) the ability to covalently attach a wide variety of dyes, targeting ligands and other functionalities at the outer periphery of the PEG shell. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in several cell studies, showing pH-triggered release in the endosome, light-triggered endosomal escape with an on-board photosensitizer, and efficient folic acid-based cell targeting.A highly stable modular platform, based on the sequential covalent attachment of different functionalities to the surface of core-shell mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for targeted drug delivery is presented. A reversible pH-responsive cap system based on covalently attached poly(2-vinylpyridine) (PVP) was developed as drug release mechanism. Our platform offers (i) tuneable interactions and release kinetics with the cargo drug in the mesopores based on chemically orthogonal core-shell design, (ii) an extremely robust and reversible closure and release mechanism based on endosomal acidification of the covalently attached PVP polymer block, (iii) high colloidal stability due to a covalently coupled PEG shell, and (iv) the ability to covalently attach a wide variety of dyes, targeting ligands and other functionalities at the outer periphery of the PEG shell. The functionality of the system was demonstrated in several cell studies, showing pH-triggered release in the endosome, light-triggered endosomal escape with an on-board photosensitizer, and efficient folic acid-based cell targeting. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods used for the preparation of the nanoparticles, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, nitrogen sorption isotherms, IR and Raman spectroscopy, in situ release experiments, UV-VIS spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy and in vivo experiments, Fig. S1-S18 including supplementing text. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07245f

  4. Preparation of irinotecan-loaded folate-targeted liposome for tumor targeting delivery and its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ziqiang; Yao, Jing

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo distribution and antitumor activity of irinotecan (camptothecin (CPT)-11)-loaded folate-targeted liposome (F-Lip) in tumor-bearing mice following i.v. administration. Folate-poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (FA-PEG-DSPE) was synthesized by amide reaction of DSPE-PEG-NH(2) and FA. F-Lip modified by FA-PEG-DSPE was prepared by an ammonium sulfate gradient. The mean particle size and entrapment efficiency of F-Lip with negative charge were 197.8 ± 4.58 nm and 91.39 ± 2.34 %, respectively. The distributions of CPT-11 and SN-38 in the tumor after i.v. administration of F-Lip, CPT-11-loaded liposomes (C-Lip), and CPT-11 injection (C-Inj) were far greater with the F-Lip group in comparison to the C-Inj and C-Lip, which might contribute to folate-meditated targeting uptake by the folate receptor on the surface of the tumor cells. The uptake of CPT-11 in the liver and rectum for two liposome groups were all markedly increased as compared to the C-Inj. Moreover, F-Lip exhibited a dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition and superior anticancer activity to C-Lip and C-Inj after i.v. administration. It also showed no significant body weight loss and much lower toxicity on the center immune organs. Therefore, F-Lip may be presented as potential candidates for tumor targeting drug delivery. PMID:22639238

  5. Plasma pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of paclitaxel in CD2F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, J L; Eddington, N D; Leslie, J; MacAuley, C; Sentz, D L; Zuhowski, M; Kujawa, J M; Young, D; Egorin, M J

    1994-01-01

    We defined the pharmacokinetics of paclitaxel after i.v., i.p., p.o., and s.c. administration of 22.5 mg/kg to CD2F1 mice. Additional mice were studied after i.v. bolus dosing at 11.25 mg/kg or 3-h continuous i.v. infusions delivered at 43.24 micrograms kg-1 min-1. Plasma was sampled between 5 min and 40 h after dosing. Brains, hearts, lungs, livers, kidneys, skeletal muscles, and, where applicable, testicles were sampled after i.v. dosing at 22.5 mg/kg. Liquid-liquid extraction followed by isocratic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV detection was used to determine paclitaxel concentrations in plasma and tissues. After i.v. administration to male mice, paclitaxel clearance (CLtb) was 3.25 ml min-1 kg-1 and the terminal half-life (t1/2) was 69 min. After i.v. administration to female mice, paclitaxel CLtb was 4.54 ml min-1 kg-1 and the terminal t1/2 was 43 min. The bioavailability of paclitaxel was approximately 10%, 0, and 0 after i.p., p.o., and s.c. administration, respectively. Paclitaxel bioavailability after i.p. administration was the same when the drug was delivered in a small volume to mimic the delivery method used to evaluate in vivo antitumor efficacy or when it was delivered in a large volume to simulate clinical protocols using i.p. regional therapy. Paclitaxel was not detected in the plasma of mice after i.p. delivery of the drug as a suspension in Klucel: Tween 80. Pharmacokinetic parameters were similar after i.v. delivery of paclitaxel at 22.5 and 11.25 mg/kg; however, the CLtb calculated in these studies was much lower than that associated with 3-h continuous i.v. infusions. After i.v. administration, paclitaxel was distributed extensively to all tissues but the brain and testicle. These data are useful in interpreting preclinical efficacy studies of paclitaxel and predicting human pharmacokinetics through scaling techniques. PMID:7923556

  6. Doxorubicin loaded magnetic gold nanoparticles for in vivo targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Elbialy, Nihal Saad; Fathy, Mohamed Mahmoud; Khalil, Wafaa Mohamed

    2015-07-25

    Treatment of approximately 50% of human cancers includes the use of chemotherapy. The major problem associated with chemotherapy is the inability to deliver pharmaceuticals to specific site of the body without inducing normal tissue toxicity. Latterly, magnetic targeted drug delivery (MTD) has been used to improve the therapeutic performance of the chemotherapeutic agents and reduce the severe side effects associated with the conventional chemotherapy for malignant tumors. In this study, we were focused on designing biocompatible magnetic nanoparticles that can be used as a nanocarrier's candidate for MTD regimen. Magnetic gold nanoparticles (MGNPs) were prepared and functionalized with thiol-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG), then loaded with anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX). The physical properties of the prepared NPs were characterized using different techniques. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the spherical mono-dispersed nature of the prepared MGNPs with size about 22nm. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) assured the existence of both iron and gold elements in the prepared nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy assessment revealed that PEG and DOX molecules were successfully loaded on the MGNPs surfaces, and the amine group of DOX is the active attachment site to MGNPs. In vivo studies proved that magnetic targeted drug delivery can provide a higher accumulation of drug throughout tumor compared with that delivered by passive targeting. This clearly appeared in tumor growth inhibition assessment, biodistribution of DOX in different body organs in addition to the histopathological examinations of treated and untreated Ehrlich carcinoma. To assess the in vivo toxic effect of the prepared formulations, several biochemical parameters such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB), urea, uric acid and creatinine were measured. MTD technology not only minimizes the random distribution of the chemotherapeutic agents, but also reduces their side effects to healthy tissues, which are the two primary concerns in conventional cancer therapies. PMID:25997662

  7. Hepatic Stellate Cell–Targeted Delivery of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Transgene via Bile Duct Infusion Enhances Its Expression at Fibrotic Foci to Regress Dimethylnitrosamine-Induced Liver Fibrosis

    E-print Network

    Narmada, Balakrishnan Chakrapani

    Liver fibrosis generates fibrotic foci with abundant activated hepatic stellate cells and excessive collagen deposition juxtaposed with healthy regions. Targeted delivery of antifibrotic therapeutics to hepatic stellate ...

  8. Localized increase of tissue oxygen tension by magnetic targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liong, Celine; Ortiz, Daniel; Ao-ieong, Eilleen; Navati, Mahantesh S.; Friedman, Joel M.; Cabrales, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    Hypoxia is the major hindrance to successful radiation therapy of tumors. Attempts to increase the oxygen (O2) tension (PO2) of tissue by delivering more O2 have been clinically disappointing, largely due to the way O2 is transported and released by the hemoglobin (Hb) within the red blood cells (RBCs). Systemic manipulation of O2 transport increases vascular resistance due to metabolic autoregulation of blood flow to prevent over oxygenation. This study investigates a new technology to increase O2 delivery to a target tissue by decreasing the Hb-O2 affinity of the blood circulating within the targeted tissue. As the Hb-O2 affinity decreases, the tissue PO2 to satisfy tissue O2 metabolic needs increases without increasing O2 delivery or extraction. Paramagnetic nanoparticles (PMNPs), synthetized using gadolinium oxide, were coated with the cell permeable Hb allosteric effector L35 (3,5-trichlorophenylureido-phenoxy-methylpropionic acid). L35 decreases Hb affinity for O2 and favors the release of O2. The L35-coated PMNPs (L35-PMNPs) were intravenously infused (10 mg kg-1) to hamsters instrumented with the dorsal window chamber model. A magnetic field of 3 mT was applied to localize the effects of the L35-PMNPs to the window chamber. Systemic O2 transport characteristics and microvascular tissue oxygenation were measured after administration of L35-PMNPs with and without magnetic field. The tissue PO2 in untreated control animals was 25.2 mmHg. L35-PMNPs without magnetic field decreased tissue PO2 to 23.4 mmHg, increased blood pressure, and reduced blood flow, largely due to systemic modification of Hb-O2 affinity. L35-PMNPs with magnetic field increased tissue PO2 to 27.9 mmHg, without systemic or microhemodynamic changes. These results indicate that localized modification of Hb-O2 affinity can increase PO2 of target tissue without affecting systemic O2 delivery or triggering O2 autoregulation mechanisms. This technology can be used to treat local hypoxia and to increase O2 in tumors, enhancing the efficacy of radiation therapies.

  9. Photoactive metal carbonyl complexes as potential agents for targeted CO delivery.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Margarita A; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2014-04-01

    The surprising discovery of carbon monoxide (CO) as a signaling molecule in mammalian physiology has recently raised interest in this toxic gas among researchers in biochemical and pharmaceutical community. CO is endogenously produced mainly from catabolism of heme by the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO) and participates in a myriad of anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, and vasoregulatory pathways. In animal models, low doses of CO have exhibited beneficial effects in suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. The salutary effects of CO have naturally drawn attention of the pharmaceutical industry for its use as a cytoprotective agent. Safety-related concerns of the use of this noxious gas have prompted research in the area of syntheses of CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) and to date, several metal carbonyls (metal complexes of CO) have been employed as CORMs in promoting prolonged (and safe) delivery of low doses of CO to cellular targets. Because many carbonyl complexes release CO upon illumination, investigators have recently began to explore the possibility of "controlled CO delivery" through the use of light. During the past few years, a number of photoactive CORMs or "photoCORMs" have been synthesized that release CO upon illumination with UV or visible light. The utility of these photoCORMs in CO delivery has also been confirmed. Novel design principles for isolation of photoCORMs have started to appear in recent reports. Scrutiny of the literature reveals the emergence of a new exciting area of drug development in such efforts. The potential of photoCORMs as CO-donating pharmaceuticals along with a brief overview of the physiological roles of CO is presented in this review. PMID:24287103

  10. Target delivery and cell imaging using hyaluronic acid-functionalized graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Abdullah-Al-Nahain; Lee, Jung-Eun; In, Insik; Lee, Haeshin; Lee, Kang Dae; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Park, Sung Young

    2013-10-01

    This work demonstrates the way to achieve efficient and target specific delivery of a graphene quantum dot (GQD) using hyaluronic acid (HA) (GQD-HA) as a targeting agent. HA has been anchored to a GQD that accepts the fascinating adhesive properties of the catechol moiety, dopamine hydrochloride, conjugated to HA, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a particle size of ?20 nm, and the fluorescence spectra revealed significant fluorescence intensity even after the anchoring of HA. The prepared GQD-HA was applied to CD44 receptor overexpressed tumor-bearing balb/c female mice, and the in vivo biodistribution investigation demonstrated more bright fluorescence from the tumor tissue. In vitro cellular imaging, via a confocal laser scanning microscope, exhibited strong fluorescence from CD44 overexpressed A549 cells. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed the effectiveness of using HA as targeting molecule. The loading and release kinetics of the hydrophobic drug doxorubicin from a GQD under mildly acidic conditions showed that a GQD can be considered as a novel drug carrier, while the nontoxic behavior from the MTT assay strongly supports the identification of GQD-HA as a biocompatible material. PMID:24007260

  11. Delivery and subcellular targeting of dendrimer-based fluorescent pH sensors in living cells.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, Lorenzo; Storti, Barbara; Marchetti, Laura; Beltram, Fabio

    2010-12-29

    Synthesis and targeted delivery of dendrimer-based fluorescent biosensors in living HeLa cells are reported. Following electroporation dendrimers are shown to display specific subcellular localization depending on their size and surface charge and this property is preserved when they are functionalized with sensing moieties. We analyze the case of double dendrimer conjugation with pH-sensitive and pH-insensitive molecules leading to the realization of ratiometric pH sensors that are calibrated in vitro and in living cells. By tuning the physicochemical properties of the dendrimer scaffold sensors can be targeted to specific cellular compartments allowing selective pH measurements in different organelles in living cells. In order to demonstrate the modularity of this approach we present three different pH sensors with tuned H(+) affinity by appropriately choosing the pH-sensitive dye. We argue that the present methodology represents a general approach toward the realization of targetable ratiometric sensors suitable to monitor biologically relevant ions or molecules in living cells. PMID:21141854

  12. In Vivo Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging for Targeted Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Kevin; Gaind, Vaibhav; Tsai, Hsiaorho; Bentz, Brian; Chelvam, Venkatesh; Low, Philip

    2012-02-01

    We describe an approach for the evaluation of targeted anti-cancer drug delivery in vivo. The method emulates the drug release and activation process through acceptor release from a targeted donor-acceptor pair that exhibits fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). In this case, folate targeting of the cancer cells is used - 40 % of all human cancers, including ovarian, lung, breast, kidney, brain and colon cancer, over-express folate receptors. We demonstrate the reconstruction of the spatially-dependent FRET parameters in a mouse model and in tissue phantoms. The FRET parameterization is incorporated into a source for a diffusion equation model for photon transport in tissue, in a variant of optical diffusion tomography (ODT) called FRET-ODT. In addition to the spatially-dependent tissue parameters in the diffusion model (absorption and diffusion coefficients), the FRET parameters (donor-acceptor distance and yield) are imaged as a function of position. Modulated light measurements are made with various laser excitation positions and a gated camera. More generally, our method provides a new vehicle for studying disease at the molecular level by imaging FRET parameters in deep tissue, and allows the nanometer FRET ruler to be utilized in deep tissue.

  13. Folic-Acid-Targeted Self-Assembling Supramolecular Carrier for Gene Delivery.

    PubMed

    Liao, Rongqiang; Yi, Shouhui; Liu, Manshuo; Jin, Wenling; Yang, Bo

    2015-07-27

    A targeting gene carrier for cancer-specific delivery was successfully developed through a "multilayer bricks-mortar" strategy. The gene carrier was composed of adamantane-functionalized folic acid (FA-AD), an adamantane-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) derivative (PEG-AD), and ?-cyclodextrin-grafted low-molecular-weight branched polyethylenimine (PEI-CD). Carriers produced by two different self-assembly schemes, involving either precomplexation of the PEI-CD with the FA-AD and PEG-AD before pDNA condensation (Method A) or pDNA condensation with the PEI-CD prior to addition of the FA-AD and PEG-AD to engage host-guest complexation (Method B) were investigated for their ability to compact pDNA into nanoparticles. Cell viability studies show that the material produced by the Method A assembly scheme has lower cytotoxicity than branched PEI 25 kDa (PEI-25KD) and that the transfection efficiency is maintained. These findings suggest that the gene carrier, based on multivalent host-guest interactions, could be an effective, targeted, and low-toxicity carrier for delivering nucleic acid to target cells. PMID:26032689

  14. Using ultrasound to steer ultrasound contrast agents: Implications for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Alicia; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Ultrasound can be used to manipulate ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), micron-sized bubbles used in ultrasound imaging to increase image contrast. The Bjerknes force, resulting from the lagged response of the microbubbles to the oscillatory ultrasound pressure field, can be utilized to steer the microbubbles to a targeted area in the vasculature, with the microbubbles serving as drug delivery vectors and injectors. The response of microbubbles to ultrasound in a sheared flow has shown a complex coupling of ultrasound-induced volume oscillations with hydrodynamic forces: Saffman lift and the Bjerknes force. In this work, the relative influence of these two forces acting in the across-streamlines direction is determined as a function of the Reynolds and Womersley and the excitation to bubble natural frequency ratio. We use in-vitro experiments to study the behavior of microbubbles in physiologically-realistic pulsatile flows. Quantitative information about microbubble trajectories in physiological conditions is necessary to develop models in order to control ultrasound steering of bubble-based drug delivery vectors in the human vasculature.

  15. Mannosylated Chitosan Nanoparticles for Delivery of Antisense Oligonucleotides for Macrophage Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Asthana, Abhay; Kohli, Dharm Veer; Vyas, Suresh Prasad

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of antisense oligonucleotides (ASODN) is primarily dependent upon its safe and efficient delivery to specific cells overcoming degradation and maximizing cellular uptake in vivo. The present study focuses on designing mannosylated low molecular weight (LMW) chitosan nanoconstructs for safe ODNs delivery by macrophage targeting. Mannose groups were coupled with LMW chitosan and characterized spectroscopically. Mannosylated chitosan ODN nanoparticles (MCHODN NPs) were formulated by self-assembled method using various N/P ratio (moles of amine groups of MCH to phosphate moieties of ODNs) and characterized for gel retardation assay, physicochemical characteristics, cytotoxicity and transfection efficiency, and antisense assay. Complete complexation of MCH/ODN was achieved at charge ratio of 1:1 and above. On increasing the N/P ratio of MCH/ODN, particle size of the NPs decreased whereas zeta potential (ZV) increased. MCHODN NPs displayed much higher transfection efficiency into Raw 264.7 cells (bears mannose receptors) than Hela cells and no significant toxicity was observed at all MCH concentrations. Antisense assay revealed that reduction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced serum TNF-? is due to antisense activity of TJU-2755 ODN (sequence complementary to 3?-UTR of TNF-?). These results suggest that MCHODN NPs are acceptable choice to improve transfection efficiency in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25057492

  16. Targeting Anticancer Drug Delivery to Pancreatic Cancer Cells Using a Fucose-Bound Nanoparticle Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Makoto; Takimoto, Rishu; Murase, Kazuyuki; Sato, Yasushi; Hirakawa, Masahiro; Tamura, Fumito; Sato, Tsutomu; Iyama, Satoshi; Osuga, Takahiro; Miyanishi, Koji; Takada, Kohichi; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Kobune, Masayoshi; Kato, Junji

    2012-01-01

    Owing to its aggressiveness and the lack of effective therapies, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a dismal prognosis. New strategies to improve treatment and survival are therefore urgently required. Numerous fucosylated antigens in sera serve as tumor markers for cancer detection and evaluation of treatment efficacy. Increased expression of fucosyltransferases has also been reported for pancreatic cancer. These enzymes accelerate malignant transformation through fucosylation of sialylated precursors, suggesting a crucial requirement for fucose by pancreatic cancer cells. With this in mind, we developed fucose-bound nanoparticles as vehicles for delivery of anticancer drugs specifically to cancer cells. L-fucose-bound liposomes containing Cy5.5 or Cisplatin were effectively delivered into CA19-9 expressing pancreatic cancer cells. Excess L-fucose decreased the efficiency of Cy5.5 introduction by L-fucose-bound liposomes, suggesting L-fucose-receptor-mediated delivery. Intravenously injected L-fucose-bound liposomes carrying Cisplatin were successfully delivered to pancreatic cancer cells, mediating efficient tumor growth inhibition as well as prolonging survival in mouse xenograft models. This modality represents a new strategy for pancreatic cancer cell-targeting therapy. PMID:22808043

  17. Targeted Drug Delivery to Intestinal Macrophages by Bioactive Nanovesicles Released from Grapefruit

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baomei; Zhuang, Xiaoying; Deng, Zhong-Bin; Jiang, Hong; Mu, Jingyao; Wang, Qilong; Xiang, Xiaoyu; Guo, Haixun; Zhang, Lifeng; Dryden, Gerald; Yan, Jun; Miller, Donald; Zhang, Huang-Ge

    2014-01-01

    The gut mucosal immune system is considered to play an important role in counteracting potential adverse effects of food-derived antigens including nanovesicles. Whether nanovesicles naturally released from edible fruit work in a coordinated manner with gut immune cells to maintain the gut in a noninflammatory status is not known. Here, as proof of concept, we demonstrate that grapefruit-derived nanovesicles (GDNs) are selectively taken up by intestinal macrophages and ameliorate dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced mouse colitis. These effects were mediated by upregulating the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and inhibiting the production of IL-1? and TNF-? in intestinal macrophages. The inherent biocompatibility and biodegradability, stability at wide ranges of pH values, and targeting of intestinal macrophages led us to further develop a novel GDN-based oral delivery system. Incorporating methotrexate (MTX), an anti-inflammatory drug, into GDNs and delivering the MTX-GDNs to mice significantly lowered the MTX toxicity when compared with free MTX, and remarkably increased its therapeutic effects in DSS-induced mouse colitis. These findings demonstrate that GDNs can serve as immune modulators in the intestine, maintain intestinal macrophage homeostasis, and can be developed for oral delivery of small molecule drugs to attenuate inflammatory responses in human disease. PMID:23939022

  18. Liposomes co-modified with cholesterol anchored cleavable PEG and octaarginines for tumor targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jie; Fu, Han; Kuang, Qifang; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Qianyu; Liu, Yayuan; Ran, Rui; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2014-05-01

    Tumor targeted drug delivery system with high efficiency of tumor accumulation, cell internalization and endosomal escape was considered ideal for cancer therapy. Herein, a cleavable polyethylene glycol (PEG) and octaarginines (R8) co-modified liposome (CL-R8-LP) was developed, in which the cholesterol was used as an alternative anchor to the commonest phospholipids for the diversified development of surface modification. The in vitro hemolysis assay and bio-distribution study demonstrated that CL-R8-LP improved biocompatibility and tumor accumulation compared with the single R8 modified liposomes (R8-LP), since the strong positive charges, toxicity and non-specificity of R8 were efficiently shielded by the outer cleavable PEG. And the cellular uptake, cytotoxicity and apoptosis of CL-R8-LP on C26 cells were much stronger than that of control liposomes in which R8 was not included or exposed. In addition, it was confirmed that CL-R8-LP entered cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis and the macropinocytosis, and followed by a more efficient endosomal escape compared with R8-LP due to the topology change of R8. The enhanced in vivo delivery efficiency and anti-tumor efficacy were validated in C26 bearing mice. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that CL-R8-LP was a promising vehicle for enhancing the chemotherapy of solid cancers. PMID:24404866

  19. Systemic delivery of small interfering RNA by use of targeted polycation liposomes for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kenjo, Eriya; Asai, Tomohiro; Yonenaga, Norihito; Ando, Hidenori; Ishii, Takayuki; Hatanaka, Kentaro; Shimizu, Kosuke; Urita, Yugo; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Tsukada, Hideo; Oku, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Novel polycation liposomes decorated with cyclic(Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe) peptide (cyclicRGD)-polyethylene glycol (PEG) (RGD-PEG-polycation liposomes (PCL)) were previously developed for cancer therapy based on RNA interference. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to tumors by use of RGD-PEG-PCL in B16F10 melanoma-bearing mice. Pharmacokinetic data obtained by positron emission tomography showed that cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in RGD-PEG-PCL markedly accumulated in the tumors. Delivered by RGD-PEG-PCL, a therapeutic cocktail of siRNAs composed of cholesterol-conjugated siRNAs for c-myc, MDM2, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were able to significantly inhibit the growth of B16F10 melanoma both in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that targeted delivery of siRNAs by use of RGD-PEG-PCL has considerable potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23370357

  20. Targeted drug delivery across the blood–brain barrier using ultrasound technique

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Cheri X

    2011-01-01

    Effective delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain can greatly improve the treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Application of focused ultrasound facilitated by microbubbles has shown the potential to deliver drugs across the blood–brain barrier into targeted sites within the brain noninvasively. This review provides a summary of the technological background and principle, highlights of recent significant developments and research progress, as well as a critical commentary on the challenges and future directions in the field. This review also outlines and discusses the tasks that researchers face in order to successfully translate the technology into a clinical reality, including obtaining improved understanding of the mechanisms, demonstration of therapeutic efficacy and safety for specific applications, and development of methodology for rational design to achieve optimized and consistent outcome. PMID:21785679

  1. Magnetic Microbubbles: Magnetically Targeted and Ultrasound-Triggered Vectors for Gene Delivery in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaskou, Dialechti; Pradhan, Pallab; Bergemann, Christian; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Hensel, Karin; Schmitz, Georg; Plank, Christian; Mykhaylyk, Olga

    2010-12-01

    Based on the concept of magnetofection, we prepared lipid shell microbubbles loaded with highly positively charged iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles through electrostatic and matrix affinity interactions. These magnetic microbubbles showed strong ultrasound contrast. When the magnetic microbubbles were mixed with plasmid DNA encoding a reporter gene, gene delivery to HeLa cells was achieved only when ultrasound was applied. Gene transfer efficiency strongly depended on the application of a gradient magnetic field. Treatment of HeLa cells with the microbubbles and ultrasound resulted in strong concentration-dependent cytotoxic effects, whereas ultrasound alone, lipid microbubbles alone, magnetic nanoparticles or magnetic microbubbles alone did not significantly affect cell viability. These magnetic microbubbles could be used as magnetically targeted diagnostic agents for real-time ultrasound imaging or for cancer therapy, therapy of vascular thrombosis and gene therapy.

  2. Modification of drug delivery to improve antibiotic targeting to the stomach.

    PubMed

    Adebisi, Adeola O; Conway, Barbara R

    2015-07-01

    The obstacles to the successful eradication of Helicobacter pylori infections include the presence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and therapy requiring multiple drugs with complicated dosing schedules. Other obstacles include bacterial residence in an environment where high antibiotic concentrations are difficult to achieve. Biofilm production by the bacteria is an additional challenge to the effective treatment of this infection. Conventional oral formulations used in the treatment of this infection have a short gastric residence time, thus limiting the duration of exposure of drug to the bacteria. This review summarizes the current research in the development of gastroretentive formulations and the prospective future applications of this approach in the targeted delivery of drugs such as antibiotics to the stomach. PMID:26149788

  3. Synthesis and evaluation of clickable block copolymers for targeted nanoparticle drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyan; Chan, Kiat Hwa; Prud'homme, Robert K; Link, A James

    2012-08-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles with multifunctional capabilities, including surface functionalization, hold great promise to address challenges in targeted drug delivery. Here, we describe a concise, robust synthesis of a heterofunctional polyethylene glycol (PEG), HO-PEG-azide. This macromer was used to synthesize polylactide (PLA)-PEG-azide, a functional diblock copolymer. Rapid precipitation of this copolymer with a hydrophobic cargo resulted in the generation of monodisperse nanoparticles with azides in the surface corona. To demonstrate conjugation to these nanoparticles, a regioselectively modified alkyne-folate was employed as a model small molecule ligand, and the artificial protein A1 with an alkyne moiety introduced by unnatural amino acid substitution was selected as a model macromolecular ligand. Using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne ligation reaction, both ligands exhibited good conjugation efficiency even when low concentrations of ligands were used. PMID:22734614

  4. Targeted delivery of curcumin to tumors via PEG-derivatized FTS-based micellar system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yichao; Zhang, Xiaolan; Lu, Jianqin; Huang, Yixian; Li, Jiang; Li, Song

    2014-05-01

    Curcumin and S-trans, trans-farnesylthiosalicylic acid (FTS) are two promising anticancer agents. In this study, we demonstrated that the two agents exerted significant synergy in antitumor activity in various types of cancer cells with combination indices ranging from 0.46 to 0.98 (a value of less than unity indicates synergism). We have further shown that synergistic-targeted co-delivery of the two agents can be achieved via formulating curcumin in polyethylene glycol (PEG)-derivatized FTS-based nanomicellar system. Curcumin formulated in PEG-FTS micelles had small size of around 20 nm. The nanomicellar curcumin demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity towards several cancer cell lines in vitro. Intravenous application of curcumin-loaded micelle (20 mg kg(-1) curcumin) led to a significantly more effective inhibition of tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model (4T1.2) than curcumin formulated in Cremophor/EL (P?

  5. Targeted liposome-loaded microbubbles for cell-specific ultrasound-triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Geers, Bart; De Wever, Olivier; Demeester, Joseph; Bracke, Marc; De Smedt, Stefaan C; Lentacker, Ine

    2013-12-01

    One of the main problems in cancer treatment is disease relapse through metastatic colonization, which is caused by circulating tumor cells (CTCs). This work reports on liposome-loaded microbubbles targeted to N-cadherin, a cell-cell adhesion molecule expressed by CTCs. It is shown that such microbubbles can indeed bind to N-cadherin at the surface of HMB2 cells. Interestingly, in a mixture of cells with and without N-cadherin expression, binding of the liposome-loaded microbubbles mainly occurs to the N-cadherin-expressing cells. Importantly, applying ultrasound results in the intracellular delivery of a model drug (loaded in the liposomes) in the N-cadherin-expressing cells only. As described in this paper, such liposome-loaded microbubbles may find application as theranostics and in devices aimed for the specific killing of CTCs in blood. PMID:23737360

  6. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is capable of targeting diseased tissue and preventing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in both in vitro and ex vivo models.

  7. Polyaptamer DNA nanothread-anchored, reduced graphene oxide nanosheets for targeted delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Park, Joo Yeon; Miao, Wenjun; Lee, Jaiwoo; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets anchoring receptor-specific polyaptamer nanothreads for targeted drug delivery. DNA polyaptamer nanothreads of protein tyrosine kinase 7 receptor (PTK7) were synthesized by rolling cycle amplification. To strengthen the anchoring of polyaptamer nanothreads onto rGO, oligoT bridge domain was introduced between each repeating PTK7 aptamer sequence. As compared to PTK7 polyaptamer nanothreads alone, PTK7 polyaptamer nanothreads with 22-mer oligoT bridges (PNT) showed higher anchoring capacity onto rGO nanosheets. Nanothread-coated surface morphology of PNTrGO was observed. Coating of PNT did not affect the sizes of rGO, but reduced the zeta potential. In PTK7-negative Ramos cells, the uptake of PNT-anchored rGO (PNTrGO) did not differ from that of oligoT-bridged scrambled polyaptamer-anchored rGO (SNTrGO). However, in CCRF-CEM leukemia cells overexpressing PTK7, the uptake of PNTrGO was 2.1-fold higher than that of SNTrGO after 15 min pulse. In vivo distribution to CCRF-CEM tumor tissues was 2.8-fold higher in PNTrGO than in SNTrGO at 48 h post-injection. In CCRF-CEM xenografted mice, intravenously administered doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded PNTrGO showed the higher antitumor activity than other groups, reducing the tumor weight down to 12% of tumor weights of untreated mice. These results suggest the potential of PNTrGO for target-specific drug delivery nanoplatform. PMID:25701038

  8. Combination of antibody targeting and PTD-mediated intracellular toxin delivery for colorectal cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Moon, Cheol; Balthasar, Joseph P; Yang, Victor C

    2014-11-28

    The bottlenecks of current chemotherapy in the treatment of colorectal cancer lie in the ineffectiveness of the existing anti-cancer small molecule drugs as well as the dose-limiting toxicity caused by the nonselective action on normal tissues by such drugs. To address these problems, we introduce a novel therapeutic strategy based on tumor targeting using a non-internalizing anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and intracellular delivery of the extremely potent yet cell-impermeable protein toxin gelonin via the aid of a cell-penetrating peptide (also termed as protein transduction domain; PTD). A chimeric TAT-gelonin fusion protein was genetically engineered, and it displayed remarkably enhanced anti-cancer activity against human colorectal cancer cells, with IC50 values being several orders of magnitude lower than the unmodified gelonin. On the other hand, a chemically synthesized conjugate of heparin and a murine anti-CEA mAb, T84.66 (termed T84.66-Hep) was found able to bind highly specifically to CEA over-expressing LS174T colorectal cancer cells. When mixing together, TAT-gelonin and T84.66-Hep could associate tightly and automatically through an electrostatic interaction between the cationic TAT and anionic heparin. In preliminary in vivo studies using LS174T s.c. xenograft tumor bearing mouse, selective and significantly augmented (58-fold) delivery of TAT-gelonin to the tumor target was observed, when compared with administration of TAT-gelonin alone. More importantly, efficacy studies also revealed that only the TAT-gelonin/T84.66-Hep complex yielded a significant inhibition of tumor growth (46%) without causing gelonin-induced systemic toxicity. Overall, this study suggested a generic strategy to effectively yet safely deliver potent PTD-modified protein toxins to the tumor. PMID:25204286

  9. The development and maintenance of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain require activation of the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor subtype 1.

    PubMed

    Janes, Kali; Little, Joshua W; Li, Chao; Bryant, Leesa; Chen, Collin; Chen, Zhoumou; Kamocki, Krzysztof; Doyle, Timothy; Snider, Ashley; Esposito, Emanuela; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Bieberich, Erhard; Obeid, Lina; Petrache, Irina; Nicol, Grant; Neumann, William L; Salvemini, Daniela

    2014-07-25

    The ceramide-sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) rheostat is important in regulating cell fate. Several chemotherapeutic agents, including paclitaxel (Taxol), involve pro-apoptotic ceramide in their anticancer effects. The ceramide-to-S1P pathway is also implicated in the development of pain, raising the intriguing possibility that these sphingolipids may contribute to chemotherapy- induced painful peripheral neuropathy, which can be a critical dose-limiting side effect of many widely used chemotherapeutic agents.We demonstrate that the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain was associated with ceramide and S1P formation in the spinal dorsal horn that corresponded with the engagement of S1P receptor subtype 1 (S1PR(1))- dependent neuroinflammatory processes as follows: activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors (NF?B) and MAPKs (ERK and p38) as well as enhanced formation of pro-inflammatory and neuroexcitatory cytokines (TNF-? and IL-1?). Intrathecal delivery of the S1PR1 antagonist W146 reduced these neuroinflammatory processes but increased IL-10 and IL-4, potent anti-inflammatory/ neuroprotective cytokines. Additionally, spinal W146 reversed established neuropathic pain. Noteworthy, systemic administration of the S1PR1 modulator FTY720 (Food and Drug Administration- approved for multiple sclerosis) attenuated the activation of these neuroinflammatory processes and abrogated neuropathic pain without altering anticancer properties of paclitaxel and with beneficial effects extended to oxaliplatin. Similar effects were observed with other structurally and chemically unrelated S1PR1 modulators (ponesimod and CYM-5442) and S1PR1 antagonists (NIBR-14/15) but not S1PR1 agonists (SEW2871). Our findings identify for the first time the S1P/S1PR1 axis as a promising molecular and therapeutic target in chemotherapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy, establish a mechanistic insight into the biomolecular signaling pathways, and provide the rationale for the clinical evaluation of FTY720 in chronic pain patients. PMID:24876379

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging-visible and pH-sensitive polymeric micelles for tumor targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zuoquan; Sun, Qiquan; Zhong, Jinglian; Yang, Qihua; Li, Hao; Du, Cheng; Liang, Biling; Shuai, Xintao

    2014-02-01

    Folate-functionalized copolymers of poly(ethylene glycol) and 2-(diisopropylamino) ethylamine grafted poly(L-aspartic acid) are synthesized. The copolymers can self-assemble into nanoscaled micelles encapsulated with hydrophobic model drug Fluorescein Diacetate (FDA) and MRI diagnostic agents superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in aqueous solution of a neutral pH resembling physiological environment, whereas disassemble in acidic endosomal/lysosomal compartments of tumor cells to achieve rapid drug release. In vitro drug release study showed that FDA release from the pH-sensitive micelles was much faster at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.4. Clustering of SPIONs inside the hydrophobic core of the micelles resulted in a high spin-spin (T2,) relaxivity for a super MRI sensitivity. Cell culture studies showed that the FDA-SPION-loaded micelles were effectively internalized by human hepatic Bel-7402 cancer cells following a folate receptor-mediated targeting mechanism, and then FDA was rapidly release from micelles inside lysosomal compartments. Micelles encapsulating paclitaxel (PTX) studies showed it can induce more effective cell toxicity. This study demonstrated the great potential of the pH-sensitive micelles as an effective multifunctional nanomedician platform for cancer therapy due to their active tumor targeting, pH-triggered drug release and ultrasensitive MRI responsiveness. PMID:24738330

  11. Locally targeted delivery of a micron-size radiation therapy source using temperature-sensitive hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y; Seol, DR; Mohapatra, S; Sunderland, JJ; Schultz, MK; Domann, FE; Lim, TH

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To propose a novel radiotherapy (RT) delivery modality—locally targeted delivery of micro-size level RT sources using temperature-sensitive hydroGEL (RT-GEL) as an injectable vehicle. Methods and Materials Hydrogel is a water-like liquid at room temperature but gels at body temperature. Two FDA-approved polymers were synthesized. Indium-111 (In-111) was used as a radioactive RT-GEL source. The release characteristics of In-111 from polymerized RT-GEL were evaluated. The injectability and efficacy of RT-GEL delivery to human breast tumor were tested using animal models with control datasets of RT-Saline injection. As proof-of-concept studies, a total of 6 nude mice were tested by injecting 4 million tumor cells into their upper backs after a week of acclimatization. Three mice were injected with RT-GEL and three with RT-Saline. A SPECT and a CT scan were performed on each mouse at 0, 24, and 48 hours after injection. The efficacy of RT-GEL over the control datasets was determined by measuring kidney In-111 accumulation (mean nCi/cc), representing the distant diffusion of In-111. Results RT-GEL was successfully injected to the tumor using 30-gauge needles. No difficulties due to polymerization of hydrogel during injection and intratumoral pressure were observed during RT-GEL injection. No back flow occurred for either RT-GEL or RT-Saline. The residual tumor activities of In-111 were 49% (44%) at 24 hours (48 hour) for RT-GEL and 29% (22%) for RT-Saline. SPECT-CT fused images of RT-Saline show considerable kidney accumulation of In-111 (2,886%, 261% and 262% of RT-GEL at the 0, 24 and 48 hour marks, respectively). Conclusion RT-GEL was successfully injected and showed much higher residual tumor activity 170% (200%) than that of RT-Saline 24 hour (48 hour) after injection with a minimal accumulation of In-111 to the kidneys. The preliminary data of RT-GEL as a delivery modality of a radiation source to a local tumor is promising. PMID:24495593

  12. GEN | News Highlights: Scientists Develop High-Capacity Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery of Drug Cocktails http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/scientists-develop-high-capacity-nanoparticles-for-targeted-delivery-of-drug-cocktails/81245016/[4/

    E-print Network

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    GEN | News Highlights: Scientists Develop High-Capacity Nanoparticles for Targeted Delivery of Drug Cocktails http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/scientists-develop NEWS Blogs Podcasts Webinars Videos New Products Best of the Web Events Jobs Polls App Notes GEN

  13. Modular nanotransporters: a multipurpose in vivo working platform for targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Slastnikova, Tatiana A; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Gulak, Pavel V; Schiffelers, Raymond M; Lupanova, Tatiana N; Khramtsov, Yuri V; Zalutsky, Michael R; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2012-01-01

    Background Modular nanotransporters (MNT) are recombinant multifunctional polypeptides created to exploit a cascade of cellular processes, initiated with membrane receptor recognition to deliver selective short-range and highly cytotoxic therapeutics to the cell nucleus. This research was designed for in vivo concept testing for this drug delivery platform using two modular nanotransporters, one targeted to the ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?MSH) receptor overexpressed on melanoma cells and the other to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor overexpressed on several cancers, including glioblastoma, and head-and-neck and breast carcinoma cells. Methods In vivo targeting of the modular nanotransporter was determined by immuno-fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy and by accumulation of 125I-labeled modular nanotransporters. The in vivo therapeutic effects of the modular nanotransporters were assessed by photodynamic therapy studies, given that the cytotoxicity of photosensitizers is critically dependent on their delivery to the cell nucleus. Results Immunohistochemical analyses of tumor and neighboring normal tissues of mice injected with multifunctional nanotransporters demonstrated preferential uptake in tumor tissue, particularly in cell nuclei. With 125I-labeled MNT{?MSH}, optimal tumor:muscle and tumor:skin ratios of 8:1 and 9.8:1, respectively, were observed 3 hours after injection in B16-F1 melanoma-bearing mice. Treatment with bacteriochlorin p-MNT{?MSH} yielded 89%–98% tumor growth inhibition and a two-fold increase in survival for mice with B16-F1 and Cloudman S91 melanomas. Likewise, treatment of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma-bearing mice with chlorin e6- MNT{EGF} resulted in 94% tumor growth inhibition compared with free chlorin e6, with 75% of animals surviving at 3 months compared with 0% and 20% for untreated and free chlorin e6-treated groups, respectively. Conclusion The multifunctional nanotransporter approach provides a new in vivo functional platform for drug development that could, in principle, be applicable to any combination of cell surface receptor and agent (photosensitizers, oligonucleotides, radionuclides) requiring nuclear delivery to achieve maximum effectiveness. PMID:22346349

  14. Intelligently Targeted Drug Delivery and Enhanced Antitumor Effect by Gelatinase-Responsive Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rutian; Wu, Wei; Liu, Qin; Wu, Puyuan; Xie, Li; Zhu, Zhenshu; Yang, Mi; Qian, Xiaoping; Ding, Yin; Yu, Lixia; Jiang, Xiqun; Guan, Wenxian; Liu, Baorui

    2013-01-01

    Aims The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 2/9, also known as collagenases IV and gelatinases A/B, play a key role in cancer invasion and metastasis. However, the clinical trials of the MMP inhibitors (MMPIs) ended up with disappointing results. In this paper, we synthesized a gelatinase-responsive copolymer (mPEG-PCL) by inserting a gelatinase cleavable peptide (PVGLIG) between mPEG and PCL blocks of mPEG-PCL for anticancer drug delivery to make use of MMP2/9 as an intelligent target for drug delivery. Materials and Methods mPEG-pep-PCL copolymer was synthesized via ring-opening copolymerization and double-amidation. To evaluate whether Nanoparticles (NPs) prepared from this copolymer are superior to NPs prepared from mPEG-PCL, NPs prepared from mPEG-PCL copolymer were used as positive control. Docetaxel-loading NPs using mPEG-pep-PCL and mPEG-PCL were prepared by nano-precipitation method, mentioned as Gel-NPs and Con-NPs, respectively. The morphologic changes of the NPs after treatment with gelatinases were observed macroscopically by spectrophotometer and microscopically by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The cellular uptake amount and cytotoxicity of Gel-NPs and Con-NPs, respectively, in cell lines with different levels of gelatinase expression were studied. Moreover, the cytotoxicity study on the primary cancer cells isolated from pericardial fluids from a patient with late-stage lung cancer was conducted. Results The Gel-NPs aggregated in response to gelatinases, which was confirmed macroscopically and microscopically. The cellular uptake amount of Gel-NPs was correlated with the level of gelatinases. The in vitro antitumor effect of Gel-NPs was also correlated with the level of gelatinases and was superior to Taxotere (commercially available docetaxel) as well as the Con-NPs. The cytotoxicity study on the primary lung cancer cells also confirmed the effectiveness of Gel-NPs. Conclusion The results in this study preliminarily demonstrated the effectiveness of gelatinase-responsive targeting strategy and the prospect of this intelligent nano-drug delivery system though further studies are needed. PMID:23936062

  15. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Coughlan, Lynda; Alba, Raul; Parker, Alan L.; Bradshaw, Angela C.; McNeish, Iain A.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans) and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX), which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs). These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad) have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon), pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR) substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies), can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX), or alternatively, through the use of polymer-coated “stealth” vectors which avoid these interactions. Simultaneous retargeting and detargeting can be achieved by combining multiple genetic and/or chemical modifications. PMID:21994621

  16. Delivery of lipid micelles into infarcted myocardium using a lipid-linked matrix metalloproteinase targeting peptide.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Juliane; Sievers, Richard; Motion, J P Michael; Kivimäe, Saul; Fang, Qizhi; Lee, Randall J

    2015-04-01

    There is a great need for delivery strategies capable of efficiently localizing drugs to the damaged myocardium that do not require direct intramyocardial injection of therapeutic molecules. In the work discussed here, we exploited the myocardium-specific upregulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that occurs during myocardium remodeling by designing a micellar vehicle containing an MMP-targeting peptide (MMP-TP). The binding of MMP-TP to MMP was evaluated with purified MMP-2 protein and U-937 cells induced to overexpress MMP. Inhibition of MMP-2 activity was not observed in the presence of unmodified micelles but was pronounced at a 5 mol % MMP-TP ligand density. In a FACS analysis, MMP-TP micelles containing 5 mol % of the MMP-targeting peptide showed ?10-fold higher binding to activated U937 cells than plain micelles and micelles containing a control peptide with two amino acid replacements. MMP-TP-micelles and plain micelles were injected intravenously into C57BL/6 mice 1, 3, and 7 days after the induction of a myocardial infarction (MI). Immunohistochemistry performed on heart tissue sections revealed that MMP-TP-micelles colocalize with both MMP and infiltrating macrophages. MMP-TP micelles showed significantly enhanced accumulation to the necrotic area of the heart after MI on days 3 and 7 when compared to plain micelles and negative control peptide micelles. This is coincident with the measured temporal profile of MMP gene expression in the heart after MI. These results suggest that MMP-TP micelles are candidates for the development of targeted regenerative heart therapeutics because of their ability to target the infarcted myocardium in a MMP dependent manner. PMID:25642730

  17. Aptamer-mediated up-conversion core/MOF shell nanocomposites for targeted drug delivery and cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kerong; Hou, Zhiyao; Li, Xuejiao; Li, Chunxia; Zhang, Yuanxin; Deng, Xiaoran; Cheng, Ziyong; Lin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Multifunctional nanocarriers for targeted bioimaging and drug delivery have attracted much attention in early diagnosis and therapy of cancer. In this work, we develop a novel aptamer-guided nanocarrier based on the mesoporous metal-organic framework (MOF) shell and up-conversion luminescent NaYF4:Yb(3+)/Er(3+) nanoparticles (UCNPs) core for the first time to achieve these goals. These UCNPs, chosen as optical labels in biological assays and medical imaging, could emit strong green emission under 980 nm laser. The MOF structure based on iron (III) carboxylate materials [MIL-100 (Fe)] possesses high porosity and non-toxicity, which is of great value as nanocarriers for drug storage/delivery. As a unique nanoplatform, the hybrid inorganic-organic drug delivery vehicles show great promising for simultaneous targeted labeling and therapy of cancer cells. PMID:25597762

  18. Targeted delivery of a combination therapy consisting of combretastatin A4 and low-dose doxorubicin against tumor neovasculature

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tingyuan Yang; Yiguang Wang; Zaiquan Li; Wenbing Dai; Jie Yin; Liang Liang; Xue Ying; Shufeng Zhou; Jiancheng Wang; Xuan Zhang; Qiang Zhang

    The present study demonstrates the applicability of a novel strategy that employs targeted delivery of combined treatment against tumor neovasculature. Briefly, a ligand of integrins, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid-tyrosine-lysine pentapeptide (cRGDyK), was conjugated to the PEG end of polyethylene glycol-b-poly lactic acid (PEG-b-PLA), and doxorubicin was chemically linked to the PLA end of PEG-b-PLA. The targeted dual-drug micelle system was prepared

  19. Ultrasound contrast-enhanced imaging and in vitro antitumor effect of paclitaxel-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-monomethoxypoly (ethylene glycol) nanocapsules with ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction

    PubMed Central

    MA, JING; XING, LING XI; SHEN, MING; LI, FAN; ZHU, MING JIE; JIN, LI FANG; LI, ZHAOJUN; GAO, FENG; SU, YIJIN; DUAN, YOU RONG; DU, LIAN FANG

    2015-01-01

    A combination of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound (US) techniques may be able to provide the basis of specific therapeutic protocols, particularly for the treatment of tumors. Nanotechnology may aid the progression towards the use of US for tumor diagnosis and targeted therapy. The current study investigated in vivo and in vitro US contrast imaging using nanocapsules (NCs), and also US and US-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) therapy using drug-loaded NCs for pancreatic cancer in vitro. In the current study, the NCs were made from the polymer nanomaterial poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-monomethoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-mPEG), encapsulated with paclitaxel (PTX), to create PTX-PLGA-mPEG NCs. The PTX-PLGA-mPEG NCs were used as a US contrast agent (UCA), which produced satisfactory US contrast-enhanced images in vitro and in vivo of the rabbit kidneys, with good contrast compared with lesions in the peripheral regions. However, clear contrast-enhanced images were not obtained using PTX-PLGA-mPEG NCs as a UCA, when imaging the superficial pancreatic tumors of nude mice in vivo. Subsequently, fluorescence and flow cytometry were used to measure the NC uptake rate of pancreatic tumor cells under various US or UTMD conditions. An MTT assay was used to evaluate the efficiency of PTX and PTX-PLGA-mPEG NCs in killing tumor cells following 24 or 48 h of US or UTMD therapy, compared with controls. The specific US or UTMD conditions had been previously demonstrated to be optimal through repeated testing, to determine the conditions by which cells were not impaired and the efficiency of uptake of nanoparticles was highest. The current study demonstrated high cellular uptake rates of PLGA-mPEG NCs and high tumor cell mortality with PTX-PLGA-mPEG NCs under US or UTMD optimal conditions. It was concluded that the use of NCs in US-mediated imaging and antitumor therapy may provide a novel application for US. PMID:25500683

  20. Effect of Antigen Shedding on Targeted Delivery of Immunotoxins in Solid Tumors from a Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Youngshang; Pastan, Ira; Kreitman, Robert J.; Lee, Byungkook

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer-specific antigens used as targets of antibody-drug conjugates and immunotoxins are shed from the cell surface (Zhang & Pastan (2008) Clin. Cancer Res. 14: 7981-7986), although at widely varying rates and by different mechanisms (Dello Sbarba & Rovida (2002) Biol. Chem. 383: 69–83). Why many cancer-specific antigens are shed and how the shedding affects delivery efficiency of antibody-based protein drugs are poorly understood questions at present. Before a detailed numerical study, it was assumed that antigen shedding would reduce the efficacy of antibody-drug conjugates and immunotoxins. However, our previous study using a comprehensive mathematical model showed that antigen shedding can significantly improve the efficacy of the mesothelin-binding immunotoxin, SS1P (anti-mesothelin-Fv-PE38), and suggested that receptor shedding can be a general mechanism for enhancing the effect of inter-cellular signaling molecules. Here, we improved this model and applied it to both SS1P and another recombinant immunotoxin, LMB-2, which targets CD25. We show that the effect of antigen shedding is influenced by a number of factors including the number of antigen molecules on the cell surface and the endocytosis rate. The high shedding rate of mesothelin is beneficial for SS1P, for which the antigen is large in number and endocytosed rapidly. On the other hand, the slow shedding of CD25 is beneficial for LMB-2, for which the antigen is small in number and endocytosed slowly. PMID:25343405

  1. Bacterial type III secretion systems: specialized nanomachines for protein delivery into target cells

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Jorge E.; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Wagner, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of bacterial pathogenesis in recent years is the discovery that many pathogens utilized complex nanomachines to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. These effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular functions for the pathogen’s benefit. One of these protein-delivery machines is the type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SSs are widespread in nature and are encoded not only by bacteria pathogenic to vertebrates or plants, but also by bacteria that are symbiotic to plants or insects. A central component of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins across the bacterial envelope. Working in conjunction with several cytoplasmic components, the needle complex engages specific substrates in sequential order, moves them across the bacterial envelope, and ultimately delivers them into eukaryotic cells. The central role of T3SSs in pathogenesis makes them great targets for novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25002086

  2. Engineering of Bacteria for the Visualization of Targeted Delivery of a Cytolytic Anticancer Agent

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Sheng-Nan; Park, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Hee Jung; Zheng, Jin Hai; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Bom, Hee-Seung; Hong, Yeongjin; Szardenings, Michael; Shin, Myung Geun; Kim, Sun-Chang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Choy, Hyon E; Min, Jung-Joon

    2013-01-01

    A number of recent reports have demonstrated that attenuated Salmonella typhimurium are capable of targeting both primary and metastatic tumors. The use of bacteria as a vehicle for the delivery of anticancer drugs requires a mechanism that precisely regulates and visualizes gene expression to ensure the appropriate timing and location of drug production. To integrate these functions into bacteria, we used a repressor-regulated tetracycline efflux system, in which the expression of a therapeutic gene and an imaging reporter gene were controlled by divergent promoters (tetAP and tetRP) in response to extracellular tetracycline. Attenuated S. typhimurium was transformed with the expression plasmids encoding cytolysin A, a therapeutic gene, and renilla luciferase variant 8, an imaging reporter gene, and administered intravenously to tumor-bearing mice. The engineered Salmonella successfully localized to tumor tissue and gene expression was dependent on the concentration of inducer, indicating the feasibility of peripheral control of bacterial gene expression. The bioluminescence signal permitted the localization of gene expression from the bacteria. The engineered bacteria significantly suppressed both primary and metastatic tumors and prolonged survival in mice. Therefore, engineered bacteria that carry a therapeutic and an imaging reporter gene for targeted anticancer therapy can be designed as a theranostic agent. PMID:23922014

  3. EGF-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes for targeting delivery of etoposide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Xie, Xiao-Xia; Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Feng-Yi; Wang, Qiao-Ling; Liu, Ya-Qing; Zou, Yina; Tao, Qing; Ji, Xue-Mei; Yu, Shu-Qin

    2012-02-01

    To enhance the therapeutic potential of etoposide (ETO), we devised a targeted drug delivery system (TDDS) of epidermal growth factor-chitosan-carboxyl single-walled carbon nanotubes-ETO (EGF/CHI/SWNT-COOHs/ETO) using modified SWNTs (m-SWNTs) as the carrier, EGF-functionalized SWNTs (f-SWNTs) as the targeted moiety and ETO as the drug. After SWNT-COOHs were conjugated with CHI (CHI/SWNT-COOHs/ETO), they displayed high solubility and stable dispersion in aqueous solution. The drug loading capacity was approximately 25-27%. The m-SWNTs and f-SWNTs had only slight cytotoxicity. ETO was released from EGF/CHI/SWNT-COOHs/ETO at low pH and taken up by tumour cells via adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent endocytosis. The cell death induced by EGF/CHI/SWNT-COOHs/ETO was as much as 2.7 times that due to ETO alone. In summary, these results demonstrated that our TDDS had a greater anticancer effect than free ETO in vitro. PMID:22222202

  4. Folate-conjugated amphiphilic block copolymers for targeted and efficient delivery of doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yin; Yang, Bin; Jiang, Tao; Li, You-Mei; He, Feng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, novel biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers based on folate-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol)-b-copolycarbonates (FA-PEG-b-P(MAC-co-DTC)) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-copolycarbonates (mPEG-b-P(MAC-co-DTC)) were successfully synthesized for targeted and efficient delivery of doxorubicin (DOX) to cancer cells. Immobilized porcine pancreas lipase (IPPL) was employed as the catalyst to perform the ring-opening copolymerization in bulk, while the folate-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) (FA-PEG) or methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (mPEG) was used as the initiator. The resulting copolymers, characterized by (1)H NMR and GPC, could self-assemble to form nano-sized micelles in aqueous solution by dialysis method. P(MAC-co-DTC) acted as the hydrophobic core, thereby aggregating hydrophilic PEG chains as the outer shell with FA as targeting ligand located at the surface of the polymeric micelles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation showed that the micelles dispersed in spherical shape with nano-size before and after DOX loading. Both the FA-conjugated and non-conjugated block copolymers showed low cellular cytotoxicity. Furthermore, as compared to the non-conjugated copolymers, much more efficient cellular uptake of the FA-conjugated copolymers via FA-receptor-mediated endocytosis could be observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), while MTT assays also demonstrated highly potent cytotoxic activity against HeLa cells. PMID:24370849

  5. MiR-634 sensitizes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells to paclitaxel and inhibits cell growth both in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xiaowei; Cao, Peiguo; He, Dong; Han, Shuang; Zhou, Jianda; Tan, Guolin; Li, Wei; Yu, Fenghui; Yu, Jianjun; Li, Zan; Cao, Ke

    2014-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy is one of the key causal factors in cancer death and increasing evidence has revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in chemoresistance in many kinds of human cancers. Paclitaxel has been used for treatment of advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC); however, treatment failure often occurs due to development of acquired paclitaxel resistance. In this study, based on miRNA microarray screening and qRT-PCR validation, we found six differentially expressed miRNAs in our induced paclitaxel-resistant NPC CNE-1/Taxol cells. Furthermore, we clarified the role of miR-634, most significantly downregulated in the paclitaxel-resistant CNE-1/Taxol, in regulating the paclitaxel sensitivity in NPC cells. We restored miR-634 expression in the CNE-1/Taxol cells by lentivirus infection, and found restoration of miR-634 re-sensitized the CNE-1/Taxol cells to paclitaxel in vitro by MTT assay and colony formation assay. In xenograft mouse model, we found that miR-634 inhibited tumor growth and enhanced paclitaxel sensitivity. Thus, our findings provide important information for the development of targeted gene therapy for reversing paclitaxel resistance in NPC. PMID:25400759

  6. Alendronate-decorated biodegradable polymeric micelles for potential bone-targeted delivery of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yingying; Quan, Changyun; Liu, Meiqing; Liu, Jie; Huang, Gang; Tong, Guoquan; Yin, Yihua; Zhang, Chao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-08-01

    Osteomyelitis is a bone infection disease which is caused by bacteria or other germs, and could cause serious impact on the health and working capacity of the patients. Alendronate (ALN) can chelate strongly with the calcium ion of hydroxyapatite (HA) which is commonly used to treat osteoporosis. Nanomedicine has attracted a lot of attention in that the nano-sized carrier can deliver drug molecules to specific site of interest with the aid of targeting moiety and achieve sustained release, resulting in improved therapeutic effect and reduced side effect. In this study, micelles self-assembled from poly(lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)-alendronate (PLGA-PEG-ALN) copolymer were prepared for bone-targeted delivery of vancomycin (Van). The chemical structure of PLGA-PEG-ALN was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR) spectroscopy. The formation of the nanoparticles was characterized by dynamic light scattering, transmission electronic microscopy as well as the critical micelle concentration measurement. Release profiles from the micelles revealed that the conjugation of ALN to the surface of micelle did not pose adverse effect on the drug-loading capacity and release behaviors. The cytotoxicity of Van-loaded PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles as well as the blank micelles was evaluated via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay toward rat bone marrow stromal cells (rBMSCs) and human embryonic hepatocytes (L02 cells), and results showed that this Van-loaded micelle possesses appropriate cytotoxicity and is safe in the potential treatment of osteomyelitis. The in vitro affinity of PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles to the HA was also confirmed in vitro. The antibacterial effect of Van-loaded PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles was tested against Staphylococcus aureus (SA) which is the main pathogenic bacteria in osteomyelitis, and the results showed that the Van-loaded micelles can effectively inhibit the growth of SA. These results demonstrated that the PLGA-PEG-ALN micelles may be potentially used for the bone targeted delivery of Van. PMID:25994241

  7. Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Thomas A

    2013-01-01

    Enthusiasm greeted the development of synthetic organic insecticides in the mid-twentieth century, only to see this give way to dismay and eventually scepticism and outright opposition by some. Regardless of how anyone feels about this issue, insecticides and other pesticides have become indispensable, which creates something of a dilemma. Possibly as a result of the shift in public attitude towards insecticides, genetic engineering of microbes was first met with scepticism and caution among scientists. Later, the development of genetically modified crop plants was met with an attitude that hardened into both acceptance and hard-core resistance. Transgenic insects, which came along at the dawn of the twenty-first century, encountered an entrenched opposition. Those of us responsible for studying the protection of crops have been affected more or less by these protagonist and antagonistic positions, and the experiences have often left one thoughtfully mystified as decisions are made by non-participants. Most of the issues boil down to concerns over delivery mechanisms. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry PMID:23852646

  8. Folic acid modified cationic ?-cyclodextrin-oligoethylenimine star polymer with bioreducible disulfide linker for efficient targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Yin, Hui; Zhang, Zhongxing; Li, Jun

    2013-02-11

    For an efficient folate-targeted delivery, while the interaction between the folate on the carriers and the folate receptor (FR) on the cells is necessary, the recovering and recycling of FR to maintain a high density level of FR on the cellular membrane is also important. Herein, we demonstrate a design and synthesis of a new star-shaped cationic polymer containing a ?-cyclodextrin (?-CD) core and multiple oligoethylenimine (OEI) arms with folic acid (FA) linked by a bioreducible disulfide bond for efficient targeted gene delivery. The newly synthesized cationic polymer, named ?-CD-OEI-SS-FA, could be cleaved efficiently, and FA was readily released under reductive condition similar to intracellular environment. The ?-CD-OEI-SS-FA polymer was well-characterized and studied in terms of its gene delivery properties in FR-positive KB cells and FR-negative A549 cells under various conditions, in comparison with cationic polymers such as high molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (PEI), ?-CD-OEI star-shaped cationic polymer, ?-CD-OEI-FA polymer where FA was directed linked to the star polymer without disulfide linker. Our data have demonstrated that the new ?-CD-OEI-SS-FA gene carrier had low cytotoxicity and possessed capacity to target and deliver DNA to specific tumor cells that overexpress FRs, as well as functions to recover and recycle FRs onto cellular membranes to facilitate continuous FR-mediated endocytosis to achieve very high levels of gene expression. This study has expanded the strategy of FA-targeted delivery by combining the smart FR-recycling function to achieve the significant enhancement of gene expression. The new FA-targeted and bioreducible carrier may be a promising efficient gene delivery system for potential cancer gene therapy. PMID:23323627

  9. Targeted delivery of CpG ODN to CD32 on human and monkey plasmacytoid dendritic cells augments IFN? secretion.

    PubMed

    Tel, Jurjen; Beenhakker, Niels; Koopman, Gerrit; Hart, Bert't; Mudde, Geert C; de Vries, I Jolanda M

    2012-10-01

    Atopic diseases are characterized by the presence of Th2 cells. Recent studies, in mice and man, demonstrated that allergen-specific Th2 responses can be shifted to Th0/Th1 responses. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) produce large amounts of type I interferons (IFNs) after stimulation of Toll Like Receptor 9 (TLR9) and are likely to play an important role in the reorientation of these Th2 cells. The expression of CD32a on the cell surface of pDCs makes this cell type attractive for targeted delivery of antigen and TLR agonists to revert Th2 responses. Therefore we sought to determine the efficacy of targeted delivery of CpG-C ODN to CD32a on the ability of human and monkey pDCs to secrete inflammatory cytokines. Here we demonstrate that targeted delivery of 3'-biotinylated CpG-C to CD32a on pDC induced phenotypical maturation as determined by CD80, CD83 and CD86 expression. Furthermore, targeting both monkey and human pDCs strongly augmented the secretion of IFN? compared to the delivery of CpG-C in an untargeted fashion (p<0.001). TLR9 induced activation hampers the ability of human pDCs to internalize CD32a. Therefore we opted for targeted delivery of CpG-ODNs to CD32a, which reduces the risk of undesired side effects of systemic TLR treatment and in addition delivers a superior signal for the activation of pDCs. This approach opens new treatment principles for allergic patients. PMID:22349518

  10. Formulation and Evaluation of Chondroitin Sulphate Tablets of Aceclofenac for Colon Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Thiruganesh; Subbaih Khandasamy, Umadevi; Shanmugam, Suresh; Ruttala, Himabindhu

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a single unit, site-specific matrix tablets of aceclofenac allowing targeted drug release in the colon with a microbially degradable polymeric carrier, chondroitin suphate (CS) and to coat the optimized batches with a pH dependent polymeric. The tablets were prepared by wet granulation method using starch mucilage as a binding agent and HPMC K-100 as a swellable polymer. Chondroitin Sulphate and drug and physical mixture were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The tablets were tested for their in-vitro dissolution characteristics in various simulated gastric fluids for their suitability as a colon-specific drug delivery system and also the tablets were evaluated for physicochemical properties, drug content, water percentage swelling and erosion characteristics. The dissolution data demonstrates that the 10% w/w increase in coating level of the pH dependent polymer (Eudragit L-100 and Eudragit S-100 in a ratio of 1 : 4 prevented the drug release in the simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2-SGF) and the simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4-SIF). The dissolution rate of the tablet is dependent upon the concentration of Chondroitin sulphate in the simulated colonic fluid (SCF). The rapid increase in release of aceclofenac in SCF was revealed as due to the degradation of the Chondroitin sulphate membrane by bacterial enzymes. The studies confirmed that, the designed system could be used potentially as a carrier for colon delivery of aceclofenac by regulating drug release in stomach and the small intestine. PMID:24250470

  11. Peptide GE11-Polyethylene Glycol-Polyethylenimine for targeted gene delivery in laryngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Henglei; Zhou, Liang; Liu, Min; Lu, Weiyue; Gao, Chunli

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using GE11-polyethylene glycol-polyethylenimine (GE11-PEG-PEI) for targeted gene delivery to treat epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-overexpressing laryngeal cancer. This study described the design, characterization, and in vitro and in vivo study of the nanocarrier GE11-PEG-PEI for gene delivery to treat laryngeal cancer. Analysis of the sizes and zeta potentials indicated that the formation of PEGylated complexes was dependent on the N/P ratio, and these complexes were capable of binding plasmid DNA and condensing DNA into small positively charged nanoparticles. The results also revealed that GE11-PEG-PEI had a weaker effect on cell survival in vitro. Gene transfection was performed on human laryngeal cancer Hep-2 cells in vitro and in vivo. Both the in vitro and in vivo results demonstrated that GE11-PEG-PEI had greater transfection efficiency than mPEG-PEI. Compared with mPEG-PEI/pORF-hTRAIL and saline, GE11-PEG-PEI/pORFh-TRAIL significantly (p < 0.05) reduced tumor growth in nude mice with laryngeal cancer. Moreover, the GE11-PEG-PEI/pORF-hTRAIL-treated groups showed more apoptosis than the mPEG-PEI/pORF-hTRAIL-treated groups. Therefore, our results showed that the peptide GE11 conjugated to PEG-PEI delivered significantly more genes to EGFR-overexpressing laryngeal cancer cells in vivo, indicating that GE11-PEG-PEI may be a suitable gene vector for treating EGFR-overexpressing laryngeal cancer. PMID:26008151

  12. Formulation and evaluation of niosomal nasal drug delivery system of folic acid for brain targeting.

    PubMed

    Ravouru, Nagaraju; Kondreddy, Pallavi; Korakanchi, Deepthy; Haritha, M

    2013-12-01

    Nasal mucosa offers advantages to deliver drugs to brain via olfactory route thus provides rapid onset of drug action and hence faster therapeutic effect. Therefore, various strategies have been proposed to improve the delivery of different drugs to brain including liposomes, colloidal drug carriers, micelles, chimeric peptide technology and nanotechnology through nasal route. The low blood level of folates is the primary cause of depression in Alzheimer's disease. Folic acid is a water soluble vitamin showing difficulty in crossing the blood brain barrier and thus was formulated as niosomal nasal drug delivery systems to target the brain. In the present work, folic acid niosomes were prepared using different nonionic surfactants i.e., span 20, span 60, span 80, tween 20, tween 80 and cholesterol by using lipid layer hydration technique. These were evaluated for particle size, viscosity, osmotic shock, entrapment efficiency and in vitro drug release. The influence of different formulation variables such as surfactant type, surfactant concentration, and cholesterol concentration was optimized for required size distribution, viscosity, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release. The prepared niosomes were in the size range of 3.05-5.625 µm. Niosomes prepared with span 60 and cholesterol in the ratio of 1:1 (50 mg: 50 mg) shown higher entrapment efficiency of 69.42% and better in vitro drug release of 64.2% at the end of 12 hrs and therefore considered as optimized formulation. The stability studies were carried out by storing niosomes at 4±1°C and 25±1°C and showed good stability over the period of storage. The release of drug from niosomes followed anomalous diffusion and obeyed first order release kinetics. Ex-vivo perfusion studies were also performed by using rat model, about 48.15% of drug was found to be absorbed through nasal cavity at the end of 6 hrs. PMID:23863098

  13. Intracoronary delivery of DNAzymes targeting human EGR-1 reduces infarct size following myocardial ischaemia reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Bhindi, Ravinay; Fahmy, Roger G; McMahon, Aisling C; Khachigian, Levon M; Lowe, Harry C

    2012-06-01

    Despite improvements in treatment, myocardial infarction (MI) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Inflammation arising from ischaemic and reperfusion injury is a key mechanism which underpins myocardial damage and impairment of cardiac function. Early growth response-1 (Egr-1) is an early immediate gene and a master regulator that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of ischaemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. This study sought to examine the effect of selective inhibition of Egr-1 using catalytic deoxyribonucleic acid molecules (DNAzymes, DZs) delivered via the clinically relevant coronary route in a large animal model of myocardial IR. It was hypothesized that Egr-1 inhibition with intracoronary DZ would reduce infarction size by modulating its downstream effector molecules. Egr-1 DZs inhibited the adherence of THP-1 monocytes to IL-1?-activated endothelial cells in vitro and retained its catalytic activity up to 225 min after in vivo administration. In a porcine model of myocardial IR (45 min ischaemia/3 h reperfusion), DZ was taken up in the cytoplasm and nuclei of cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells in the myocardium after intracoronary delivery. Egr-1 DZs reduced infarct size and improved cardiac functional recovery following intracoronary delivery at the initiation of IR in this large animal model of MI. This was associated with inhibition of pro-inflammatory Egr-1 and ICAM-1 expression, and the reduced expression of TNF-?, PAI-1, TF, and myocardial MPO activity in tissue derived from the border zone of the infarct. Taken together, these data suggest that strategies targeting Egr-1 via the intracoronary route after IR injury in pigs have potential therapeutic implications in human MI. PMID:22344601

  14. Paclitaxel-incorporated nanoparticles using block copolymers composed of poly(ethylene glycol)/poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Block copolymers composed of poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate) (PHO) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were synthesized to prepare paclitaxel-incorporated nanoparticle for antitumor drug delivery. In a 1H-NMR study, chemical structures of PHO/PEG block copolymers were confirmed and their molecular weight (M.W.) was analyzed with gel permeation chromatography (GPC). Paclitaxel as a model anticancer drug was incorporated into the nanoparticles of PHO/PEG block copolymer. They have spherical shapes and their particle sizes were less than 100 nm. In a 1H-NMR study in D2O, specific peaks of PEG solely appeared while peaks of PHO disappeared, indicating that nanoparticles have core-shell structures. The higher M.W. of PEG decreased loading efficiency and particle size. The higher drug feeding increased drug contents and average size of nanoparticles. In the drug release study, the higher M.W. of PEG block induced the acceleration of drug release rate. The increase in drug contents induced the slow release rate of drug. In an antitumor activity study in vitro, paclitaxel nanoparticles have practically similar anti-proliferation activity against HCT116 human colon carcinoma cells. In an in vivo animal study using HCT116 colon carcinoma cell-bearing mice, paclitaxel nanoparticles have enhanced antitumor activity compared to paclitaxel itself. Therefore, paclitaxel-incorporated nanoparticles of PHO/PEG block copolymer are a promising vehicle for antitumor drug delivery. PMID:25288916

  15. Enhanced siRNA delivery into cells by exploiting the synergy between targeting ligands and cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Christopher J; Saltzman, W Mark

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a polymer nanoparticle-based siRNA delivery system that exploits a cell surface binding synergism between targeting ligands and cell-penetrating peptides. Nanoparticles were coated with folate and penetratin via a PEGylated phospholipid linker (DSPE-PEG): the combination of both of these ligands represents a strategy for enhancing intracellular delivery of attached polymer nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were characterized for size, morphology, density of surface modification, and ligand association and retention. The surface coverage achieved on DSPE-PEG-coated nanoparticles is as high as (or higher than) obtained with other ligand-modified nano-scale particulate systems (?0.5-5 pmol ligand/cm²). Additionally, these nanoparticles were loaded with a high density of siRNA (?130-140 pmol siRNA/mg nanoparticles), which is slowly released upon incubation in water. Synergies between the activity of surface binding and cell internalizing ligands on these siRNA-loaded nanoparticles impart delivery enhancements that improve their gene silencing efficacy both in culture and in tumor models. Traditionally, targeting ligands function by binding to cell surface receptors, while cell-penetrating peptides function by nonspecifically transporting across cell membranes. Interestingly, we have observed that improved delivery of these dual-functionalized nanoparticles was in part, a result of increased cell surface avidity afforded by both ligands. This siRNA delivery system presents an approach to surface modification of nanovehicles, in which multiple ligands function in parallel to enhance cell binding and uptake. PMID:21664689

  16. Quantum Dots in an Amphiphilic Polyethyleneimine Derivative Platform for Cellular Labeling, Targeting, Gene Delivery, and Ratiometric Oxygen Sensing.

    PubMed

    Park, Joonhyuck; Lee, Junhwa; Kwag, Jungheon; Baek, Yeonggyeong; Kim, Bumju; Yoon, Calvin Jinse; Bok, Seoyeon; Cho, So-Hye; Kim, Ki Hean; Ahn, G-One; Kim, Sungjee

    2015-06-23

    Amphiphilic polyethyleneimine derivatives (amPEIs) were synthesized and used to encapsulate dozens of quantum dots (QDs). The QD-amPEI composite was ?100 nm in hydrodynamic diameter and had the slightly positive outer surface that suited well for cellular internalization. The QD-amPEI showed very efficient QD cellular labeling with the labeled cell fluorescence intensity more than 10 times higher than conventional techniques such as Lipofectamine-assisted QD delivery. QD-amPEI was optimal for maximal intracellular QD delivery by the large QD payload and the rapid endocytosis kinetics. QD-amPEI platform technology was demonstrated for gene delivery, cell-specific labeling, and ratiometric oxygen sensing. Our QD-amPEI platform has two partitions: positive outer surface and hydrophobic inside pocket. The outer positive surface was further exploited for gene delivery and targeting. Co-delivery of QDs and GFP silencing RNAs was successfully demonstrated by assembling siRNAs to the outer surfaces, which showed the transfection efficiency an order of magnitude higher than conventional gene transfections. Hyaluronic acids were tethered onto the QD-amPEI for cell-specific targeted labeling which showed the specific-to-nonspecific signal ratio over 100. The inside hydrophobic compartment was further applied for cohosting oxygen sensing phosphorescence Ru dyes along with QDs. The QD-Ru-amPEI oxygen probe showed accurate and reversible oxygen sensing capability by the ratiometric photoluminescence signals, which was successfully applied to cellular and spheroid models. PMID:26057729

  17. Phase II Study Evaluating the Addition of Cetuximab to the Concurrent Delivery of Weekly Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, and Daily Radiotherapy for Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinomas of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Kwok, Young [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Goloubeva, Olga [University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Parekh, Arti [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Taylor, Rodney; Wolf, Jeffrey [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zimrin, Ann [University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Strome, Scott [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Ord, Robert [Department of Oral-Maxillo Facial Surgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Cullen, Kevin J. [University of Maryland Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To report the mature data of a prospective Phase II trial designed to evaluate the efficacy of an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor cetuximab (CTX) added to the concurrent therapy of weekly paclitaxel/carboplatin (PC) and daily radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2009, a total of 43 patients were enrolled in the study. The median follow-up was 31 months (range, 9-59 months). All patients had Stage III/IV disease at presentation, and 67% had oropharyngeal primaries. The weekly IV dose schedules were CTX 250 mg/m{sup 2} (400 mg/m{sup 2} IV loading dose 1 week before RT), paclitaxel 40 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin AUC 2. RT was given at 1.8 Gy per day to 70.2 Gy. Intensity-modulated RTwas used in 70% of cases. Results: All patients completed the planned RT dose, 74% without any treatment breaks. The planned CTX and PC cycles were completed in 70% (91% with at least seven of planned nine cycles) and 56% (93% with at least seven of planned eight cycles) of patients, respectively. Toxicity included Grade 3 mucositis (79%), rash (9%), leucopenia (19%), neutropenia (19%), and RT dermatitis (16%). The complete response (CR) rate at the completion of therapy was 84%. The estimated 3-year local regional control rate was 72%. Six patients with an initial CR subsequently experienced a local recurrence, 10 patients experienced distant progression. The median overall survival and disease-free survivals have not been reached. The 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival were 59% and 58%, respectively. Conclusions: The addition of CTX to weekly PC and daily RT was well tolerated and resulted in encouraging local control and survival rates.

  18. pH-responsive high-density lipoprotein-like nanoparticles to release paclitaxel at acidic pH in cancer chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Yoon; Yang, Yoosoo; Heo, Paul; Lee, Ji-Chun; Kong, ByoungJae; Cho, Jae Youl; Yoon, Keejung; Shin, Cheol-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho; Kim, Sung-Gun; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2012-01-01

    Background Nanoparticles undergoing physicochemical changes to release enclosed drugs at acidic pH conditions are promising vehicles for antitumor drug delivery. Among the various drug carriers, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-like nanoparticles have been shown to be beneficial for cancer chemotherapy, but have not yet been designed to be pH-responsive. Methods and results In this study, we developed a pH-responsive HDL-like nanoparticle that selectively releases paclitaxel, a model antitumor drug, at acidic pH. While the well known HDL-like nanoparticle containing phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, and apolipoprotein A-I, as well as paclitaxel (PTX-PL-NP) was structurally robust at a wide range of pH values (3.8–10.0), the paclitaxel nanoparticle that only contained paclitaxel and apoA-I selectively released paclitaxel into the medium at low pH. The paclitaxel nanoparticle was stable at physiological and basic pH values, and over a wide range of temperatures, which is a required feature for efficient cancer chemotherapy. The homogeneous assembly enabled high paclitaxel loading per nanoparticle, which was 62.2% (w/w). The molar ratio of apolipoprotein A-I and paclitaxel was 1:55, suggesting that a single nanoparticle contained approximately 110 paclitaxel particles in a spherical structure with a 9.2 nm diameter. Among the several reconstitution methods applied, simple dilution following sonication enhanced the reconstitution yield of soluble paclitaxel nanoparticles, which was 0.66. As a result of the pH responsiveness, the anticancer effect of paclitaxel nanoparticles was much more potent than free paclitaxel or PTX-PL-NP. Conclusion The anticancer efficacy of both paclitaxel nanoparticles and PTX-PL-NP was dependent on the expression of scavenger receptor class B type I, while the killing efficacy of free paclitaxel was independent of this receptor. We speculate that the pH responsiveness of paclitaxel nanoparticles enabled efficient endosomal escape of paclitaxel before lysosomal break down. This is the first report on pH-responsive nanoparticles that do not contain any synthetic polymer. PMID:22745543

  19. A Controllable Aptamer-Based Self-Assembled DNA Dendrimer for High Affinity Targeting, Bioimaging and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Xie, Yi; An, Yuan; Huang, Yishun; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery is important in cancer therapy to decrease the systemic toxicity resulting from nonspecific drug distribution and to enhance drug delivery efficiency. We have developed an aptamer-based DNA dendritic nanostructure as a multifunctional vehicle for targeted cancer cell imaging and drug delivery. The multifunctional DNA dendrimer is constructed from functional Y-shaped building blocks with predesigned base-pairing hybridization including fluorophores, targeting DNA aptamers and intercalated anticancer drugs. With controllable step-by-step self-assembly, the programmable DNA dendrimer has several appealing features, including facile modular design, excellent biostability and biocompatibility, high selectivity, strong binding affinity, good cell internalization efficiency, and high drug loading capacity. Due to the unique structural features of DNA dendrimers, multiple copies of aptamers can be incorporated into each dendrimer, generating a multivalent aptamer-tethered nanostructure with enhanced binding affinity. A model chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was delivered via these aptamer-based DNA dendrimers and exerted a potent toxicity for target cancer cells (human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line) with low side effects for the non-target cells (human Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line). This controllable aptamer-based DNA dendrimer is a promising candidate for biomedical applications. PMID:25959874

  20. A controllable aptamer-based self-assembled DNA dendrimer for high affinity targeting, bioimaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huimin; Ma, Yanli; Xie, Yi; An, Yuan; Huang, Yishun; Zhu, Zhi; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery is important in cancer therapy to decrease the systemic toxicity resulting from nonspecific drug distribution and to enhance drug delivery efficiency. We have developed an aptamer-based DNA dendritic nanostructure as a multifunctional vehicle for targeted cancer cell imaging and drug delivery. The multifunctional DNA dendrimer is constructed from functional Y-shaped building blocks with predesigned base-pairing hybridization including fluorophores, targeting DNA aptamers and intercalated anticancer drugs. With controllable step-by-step self-assembly, the programmable DNA dendrimer has several appealing features, including facile modular design, excellent biostability and biocompatibility, high selectivity, strong binding affinity, good cell internalization efficiency, and high drug loading capacity. Due to the unique structural features of DNA dendrimers, multiple copies of aptamers can be incorporated into each dendrimer, generating a multivalent aptamer-tethered nanostructure with enhanced binding affinity. A model chemotherapeutic anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was delivered via these aptamer-based DNA dendrimers and exerted a potent toxicity for target cancer cells (human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line) with low side effects for the non-target cells (human Burkitt's lymphoma cell line). This controllable aptamer-based DNA dendrimer is a promising candidate for biomedical applications. PMID:25959874

  1. siRNA delivery targeting to the lung via agglutination-induced accumulation and clearance of cationic tetraamino fullerene

    PubMed Central

    MINAMI, Kosuke; OKAMOTO, Koji; DOI, Kent; HARANO, Koji; NOIRI, Eisei; NAKAMURA, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    The efficient treatment of lung diseases requires lung-selective delivery of agents to the lung. However, lung-selective delivery is difficult because the accumulation of micrometer-sized carriers in the lung often induces inflammation and embolization-related toxicity. Here we demonstrate a lung-selective delivery system of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by controlling the size of carrier vehicle in blood vessels. The carrier is made of tetra(piperazino)fullerene epoxide (TPFE), a water-soluble cationic tetraamino fullerene. TPFE and siRNA form sub-micrometer-sized complexes in buffered solution and these complexes agglutinate further with plasma proteins in the bloodstream to form micrometer-sized particles. The agglutinate rapidly clogs the lung capillaries, releases the siRNA into lung cells to silence expression of target genes, and is then cleared rapidly from the lung after siRNA delivery. We applied our delivery system to an animal model of sepsis, indicating the potential of TPFE-based siRNA delivery for clinical applications. PMID:24814863

  2. Ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption for targeted drug delivery in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Alexander, Phillip M.; McDannold, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at discrete targets. This review provides insight on the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB. PMID:24462453

  3. Targeted lipid based drug conjugates: a novel strategy for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Kwatra, Deep; Earla, Ravinder; Samanta, Swapan K; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-09-15

    A majority of studies involving prodrugs are directed to overcome low bioavailability of the parent drug. The aim of this study is to increase the bioavailability of acyclovir (ACV) by designing a novel prodrug delivery system which is more lipophilic, and at the same time site specific. In this study, a lipid raft has been conjugated to the parent drug molecule to impart lipophilicity. Simultaneously a targeting moiety that can be recognized by a specific transporter/receptor in the cell membrane has also been tethered to the other terminal of lipid raft. Targeted lipid prodrugs i.e., biotin-ricinoleicacid-acyclovir (B-R-ACV) and biotin-12hydroxystearicacid-acyclovir (B-12HS-ACV) were synthesized with ricinoleicacid and 12hydroxystearicacid as the lipophilic rafts and biotin as the targeting moiety. Biotin-ACV (B-ACV), ricinoleicacid-ACV (R-ACV) and 12hydroxystearicacid-ACV (12HS-ACV) were also synthesized to delineate the individual effects of the targeting and the lipid moieties. Cellular accumulation studies were performed in confluent MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. The targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV exhibited much higher cellular accumulation than B-ACV, R-ACV and 12HS-ACV in both cell lines. This result indicates that both the targeting and the lipid moiety act synergistically toward cellular uptake. The biotin conjugated prodrugs caused a decrease in the uptake of [(3)H] biotin suggesting the role of sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in uptake. The affinity of these targeted lipid prodrugs toward SMVT was studied in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Both the targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV (20.25 ± 1.74 ?M) and B-12HS-ACV (23.99 ± 3.20 ?M) demonstrated higher affinity towards SMVT than B-ACV (30.90 ± 4.19 ?M). Further, dose dependent studies revealed a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on [(3)H] biotin uptake in the presence of biotinylated prodrugs. Transepithelial transport studies showed lowering of [(3)H] biotin permeability in the presence of biotin and biotinylated prodrugs, further indicating a carrier mediated translocation by SMVT. Overall, results from these studies clearly suggest that these biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. These prodrugs appear to be potential candidates for the treatment of oral and ocular herpes virus infections, because of higher expression of SMVT on intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion we hypothesize that our novel prodrug design strategy may help in higher absorption of hydrophilic parent drug. Moreover, this novel prodrug design can result in higher cell permeability of hydrophilic therapeutics such as genes, siRNA, antisense RNA, DNA, oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins. PMID:22692074

  4. TARGETED LIPID BASED DRUG CONJUGATES: A NOVEL STRATEGY FOR DRUG DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Vadlapudi, Aswani Dutt; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Kwatra, Deep; Earla, Ravinder; Samanta, Swapan K.; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2012-01-01

    A majority of studies involving prodrugs are directed to overcome low bioavailability of the parent drug. The aim of this study is to increase the bioavailability of acyclovir (ACV) by designing a novel prodrug delivery system which is more lipophilic, and at the same time site specific. In this study, a lipid raft has been conjugated to the parent drug molecule to impart lipophilicity. Simultaneously a targeting moiety that can be recognized by a specific transporter/receptor in the cell membrane has also been tethered to the other terminal of lipid raft. Targeted lipid prodrugs i.e., biotin-ricinoleicacid-acyclovir (B-R-ACV) and biotin-12hydroxystearicacid-acyclovir (B-12HS-ACV) were synthesized with ricinoleicacid and 12hydroxystearicacid as the lipophilic rafts and biotin as the targeting moiety. Biotin-ACV (B-ACV), ricinoleicacid-ACV (R-ACV) and 12hydroxystearicacid-ACV (12HS-ACV) were also synthesized to delineate the individual effects of the targeting and the lipid moieties. Cellular accumulation studies were performed in confluent MDCK-MDR1 and Caco-2 cells. The targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV and B-12HS-ACV exhibited much higher cellular accumulation than B-ACV, R-ACV and 12HS-ACV in both cell lines. This result indicates that both the targeting and the lipid moiety act synergistically towards cellular uptake. The biotin conjugated prodrugs caused a decrease in the uptake of [3H] biotin suggesting the role of sodium dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT) in uptake. The affinity of these targeted lipid prodrugs towards SMVT was studied in MDCK-MDR1 cells. Both the targeted lipid prodrugs B-R-ACV (20.25 ± 1.74 µM) and B-12HS-ACV (23.99 ± 3.20 µM) demonstrated higher affinity towards SMVT than B-ACV (30.90 ± 4.19 µM). Further, dose dependent studies revealed a concentration dependent inhibitory effect on [3H] biotin uptake in the presence of biotinylated prodrugs. Transepithelial transport studies showed lowering of [3H] biotin permeability in the presence of biotin and biotinylated prodrugs, further indicating a carrier mediated translocation by SMVT. Overall, results from these studies clearly suggest that these biotinylated lipid prodrugs of ACV possess enhanced affinity towards SMVT. These prodrugs appear to be potential candidates for the treatment of oral and ocular herpes virus infections, because of higher expression of SMVT on intestinal and corneal epithelial cells. In conclusion we hypothesize that our novel prodrug design strategy may help in higher absorption of hydrophilic parent drug. Moreover, this novel prodrug design can result in higher cell permeability of hydrophilic therapeutics such as genes, siRNA, antisense RNA, DNA, oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins. PMID:22692074

  5. Effective Targeted Gene Delivery to Dendritic Cells via Synergetic Interaction of Mannosylated Lipid with DOPE and BCAT

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Kwon; Wei, Huiling; Kulkarni, Aditya; Pogranichniy, Roman M.; Thompson, David H.

    2012-01-01

    The efficient delivery of plasmids encoding antigenic determinants into dendritic cells (DCs) that control immune response is a promising strategy for rapid development of new vaccines. In this study, we prepared a series of targeted cationic lipoplex based on two synthetic lipid components, mannose-poly(ethylene glycol, MW3000)-1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (Mannose-PEG3000-DSPE) and O-(2R-1,2-di-O-(1'Z,9'Z-octadecadienyl)-glycerol)-3-N-(bis-2-aminoethyl)-carbamate (BCAT), that were formulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) for evaluation as non-viral vectors for transgene expression in DCs. First, we optimized the N:P ratio for maximum transfection and then screened the effects of mannose targeting for further enhancement of transfection levels. Our results indicate that efficient delivery of gWIZ GFP plasmid into DCs was observed for mannose compositions of ~10%, whereas low transfection efficiencies were observed with non-targeted formulations. Mannose-targeted lipofectamine complexes also showed high GFP expression levels in DCs relative to non-targeted lipofectamine controls. The best transfection performance was observed using 10 mol % Mannose-PEG3000-DSPE, 60 mol% BCAT, and 30 mol % DOPE, indicating that the most efficient delivery into DCs occurs via synergistic interaction between mannose targeting and acid-labile, fusogenic BCAT:DOPE formulations. Our data suggest that mannose-PEG3000-DSPE:BCAT:DOPE formulations may be effective gene delivery vehicles for the development of DC-based vaccines. PMID:22229467

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel and carboplatin via arterial or venous perfusion in rabbits with VX-2 tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ni-Ni; Zhang, Li-Gang; Liu, Ze-Nian; Huang, Gui-Lin; Zhang, Lin; Yi, Jie; Yao, Li; Hu, Xiao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin in different ways in rabbits with VX-2 tongue cancer. Methods: Rabbit VX-2 tongue cancer model was established and animals were then divided into 6 groups, in which animals received perfusion with paclitaxel liposome and carboplatin via the lingual artery, with free paclitaxel and carboplatin via the lingual artery, with 5% glucose via the lingual artery, with paclitaxel liposome and carboplatin via ear vein, with free paclitaxel and carboplatin via the ear vein and with 5% glucose via the ear vein independently. When the maximum diameter of cervical lymph nodes was larger than 5 mm, chemotherapy was initiated. Seven days later, flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry were performed to detect the apoptosis of VX-2 cells and P53 expression in the primary cancer and metastatic lymph nodes. Results: Targeted arterial perfusion with paclitaxel liposome in combination with carboplatin was more effective to induce the apoptosis of cancer cells in the primary cancer and metastatic lymph nodes and inhibit their proliferation. Conclusion: Targeted arterial perfusion with paclitaxel liposome in combination with carboplatin is effective to reduce tumor size, attenuate the surgery induced injury and improve the post-operative quality of life of oral cancer patients.

  7. Microwave-assisted efficient conjugation of nanodiamond and paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Han; Liu, Kuang-Kai; Sulake, Rohidas S; Chao, Jui-I; Chen, Chinpiao

    2015-05-15

    Nanodiamond has recently received considerable attention due to the various possible applications in medical field such as drug delivery and bio-labeling. For this purpose suitable and effective surface functionalization of the diamond material are required. A versatile and reproducible surface modification method of nanoscale diamond is essential for functionalization. We introduce the input of microwave energy to assist the functionalization of nanodiamond surface. The feasibility of such a process is illustrated by comparing the biological assay of ND-paclitaxel synthesized by conventional and microwave irradiating. Using a microwave we manage to have approximately doubled grafted molecules per nanoparticle of nanodiamond. PMID:25890802

  8. Bufalin loaded biotinylated chitosan nanoparticles: an efficient drug delivery system for targeted chemotherapy against breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xin; Yin, Hongzhuan; Zhang, Shichen; Luo, Ying; Xu, Kai; Ma, Ping; Sui, Chengguang; Meng, Fandong; Liu, Yunpeng; Jiang, Youhong; Fang, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Bufalin is a traditional oriental medicine which is known to induce apoptosis in many tumor cells, and it is thus considered as a new anticancer therapeutic. By now, most of the studies of bufalin are in vitro, however in vivo evaluations of its therapeutic efficacy are less and are in great demand for its development toward anticancer drug. One of the problems probably hampering the development of bufalin is the lack of tumor selectivity, which may reduce the therapeutic effect as well as showing side effects. To overcome this drawback, in this study, we designed a tumor-targeted drug delivery system of bufalin based on enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, by using biotinylated chitosan, resulting in bufalin encapsulating nanoparticles (Bu-BCS-NPs) with mean hydrodynamic size of 171.6 nm, as evidenced by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscope. Bu-BCS-NPs showed a relative slow and almost linear release of bufalin, and about 36.8% of bufalin was released in 24 h when dissolved in sodium phosphate buffer. Compared to native bufalin, Bu-BCS-NPs exhibited a stronger cytotoxicity against breast cancer MCF-7 cells (IC50 of 0.582 ?g/ml vs 1.896 ?g/ml of native bufalin). Similar results were also obtained in intracellular reactive oxygen species production, apoptosis induction, and decrease in mitochondria membrane potential. These results may contribute to the rapid intracellular uptake of nanoparticles, partly benefiting from the highly expressed biotin receptors in tumor cells. In vivo studies using MCF-7 tumor models in nude mice confirmed the remarkable therapeutic effect of Bu-BCS-NPs. These findings suggest the potential of Bu-BCS-NPs as an anticancer drug with tumor targeting property. PMID:24846793

  9. Development of a folate-modified curcumin loaded micelle delivery system for cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chunfen; Chen, Hao; Zhao, Jie; Pang, Xin; Xi, Yanwei; Zhai, Guangxi

    2014-09-01

    Targeted drug delivery system for tumor cells is an appealing platform on enhancing the therapeutic effects and reducing the side effects of the drug. In this study, we developed folate-modified curcumin (Cur) loaded micelles (Cur-FPPs) for cancer chemotherapy. The targeting material, Folate-PEG3000-PLA2000, was synthesized by the amide bond formation reaction. And the Cur loaded micelles were prepared by thin-film hydration method with mPEG2000-PLA2000 (Cur-PPs) or mPEG2000-PLA2000 and Folate-PEG3000-PLA2000 (Cur-FPPs) as carrier. A central composite design (CCD) was used to optimize the formulation, and the optimized Cur-FPPs was prepared with the weight ratio of Folate-PEG3000-PLA2000 and mPEG2000-PLA2000 at 1:9. The average size of the mixed micelles was 70nm, the encapsulating efficiency and drug-loading were 80.73±0.16% and 4.84±0.01%, respectively. Compared with the Cur propylene glycol solution, the in vitro release of Cur from Cur-FPPs showed a sustained manner. Furthermore, the in vitro cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of Cur-FPPs were significantly enhanced towards MCF-7 and HepG2 cells. The pharmacokinetic studies in rats indicated that a 3-fold increase in the half-life was achieved for Cur loaded micelle formulations relative to solubilized Cur. All the results demonstrated that folate-modified Cur micelles could serve as a potential nanocarrier to improve the solubility and anti-cancer activity of Cur. PMID:24984268

  10. Functionalized nanoscale oil bodies for targeted delivery of a hydrophobic drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chung-Jen; Lin, Che-Chin; Lu, Tzu-Li; Wang, Hesin-Fu

    2011-10-01

    Effective formulations of hydrophobic drugs for cancer therapies are challenging. To address this issue, we have sought to nanoscale artificial oil bodies (NOBs) as an alternative. NOBs are lipid-based particles which consist of a central oil space surrounded by a monolayer of oleosin (Ole)-embedded phospholipids (PLs). Ole was first fused with the anti-HER2/neu affibody (Ole-ZH2), and the resulting hybrid protein was overproduced in Escherichia coli. ZH2-displayed NOBs were then assembled by sonicating the mixture containing plant oil, PLs, and isolated Ole-ZH2 in one step. To illustrate their usefulness, functionalized NOBs were employed to encapsulate a hydrophobic anticancer drug, Camptothecin (CPT). As a result, these CPT-loaded NOBs remained stable in serum and the release of CPT at the non-permissive condition exhibited a sustained and prolonged profile. Moreover, plain NOBs were biocompatible whereas CPT-loaded NOBs exerted a strong cytotoxic effect on HER2/neu-positive cells in vitro. Administration of xenograft nude mice with CPT-loaded NOBs also led to the regression of solid tumors in an effective way. Overall, the result indicates the potential of NOBs for targeted delivery of hydrophobic drugs.

  11. Ultrasound-targeted Microbubble Destruction-mediated Gene Delivery Into Canine Livers

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Misty L; Kuhr, Christian S; Graves, Scott S; Loeb, Keith R; Sun, Samuel S; Keilman, George W; Morrison, Kyle P; Paun, Marla; Storb, Rainer F; Miao, Carol H

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) was applied to a targeted canine liver lobe simultaneously with injection of plasmid DNA (pDNA)/microbubble (MB) complexes into a portal vein (PV) segmental branch and occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) to facilitate DNA uptake. By using a 1.1 MHz, 13 mm diameter transducer, a fivefold increase in luciferase activity was obtained at 3.3 MPa peak negative pressure (PNP) in the treated lobe. For more effective treatment of large tissue volumes in canines, a planar unfocused transducer with a large effective beam diameter (52?mm) was specifically constructed. Its apodized dual element configuration greatly reduced the near-field transaxial pressure variations, resulting in a remarkably uniform field of US exposure for the treated tissues. Together with a 15 kW capacity US amplifier, a 692-fold increase of gene expression was achieved at 2.7?MPa. Transaminase and histology analysis indicated minimal tissue damage. These experiments represent an important developmental step toward US-mediated gene delivery in large animals and clinics. PMID:23732985

  12. Multifunctional, self-assembling anionic peptide-lipid nanocomplexes for targeted siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Tagalakis, Aristides D; Lee, Do Hyang D; Bienemann, Alison S; Zhou, Haiyan; Munye, Mustafa M; Saraiva, Luisa; McCarthy, David; Du, Zixiu; Vink, Conrad A; Maeshima, Ruhina; White, Edward A; Gustafsson, Kenth; Hart, Stephen L

    2014-09-01

    Formulations of cationic liposomes and polymers readily self-assemble by electrostatic interactions with siRNA to form cationic nanoparticles which achieve efficient transfection and silencing in vitro. However, the utility of cationic formulations in vivo is limited due to rapid clearance from the circulation, due to their association with serum proteins, as well as systemic and cellular toxicity. These problems may be overcome with anionic formulations but they provide challenges of self-assembly and transfection efficiency. We have developed anionic, siRNA nanocomplexes utilizing anionic PEGylated liposomes and cationic targeting peptides that overcome these problems. Biophysical measurements indicated that at optimal ratios of components, anionic PEGylated nanocomplexes formed spherical particles and that, unlike cationic nanocomplexes, were resistant to aggregation in the presence of serum, and achieved significant gene silencing although their non-PEGylated anionic counterparts were less efficient. We have evaluated the utility of anionic nanoparticles for the treatment of neuronal diseases by administration to rat brains of siRNA to BACE1, a key enzyme involved in the formation of amyloid plaques. Silencing of BACE1 was achieved in vivo following a single injection of anionic nanoparticles by convection enhanced delivery and specificity of RNA interference verified by 5' RACE-PCR and Western blot analysis of protein. PMID:24985735

  13. Temporal Multiscale Approach for Nanocarrier Motion with Simultaneous Adhesion and Hydrodynamic Interactions in Targeted Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Uma, B.; Liu, J.; Ayyaswamy, P. S.; Eckmann, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluctuating hydrodynamics approach and a hybrid approach combining fluctuating hydrodynamics with generalized Langevin dynamics to resolve the motion of a nanocarrier when subject to both hydrodynamic interactions and adhesive interactions. Specifically, using these approaches, we compute equilibrium probability distributions at constant temperature as well as velocity autocorrelation functions of the nanocarrier subject to thermal motion in a quiescent Newtonian fluid medium, when tethered by a harmonic spring force mimicking a tether due to a single receptor-ligand bond. We demonstrate that the thermal equipartition of translation, rotation, and spring degrees of freedom are preserved by our formalism while simultaneously resolving the nature of the hydrodynamic correlations. Additionally, we evaluate the potential of mean force (or free energy density) along a specified reaction coordinate to faciltate extensive conformational sampling of the nanocarrier motion. We show that our results are in excellent agreement with analytical results and Monte Carlo simulations, thereby validating our methodologies. The frameworks we have presented provide a comprehensive platform for temporal multiscale modeling of hydrodynamic and microscopic interactions mediating nanocarrier motion and adhesion in vascular targeted drug delivery. PMID:23853388

  14. Preparation and evaluation of lipid vesicles of camptothecin as targeted drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Prabhu; Zenia, Teles; Marina, Koland; Shama, Khandige Prasanna; Girish, Shetty Nisha; Matapady, Nairy Harish

    2013-07-01

    Site-specific delivery of anticancer based therapy of human cancers has led to several remarkable outcomes, particularly in the therapy of breast cancer and lymphoma. Camptothecin, a plant secondary metabolite is widely used in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer and lymphoma. However its side effect profile often results in cessation of therapy. In this study the principle of both active as well as passive targeting using camptothecin loaded stealth liposomes as per the magic gun approach was followed. Stealth liposomes of camtothecin were prepared by thin film hydration method using a PEGylated phospholipid like DSPE-MPEG 2000. Similarly conventional liposomes were prepared using phospholipids like DPPC, DSPC. Conventional liposomes were coated with a hydrophilic biocompatible polymer like chitosan. It was found that chitosan coating of the conventional liposomes increased the physical stability of the liposomal suspension. Further, chitosan coated conventional liposomes and the PEGylated liposomes released the drug for a prolonged period of time, compared to the uncoated conventional liposomes. In vivo screening of the formulations for their antitumor efficacy was carried out in rats. Breast cancer was induced in female Sprague-Dawley rats using an indirectly acting chemical carcinogen DMBA (7, 12 dimethyl benz(a)anthracene). It was found that there was significant decrease (P>0.01) in tumor volume in the rat group treated with test 2 formulation and test 1 formulation compared to standard free CPT. However the chitosan coated liposomal formulation showed a better antitumor efficacy than that of the PEGylated liposomal formulation. PMID:23811458

  15. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiangru; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Ziming; Zhang, Yifang; Sun, Tingting; Zhang, Fang; Wu, Jian; Fu, Yanyan; Du, Yang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Ying; Liu, YongHai; Ma, Kai; Liu, Hongzhi; Song, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs) were fabricated from PLGA, L-?-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE), 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2), and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs), and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT) peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES), naringin (NAR), and glutathione (GSH) were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10%) and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%). The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain. PMID:25187980

  16. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of mebeverine HCl colon-targeted drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Ghassan Z; Abdulkarim, Muthanna F; Chitneni, Mallikarjun; Mutee, Ahmed F; Ameer, Omar Z; Salman, Ibrahim M; Noor, Azmin M

    2011-08-01

    Mebeverine HCl is a water soluble drug commonly used to treat irritable bowel syndrome by acting directly on the smooth muscles of the colon. This work was aimed at the formulation and in vitro evaluation of a colon-targeted drug delivery system containing mebeverine HCl. Matrix tablets were prepared using ethyl cellulose (EC), Eudragit RL 100 either solely or in combination by wet granulation technique. Dissolution was carried out in 0.1 N HCl for 2?h followed by pH 6.8 phosphate buffer for eight hours. Uncoated forms released more than 5% drug in 0.1 N HCl therefore, Eudragit L100 was used as a coat. The results indicated very slow release profile. As a result, single retardant was used to prepare the matrix and coated by Eudragit L 100. The matrix containing 7% Eudragit RL 100 and 6% of binder was subjected to further studies to assess the effect of different coats (Eudragit L 100-55 and cellulose acetate phthalate) and different binders (pectin and sodium alginate) on the release profile. Eudragit L 100 and pectin were the best coating agent and binder, respectively. The final formula was stable and it can be concluded that the prepared system has the potential to deliver mebeverine HCl in vivo to the colon. PMID:20429815

  17. Targeted Delivery of 5-fluorouracil with Monoclonal Antibody Modified Bovine Serum Albumin Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Fadaeian, Ghazal; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Shokri, Fazel; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Herein, 1F2, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), was covalently coupled to the surface of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles. Concerning two different crosslinkers for conjugation of 1F2, Maleimide-poly (ethylene glycol)-Succinimidyl carbonate (Mal-PEG5000-NHS) was selected due to its higher conjugation efficiency (23 ± 4%) obtained in comparison to N-succinimidyl 3-(2-Pyridyl Dithio) Propionate (SPDP) (8 ± 2%). A slight increase in the average particle size with a negligible prolongation of the 5-FU release was observed after 1F2 coupling. The 1F2-coupled 5-FU-loaded BSA nanoparticles interacted with nearly all HER2 receptors available on the surface of HER2-positive SKBR3 cells. No cellular uptake was observed for HER2-negative MCF7 cells. Physicochemical and biological properties of the mAb-modified nanoparticles did not significantly alter after three months of storage at room temperature. The in-vitro cytotoxicity evaluation by MTT assay, demonstrated lower SKBR3 viability (50.7 ± 9 %) after 5 hours contact with 1F2-coupled 5-FU-loaded BSA nanoparticles in comparison with the other control systems due to their cell attachment and internalization after washing. In addition, no significant toxicity was observed on MCF7 cells. This novel system can efficiently be employed for targeted delivery of 5-FU to HER2-positive cancerous cells. PMID:25901146

  18. Targeted Delivery of 5-fluorouracil with Monoclonal Antibody Modified Bovine Serum Albumin Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fadaeian, Ghazal; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Kouchakzadeh, Hasan; Shokri, Fazel; Soleimani, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    Herein, 1F2, an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb), was covalently coupled to the surface of 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) loaded bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanoparticles. Concerning two different crosslinkers for conjugation of 1F2, Maleimide-poly (ethylene glycol)-Succinimidyl carbonate (Mal-PEG5000-NHS) was selected due to its higher conjugation efficiency (23 ± 4%) obtained in comparison to N-succinimidyl 3-(2-Pyridyl Dithio) Propionate (SPDP) (8 ± 2%). A slight increase in the average particle size with a negligible prolongation of the 5-FU release was observed after 1F2 coupling. The 1F2-coupled 5-FU-loaded BSA nanoparticles interacted with nearly all HER2 receptors available on the surface of HER2-positive SKBR3 cells. No cellular uptake was observed for HER2-negative MCF7 cells. Physicochemical and biological properties of the mAb-modified nanoparticles did not significantly alter after three months of storage at room temperature. The in-vitro cytotoxicity evaluation by MTT assay, demonstrated lower SKBR3 viability (50.7 ± 9 %) after 5 hours contact with 1F2-coupled 5-FU-loaded BSA nanoparticles in comparison with the other control systems due to their cell attachment and internalization after washing. In addition, no significant toxicity was observed on MCF7 cells. This novel system can efficiently be employed for targeted delivery of 5-FU to HER2-positive cancerous cells. PMID:25901146

  19. Gene and microRNA expression reveals sensitivity to paclitaxel in laryngeal cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cheng-Zhi; Xie, Jin; Jin, Bin; Chen, Xin-Wei; Sun, Zhen-Feng; Wang, Bao-Xing; Dong, Pin

    2013-01-01

    Paclitaxel is a widely used chemotherapy drug for advanced laryngeal cancer patients. However, the fact that there are 20-40% of advanced laryngeal cancer patients do not response to paclitaxel makes it necessary to figure out potential biomarkers for paclitaxel sensitivity prediction. In this work, Hep2, a laryngeal cancer cell line, untreated or treated with lower dose of paclitaxel for 24 h, was applied to DNA microarray chips for gene and miR expression profile analysis. Expression of eight genes altered significantly following paclitaxel treatment, which was further validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Four up-regulated genes were ID2, BMP4, CCL4 and ACTG2, in which ID2 and BMP4 were implicated to be involved in several drugs sensitivity. While the down-regulated four genes, MAPK4, FASN, INSIG1 and SCD, were mainly linked to the endoplasmic reticulum and fatty acid biosynthesis, these two cell processes that are associated with drug sensitivity by increasing evidences. After paclitaxel treatment, expression of 49 miRs was significantly altered. Within these miRs, the most markedly expression-changed were miR-31-star, miR-1264, miR-3150b-5p and miR-210. While the miRs putatively modulated the mRNA expression of the most significantly expression-altered genes were miR-1264, miR-130a, miR-27b, miR-195, miR-1291, miR-214, miR-1277 and miR-1265, which were obtained by miR target prediction and miRNA target correlation. Collectively, our study might provide potential biomarkers for paclitaxel sensitivity prediction and drug resistance targets in laryngeal cancer patients. PMID:23826416

  20. Targeted Intracellular Controlled Drug Delivery and Tumor Therapy through in Situ Forming Ag Nanogates on Mesoporous Silica Nanocontainers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changhui; Zheng, Jing; Deng, Li; Ma, Cheng; Li, Jishan; Li, Yinhui; Yang, Sheng; Yang, Jinfeng; Wang, Jing; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-06-10

    Targeting nanocontainers to the pathological zone and controlling release of their cargoes, in particular delivery of anticancer drugs to specific tumor cells in a targeted and controlled manner, remain the key challenges in drug delivery. This paper reports the development of a traceable and tumor-targeted intracellular drug release nanocontainer. The nanocontainer is obtained by in situ growth of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the surfaces of mesoporous silica nanospheres (MSNs) using a DNA-templated process. Additionally, drug release from the nanopores is achieved by selective glutathione (GSH)-triggered dismantle of the AgNPs, and the concurrent fluorescence change allows real-time monitoring of drug release efficacy and facile visualization of in vivo delivery events. After being functionalized with sgc8 aptamer on the outer shell of the AgNPs, the targeted nanocontainers are delivered into acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by aptamer-mediated recognition and endocytosis. Moreover, the GSH-responsive process presents an improvement in the cell-specific drug release and chemotherapeutic inhibition of tumor growth. PMID:25966745

  1. Biofunctionalized phospholipid-capped mesoporous silica nanoshuttles for targeted drug delivery: improved water suspensibility and decreased nonspecific protein binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Sheng; Wu, Li-Chen; Lu, Shin-Yi; Chang, Li-Ling; Teng, I-Ting; Yang, Chia-Min; Ho, Ja-An Annie

    2010-08-24

    A main challenge in nanobiomedicine is the engineering of nanostructures or nanomaterials that can efficiently encapsulate drugs at high load, cross cell membranes, and controllably release their cargo at target sites. Although mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are safe, versatile, and promising carrier materials for targeted drug delivery, their aggregation phenomena under physiological conditions (or salt-containing environments) and their nonspecific binding in protein-containing solutions (or serum) limit their applications in biological science and biomedicine. To address this challenge, we have developed a novel delivery system, termed a nanoshuttle, comprising a nanoscale PEGylated-phospholipid coating and 13-(chlorodimethylsilylmethyl)heptacosane-derivatized MSNs, in which therapeutic or imaging agents may be trapped and ligand-assisted targeted delivery may be achieved through surface functionalization of the phospholipids. As a proof of concept in this study, we selected fluorescein isothiocyanate and folate as the imaging tracer and targeted ligand, respectively. Relative to the bare MSNs, the lipid-capped MSNs exhibited superior suspensibility in phosphate-buffered saline and much lower nonspecific binding in vitro. Furthermore, enhanced specific cellular uptake by Hela cells occurred after administering the folate-sensitized phospholipid-capped MSNs. Our results suggest that these highly versatile multifunctional MSNs are promising vectors for nanomedicine applications. PMID:20731423

  2. From Phage Display to Nanoparticle Delivery: Functionalizing Liposomes with Multivalent Peptides Improves Targeting to a Cancer Biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Bethany Powell; Li, Shunzi; Brown, Kathlynn C.

    2013-01-01

    Phage display is commonly used to isolate peptides that bind to a desired cell type. While chemical synthesis of selected peptides often results in ligands with low affinity, a multivalent tetrameric presentation of the peptides dramatically improves affinity. One of the primary uses of these peptides is conjugation to nanoparticle-based therapeutics for specific delivery to target cell types. We set out to optimize the path from phage display peptide selection to peptide presentation on a nanoparticle surface for targeted delivery. Here, we examine the effects of peptide valency, density, and affinity on nanoparticle delivery and therapeutic efficacy, using the ?v?6-specific H2009.1 peptide as a model phage-selected peptide and liposomal doxorubicin as a model therapeutic nanoparticle. Liposomes displaying the higher affinity multivalent H2009.1 tetrameric peptide demonstrate 5-10 fold higher drug delivery than liposomes displaying the lower affinity monomeric H2009.1 peptide, even when the same number of peptide subunits are displayed on the liposome. Importantly, a 6-fold greater toxicity is observed towards ?v?6-expressing cells for liposomes displaying tetrameric verses monomeric H2009.1 peptides. Additionally, liposomal targeting and toxicity increase with increasing concentrations of H2009.1 tetrameric peptide on the liposome surface. Thus, both the multivalent peptide and the multivalent liposome scaffold work together to increase targeting to ?v?6-expressing cells. This multi-layered approach to developing high affinity targeted nanoparticles may improve the utility of moderate affinity peptides. As tetramerization is known to increase affinity for a variety of phage-selected peptides, it is anticipated that the tetrameric scaffold may act as a general method for taking peptides from phage display to nanoparticle display. PMID:23186007

  3. Magnetically Targeted Delivery of Therapeutic Agents to Injured Blood Vessels for Prevention of In-Stent Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Fishbein, Ilia; Adamo, Richard F.; Forbes, Scott P.; Folchman-Wagner, Zoë; Alferiev, Ivan S.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic guidance is a physical targeting strategy with the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of a variety of therapeutic agents — including small-molecule pharmaceuticals, proteins, gene vectors, and cells — by enabling their site-specific delivery. The application of magnetic targeting for in-stent restenosis can address the need for safer and more efficient treatment strategies. However, its translation to humans may not be possible without revising the traditional magnetic targeting scheme, which is limited by its inability to selectively guide therapeutic agents to deep localized targets. An alternative two-source strategy can be realized through the use of uniform, deep-penetrating magnetic fields in conjunction with vascular stents included as part of the magnetic setup and the platform for targeted delivery to injured arteries. Studies showing the feasibility of this novel targeting strategy in in-stent restenosis models and considerations in the design of carrier formulations for magnetically guided antirestenotic therapy are discussed in this review. PMID:22891107

  4. Use of hollow microneedles for targeted delivery of phenylephrine to treat fecal incontinence.

    PubMed

    Jun, Hyesun; Han, Mee-Ree; Kang, Nae-Gyu; Park, Jung-Hwan; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-06-10

    A hollow microneedle (HM) was prepared to deliver a phenylephrine (PE) solution into the anal sphincter muscle as a method for treating fecal incontinence. The goal of this study was the local targeted delivery of PE into the sphincter muscle through the perianal skin with minimal pain using hollow microneedles, resulting in the increase of resting anal sphincter pressure. PE was administered on the left and the right sides of the anus of a rat through the perianal skin using 1.5mm long HM. An in vivo imaging system study was conducted after injection of Rhodamine B, and a histological study was performed after injection of gentian violet. The resting anal sphincter pressure in response to various drug doses was measured by using an air-charged catheter. Anal pressure change produced by HM administration was compared with change produced by intravenous injection (IV), subcutaneous (SC) injection and intramuscular (IM) injection. The change in mean blood pressure produced by HM administration as a function of PE dose was compared with change produced by PBS injection. A pharmacokinetic study of the new HM administration method was performed. A model drug solution was localized in the muscle layer under the perianal skin at the injection site and then diffused out over time. HM administration of PE induced significant contraction of internal anal sphincter pressure over 12h after injection, and the maximum anal pressure was obtained between 5 and 6h. Compared to IV, SC and IM treatments, HM treatment produced greater anal pressure. There was no increase in blood pressure after HM administration of PE within the range of predetermined concentration. Administration of 800?g/kg of PE using HM produced 0.81±0.38h of tmax. Our study suggests that HM administration enables local delivery of a therapeutic dose of PE to the anal sphincter muscle layer with less pain. This new treatment has great potential as a clinical application because of the ease of the procedure, minimal pain, and dose-dependent response. PMID:25828366

  5. Design and development of a multifunctional nano carrier system for imaging, drug delivery, and cell targeting in cancer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hoon-Sung

    There has been an increasing need in the last decade for early diagnosis and treatment of cancer prior to the tumor mass becoming evident as anatomical anomaly. A major challenge in cancer diagnosis is to distinguish cancer cells from the surrounding, normal tissue. For early cancer diagnosis and treatment, a nano carrier system was designed and developed with key components uniquely structured according to biomedical and clinical requirements: targeting, drug storage capabilities, fluorescent emissions near the infrared range for in vivo imaging, and magnetic hyperthermia. For in vivo imaging, quantum dots with emissions near infrared range (˜800 nm) were conjugated onto the surface of carbon nanotubes and nanospheres consisting of a spherical polystyrene matrix (˜100 nm) and high fraction of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (˜10 nm) embedded. The QDs on these nano carriers exhibited intense visible emissions using fluorescent spectroscopy and successfully facilitated in vivo soft tissue imaging in mice. For drug storage, the chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel (PTX) was loaded onto the surfaces of these nano-carriers by using a layer of biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). A cell-based cytotoxicity assay was employed to verify successful loading of pharmacologically active drug, PTX. Cell viability of human, metastatic PC3mm2 prostate cancer cells was assessed in the presence and absence of various nano-carrier populations using the MTT assay. For hyperthermia, Fe3O 4 nanoparticles were conjugated onto the surfaces of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and embedded into the nanospheres. Magnetization measurements showed nearly reversible hysteresis curves from the Fe3O4-conjugated CNTs and the magnetic nanospheres (MNS). Application of an alternating electromagnetic field effectively induced heating the solution of the Fe3O 4-conjugated CNTs and the magnetic nanospheres (MNS) into temperature ranges (up to 55ºC) suitable for therapeutic hyperthermia. PTX loaded nanocarrier systems were, then, developed by conjugating anti-Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (anti-PSMA) for in vitro and in vivo targeting. Specific detection studies of anti-PSMA-conjugated nano carrier systems binding activity in LNCaP prostate cancer cells were carried out. Substantial differences were observed between the targeted- and nontargeted nano carriers. LNCaP cells were targeted successfully by the conjugation of anti-PSMA on the nano carrier surfaces. To explore in vivo targeting, the nano carriers conjugated with anti-PSMA were intravenously injected into nude mice bearing a human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP). Upon post-injection, significant fluorescence attributed to the nano-carrier system was detected, indicating substantial uptake in the region of the tumor.

  6. CD40-targeted dendritic cell delivery of PLGA-nanoparticle vaccines induce potent anti-tumor responses.

    PubMed

    Rosalia, Rodney A; Cruz, Luis J; van Duikeren, Suzanne; Tromp, Angelino T; Silva, Ana L; Jiskoot, Wim; de Gruijl, Tanja; Löwik, Clemens; Oostendorp, Jaap; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Ossendorp, Ferry

    2015-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a prominent role in the priming of CD8(+) T cells. Vaccination is a promising treatment to boost tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells which is crucially dependent on adequate delivery of the vaccine to DC. Upon subcutaneous (s.c.) injection, only a small fraction of the vaccine is delivered to DC whereas the majority is cleared by the body or engulfed by other immune cells. To overcome this, we studied vaccine delivery to DC via CD40-targeting using a multi-compound particulate vaccine with the aim to induce potent CD8(+) T cell responses. To this end, biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles (NP) were formulated encapsulating a protein Ag, Pam3CSK4 and Poly(I:C) and coated with an agonistic ?CD40-mAb (NP-CD40). Targeting NP to CD40 led to very efficient and selective delivery to DC in vivo upon s.c. injection and improved priming of CD8(+) T cells against two independent tumor associated Ag. Therapeutic application of NP-CD40 enhanced tumor control and prolonged survival of tumor-bearing mice. We conclude that CD40-mediated delivery to DC of NP-vaccines, co-encapsulating Ag and adjuvants, efficiently drives specific T cell responses, and therefore, is an attractive method to improve the efficacy of protein based cancer vaccines undergoing clinical testing in the clinic. PMID:25465442

  7. New tools for the quantitative assessment of prodrug delivery and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Lynn E; Scherer, Randy L; VanSaun, Michael N; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Dozier, E Ashley; Carter, Kathy J; Koyama, Tatsuki; Shyr, Yu; Aschner, Michael; Stanwood, Gregg D; Bornhop, Darryl J; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2015-03-01

    Systemic off-target toxicities, including neurotoxicity, are prevalent side effects in cancer patients treated with a number of otherwise highly efficacious anticancer drugs. In the current study, we have: (1) developed a new analytical metric for the in vivo preclinical assessment of systemic toxicities/neurotoxicity of new drugs and delivery systems; and (2) evaluated, in mice, the in vivo efficacy and toxicity of a versatile and modular NanoDendron (ND) drug delivery and imaging platform that we recently developed. Our paclitaxel-carrying ND prodrug, ND(PXL), is activated following proteolytic cleavage by MMP9, resulting in localized cytotoxic chemotherapy. Using click chemistry, we combined ND(PXL) with a traceable beacon, ND(PB), yielding ND(PXL)-ND(PB) that functions as a theranostic compound. In vivo fluorescence FRET imaging of this theranostic platform was used to confirm localized delivery to tumors and to assess the efficiency of drug delivery to tumors, achieving 25-30% activation in the tumors of an immunocompetent mouse model of breast cancer. In this model, ND-drug exhibited anti-tumor efficacy comparable to nab-paclitaxel, a clinical formulation. In addition, we combined neurobehavioral metrics of nociception and sensorimotor performance of individual mice to develop a novel composite toxicity score that reveals and quantifies peripheral neurotoxicity, a debilitating long-term systemic toxicity of paclitaxel therapy. Importantly, mice treated with nab-paclitaxel developed changes in behavioral metrics with significantly higher toxicity scores indicative of peripheral neuropathy, while mice treated with ND(PXL) showed no significant changes in behavioral responses or toxicity score. Our ND formulation was designed to be readily adaptable to incorporate different drugs, imaging modalities and/or targeting motifs. This formulation has significant potential for preclinical and clinical tools across multiple disease states. The studies presented here report a novel toxicity score for assessing peripheral neuropathy and demonstrate that our targeted, theranostic NDs are safe and effective, providing localized tumor delivery of a chemotherapeutic and with reduced common neurotoxic side-effects. PMID:25732874

  8. Targeted delivery of 5-aminolevulinic Acid by multifunctional hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles for photodynamic skin cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xing; Qu, Qiuyu; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-05-27

    5-Aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is a precursor of a strong photosensitizer, protoporphyrin IX (PphIX), for photodynamic therapy (PDT). Developing appropriate delivery carriers that can assist 5-ALA in bypassing the lipophilic barrier to directly enter into cancer cells is a research focus. The improved delivery of 5-ALA is even important for skin cancer therapy through PDT process. In this work, targeting ligand folic acid (FA)-functionalized hollow mesoporous silica nanoparticles (HMSNPs) were fabricated to deliver 5-ALA for PDT against B16F10 skin cancer cells. The FA targeting ligand enabled selective endocytosis of 5-ALA loaded HMSNPs into cancer cells. PphIX formed from delivered 5-ALA exhibited high photocytotoxicity to the cancer cells in vitro. PMID:25974979

  9. Target specific and long-acting delivery of protein, peptide, and nucleotide therapeutics using hyaluronic acid derivatives

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Eun Ju Oh; Ki Su Kim; Jiseok Kim; Jeong-A Yang; Ji-Hyun Kong; Min Young Lee; Allan S. Hoffman; Sei Kwang Hahn

    2010-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a biodegradable, biocompatible, non-toxic, non-immunogenic and non-inflammatory linear polysaccharide, which has been used for various medical applications such as arthritis treatment, ocular surgery, tissue augmentation, and so on. In this review, the effect of chemical modification of HA on its distribution throughout the body was reported for target specific and long-acting delivery applications of protein, peptide,

  10. Folate conjugated carboxymethyl chitosan–manganese doped zinc sulphide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery and imaging of cancer cells

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manjusha Elizabeth Mathew; Jithin C. Mohan; K. Manzoor; S. V. Nair; H. Tamura; R. Jayakumar

    2010-01-01

    We developed a novel folic acid (FA) conjugated carboxymethyl chitosan coordinated to manganese doped zinc sulphide quantum dot (FA–CMC–ZnS:Mn) nanoparticles. The system can be used for targeting, controlled drug delivery and also imaging of cancer cells. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using SEM, AFM, FT-IR, UV and DLS studies. The size range of 5-FU encapsulated FA–CMC–ZnS:Mn nanoparticles were from 130

  11. Poly(Ethylene Glycol) in Drug Delivery, Why Does it Work, and Can We do Better? All Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulation Provides Some Answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunker, Alex

    We summarize our recent work, using all atom molecular dynamics simulation to study the role of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in drug delivery. We have simulated the drug delivery liposome membrane, in both the Gel and Liquid crystalline states. The simulations of the PEGylated membrane have been carried out in the presence of a physiological concentration of NaCl, and two other salts encountered in physiological conditions, KCL and CaCl2. We also simulated targeting moieties on the PEGylated membrane, comparing the behavior of two targeting moieties. We also simulated PEG with three drug molecules for which it is used as a delivery aid: paclitaxel, piroxicam, and hematoporphyrin. We found that the specific properties of PEG, its solubility in both polar and non-polar solvents, and its acting as a polymer electrolyte, have a significant e_ect on its behavior when used in drug delivery.

  12. Maximizing gene delivery efficiencies of cationic helical polypeptides via balanced membrane penetration and cellular targeting

    E-print Network

    Cheng, Jianjun

    Maximizing gene delivery efficiencies of cationic helical polypeptides via balanced membrane: Received 26 July 2013 Accepted 24 September 2013 Available online 7 November 2013 Keywords: Non-viral gene a c t The application of non-viral gene delivery vectors is often accompanied with the poor

  13. Antitumor activity of an epithelial cell adhesion molecule- targeted nanovesicular drug delivery system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sajid Hussain; Andreas Pluckthun; Theresa M. Allen; Uwe Zangemeister-Wittke

    2007-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of anticancer agents to tumors represents a promisingtherapeutic strateg y because it increases efficacy and reduces toxicity to normal tissues compared with untargeted drugs. Sterically stabilized immunoliposomes (SIL), guided by antibodies that specif- ically bind to well internalizingantig ens on the tumor cell surface, are effective nanoscale delivery systems capable of accumulating large quantities of anticancer agents at

  14. 377. Intravascular Delivery of Adenovirus Vectors Rapidly Targets Platelets to the Reticuloendothelial System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Stone; Shaoheng Ni; Zong-Yi Li; Dmitry Shayakhmetov; Andre Lieber

    2006-01-01

    Following intravenous (iv) delivery of an adenovirus (Ad) vector a severely adverse event was seen in a phase I clinical trial. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and biochemically detectable disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) were among complications that ultimately resulted in multiple organ system failure 98 hours after iv delivery of a dose of 6 x 1011 viral particles\\/kg. DIC is

  15. Bioadhesive polymeric drug delivery systems for tumor targeting and tissue repair

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zohreh Amoozgar

    2011-01-01

    A drug delivery system refers to a dosage form that is able to control or modify the availability of the active ingredient to the body due to its construction as well as temporal or spatial arrangement. An efficient drug delivery system should localize treatment to diseased cells or the site of injury. This can be achieved by increasing the adhesion

  16. Dasatinib enhances antitumor activity of paclitaxel in ovarian cancer through Src signaling.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Xu, Manman; Hou, Teng; Huang, Yongwen; Yang, Chenlu; Li, Jundong

    2015-09-01

    Src family tyrosine kinase (SFK) activation is associated with ovarian cancer progression. Therefore, SFKs are targets for the development of potential treatments of ovarian cancer. Dasatinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that targets SFK activity, and is used for the treatment of B cell and Abelson lymphomas. At the present time, the potential effect of dasatinib on ovarian cancer is not clear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor activity of dasatinib, alone and in combination with paclitaxel, in ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the expression of Src and phospho?Src-Y416 (p?Src) was measured in six ovarian cancer cell lines using western blotting and immunohistochemistry. In addition, cell viability and apoptosis were measured using an MTT assay and annexin V?fluorescein isothiocyanate staining. An ovarian cancer murine xenograft model was established, in order to evaluate the antitumor effect of dasatinib alone and in combination with paclitaxel in ovarian cancer. High levels of p?Src protein expression were observed in all cell lines, as compared with healthy cells, which indicated activation of the Src signaling pathway. p?Src expression increased in ovarian cancer cells following paclitaxel treatment. Dasatinib treatment demonstrated anti?ovarian cancer properties, by downregulating p?Src expression and by inducing cancer cell apoptosis. Combined treatment with dasatinib and paclitaxel markedly inhibited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, compared with control cells. Combined dasatinib and paclitaxel treatment exhibited antitumor activities in vivo and in vitro (combination indices, 0.25?0.93 and 0.31?0.75; and tumor growth inhibitory rates, 76.7% and 58.5%, in A2780 and HO8910 cell lines, respectively), compared with paclitaxel treatment alone. Dasatinib monotherapy demonstrated anti?ovarian cancer activities. The effects of dasatinib and paclitaxel treatments on ovarian cancer cells appeared to be mediated by the Src pathway. PMID:25975261

  17. Polymeric nanoparticles: potent vectors for vaccine delivery targeting cancer and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Bolhassani, Azam; Javanzad, Shabnam; Saleh, Tayebeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers with various compositions and biological properties have been extensively applied for in vitro/in vivo drug and gene delivery. The family of nanocarriers includes polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based carriers (liposomes/micelles), dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and gold nanoparticles (nanoshells/nanocages). Among different delivery systems, polymeric carriers have several properties such as: easy to synthesize, inexpensive, biocompatible, biodegradable, non-immunogenic, non-toxic, and water soluble. In addition, cationic polymers seem to produce more stable complexes led to a more protection during cellular trafficking than cationic lipids. Nanoparticles often show significant adjuvant effects in vaccine delivery since they may be easily taken up by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Natural polymers such as polysaccharides and synthetic polymers have demonstrated great potential to form vaccine nanoparticles. The development of new adjuvants or delivery systems for DNA and protein immunization is an expanding research field. This review describes polymeric carriers especially PLGA, chitosan, and PEI as vaccine delivery systems. PMID:24128651

  18. Development and characterization of gelatin based nanoparticles for targeted delivery of zidovudine

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Namdeo R; Tone, Jadhav S; Irny, Preeti V; Nadaf, Sameer J

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The present work was aimed at development and evaluation of zidovudin (AZT) loaded gelatin nanoparticles (GNPs) by simple desolvation method and further couple it with mannose. Material and Methods: Total seven batches of GNPs (A1-A7) were formulated by changing the concentration of polymer gelatin. Various parameters such as particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, % entrapment efficiency and in-vitro drug release of plain and mannosylated gelatin nanoparticles (M-GNPs) were studied. Results: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) studies revealed that the average particle size of GNPs and M-GNPs were found to be 394 ± 3.21 and 797.2 ± 2.89 nm respectively (optimised batch A3). It was interesting to note that the average particle size of M-GNPs was more due to anchored mannose, whereas drug entrapment was lesser compared to plain GNPs. Studies have showed drug loading for GNPs and M-GNPs to be 66.56% and 58.85% respectively. Zeta potential studies demonstrated little reduction in solution stability of M-GNPs compared to GNPs. In-vitro drug release studies showed almost 80% release (bimodal) up to 24 h, following Korsmeyer-Peppas release kinetics model (GNPs, r = 0.9760; M-GNPs, r = 0.9712). Conclusions: Hence, it can be concluded that, development of GNPs and M-GNPs will pave the way for reticuloendothelial system uptake of AZT; thus, achieving targeted delivery, selectivity and reduction in associated side effect reduction in acquired immuno defficiency syndrome. PMID:24167784

  19. Temperature-responsive magnetite/PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer nanoparticles for controlled drug targeting delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shu; Li, Ying; Guo, Chen; Wang, Jing; Ma, Junhe; Liang, Xiangfeng; Yang, Liang-Rong; Liu, Hui-Zhou

    2007-12-01

    In this study, temperature-responsive magnetite/polymer nanoparticles were developed from iron oxide nanoparticles and poly(ethyleneimine)-modified poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer. The particles were characterized by TEM, XRD, DLS, VSM, FTIR, and TGA. A typical product has an approximately 20 nm magnetite core and an approximately 40 nm hydrodynamic diameter with a narrow size distribution and is superparamagnetic with large saturation magnetization (51.34 emu/g) at room temperature. The most attractive feature of the nanoparticles is their temperature-responsive volume-transition property. DLS results indicated that their average hydrodynamic diameter underwent a sharp decrease from 45 to 25 nm while evaluating the temperature from 20 to 35 degrees C. The temperature-dependent evolution of the C-O stretching band in the FTIR spectra of the aqueous nanoparticles solution revealed that thermo-induced self-assembly of the immobilized block copolymers occurred on the magnetite solid surfaces, which is accompanied by a conformational change from a fully extended state to a highly coiled state of the copolymer. Consequently, the copolymer shell could act as a temperature-controlled "gate" for the transit of guest substance. The uptake and release of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic model drugs were well controlled by switching the transient opening and closing of the polymer shell at different temperatures. A sustained release of about 3 days was achieved in simulated human body conditions. In primary mouse experiments, drug-entrapped magnetic nanoparticles showed good biocompatibility and effective therapy for spinal cord damage. Such intelligent magnetic nanoparticles are attractive candidates for widespread biomedical applications, particularly in controlled drug-targeting delivery. PMID:17988160

  20. Formulation and evaluation of chitosan microspheres of aceclofenac for colon-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Umadevi, S K; Thiruganesh, R; Suresh, S; Reddy, K Bhaskar

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this investigation was to develop novel colon specific drug delivery. Aceclofenac, a NSAID, was successfully encapsulated into chitosan microspheres. Various formulations were prepared by varying the ratio of chitosan, span-85 and stirring speed and the amount of glutaraldehyde. The SEM study showed that microspheres have smooth surfaces. Microspheres were characterised by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to confirm the absence of chemical interactions between drug and polymer and to know the formation of microspheres structure. The microspheres were evaluated for particle size, encapsulation efficiency, drug loading capacity, mucoadhesion studies, stability studies, in vitro and in vivo drug release studies. Particle sizes, as measured by the laser light scattering technique, were of an average size in the range 41-80?µm. The swelling index was in the range 0.37-0.82 and the entrapment efficiency range was 51-75% for all the formulations. The optimised batch ACM(13) released 83.6% at 8?h and 104% at 24?h in SCF containing rat caecal content. Eudragit coated chitosan microspheres prevented the release of the aceclofenac in the physiological environment of the stomach and small intestine and released 95.9±0.34% in the colon. With regard to release kinetics, the data were best fitted with the Higuchi model and showed zero order release with non-Fickian diffusion mechanism. The in vivo findings suggest that aceclofenac microspheres exhibit a prolonged effect of aceclofenac in rats and produce a significant anti-inflammatory effect. The findings of the present study conclusively state that chitosan microspheres are promising for colon targeting of aceclofenac to synchronise with chronobiological symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:20848388

  1. Design, synthesis and evaluation of N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG)-PEG-doxorubicin targeted conjugates for anticancer delivery.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Smita K; Badhwar, Archana J; Kharas, Firuza; Khandare, Jayant J; Vavia, Pradeep R

    2012-10-15

    Efficacy of anticancer drug is limited by the severe adverse effects induced by drug; therefore the crux is in designing delivery systems targeted only to cancer cells. Toward this objectives, we propose, synthesis of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-doxorubicin (DOX) prodrug conjugates consisting N-acetyl glucosamine (NAG) as a targeting moiety. Multicomponent system proposed here is characterized by (1)H NMR, UV spectroscopy, and HPLC. The multicomponent system is evaluated for in vitro cellular kinetics and anticancer activity using MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Molecular modeling study demonstrated sterically stabilized conformations of polymeric conjugates. Interestingly, PEG-DOX conjugate with NAG ligand showed significantly higher cytotoxicity compared to drug conjugate with DOX. In addition, the polymer drug conjugate with NAG and DOX showed enhanced internalization and retention effect in cancer cells, compared to free DOX. Thus, with enhanced internalization and targeting ability of PEG conjugate of NAG-DOX has implication in targeted anticancer therapy. PMID:22721850

  2. Polymersomes conjugated with des-octanoyl ghrelin and folate as a BBB-penetrating cancer cell-targeting delivery system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Chu; Chiang, Chi-Feng; Chen, Li-Fang; Liang, Po-Chin; Hsieh, Wen-Yuan; Lin, Win-Li

    2014-04-01

    Chemotherapy for brain cancer tumors remains a big challenge for clinical medicine due to the inability to transport sufficient drug across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the poor penetration of drug into the tumors. To effectively treat brain tumors and reduce side effects on normal tissues, both des-octanoyl ghrelin and folate conjugated with polymersomal doxorubicin (GFP-D) was developed in this study to help transport across the BBB and target the tumor as well. The size measurements revealed that this BBB-penetrating cancer cell-targeting GFP-D was about 85 nm. In-vitro experiments with a BBB model and C6 glioma cells demonstrated that GFP-D owned a robust penetrating-targeting function for drug delivery. In C6 cell viability tests, GFP-D exhibited an inhibitory effect significantly different from the unmodified polymersomal doxorubicin (P-D). In-vivo antitumor experiments showed that GFP-D performed a much better anti-glioma effect and presented a significant improvement in the overall survival of the tumor-bearing mice as compared to the treatments with free doxorubicin (Dox), liposomal doxorubicin (L-D), P-D, or single ligand conjugated P-D. In addition, Cy 5.5 was used as a probe to investigate the delivery property of this penetrating-targeting delivery system. The overall experimental results indicate that this BBB-penetrating cancer cell-targeting GFP is a highly potential nanocarrier for the treatment of brain tumors. PMID:24513319

  3. Acute transient encephalopathy after weekly paclitaxel infusion.

    PubMed

    Muallao?lu, Sad?k; Koçer, Murat; Güler, Nilüfer

    2012-06-01

    Paclitaxel is highly active against a variety of solid tumors including breast lung, ovarian and head and neck cancer. Although peripheral neurotoxicity is well-known side effect, central nervous system (CNS) toxicity-related standard dose of paclitaxel is extremely uncommon, because paclitaxel dose not cross the blood-brain barrier and is not detectable in the cerebrospinal fluid. We present a patient with advanced stage breast carcinoma who developed acute and spontaneous resolving encephalopathy after weekly dose of paclitaxel. The patient did not have brain metastasis, or prior whole-brain irradiation, or any type of neurosurgery. Radiological imaging studies showed no abnormalities. CNS toxicity of paclitaxel should be kept in mind in patients without a previous history of brain metastasis or brain irradiation and even with low weekly doses. PMID:21618057

  4. Development and Testing of Simulation (Game) to Illustrate Basic Principles of Integrated Project Delivery and Target Value Design: A First Run Study 

    E-print Network

    Munankami, Manish 1972-

    2012-12-07

    This research is focused on developing a simulation (game) that will help explain the basic principles of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD) and Target Value Design (TVD). The transfer of knowledge about Lean principles ...

  5. Efficacy of dual-functional liposomes containing paclitaxel for treatment of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Hua; Cao, Hong-Mei; Tian, Zhi-Ju; Jin, Bo; Wang, Qing; Ma, Hong; Wu, Jing

    2015-02-01

    This study was mainly focused on the development of a dual-ligand liposomal delivery system for targeting the delivery of paclitaxel (PTX) to lung cancer. The specific ligand peptide HAIYPRH (T7) and the cationic cell-penetrating peptide TAT were connected with phospholipid via a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer to prepare the dual-ligand liposomes (T7/TAT-LP-PTX). Physicochemical characterizations of T7/TAT-LP-PTX, such as particle size, ? potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and in vitro PTX release, were also evaluated. In the cellular uptake study, the T7/TAT-LP endocytosed by the A549 cells was 2.26-, 3.48- and 8.56-fold higher than TAT-LP, T7-LP and LP, respectively. The IC50 values of TAT-LP-PTX, T7-LP-PTX and LP-PTX were much higher than those of T7/TAT-LP-PTX, respectively. The homing specificity of T7/TAT-LP was evaluated on the tumor spheroids, which revealed that T7/TAT-LP was more efficaciously internalized in tumor cells than TAT-LP, T7-LP and LP, respectively. Compared to LP, TAT-LP and T7-LP, T7/TAT-LP showed the strongest cell uptake property, and the highest accumulation ability in tumor spheroids in vitro. In the in vivo study, the T7/TAT-LP-PTX exhibited the best inhibitory effect of tumor growth for A549-bearing mice. Collectively, these results suggested that T7/TAT-LP-PTX is a promising drug delivery system for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:25482610

  6. Modulation of CD4+ T Lymphocyte Lineage Outcomes with Targeted, Nanoparticle-Mediated Cytokine Delivery

    E-print Network

    Fahmy, Tarek

    Delivery Jason Park,§,| Wenda Gao,|, Roy Whiston,# Terry B. Strom, Su Metcalfe,*,# and Tarek M. Fahmy-512-1699; fax, 203-432-0030; e-mail, tarek.fahmy@yale.edu. The authors declare no competing financial interests

  7. Self-assembled phenylalanine-?,?-dehydrophenylalanine nanotubes for sustained intravitreal delivery of a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Panda, Jiban J; Yandrapu, Sarath; Kadam, Rajendra S; Chauhan, Virander S; Kompella, Uday B

    2013-12-28

    Current standard of care for sustained back of the eye drug delivery is surgical placement or injection of large, slow release implants using a relatively large 22 gauge needle. We designed novel dipeptide (phenylalanine-?,?-dehydrophenylalanine; Phe-?Phe) based nanotubes with a diameter of ~15-30 nm and a length of ~1500 nm that could be injected with a 33 gauge needle for sustained intravitreal delivery of pazopanib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. The drug could be loaded during nanotube assembly or post-loaded after nanotube formation, with the former being more efficient at 25% w/w pazopanib loading and ~55% loading efficiency. Plain and peptide loaded nanotube were non-cytotoxic to retinal pigment epithelial cells even at a concentration of 200 ?g/ml. Following intravitreal injection of fluorescently labeled nanotubes using a 33 gauge needle in a rat model, the nanotube persistence and drug delivery were monitored using noninvasive fluorophotometry, electron microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis. Nanotubes persisted in the vitreous humor during the 15 days study and pazopanib levels in the vitreous humor, retina, and choroid-RPE at the end of the study were 4.5, 5, and 2.5-folds higher, respectively, compared to the plain drug. Thus, Phe-?Phe nanotubes allow intravitreal injections with a small gauge needle and sustain drug delivery. PMID:24075925

  8. Dual-pH Sensitive Charge-Reversal Polypeptide Micelles for Tumor-Triggered Targeting Uptake and Nuclear Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Han, Shi-Song; Li, Ze-Yong; Zhu, Jing-Yi; Han, Kai; Zeng, Zheng-Yang; Hong, Wei; Li, Wen-Xin; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Liu, Yun; Zhuo, Ren-Xi; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-06-01

    A novel dual-pH sensitive charge-reversal strategy is designed to deliver antitumor drugs targeting to tumor cells and to further promote the nuclei internalization by a stepwise response to the mildly acidic extracellular pH (?6.5) of a tumor and endo/lysosome pH (?5.0). Poly(l-lysine)-block-poly(l-leucine) diblock copolymer is synthesized and the lysine amino residues are amidated by 2,3-dimethylmaleic anhydride to form ?-carboxylic amide, making the polypeptides self-assemble into negatively charged micelles. The amide can be hydrolyzed when exposed to the mildly acidic tumor extracellular environment, which makes the micelles switch to positively charged and they are then readily internalized by tumor cells. A nuclear targeting Tat peptide is further conjugated to the polypeptide via a click reaction. The Tat is amidated by succinyl chloride to mask its positive charge and cell-penetrating function and thus to inhibit nonspecific cellular uptake. After the nanoparticles are internalized into the more acidic intracellular endo/lysosomes, the Tat succinyl amide is hydrolyzed to reactivate the Tat nuclear targeting function, promoting nanoparticle delivery into cell nuclei. This polypeptide nanocarrier facilitates tumor targeting and nuclear delivery simultaneously by simply modifying the lysine amino residues of polylysine and Tat into two different pH-sensitive ?-carboxylic amides. PMID:25626995

  9. An aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system using "off-on" graphene oxide wrapped mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuxia; Hu, Hao; Zhang, Molly Gu; Song, Jibin; Nie, Liming; Wang, Shouju; Niu, Gang; Huang, Peng; Lu, Guangming; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-04-14

    We have developed a novel aptamer-targeting photoresponsive drug delivery system by non-covalent assembly of a Cy5.5-AS1411 aptamer conjugate on the surface of graphene oxide wrapped doxorubicin (Dox)-loaded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-Dox@GO-Apt) for light-mediated drug release and aptamer-targeted cancer therapy. The two "off-on" switches of the MSN-Dox@GO-Apt were controlled by aptamer targeting and light triggering, respectively. The Cy5.5-AS1411 ligand provides MSN-Dox@GO-Apt with nucleolin specific targeting and real-time indicator abilities by "off-on" Cy5.5 fluorescence recovery. The GO acts as a gatekeeper to prevent the loaded Dox from leaking in the absence of laser irradiation, and to control the Dox release in response to laser irradiation. When the GO wrapping falls off upon laser irradiation, the "off-on" photoresponsive drug delivery system is activated, thus inducing chemotherapy. Interestingly, with an increase in laser power, the synergism of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy in a single MSN-Dox@GO-Apt platform led to much more effective cancer cell killing than monotherapies, providing a new approach for treatment against cancer. PMID:25782595

  10. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyi; Zhao, Xianrui; Chen, Jingyi; Chen, Jin; Kuznetsova, Larisa; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Ojima, Iwao

    2011-01-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface, (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3 and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed) and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system will find a range of applications. PMID:20429547

  11. Mechanism-Based Tumor-Targeting Drug Delivery System. Validation of Efficient Vitamin Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis and Drug Release

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wong, S.; Zhao, X.; Chen, J.; Chen, J.; Kuznetsova, L.; Ojima, I.

    2010-05-01

    An efficient mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system, based on tumor-specific vitamin-receptor mediated endocytosis, has been developed. The tumor-targeting drug delivery system is a conjugate of a tumor-targeting molecule (biotin: vitamin H or vitamin B-7), a mechanism-based self-immolative linker and a second-generation taxoid (SB-T-1214) as the cytotoxic agent. This conjugate (1) is designed to be (i) specific to the vitamin receptors overexpressed on tumor cell surface and (ii) internalized efficiently through receptor-mediated endocytosis, followed by smooth drug release via glutathione-triggered self-immolation of the linker. In order to monitor and validate the sequence of events hypothesized, i.e., receptor-mediated endocytosis of the conjugate, drug release, and drug-binding to the target protein (microtubules), three fluorescent/fluorogenic molecular probes (2, 3, and 4) were designed and synthesized. The actual occurrence of these processes was unambiguously confirmed by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) and flow cytometry using L1210FR leukemia cells, overexpressing biotin receptors. The molecular probe 4, bearing the taxoid linked to fluorescein, was also used to examine the cell specificity (i.e., efficacy of receptor-based cell targeting) for three cell lines, L1210FR (biotin receptors overexpressed), L1210 (biotin receptors not overexpressed), and WI38 (normal human lung fibroblast, biotin receptor negative). As anticipated, the molecular probe 4 exhibited high specificity only to L1210FR. To confirm the direct correlation between the cell-specific drug delivery and anticancer activity of the probe 4, its cytotoxicity against these three cell lines was also examined. The results clearly showed a good correlation between the two methods. In the same manner, excellent cell-specific cytotoxicity of the conjugate 1 (without fluorescein attachment to the taxoid) against the same three cell lines was confirmed. This mechanism-based tumor-targeting drug delivery system will find a range of applications.

  12. A review on skin targeted delivery of bioactives as ultradeformable vesicles: overcoming the penetration problem.

    PubMed

    Priyanka, Karunanidhi; Singh, Sanjay

    2014-02-01

    Administration of drugs through skin via transdermal route is a non-invasive approach and applicable for systemic delivery but it is not suitable for drugs having higher molecular weight. Various approaches have been used to improve the efficacy of transdermal route such as vesicular system, iontophoresis, microneedles, use of permeation enhancers, etc. Among the several approaches, vesicular delivery is gaining importance in transdermal drug delivery. Transfersomes are one of the vesicular systems and they are best suited for the transdermal delivery of higher molecular weight compounds. Due to the deformable nature of transfersomes, they penetrate into deeper layers of skin, retain their original structure after penetration and finally enter into the systemic circulation. This review focuses mainly on the applications of transfersomes in the field of drug delivery i.e. delivery of analgesics, anti-cancers, proteins and peptides, immunomodulators, steroidal hormones and herbal drugs with increased penetration through skin. In addition, this review also deals with preparation methods available for preparing transfersomes, characterization, mechanism of penetration upon topical application and its kinetic aspects. PMID:24410447

  13. Properties and evaluation of quaternized chitosan/lipid cation polymeric liposomes for cancer-targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaofei; Li, Xiaoyu; Chang, Jin; Duan, Yourong; Li, Zonghai

    2013-07-01

    Development of high-stability and efficient nonviral vectors with low cytoxicity is important for targeted tumor gene therapy. In this study, cationic polymeric liposomes (CPLs), with similar lipid bilayer structure and high thermal stability, were prepared from polymeric surfactants of quaternized (carboxymethyl)chitosan with different carbon chains (dodecyl, tetradecyl, hexadecyl, and octadecyl). By comparing different factors that influence gene delivery, tetradecyl-quaternized (carboxymethy)chitosan (TQCMC) CPLs, with suitable size (184.4 ± 17.1 nm), ? potentials (27.5 ± 4.9 mV), and productivity for synthesis TQCMC (weight yield 13.1%), were selected for gene transfection evaluation in various cancer cell lines. Although TQCMC CPLs have lower gene transfection efficiency compared with cationic liposomes (Lipofectamine 2000) in vitro, they displayed higher reporter gene delivery ability for cancer tissues (bearing U87 and SMMC-7721 tumors) in vivo after intravenous injection. TQCMC CPLs also have lower cell cytotoxicity and lower cytokine production or liver injury for BALB/c mice. We conclude that the CPLs are promising gene delivery systems that may be used to target various cancers. PMID:23763489

  14. In Vitro Investigation of the Individual Contributions of Ultrasound-Induced Stable and Inertial Cavitation in Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gourevich, Dana; Volovick, Alexander; Dogadkin, Osnat; Wang, Lijun; Mulvana, Helen; Medan, Yoav; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery is a therapeutic modality under development with the potential to treat cancer. Its ability to produce local hyperthermia and cell poration through cavitation non-invasively makes it a candidate to trigger drug delivery. Hyperthermia offers greater potential for control, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging temperature measurement. However, cavitation may offer reduced treatment times, with real-time measurement of ultrasonic spectra indicating drug dose and treatment success. Here, a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery system was used to study ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery in vitro. Drug uptake into breast cancer cells in the vicinity of ultrasound contrast agent was correlated with occurrence and quantity of stable and inertial cavitation, classified according to subharmonic spectra. During stable cavitation, intracellular drug uptake increased by a factor up to 3.2 compared with the control. Reported here are the value of cavitation monitoring with a clinical system and its subsequent employment for dose optimization. PMID:25887690

  15. Prestin binding peptides as ligands for targeted polymersome mediated drug delivery to outer hair cells in the inner ear.

    PubMed

    Surovtseva, Elena V; Johnston, Alexander H; Zhang, Weikai; Zhang, Ya; Kim, Adele; Murakoshi, Michio; Wada, Hiroshi; Newman, Tracey A; Zou, Jing; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2012-03-15

    Targeted delivery of treatment agents to the inner ear using nanoparticles is an advanced therapeutic approach to cure or alleviate hearing loss. Designed to target the outer hair cells of the cochlea, two 12-mer peptides (A(665) and A(666)) with affinity to prestin were identified following 3 rounds of sequential phage display. Two-round display with immobilized prestin protein was used to enrich the library for full-length prestin. The last round was performed using Cos-7 cells transiently transfected with a cCFP-prestin plasmid to display phages expressing peptides restrictive to the extracellular loops of prestin. The binding properties of A(665) and A(666) shown by flow cytometry demonstrated selectivity to prestin-expressing Chinese hamster ovary cells. PEG6K-b-PCL19K polymersomes covalently labelled with these peptides demonstrated effective targeting to outer hair cells in a rat cochlear explant study. PMID:22227343

  16. Anticancer efficacy and toxicokinetics of a novel paclitaxel-clofazimine nanoparticulate co-formulation.

    PubMed

    Koot, Dwayne; Cromarty, Duncan

    2015-06-01

    Contemporary chemotherapy is limited by disseminated, resistant cancer. Targeting nanoparticulate drug delivery systems that encapsulate synergistic drug combinations are a rational means to increase the therapeutic index of chemotherapeutics. A lipopolymeric micelle co-encapsulating an in vitro optimized, synergistic fixed-ratio combination of paclitaxel (PTX) and clofazimine (B663) has been developed and called Riminocelles™. The present pre-clinical study investigated the acute toxicity, systemic exposure, repeat dose toxicity and efficacy of Riminocelles in parallel to Taxol® at an equivalent PTX dose of 10 mg/kg. Daily and weekly dosing schedules were evaluated against Pgp-expressing human colon adenocarcinoma (HCT-15) xenografts implanted subcutaneously in athymic mice. Riminocelles produced statistically significant (p targeting was not achieved and the tumor burden progressed quickly. Prior to further animal studies, the in vivo thermodynamic instability of the simple lipopolymeric micellular delivery system requires improvement so as to maintain and selectively deliver the fixed-ratio drug combination. PMID:25795051

  17. Development of chitosan oligosaccharide-modified gold nanorods for in vivo targeted delivery and noninvasive imaging by NIR irradiation.

    PubMed

    Charan, Shobhit; Sanjiv, Kumar; Singh, Narendra; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chen, Yi-Fan; Nergui, Navchtsetseg Navchaa; Huang, Shih-Hsin; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Peilin

    2012-11-21

    In the present study, we demonstrate the synthesis and applications of multifunctional gold nanorod-based probes for specific targeting and noninvasive imaging based on localized heating generated by gold nanorods after NIR irradiation. The structural design of the probe consists of MUA (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid)-capped gold nanorods covalently linked with low-molecular-weight chitosan oligosaccharide (M(w) ~5000) via carbodiimide (EDC) coupling agent. This surface modification is performed for complete replacement of toxic CTAB (hexadecyltrimethyl-ammonium chloride) and acid-responsive delivery of gold nanorods in acidic environment as known to be present at tumor surrounding areas. The resulting chitosan oligosaccharide-modified gold nanorods (CO-GNRs) were further conjugated with tumor targeting monoclonal antibody against EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor) to provide localized targeting functionality owing to the overexpression of EGFR in human oral adenosquamous carcinoma cell line CAL 27. Initial in vitro and in vivo toxicity assessments indicated that CO-GNRs did not induce any significant toxicity and are thus suitable for biological applications. Furthermore, selective targeting and accumulation of CO-GNRs were observed in vitro via two-photon luminescence imaging studies in CAL 27, which was also observed through in vivo targeting studies performed via NIR (near-infrared) laser irradiation in CAL 27 xenografts of BALB/c nude mice. Hence, the CO-GNRs that we have developed are biocompatible and nontoxic and can be a potential candidate for in vivo targeted delivery, noninvasive imaging based on localized hyperthermia, and photothermal-related therapies. PMID:23030814

  18. Oral administration of paclitaxel with pegylated poly(anhydride) nanoparticles: permeability and pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Zabaleta, Virginia; Ponchel, Gilles; Salman, Hesham; Agüeros, Maite; Vauthier, Christine; Irache, Juan M

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this work was to study the potential of pegylated poly(anhydride) nanoparticles as carriers for the oral delivery of paclitaxel (PTX). Paclitaxel is an anticancer drug, ascribed to the class IV of the Biopharmaceutical Classification system, characterised for its low aqueous solubility and to act as a substrate of the P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P450. For the pegylation of nanoparticles, three different poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used: PEG 2000 (PTX-NP2), PEG 6000 (PTX-NP6) and PEG 10,000 (PTX-NP10). The transport and permeability of paclitaxel through the jejunum mucosa of rats was determined in Ussing chambers, whereas its oral bioavailability was studied in rats. The loading of PTX in pegylated nanoparticles increased between 3 and 7 times the intestinal permeability of paclitaxel through the jejunum compared with the commercial formulation Taxol. Interestingly, the permeability of PTX was significantly higher for PTX-NP2 and PTX-NP6 than for PTX-NP10. In the in vivo studies, similar results were obtained. When PTX-NP2 and PTX-NP6 were administered to rats by the oral route, sustained and therapeutic plasma levels of paclitaxel for at least 48 h were observed. The relative oral bioavailability of paclitaxel delivered in nanoparticles was calculated to be 70% for PTX-NP2, 40% for PTX-NP6 and 16% in case of PTX-NP10. All of these observations would be related with both the bioadhesive properties of these carriers and the inhibitory effect of PEG on the activity of both P-gp and P450 cytochrome. PMID:22516136

  19. Rev-Free HIV-1 Gene Delivery System for Targeting Rev-RRE-Crm1 Nucleocytoplasmic RNA Transport Pathway