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Sample records for tau decay tau

  1. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and new physics'' searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  2. Tau decays: A theoretical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, W.J.

    1992-11-01

    Theoretical predictions for various tau decay rates are reviewed. Effects of electroweak radiative corrections are described. Implications for precision tests of the standard model and ``new physics`` searches are discussed. A perspective on the tau decay puzzle and 1-prong problem is given.

  3. QCD Description of Hadronic Tau Decays

    E-print Network

    Pich, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    The QCD analysis of hadronic tau decays is reviewed and a summary of the present phenomenological status is presented. The following topics are discussed: the determination of alpha_s(m_tau) = 0.338 +- 0.012 from the inclusive tau hadronic width, the measurement of |V_us| through the Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the tau, and the extraction of chiral-perturbation-theory couplings from the spectral tau data.

  4. The tau decay mode problem

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1988-05-01

    The problem of understanding the branching fractions of the 1-charged particle decay modes of the /tau/ lepton is reviewed. The emphasis is on a recent study by K.G. Hayes and M.L. Perl of the statistical validity of the branching fraction measurements. Unconventional explanations of the problem, none of them satisfactory, are also discussed. 25 refs., 4 tabs.

  5. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; ,

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  6. Decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.

    1986-02-01

    Previous measurements of the branching fractions of the tau lepton result in a discrepancy between the inclusive branching fraction and the sum of the exclusive branching fractions to final states containing one charged particle. The sum of the exclusive branching fractions is significantly smaller than the inclusive branching fraction. In this analysis, the branching fractions for all the major decay modes are measured simultaneously with the sum of the branching fractions constrained to be one. The branching fractions are measured using an unbiased sample of tau decays, with little background, selected from 207 pb/sup -1/ of data accumulated with the Mark II detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The sample is selected using the decay products of one member of the ..gamma../sup +/..gamma../sup -/ pair produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to identify the event and then including the opposite member of the pair in the sample. The sample is divided into subgroups according to charged and neutral particle multiplicity, and charged particle identification. The branching fractions are simultaneously measured using an unfold technique and a maximum likelihood fit. The results of this analysis indicate that the discrepancy found in previous experiments is possibly due to two sources. First, the leptonic branching fractions measured in this analysis are about one standard deviation higher than the world average. The measured leptonic branching fractions correspond to a tau lifetime of (3.0 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -13/ s. Secondly, the total branching fraction to one charged hadron plus at least one neutral particle is measured to be (7 +- 3)% higher than the branching fraction expected from a combination of previous measurements and theoretical predictions. It is shown that decay modes involving the eta are not expected to contribute more than 3% to this excess.

  7. B to tau Leptonic and Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.; /Brunel U.

    2011-11-17

    Decays of B mesons to states involving {tau} leptons can be used as a tool to search for the effects of new physics, such as those involving a charged Higgs boson. The experimental status of the decays B {yields} {tau}{nu} and B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu} is discussed, together with limits on new physics effects from current results. Leptonic and semileptonic decays of B mesons into states involving {tau} leptons remain experimentally challenging, but can prove a useful tool for constraining Standard Model parameters, and also offer to constrain the effects of any new physics that may exist including the presence of a charged Higgs boson.

  8. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Ian M.; /Victoria U.

    2010-03-16

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (8.83 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.13)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.273 {+-} 0.002 {+-} 0.009)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.1346 {+-} 0.0010 {+-} 0.0036)%, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.58 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -5} are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.42 {+-} 0.55 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -5}, a measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.28) x 10{sup -5} and an upper limit on {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}[ex.{phi}]) {le} 2.5 x 10{sup -6} {at} 905 CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is measured to be (6.531 {+-} 0.056 {+-} 0.093) x 10{sup -2} from which |V{sub us}| is determined to be 0.2255 {+-} 0.0023. The branching ratio {Beta}/({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (9.796 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.035) x 10{sup -1} is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of charged current lepton universality, g{sub {mu}}/g{sub e} = 1.0036 {+-} 0.0020. The branching ratios {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (3.882 {+-} 0.032 {+-} 0.057) x 10{sup -2}, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (5.9545 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.061) x 10{sup -1} are measured which provide additional tests of charged current lepton universality, (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub {pi}} = 0.9856 {+-} 0.0057 and (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub K} = 0.9827 {+-} 0.0086 which can be combined to give (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub {pi}/K} = 0.9850 {+-} 0.0054. Any deviation of these measurements from the expected Standard Model values would be an indication of new physics.

  9. Review of Rare and Forbidden $\\tau$ Decays

    E-print Network

    Gan, K K

    1997-01-01

    This is a review of rare and forbidden decays of the $\\tau$ lepton. For the rare decays, this includes new results on the chiral anomaly decay and the observations of the Cabibbo-suppressed decay $\\tauketa$ and the internal conversion decay $\\taueee$. For the forbidden decays, there are new upper limits on the radiative decays $\\tauegamma$ and $\\taumugamma$. Some forbidden decays which have not been previously searched for are also suggested.

  10. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  11. Speedy Higgs boson discovery in decays to tau lepton pairs : h->tau,tau

    E-print Network

    Alan J. Barr; Sky T. French; James A. Frost; Christopher G. Lester

    2011-09-12

    Discovery of the Higgs boson in any decay channel depends on the existence of event variables or cuts with sensitivity to the presence of the Higgs. We demonstrate the non-optimality of the kinematic variables which are currently expected to play the largest role in the discovery (or exclusion) of the Higgs at the LHC in the tau channel. Any LHC collaboration looking for opportunities to gain advantages over its rivals should, perhaps, consider the alternative strategy we propose.

  12. Observation of the Semileptonic Decays B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and Evidence for B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.

    2008-01-18

    We present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -}{yields}D{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -}{yields}D*{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and B{sup 0}{yields}D*{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which are potentially sensitive to non-standard model amplitudes. The data sample comprises 232x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB decays collected with the BABAR detector. From a combined fit to B{sup -} and B{sup 0} channels, we obtain the branching fractions B(B{yields}D{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(0.86{+-}0.24{+-}0.11{+-}0.06)% and B(B{yields}D*{tau}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.62{+-}0.31{+-}0.10{+-}0.05)% (normalized for the B{sup 0}), where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and normalization-mode-related.

  13. Study of Michel spectrum of tau decay

    E-print Network

    Ackerman, Nicole (Nicole L.)

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is the beginning of a larger project to use BaBar to examine weak couplings through leptonic [tau] decay. I will use the ratio of Br... and Br... and the Michel parameters [rho] and [eta]. which describe the ...

  14. Search for the rare decay B0-->tau+tau- at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Martinez-Vidal, F; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, Ian J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L

    2006-06-23

    We present the results of a search for the decay B0-->tau+tau- in a data sample of (232+/-3)x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the standard model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain Beta(B0->tau+tau-)<4.1x10(-3) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:16907230

  15. A Search for the Rare Decay B0 to tau+tau- atBaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, AUTHOR = Roethel, W. /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /INFN, Perugia /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2005-11-09

    We present the results of a search for the decay B{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} in a data sample of (232 {+-} 3) x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the Standard Model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 3.2 x 10{sup -3} at the 90% confidence level.

  16. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  17. Theoretical constraints on the rare tau decays in the MSSM

    E-print Network

    Alejandro Ibarra; Tetsuo Shindou; Cristoforo Simonetto

    2008-09-03

    The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model contains in general sources of tau lepton flavour violation which induce the rare decays tau --> mu gamma and tau --> e gamma. We argue in this paper that the observation of both rare processes would imply a lower bound on the radiative muon decay of the form BR(mu --> e gamma) > C BR(tau --> mu gamma) BR(tau --> e gamma). We estimate the size of the constant C without specifying the origin of the tau flavour violation in the supersymmetric model and we discuss the implications of our bound for future searches of rare lepton decays. In particular, we show that, for a wide class of models, present B-factories could discover either tau --> mu gamma or tau --> e gamma, but not both. We also derive for completeness the constant C in the most general setup, pursuing an effective theory approach.

  18. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  19. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  20. Search for CP violation in tau -> K pi nu(tau) decays

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Besson, David Zeke; Zhao, X.

    2002-03-01

    We search and find no evidence for CP violation in tau decays into the K pi v(tau) final state. We provide limits on the imaginary part of the coupling constant L describing a relative contribution of the CP violating processes with respect...

  1. Study of the decay tau(-)->2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0)nu(tau)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan

    1997-11-01

    The decay tau(-) --> 2 pi(-)pi(+)3 pi(0) nu(tau) has been studied with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The branching fraction is measured to be (2.85 +/- 0.56 +/- 0.51) x 10(-4). The result is in good agreement...

  2. Constraining new interactions with leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.; Silva, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    The recent measurements of the Michel parameters in {tau} decays enable, for the first time, a thorough analysis of the leptonic sector. In general, in models beyond the standard model, these parameters will be altered through changes in the {ital W} and {ital Z} couplings, and/or through interactions mediated by new gauge bosons. We perform a complete, model-independent analysis of the constraints imposed by the present data on such boson-mediated interactions, and point out the existence of useful relations among the couplings.

  3. A Search for the Decay B+ to tau+ nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2005-07-27

    We search for the rare leptonic decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} in a sample of 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. Signal events are selected by examining the properties of the B meson recoiling against the semileptonic decay B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0}{ell}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}. We find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level. We combine this result with a previous, statistically independent BABAR search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} to give an upper limit of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.6 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level.

  4. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.; ,

    2008-09-24

    Using approximately 350 million {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}{ell}{ell}) in the range (4-8) x 10{sup -8}.

  5. Search for the Decay tau- to 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; /Annecy, LAPP /Barcelona, IFAE /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Bergen U. /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U.

    2005-06-07

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and one or zero {pi}{sup 0} mesons was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses 232.2 fb{sup -1} of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We observe 24 events with an expected background of 21.6 {+-} 1.3 events. Without evidence for a signal, we calculate an upper limit of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +})({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} < 3.0 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level. This is an improvement by nearly an order of magnitude over the previously established limit. In addition, we set upper limits for the exclusive decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -}3{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}.

  6. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The decay. tau. sup minus r arrow K sup minus K sup +. pi. sup minus. nu. sub. tau. and the. nu. sub. tau. mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cadenas, J.J. ); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Pich, A. Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Valencia, Burjasot )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on the effective chiral Lagrangian to describe the decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. Using our model we study the possible limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass that can be achieved by a high-statistics, high-precision experiment taking data close to the {tau}-pair production threshold.

  8. Tau Physics: Theory Overview

    E-print Network

    Pich, A

    2008-01-01

    The present status of some selected topics on tau physics is presented: charged-current universality tests, bounds on lepton-flavour violation, the determination of alpha_s from the inclusive tau hadronic width, the measurement of |V_{us}| through the Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the tau, and the theoretical description of the "tau -> nu_tau K pi" spectrum.

  9. Tau Physics: Theory Overview

    E-print Network

    A. Pich

    2008-06-17

    The present status of some selected topics on tau physics is presented: charged-current universality tests, bounds on lepton-flavour violation, the determination of alpha_s from the inclusive tau hadronic width, the measurement of |V_{us}| through the Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the tau, and the theoretical description of the "tau -> nu_tau K pi" spectrum.

  10. First observation of the decay tau(-)-> K*(-)eta nu(tau)

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-01-01

    gamma. The measured branching fraction is B(tau(-) --> K- pi(0)eta nu(tau)) = (2.9 +/- 0.8 +/- 0.3) x 10(-4). We also measure the inclusive branching fractions without requiring the K* resonance, B(tau(-) --> K(S)pi(-) eta nu(tau)) = (1.10 +/- 0.35 +/- 0...

  11. Measurement of tau-decays involving eta-mesons

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1992-12-01

    ) prediction based on e+e- --> pi+pi-eta data. Upper limits on the branching ratios for other tau decays to final states including eta mesons are improved by an order of magnitude compared to previous measurements....

  12. The strong coupling from tau decays without prejudice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boito, Diogo; Golterman, Maarten; Jamin, Matthias; Mahdavi, Andisheh; Maltman, Kim; Osborne, James; Peris, Santiago

    2014-08-01

    We review our recent determination of the strong coupling ?s from the OPAL data for non-strange hadronic tau decays. We find that ?s (m?2)= 0.325 ± 0.018 using fixed-order perturbation theory, and ?s (m?2)= 0.347 ± 0.025 using contour-improved perturbation theory. At present, these values supersede any earlier determinations of the strong coupling from hadronic tau decays, including those from ALEPH data.

  13. Sensitivity to the Higgs sector of SUSY-seesaw models via LFV tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.

    2010-02-10

    Here we study and compare the sensitivity to the Higgs sector of SUSY-seesaw models via the LFV tau decays: tau->3mu, tau->muK{sup +}K{sup -}, tau->mueta and tau->mu f{sub 0}. We emphasize that, at present, the two latter channels are the most efficient ones to test indirectly the Higgs particles.

  14. Resonance Effective Theory Approach to {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2004-12-02

    The decays {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} are analyzed in the framework of the resonance effective theory of QCD, We derive the effective chiral Lagrangian relevant for the evaluation of the hadronic axial-vector current, taking into account the constraints imposed by QCD on the high energy asymptotic behaviour. Then we fit the unknown parameters to the spectral function and branching ratio measured by ALEPH, showing that the theory is in good agreement with experimental data. A detailed description of the work sketched here can be found.

  15. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  16. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  17. Tau Decays and $\\alpha_s$

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Zhiqing

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of the determination of the strong coupling constant $\\alpha_s$ from the leptonic branching ratios, the lifetime, and the invariant mass distributions of the hadronic final state of the $\\tau$ lepton over the last two decades is briefly reviewed. The improvements in the latest ALEPH update are described in some detail. Currently this is one of the most precise $\\alpha_s$ determinations. Together with the other determination at the $Z$ boson mass pole, they constitutes the most accurate test of the asymptotic freedom in QCD.

  18. Wess-Zumino current and the structure of the decay tau(-)-> K-pi K--(+)nu(tau)

    E-print Network

    Besson, David Zeke

    2004-06-01

    We present the first study of the vector (Wess-Zumino) current in tau(-)-->K(-)pi(-)K(+)nu(tau) decay using data collected with the CLEO III detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We determine the quantitative contributions to the decay...

  19. Searches for Lepton flavor violation in the decays tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma and tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Hooberman, B; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; Firmino da Costa, J; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Nguyen, X; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bard, D J; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Franco Sevilla, M; Fulsom, B G; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B

    2010-01-15

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a tau lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963+/-7)x10{6} tau decays collected by the BABAR detector near the Upsilon(4S), Upsilon(3S) and Upsilon(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and we set upper limits on the branching fractions of B(tau{+/-}-->e{+/-}gamma)<3.3x10{-8} and B(tau{+/-}-->mu{+/-}gamma)<4.4x10{-8} at 90% confidence level. PMID:20366586

  20. First search for CP violation in tau lepton decay

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Darling, C.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1998-11-01

    We have performed the first search for CP violation in tau lepton decay. CP violation in lepton decay does not occur in the minimal standard model but can occur in extensions such as the multi-Higgs doublet model. It appears as a characteristic...

  1. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  2. Hadron structure in {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Roig, P.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the hadronization structure of both vector and axial-vector currents leading to {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays. At leading order in the 1/N{sub C} expansion, and considering only the contribution of the lightest resonances, we work out, within the framework of the resonance chiral Lagrangian, the structure of the local vertices involved in those processes. The couplings in the resonance theory are constrained by imposing the asymptotic behavior of vector and axial-vector spectral functions ruled by QCD. In this way we predict the hadron spectra and conclude that, contrary to previous assertions, the vector contribution dominates by far over the axial-vector one in all KK{pi} charge channels.

  3. Lepton Universality, |V(Us)| and Search for Second Class Current in Tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Swagato; /Victoria U.

    2011-11-10

    Several hundred million {tau} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Recent results on Charged Current Lepton Universality and two independent measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, K{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays, and a search for Second Class Current in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are presented, where the charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  4. Search for CP Violation in the Decay tau- \\to pi- K^0_S (>= 0 pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-16

    We report a search for CP violation in the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}({>=} 0{pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} using a dataset of 437 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 476 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The CP-violating decay-rate asymmetry is determined to be (-0.45 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11)%, approximately three standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction of (0.33 {+-} 0.01)%.

  5. Heavy neutrinos and the kinematics of tau decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobach, Andrew; Dobbs, Sean

    2015-03-01

    Searches for heavy neutrinos often rely on the possibility that the heavy neutrinos will decay to detectable particles. Interpreting the results of such searches requires a particular model for the heavy-neutrino decay. We present a method for placing limits on the probability that a tau can couple to a heavy neutrino, |U? 4|2 , using only the kinematics of semileptonic tau decays, instead of a specific model. Our study suggests that B factories with large data sets, such a Belle and BABAR, may be able to place stringent limits on |U? 4|2 as low as O (10-7-10-3) when 100 MeV ?m4?1.2 GeV , utilizing minimal assumptions regarding the decay modes of heavy neutrinos.

  6. TAU2012 Summary

    E-print Network

    Antonio Pich

    2013-03-03

    The main highlights discussed at TAU2012 are briefly summarized. Besides the standard topics on lepton physics covered also at previous conferences (universality, QCD tests, V_{us} determination from tau decay, g-2, neutrino oscillations, lepton-flavour violation), the tau lepton is playing now a very important role in searches for new physics phenomena.

  7. TAU2012 Summary

    E-print Network

    Pich, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The main highlights discussed at TAU2012 are briefly summarized. Besides the standard topics on lepton physics covered also at previous conferences (universality, QCD tests, V_{us} determination from tau decay, g-2, neutrino oscillations, lepton-flavour violation), the tau lepton is playing now a very important role in searches for new physics phenomena.

  8. Tau Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, tau immunotherapy has advanced from proof-of-concept studies [Sigurdsson EM, NIH R01AG020197, 2001; Asuni AA, et al: J Neurosci 2007;27:9115-9129], which have now been confirmed and extended by us and others. Phase I clinical trials on active and passive tau immunizations are being conducted, with several additional passive tau antibody trials likely to be initiated in the near future for Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. Because tau pathology correlates better with the degree of dementia than amyloid-? (A?) pathology, greater clinical efficacy may be achieved by clearing tau than A? aggregates in the later stages of the disease, when cognitive impairments become evident. Substantial insight has now been obtained regarding which epitopes to target, mechanism of action and potential toxicity, but much remains to be clarified. All of these factors likely depend on the model/disease or stage of pathology and the immunogen/antibody. Interestingly, tau antibodies interact with the protein both extra- and intracellularly, but the importance of each site for tau clearance is not well defined. Some antibodies are readily taken up into neurons, whereas others are not. It can be argued that extracellular clearance may be safer but less efficacious than intraneuronal clearance and/or sequestration to prevent secretion and further spread of tau pathology. Development of therapeutic tau antibodies has led to antibody-derived imaging probes, which are more specific than the dye-based compounds that are already in clinical trials. Such specificity may give valuable information on the pathological tau epitope profile, which could then guide the selection of therapeutic antibodies for maximal efficacy and safety. Hopefully, tau immunotherapy will be effective in clinical trials, and further advanced by mechanistic clarification in experimental models with insights from biomarkers and postmortem analyses of clinical subjects. PMID:26551002

  9. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  10. Measurement of sigma(ppbar->Z) Br(Z->tau+tau-) and search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau+tau- at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Galea, Cristina Florina; /Nijmegen U.

    2008-01-01

    The resonant production of tau-lepton pairs is as interesting for the study of Standard Model (SM) physics as the production of lighter leptons pairs. For new phenomena, such as Higgs boson production or in case new particles beyond the SM would arise, the detection of (resonant) pairs of tau leptons becomes much more interesting. This is due to the fact that tau leptons are much heavier than the other leptons, which increases the chance that these new phenomena would be observed first in this channel. Unfortunately their clean detection is far more difficult than that of muons or electrons. The cross section times branching ratio {sigma}{center_dot} Br for the process p{bar p} {yields} Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} was measured at {radical}s = 1.96 GeV using 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment. This measurement was performed in the channel in which one of the tau leptons decays to a muon and neutrinos, while the other decays either hadronically or to an electron and neutrinos. A set of 1511 events, of which about 20% estimated background, passed all selection criteria. The trigger and muon reconstruction efficiencies, as well as the efficiency for track reconstruction were obtained from data using the 'tag and probe' method on Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events. The multijet background was estimated from the sample of events which passed all selection criteria but in which the muon and the tau candidate had the same charge. The W {yields} {mu}{nu} + jets background was modeled by Monte Carlo simulations, but normalized to data. All the other backgrounds, as well as the efficiency for Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} events were estimated using simulated events normalized to the theoretical calculations of cross sections at next-to-leading order or next-to-next-to-leading order. The energy of the tau candidates was corrected for the estimated response of the charged pions in the calorimeter, which is of the order 50-80%. Since the charged pion response in data was not well reproduced by the default simulation of hadronic interactions (Geisha), a different simulation (gCALOR) was used to obtain an estimated charged pion response consistent with the one measured in data. This tau energy correction method makes use of the superior resolution of the track momentum measurement compared to the resolution of the tau candidate energy as measured by the calorimeter, which leads to a better data--simulation agreement and a decrease of 10% in the resolution of the visible mass peak. The result of this measurement is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z) {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 240 {+-} 8(stat) {+-} 12(syst) {+-} 15(lumi) pb, in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of 241.6{sub -3.2}{sup +3.6} pb [79] or 251.9{sub -12}{sup +5.1} pb [93-95], as well as with other measurements performed by the D0 and CDF experiments in all channels in which the Z boson decays leptonically [96-100]. This is the most precise Z boson cross section measurement to date performed in the tau lepton channel at hadron colliders. The analysis demonstrates the ability of the D0 experiment to identify tau leptons decaying hadronically with good efficiency and high purity, a challenging task in p{bar p} collisions where the number of jets resembling tau leptons is very high. This achievement forms a solid basis for other analyses using hadronic tau lepton decays, such as the search for the Higgs boson decaying into tau-lepton pairs, which was performed for the last part of this thesis.

  11. Reconstruction and identification of hadronic decays of tau leptons in ATLAS

    E-print Network

    Zinonos, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Hadronically decaying tau leptons are of prime importance in numerous physics analyses in ATLAS. The spectrum of the possible applications of hadronically decaying tau leptons reaches from Standard Model measurements, including Higgs searches, to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The basic principles behind the sophisticated tau reconstruction and identification techniques, which are specifically designed to identify hadronically decaying taus and reject various background processes, are delineated here along with current data-driven estimates of their respective performance.

  12. ChPT parameters from tau-decay data

    E-print Network

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, A; Pich, A

    2015-01-01

    Using the updated ALEPH V-A spectral function from tau decays, we determine the lowest spectral moments of the left-right correlator and extract dynamical information on order parameters of the QCD chiral symmetry breaking. Uncertainties associated with violations of quark-hadron duality are estimated from the data, imposing all known short-distance constraints on a resonance-based parametrization. Employing proper pinched weight functions, we obtain an accurate determination of the effective chiral couplings L10 and C87 and the dimension-six and -eight contributions in the Operator Product Expansion.

  13. ChPT parameters from tau-decay data

    E-print Network

    A. Rodríguez-Sánchez; M. González-Alonso; A. Pich

    2015-09-28

    Using the updated ALEPH V-A spectral function from tau decays, we determine the lowest spectral moments of the left-right correlator and extract dynamical information on order parameters of the QCD chiral symmetry breaking. Uncertainties associated with violations of quark-hadron duality are estimated from the data, imposing all known short-distance constraints on a resonance-based parametrization. Employing proper pinched weight functions, we obtain an accurate determination of the effective chiral couplings L10 and C87 and the dimension-six and -eight contributions in the Operator Product Expansion.

  14. Measurement of Cabibbo-Suppressed Tau Lepton Decays and the Determination of |Vus|

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Stefan; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    This work presents simultaneous branching fraction measurements of the decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n = 0,1,2,3 and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n = 3,4. The analysis is based on a data sample of 427 x 10{sup 6} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 464.4 fb{sup -1}. The measured values are {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (6.57 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -3}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.61 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -3}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (5.05 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -4}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.31 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.40) x 10{sup -4}, {Beta}({tau}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.263 {+-} 0.008 {+-} 0.078) x 10{sup -2} and {Beta}({tau}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (9.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup -4}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. All measurements are compatible with the current world averages whereas the uncertainties are significantly smaller by a factor of up to five. The determination of {Beta}({tau}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is the first measurement of this branching fraction. The measured branching fractions are combined with the current world averages. Using the new averages, an updated determination of |V{sub us}| from hadronic {tau} decays yields |V{sub us}| = 0.2146 {+-} 0.0025, which improves previous measurements by 19%. Its uncertainty is comparable to the one of the current world average from semileptonic kaon decays.

  15. Kaon content of three-prong decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.J.

    1990-12-01

    We present a series of measurements involving the production of charged kaons in three-prong hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton. The data sample was obtained with the TPC/Two-Gamma detector facility at PEP. We set a limit on the branching fraction BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0}) < 0.26% at the 95% confidence level. The process {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0} is related via SU(3) to the second-class current decay {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}{pi}{sup {minus}}{eta}. We also present new measurements of the three-prong branching fractions BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.70 (+0.20/{minus}0.17)% and BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.16 (+0.10/{minus}0.07)%. 68 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Search for Rare Multi-Pion Decays of the Tau Lepton Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonyan, Ruben

    2007-09-18

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to rare multi-pion final states is performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The analysis uses 232 fb-1 of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. In the search for the {tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay, we observe 10 events with an expected background of 6.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.4} events. In the absence of a signal, we calculate the decay branching ratio upper limit {beta}({tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. This is more than a factor of 30 improvement over the previously established limit. In addition, we search for the exclusive decay mode {tau}- {yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} with the further decay of {omega} {yields} {pi}-{pi}+{pi}{sup 0}. We observe 1 event, expecting 0.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4} background events, and calculate the upper limit {beta}{tau}-{yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This is the first upper limit for this mode.

  17. CP Asymmetry in Tau Slepton Decay in The Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    E-print Network

    Wei Min Yang; Dong Sheng Du

    2002-02-06

    We investigate CP violation asymmetry in the decay of tau slepton into a tau neutrino and a chargino in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The new source of CP violation is the complex mixing in the tau slepton sector. The rate asymmetry between the decays of tau slepton and its CP conjugate process can be of order of $10^{-3}$ in some region of the parameter space of the mSUGRA scenario, which will possibly be detectable in the near-future collider experiments.

  18. A New Mass Reconstruction Technique for Resonances Decaying to di-tau

    E-print Network

    A. Elagin; P. Murat; A. Pranko; A. Safonov

    2011-02-22

    Accurate reconstruction of the mass of a resonance decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons is challenging because of the presence of multiple neutrinos from $\\tau$ decays. The existing methods rely on either a partially reconstructed mass, which has a broad spectrum that reduces sensitivity, or the collinear approximation, which is applicable only to the relatively small fraction of events. We describe a new technique, which provides an accurate mass reconstruction of the original resonance and does not suffer from the limitations of the collinear approximation. The major improvement comes from replacing assumptions of the collinear approximation by a requirement that mutual orientations of the neutrinos and other decay products are consistent with the mass and decay kinematics of a $\\tau$ lepton. This is achieved by minimizing a likelihood function defined in the kinematically allowed phase space region. In this paper we describe the technique and illustrate its performance using $Z/\\gamma^{*}\\to\\tau\\tau$ and $H\\to\\tau\\tau$ events simulated with the realistic detector resolution. The method is also tested on a clean sample of data $Z/\\gamma^{*}\\to\\tau\\tau$ events collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron. We expect that this new technique will allow for a major improvement in searches for the Higgs boson at both the LHC and the Tevatron.

  19. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons with lepton-flavour-violating decays involving tau leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2007-12-01

    The authors search for pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles (H{sup {+-}{+-}}) followed by decays into electron-tau (e{tau}) and muon-tau ({mu}{tau}) pairs using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 350 pb{sup -1} collected from {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II experiment. They search separately for cases where three or four final-state leptons are detected, and then combine the results into limits for each exclusive flavor decay mode of the H{sup {+-}{+-}}. Assuming 100% branching ratios of the H{sup {+-}{+-}} to left-handed e{tau} ({mu}{tau}) pairs, they set an H{sup {+-}{+-}} lower mass limit of 114 (112) GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level (C.L.).

  20. Software for physics of tau lepton decay in LHC experiments

    E-print Network

    Tomasz Przedzinski

    2010-09-20

    Software development in high energy physics experiments offers unique experience with rapidly changing environment and variety of different standards and frameworks that software must be adapted to. As such, regular methods of software development are hard to use as they do not take into account how greatly some of these changes influence the whole structure. The following thesis summarizes development of TAUOLA C++ Interface introducing tau decays to new event record standard. Documentation of the program is already published. That is why it is not recalled here again. We focus on the development cycle and methodology used in the project, starting from the definition of the expectations through planning and designing the abstract model and concluding with the implementation. In the last part of the paper we present installation of the software within different experiments surrounding Large Hadron Collider and the problems that emerged during this process.

  1. Software for physics of tau lepton decay in LHC experiments

    E-print Network

    Przedzinski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Software development in high energy physics experiments offers unique experience with rapidly changing environment and variety of different standards and frameworks that software must be adapted to. As such, regular methods of software development are hard to use as they do not take into account how greatly some of these changes influence the whole structure. The following thesis summarizes development of TAUOLA C++ Interface introducing tau decays to new event record standard. Documentation of the program is already published. That is why it is not recalled here again. We focus on the development cycle and methodology used in the project, starting from the definition of the expectations through planning and designing the abstract model and concluding with the implementation. In the last part of the paper we present installation of the software within different experiments surrounding Large Hadron Collider and the problems that emerged during this process.

  2. Tracker and Calorimeter Performance for the Identification of Hadronic Tau Lepton Decays in ATLAS

    E-print Network

    Stan Lai; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-16

    Tau leptons play an important role in the physics program in ATLAS. They can be used not only in searches for new phenomena like the Higgs boson or Supersymmetry, or for electroweak measurements but also in detector related studies like the determination of the missing transverse energy scale. Identifying hadronically decaying tau leptons requires good understanding of the detector performance, combining information from calorimeter and tracking detectors. The current status of the tau reconstruction and identification with the ATLAS detector is presented. The identification efficiencies are measured with W -> tau nu events, and found to be consistent with the prediction from Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Search for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decay tau -> electron gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2005-08-26

    A search for the non-conservation of lepton flavor in the decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma} has been performed with 2.07 x 10{sup 8} e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} events collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV. They find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching ratio of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  4. LFV in semileptonic {tau} decays and {mu}-e conversion in nuclei in SUSY-seesaw

    SciTech Connect

    Arganda, E.; Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Teixeira, A. M.

    2008-11-23

    Here we review the main results of LFV in the semileptonic tau decays {tau}{yields}{mu}PP(PP = {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}), {tau}{yields}{mu}P(P = {pi},{eta},{eta}'), and {tau}{yields}{mu}V(V = {rho},{phi}) as well as in {mu}-e conversion in nuclei within SUSY-seesaw scenarios, and compare our predictions with the present experimental bounds.

  5. Search for lepton flavor violation in the decay tau+/--->e+/-gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Minamora, J S; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Schott, G; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T

    2006-02-01

    A search for the nonconservation of lepton flavor in the decay tau+/--->e+/-gamma has been performed with 2.07x10(8) e+e--->tau+tau- events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP II storage ring at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV. We find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching ratio of Beta(tau+/--->e+/-gamma)<1.1x10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:16486807

  6. Studies of the Strange Hadronic Tau Decay Tau- to K0(S) Pi- Nu-Tau Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Andrew J.; /Manchester U. /SLAC

    2006-01-27

    A study of the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} (K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) using the BABAR detector is presented. Using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data we measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.830 {+-} 0.005(stat) {+-} 0.042(syst))%, which is the world's most precise measurement to date of this branching ratio, and is consistent with the current world average. This preliminary result, unlike most of the {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) measurements already published, is systematics dominated and so the biggest future improvement to this number should come from reducing the systematic uncertainties in the analysis. A study of the K{pi} mass spectrum, from which the strange (K{pi}) spectral function can be measured, reveals excess contributions above the K*(892) tail at higher K{pi} mass. While in the past this has been thought to be due to K*(892) - K*(1410) interference, we find that the K*(1410), whose branching ratio to K{pi} is approximately 7%, seems insufficient to explain the excess mass observed in the data. Instead, we perform a fit using a K*(892) - K*(1680) interference model and find better agreement. The discrepancy that remains could be due to an s-wave contribution to the interference that is not parameterized in the model used, and/or detector smearing that is not accounted for in our fit. We also attempt to find an s-wave contribution to the K{pi} mass spectrum by searching for an sp-interference effect. While we find a hint that such an effect exists, we have neither the confidence in the statistics nor systematics in the higher K{pi} mass region to announce an observation. We conclude that it would be a worthwhile study to pursue.

  7. Limit on the tau neutrino mass

    E-print Network

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1993-06-01

    A limit on the tau neutrino mass M(nu)tau is obtained from a study of tau decays in the reaction e+e- --> tau+tau- at center-of-mass energies is similar to 10.6 GeV. The result is based on an end-point analysis of the invariant mass spectrum...

  8. Selected topics on tau physics

    E-print Network

    Antonio Pich

    2007-10-31

    The B Factories have generated a large amount of new results on the tau lepton. The present status of some selected topics on tau physics is presented: charged-current universality tests, bounds on lepton-flavour violation, the determination of alpha_s from the inclusive tau hadronic width, and the measurement of |V_{us}| through the Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the tau lepton.

  9. Limits on tau lepton-flavor violating decays into three charged leptons

    E-print Network

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the ? [tau] lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468??fb-1 [fb superscript -1] collected with the BABAR ...

  10. Effects of W/sub R/ and charged Higgs in the leptonic decay of /tau/

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Yung Su

    1989-07-01

    Experimental test of the existence of the right-hand W boson and the charged Higgs particle is suggested. The experiment involves measurement of muon polarization from the decay of polarized /tau/'s. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Search for anomalous couplings in the decay of polarized Z bosons to tau lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.C.

    1997-06-01

    Using a sample of 4,500 polarized Z decays to {tau} lepton pairs accumulated with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in 1993-95, a search has been made for anomalous couplings in the neutral current reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}. A measurement of the CP violating Weak Electric Dipole Moment (WEDM) and the CP conserving Weak Magnetic Dipole Moment (WMDM) of the {tau} lepton has been performed by considering the transverse spin polarization of {tau} leptons produced at the Z pole. Using a maximum likelihood technique, the observed {tau} decay spectra in the e, {mu}, {pi}, and {rho} decay channels are used to infer the net transverse polarization of the underlying tau leptons, and a fit for the anomalous dipole moments is performed. No evidence for these dipole movements is observed, and limits are placed on both the real and imaginary parts of the WEDM and WMDM.

  12. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}l{sup {+-}}{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.

    2008-02-22

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of a {tau} to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an {omega} vector meson is performed using 384.1 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II storage ring. No signal is found, and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B({tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}e{sup {+-}}{omega})<1.1x10{sup -7} and B({tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}{omega})<1.0x10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  13. A Search for the Decay Modes B +/- to h +/- tau l

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-07-20

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} h{sup {+-}} {tau}{ell} (h = K, {pi}; {ell} = e, {mu}) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472 million B{bar B} pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and {ell} candidates, we are able to fully determine the {tau} four-momentum. The resulting {tau} candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B{sup {+-}} {yields} h{sup {+-}} {tau}{ell} decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level of a few times 10{sup -5}.

  14. Lepton flavor violating tau decays in type-III seesaw mechanism

    E-print Network

    Abdesslam Arhrib; Rachid Benbrik; Chuan-Hung Chen

    2010-05-20

    In this paper, the lepton flavor violating $\\tau\\to \\ell P(V)$ ($P,V= \\pi^0, \\eta, \\eta^{\\prime}, \\rho^0, \\omega, \\phi$) and $\\tau\\to 3\\ell$ ($\\ell = e, \\mu$) decays are studied in the framework of the type-III seesaw model, in which new triplet fermions with a zero hypercharge (Y=0) interact with ordinary lepton doublets via Yukawa couplings, and affect tree-level leptonic Z-boson couplings. We investigate the experimental bound from the leptonic Z decay to get contraint on the exsiting parameters space. We predict that the upper limits on the branching ratios of $\\tau\\to \\ell P(V)$ and $\\tau\\to 3\\ell$ can reach the experimental current limits.

  15. Lepton flavor violating {tau} decays in the type-III seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Chen, C.-H.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the lepton flavor violating {tau}{yields}lP(V) (P, V={pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, {eta}{sup '}, {rho}{sup 0}, {omega}, {phi}) and {tau}{yields}3l (l=e, {mu}) decays are studied in the framework of the type-III seesaw model, in which new triplet fermions with a zero hypercharge (Y=0) interact with ordinary lepton doublets via Yukawa couplings, and affect tree-level leptonic Z-boson couplings. We investigate the experimental bound from the leptonic Z decay to get constraints on the existing parameters space. We predict that the upper limits on the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}lP(V) and {tau}{yields}3l can reach the experimental current limits.

  16. Search for Lepton Flavour Violating Decays Tau -> l Ks with the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cenci, Riccardo; /SLAC

    2009-03-20

    We present the search for the lepton flavour violating decay {tau} {yields} lK{sup 0}{sub s} with the BaBar experiment data. This process and many other lepton flavour violating {tau} decays, like {tau} {yields} {mu}{gamma} and {tau} {yields} lll, are one of the most promising channel to search for evidence of new physics. According to the Standard Model and the neutrino mixing parameters, branching fractions are estimated well below 10{sup -14}, but many models of new physics allow for branching fractions values close to the present experimental sensitivity. This analysis is based on a data sample of 469fb{sup -1} collected by BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring from 1999 to 2007, equivalent to 431 millions of {tau} pairs. the BABAR experiment, initially designed for studying CP violation in B mesons, has demonstrated to be one of the most suitable environments for studying {tau} decays. The tracking system, the calorimeter and the particle identification of BABAR, together with the knowledge of the {tau} initial energy, allow an extremely powerful rejection of background events that, for this analysis, is better than 10{sup -9}. Being {tau} {yields} lK{sup 0}{sub s} a decay mode without neutrinos, the signal {tau} decay can be fully reconstructed. Kinematical constraints are used in a fit that provides a decay tree reconstruction with a high resolution. For this analysis MC simulated events play a decisive role for estimating the signal efficiency and study the residual background. High statistics MC sample are produced simulating detector conditions for different periods of data collection, in order to reduce any discrepancies with the data. When discrepancies can not be removed, we perform studies to compute a correction factor or an estimation of systematic errors that need to be included in the final measurement. A significant improvement of the current result can be reached only with a higher statistics and, therefore, with a new collider providing a luminosity from 10 to 100 times more than PEP-II. A new detector, with improved performance and able to collect data in a high background environment, is also requested to fully exploit the capability of such amount of data. In fact, only keeping the efficiency and the background as similar as possible to present ones, we will be able to scale almost linearly the estimated upper limit according to the luminosity. The strong potential of improvement for the search of lepton flavour violation {tau} decays makes the building of such a machine highly desirable.

  17. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau(+)tau(-) pairs in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Achary, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjea, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopia, S.; Haley, J.; Hang, L.; Harder, K.; Harein, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoangau, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I. I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-02-01

    We present a search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}, were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We set upper limits at the 95% C.L. on the product of production cross section and branching ratio for a scalar resonance decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs, and we interpret these limits as limits on the production of Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and as constraints in the MSSM parameter space.

  18. Observation of the Semileptonic Decays B to D*taunu and Evidence for B to D tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    B., Aubert

    2007-09-14

    We present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *+}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are potentially sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes, The data sample comprises 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4s) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector. From a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, we obtain the branching fractions {beta}(B {yields} D{sub {tau}}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0:86 {+-} 0:24 {+-} 0:11 {+-} 0:06)% and {beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1:62 {+-} 0:31 {+-} 0:10 {+-} 0:05)% (normalized for the {bar B}{sup 0}), , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and normalization-mode-related.

  19. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  20. Surprising theoretical results on the decay rate of the /tau/ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, E.

    1988-10-24

    Corrections to the naive prediction for the inclusive semihadronic decay rate of the /tau/ lepton contain several surprises: electroweak corrections are significant, nonperturbative QCD corrections can be treated systematically, and the order ed /sub s/T perturbative QCD corrections are enormous. The possibility of precise theoretical predictions of the decay rate is discussed. 10 refs.

  1. Strong renormalization scheme dependence in {tau}-lepton decay: Fact or fiction?

    SciTech Connect

    Chyla, J.

    1995-05-01

    The question of the renormalization scheme dependence of the {tau} semileptonic decay rate is examined in response to a recent criticism. Particular attention is payed to a distinction between a consistent quantitative description of this dependence and the actual selection of a subset of ``acceptable`` renormalization schemes. It is pointed out that this criticism is valid only within a particular definition of the ``strength`` of the renormalization scheme dependence and should not discourage further attempts to use the semileptonic {tau} decay rate for quantitative tests of perturbative QCD.

  2. Search for Lepton-Flavor and Lepton-Number Violation in the Decay tau to lhh'

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Yale U. /Yale U.

    2005-06-29

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}hh') < (0.7-4.8) x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  3. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Apolle, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Backus Mayes, J.; Badescu, E.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Baranov, S. P.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Bedikian, S.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernat, P.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Bierwagen, K.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boddy, C. R.; Boehler, M.; Boek, T. T.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borri, M.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutouil, S.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brelier, B.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy . The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2-4 %, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2.5 % for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4 % for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 . For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2-8 %, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton-proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.

  4. Theoretical overview on tau physics

    E-print Network

    Antonio Pich

    2006-09-14

    Precise measurements of the tau lepton properties provide stringent tests of the Standard Model structure and accurate determinations of its parameters. We overview the present status of a few selected topics: lepton universality, QCD tests and the determination of alpha_s, m_s and V_us from hadronic tau decays, and lepton flavor violation phenomena.

  5. Tau Physics 2006: Summary & Outlook

    E-print Network

    Antonio Pich

    2007-02-07

    A large amount of new results have been presented at TAU2006. The highlights of the workshop, the present status of a few selected topics on lepton physics (universality, QCD tests, V_{us} determination from tau decay, g-2, neutrino oscillations, lepton-flavour violation) and the prospects for future improvements are briefly summarized.

  6. Analysis of birefringence decay profiles for nucleic acid helices possessing bends: the tau-ratio approach.

    PubMed Central

    Vacano, E; Hagerman, P J

    1997-01-01

    For nucleic acid helices in the 100-200-bp range, a central bend or point of flexibility increases the rate of rotational diffusion. In a transient electric birefringence (TEB) experiment, this increase is manifest as a reduction in the terminal (slowest) birefringence decay time. Previous experimental and theoretical work has demonstrated that the ratio of the decay times for a bent/flexible molecule and its fully duplex (linear) counterpart represents a sensitive, quantifiable measure of the apparent bend angle (tau-ratio approach). In the current work, we have examined the influence of helix parameters (e.g., persistence length, helix rise, diameter) on the tau-ratio for a given bend. The tau-ratio is found to be remarkably insensitive to variations and/or uncertainties in the helix parameters, provided that one employs bent and control molecules with the same sequence and length (apart from the bend itself). Although a single tau-ratio determination normally does not enable one to distinguish between fixed and flexible bends, such a distinction can be made from a set of tau-ratios for molecules possessing two variably phased bends. A number of additional uncertainties are examined, including errors in the estimation of the dimensions of nonhelix elements that are responsible for bends; such errors can, in principle, be estimated by performing a series of measurements for molecules of varying length. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199795

  7. Prospects of constraining the Higgs CP nature in the tau decay channel at the LHC

    E-print Network

    Berge, Stefan; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how precisely the CP nature of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, parametrized by a scalar-pseudoscalar Higgs mixing angle, can be determined in Higgs-to-tau-pair decay with subsequent tau-lepton decays to charged prongs at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We combine two methods in order to define an observable which is sensitive to this scalar-pseudoscalar mixing angle: We use the rho-decay plane method for tau-to-rho decays and the impact parameter method for all other major tau decays. For estimating the precision with which the mixing angle can be measured at the LHC (13 TeV) we take into account the background from Drell-Yan production and perform a Monte Carlo simulation of measurement uncertainties on the signal and background distributions. We obtain that the mixing angle can be determined with an uncertainty of 15 degree (9 degree) at the LHC with an integrated luminosity of 150 inverse fb (500 inverse fb), and with ~4 degree with 3 inverse ab. Future measurements of the scalar-pseudoscalar mixi...

  8. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.

    2010-06-04

    The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

  9. A Search for the Rare Leptonic B- to tau- anti-neutrino Recoiling against B+ to Decays to anti-D*0 l+ Lepton-neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-17

    This thesis describes a search for the decay B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} in 231.8 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}*{sup 0} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} signal is performed in the following {tau} decay modes: {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}. They find no evidence of signal, and they set a preliminary upper limit on the branching fraction of {beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level (CL). This result is then combined with a statistically independent BABAR search for B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} to give a combined preliminary limit of {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) < 2.6 x 10{sup -4} at 90% CL.

  10. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays tau--->l-Ks0 with the BABAR Experiment

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Peter H.

    A search for the lepton flavor violating decays tau--->l-KS0 (l=e or mu) has been performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 469??fb[superscript -1], collected with the BABAR detector at the ...

  11. Two current experimental problems in heavy lepton physics: tau decay modes and close mass pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1987-08-01

    This paper investigates tau lepton decay modes and close-mass lepton pairs. The major part of the paper discusses branching functions from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Finally, the lack of experimental signatures of close-mass lepton pairs are reviewed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs. (JDH)

  12. Tau Physics from B Factories

    E-print Network

    G. D. Lafferty

    2006-10-10

    Some recent $\\tau$-physics results are presented from the BaBar and Belle experiments at the SLAC and KEK B factories, which produce copious numbers of $\\tau$-lepton pairs. Measurements of the tau mass and lifetime allow to test lepton universality and CPT invariance, while searches for lepton-flavour violation in tau decays are powerful ways to look for physics beyond the Standard Model. In semihadronic, non-strange tau decays, the vector hadronic final state is particularly important in helping determine the hadronic corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, while studies of strange final states are the best available ways to measure the CKM matrix element $V_{\\rm us}$ and the mass of the strange quark.

  13. Search for Lepton Flavour Violating Decays tau- to l- Ks with the BaBar experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, R.N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-01-06

    A search for the lepton flavor violating decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} l{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0} (l = e or {mu}) has been performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 469 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric energy collider. No statistically significant signal has been observed in either channel and the estimated upper limits on branching fractions are {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}) < 4.0 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  14. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Search for High-Mass Resonances Decaying into Leptons of Different Flavor (e mu, e tau, mu tau) in p anti-p Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Yanjun; /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-10-01

    We present a search for high-mass resonances decaying into two leptons of different flavor: e{mu}, e{tau}, and {mu}{tau}. These resonances are predicted by several models beyond the standard model, such as the R-parity-violating MSSM. The search is based on 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in proton anti-proton collisions. Our observations are consistent with the standard model expectations. The results are interpreted to set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma} x BR of {tilde {nu}}{sub {tau}} {yields} e{mu}, e{tau}, {mu}{tau}.

  16. Heavy Sterile Neutrinos in Tau Decays and the MiniBooNE Anomaly

    E-print Network

    Claudio Dib; Juan Carlos Helo; Martin Hirsch; Sergey Kovalenko; Ivan Schmidt

    2011-10-25

    Current results of the MiniBooNE experiment show excess events that indicate neutrino oscillations, but only if one goes beyond the standard 3 family scenario. Recently a different explanation of the events has been given, not in terms of oscillations but by the production and decay of a massive sterile neutrino with large transition magnetic moment. We study the effect of such a sterile neutrino in the rare decays $\\tau^- \\rightarrow \\mu^- \\mu^+ \\pi^- \

  17. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  18. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  19. TAUOLA for simulation of tau decay and production: perspectives for precision low energy and LHC applications

    E-print Network

    Zbigniew Was

    2011-01-09

    The status of Monte Carlo system for the simulation of tau-lepton production and decay in high-energy accelerator experiments is reviewed. Since previous tau-lepton conference in 2008 some practical modifications have been introduced: (i) For the TAUOLA Monte Carlo generator of tau-lepton decays, automated and simultaneous use of many versions of form-factors for the calculation of optional weights for fits was developped and checked to work in Belle and BaBar software environment. Work on alternative paramterizations of hadronic decays is advanced. (ii) the TAUOLA universal interface based on HepMC (the C++ event record) is now public. A similar interface for PHOTOS is now also public. (iii) Extension of PHOTOS Monte Carlo for QED bremsstrahlung in decays featuring kernels based on complete first order matrix element are gradually becoming widely available thanks to properites of the new, HepMC based interface. (iv) Tests of the programs systematized with the help of MC-TESTER are now available for FORTRAN and C++ users. Presented here results illustrate the status of the projects performed in collaboration with Nadia Davidson, Piotr Golonka, Gizo Nanava, Tomasz Przedzinski, Olga Shekhovtsova, El zbieta Richter-Was, Pablo Roig, Qingjun Xu and others.

  20. Evidence for an excess of B to D(*) Tau Nu decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2012-10-09

    Based on the full BABAR data sample, we report improved measurements of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}), where {ell} is either e or {mu}. These ratios are sensitive to new physics contributions in the form of a charged Higgs boson. We measure R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, which exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, our results disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. This excess cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model. We also report the observation of the decay {bar B} {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, with a significance of 6.8{sigma}.

  1. Lifetime measurements and tau physics at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1984-05-01

    Recent updates on the measurements of the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes by the Mark II Collaboration and on measurements of the tau and B-hadron lifetimes by the MAC Collaboration are presented. A new determination of an upper limit for the tau neutrino mass by the Mark II Collaboration and a recent measurement of Cabibbo-suppressed tau decay branching ratios from the DELCO Collaboration are also presented. 18 references.

  2. Research towards tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jordan R; Cisek, Katryna; Funk, Kristen E; Naphade, Swati; Schafer, Kelsey N; Kuret, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Tau-bearing neurofibrillary lesions present a promising biomarker for premortem diagnosis and staging of Alzheimer's disease and certain forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration by whole brain imaging methods. Although brain penetrating compounds capable of binding tau aggregates with high affinity have been disclosed for this purpose, the major barrier to progress remains the need for tau lesion binding selectivity relative to amyloid-beta plaques and other deposits of proteins in cross-beta-sheet conformation. Here we discuss challenges faced in the development of tau lesion-selective imaging agents, and recent preclinical advances in pursuit of this goal. PMID:21971459

  3. Search for CP Violation in $\\tau$ And D Decays With a $K^0_S$ in the Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Maurizio; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    I report the recent searches for CP violation in {tau} and D decays including a K{sub s}{sup 0} in the final state. The analyses herein shown are based on data samples recorded by BABAR and Belle experiments. A brief introduction on CP violation is followed by the summary of the experimental techniques and the results obtained for {tau} and D decays, respectively. Finally, an outlook on future development is provided.

  4. Search for CP violation in tau and D decays with a K0S in the final state

    E-print Network

    Maurizio Martinelli

    2011-08-31

    I report the recent searches for CP violation in tau and D decays including a K0S in the final state. The analyses herein shown are based on data samples recorded by BaBar and Belle experiments. A brief introduction on CP violation is followed by the summary of the experimental techniques and the results obtained for tau and D decays, respectively. Finally, an outlook on future development is provided.

  5. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  6. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  7. B ---> mu mu and B ---> tau nu decays

    SciTech Connect

    Scuri, Fabrizio; /INFN, Pisa

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the most recent experimental results on Branching Fractions of rare fully leptonic B decays is given; constraints on the parameters of some New Physics models are presented. Perspectives with new accelerator programs are discussed.

  8. Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and |Vus| using Tau Lepton Decays to e- v v, __- v v, pi- v and K- v

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-30

    Using 467 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector, they measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.9796 {+-} 0.0016 {+-} 0.0036), {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.5945 {+-} 0.0014 {+-} 0.0061), and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.03882 {+-} 0.00032 {+-} 0.00057), where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. From these precision {tau} measurements, they test the Standard Model assumption of {mu}-e and {tau}-{mu} charge current lepton universality and provide determinations of |V{sub us}| experimentally independent of the decay of a kaon.

  9. Improved Limits on the Lepton Flavor Violating Decays Tau -> l V^0

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-06-19

    The authors search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor-violating tau decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -}V{sup 0}, where {ell} is an electron or muon and V{sup 0} is a fector meson reconstructed as {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}, {rho} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, K* {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {bar K}* {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. The analysis has been performed using 451 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings. The number of events found in the data is compatible with the background expectation, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (2.6-19) x 10{sup -8} at the 90% confidence level.

  10. Tau in physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipeng; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that has a role in stabilizing neuronal microtubules and thus in promoting axonal outgrowth. Structurally, tau is a natively unfolded protein, is highly soluble and shows little tendency for aggregation. However, tau aggregation is characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies. The mechanisms underlying tau pathology and tau-mediated neurodegeneration are debated, but considerable progress has been made in the field of tau research in recent years, including the identification of new physiological roles for tau in the brain. Here, we review the expression, post-translational modifications and functions of tau in physiology and in pathophysiology. PMID:26631930

  11. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  12. Search for lepton-flavor violation in the decay tau- --> l- l+ l-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G

    2004-03-26

    A search for the lepton-flavor-violating decay of the tau into three charged leptons has been performed using 91.5 fb(-1) of data collected at an e(+)e(-)center-of-mass energy around 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP-II. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1-3)x10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:15089664

  13. Study of tau decays to six pions and a neutrino

    E-print Network

    Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J. E.; Eckhart, E.; Gan, K. K.; Gwon, C.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Hufnagel, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Pedlar, T. K.; Karamov, S.; Majumder, G.; Moneti, G. C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Wang, J. C.; Lohner, M.; Thayer, J. G.; Galik, R. S.; Wolf, A.; Wu, J.; Kopp, S.; Mahmood, A. H.; Csorna, S. E.; Danko, I.; McLean, K. W.; Xu, Z.; Godang, R.; Urner, D.; Magerkurth, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Gibbons, L.; Cinabro, D.; Dubrovin, M.; McGee, S.; Zhou, G. J.; Lipeles, E.; Pappas, S. P.; Schmidtler, M.; Valant-Spaight, B.; Shapiro, A.; Meyer, T. O.; Sun, W. M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Gittelman, B.; Wurthwein, F.; Jaffe, D. E.; Masek, G.; Paar, H. P.; Potter, E. M.; Warburton, A.; Prell, S.; Asner, D. M.; Mistry, N. B.; Eppich, A.; Hill, T. S.; Morrison, R. J.; Gray, S. W.; Briere, R. A.; Chen, G. P.; Ford, W. T.; Avery, P.; Gritsan, A.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; Nordberg, E.; Alexander, J. P.; Baker, R.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B. E.; Hartill, D. L.; Berkelman, K.; Prescott, C.; Blanc, F.; Boisvert, V.; Cassel, D. G.; Drell, P. S.; Patterson, J. R.; Ecklund, K. M.; Ehrlich, R.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hopman, P. I.; Hsu, L.; Rubiera, A. I.; Schwarthoff, H.; Jones, C. D.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Thayer, J. G.; Miller, D. H.; Romano, A.; Yelton, J.; Stoeck, H.; Yelton, J.; Shibata, E. I.; Maravin, Y.; von Toerne, E.; Brandenburg, G.; Ershov, A.; Gao, Y. S.; Kim, D. Y. J.; Wilson, R.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B. I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G. E.; Narsky, I.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Gollin, G. D.; Zoeller, M. M.; Hans, R. M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M. A.; Palmer, M.; Plager, C.; Sedlack, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Selen, M.; Pavlunin, V.; Thaler, J. J.; Williams, J.; Richichi, S. J.; Edwards, K. W.; Janicek, R.; Patel, P. M.; Sadoff, A. J.; Ammar, Raymond G.; Ye, J.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Zhao, X.; Anderson, S.; Frolov, V. V.; Severini, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, S. J.; Mahapatra, R.; Wlodek, T.; O'Neill, J. J.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Lyon, A. L.; Smith, A.; Stepaniak, C. J.; Urheim, J.; Ahmed, Samir; Skubic, P.; Alam, M. S.; Artuso, M.; Athar, S. B.; Jian, L.; Ling, L.; Saleem, M.; Thorndike, E. H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Undrus, A.; Chen, S.; Fast, J.; Ayad, R.; Hinson, J. W.; Lee, J.; Jessop, C. P.; Savinov, V.; Coan, T. E.; Foland, A. D.; Fadeyev, V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bukin, K.; Gaidarev, P.; Kreinick, D. L.; Dambasuren, E.

    2001-05-01

    VOLUME 86, NUMBER 20 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 14MAY 2001 Study of t Decays to Six Pions and a Neutrino A. Anastassov, 1 J. E. Duboscq, 1 E. Eckhart, 1 K. K. Gan, 1 C. Gwon, 1 T. Hart, 1 K. Honscheid, 1 D. Hufnagel, 1 H. Kagan, 1 R. Kass, 1 T. K.... Pedlar, 1 H. Schwarthoff, 1 J. B. Thayer, 1 E. von Toerne, 1 M. M. Zoeller, 1 S. J. Richichi, 2 H. Severini, 2 P. Skubic, 2 A. Undrus, 2 S. Chen, 3 J. Fast, 3 J. W. Hinson, 3 J. Lee, 3 D. H. Miller, 3 E. I. Shibata, 3 I. P. J. Shipsey, 3 V. Pavlunin, 3 D...

  14. The Many Faces of Tau

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Meaghan; Maeda, Sumihiro; Vossel, Keith; Mucke, Lennart

    2012-01-01

    Summary While the microtubule-binding capacity of the protein tau has been known for many years, new functions of tau in signaling and cytoskeletal organization have recently emerged. In this review, we highlight these functions and the potential roles of tau in neurodegenerative disease. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting various aspects of tau biology. PMID:21555069

  15. Observation of $W\\rightarrow\\tau\

    E-print Network

    Mohammadi, Abdollah

    2011-01-01

    The production of W bosons decaying into a tau lepton and a neutrino with the tau lepton decaying hadronically has been observed in LHC pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$~TeV with the CMS detector. The selection criteria provide a statistically significant signal

  16. Constraints on the rare tau decays from mu --> e gamma in the supersymmetric see-saw model

    E-print Network

    Alejandro Ibarra; Cristoforo Simonetto

    2008-03-03

    It is now a firmly established fact that all family lepton numbers are violated in Nature. In this paper we discuss the implications of this observation for future searches for rare tau decays in the supersymmetric see-saw model. Using the two loop renormalization group evolution of the soft terms and the Yukawa couplings we show that there exists a lower bound on the rate of the rare process mu --> e gamma of the form BR(mu --> e gamma) > C BR(tau --> mu gamma) BR(tau --> e gamma), where C is a constant that depends on supersymmetric parameters. Our only assumption is the absence of cancellations among the high-energy see-saw parameters. We also discuss the implications of this bound for future searches for rare tau decays. In particular, for large regions of the mSUGRA parameter space, we show that present B-factories could discover either tau --> mu gamma or tau --> e gamma, but not both.

  17. Search for the Baryon and Lepton Number Violating Decays tau to Lambda h

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-28

    The authors have searched for the violation of baryon number B and lepton number L in the (B-L)-conserving modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}K{sup -} as well as the (B-L)-violating modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup -} using 237 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. They do not observe any signal and determine preliminary upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}) < 5.9 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}) < 5.8 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}K{sup -}) < 7.2 x 10{sup -8}, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup -}) < 15 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  18. Search for the Decay B{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.

    2007-11-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay B{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{tau}{sup {+-}}{mu}{sup {+-}} using 383x10{sup 6} BB events collected by the BABAR experiment. The branching fraction for this decay can be substantially enhanced in new physics models. The kinematics of the tau from the signal B decay are inferred from the K{sup +}, {mu}, and other B in the event, which is fully reconstructed in one of a variety of hadronic decay modes, allowing the signal B candidate to be fully reconstructed. We observe no excess of events over the expected background and set a limit of B(B{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{tau}{mu})<7.7x10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level, where the branching fraction is for the sum of the K{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{mu}{sup +} and K{sup +}{tau}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} final states. We use this result to improve a model-independent bound on the energy scale of flavor-changing new physics.

  19. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  20. Search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau-\\tau$ decay channel in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into pairs of {tau} leptons in p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analyzed data sample was recorded by the CDFII detector and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 6.0 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed in the final state with one {tau} decaying leptonically and the second one identified through its semi-hadronic decay. Since no significant excess is observed, a 95% credibility level upper limit on the production cross section times branching ratio to the {tau}{tau} final state is set for hypothetical Higgs boson masses between 100 and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. For a Higgs boson of 120 GeV/c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 14.6 (15.3) the predicted value.

  1. Search for the associated production of a b quark and a neutral supersymmetric Higgs boson that decays into tau pairs.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Camacho-Pérez, E; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M

    2010-04-16

    We report results from a search for production of a neutral Higgs boson in association with a b quark. We search for Higgs decays to tau pairs with one tau subsequently decaying to a muon and the other to hadrons. The data correspond to 2.7 fb(-1) of pp collisions recorded by the D0 detector at square root(s)=1.96 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with background predictions. The result allows us to exclude a significant region of parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric model. PMID:20481981

  2. Search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay tau(-) -->l-(+)h+(-)h'(-).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T

    2005-11-01

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb(-1) of data collected at an e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range B(tau-->lhh')<(0.7 - 4.8) x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:16383973

  3. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy ?s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2–4%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured withmore »a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2–8%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton–proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.« less

  4. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy ?s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2–4%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2–8%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton–proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.

  5. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Tcholakov, V.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.

    2014-10-01

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m {h/max}, m {h/mod +}, m {h/mod -}, light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low- m H. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?¹, with 4.9 fb?¹ at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb?¹ at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod– , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  7. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?¹, with 4.9 fb?¹ at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb?¹ at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmore »parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod– , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.« less

  8. Measuring CP Violation in $h \\to \\tau^+ \\tau^-$ at Colliders

    E-print Network

    Harnik, Roni; Okui, Takemichi; Primulando, Reinard; Yu, Felix

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the LHC and Higgs Factory prospects for measuring the CP phase in the Higgs-tau-tau coupling. Currently this phase can be anywhere between 0 degrees (CP even) and 90 degrees (CP odd). A new, ideal observable is identified from an analytic calculation for the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\rho^\\pm\

  9. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-print Network

    Alver, B.

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is performed using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb[superscript ?1] recorded by the CMS experiment ...

  10. Tau pathology in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Nie, Sheng-Dan; Wang, Shan

    2013-08-01

    Neurodegenerative tauopathy characterized by hyperphosphorylation tau has been implicated in the pathophysiology of diabetic central nervous system (CNS) complication. Emerging evidence has suggested that hyperphosphorylation tau is caused by an imbalance of protein kinase and phosphatase activity. This review focuses on the contributions of impaired insulin signaling to diabetes-related tauopathy through disrupting the balance of tau-related protein kinases and phosphatases. In addition, we describe tau pathology as a potential target for central neuronal degeneration in diabetes mellitus. PMID:24020118

  11. Information on the structure of the a{sub 1} from {tau} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.; Leupold, S.

    2008-09-01

    The decay {tau}{yields}{pi}{pi}{pi}{nu} is analyzed using different methods to account for the resonance structure, which is usually ascribed to the a{sub 1}. One scenario is based on the recently developed techniques to generate axial-vector resonances dynamically, whereas in a second calculation the a{sub 1} is introduced as an explicit resonance. We investigate the influence of different assumptions on the result. In the molecule scenario the spectral function is described surprisingly well by adjusting only one free parameter. This result can be systematically improved by adding higher-order corrections to the iterated Weinberg-Tomozawa interaction. Treating the a{sub 1} as an explicit resonance on the other hand leads to peculiar properties.

  12. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in pp over collisions with the D0 detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G

    2008-08-15

    We present a search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons varphi decaying into tau+tau - final states in pp over collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1 fb(-1), were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Limits on the production cross section times branching ratio are set. The results are interpreted in the minimal supersymmetric standard model yielding limits that are the most stringent to date at hadron colliders. PMID:18764524

  13. Search for Charged Higgs Boson Decays of the Top Quark using Hadronic Decays of the Tau Lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, F.; Akimoto, H.; Akopian, A.; Albrow, M. G.; Amendolia, S. R.; Amidei, D.; Antos, J.; Aota, S.; Apollinari, G.; Asakawa, T.; Ashmanskas, W.; Atac, M.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Badgett, W.; Bagdasarov, S.; Bailey, M. W.; Bao, J.; de Barbaro, P.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barone, M.; Barzi, E.; Bauer, G.; Baumann, T.; Bedeschi, F.; Behrends, S.; Belforte, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Benlloch, J.; Bensinger, J.; Benton, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J. P.; Berryhill, J.; Bertolucci, S.; Bevensee, B.; Bhatti, A.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Bodek, A.; Bokhari, W.; Bolognesi, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Breccia, L.; Bromberg, C.; Bruner, N.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cammerata, J.; Campagnari, C.; Campbell, M.; Caner, A.; Carithers, W.; Carlsmith, D.; Castro, A.; Cauz, D.; Cen, Y.; Cervelli, F.; Chang, P. S.; Chang, P. T.; Chao, H. Y.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, M.-T.; Chiarelli, G.; Chikamatsu, T.; Chiou, C. N.; Christofek, L.; Cihangir, S.; Clark, A. G.; Cobal, M.; Cocca, E.; Contreras, M.; Conway, J.; Cooper, J.; Cordelli, M.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Crane, D.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Culbertson, R.; Daniels, T.; Dejongh, F.; Delchamps, S.; dell'Agnello, S.; dell'Orso, M.; Demina, R.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; Devlin, T.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; Done, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dunn, A.; Eddy, N.; Einsweiler, K.; Elias, J. E.; Ely, R.; Engels, E., Jr.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Fan, Q.; Feild, G.; Ferretti, C.; Fiori, I.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G. W.; Franklin, M.; Frautschi, M.; Freeman, J.; Friedman, J.; Frisch, H.; Fukui, Y.; Funaki, S.; Galeotti, S.; Gallinaro, M.; Ganel, O.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gay, C.; Geer, S.; Gerdes, D. W.; Giannetti, P.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giusti, G.; Gladney, L.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Gordon, A.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gotra, Y.; Goulianos, K.; Grassmann, H.; Groer, L.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Guillian, G.; Guo, R. S.; Haber, C.; Hafen, E.; Hahn, S. R.; Hamilton, R.; Handler, R.; Hans, R. M.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hardman, A. D.; Harral, B.; Harris, R. M.; Hauger, S. A.; Hauser, J.; Hawk, C.; Hayashi, E.; Heinrich, J.; Hinrichsen, B.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hohlmann, M.; Holck, C.; Hollebeek, R.; Holloway, L.; Hong, S.; Houk, G.; Hu, P.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Hylen, J.; Ikeda, H.; Incagli, M.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iwai, J.; Iwata, Y.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kadel, R. W.; Kajfasz, E.; Kambara, H.; Kamon, T.; Kaneko, T.; Karr, K.; Kasha, H.; Kato, Y.; Keaffaber, T. A.; Kelley, K.; Kennedy, R. D.; Kephart, R.; Kesten, P.; Kestenbaum, D.; Keutelian, H.; Keyvan, F.; Kharadia, B.; Kim, B. J.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kirsch, L.; Koehn, P.; Kondo, K.; Konigsberg, J.; Kopp, S.; Kordas, K.; Korytov, A.; Koska, W.; Kovacs, E.; Kowald, W.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuwabara, T.; Kuhlmann, S. E.; Kuns, E.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lamoureux, J. I.; Lancaster, M.; Lecompte, T.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limon, P.; Lindgren, M.; Liss, T. M.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, Y. C.; Lockyer, N.; Long, O.; Loomis, C.; Loreti, M.; Lu, J.; Lucchesi, D.; Lukens, P.; Lusin, S.; Lys, J.; Maeshima, K.; Maghakian, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Mangano, M.; Mansour, J.; Mariotti, M.; Marriner, J. P.; Martin, A.; Matthews, J. A.; Mattingly, R.; McIntyre, P.; Melese, P.; Menzione, A.; Meschi, E.; Metzler, S.; Miao, C.; Miao, T.; Michail, G.; Miller, R.; Minato, H.; Miscetti, S.; Mishina, M.; Mitsushio, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Miyashita, S.; Moggi, N.; Morita, Y.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, T.; Murat, P.; Nakada, H.; Nakano, I.; Nelson, C.; Neuberger, D.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Ngan, C.-Y. P.; Ninomiya, M.; Nodulman, L.; Oh, S. H.; Ohl, K. E.; Ohmoto, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Oishi, R.; Okabe, M.; Okusawa, T.; Oliveira, R.; Olsen, J.; Pagliarone, C.; Paoletti, R.; Papadimitriou, V.; Pappas, S. P.; Parashar, N.; Park, S.; Parri, A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pescara, L.; Peters, M. D.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pillai, M.; Pitts, K. T.; Plunkett, R.; Pondrom, L.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ragan, K.; Reher, D.; Ribon, A.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robertson, W. J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rolli, S.; Romano, J.; Rosenson, L.; Roser, R.; Saab, T.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltzberg, D.; Sansoni, A.; Santi, L.; Sato, H.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Scribano, A.; Segler, S.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Sganos, G.; Shapiro, M. D.; Shaw, N. M.; Shen, Q.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sill, A.; Sinervo, P.; Singh, P.; Skarha, J.; Sliwa, K.; Snider, F. D.; Song, T.; Spalding, J.; Speer, T.; Sphicas, P.; Spinella, F.; Spiropulu, M.

    1997-07-01

    This Letter describes a direct search for charged Higgs boson production in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV recorded by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. Two-Higgs-double extensions to the standard model predict the existence of charged Higgs bosons \\(H+/-\\). In such models, the branching fraction for top quarks B\\(t-->H+b-->?+?b\\) can be large. This search uses the hadronic decays of the tau lepton in this channel to significantly extend previous limits on H+/- production.

  14. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  15. Potential synergy between tau aggregation inhibitors and tau chaperone modulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a soluble, microtubule-associated protein known to aberrantly form amyloid-positive aggregates. This pathology is characteristic for more than 15 neuropathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Finding therapeutics to reverse or remove this non-native tau state is of great interest; however, at this time only one drug is entering phase III clinical trials for treating tauopathies. Generally, tau manipulation by therapeutics can either directly or indirectly alter tau aggregation and stability. Drugs that bind and change the conformation of tau itself are largely classified as aggregation inhibitors, while drugs that alter the activity of a tau-effector protein fall into several categories, such as kinase inhibitors, microtubule stabilizers, or chaperone modulators. Chaperone inhibitors that have proven effective in tau models include heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, heat shock protein 70 inhibitors and activators, as well as inducers of heat shock proteins. While many of these compounds can alter tau levels and/or aggregation states, it is possible that combining these approaches may produce the most optimal outcome. However, because many of these compounds have multiple off-target effects or poor blood–brain barrier permeability, the development of this synergistic therapeutic strategy presents significant challenges. This review will summarize many of the drugs that have been identified to alter tau biology, with special focus on therapeutics that prevent tau aggregation and regulate chaperone-mediated clearance of tau. PMID:24041111

  16. {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}l{gamma} decays in the fermion triplet seesaw model

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.; Bonnet, F.; Biggio, C.; Gavela, M. B.

    2008-08-01

    In the framework of the seesaw models with triplets of fermions, we evaluate the decay rates of {mu}{yields}e{gamma} and {tau}{yields}l{gamma} transitions. We show that although, due to neutrino mass constraints, those rates are in general expected to be well under the present experimental limits, this is not necessarily always the case. Interestingly enough, the observation of one of those decays in planned experiments would nevertheless contradict bounds stemming from present experimental limits on the {mu}{yields}eee and {tau}{yields}3l decay rates, as well as from {mu} to e conversion in atomic nuclei. Such detection of radiative decays would therefore imply that there exist sources of lepton flavor violation not associated to triplet fermions.

  17. Physics with Tau Lepton Final States in ATLAS

    E-print Network

    Pingel, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The poster shows different physics analysis with tau lepton final states in ATLAS. The increased sensitivity of searches for a SM Higgs boson in the low mass region, as well as searches for neutral and charged supersymmetric Higgs bosons, decaying to tau final states are presented. Furthermore, searches for heavy gauge bosons, leptoquarks, SUSY and tau polarization measurements in the W -> tau nu decay are shown.

  18. A Search for B+ to tau+ nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-26

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} using 383 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {bar {nu}} and {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}. They measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.9 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.1(syst.)) x 10{sup -4}. In the absence of a significant signal, we calculate an upper limit at the 90% confidence level of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -4}. They calculate the product of the B meson decay constant f{sub B} and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.0}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  19. H->tau tau and H->tau nu with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC

    E-print Network

    Goncalo, R

    2011-01-01

    The discovery and study of the source of electroweak symmetry breaking, usually explained through the Higgs mechanism, is one of the main goals of the ATLAS experiment, operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This mechanism predicts the existence of one or more scalar particles, the Higgs bosons. Channels containing taus are very important for the Higgs boson search at the LHC. Within the Standard Model, the H->tau tau channel would provide a significant contribution to the Higgs boson search in the dicult region of low Higgs mass. This channel is also important in supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model through the associated production of the Higgs bosons with heavy quarks or by gluon fusion. Finally, the observation of a charged Higgs boson would constitute irrefutable evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. A light enough charged Higgs would be produced in top quark decays through t ! bH+ and would likely decay to a tau lepton and a neutrino. This paper summarizes recent ATLAS...

  20. Tau immunization: a cautionary tale?

    PubMed

    Mably, Alexandra J; Kanmert, Daniel; Mc Donald, Jessica M; Liu, Wen; Caldarone, Barbara J; Lemere, Cynthia A; O'Nuallain, Brian; Kosik, Kenneth S; Walsh, Dominic M

    2015-03-01

    The amyloid ? (A?)-protein and microtubule-associated protein, tau, are the major components of the amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles that typify Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. As such both A? and tau have long been proposed as therapeutic targets. Immunotherapy, particularly targeting A?, is currently the most advanced clinical strategy for treating AD. However, several A?-directed clinical trials have failed, and there is concern that targeting this protein may not be useful. In contrast, there is a growing optimism that tau immunotherapy may prove more efficacious. Here, for the first time, we studied the effects of chronic administration of an anti-tau monoclonal antibody (5E2) in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. For our animal model, we chose the J20 mouse line because prior studies had shown that the cognitive deficits in these mice require expression of tau. Despite the fact that 5E2 was present and active in the brains of immunized mice and that this antibody appeared to engage with extracellular tau, 5E2-treatment did not recover age-dependent spatial reference memory deficits. These results indicate that the memory impairment evident in J20 mice is unlikely to be mediated by a form of extracellular tau recognized by 5E2. In addition to the lack of positive effect of anti-tau immunotherapy, we also documented a significant increase in mortality among J20 mice that received 5E2. Because both the J20 mice used here and tau transgenic mice used in prior tau immunotherapy trials are imperfect models of AD our results recommend extensive preclinical testing of anti-tau antibody-based therapies using multiple mouse models and a variety of different anti-tau antibodies. PMID:25619661

  1. Search for lepton flavor violating decay $\\tau^- \\to \\ell^- \\ell^ \\ell^-$ at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-05-26

    The Standard Model (SM) is one of the most tested and verified physical theories of all time, present experimental observations are consistent with SM expectations. On the other hand SM can not explain many physical observations: the cosmological observations possibly infer the presence of dark matter which is clearly beyond the SM expectations; the SM Higgs model, while explaining the generation of fermion masses, can not explain the hierarchy problem and a non natural fine tuning of SM is needed to cancel out quadratic divergences in the Higgs boson mass. New physics (NP) beyond SM should hence be investigated: rising the energy above NP processes thresholds, and detecting new particles or new effects not predicted by the standard model directly, is one of the possible approaches; another approach is to make precision measurements of well known processes or looking for rare processes which involve higher order contribution from NP processes, this approach need higher luminosities with respect to the previous approach but lower beam energies. Search for Lepton Flavor Violation (LFV) in charged lepton decays is promising: neutrino physics provides indeed a clear and unambiguous evidence of LFV in the neutral lepton sector via mixing processes, which have been observed for the first time by the Homestake collaboration. We expect LFV in the charged sector as well, both in {mu} and {tau} sector, but current experimental searches for LFV processes did not find any evidence for those processes, and more results are expected to come from new experiments in the coming years.

  2. Bilocal expansion of the Borel amplitude and the hadronic tau decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Lee, Taekoon

    2001-07-01

    The singular part of the Borel transform of a QCD amplitude near the infrared renormalon can be expanded in terms of higher order Wilson coefficients of the operators associated with the renormalon. In this paper we observe that this expansion gives nontrivial constraints on the Borel amplitude that can be used to improve the accuracy of the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude. In particular, we consider the Borel transform of the Adler function and its expansion around the first infrared renormalon due to the gluon condensate. Using the next-to-leading order (NLO) Wilson coefficient of the gluon condensate operator, we obtain an exact constraint on the Borel amplitude at the first IR renormalon. We then extrapolate, using judiciously chosen conformal transformations and Pade{prime} approximants, the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude in such a way that this constraint is satisfied. This procedure allows us to predict the O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 4}) coefficient of the Adler function, which gives a result consistent with the estimate by Kataev and Starshenko using a completely different method. We then apply this improved Borel amplitude to the tau decay width and obtain the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}{sup 2})=0.1193{+-}0.0007{sub exp.}{+-}0.0010{sub EW+CKM}{+-}0.0009{sub meth.}{+-}0.0003{sub evol.}. We then compare this result with those of other resummation methods.

  3. Tau lepton reconstruction at collider experiments using impact parameters

    E-print Network

    Daniel Jeans

    2015-11-06

    We present a novel method for the reconstruction of events containing pairs of hadronically decaying tau leptons at collider experiments. This method relies on accurate knowledge of the tau production vertex and precise measurement of its charged decay products. The method makes no assumptions about the centre-of-mass or invariant mass of the tau pair, and is insensitive to momentum loss along the beam direction. We demonstrate the method using e+e- -> mu+ mu- tau+ tau- events fully simulated in the ILD detector.

  4. UX Tau A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's rendition of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, located approximately 450 light-years away. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.

    Spitzer saw a gap in UX Tau A's disk that extends from 0.2 to 56 astronomical units (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The gap extends from the equivalent of Mercury to Pluto in our solar system, and is sandwiched between thick inner and outer disks on either side. Astronomers suspect that the gap was carved out by one or more forming planets.

    Such dusty disks are where planets are thought to be born. Dust grains clump together like snowballs to form larger rocks, and then the bigger rocks collide to form the cores of planets. When rocks revolve around their central star, they act like cosmic vacuum cleaners, picking up all the gas and dust in their path and creating gaps.

    Although gaps have been detected in disks swirling around young stars before, UX Tau A is special because the gap is sandwiched between two thick disks of dust. An inner thick dusty disk hugs the central star, then, moving outward, there is a gap, followed by another thick doughnut-shaped disk. Other systems with gaps contain very little to no dust near the central star. In other words, those gaps are more like big holes in the centers of disks.

    Some scientists suspect that these holes could have been carved out by a process called photoevaporation. Photoevaporation occurs when radiation from the central star heats up the gas and dust around it to the point where it evaporates away. The fact that there is thick disk swirling extremely close to UX Tau A's central star rules out the photoevaporation scenario. If photoevaporation from the star played a role, then large amounts of dust would not be floating so close to the star.

  5. A Search for Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in the Di-tau Decay Mode in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Amy Lynn

    2003-09-01

    A search for directly produced Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons has been performed in the di-tau decay channel in 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF during Run1b at the Tevatron. They search for events where one tau decays to an electron and the other tau decays hadronically. They perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for Higgs production in the high tan {beta} region of the m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A} = 100 and tan {beta} = 50, they set a 95% confidence level upper limit at 891 pb compared to the theoretically predicted cross section of 122 pb. For events where the tau candidates are not back-to-back, they utilize a di-tau mass reconstruction technique for the first time on hadron collider data. Limits based on a likelihood binned in di-tau mass from non-back-to-back events alone are weaker than the limits obtained from the counting experiment using the full di-tau sample.

  6. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau- -> omega.pi-.nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-04-22

    We report an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 million {tau} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode.

  7. Improved $\\tau$-weapons for Higgs hunting

    E-print Network

    Barenboim, G; López-Ibáñez, M L; Vives, O

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we use the results from Higgs searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\tau\\tau$ decay channels at LHC and indirect bounds as BR$(B \\to X_s \\gamma)$ to constrain the parameter space of a generic MSSM Higgs sector. In particular, we include the latest CMS results that look for additional Higgs states with masses up to 1 TeV. We show that the $\\tau \\tau$ channel is the best and most accurate weapon in the hunt for new Higgs states beyond the Standard Model. We obtain that present experimental results rule out additional neutral Higgs bosons in a generic MSSM below 300 GeV for any value of $\\tan \\beta$ and, for instance, values of $\\tan \\beta$ above 30 are only possible for Higgs masses above 600 GeV. ATLAS stored data has the potential to render this bound obsolete in the near future.

  8. Results on Tau Physics from BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.

    2004-10-29

    Recent results on tau physics from BABAR are reviewed. Limits on lepton-flavor violation in the tau decay process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} are presented based on 91.6 fb{sup -1} of data. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1-3) x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. A preliminary measurement of the .ve prong branching fraction based on 110.7 fb{sup -1} of data is presented with the result {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (8.52 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.40) x 10{sup -4} . A preliminary measurement of the tau lifetime based on 30 fb{sup -1} of data is presented where a lifetime of 290.8 {+-} 1.5 {+-} 1.6 fs is measured.

  9. Search for Neutral Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Bosons Decaying to Tau Pairs in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=7??TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in pp collisions at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns recorded by the CMS experiment. The search uses decays of the Higgs bosons to tau pairs. No excess is observed in the tau-pair invariant-mass spectrum. The resulting upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times branching fraction to tau pairs, as a function of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass, yield stringent new bounds in the MSSM parameter space.

  10. A study of w boson decay charge asymmetry using hadronic tau decays in proton - anti-proton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    E.W Kuns

    2002-10-18

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the tau charge asymmetry in events where the taus are produced by W decays. This charge asymmetry appears as different rapidity distributions for positive and negative taus. Two competing effects generate tau charge asymmetry. The production mechanism for the W gauge boson generates a charge asymmetry which is a function of the ratio of parton distribution functions, d(x)=u(x), measured at x {approx} M{sub W}/{radical}s. This is the dominant effect for tau charge asymmetry at small rapidity. At higher rapidity, however, the competing charge asymmetry from parity violation in W decay to taus becomes dominant. This tau asymmetry measurement is consistent with the Standard Model with a x{sup 2} per degree of freedom equal to 2.5 for 4 degrees of freedom when the asymmetry measurement is folded about y = 0, taking advantage of the CP symmetry of the underlying physics, and 8.9 for 8 degrees of freedom when it is not. This measurement introduces some methods and variables of interest to future analyses using hadronic decay modes of taus. This work was done using the CDF detector in {bar p}p collisions at {radical} = 1.8 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator.

  11. Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of AA Tau, DN Tau, UX Tau A, T Tau, RY Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Chugainov, P. F.; Weaver, W. B.; Stauffer, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a UBVRI photometric monitoring campaign for three classical T Tauri stars (AA Tau, DN Tau, and UX Tau A) and two weak emission line T Tauri stars (Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7). Observations were obtained at three sites during a core observing period spanning UT 1985 October 14 through UT 1985 December 25, with additional observations continuing until UT 1986 April 6. Concurrent spectrophotometric observations were obtained for all main program stars except Lk Ca 7 and additionally for T Tau, RW Aur, and RY Tau. Periodic photometric variability, assumed to be the stars' rotation periods, were found for AA Tau, DN Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7, respectively, as 8.2, 6.3, 3.4, and 5.7 days. Several U-filter flares were observed for Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7, which are strongly concentrated toward phases of minimum light. Correlations are found between H-alpha line strengths and V magnitudes for AA Tau and RY Tau. An analysis of absolute color variations of classical T Tauri stars confirms that hot spots are the predominant cause of these stars' variability. Our overall results are consistent with earlier findings that long-lived cool spots are responsible for most of the variability found for weak-emission T Tauri stars, while temporal hot spots are primarily responsible for the observed variability found in classical T Tauri stars.

  12. Boronate-tau mediated uptake in neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Pallas-Bazarra, Noemi; García, Carlos; Langa, Elena; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    We modified tau protein with boronic acid to facilitate its delivery into non neural or neural cultured cells lacking tau protein. Our results indicate that the incorporated tau promotes the formation of cytoplasmic extensions in non-neuronal cells, as well as the appearance of neurites in cultured tau knockout hippocampal neurons. In addition, boronated tau is incorporated into hippocampal neurons of tau knockout mice after intracranial injection in vivo. These findings describe a novel method to deliver exogenous tau protein into cells. PMID:24366920

  13. Neural representation of movement tau 

    E-print Network

    Tan, Heng?Ru May

    2008-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of goal?directed behaviour concerns the closure of motion?gaps in a timely fashion. An influential theory about how this can be achieved is provided by the tautheory (Lee, 1998). Tau is defined as ...

  14. Enhanced Higgs to $\\tau^+\\tau^-$ Searches with Deep Learning

    E-print Network

    Baldi, Pierre; Whiteson, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The Higgs boson is thought to provide the interaction that imparts mass to the fundamental fermions, but while measurements at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are consistent with this hypothesis, current analysis techniques lack the statistical power to cross the traditional 5$\\sigma$ significance barrier without more data. \\emph{Deep learning} techniques have the potential to increase the statistical power of this analysis by \\emph{automatically} learning complex, high-level data representations. In this work, deep neural networks are used to detect the decay of the Higgs to a pair of tau leptons. A Bayesian optimization algorithm is used to tune the network architecture and training algorithm hyperparameters, resulting in a deep network of eight non-linear processing layers that improves upon the performance of shallow classifiers even without the use of features specifically engineered by physicists for this application. The improvement in discovery significance is equivalent to an increase in the accumula...

  15. Therapeutic strategies for tau mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Lee, Virginia M Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Based on the amyloid hypothesis, controlling ?-amyloid protein (A?) accumulation is supposed to suppress downstream pathological events, tau accumulation, neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. However, in recent clinical trials, A? removal or reducing A? production has shown limited efficacy. Moreover, while active immunisation with A? resulted in the clearance of A?, it did not prevent tau pathology or neurodegeneration. This prompts the concern that it might be too late to employ A? targeting therapies once tau mediated neurodegeneration has occurred. Therefore, it is timely and very important to develop tau directed therapies. The pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration are unclear but hyperphosphorylation, oligomerisation, fibrillisation and propagation of tau pathology have been proposed as the likely pathological processes that induce loss of function or gain of toxic function of tau, causing neurodegeneration. Here we review the strategies for tau directed treatments based on recent progress in research on tau and our understanding of the pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23085937

  16. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A; O'Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D; Cosentino, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D; O'Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Lynch, Tim

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5' splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the 'missing' +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the 'stem' when the stem-loop model was first proposed and no mutations have been found within the 'loop' region as expected. Therefore we 'close the tau loop' having 'opened the loop' 21 years ago. PMID:26297556

  17. Study of $\\tau \\to KS \\pi - \

    E-print Network

    Epifanov, D A; Aihara, H; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bedny, I; Belous, K S; Bitenc, U; Bizjak, I; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C C; Chistov, R; Cho, I S; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Dalseno, J; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Gokhroo, G; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hou, W S; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Itoh, R; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kang, J H; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kichimi, H; Kim, H O; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Krizan, P; Krokovnyi, P P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y J; Lee, J S; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Limosani, A; Lin, S W; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; Matsumoto, T; Matyja, A; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Miyata, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Moloney, G R; Mori, T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Natkaniec, Z; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Ogawa, S; Ohshima, T; Onuki, Y; Ostrowicz, W; Ozaki, H; Pakhlov, P; Pakhlova, G; Palka, H; Park, C W; Park, H; Park, K S; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Seidl, R; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shibuya, H; Shwartz, B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Soni, N; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Stöck, H; Sumiyoshi, T; Takasaki, F; Tamai, K; Tanaka, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tian, X C; Tikhomirov, I; Tsuboyama, T; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Unno, Y; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Usov, Yu; Varner, G; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Vinokurova, A; Wang, C H; Wang, P; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yuan, C Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zupanc, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the decay tau- -> K_S pi- nu_tau using a 351 fb^-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector. The analysis is based on 53110 lepton-tagged signal events. The measured branching fraction B(tau- -> K_S pi- nu_tau)=(0.404 +- 0.002(stat.) +- 0.013(syst.))% is consistent with the world average value and has better accuracy. An analysis of the K_S pi- invariant mass spectrum reveals contributions from the K*(892)- as well as other states. For the first time the K*(892)- mass and width have been measured in tau decay: M(K*(892)-)=(895.47 +- 0.20(stat.) +- 0.44(syst.) +- 0.59(mod.)) MeV/c2, Gamma(K*(892)-)=(46.2 +- 0.6(stat.) +- 1.0(syst.) +- 0.7(mod.)) MeV. The K*(892)- mass is significantly different from the current world average value.

  18. Sensitivity to the Higgs sector of supersymmetric-seesaw models in the lepton flavor violating {tau}{yields}{mu}f{sub 0}(980) decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herrero, M. J.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A. M.

    2009-07-01

    In this work we study the lepton flavor violating (LFV) semileptonic {tau}{yields}{mu}f{sub 0}(980) decay within the context of SUSY-Seesaw Models, where the MSSM spectrum is extended by three right-handed neutrinos and their SUSY partners, and where the seesaw mechanism is used to generate the neutrino masses. We estimate its decay rate when it proceeds via the Higgs-mediated channel {tau}{yields}{mu}H{sup *}{yields}{mu}f{sub 0}(980), where H refers to the CP-even MSSM Higgs bosons h{sup 0} and H{sup 0}, and the lepton flavor violating {tau}{mu}H vertex is radiatively generated via SUSY loops. In order to describe the f{sub 0}(980) meson we follow the guidelines from chiral constraints. As an implication of our computation, we explore the sensitivity to the Higgs sector in this decay and compare it with other LFV tau decay channels. The confrontation of our predictions for BR({tau}{yields}{mu}f{sub 0}(980)) with its very competitive present experimental bound leads us to extract some interesting restrictions on the most relevant model parameters, particularly, tan{beta} and m{sub H{sup 0}}.

  19. Identification of disulfide cross-linked tau dimer responsible for tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dohee; Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Ryoo, Nayeon; Hong, Hyun Seok; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lee, Dong-Eun; Chang, Young-Tae; Lee, Jun-Seok; Cheong, Eunji; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that tau aggregates are not only neurotoxic, but also propagate in neurons acting as a seed for native tau aggregation. Prion-like tau transmission is now considered as an important pathogenic mechanism driving the progression of tau pathology in the brain. However, prion-like tau species have not been clearly characterized. To identify infectious tau conformers, here we prepared diverse tau aggregates and evaluated the effect on inducing intracellular tau-aggregation. Among tested, tau dimer containing P301L-mutation is identified as the most infectious form to induce tau pathology. Biochemical analysis reveals that P301L-tau dimer is covalently cross-linked with a disulfide bond. The relatively small and covalently cross-linked tau dimer induced tau pathology efficiently in primary neurons and also in tau-transgenic mice. So far, the importance of tau disulfide cross-linking has been overlooked in the study of tau pathology. Here our results suggested that tau disulfide cross-linking might play critical role in tau propagation by producing structurally stable and small tau conformers. PMID:26470054

  20. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b-quarks at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herner, Kenneth Richard; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-12-01

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with a b-quark in 1.6 fb{sup -1} of data taken from June 2006 to March 2008 with the D0 detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The final state includes a muon, hadronically decaying tau, and jet identified as coming from a b-quark. We set cross section times branching ratio limits on production of such neutral Higgs bosons {phi} in the mass range from 90 GeV to 160 GeV. Exclusion limits are set at the 95% Confidence Level for several supersymmetric scenarios.

  1. CP violation tests for tau/top processes

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper reviews the following topics: tests for CP violation in top-quark production and decay processes. In particular, m{sub t} = 174 {plus_minus} 17 GeV implies good top-quark polarimetry because the W bosons in t-quark decays must be predominantly longitudinally polarized ({Gamma}{sub L}/{Gamma}{sub T} = 2.4). Tests for CP violation in tau lepton decays by the {tau} {yields} {rho}{nu} decay mode by usage of {rho} polarimetry signatures. Tests for complete measurement of the Z{sup 0},{gamma}* {yields} {tau}{sup {minus}}{tau}{sup +} vertex, including tests for CP violation in tau production processes.

  2. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  3. Importance of precision measurements in the tau sector

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.

    1996-01-01

    {tau} decays provide a powerful tool to test the structure of the weak currents and the universality of their couplings to the {ital W} boson. The constraints implied by present data and the possible improvements at the {tau}cF are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Spectrophotometric study of Zeta Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, N. L.

    An investigation of 10 spectrograms of Zeta Tau (HD 37202) is presented. Equivalent widths, residual intensities, H line halfwidths, radial velocities of the star and the shell, and the electron density and number of atoms on the second level of hydrogen above the 1-sq-cm surface of the star were obtained. A comparison of present results with those obtained in 1964 shows that the mass of the envelope of Zeta Tau increased in 1973, which is evidenced by an increase in emission intensity in H-alpha and H-beta and the intensification of shell absorption lines.

  5. First measurement of sigma (p anti-p ---> Z) . Br (Z ---> tau tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2004-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section for Z production times the branching fraction to {tau} leptons, {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}), in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the channel in which one {tau} decays into {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and the other into hadrons + {nu}{sub {tau}} or e{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 226 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The final sample contains 2008 candidate events with an estimated background of 55%. From this they obtain {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 237 {+-} 15(stat) {+-} 18(sys) {+-} 15(lum) pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  6. Improved Limits on Lepton-Flavor-Violating tau Decays to l phi , l rho , lK^{*}, and lK[over -bar]^{*}

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Peter H.

    We search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor-violating tau decays ?[over-bar]??[over-bar]V[superscript 0], where ? is an electron or muon and V[superscript 0] is a vector meson reconstructed as ??K[superscript +]K[superscript ...

  7. Correlation between flavor-violating decay of long-lived slepton and tau in the coannihilation scenario with the seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Satoru; Saito, Hiroki; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi; Vives, Oscar; Yamanaka, Masato

    2011-06-01

    We investigate flavor violating decays of the long-lived lightest slepton and the tau lepton in the coannihilation region of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a seesaw mechanism to generate neutrino masses. We consider a situation where the mass difference between the lightest neutralino, as the lightest supersymmetric particle, and the lightest slepton, as the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle, is smaller than the mass of tau lepton. In this situation, the lifetime of the lightest slepton is very long and it is determined by lepton flavor violating (LFV) couplings because the slepton mainly consists of the lighter stau and the flavor conserving 2-body decay is kinematically forbidden. We show that the lifetime can change many orders of magnitude by varying the Yukawa couplings entering the seesaw mechanism. We also show that the branching ratios of LFV tau decays are strongly correlated with the lightest slepton lifetime. Therefore the branching ratios of LFV tau decays can be determined or constrained by measuring the slepton lifetime at the LHC experiment.

  8. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks decaying to a tau lepton and a b quark in 1.96 TeV ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Khotilovich, Vadim, G.; /Texas A-M

    2008-05-01

    I present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in an R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario using 322 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. I assume each {tilde t}{sub 1} decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark, with branching ratio {beta}, and search for final states containing either an electron or a muon from a leptonic {tau} decay, a hadronically decaying {tau} lepton, and two or more jets. Two candidate events pass my final selection criteria, consistent with the expectation from standard model processes. I present upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio squared {sigma}({tilde t}{sub 1}{bar {tilde t}}{sub 1}) x {beta}{sup 2} as a function of the stop mass m({tilde t}{sub 1}). Assuming {beta} = 1, I set a 95% confidence level limit m({tilde t}{sub 1}) > 153 GeV=c{sup 2}. These limits are also fully applicable to the case of a pair produced third generation scalar leptoquark that decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark.

  9. Tau Splicing and the Intricacies of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein that fulfills several functions critical for neuronal formation and health. Tau discharges its functions by producing multiple isoforms via regulated alternative splicing. These isoforms modulate tau function in normal brain by altering the domains of the protein, thereby influencing its localization, conformation and post-translational modifications and hence its availability and affinity for microtubules and other ligands. Disturbances in tau expression result in disruption of the neuronal cytoskeleton and formation of tau structures (neurofibrillary tangles) found in brains of dementia sufferers. More specifically, aberrations in tau splicing regulation directly cause several neurodegenerative diseases which lead to dementia. In this review, I present our cumulative knowledge of tau splicing regulation in connection with neurodegeneration and also briefly go over the still-extensive list of questions that are connected to tau (dys)function. PMID:21604267

  10. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  11. Modulation of Tau Dysfunction In Vitro

    E-print Network

    Voss, Kellen

    2011-05-31

    The microtubule associated protein tau is a causative factor in a class of neurodegenerative diseases termed tauopathies. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent tauopathy. In AD, natively unfolded, tau becomes ...

  12. The dipion mass spectrum in e+e- annihilation and tau decay: Isospin symmetry breaking effects from the (rho, omega, phi) mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Leitner, O.; O'Connell, H.B.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    A way to explain the puzzling difference between the pion form factor as measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations and in {tau} decays is discussed. We show that isospin symmetry breaking, beside the already identified effects, produces also a full mixing between the {rho}{sup 0}, {omega} and {phi} mesons which generates an isospin 0 component inside the {rho}{sup 0} meson. This effect, not accounted for in current treatments of the problem, seems able to account for the apparent mismatch between e{sup +}e{sup -} and {tau} data below the {phi} mass.

  13. Alzheimer disease hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates hydrophobically.

    PubMed

    Ruben, G C; Ciardelli, T L; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    1997-11-01

    The chemical interaction that condenses the hyperphosphorylated protein tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD P-tau) into neurofibrillary tangles and cripples synaptic transmission remains unknown. Only beta-sheet, positive ion salt bridges between phosphates, and hydrophobic association can create tangles of just AD P-tau. We have correlated transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of tau aggregation with different percentages of beta-sheet in aqueous suspensions of tau while using buffers that block dispositive or tripositive ionic bridges between intermolecular phosphates. Circular dichroism (CD) studies were performed at different temperatures from 5-85 degrees C using AD P-tau, AD P-tau dephosphorylated with hydrofluoric acid (HF AD P-tau) or alkaline phosphatase (AP AD P-tau), and recombinant human tau with 3-repeats and two amino terminal inserts (R-39) and using bovine tau (B tau) isolated without heat or acid treatment. Secondary structure was estimated from CD spectra at 5 degrees C using the Lincomb algorithm. Each preparation except one demonstrated an inverse temperature transition, Ti, in the CD at 197 nm. No correlation was found between beta-sheet content and aggregation, leaving only hydrophobic interaction as the remaining possibility. Thirteen of 21 possible phosphorylation sites in AD P-tau lie adjacent to positive residues in tau's primary structure. Occupation of five to nine phosphate sites on AD P-tau appears sufficient to reduce or neutralize tau's basic character. AD P-tau's hydrophobic character is indicated by its low inverse temperature transition, Ti. The Ti for AD P-tau was 24.5 degrees C or 28 degrees C, whereas for B tau with three phosphates it was 32 degrees C, for unphosphorylated tau R-39 it was 38 degrees C, and for dephosphorylated HF AD P-tau it was 37.5 degrees C. The hydrophobic protein elastin and its analogs coalesce and precipitate at their Ti of 24-29 degrees C, well below body temperature. We hypothesize that AD P-tau causes tangle accumulation by this mechanism. PMID:9329157

  14. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays {tau}{sup -}{yields}l{sup -}K{sub s}{sup 0} with the BABAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Cahn, R. N.

    2009-01-01

    A search for the lepton flavor violating decays {tau}{sup -}{yields}l{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0} (l=e or {mu}) has been performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 469 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric energy collider. No statistically significant signal has been observed in either channel and the estimated upper limits on branching fractions are B({tau}{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0})<3.3x10{sup -8} and B({tau}{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0})<4.0x10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  15. Tau identification at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Galea, Cristina; /Radboud U. Nijmegen

    2006-12-01

    We describe methods to identify {tau} leptons produced in high energy p{bar p} collisions ({radical}s = 1.96 GeV) at the Tevatron, using the D0 detector. Different procedures used for discrimination against background particles misidentified as taus are also discussed. Finally, we present some physics results obtained by applying these methods to illustrate their performance.

  16. Search for a low-mass scalar Higgs boson decaying to a tau pair in single-photon decays of ?(1S)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Georges, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Paudel, U.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.

    2013-10-01

    We search for a low-mass scalar CP-odd Higgs boson, A0, produced in the radiative decay of the upsilon resonance and decaying into a ?+?- pair: ?(1S)??A0. The production of ?(1S) mesons is tagged by ?(2S)??+?-?(1S) transitions, using a sample of (98.3±0.9)×106 ?(2S) mesons collected by the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson in the mass range 3.5?mA0?9.2GeV, and combine these results with our previous search for the tau decays of the light Higgs in radiative ?(3S) decays, setting limits on the coupling of A0 to the bb¯ quarks in the range 0.09-1.9. Our measurements improve the constraints on the parameters of the next-to-minimal-supersymmetric Standard Model and similar theories with low-mass scalar degrees of freedom.

  17. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  18. Removing endogenous tau does not prevent tau propagation yet reduces its neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Susanne; Maury, Eduardo A; Kirk, Molly J; Saqran, Lubna; Roe, Allyson; DeVos, Sarah L; Nicholls, Samantha; Fan, Zhanyun; Takeda, Shuko; Cagsal-Getkin, Ozge; William, Christopher M; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Pitstick, Rose; Carlson, George A; Pooler, Amy M; Hyman, Bradley T

    2015-12-14

    In Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies, tau protein aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles that progressively spread to synaptically connected brain regions. A prion-like mechanism has been suggested: misfolded tau propagating through the brain seeds neurotoxic aggregation of soluble tau in recipient neurons. We use transgenic mice and viral tau expression to test the hypotheses that trans-synaptic tau propagation, aggregation, and toxicity rely on the presence of endogenous soluble tau. Surprisingly, mice expressing human P301Ltau in the entorhinal cortex showed equivalent tau propagation and accumulation in recipient neurons even in the absence of endogenous tau. We then tested whether the lack of endogenous tau protects against misfolded tau aggregation and toxicity, a second prion model paradigm for tau, using P301Ltau-overexpressing mice with severe tangle pathology and neurodegeneration. Crossed onto tau-null background, these mice had similar tangle numbers but were protected against neurotoxicity. Therefore, misfolded tau can propagate across neural systems without requisite templated misfolding, but the absence of endogenous tau markedly blunts toxicity. These results show that tau does not strictly classify as a prion protein. PMID:26538322

  19. Observation of neutrino induced diffractive $D_s^{*+}$ production and subsequent decay $D_s^{*+} \\to D_s^+ \\to \\tau^+ \\to \\mu^+$

    E-print Network

    Annis, P; Artamonov, S A; Barbuto, E; Di Bartolomeo, A; Bonekämper, D; Bozza, C; Brooijmans, G; Brunner, J; Bülte, A; Buontempo, S; Capone, A; Cassol, F; Catanesi, M G; Chikawa, M; Cocco, A G; Cussans, D G; D'Ambrosio, N; Van Dantzig, R; De Lellis, G; De Pedis, D; Di Capua, E; Dore, U; El-Aidi, R; Ereditato, A; Favart, D; Ferreira, R; Fiorillo, G; Frekers, D; Goldberg, J; Gorbunov, P; Grégoire, G; Grella, G; Hara, T; Hérin, J; Hoshino, K; Iovane, G; Ishi, Y; De Jong, M; Kawamura, T; Kayis, A; Kazuno, M; Khovanskii, V D; Kodama, K; Komatsu, M; Konijn, J; Kotaka, Y; Kozaki, T; Litmaath, M; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Meinhard, H; Melzer, O; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Miyanishi, M; Muciaccia, M T; Nakamura, K; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Niu, E; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Obayashi, Y; Ogawa, S; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R G C; Onengüt, G; Øverås, H; Palladino, Vittorio; Panman, J; Papadopoulos, I M; Park, I G; Pesen, E; Piredda, G; Van der Poel, C A F J; Radicioni, E; Ricciardi, S; Righini, P; Romano, G; Rondeshagen, D; Rosa, G; Saltzberg, D; Saitta, B; Santacesaria, R; Sato, O; Sato, Y; Satta, A; Shamanov, V V; Shibuya, H; Simone, S; Song, J S; Sorrentino, S; Strolin, P; Tezuka, I; Tioukov, V; Tolun, P; Toshito, T; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Ushida, N; Van der Donckt, M; Van de Vyver, B L; Vilain, P; Visschers, J L; Vivolo, L; Weinheimer, C; Wilquet, G; Winter, Klaus; Wolff, T; Wong, H; Yoon, C S; Zeyrek, M T; Zucchelli, P

    1998-01-01

    We report on the first direct observation of a neutrino induced charged-current interaction with two subsequent decays of short-lived particles close to the interaction vertex. This rare double- kink signature in the CHORUS emulsion target is interpreted as a $D_s^{*+}$ production followed by the decay chain $D_s^{*+} \\rightarrow D_s^+ \\gamma, D_s^+ \\rightarrow \\tau^+ \

  20. Measurements of the tau mass and the mass difference of the tau+ and tau- at BABAR

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Peter H.

    We present the result from a precision measurement of the mass of the tau lepton, M?, based on 423??fb[subscript -1] of data recorded at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, we ...

  1. Study of the $\\tau^- to 3h^- 2h^+ \

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. ,

    2005-05-04

    The branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is measured with the BABAR detector to be (8.56 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.42) x 10{sup -4}, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The observed structure of this decay is significantly different from the phase space prediction, with the {rho} resonance playing a strong role. The decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with the f{sub 1}(1285) meson decaying to four charged pions, is observed and the branching fraction is measured to be (3.9 {+-} 0.7 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup -4}.

  2. HST/NICMOS Imaging of HL Tau and XZ Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotera, A. S.; Young, E.; Chen, Hua

    1999-09-01

    We have obtained HST/NICMOS images of HL Tau and XZ Tau using Camera 2 with a nominal plate scale of 0.0755+/-0.005 arcsec/pixel. We selected the filter combination F110W, F160W, F187N, F204M and F212N, to investigate the NIR continuum emission, Paalpha and H_2 features within the region. The data was reduced using the NICRED package and software developed by the NICMOS team. We will present the continuum subtracted narrow band images and point-spread-function (PSF) subtracted images at all wavelengths. The images are diffraction limited with a measured FWHM of ~ 0.''11 at 1.104\\micron. At the distance of HL Tau ( ~ 160 pc), this corresponds to an angular resolution of ?18 AU. Therefore, with the PSF subtracted images we will be able to investigate the properties of the proposed dust accretion disk reported at ~ 150 AU by Close et. al. (1997).

  3. Precision Measurement of the Mass of the $\\tau$ Lepton

    E-print Network

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Braun, S; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fuks, O; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Kloss, B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q J; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, H L; Lu, J G; Lu, X R; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Q., N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C B; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    An energy scan near the $\\tau$ pair production threshold has been performed using the BESIII detector. About $24$ pb$^{-1}$ of data, distributed over four scan points, was collected. This analysis is based on $\\tau$ pair decays to $ee$, $e\\mu$, $eh$, $\\mu\\mu$, $\\mu h$, $hh$, $e\\rho$, $\\mu\\rho$ and $\\pi\\rho$ final states, where $h$ denotes a charged $\\pi$ or $K$. The mass of the $\\tau$ lepton is measured from a maximum likelihood fit to the $\\tau$ pair production cross section data to be $m_{\\tau} = (1776.91\\pm0.12 ^{+0.10}_{-0.13}$) MeV/$c^2$, which is currently the most precise value in a single measurement.

  4. Rescue from tau-induced neuronal dysfunction produces insoluble tau oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Catherine M.; Quraishe, Shmma; Hands, Sarah; Sealey, Megan; Mahajan, Sumeet; Allan, Douglas W.; Mudher, Amritpal

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of highly phosphorylated tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. Nevertheless, animal models demonstrate that tau-mediated dysfunction/toxicity may not require large tau aggregates but instead may be caused by soluble hyper-phosphorylated tau or by small tau oligomers. Challenging this widely held view, we use multiple techniques to show that insoluble tau oligomers form in conditions where tau-mediated dysfunction is rescued in vivo. This shows that tau oligomers are not necessarily always toxic. Furthermore, their formation correlates with increased tau levels, caused intriguingly, by either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of tau kinase glycogen-synthase-kinase-3beta (GSK-3?). Moreover, contrary to common belief, these tau oligomers were neither highly phosphorylated, and nor did they contain beta-pleated sheet structure. This may explain their lack of toxicity. Our study makes the novel observation that tau also forms non-toxic insoluble oligomers in vivo in addition to toxic oligomers, which have been reported by others. Whether these are inert or actively protective remains to be established. Nevertheless, this has wide implications for emerging therapeutic strategies such as those that target dissolution of tau oligomers as they may be ineffective or even counterproductive unless they act on the relevant toxic oligomeric tau species. PMID:26608845

  5. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. PMID:26385829

  6. Searches for the Decays B0 to l+- tau-+ and B+ to l+ nu(L=e,mu) using Hadronic Tag Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; ,

    2008-01-30

    We present searches for the leptonic decays B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu} and the lepton flavor violating decays B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, with data collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. This search demonstrates a novel technique in which we fully reconstruct the accompanying {bar B} in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events, and look for a monoenergetic lepton from the signal B decay. The signal yield is extracted from a fit to the signal lepton candidate momentum distribution in the signal B rest frame. Using a data sample of approximately 378 million B{bar B} pairs (342 fb{sup -1}), we find no evidence of signal in any of the decay modes. Branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}) < 5.2 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}) < 5.6 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 2.2 x 10{sup -5}, are obtained at 90% confidence level.

  7. Glycation alter the process of Tau phosphorylation to change Tau isoforms aggregation property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kefu; Liu, Yutong; Li, Lingyun; Qin, Peibin; Iqbal, Javed; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-02-01

    The risk of tauopathies depends in part on the levels and modified composition of six Tau isoforms in the human brain. Abnormal phosphorylation of the Tau protein and the shift of the ratio of 3R Tau to 4R Tau are presumed to result in neurofibrillary pathology and neurodegeneration. Glycation has recently been linked to dementia and metabolic syndrome. To determine the contribution of Tau protein glycation and phosphorylation on Tau aggregation propensity, the assembled kinetics were examined in vitro using Thioflavin T fluorescence assays. We found that glycation and phosphorylation have different effects on aggregation propensity in different Tau isoforms. Different Tau proteins play important parts in each tauopathies, but 3R0N, fetal Tau protein, has no effect on tauopathies. Conversely, 4R2N has more modified sites and a higher tendency to aggregate, playing the most important role in 4R tauopathies. Finally, Glycation, which could modulate Tau phosphorylation, may occur before any other modification. It also regulates the 3R to 4R ratio and promotes 4R2N Tau protein aggregation. Decreasing the sites of glycation, as well as shifting other Tau proteins to 3R0N Tau proteins has potential therapeutic implications for tauopathies. PMID:26655600

  8. Analyzing Tau Aggregation with Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Huseby, Carol J; Kuret, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Conversion of monomeric tau protein into filamentous aggregates is a defining event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. To gain insight into disease pathogenesis, the mechanisms that trigger and mediate tau aggregation are under intense investigation. Characterization efforts have relied primarily on recombinant tau protein preparations and high-throughput solution-based detection methods such as thioflavin-dye fluorescence and laser-light-scattering spectroscopies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a static imaging tool that complements these approaches by detecting individual tau filaments at nanometer resolution. In doing so, it can provide unique insight into the quality, quantity, and composition of synthetic tau filament populations. Here we describe protocols for analysis of tau filament populations by TEM for purposes of dissecting aggregation mechanism. PMID:26453208

  9. Determination of the chiral couplings L{sub 10} and C{sub 87} from semileptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Alonso, Martin; Pich, Antonio; Prades, Joaquim

    2008-12-01

    Using recent precise hadronic {tau}-decay data on the V-A spectral function, and general properties of QCD such as analyticity, the operator product expansion, and chiral perturbation theory, we get accurate values for the QCD chiral order parameters L{sub 10}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}}) and C{sub 87}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}}). These two low-energy constants appear at order p{sup 4} and p{sup 6}, respectively, in the chiral perturbation theory expansion of the V-A correlator. At order p{sup 4} we obtain L{sub 10}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}})=-(5.22{+-}0.06)x10{sup -3}. Including in the analysis the two-loop (order p{sup 6}) contributions, we get L{sub 10}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}})=-(4.06{+-}0.39)x10{sup -3} and C{sub 87}{sup r}(M{sub {rho}})=(4.89{+-}0.19)x10{sup -3} GeV{sup -2}. In the SU(2) chiral effective theory, the corresponding low-energy coupling takes the value l{sub 5}=13.30{+-}0.11 at order p{sup 4}, and l{sub 5}=12.24{+-}0.21 at order p{sup 6}.

  10. Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

  11. Bose-Einstein Correlations and the Tau-Model

    E-print Network

    W. J. Metzger; T. Novák; T. Csörg?; W. Kittel

    2011-05-09

    Bose-Einstein correlations of pairs of identical charged pions produced in hadronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. A good description is achieved using a L\\'evy stable distribution in conjunction with a model where a particle's momentum is highly correlated with its space-time point of production, the tau model. However, a small but significant elongation of the particle emission region is observed in the Longitudinal Center of Mass frame, which is not accommodated in the tau model. This is investigated using an ad hoc modification of the tau model.

  12. Shower spectrum and detection of tau from Earth-skimming neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Ming-Huey A. Huang

    2004-12-28

    A Monte-Carlo simulation code was described for simulation of Earth skimming tau-neutrinos. The Earth density and composition profile, charged/neutral current interaction, energy loss of tau leptons, and tau decay are all included in the code. This paper compares the tau spectrum calculated from two methods, analytical formula and Monte-Carlo simulation. the results consistent with each other, which proves the algorithms are all correct in this simulation code.

  13. Higgs pair production in [beta][beta][tau][tau] final states at the HL-LHC

    E-print Network

    Lawhorn, Jay Mathew

    2015-01-01

    A measurement of standard model Higgs pair production in [beta][beta][tau][tau] final states at the High Luminosity LHC is investigated. Higgs pair production can be used to measure the Higgs trilinear coupling constant, ...

  14. A measurement of the tau Michel parameters at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, J.

    1997-05-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the tau Michel parameters. This measurement utilizes the highly polarized SLC electron beam to extract these quantities directly from the measured tau decay spectra using the 1993--95 SLD sample of 4,528 tau pair events. The results are {rho}{sup e} = 0.71 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05, {xi}{sup e} = 1.16 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.06, and ({xi}{delta}){sup e} = 0.85 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.08 for tau decays to electrons and {rho}{sup {mu}} = 0.54 {+-} 0.28 {sup {minus}} 0.14, {eta}{sup {mu}} = {minus}0.59 {+-} 0.82 {+-} 0.45, {xi}{sup {mu}} = 0.75 {+-} 0.50 {+-} 0.14, and ({xi}{delta}){sup {mu}} = 0.82 {+-} 0.32 {+-} 0.07 for tau decays to muons. Combining all leptonic tau decays gives {rho} = 0.72 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.03, {xi} = 1.05 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.04, and {Xi}{delta} = 0.88 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.04. These results agree well with the current world average and the Standard Model.

  15. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  16. In vivo tau imaging: obstacles and progress.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, Victor L; Okamura, Nobuyuki

    2014-06-01

    The military conflicts of the last decade have highlighted the growing problem of traumatic brain injury in combatants returning from the battlefield. The considerable evidence pointing at the accumulation of tau aggregates and its recognition as a risk factor in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease have led to a major effort to develop selective tau ligands that would allow research into the physiopathologic underpinnings of traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy in military personnel and the civilian population. These tracers will allow new insights into tau pathology in the human brain, facilitating research into causes, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic encephalopathy and major neurodegenerative dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease and some variants of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, in which tau plays a role. The field of selective tau imaging has to overcome several obstacles, some of them associated with the idiosyncrasies of tau aggregation and others related to radiotracer design. A worldwide effort has focused on the development of imaging agents that will allow selective tau imaging in vivo. Recent progress in the development of these tracers is enabling the noninvasive assessment of the extent of tau pathology in the brain, eventually allowing the quantification of changes in tau pathology over time and its relation to cognitive performance, brain volumetrics, and other biomarkers, as well as assessment of efficacy and patient recruitment for antitau therapeutic trials. PMID:24924676

  17. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice. Second, CD45(+) microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain. PMID:25833819

  18. Detecting tau in serum of transgenic animal models after tau immunotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    d'Abramo, Cristina; Acker, Christopher M; Schachter, Joel B; Terracina, Giuseppe; Wang, Xiaohai; Forest, Stefanie K; Davies, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the attempt to elucidate if the "peripheral sink hypothesis" could be a potential mechanism of action for tau removal in passive immunotherapy experiments, we have examined tau levels in serum of chronically injected JNPL3 and Tg4510 transgenic animals. Measurement of tau in serum of mice treated with tau antibodies is challenging because of the antibody interference in sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To address this issue, we have developed a heat-treatment protocol at acidic pH to remove interfering molecules from serum, with excellent recovery of tau. The present data show that pan-tau and conformational antibodies do increase tau in mouse sera. However, these concentrations in serum do not consistently correlate with reductions of tau pathology in brain, suggesting that large elevations of tau species measured in serum are not predictive of efficacy. Here, we describe a reliable method to detect tau in serum of transgenic animals that have undergone tau immunotherapy. Levels of tau in human serum are less than the sensitivity of current assays, although artifactual signals are common. The method may be useful in similarly treated humans, a situation in which false positive signals are likely. PMID:26508157

  19. Tau Physics Prospects at the Tau-Charm Factory and at Other Machines

    E-print Network

    A. Pich

    1993-12-13

    The prospects for tau physics at future high-luminosity facilities are briefly discussed. Although important (and often complementary) contributions will be made from other machines, the unique experimental environment near threshold makes the Tau-Charm Factory the best experimental tool for $\\tau$ physics.

  20. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in pp[over ] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A

    2006-09-22

    A search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons Phi decaying into tau(+)tau(-) final states in pp[over ] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 325 pb(-1), were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Since no excess compared to the expectation from standard model processes is found, limits on the production cross section times branching ratio are set. The results are combined with those obtained from the D0 search for Phib(b[over ])-->bb[over ]b(b[over ]) and are interpreted in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. PMID:17025951

  1. Heavy sterile neutrinos in tau decays and the MiniBooNE anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dib, Claudio; Helo, Juan Carlos; Hirsch, Martin; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Current results of the MiniBooNE experiment show excess events that indicate neutrino oscillations, but only if one goes beyond the standard 3 family scenario. Recently a different explanation of the events has been given, not in terms of oscillations but by the production and decay of a massive sterile neutrino with large transition magnetic moment. We study the effect of such a sterile neutrino in the rare decays ?-??-?+?-? and ?-??-?+e-??. We find that searches for these decays, featuring displaced vertices between the ?- and the other charged particles, constitute reliable tests for the existence of the sterile neutrino proposed to explain the MiniBooNE anomaly. These searches could be done with already existing experimental data.

  2. Improved Limits on the Lepton-Flavor Violating Decays {tau}{sup -}{yields}l{sup -}l{sup +}l{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.

    2007-12-21

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the tau lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using 376 fb{sup -1} of data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} center-of-mass energy around 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage rings. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (4-8)x10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  3. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau[superscript ±]-->e[superscript ±]gamma and tau[superscript ±]-->mu[superscript ±]gamma

    E-print Network

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a ? lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire data set of (963±7)×10[superscript 6]?? decays collected by the BABAR detector near the ...

  4. TAUOLA for simulation of tau decay and production: perspectives for precision low energy and LHC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W?s, Z.

    2011-09-01

    The status of Monte Carlo system for the simulation of ?-lepton production and decay in high-energy accelerator experiments is reviewed. Since the previous ?-lepton conference in 2008 some practical modifications have been introduced: (i) For the TAUOLA Monte Carlo generator of ?-lepton decays, automated and simultaneous use of many versions of form-factors for the calculation of optional weights for fits was developed and checked to work in the Belle and BaBar software environment. Work on alternative parametrizations of hadronic decays is advanced. (ii) the TAUOLA universal interface based on HepMC (the C++ event record) is now public. A similar interface for PHOTOS is now also public. (iii) Extension of the PHOTOS Monte Carlo for QED bremsstrahlung in decays featuring kernels based on complete first order matrix element are gradually becoming widely available thanks to properties of the new, HepMC based interface. (iv) Systematic tests of the programs with the help of MC-TESTER are now available for FORTRAN and C++ users. The results presented here illustrate the status of the projects performed in collaboration with Nadia Davidson, Piotr Golonka, Gizo Nanava, Tomasz Przedzi?ski, Olga Shekhovtsova, El?bieta Richter-W?as, Pablo Roig, Qingjun Xu and others.

  5. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  6. Prediction for CP Violation via Electric Dipole Moment of $\\tau$ Lepton in ${\\gamma\\gamma \\to \\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}}$ Process at CLIC

    E-print Network

    Atag, S

    2015-01-01

    CP violating effects are investigated using tau pair spin correlation including anomalous electric dipole moment coupling of tau lepton in the subprocess ${\\gamma\\gamma \\to \\tau^{+}\\tau}^{-}$ at CLIC. Competitive bounds with previous works on the electric dipole moment from CP odd terms have been obtained.

  7. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-01

    The hadronic current for the ?- ? ?-?+?-?? decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the ? meson is described. Implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented. This paper is based on [1].

  8. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the ?? ? ???????? decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the ? meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  9. The production and decay of Tau leptons in e + e - annihilation at PETRA energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althoff, M.; Braunschweig, W.; Kirschfink, F. J.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Martyn, H.-U.; Rosskamp, P.; Schmitz, D.; Siebke, H.; Wallraff, W.; Eisenmann, J.; Fischer, H. M.; Hartmann, H.; Jocksch, A.; Knop, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Kück, H.; Mertens, V.; Wedemeyer, R.; Foster, B.; Eskreys, A.; Gather, K.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hultschig, H.; Joos, P.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Lüke, D.; Mättig, P.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Pyrlik, J.; Ronat, E.; Rushton, M.; Schütte, W.; Trines, D.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wolf, G.; Yekutieli, G.; Xiao, Ch.; Fohrmann, R.; Hilger, E.; Kracht, T.; Krasemann, H. L.; Leu, P.; Lohrmann, E.; Pandoulas, D.; Poelz, G.; Pösnecker, K. U.; Wiik, B. H.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Campbell, A. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Garbutt, D. A.; Jenkins, C.; Jones, T. D.; Jones, W. G.; McCardle, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thomas, J.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Bell, K. W.; Bowler, M. G.; Bull, P.; Cashmore, R. J.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Dauncey, P.; Devenish, R.; Grossmann, P.; Hawkes, C. M.; Lloyd, S. L.; Mellor, D. J.; Youngman, C.; Forden, G. E.; Hart, J. C.; Harvey, J.; Hasell, D. K.; Saxon, D. H.; Woodworth, P. L.; Barreiro, F.; Brandt, S.; Dittmar, M.; Holder, M.; Kreutz, G.; Neumann, B.; Duchovni, E.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Mikenberg, G.; Mir, R.; Revel, D.; Shapira, A.; Baranko, G.; Caldwell, A.; Cherney, M.; Izen, J. M.; Mermikides, M.; Ritz, S.; Rudolph, G.; Strom, D.; Takashima, M.; Venkataramania, H.; Wicklund, E.; Wu, Sau Lan; Zobernig, G.

    1985-12-01

    We have observed ? pair production at average CM energies of 13.9, 22.3, 34.5 and 43.1 GeV. The cross-sections are consistent with QED, the cut off parameters being ? +>161 GeV and ? -169 GeV (95% CL). The topological branching fraction of the ? to 1 charged particle, B 1, is 0.847±0.011 (stat){-0.013/+0.016}(syst) and no decays to 5 charged particles were observed resulting in B 5<0.007 (95% CL). Within the 3 charged track final state B( ? -? ? - ? + ? - v)/( B( ? -? ? - ? + ? - v)+ B( ? -? ? - ? + ? - ? 0 v))=0.37{-0.20/+0.35}

  10. HL Tau - The Missing Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettig, T.; Brittain, S.; Simon, T.; Kulesa, C.; Haywood, J.

    2004-06-01

    High-resolution infrared spectra of HL Tau exhibit broad emission lines of 12CO gas phase molecules as well as narrow absorption lines of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. The broad emission lines of vibrationally-excited 12CO are dominated by the hot (T ~1500 K) inner-disk (radius r < 0.2 AU). The narrow absorption lines of CO are found to originate from the circumstellar gas at a temperature of ~100 K. The cooler material indicates a large column of absorbing gas along the line of sight, which indirectly implies a large amount of dust extinction. However, the minimal opacity allowed by our emission line results severely constrains the M-band extinction and suggests that there is much less dust along the line of sight than inferred from the CO absorption data.

  11. Isolated tau leptons in events with large missing transverse momentum at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Loizides, J. H.; Magill, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Yoshida, R.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Antonioli, P.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Cara Romeo, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; De Pasquale, S.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Margotti, A.; Montanari, A.; Nania, R.; Palmonari, F.; Pesci, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Zichichi, A.; Aghuzumtsyan, G.; Bartsch, D.; Brock, I.; Goers, S.; Hartmann, H.; Hilger, E.; Irrgang, P.; Jakob, H.-P.; Kind, O.; Meyer, U.; Paul, E.; Rautenberg, J.; Renner, R.; Stifutkin, A.; Tandler, J.; Voss, K. C.; Wang, M.; Weber, A.; Bailey, D. S.; Brook, N. H.; Cole, J. E.; Heath, G. P.; Namsoo, T.; Robins, S.; Wing, M.; Capua, M.; Mastroberardino, A.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, Y. K.; Lee, J. H.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Caldwell, A.; Helbich, M.; Liu, X.; Mellado, B.; Ning, Y.; Paganis, S.; Ren, Z.; Schmidke, W. B.; Sciulli, F.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Figiel, J.; Galas, A.; Olkiewicz, K.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bo?d, T.; Grabowska-Bo?d, I.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowal, A. M.; Kowal, M.; Kowalski, T.; Przybycie?, M.; Suszycki, L.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Kota?ski, A.; S?omi?ski, W.; Adler, V.; Behrens, U.; Bloch, I.; Borras, K.; Chiochia, V.; Dannheim, D.; Drews, G.; Fourletova, J.; Fricke, U.; Geiser, A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gutsche, O.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hillert, S.; Kahle, B.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kramberger, G.; Labes, H.; Lelas, D.; Lim, H.; Löhr, B.; Mankel, R.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Nguyen, C. N.; Notz, D.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Polini, A.; Raval, A.; Rurua, L.; Schneekloth, U.; Stoesslein, U.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W.; Schlenstedt, S.; Barbagli, G.; Gallo, E.; Genta, C.; Pelfer, P. G.; Bamberger, A.; Benen, A.; Coppola, N.; Bell, M.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Ferrando, J.; Hamilton, J.; Hanlon, S.; Saxon, D. H.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Gialas, I.; Bodmann, B.; Carli, T.; Holm, U.; Klimek, K.; Krumnack, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Milite, M.; Salehi, H.; Schleper, P.; Stonjek, S.; Wick, K.; Ziegler, A.; Ziegler, Ar; Collins-Tooth, C.; Foudas, C.; Gonçalo, R.; Long, K. R.; Tapper, A. D.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; Kataoka, M.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Boos, E. G.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Son, D.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Barreiro, F.; Glasman, C.; González, O.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Vázquez, M.; Zambrana, M.; Barbi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Gliga, S.; Lainesse, J.; Padhi, S.; Stairs, D. G.; Walsh, R.; Tsurugai, T.; Antonov, A.; Danilov, P.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Gladkov, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Suchkov, S.; Dementiev, R. K.; Ermolov, P. F.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Katkov, I. I.; Khein, L. A.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Lukina, O. Yu; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Vlasov, N. N.; Zotkin, S. A.; Coppola, N.; Grijpink, S.; Koffeman, E.; Kooijman, P.; Maddox, E.; Pellegrino, A.; Schagen, S.; Tiecke, H.; Velthuis, J. J.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; Brümmer, N.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Ling, T. Y.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cottrell, A.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Foster, B.; Grzelak, G.; Gwenlan, C.; Patel, S.; Straub, P. B.; Walczak, R.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; Dusini, S.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Longhin, A.; Parenti, A.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Turcato, M.; Heaphy, E. A.; Metlica, F.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; Iga, Y.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Cormack, C.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Heusch, C.; Park, I. H.; Pavel, N.; Abramowicz, H.; Gabareen, A.; Kananov, S.; Kreisel, A.; Levy, A.; Kuze, M.; Fusayasu, T.; Kagawa, S.; Kohno, T.; Tawara, T.; Yamashita, T.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Inuzuka, M.; Kaji, H.; Kitamura, S.; Matsuzawa, K.; Ferrero, M. I.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Arneodo, M.; Ruspa, M.; Koop, T.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Mirea, A.; Butterworth, J. M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Jones, T. W.; Lightwood, M. S.; Sutton, M. R.; Targett-Adams, C.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; ?u?niak, P.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Sztuk, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Ukleja, A.; Ukleja, J.; ?arnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Plucinski, P.; Eisenberg, Y.; Gladilin, L. K.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Riveline, M.; Kçira, D.; Lammers, S.; Li, L.; Reeder, D. D.; Rosin, M.; Savin, A. A.; Smith, W. H.; Deshpande, A.; Dhawan, S.; Bhadra, S.; Catterall, C. D.; Fourletov, S.; Hartner, G.; Menary, S.; Soares, M.; Standage, J.; ZEUS Collaboration

    2004-03-01

    A search for events containing isolated tau leptons and large missing transverse momentum, not originating from the tau decay, has been performed with the ZEUS detector at the electron-proton collider HERA, using 130 pb-1 of integrated luminosity. A search was made for isolated tracks coming from hadronic tau decays. Observables based on the internal jet structure were exploited to discriminate between tau decays and quark- or gluon-induced jets. Three tau candidates were found, while 0.40+0.12-0.13 were expected from Standard Model processes, such as charged current deep inelastic scattering and single W±-boson production. To search for heavy-particle decays, a more restrictive selection was applied to isolate tau leptons produced together with a hadronic final state with high transverse momentum. Two candidate events survive, while 0.20±0.05 events are expected from Standard Model processes.

  12. Proteopathic tau seeding predicts tauopathy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Brandon B; Furman, Jennifer L; Mahan, Thomas E; Yamasaki, Tritia R; Mirbaha, Hilda; Eades, William C; Belaygorod, Larisa; Cairns, Nigel J; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2014-10-14

    Transcellular propagation of protein aggregates, or proteopathic seeds, may drive the progression of neurodegenerative diseases in a prion-like manner. In tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, this model predicts that tau seeds propagate pathology through the brain via cell-cell transfer in neural networks. The critical role of tau seeding activity is untested, however. It is unknown whether seeding anticipates and correlates with subsequent development of pathology as predicted for a causal agent. One major limitation has been the lack of a robust assay to measure proteopathic seeding activity in biological specimens. We engineered an ultrasensitive, specific, and facile FRET-based flow cytometry biosensor assay based on expression of tau or synuclein fusions to CFP and YFP, and confirmed its sensitivity and specificity to tau (? 300 fM) and synuclein (? 300 pM) fibrils. This assay readily discriminates Alzheimer's disease vs. Huntington's disease and aged control brains. We then carried out a detailed time-course study in P301S tauopathy mice, comparing seeding activity versus histological markers of tau pathology, including MC1, AT8, PG5, and Thioflavin S. We detected robust seeding activity at 1.5 mo, >1 mo before the earliest histopathological stain. Proteopathic tau seeding is thus an early and robust marker of tauopathy, suggesting a proximal role for tau seeds in neurodegeneration. PMID:25261551

  13. Simulated Cytoskeletal Collapse via Tau Degradation

    E-print Network

    Austin Sendek; Henry R. Fuller; N. Robert Hayre; Rajiv R. P. Singh; Daniel L. Cox

    2014-09-29

    We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i) taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii) removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii) a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundle falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06-0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse.

  14. Search for Lepton Flavor Violating Decays $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\ell^\\pm{\\pi^0}, \\ell^\\pm\\eta, \\ell^\\pm{\\eta^\\prime}$

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-15

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of the {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a pseudoscalar meson has been performed using 339 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58GeV by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring. No evidence of signal has been found, and upper limits on the branching fractions are set at 10{sup -7} level.

  15. Tau Lepton Flavor Violation Results from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, A.; /INFN, Pisa

    2012-04-03

    We report the recent results obtained by BABAR collaboration in lepton flavor violation (LFV) searches in the tau lepton sector, presenting 16 new results from {tau}{sub LLL} (L = e, {mu}), {tau} {yields} LV{sup 0} V{sup 0} = {rho}{sup 0}, K*{sup 0}, K*{sup -0}, {Phi} and {tau} {yields} lK{sub S}.

  16. Complementary dimerization of microtubule-associated tau protein: Implications for

    E-print Network

    Ross, Jennifer

    splicing, there are six naturally occurring isoforms of tau expressed in the CNS (Fig. 1). Based with tau acting as a monomer; rather, they indicate that two tau molecules associate in an antiparallel mutations cause amino acid substitutions in tau, whereas others are regu- latory, causing aberrant patterns

  17. Mechanisms of tau-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Alonso, Alejandra Del C; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge

    2009-07-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and related tauopathies are histopathologically characterized by a specific type of slow and progressive neurodegeneration, which involves the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule associated protein (MAP) tau. This hallmark, called neurofibrillary degeneration, is seen as neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads, and dystrophic neurites and is apparently required for the clinical expression of AD, and in related tauopathies it leads to dementia in the absence of amyloid plaques. While normal tau promotes assembly and stabilizes microtubules, the non-fibrillized, abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau sequesters normal tau, MAP1 and MAP2, and disrupts microtubules. The abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau, which can be generated by catalysis of several different combinations of protein kinases, also promotes its misfolding, decrease in turnover, and self-assembly into tangles of paired helical and or straight filaments. Some of the abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau ends up both amino and C-terminally truncated. Disruption of microtubules by the non-fibrillized abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau as well as its aggregation as neurofibrillary tangles probably impair axoplasmic flow and lead to slow progressive retrograde degeneration and loss of connectivity of the affected neurons. Among the phosphatases, which regulate the phosphorylation of tau, protein phosphatase-2A (PP2A), the activity of which is down-regulated in AD brain, is by far the major enzyme. The two inhibitors of PP-2A, I (1) (PP2A) and I (2) (PP2A) , which are overexpressed in AD, might be responsible for the decreased phosphatase activity. AD is multifactorial and heterogeneous and involves more than one etiopathogenic mechanism. PMID:19184068

  18. On the Behavior of the Effective QCD Coupling {alpha}{sub {tau}}(s)at Low Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-12-11

    The hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton can be used to determine the effective charge {alpha}{tau}(m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2}) for a hypothetical {tau}-lepton with mass in the range 0 < m{sub {tau}{prime}} < m{sub {tau}}. This definition provides a fundamental definition of the QCD coupling at low mass scales. We study the behavior of {alpha}{sub {tau}} at low mass scales directly from first principles and without any renormalization-scheme dependence by looking at the experimental data from the OPAL Collaboration. The results are consistent with the freezing of the physical coupling at mass scales s = m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2} of order 1 GeV{sup 2} with a magnitude {alpha}{sub {tau}} {approx} 0.9 {+-} 0.1.

  19. ATLAS Search for SM H{yields}{tau}{tau} in the VBF Production Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hanninger, Guilherme Nunes

    2008-11-23

    This article discusses the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in vector boson fusion and subsequent decay into {tau} pairs with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. This analysis is based on Monte Carlo signal and background samples simulated with a detailed detector description and the entire trigger chain. Preliminary results are reported including the expected discovery potential with 30 fb{sup -1} of data as well as the 95% expected signal exclusion with 10 fb{sup -1}.

  20. Generalized $\\mu-\\tau$ reflection symmetry and leptonic CP violation

    E-print Network

    Chen, Peng; Gonzalez-Canales, Felix; Valle, J W F

    2015-01-01

    We propose a generalized $\\mu-\\tau$ reflection symmetry to constrain the lepton flavor mixing parameters. We obtain a new correlation between the atmospheric mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ and the "Dirac" CP violation phase $\\delta_{\\rm CP}$. Only in a specific limit our proposed CP transformation reduces to standard $\\mu-\\tau$ reflection, for which $\\theta_{23}$ and $\\delta_{CP}$ are both maximal. The "Majorana" phases are predicted to lie at their CP-conserving values with important implications for the neutrinoless double beta decay rates. We also study the phenomenological implications of our scheme for present and future neutrino oscillation experiments including T2K, NO$\

  1. Rapamycin attenuates the progression of tau pathology in P301S tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, Sefika; Fraser, Graham; Castets, Perrine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Skachokova, Zhiva; Breu, Karin; Clavaguera, Florence; Sinnreich, Michael; Kappos, Ludwig; Goedert, Michel; Tolnay, Markus; Winkler, David Theo

    2013-01-01

    Altered autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, for which curative treatment options are still lacking. We have recently shown that trehalose reduces tau pathology in a tauopathy mouse model by stimulation of autophagy. Here, we studied the effect of the autophagy inducing drug rapamycin on the progression of tau pathology in P301S mutant tau transgenic mice. Rapamycin treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cortical tau tangles, less tau hyperphosphorylation, and lowered levels of insoluble tau in the forebrain. The favourable effect of rapamycin on tau pathology was paralleled by a qualitative reduction in astrogliosis. These effects were visible with early preventive or late treatment. We further noted an accumulation of the autophagy associated proteins p62 and LC3 in aged tangle bearing P301S mice that was lowered upon rapamycin treatment. Thus, rapamycin treatment defers the progression of tau pathology in a tauopathy animal model and autophagy stimulation may constitute a therapeutic approach for patients suffering from tauopathies. PMID:23667480

  2. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  3. Probing penguin coefficients with the lifetime ratio tau(B_s)/tau(B_d)

    E-print Network

    Yong-Yeon Keum; Ulrich Nierste

    1997-10-28

    We calculate penguin contributions to the lifetime splitting between the B_s and the B_d meson. In the Standard Model the penguin effects are found to be opposite in sign, but of similar magnitude as the contributions of the current-current operators, despite of the smallness of the penguin coefficients. We predict tau(B_s)/tau(B_d) -1 = ( -1.2 +/- 10.0 ) * 10^(-3) * (f_{B_s}/190 MeV)^2 where the error stems from hadronic uncertainties. Since penguin coefficients are sensitive to new physics and poorly tested experimentally, we analyze the possibility to extract them from a future precision measurement of tau(B_s)/tau(B_d). Anticipating progress in the determination of the hadronic parameters epsilon_1, epsilon_2 and f_{B_s}/f_{B_d} we find that the coefficient C_4 can be extracted with an uncertainty of order |Delta C_4|= 0.1 from the double ratio (tau(B_s)-tau(B_d))/(tau(B^+)-tau(B_d)), if |epsilon_1-epsilon_2| is not too small.

  4. Trehalose ameliorates dopaminergic and tau pathology in parkin deleted/tau overexpressing mice through autophagy activation.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Jose A; Rodríguez, Laura; Casarejos, María J; Solano, Rosa M; Gómez, Ana; Perucho, Juan; Cuervo, Ana María; García de Yébenes, Justo; Mena, María A

    2010-09-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases, sporadic or familial, mainly characterized by dementia and parkinsonism associated to atrophy of the frontotemporal cortex and the basal ganglia, with deposition of abnormal tau in brain. Hereditary tauopathies are related with mutations of the tau gene. Up to the present, these diseases have not been helped by any disease-modifying treatment, and patients die a few years after the onset of symptoms. We have developed and characterized a mouse model of tauopathy with parkinsonism, overexpressing human mutated tau protein with deletion of parkin (PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW)). At 3 months of age, these mice present abnormal dopamine-related behavior, severe dropout of dopamine neurons in the ventral midbrain, reduced dopamine levels in the striatum and abundant phosphorylated tau-positive neuritic plaques, neurofibrillary tangles, astrogliosis, and, at 12 months old, plaques of murine beta-amyloid in the hippocampus. Trehalose is a natural disaccharide that increases the removal of abnormal proteins through enhancement of autophagy. In this work, we tested if 1% trehalose in the drinking water reverts the PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) phenotype. The treatment with trehalose of 3-month-old PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice for 2.5 months reverted the dropout of dopamine neurons, which takes place in the ventral midbrain of vehicle treated PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) and the reduced dopamine-related proteins levels in the midbrain and striatum. The number of phosphorylated tau-positive neuritic plaques and the levels of phosphorylated tau decreased, as well as astrogliosis in brain regions. The autophagy markers in the brain, the autophagic vacuoles isolated from the liver, and the electron microscopy data indicate that these effects of trehalose are mediated by autophagy. The treatment with trehalose for 4 months of 3-month-old PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice maintained the amelioration of the tau pathology and astrogliosis but failed to revert DA-related pathology in the striatum. Furthermore, the 3-week treatment with trehalose of 14-month-old PK(-/-)/Tau(VLW) mice, at the limit of their life expectancy, improved the motor behavior and anxiety of these animals, and reduced their levels of phosphorylated tau and the number of murine beta-amyloid plaques. Trehalose is neuroprotective in this model of tauopathy. Since trehalose is free of toxic effects at high concentrations, this study opens the way for clinical studies of the effects of trehalose in human tauopathies. PMID:20546895

  5. Search for the Electric Dipole Moment of the tau lepton

    E-print Network

    Inami, K; Abe, K

    2003-01-01

    We have searched for a T/CP violation signature arising from an electric dipole form factor (d_tau) of the tau lepton in the e+e- -> tau+tau- reaction. Using an optimal observable method for 29.5 fb^{-1} of data collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB collider at sqrt{s}=10.58 GeV, we obtained the preliminary result Re(d_tau) = (1.15 +- 1.70) x 10^{-17} ecm and Im(d_tau) = (-0.83 +- 0.86) x 10^{-17} ecm for the real and imaginary parts of d_tau, respectively, and set the 95% confidence level limits -2.2 < Re(d_tau) < 4.5 (10^{-17} ecm) and -2.5 < Im(d_tau) < 0.8 (10^{-17} ecm).

  6. Ultrahigh energy tau neutrino flux regeneration while skimming the Earth

    SciTech Connect

    Bigas, Oscar Blanch

    2008-09-15

    The detection of Earth-skimming tau neutrinos has turned into a very promising strategy for the observation of ultra-high-energy cosmic neutrinos. The sensitivity of this channel crucially depends on the parameters of the propagation of the tau neutrinos through the terrestrial crust, which governs the flux of emerging tau leptons that can be detected. One of the characteristics of this propagation is the possibility of regeneration through multiple {nu}{sub {tau}}{r_reversible}{tau} conversions, which are often neglected in the standard picture. In this paper, we solve the transport equations governing the {nu}{sub {tau}} propagation and compare the flux of emerging tau leptons obtained allowing regeneration or not. We discuss the validity of the approximation of neglecting the {nu}{sub {tau}} regeneration using different scenarios for the neutrino-nucleon cross sections and the tau energy losses.

  7. Passive Immunization with Phospho-Tau Antibodies Reduces Tau Pathology and Functional Deficits in Two Distinct Mouse Tauopathy Models

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M.; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S.; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F.; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Brunden, Kurt R.; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:25933020

  8. CO Fundamental Emission from V836 Tau

    E-print Network

    Joan R. Najita; Nathan Crockett; John S. Carr

    2008-09-23

    We present high resolution 4.7 micron CO fundamental spectroscopy of V836 Tau, a young star with properties that are between those of classical and weak T Tauri stars and which may be dissipating its circumstellar disk. We find that the CO line profiles of V836 Tau are unusual in that they are markedly double-peaked, even after correcting for stellar photospheric absorption in the spectrum. This suggests that the CO emission arises from a restricted range of disk radii (< 0.5 AU), in contrast to the situation for most classical T Tauri stars where the CO emission extends out to much larger radii (~ 1-2 AU). We discuss whether the outer radius of the emission in V836 Tau results from the physical truncation of the disk or an excitation effect. We also explore how either of these hypotheses may bear on our understanding of disk dissipation in this system.

  9. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  10. Akt and CHIP coregulate tau degradation through coordinated interactions

    PubMed Central

    Dickey, Chad A.; Koren, John; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Xu, Ya-fei; Jinwal, Umesh K.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Monks, Bobby; Sun, Mei; Cheng, Jin Q.; Patterson, Cam; Bailey, Rachel M.; Dunmore, Judith; Soresh, Sareh; Leon, Carlos; Morgan, Dave; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    A hallmark of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau into fibrillar aggregates. Recent studies suggest that they accumulate because cytosolic chaperones fail to clear abnormally phosphorylated tau, preserving a pool of toxic tau intermediates within the neuron. We describe a mechanism for tau clearance involving a major cellular kinase, Akt. During stress, Akt is ubiquitinated and degraded by the tau ubiquitin ligase CHIP, and this largely depends on the Hsp90 complex. Akt also prevents CHIP-induced tau ubiquitination and its subsequent degradation, either by regulating the Hsp90/CHIP complex directly or by competing as a client protein with tau for binding. Akt levels tightly regulate the expression of CHIP, such that, as Akt levels are suppressed, CHIP levels also decrease, suggesting a potential stress response feedback mechanism between ligase and kinase activity. We also show that Akt and the microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2 (PAR1/MARK2), a known tau kinase, interact directly. Akt enhances the activity of PAR1 to promote tau hyperphosphorylation at S262/S356, a tau species that is not recognized by the CHIP/Hsp90 complex. Moreover, Akt1 knockout mice have reduced levels of tau phosphorylated at PAR1/MARK2 consensus sites. Hence, Akt serves as a major regulator of tau biology by manipulating both tau kinases and protein quality control, providing a link to several common pathways that have demonstrated dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18292230

  11. Search for Pair Production of Scalar Top Quarks Decaying to a tau Lepton and a b Quark in ppbar Collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Brigliadori, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Bologna U. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U., Math. Dept. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in an R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario using 322 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. We assume each {tilde t}{sub 1} decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark with a branching ratio {beta}, and that the final state contains either an electron or a muon from a leptonic {tau} decay, a hadronically decaying {tau} lepton, and two or more jets. Two candidate events pass our final selection criteria, consistent with the expectation from standard model processes. We present upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio squared {sigma}({tilde t}{sub 1}{bar {tilde t}}{sub 1}) x {beta}{sup 2} as a function of the stop mass m({tilde t}{sub 1}). Assuming {beta} = 1, we set a 95% confidence level limit m({tilde t}{sub 1}) > 153 GeV=c{sup 2} obtained using a next-to-leading order cross section. These limits are also fully applicable to the case of a pair produced third generation scalar leptoquark decaying into a {tau} lepton and a b quark.

  12. A Search for supersymmetric Higgs bosons in the di-tau decay mode in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne, PHY /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U. /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U.

    2005-06-01

    A search for direct production of Higgs bosons in the di-tau decay mode is performed with 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during the 1994-1995 data taking period of the Tevatron. We search for events where one tau decays to an electron plus neutrinos and the other tau decays hadronically. We perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for supersymmetric Higgs boson production where tan {beta} is large and m{sub A} is small. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A{sup 0}} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and tan {beta} = 50, we limit the production cross section multiplied by the branching ratio to be less than 77.9 pb at the 95% confidence level compared to theoretically predicted value of 11.0 pb. This is the first search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs at a hadron collider.

  13. Search for W' decaying to tau lepton and neutrino in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-08-19

    We found that the first search for a heavy charged vector boson in the final state with a tau lepton and a neutrino is reported, using 19.7 fb-1 of LHC data at ?s = 8 TeV. A signal would appear as an excess of events in kinematic regions where the standard model background is low. No excess is observed. Limits are set on a model in which the W' decays preferentially to fermions of the third generation. Our results substantially extend previous constraints on this model. Masses below 2.0 to 2.7 TeV are excluded, depending on the model parameters. In addition, the existence of a W' boson with universal fermion couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level, for W' masses below 2.7 TeV.

  14. Search for W' decaying to tau lepton and neutrino in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    E-print Network

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-08-18

    The first search for a heavy charged vector boson in the final state with a tau lepton and a neutrino is reported, using 19.7 inverse femtobarns of LHC data at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. A signal would appear as an excess of events in kinematic regions where the standard model background is low. No excess is observed. Limits are set on a model in which the W' decays preferentially to fermions of the third generation. These results substantially extend previous constraints on this model. Masses below 2.0 to 2.7 TeV are excluded, depending on the model parameters. In addition, the existence of a W' boson with universal fermion couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level, for W' masses below 2.7 TeV.

  15. Search for W' decaying to tau lepton and neutrino in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 8 TeV

    E-print Network

    Khachatryan, Vardan; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; A??lar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Ochesanu, Silvia; Rougny, Romain; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Gay, Arnaud; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Reis, Thomas; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Strobbe, Nadja; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hensel, Carsten; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Genchev, Vladimir; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    The first search for a heavy charged vector boson in the final state with a tau lepton and a neutrino is reported, using 19.7 fb$ ^{-1} $ of LHC data at $\\sqrt{s} =$ 8 TeV. A signal would appear as an excess of events in kinematic regions where the standard model background is low. No excess is observed. Limits are set on a model in which the W' decays preferentially to fermions of the third generation. These results substantially extend previous constraints on this model. Masses below 2.0 to 2.7 TeV are excluded, depending on the model parameters. In addition, the existence of a W' boson with universal fermion couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level, for W' masses below 2.7 TeV.

  16. Tau physics at p[bar p] colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J. . High Energy Physics Lab.)

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  17. A precision measurement of the Z{sup 0} lineshape parameters for the process Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Lahmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, a measurement of the partial decay width of the process Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} using data collected during 1993 and 1994 at the OPAL detector at CERN is described. The cross sections of this process at three center-of-mass energies near the Z{sup 0} resonance were determined, and from a fit to those cross sections, the mass of the Z{sup 0}, its total decay width and its partial decay width into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} final states were determined as M{sub Z} = 91.183 {+-} 0.020 GeV, {Lambda}{sub tot} = 2.514 {+-} 0.018 GeV and {Lambda}{sub {tau}{tau}} = 84.54 {+-} 0.59 MeV. Using published results for M{sub Z}, and {Lambda}{sub tot} with higher accuracy, a value for the partial decay width of {Lambda}{sub {tau}{tau}} = 84.02 {+-} 0.20 MeV was obtained. Further using published results for the decay width of the Z{sup 0} into quark pair final states, the invisible decay width of the Z{sup 0} was determined as {Lambda}{sub inv} = 496.9 {+-} 4.1 MeV, and the number of neutrino generations was determined as N{sub {nu}} = 2.974 {+-} 0.025(exp) {+-} 0.007 (m{sub top}, M{sub Higgs}). All results were found to be in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions and were consistent with the assumption of lepton universality within the Standard Model framework.

  18. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  19. Tau Neutrino Appearance via Neutrino Oscillations in Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-print Network

    Tokyo, University of

    Tau Neutrino Appearance via Neutrino Oscillations in Atmospheric Neutrinos A Dissertation Presented of the Dissertation Tau Neutrino Appearance via Neutrino Oscillations in Atmospheric Neutrinos by Tokufumi Kato Doctor of Philosophy in Physics Stony Brook University 2007 A search for the appearance of tau neutrinos from µ

  20. Tau protein is cross-linked by transglutaminase in P301L tau transgenic mice

    E-print Network

    Halverson, Robyn A.; Lewis, Jada; Frausto, Shanti; Hutton, Mike; Muma, Nancy A.

    2005-02-02

    filaments and NFTs in tauopathies remain unclear. Several lines of evidence suggest that transglutaminase may cross-link tau into stable, insoluble aggregates, leading to the formation of NFTs in Alzheimer's disease and progressive supranuclear palsy...

  1. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ?60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ?0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ?}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  2. Implicating Calpain in Tau-Mediated Toxicity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, James P.; Shepard, Amanda M.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Tait, Don N.; Fleming, Samantha R.; Vincent, Michael P.; Steinhilb, Michelle L.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and other related neurodegenerative disorders known as tauopathies are characterized by the accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated and aggregated forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Several laboratories have identified a 17 kD proteolytic fragment of tau in degenerating neurons and in numerous cell culture models that is generated by calpain cleavage and speculated to contribute to tau toxicity. In the current study, we employed a Drosophila tauopathy model to investigate the importance of calpain-mediated tau proteolysis in contributing to tau neurotoxicity in an animal model of human neurodegenerative disease. We found that mutations that disrupted endogenous calpainA or calpainB activity in transgenic flies suppressed tau toxicity. Expression of a calpain-resistant form of tau in Drosophila revealed that mutating the putative calpain cleavage sites that produce the 17 kD fragment was sufficient to abrogate tau toxicity in vivo. Furthermore, we found significant toxicity in the fly retina associated with expression of only the 17 kD tau fragment. Collectively, our data implicate calpain-mediated proteolysis of tau as an important pathway mediating tau neurotoxicity in vivo. PMID:21858230

  3. The disk around the brown dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Di Francesco, James; Duchêne, Gaspard; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-10

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 ?m and 850 ?m taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3? detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?} (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?} and <2.7 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ?}, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  4. The Disk around the Brown Dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Duchêne, Gaspard; Di Francesco, James; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-01

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 ?m and 850 ?m taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3? detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10-4 M ? (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10-4 M ? and <2.7 × 10-4 M ?, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  5. T-Tau and P-Tau in Brain and Blood from Natural and Experimental Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Richard; Chang, Binggong; Petersen, Robert; Chiu, Allen; Davies, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic abnormalities are prominent in prion disease pathogenesis and are responsible for functional deficits. The microtubule associated protein, Tau, binds to and stabilizes microtubules in axons ensuring axonal transport of synaptic components. Tau phosphorylation reduces its affinity for microtubules leading to their instability and resulting in disrupted axonal transport and synaptic dysfunction. We report on the levels of total Tau (T-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau), measured by highly sensitive laser-based immunoassays, in the central nervous system and biofluids from experimentally transmitted prion disease in mice and natural cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD) in humans. We found that, in contrast to sCJD where only the levels of T-Tau in brain are increased, both T-Tau and P-Tau are increased in the brains of symptomatic mice experimentally infected with the ME7, 139A and 22L mouse-adapted scrapie strains. The increased levels of T-Tau in sCJD brain, compared to control samples, were also observed in patient plasma. In contrast, there was no detectable increase in T-Tau and P-Tau in plasma from symptomatic experimentally infected mice. Furthermore, our data suggests that in mice showing clinical signs of prion disease the levels and/or ratios of T-Tau and P-Tau are only a useful parameter for differentiating the mouse-adapted scrapie strains that differ in the extent of disease. We conclude that the neuropathogenesis associated with P-Tau and synaptic dysfunction is similar for at least two of the mouse-adapted scrapie strains tested but may differ between sporadic and experimentally transmitted prion diseases. PMID:26630676

  6. Tau Binds to Multiple Tubulin Dimers with Helical Structure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Han; Culver, Jacob A.; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism by which tau binds to and promotes microtubule (MT) assembly as part of its native function may also provide insight into its loss of function that occurs in neurodegenerative disease. Both mechanistic and structural studies of tau have been hindered by its intrinsic disorder and highly dynamic nature. Here, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and acrylodan fluorescence screening to study the stoichiometry and structural features of tau-tubulin assemblies. Our results show that tau binds to multiple tubulin dimers, even when MT assembly is inhibited. Moreover, we observe helical structure in the repeat regions of the MT binding domain of tau in the tau-tubulin complex, reflecting partial folding upon binding. Our findings support a role for tau’s intrinsic disorder in providing a flexible scaffold for binding tubulin and MTs and a disorder-to-order transition in mediating this important interaction. PMID:26165802

  7. Tau mediated neurodegeneration: an insight into Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    PubMed

    Obulesu, M; Venu, R; Somashekhar, R

    2011-08-01

    Extracellular accumulations of A?, hyperphosphorylation of tau and intracellular neurofibrillary tangle formation have been the hallmarks of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Although tau and its phosphorylation play a pivotal role in the normal physiology yet its hyperphosphorylation has been a pathological manifestation in neurodegenerative disorders like AD. In this review physiology of tau, its phosphorylation, hyperphosphorylation with the intervention of various kinases, aggregation and formation of paired helical filaments has been discussed. A brief account of various animal models employed to study the pathological manifestation of tau in AD and therapeutic strategies streamlined to counter the tau induced pathology has been given. The reasons for the failure to have suitable animal model to study AD pathology and recent success in achieving this has been included. The role of caspase cascade in tau cleavage has been emphasized. The summary of current studies on tau and the need for future studies has been accentuated. PMID:21509508

  8. A Young Planet Search in Visible and IR Light: DN Tau, V836 Tau, and V827 Tau

    E-print Network

    L. Prato; M. Huerta; C. M. Johns-Krull; N. Mahmud; D. T. Jaffe; P. Hartigan

    2008-09-21

    In searches for low-mass companions to late-type stars, correlation between radial velocity variations and line bisector slope changes indicates contamination by large starspots. Two young stars demonstrate that this test is not sufficient to rule out starspots as a cause of radial velocity variations. As part of our survey for substellar companions to T Tauri stars, we identified the ~2 Myr old planet host candidates DN Tau and V836 Tau. In both cases, visible light radial velocity modulation appears periodic and is uncorrelated with line bisector span variations, suggesting close companions of several M_Jup in these systems. However, high-resolution, infrared spectroscopy shows that starspots cause the radial velocity variations. We also report unambiguous results for V827 Tau, identified as a spotted star on the basis of both visible light and infrared spectroscopy. Our results suggest that infrared follow up observations are critical for determining the source of radial velocity modulation in young, spotted stars.

  9. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  10. Electrochemical Investigations into Kinase-Catalyzed Transformations of Tau Protein

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The formation of neurofibrillary tangles by hyperphosphorylated tau is a well-recognized hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Resulting from malfunctioning protein kinases, hyperphosphorylated tau is unable to bind microtubules properly, causing it to self-associate and aggregate. The effects of tau phosphorylation on tau conformation and aggregation are still largely unexplored. The conformational analysis of tau and its hyperphosphorylated forms is usually performed by a variety of spectroscopic techniques, all of which require ample sample concentrations and/or volumes. Here we report on the use of surface based electrochemical techniques that allow for detection of conformational changes and orientation of tau protein as a function of tau phosphorylation by tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases. The electrochemical methods utilize 5?-?-ferrocenyl adenosine triphosphate (Fc-ATP) derivative as a cosubstrate and tau immobilized on gold surface to probe the role of the following protein kinases: Sarcoma related kinase (Src), Abelson tyrosine kinase (Abl), tau-tubulin kinase (TTBK), proto-oncogene tyrosine protein kinase Fyn (Fyn), and glycogen synthase kinase 3-? (Gsk-3?). The single kinase and sequential kinase-catalyzed Fc-phosphorylations modulate the electrochemical signal, pointing to the dramatic changes around the Fc group in the Fc-phosphorylated tau films. The location and orientation of the Fc-group in Fc-tau film was investigated by the surface plasmon resonance based on antiferrocene antibodies. Additional surface characterization of the Fc-tau films by time-of-flight secondary ion-mass spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that Fc-phosphorylations influence the tau orientation and conformation on surfaces. When Fc-phosphorylations were performed in solution, the subsequently immobilized Fc-tau exhibited similar trends. This study illustrates the validity and the utility of the labeled electrochemical approach for probing the changes in protein film properties, conformation, and orientation as a function of the enzymatically catalyzed modifications. PMID:23687953

  11. Search for a very light NMSSM Higgs boson produced in decays of the 125 GeV scalar boson and decaying into tau leptons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    E-print Network

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-10-22

    A search for a very light Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is presented within the framework of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. This search is based on a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 inverse-femtobarns of proton-proton collisions collected by the CMS experiment at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. The signal is defined by the production of either of the two lightest scalars, h[1] or h[2], via gluon-gluon fusion and subsequent decay into a pair of the lightest Higgs bosons, a[1] or h[1]. The h[1] or h[2] boson is identified with the observed state at a mass of 125 GeV. The analysis searches for decays of the a[1] (h[1]) states into pairs of tau leptons and covers a mass range for the a[1] (h[1]) boson of 4 to 8 GeV. The search reveals no significant excess in data above standard model background expectations, and an upper limit is set on the signal production cross section times branching fraction as a function of the a[1] (h[1]) boson mass. The 95\\% confidence level limit ranges from 4.5 pb at m(a[1]) (m(h[1])) = 8 GeV to 10.3 pb at m(a[1]) (m(h[1])) = 5 GeV.

  12. Upper limit on the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy tau neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J; Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, L; Andringa, S; Anzalone, A; Aramo, C; Argirò, S; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bäcker, T; Badagnani, D; Barbosa, A F; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; BenZvi, S; Berat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Bohácová, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brogueira, P; Brown, W C; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Burton, R E; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Carvalho, W; Castellina, A; Catalano, O; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Colombo, E; Conceição, R; Connolly, B; Contreras, F; Coppens, J; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Creusot, A; Criss, A; Cronin, J; Curutiu, A; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; De Donato, C; de Jong, S J; De La Vega, G; de Mello Junior, W J M; de Mello Neto, J R T; DeMitri, I; de Souza, V; del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; dos Anjos, J C; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Dutan, I; DuVernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fonte, R; Fracchiolla, C E; Fulgione, W; García, B; García Gámez, D; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Glass, H; Gold, M S; Golup, G; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gómez Berisso, M; Gómez Herrero, R; Gonçalves, P; Gonçalves do Amaral, M; Gonzalez, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Góra, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A F; Grunfeld, C; Guardincerri, Y; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutiérrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Hauschildt, T; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Hebrero, G; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Holmes, V C; Homola, P; Hörandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hussain, M; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Ionita, F; Italiano, A; Kaducak, M; Kampert, K H; Karova, T; Kégl, B; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D-H; Krieger, A; Krömer, O; Kuempel, D; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; La Rosa, G; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Leigui de Oliveira, M A; Letessier-Selvon, A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; López, R; Lopez Agüera, A; Lozano Bahilo, J; Luna García, R; Maccarone, M C; Macolino, C; Maldera, S; Mancarella, G; Manceñido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Marquez Falcon, H R; Martello, D; Martínez, J; Martínez Bravo, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, M C; Medina-Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menschikov, A; Meurer, Chr; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, F; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, J C; Morris, C; Mostafá, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Navarro, J L; Navas, S; Necesal, P; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nierstenhoefer, N; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ortolani, F; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Pacheco, N; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Pastor, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Pavlidou, V; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Pham Ngoc, Diep; Pham Ngoc, Dong; Pham Thi, T N; Pichel, A; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pimenta, M; Pinto, T; Pirronello, V; Pisanti, O; Platino, M; Pochon, J; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Redondo, A; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rezende, F A S; Ridky, J; Riggi, S; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodriguez, G; Rodríguez Frías, D; Rodriguez Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Rodriguez-Cabo, I; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Rouillé-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santo, C E; Santos, E M; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, F; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovánek, P; Schüssler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Segreto, A; Semikoz, D; Settimo, M; Shellard, R C; Sidelnik, I; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G

    2008-05-30

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to Earth-skimming tau neutrinos that interact in Earth's crust. Tau leptons from nu(tau) charged-current interactions can emerge and decay in the atmosphere to produce a nearly horizontal shower with a significant electromagnetic component. The data collected between 1 January 2004 and 31 August 2007 are used to place an upper limit on the diffuse flux of nu(tau) at EeV energies. Assuming an E(nu)(-2) differential energy spectrum the limit set at 90% C.L. is E(nu)(2)dN(nu)(tau)/dE(nu)<1.3 x 10(-7) GeV cm(-2) s(-1) sr(-1) in the energy range 2 x 10(17) eV< E(nu)< 2 x 10(19) eV. PMID:18518595

  13. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    E-print Network

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Ramirez, Ana Lopez; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-09-22

    . 4Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. 5Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710, USA. * These authors are the joint first... evident, we blocked cell death by treatment with the caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, to prolong photoreceptor survival. Thioflavin-S-positive tangles were observed in the photoreceptor layer of rho::GFP-tau fish, but not rho::GFP fish (Fig. 10...

  14. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  15. V409 Tau as Another AA Tau: Photometric Observations of Stellar Occultations by the Circumstellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Cargile, Phillip; Weintraub, David A.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Mamajek, Eric E.; Sanchez, N. Nicole

    2015-07-01

    AA Tau is a well studied young stellar object (YSO) that presents many of the photometric characteristics of a Classical T Tauri star (CTTS), including short-timescale stochastic variability attributed to spots and/or accretion as well as long-duration dimming events attributed to occultations by vertical features (e.g., warps) in its circumstellar disk. We present new photometric observations of AA Tau from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope North (KELT-North) which reveal a deep, extended dimming event in 2011, which we show supports the interpretation by Bouvier et al. of an occultation by a high-density feature in the circumstellar disk located \\gt 8 AU from the star. We also present KELT-North observations of V409 Tau, a relatively unstudied YSO also in Taurus–Auriga, showing short timescale erratic variability, along with two separate long and deep dimming events, one from 2009 January through late 2010 October, and the other from 2012 March until at least 2013 September. We interpret both dimming events to have lasted more than 600 days, each with a depth of ?1.4 mag. From a spectral energy distribution analysis, we propose that V409 Tau is most likely surrounded by a circumstellar disk viewed nearly edge-on, and using Keplerian timescale arguments we interpret the deep dimmings of V409 Tau as occultations from one or more features within this disk ?10 AU from the star. In both AA Tau and V409 Tau, the usual CTTS short-timescale variations associated with accretion processes close to the stars continue during the occultations, further supporting the distant occulting material interpretation. Like AA Tau, V409 Tau serves as a laboratory for studying the detailed structure of the protoplanetary environments of T Tauri disks, specifically disk structures that may be signposts of planet formation at many AU out in the disk. We also provide a table of all currently known disk-occulting young stars as a convenient reference for future work on such objects.

  16. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano-Takahashi, Michiko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Tomizawa, Kayoko; Kato, Ryohei; Tanio, Michikazu; Shirota, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, ? = ? = ? = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  17. Adaptive Optics Spectroscopy of Young Stellar Jets : DG Tau, HL Tau, and RW Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyo, T.-S.; Hayashi, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Tokunaga, A. T.; Terada, H.; Takami, H.; Takato, N.; Hayashi, S. S.; Usuda, T.; Yamashita, T.; Nedachi, K.; Hayano, Y.; Kamata, Y.; Iye, M.; Gaessler, W.

    2004-05-01

    We present results of the high angular resolution spectroscopy with the near infrared [Fe II] ? 1.644 ? m emission line toward the outflows emanating from DG Tau, HL Tau, and RW Aur using the Adaptive Optics System of Subaru Telescope. We resolved the region within ˜140 AU (< 1'') in the vicinity of their driving sources with an angular resolution of upto 0.''16. We detected two distinct velocity components separated in space and velocity from all the objects. The high velocity component (HVC) shows the radial velocities |V| > 250 km s-1 and is extended, while the low velocity component (LVC) has the radial velocities of 80 < |V| <150 km s-1 and is located at or near the driving sources. These velocities are consistent with the interpretation that the HVC is launched from the stellar surfaces or their vicinities, while the LVC is accelerated near the inner edges of accreting disks. We also detected redshifted counter outflows for all three objects. While the redshifted outflow of RW Aur is detected within 0.''1 from the star, DG Tau and HL Tau show gaps of ˜ 0.''7 ( ˜ 100 AU) occulted by their circumstellar disks. HL Tau and RW Aur show asymmetries in velocities between their blueshifted and redshifted outflows within 1'' and 0.''1, respectively, from the stars. We have demonstrated that the [Fe II] spectroscopy at high spatial and velocity resolutions is a powerful tool to study the outflow mechanisms from young stellar objects especially with large extinctions.

  18. Chaperones increase association of tau protein with microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Fei; Netzer, William J.; Tanemura, Kentaro; Li, Feng; Hartl, F. Ulrich; Takashima, Akihiko; Gouras, Gunnar K.; Greengard, Paul; Xu, Huaxi

    2003-01-01

    Molecular chaperones and their functions in protein folding have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, which are characterized by accumulation of protein aggregates (e.g., ?-synuclein and huntingtin, respectively). These aggregates have been shown in various experimental systems to respond to changes in levels of molecular chaperones suggesting the possibility of therapeutic intervention and a role for chaperones in disease pathogenesis. It remains unclear whether chaperones also play a role in Alzheimer's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by ?-amyloid and tau protein aggregates. Here, we report an inverse relationship between aggregated tau and the levels of heat shock protein (Hsp)70/90 in tau transgenic mouse and Alzheimer's disease brains. In various cellular models, increased levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 promote tau solubility and tau binding to microtubules, reduce insoluble tau and cause reduced tau phosphorylation. Conversely, lowered levels of Hsp70 and Hsp90 result in the opposite effects. We have also demonstrated a direct association of the chaperones with tau proteins. Our results suggest that up-regulation of molecular chaperones may suppress formation of neurofibrillary tangles by partitioning tau into a productive folding pathway and thereby preventing tau aggregation. PMID:12522269

  19. Preoperative cerebrospinal fluid ?-Amyloid/Tau ratio and postoperative delirium

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongcong; Swain, Celeste A; Ward, Sarah A P; Zheng, Hui; Dong, Yuanlin; Sunder, Neelakantan; Burke, Dennis W; Escobar, Diana; Zhang, Yiying; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2014-01-01

    Objective The neuropathogenesis of postoperative delirium remains unknown. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ?-amyloid protein (A?) and high CSF Tau levels are associated with Alzheimer's disease. We, therefore, assessed whether lower preoperative CSF A?/Tau ratio was associated with higher incidence and greater severity of postoperative delirium. Methods One hundred and fifty-three participants (71 ± 5 years, 53% men) who had total hip/knee replacement under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. CSF was obtained during initiation of spinal anesthesia. The incidence and severity of postoperative delirium were determined by Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) and Memorial Delirium Assessment Scale (MDAS) on postoperative day 1 and 2. A?40, A?42, and Tau levels in the CSF were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The relationships among these variables were determined, adjusting for age and gender. Results Participants in the lowest quartile of preoperative CSF A?40/Tau and A?42/Tau ratio had higher incidence (32% vs. 17%, P = 0.0482) and greater symptom severity of postoperative delirium (A?40/Tau ratio: 4 vs. 3, P = 0.034; A?42/Tau ratio: 4 vs. 3, P = 0.062, the median of the highest MDAS score) as compared to the combination of the rest of the quartiles. The preoperative CSF A?40/Tau or A?42/Tau ratio was inversely associated with MDAS score (A?40/Tau ratio: ?0.12 ± 0.05, P = 0.014, adj. ?0.12 ± 0.05, P = 0.018; A?42/Tau ratio: ?0.65 ± 0.26, P = 0.013, adj. ?0.62 ± 0.27, P = 0.022). Interpretation Lower CSF A?/Tau ratio could be associated with postoperative delirium, pending confirmation of our preliminary results in further studies. These findings suggest potential roles of A? and/or Tau in postoperative delirium neuropathogenesis. PMID:24860840

  20. Search for neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b quarks in pp collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Aoki, M; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guo, F; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jamin, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Jung, A W; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kulikov, S; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kur?a, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miconi, F; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padilla, M; Pal, A; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Salcido, P; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Soustruznik, K; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsai, Y-T; Tschann-Grimm, K; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D

    2011-09-16

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb(-1). This production mode can be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model (SM) such as in its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) at high tan?. We search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos and the other to hadrons. The data are found to be consistent with SM expectations, and we set upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range from 90 to 320 GeV/c(2). We interpret our result in the MSSM parameter space, excluding tan? values down to 25 for Higgs boson masses below 170 GeV/c(2). PMID:22026764

  1. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b quarks in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-09-12

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb-1. This production mode can be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model (SM) such as in its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) at high tanß. We search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos and the other to hadrons. The data are found to be consistent with SM expectations, and we set upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range from 90 to 320 GeV/c2. We interpret our result in the MSSM parameter space, excluding tanß values down to 25 for Higgs boson masses below 170 GeV/c2.

  2. Search for Higgs bosons predicted in two-Higgs-doublet models via decays to tau lepton pairs in 1.96-TeV p anti-p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-06-01

    We present the results of a search for Higgs bosons predicted in two-Higgs-doublet models, in the case where the Higgs bosons decay to tau lepton pairs, using 1.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity of p{bar p} collisions recorded by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. Studying the mass distribution in events where one or both tau leptons decay leptonically, no evidence for a Higgs boson signal is observed. The result is used to infer exclusion limits in the two-dimensional space of tan {beta} versus m{sub A} (the ratio of the vaccum expectation values of the two Higgs doublets and the mass of the pseudoscalar boson, respectively).

  3. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b quarks in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-09-12

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb-1. This production mode can be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model (SM) such as in its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) at high tanß. We search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos and the other to hadrons. The data are found to be consistent with SM expectations, and we set upper limitsmore »on the cross section times branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range from 90 to 320 GeV/c2. We interpret our result in the MSSM parameter space, excluding tanß values down to 25 for Higgs boson masses below 170 GeV/c2.« less

  4. A search for charged Higgs boson decays of the top quark using hadronic decays of the tau lepton in proton- antiproton collisions at 1.8 TEV at CDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groer, Leslie Stevan

    The Standard Model predicts the existence of one neutral scalar Higgs boson, which is a remnant of the mechanism that breaks the SU(2) L × U(1)Y electroweak symmetry and generates masses for the heavy vector bosons and fermions. Many extensions to the Standard Model predict two or more Higgs doublets, resulting in a larger spectrum of Higgs bosons including a charged Higgs boson (H +/-). For a light charged Higgs boson mass, the top quark decay into a charged Higgs boson and bottom quark might occur. This thesis presents results of a direct search for this top quark decay mode via the charged Higgs decay to a tau lepton and tau-neutrino, using the hadronic decays of the tau leptons. The search data consist of 100 pb -1 of Run 1 data collected between 1992-1995 at the CDF detector, from pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV produced at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator. A total of seven events are observed in two search channels with an expected background contribution of 7.4 +/- 2.0 events coming from fake taus (5.4 +/- 1.5), heavy vector boson decays with jets (1.9 +/- 1.3) and dibosons (0.08 +/- 0.06). Lacking evidence for a signal, we set limits on charged Higgs production at the 95% confidence level in the charged Higgs mass plane versus tan ? (a parameter of the theory) for a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2 and for top production cross sections ( stt ) of 5.0 and 7.5 pb, assuming the Type-II Two- Higgs-Doublet-Model. For large tan ?, this analysis excludes a charged Higgs boson of mass below 147 (158) GeV/c2 for stt = 5.0 (7.5) pb. Using the Standard Model measured top quark cross section from CDF, this limit increases to 168 GeV/c 2 and we also exclude a branching fraction of top decays via this charged Higgs mode of greater than 43% for charged Higgs masses below 168 GeV/c2.

  5. UV and optical spectrum variability of T Tau and RY Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismailov, N. Z.; Quliyev, N. Kh.; Khalilov, O. V.; Adigezalzade, H. N.

    2013-03-01

    In this report we have presented results of spectral observations of classical T Tauri type stars T Tau and RY Tau. Observational dates were obtained from following sources: spectrograms of the UV range from the IUE archive data, and spectrograms of the visual range obtained in the 2 m telescope of ShAO of the NAS of Azerbaijan (Ismailov et al. 2010). For both of stars on the Scargle method we have searched a periodicity of variations in equivalent widths of emission lines in the optical and UV ranges. In the RY Tau firstly was detected the periodic variability in MgII ?2800 Å emission doublet intensities with a period of 23 days. The observed period had also revealed with the equivalent widths and displacements of components of H? and H+H? and K CaII emission.

  6. The CDF-II tau physics program triggers, tau ID and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Pagliarone et al.

    2003-11-03

    The study of processes containing {tau} leptons in the final state will play an important role at Tevatron Run II. Such final states will be relevant both for electroweak studies and measurements as well as in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The present paper discusses the physics opportunities and challenges related to the implementation of new set of triggers able to select events containing tau candidates in the final state. They illustrate, in particular, the physics capabilities for a variety of new physics scenarios such as supersymmetry (SUSY), SUSY with Rp-parity violation, with Bilinear parity violation or models with the violation of lepton flavor. Finally, they present the first Run II results obtained using some of the described tau triggers.

  7. Can numerical modeling help understand the fate of tau protein in the axon terminal?

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, I A; Kuznetsov, A V

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the fate of tau protein in the axon terminal. We developed a comprehensive model of tau transport that accounts for transport of cytosolic tau by diffusion, diffusion transport of microtubule (MT)-bound tau along the MT lattice, active motor-driven transport of MT-bound tau via slow axonal transport mechanism, and degradation of tau in the axon due to tau's finite half-life. We investigated the effect of different assumptions concerning the fate of tau in the terminal on steady-state transport of tau in the axon. In particular, we studied two possible scenarios: (i) tau is destroyed in the terminal and (ii) there is no tau destruction in the terminal, and to avoid tau accumulation we postulated zero flux of tau at the terminal. We found that the tau concentration and percentage of MT-bound tau are not very sensitive to the assumption concerning the fate of tau in the terminal, but the tau's flux and average velocity of tau transport are very sensitive to this assumption. This suggests that measuring the velocity of tau transport and comparing it with the results of mathematical modeling for different assumptions concerning tau's fate in the terminal can provide information concerning what happens to tau in the terminal. PMID:25563412

  8. Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts permit intracellular delivery of human Tau in rat hippocampal neurons: requirement of Tau phosphorylation for functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Koss, Dave J; Robinson, Lianne; Mietelska-Porowska, Anna; Gasiorowska, Anna; Sep?i?, Kristina; Turk, Tom; Jaspars, Marcel; Niewiadomska, Grazyna; Scott, Roderick H; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with intra-neuronal aggregation of microtubule-associated protein Tau. During the disease process, Tau undergoes excessive phosphorylation, dissociates from microtubules and aggregates into insoluble neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), accumulating in the soma. While many aspects of the disease pathology have been replicated in transgenic mouse models, a region-specific non-transgenic expression model is missing. Complementing existing models, we here report a novel region-specific approach to modelling Tau pathology. Local co-administration of the pore-former polymeric 1,3-alkylpyridinium salts (Poly-APS) extracted from marine sponges, and synthetic full-length 4R recombinant human Tau (hTau) was performed in vitro and in vivo. At low doses, Poly-APS was non-toxic and cultured cells exposed to Poly-APS (0.5 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml; ~22 µM) had normal input resistance, resting-state membrane potentials and Ca(2+) transients induced either by glutamate or KCl, as did cells exposed to a low concentration of the phosphatase inhibitor Okadaic acid (OA; 1 nM, 24 h). Combined hTau loading and phosphatase inhibition resulted in a collapse of the membrane potential, suppressed excitation and diminished glutamate and KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) transients. Stereotaxic infusions of Poly-APS (0.005 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml) bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus at multiple sites resulted in hTau loading of neurons in rats. A separate cohort received an additional 7-day minipump infusion of OA (1.2 nM) intrahippocampally. When tested 2 weeks after surgery, rats treated with Poly-APS+hTau+OA presented with subtle learning deficits, but were also impaired in cognitive flexibility and recall. Hippocampal plasticity recorded from slices ex vivo was diminished in Poly-APS+hTau+OA subjects, but not in other treatment groups. Histological sections confirmed the intracellular accumulation of hTau in CA1 pyramidal cells and along their processes; phosphorylated Tau was present only within somata. This study demonstrates that cognitive, physiological and pathological symptoms reminiscent of tauopathies can be induced following non-mutant hTau delivery into CA1 in rats, but functional consequences hinge on increased Tau phosphorylation. Collectively, these data validate a novel model of locally infused recombinant hTau protein as an inducer of Tau pathology in the hippocampus of normal rats; future studies will provide insights into the pathological spread and maturation of Tau pathology. PMID:26070304

  9. Mass reconstruction techniques and cross section measurement for $Z\\to \\tau\\tau \\to e\\mu+4\

    E-print Network

    Kormoll, Kathrin

    A central aspect of modern particle physics is the search for the Higgs boson. First, the Higgs boson remains the only particle of the Standard Model not being proven experimentally. Secondly, its possible observation may improve our understanding of new physics. With the start of operation of the LHC at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), proton-proton collisions with a centre of mass energy being as high as ${\\sqrt{s}=7}$ TeV and ${\\sqrt{s}=8}$ TeV could be achieved.\\\\ This work measures the cross section of the process ${pp\\to Z^{0}/\\gamma^{*} \\rightarrow \\tau^{+}\\tau^{-}}$ in the mixed leptonic final state with data of the ATLAS detector. The decay of the coherent sum of the photon, $\\gamma^{*}$, and the $Z^{0}$ boson is an irreducible background for Higgs boson decays into two $\\tau$-leptons. For the Higgs boson search a precise knowledge of its mass spectrum and its normalisation is essential. The data used are equal to an integrated luminosity of L = 35.51 pb$^{-1}$ with a centre of...

  10. A resolution of the puzzle of low V_us values from inclusive flavor-breaking sum rule analyses of hadronic tau decay

    E-print Network

    R. J. Hudspith; R. Lewis; K. Maltman; C. E. Wolfe; J. Zanotti

    2015-11-26

    Continuum and lattice methods are used to investigate systematic issues in the sum rule determination of $V_{us}$ using inclusive hadronic $\\tau$ decay data. Results for $V_{us}$ employing assumptions for $D>4$ OPE contributions used in previous conventional implementations of this approach are shown to display unphysical dependence on the sum rule weight, $w$, and choice of upper limit, $s_0$, of the relevant experimental spectral integrals. Continuum and lattice results suggest a new implementation of the sum rule approach with not just $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$, but also $D>4$ effective condensates, fit to data. Lattice results are also shown to provide a quantitative assessment of truncation uncertainties for the slowly converging $D=2$ OPE series. The new sum rule implementation yields $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$ results free of unphysical $s_0$- and $w$-dependences and $\\sim 0.0020$ higher than that obtained using the conventional implementation. With preliminary new experimental results for the $K\\pi$ branching fraction, the resulting $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$ is in excellent agreement with that based on $K_{\\ell 3}$, and compatible within errors with expectations from three-family unitarity.

  11. Evidence for Extinction and Accretion Variability in T Tau S

    E-print Network

    Tracy Beck; L. Prato; M. Simon

    2001-01-02

    We present angularly resolved spectra of T Tau North and South in the 3 micron water ice feature and K-band. Most of the water ice absorption lies along the line of sight toward T Tau South, confirming that it is viewed through stronger extinction. A decrease in ice-band absorption toward T Tau S between December 1998 and January 2000, significant at the 2 sigma level, was associated with an increase in its near infrared flux. Br gamma emission is detected in T Tau North and South and H_{2} (2.12 micron) emission only toward T Tau South, consistent with previous studies of infrared companions to T Tauri stars. Our results suggest that the near IR variability of T Tau S is probably caused by both variations in accretion rate and variable extinction along the line of sight.

  12. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    E-print Network

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allison, Lee John; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Bartsch, Valeria; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Results of a search for $H \\to \\tau \\tau$ decays are presented, based on the full set of proton--proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ and 20.3 $\\rm{fb}^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV and $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic ($\\tau \\to \\ell \

  13. Search for Second-Class Currents in \\tau^-\\to\\omega\\pi^-\

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-03

    We report on an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using data containing nearly 320 million tau pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and set an upper limit at 0.69% at a 90% confidence level for the ratio of second- to first-class currents.

  14. Waring's problem with the Ramanujan \\tau-function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaev, M. Z.; Garcia, V. C.; Konyagin, S. V.

    2008-02-01

    We prove that for every integer N the Diophantine equation \\sum_{i=1}^{74000}\\tau(n_i)=N, where \\tau(n) is the Ramanujan \\tau-function, has a solution in positive integers n_1, n_2,\\dots, n_{74000} satisfying the condition \\max_{1\\le i\\le 74000}n_i\\,{\\ll}\\vert N\\vert^{2/11}+1. We also consider similar questions in residue fields modulo a large prime p.

  15. Greater Specificity for Cerebrospinal Fluid P-tau231 over P-tau181 in the Differentiation of Healthy Controls from Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, Jonathan; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Osorio, Ricardo S.; Glodzik, Lidia; Li, Yi; Tsui, Wai; Saint Louis, Leslie A.; Randall, Catherine; Butler, Tracy; Xu, Jinfeng; Zinkowski, Raymond P.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Fortea, Juan; Fossati, Silvia; Wisniewski, Thomas; Davies, Peter; Blennow, Kaj; de Leon, Mony J.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) measures of phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) 231 and P-tau181 are two biomarkers for the identification of tau pathology as related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). While both are pathologically validated, their relative diagnostic performances are not well known. This cross-sectional diagnostic study of 87 normal (NL) subjects and 28 AD subjects compared CSF P-tau231 with CSF P-tau181. Logistic regression modeling demonstrated that the P-tau231 was superior to the P-tau181 in the diagnostic classifications. At a fixed 85% sensitivity cutoff, the ROC analysis shows that P-tau231 has greater overall specificity than P-tau181. While both P-tau analytes demonstrated equivalent negative predictive accuracies, P-tau231 yielded significantly fewer false positives. Moreover, P-tau231, but not P-tau181, demonstrated sensitivity to the E4 genotype. A postmortem validation with 9 AD subjects confirmed the superiority of the CSF P-tau231 specificity. This study suggests that P-tau231 has the potential to improve the CSF tau biomarker diagnosis of AD. PMID:26444757

  16. Hyperphosphorylated Tau is Elevated in Alzheimer's Disease with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick S.; Kirkwood, Caitlin M.; Gray, Megan C.; Fish, Kenneth N.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Kofler, Julia K.; Klunk, William E.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis occurs in 40–60% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects, is heritable, and indicates amore rapidly progressive disease phenotype. Neuroimaging and postmortem evidence support an exaggerated prefrontal cortical synaptic deficit in AD with psychosis. Microtubule-associated protein tau is a key mediator of amyloid-?-induced synaptotoxicity in AD, and differential mechanisms of progressive intraneuronal phospho-tau accumulation and interneuronal spread of tau aggregates have recently been described. We hypothesized that psychosis in AD would be associated with greater intraneuronal concentration of phospho-tau and greater spread of tau aggregates in prefrontal cortex. We therefore evaluated prefrontal cortex phospho-tau in a cohort of 45 AD cases with and without psychosis. Intraneuronal phospho-tau concentration was higher in subjects with psychosis, while a measure of phospho-tau spread, volume fraction, was not. Across groups both measures were associated with lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination and Digit Span Backwards test. These novel findings indicate that tau phosphorylation may be accelerated in AD with psychosis, indicating a more dynamic, exaggerated pathology in AD with psychosis. PMID:24270207

  17. Accelerated neurodegeneration through chaperone-mediated oligomerization of tau.

    PubMed

    Blair, Laura J; Nordhues, Bryce A; Hill, Shannon E; Scaglione, K Matthew; O'Leary, John C; Fontaine, Sarah N; Breydo, Leonid; Zhang, Bo; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Li; Cotman, Carl; Paulson, Henry L; Muschol, Martin; Uversky, Vladimir N; Klengel, Torsten; Binder, Elisabeth B; Kayed, Rakez; Golde, Todd E; Berchtold, Nicole; Dickey, Chad A

    2013-10-01

    Aggregation of tau protein in the brain is associated with a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies. FK506 binding protein 51 kDa (FKBP51, encoded by FKBP5) forms a mature chaperone complex with Hsp90 that prevents tau degradation. In this study, we have shown that tau levels are reduced throughout the brains of Fkbp5-/- mice. Recombinant FKBP51 and Hsp90 synergized to block tau clearance through the proteasome, resulting in tau oligomerization. Overexpression of FKBP51 in a tau transgenic mouse model revealed that FKBP51 preserved the species of tau that have been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, blocked amyloid formation, and decreased tangle load in the brain. Alterations in tau turnover and aggregate structure corresponded with enhanced neurotoxicity in mice. In human brains, FKBP51 levels increased relative to age and AD, corresponding with demethylation of the regulatory regions in the FKBP5 gene. We also found that higher FKBP51 levels were associated with AD progression. Our data support a model in which age-associated increases in FKBP51 levels and its interaction with Hsp90 promote neurotoxic tau accumulation. Strategies aimed at attenuating FKBP51 levels or its interaction with Hsp90 have the potential to be therapeutically relevant for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:23999428

  18. Accelerated neurodegeneration through chaperone-mediated oligomerization of tau

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Laura J.; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Hill, Shannon E.; Scaglione, K. Matthew; O’Leary, John C.; Fontaine, Sarah N.; Breydo, Leonid; Zhang, Bo; Li, Pengfei; Wang, Li; Cotman, Carl; Paulson, Henry L.; Muschol, Martin; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Klengel, Torsten; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Kayed, Rakez; Golde, Todd E.; Berchtold, Nicole; Dickey, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation of tau protein in the brain is associated with a class of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies. FK506 binding protein 51 kDa (FKBP51, encoded by FKBP5) forms a mature chaperone complex with Hsp90 that prevents tau degradation. In this study, we have shown that tau levels are reduced throughout the brains of Fkbp5–/– mice. Recombinant FKBP51 and Hsp90 synergized to block tau clearance through the proteasome, resulting in tau oligomerization. Overexpression of FKBP51 in a tau transgenic mouse model revealed that FKBP51 preserved the species of tau that have been linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, blocked amyloid formation, and decreased tangle load in the brain. Alterations in tau turnover and aggregate structure corresponded with enhanced neurotoxicity in mice. In human brains, FKBP51 levels increased relative to age and AD, corresponding with demethylation of the regulatory regions in the FKBP5 gene. We also found that higher FKBP51 levels were associated with AD progression. Our data support a model in which age-associated increases in FKBP51 levels and its interaction with Hsp90 promote neurotoxic tau accumulation. Strategies aimed at attenuating FKBP51 levels or its interaction with Hsp90 have the potential to be therapeutically relevant for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:23999428

  19. The tau leptons theory and experimental data: Monte Carlo, fits, software and systematic errors

    E-print Network

    Zbigniew Was

    2014-12-09

    Status of tau lepton decay Monte Carlo generator TAUOLA is reviewed. Recent efforts on development of new hadronic currents are presented. Multitude new channels for anomalous tau decay modes and parametrization based on defaults used by BaBar collaboration are introduced. Also parametrization based on theoretical considerations are presented as an alternative. Lesson from comparison and fits to the BaBar and Belle data is recalled. It was found that as in the past, in particular at a time of comparisons with CLEO and ALEPH data, proper fitting, to as detailed as possible representation of the experimental data, is essential for appropriate developments of models of tau decays. In the later part of the presentation, use of the TAUOLA program for phenomenology of W,Z,H decays at LHC is adressed. Some new results, relevant for QED bremsstrahlung in such decays are presented as well.

  20. Silencing of TREM2 exacerbates tau pathology, neurodegenerative changes, and spatial learning deficits in P301S tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Zhou, Jun-Shan; Cao, Lei; Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Chen, Qi; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2015-12-01

    Tau pathology is a pathological hallmark for several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia. As a novel susceptibility gene for these 2 diseases, triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) gene encodes an immune receptor that is uniquely expressed by microglia. Recently, a correlation between TREM2 expression and hyperphosphorylated tau has been revealed in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients, suggesting a potential association between TREM2 and tau pathology. However, the role of TREM2 in tau pathology remains unclear thus far. Herein, using P301S mice, we showed that TREM2 was upregulated in microglia during disease progression. Silencing of brain TREM2 exacerbated tau pathology in P301S mice. This exacerbation might be attributed to neuroinflammation-induced hyperactivation of tau kinases. Additionally, more severe neurodegenerative changes and spatial learning deficits were observed following TREM2 silencing. Our results imply that TREM2 attenuates tau kinase activity through restriction of neuroinflammation, and thus protects against tau pathology. These findings further suggest that TREM2 may represent as a potential therapeutic target for tau-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26364736

  1. Measurement of the {tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} branching fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.

    2007-09-01

    A measurement of the {tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} branching fraction has been made using 230.2 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), at a center-of-mass energy {radical}(s) close to 10.58 GeV. We measure B({tau}{sup -}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(0.416{+-}0.003(stat){+-}0.018(syst))%.

  2. Measurement of cross-section (p anti-p --> Z0) x BF (Z0 --> tau anti-tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the D0 detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Duensing, Silke

    2004-04-01

    In this thesis the first measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p}) {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{bar {tau}} with the D0 detector at the Tevatron is presented. The tau pair candidates are recorded by the D0 detector using p{bar p} interactions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events in which one tau decays into a muon and the other tau final state is hadronic with one charged particle are selected for this analysis. The selection criteria for the hadronic tau decay are based on the tau final state, hence for two channels of one-prong taus: single charged pion ({tau}{sub {pi}}) and rho decays ({tau}{sub {rho}}). The selection is based on simple cuts on a number of discriminating variables and the cut values have been optimized for the best cross section measurement. Of hadronic tau candidates that have been reconstructed as {tau}{sub {pi}} candidates, 0.801 {+-} 0.017 {+-} 0.066 pass the selection cut; in the case of {tau}{sub {rho}} taus, the selection efficiency is 0.676 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.009. Of all QCD jets that are reconstructed as hadronic tau candidates, 0.0093 {+-} 0.0002 pass the {tau}{sub {pi}} selection cuts and 0.0122 {+-} 0.0002 the {tau}{sub {rho}} cuts. The cross section has been measured to be 274 {+-} 121 {+-} 40 {+-} 27 pb in the {mu}{tau}{sub {pi}} channel and 273 {+-} 40{sub -23}{sup +18} {+-} 27 pb in the {mu}{tau}{sub {rho}} channel, resulting in a combined measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{bar {tau}}) = 273 {+-} 38{sub -23}{sup +19} {+-} 27 pb which agrees with the SM prediction within errors. The errors are dominated by the statistical error as only the first data taken with the D0 detector in Run II was used. Due to the small set of tau candidates, the calorimeter energy scale could not yet be determined using data and this uncertainty is the largest systematic effect on the measurement. Another large contribution arises from the uncertainty of 10% on the luminosity measurement. This is expected to decrease significantly in the future. It was demonstrated that the currently available tools are sufficient to use tau leptons in the measurement of a SM process. This opens the door to the use of hadronic tau decays in the search for new particles, like SUSY particles, that decay preferentially to tau leptons in a number of models or the Higgs boson of either the SM or extended model. Doing physics at the Tevatron as the accelerator at the current energy frontier is our current best hope to find the yet elusive Higgs boson and will allow to either find proof of physics beyond the Standard Model or tighten the constraints on these models.

  3. Loss of tau rescues inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N.; Cardona, Astrid E.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lamb, Bruce T.; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is one of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Activated microglia spatially coexist with microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt or tau)-burdened neurons in the brains of human AD and non-AD tauopathies. Numerous studies have suggested that neuroinflammation precedes tau pathology and that induction or blockage of neuroinflammation via lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or anti-inflammatory compounds (such as FK506) accelerate or block tau pathology, respectively in several animal models of tauopathy. We have previously demonstrated that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation via deficiency of the microglia-specific chemokine (fractalkine) receptor, CX3CR1, promotes tau pathology and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that tau mediates the neurotoxic effects of LPS in Cx3cr1?/? mice. First, Mapt+/+ neurons displayed elevated levels of Annexin V (A5) and TUNEL (markers of neurodegeneration) when co-cultured with LPS-treated Cx3cr1?/?microglia, which is rescued in Mapt?/? neurons. Second, a neuronal population positive for phospho-S199 (AT8) tau in the dentate gyrus is also positive for activated or cleaved caspase (CC3) in the LPS-treated Cx3cr1?/? mice. Third, genetic deficiency for tau in Cx3cr1?/? mice resulted in reduced microglial activation, altered expression of inflammatory genes and a significant reduction in the number of neurons positive for CC3 compared to Cx3cr1?/?mice. Finally, Cx3cr1?/?mice exposed to LPS displayed a lack of inhibition in an open field exploratory behavioral test, which is rescued by tau deficiency. Taken together, our results suggest that pathological alterations in tau mediate inflammation-induced neurotoxicity and that deficiency of Mapt is neuroprotective. Thus, therapeutic approaches toward either reducing tau levels or blocking neuroinflammatory pathways may serve as a potential strategy in treating tauopathies. PMID:26089772

  4. Prospects of constraining the Higgs boson's C P nature in the tau decay channel at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Stefan; Bernreuther, Werner; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how precisely the C P nature of the 125 GeV Higgs boson h , parametrized by a scalar-pseudoscalar Higgs mixing angle ??, can be determined in h ??-?+ decay with subsequent ? -lepton decays to charged prongs at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We combine two methods in order to define an observable ?CP * which is sensitive to ??: We use the ? -decay plane method for ????? and the impact parameter method for all other major ? decays. For estimating the precision with which ?? can be measured at the LHC (13 TeV) we take into account the ?-?+ background from Drell-Yan production and perform a Monte Carlo simulation of measurement uncertainties on the ?CP * signal and background distributions. We obtain that the mixing angle ?? can be determined with an uncertainty of ? ???1 5 ° (9°) at the LHC with an integrated luminosity of 150 fb-1 (500 fb-1 ), and with ? ???4 ° with 3 ab-1 . Future measurements of ?? yield direct information on whether or not there is an extended Higgs-boson sector with Higgs-sector C P violation. We analyze this in the context of a number of two-Higgs-doublet extensions of the Standard Model, namely the so-called aligned model and conventional two-Higgs-doublet extensions with tree-level neutral flavor conservation.

  5. Controlled guidance of handwriting in Parkinson's Disease patients. Can a sonic aid improve tau guidance measures 

    E-print Network

    Baxter, Holly

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To identify, using “tau theory” (Lee, 1998), i) if there are significant differences in tau guidance of handwriting between PD patients and normal healthy controls, and if so, ii) whether tau guidance for these ...

  6. Tau phosphorylation by GSK-3? promotes tangle-like filament morphology

    E-print Network

    Rankin, Carolyn A.; Sun, Qian; Gamblin, Truman Chris

    2007-06-28

    -associated protein tau. During the progression of NFT formation, disperse and non-interacting tau fibrils become stable aggregates of tightly packed and intertwined filaments. Although the molecular mechanisms responsible for the conversion of disperse tau filaments...

  7. RAMANUJAN'S UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPT ON THE PARTITION AND TAU FUNCTIONS

    E-print Network

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    RAMANUJAN'S UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPT ON THE PARTITION AND TAU FUNCTIONS WITH PROOFS AND COMMENTARY Introduction When Ramanujan died in 1920, he left behind an incomplete, unpublished manu- script in two parts on the partition function p(n) and, in contemporary terminology, Ramanujan's tau-function (n). The first part

  8. RAMANUJAN'S UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPT ON THE PARTITION AND TAU FUNCTIONS

    E-print Network

    Berndt, Bruce C.

    RAMANUJAN'S UNPUBLISHED MANUSCRIPT ON THE PARTITION AND TAU FUNCTIONS WITH PROOFS AND COMMENTARY Introduction When Ramanujan died in 1920, he left behind an incomplete, unpublished manu­ script in two parts on the partition function p(n) and, in contemporary terminology, Ramanujan's tau­function #(n). The first part

  9. Identification of nuclear. tau. isoforms in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, P.A.; Howard, T.H.; Castleberry, R.P.; Binder, L.I. )

    1990-11-01

    The {tau} proteins have been reported only in association with microtubules and with ribosomes in situ, in the normal central nervous system. In addition, {tau} has been shown to be an integral component of paired helical filaments, the principal constituent of the neurofibrillary tangles found in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and of most aged individuals with Down syndrome (trisomy 21). The authors report here the localization of the well-characterized Tau-1 monoclonal antibody to the nucleolar organizer regions of the acrocentric chromosomes and to their interphase counterpart, the fibrillar component of the nucleolus, in human neuroblastoma cells. Similar localization to the nucleolar organizer regions was also observed in other human cell lines and in one monkey kidney cell line but was not seen in non-primate species. Immunochemically, they further demonstrated the existence of the entire {tau} molecule in the isolated nuclei of neuroblastoma cells. Nuclear {tau} proteins, like the {tau} proteins of the paired helical filaments, cannot be extracted in standard SDS-containing electrophoresis sample buffer but require pretreatment with formic acid prior to immunoblot analysis. This work indicates that {tau} may function in processes not directly associated with microtubules and that highly insoluble complexes of {tau} may also play a role in normal cellular physiology.

  10. PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES Asator, a Tau-Tubulin Kinase Homolog in

    E-print Network

    Johansen, Jorgen

    PATTERNS & PHENOTYPES Asator, a Tau-Tubulin Kinase Homolog in Drosophila Localizes to the Mitotic have used a yeast two-hybrid interaction assay to identify Asator, a tau-tubulin kinase homolog by an Asator-specific mAb as well as by transgenic expression of a GFP-labeled Asator construct, we show

  11. Amyloid ?-Mediated Cell Death of Cultured Hippocampal Neurons Reveals Extensive Tau Fragmentation without Increased Full-length Tau Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Reifert, Jack; Hartung-Cranston, DeeAnn; Feinstein, Stuart C.

    2011-01-01

    A variety of genetic and biochemical evidence suggests that amyloid ? (A?) oligomers promote downstream errors in Tau action, in turn inducing neuronal dysfunction and cell death in Alzheimer and related dementias. To better understand molecular mechanisms involved in A?-mediated neuronal cell death, we have treated primary rat hippocampal cultures with A? oligomers and examined the resulting cellular changes occurring before and during the induction of cell death with a focus on altered Tau biochemistry. The most rapid neuronal responses upon A? administration are activation of caspase 3/7 and calpain proteases. A? also appears to reduce Akt and Erk1/2 kinase activities while increasing GSK3? and Cdk5 activities. Shortly thereafter, substantial Tau degradation begins, generating relatively stable Tau fragments. Only a very small fraction of full-length Tau remains intact after 4 h of A? treatment. In conflict with expectations based on suggested increases of GSK3? and Cdk5 activities, A? does not cause any major increases in phosphorylation of full-length Tau as assayed by immunoblotting one-dimensional gels with 11 independent site- and phospho-specific anti-Tau antibodies as well as by immunoblotting two-dimensional gels probed with a pan-Tau antibody. There are, however, subtle and transient increases in Tau phosphorylation at 3–4 specific sites before its degradation. Taken together, these data are consistent with the notion that A?-mediated neuronal cell death involves the loss of full-length Tau and/or the generation of toxic fragments but does not involve or require hyperphosphorylation of full-length Tau. PMID:21482827

  12. Pre-synaptic C-terminal truncated tau is released from cortical synapses in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sokolow, Sophie; Henkins, Kristen M; Bilousova, Tina; Gonzalez, Bianca; Vinters, Harry V; Miller, Carol A; Cornwell, Lindsey; Poon, Wayne W; Gylys, Karen H

    2015-05-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has primarily been associated with axonal location and function; however, recent work shows tau release from neurons and suggests an important role for tau in synaptic plasticity. In our study, we measured synaptic levels of total tau using synaptosomes prepared from cryopreserved human postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control samples. Flow cytometry data show that a majority of synaptic terminals are highly immunolabeled with the total tau antibody (HT7) in both AD and control samples. Immunoblots of synaptosomal fractions reveal increases in a 20 kDa tau fragment and in tau dimers in AD synapses, and terminal-specific antibodies show that in many synaptosome samples tau lacks a C-terminus. Flow cytometry experiments to quantify the extent of C-terminal truncation reveal that only 15-25% of synaptosomes are positive for intact C-terminal tau. Potassium-induced depolarization demonstrates release of tau and tau fragments from pre-synaptic terminals, with increased release from AD compared to control samples. This study indicates that tau is normally highly localized to synaptic terminals in cortex where it is well-positioned to affect synaptic plasticity. Tau cleavage may facilitate tau aggregation as well as tau secretion and propagation of tau pathology from the pre-synaptic compartment in AD. Results demonstrate the abundance of tau, mainly C-terminal truncated tau, in synaptic terminals in aged control and in Alzheimer's disease (AD) samples. Tau fragments and dimers/oligomers are prominent in AD synapses. Following depolarization, tau release is potentiated in AD nerve terminals compared to aged controls. We hypothesize (i) endosomal release of the different tau peptides from AD synapses, and (ii) together with phosphorylation, fragmentation of synaptic tau exacerbates tau aggregation, synaptic dysfunction, and the spread of tau pathology in AD. A? = amyloid-beta. PMID:25393609

  13. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau final states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V

    2009-06-26

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using hadronically decaying tau leptons, in 1 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. We select two final states: tau+/- plus missing transverse energy and b jets, and tau+ tau- plus jets. These final states are sensitive to a combination of associated W/Z boson plus Higgs boson, vector boson fusion, and gluon-gluon fusion production processes. The observed ratio of the combined limit on the Higgs production cross section at the 95% C.L. to the standard model expectation is 29 for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV. PMID:19659068

  14. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPP? and sAPP?), amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (A?1-42), and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau) in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC), 25 with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV-) subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPP? and sAPP? concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF A?1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPP? and sAPP? in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20028512

  15. On planet formation in HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dipierro, Giovanni; Price, Daniel; Laibe, Guillaume; Hirsh, Kieran; Cerioli, Alice; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    We explain the axisymmetric gaps seen in recent long-baseline observations of the HL Tau protoplanetary disc with the Atacama Large Millimetre/Submillimetre Array (ALMA) as being due to the different response of gas and dust to embedded planets in protoplanetary discs. We perform global, three-dimensional dusty smoothed particle hydrodynamics calculations of multiple planets embedded in dust/gas discs which successfully reproduce most of the structures seen in the ALMA image. We find a best match to the observations using three embedded planets with masses of 0.2, 0.27 and 0.55 MJ in the three main gaps observed by ALMA, though there remain uncertainties in the exact planet masses from the disc model.

  16. Probing lepton nonuniversality in tau neutrino scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongkai; Rashed, Ahmed; Datta, Alakabha

    2015-10-01

    Recently hints of lepton flavor nonuniversality emerged in the BABAR and LHCb experiments. In this paper we propose tests of lepton universality in ?? scattering. To parametrize the new physics we adopt an effective Lagrangian approach and consider the neutrino deep inelastic scattering processes ??+N ?? +X and ??+N ?? +X where we assume the largest new physics effects are in the ? sector. We also consider an explicit leptoquark model in our calculations. In order to make comparison with the standard model and also in order to cancel out the uncertainties of the parton distribution functions, we consider the ratio of total and differential cross sections of tau-neutrino to muon-neutrino scattering. We find new physics effects that can possibly be observed at the proposed Search for Hidden Particles (SHiP) experiment at CERN.

  17. Search for MSSM Higgs Bosons in Tau Final States with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wan-Ching; /Manchester U.

    2010-09-01

    The cross-section times branching ratio of the Higgs boson decaying to {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} final state in the Standard Model (SM) is too small to play any role in the SM Higgs boson searches. This, however, is different in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), which predicts two Higgs doublets leading to five Higgs bosons: a pair of charged Higgs boson (H{sup {+-}}); two neutral CP-even Higgs bosons (h,H) and a CP-odd Higgs boson (A). A search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} final states in p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented in this thesis. One of the two {tau} leptons is required to decay into a muon while the other decays hadronically. The integrated luminosity is L = 1.0-5.36 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider from 2002 to 2009 in the Run II.

  18. WFPC-2 Observations of the Circumstellar Nebulosity of T Tau and HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapelfeldt, Karl R.; Burrows, C. J.; Krist, J.; Trauger, J.; Ballester, G.; Casertano, S.; Clarke, J.; Crisp, D.; Gallagher, J.; Griffiths, R.; Hester, J.; Hoessel, J.; Holtzman, J.; Mould, J.; Scowen, P.; Westphal, J.; Watson, A.

    1994-05-01

    T Tauri lies on an arc of reflection nebulosity which extends approximately 3('') N and 2('') SW from the star. This nebula has a characteristic width of 0.5('') , is concave open toward the nearby Burnham's Nebula, and is closely aligned with the optical polarization vector of the system. The morphology T Tau's edge-brightened cometary nebula is similar to models of scattered light from a flared, optically thick disk observed from 45 degrees above the equator plane. No optical counterpart to the infrared companion is seen to a limiting magnitude of V= 23. WFPC2 images of HL Tauri show that this object is entirely reflection nebulosity at optical wavelengths. No stellar source is visible to a limiting magnitude of V= 26, a result which dictates a significant upward revision of the luminosity and mass estimates for HL Tau. The V-I color of the nebula is dominated by foreground extinction, with only small internal color changes. The bright core of the nebula has an east-west elongation of 1('') and has an unusual morphology. We will discuss the implications of these results for i). HL Tau's stellar type and ii). models for the distribution of the circumstellar matter.

  19. V409 Tau As Another AA Tau: Photometric Observations of Stellar Occultations by the Circumstellar Disk

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez, Joseph E; Stassun, Keivan G; Siverd, Robert J; Cargile, Phillip; Weintraub, David A; Beatty, Thomas G; Gaudi, B Scott; Mamajek, Eric E; Sanchez, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    AA Tau is a well studied young stellar object that presents many of the photometric characteristics of a Classical T Tauri star (CTTS), including short-timescale stochastic variability attributed to spots and/or accretion as well as long duration dimming events attributed to occultations by vertical features (e.g., warps) in its circumstellar disk. We present new photometric observations of AA Tau from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope North (KELT-North) which reveal a deep, extended dimming event in 2011, which we show supports the interpretation by Bouvier et al. (2013) of an occultation by a high-density feature in the circumstellar disk located >8 AU from the star. We also present KELT-North observations of V409 Tau, a relatively unstudied young stellar object also in Taurus-Auriga, showing short timescale erratic variability, along with two separate long and deep dimming events, one from January 2009 through late October 2010, and the other from March 2012 until at least September 2013. We interp...

  20. Human Stem Cell-Derived Neurons: A System to Study Human Tau Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Iovino, Mariangela; Patani, Rickie; Watts, Colin; Chandran, Siddharthan; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2010-01-01

    Background Intracellular filamentous deposits containing microtubule-associated protein tau constitute a defining characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders. Current experimental models to study tau pathology in vitro do not usually recapitulate the tau expression pattern characteristic of adult human brain. In this study, we have investigated whether human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons could be a good model to study human tau distribution, function and dysfunction. Methodology/Principal Findings Using RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, western blotting and cell transfections we have investigated whether all 6 adult human brain tau isoforms are expressed in neurons derived from human embryonic and fetal stem cells and whether 4 repeat tau over-expression alone, or with the F3 tau repeat fragment, (amino acid 258–380 of the 2N4R tau isoform with the ?K280 mutation) affects tau distribution. We found that the shortest 3 repeat tau isoform, similarly to human brain, is the first to be expressed during neuronal differentiation while the other 5 tau isoforms are expressed later. Over expression of tau with 4 repeats affects tau cellular distribution and the short tau F3 fragment appears to increase tau phosphorylation but this effect does not appear to be toxic for the cell. Conclusions Our results indicate that human embryonic stem cell-derived neurons express all 6 tau isoforms and are a good model in which to study tau physiology and pathology. PMID:21085657

  1. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of astroglial tau pathology in the aged brain, facilitating communication among neuropathologists and researchers, and informing interpretation of clinical biomarkers and imaging studies that focus on tau-related indicators. PMID:26659578

  2. Electron-to-Tau Lepton Flavor Violation at the Electron-Ion Collider

    E-print Network

    Matthew Gonderinger; Michael J. Ramsey-Musolf

    2010-06-25

    We analyze the potential sensitivity of a search for $e\\rightarrow\\tau$ conversion at a proposed electron-ion collider (EIC) facility. To that end, we calculate the cross sections for $e\\rightarrow\\tau$ events in a leptoquark framework assuming that the leptoquark masses are on the order of several hundred GeV or more. Given present limits on leptoquarks from direct searches at HERA and rare decay processes, an EIC sensitive to 0.1 fb $e\\rightarrow\\tau$ cross sections could probe previously unexplored regions of parameter space for these lepton flavor violating events (assuming 90 GeV center-of-mass energy and 10 fb$^{-1}$ integrated luminosity). Depending on the species of leptoquark and flavor structure of the couplings, an EIC search could surpass the HERA and rare process sensitivity to $e\\rightarrow\\tau$ conversion amplitudes by as much as an order of magnitude or more. We also derive updated limits on quark flavor-diagonal LFV leptoquark interactions using the most recent BaBar $\\tau\\rightarrow e\\gamma$ search. We find that limits from an EIC $e\\rightarrow\\tau$ search could be competitive with the most recent $\\tau\\rightarrow e\\gamma$ limit for a subset of the quark flavor-diagonal leptoquark couplings. Using an SU(5) GUT model in which leptoquark couplings are constrained by the neutrino masses and mixing, we illustrate how observable leptoquark-induced $e\\rightarrow\\tau$ conversion can be consistent with stringent LFV limits imposed by $\\mu\\rightarrow e\\gamma$ and $\\mu\\rightarrow e$ conversion searches.

  3. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S{sub 1}?S{sub 2}. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-?. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-? performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-? is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-? method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  4. Study of t anti-t production in tau jets channel at CDFII using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia; /Trento U.

    2005-12-01

    CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) is a particle detector located at Fermi National Laboratories, near Chicago. it allows to study decay products of p{bar p} collisions at center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. During its first period of data taking (RunI), CDF observed for the first time the top quark (1995). The current period of data taking (RunII) is devoted to precise measurements of top properties and to search for new physics. This thesis work is about the top decay channel named {tau} + jets. A t{bar t} pair decays in two W bosons and two b quarks. In a {tau} + jets event, one out of the two W decays into two jets of hadrons, while the other produces a {tau} lepton and a neutrino; the {tau} decays semileptonically in one or more charged and neutral pions while b quarks hadronize producing two jets of particles. Thus the final state of a {tau} + jets event has this specific signature: five jets, one {tau}-like, i.e. narrow and with low track multiplicity, two from b quarks, two from a W boson and a large amount of missing energy from two {tau} neutrinos. They search for this signal in 311 pb{sup -1} of data collected with TOP{_}MULTIJET trigger. They use neural networks to separate signal from background and on the selected sample they perform a t{bar t} production cross section measurement. The thesis is structured as follows: in Chapter 1 they outline the physics of top and {tau}, concentrating on their discovery, production mechanisms and current physics results involving them. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the experimental setup: the accelerator complex first and CDF detector then. The trigger system is described in Chapter 3, while Chapter 4 shows how particles are reconstructed exploiting information from different CDF subdetectors. With Chapter 5 they begin to present their analysis: we use a feed forward neural network based on a minimization algorithm developed in Trento University, called Reactive Taboo Search (RTS), especially designed to rapidly escape from local minima. Using this neural network, they explore two techniques to select t{bar t} {yields} {tau} + jets events, the first based on a single net, the second on two neural networks in cascade; both techniques are described in Chapter 6, together with the variables used as inputs for the nets. Finally, in Chapter 7 they present a method to measure cross section on the sample of events selected by neural networks.

  5. A measurement of the tau lepton lifetime at ARGUS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saull, Patrick Richard Behrendt

    Data taken with the ARGUS detector at DESY, Hamburg, specifically toverlinetoverline pairs produced from e+e - collisions in the energy range (10.4-10.6)GeV, are used to make a precision measurement of the tau lifetime. A new method is introduced which is independent of the beam position and envelope, and applicable to tau events having one-three topology. Applied to ARGUS data the method yields a value for the tau lifetime of tt=287+/-11(st atistical)+/-8(systemat ic)fs.

  6. Imaging The Candidate Proto-planet HL Tau B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greaves, Jane; Rice, K.; Richards, A.; Muxlow, T.; Forgan, D.; Sibthorpe, B.

    2011-09-01

    Our VLA and MERLIN radio images of the HL Tau system trace the emission from the proto-planetary disc at ultra-high resolution. A candidate proto-planet is seen at tens of AU from the star, at these long wavelengths where it stands out from the bright background disc. A simulation shows that gravitational instability within the disc is capable of forming this 10 Jupiter-mass object. Submillimetre images made recently with SCUBA-2 show that HL Tau's disc is perturbed by an interaction with XZ Tau, and this may have helped trigger disc fragmentation, in a flyby event as recent as a few thousand years ago.

  7. Measurement of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O Ratios in HL~Tau and GV~Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Scott; Teasley, Thomas; Brittain, Sean D.; Doppmann, Greg; Najita, Joan R.

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of three CO isotopologues taken from the high resolution 4.7 um fundamental and 2.3 um overtone ro-vibrational CO absorption spectraobtained using the NIRSPEC infrared spectrometer on the Keck II telescope. These CO absorption lines arise from the circumstellar material surrounding the Classical T Tauri Stars GV Tau and HL Tau. For HL Tau, we find that the 12CO/13CO and 12CO/C18O abundances are consistent with their abundance in the local ISM and previously published values. For GV Tau we find that 13CO and C18O are heavily depleted relative to their abundance in the ISM. The depletion in GV Tau is consistent with that of selective photodissociation in the disk. In our poster, we will discuss why the depletion of 13CO and C18O is higher in GV Tau than in HL Tau and the implications this may have for the abundance of 18O in meteorites.

  8. Electroweak and Higgs Measurements Using Tau Final States with the LHCb Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilten, Philip

    Spin correlations for tau lepton decays are included in the Pythia 8 event generation software with a framework which can be expanded to include the decays of particles other than the tau lepton. The spin correlations for the decays of tau leptons produced from electroweak and Higgs bosons are calculated. Decays of the tau lepton using sophisticated resonance models are included in Pythia 8 for all channels with experimentally observed branching fractions greater than 0.04%. The mass distributions for the decay products of these channels calculated with Pythia 8 are validated against the equivalent distributions from the Herwig++ and Tauola event generators. The technical implementation of the tau lepton spin correlations and decays in Pythia 8 is described. A measurement of the inclusive Z to di-tau cross-section using 1.0 inverse fb of data from pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the LHCb detector is presented. Reconstructed final states containing two muons, a muon and an electron, a muon and a charged hadron, or an electron and a charged hadron are selected as Z to di-tau candidates. The cross-section for Z bosons with a mass between 60 and 120 GeV decaying into tau leptons with pseudo-rapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 and transverse momenta greater than 20 GeV is measured to be 72.3 +/- 3.5 +/- 2.9 +/- 2.5 pb. The first uncertainty is statistical, the second uncertainty is systematic, and the third is to due the integrated luminosity uncertainty. The Z to di-tau to Z to di-muon cross-section ratio is found to be 0.94 +/- 0.09 and the Z to di-tau to Z to di-electron cross-section ratio is found to be 0.95 +/- 0.07. The uncertainty on these ratios is the combined statistical, systematic, and luminosity uncertainties. Limits on the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into tau lepton pairs with pseudo-rapidities between 2.0 and 4.5 are set at a 95% confidence level using the same LHCb dataset. A model independent upper limit on the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into tau leptons is set and ranges between 8.6 pb for a Higgs boson mass of 90 GeV to 0.7 pb for a Higgs boson mass of 250 GeV. This limit is compared to the expected standard model cross-section. An upper limit on tan-beta in the CP-odd Higgs mass and tan-beta plane is set for the mh-max scenario of the minimal supersymmetric model and varies from 34 for a CP-odd Higgs boson mass of 90 GeV to 70 for a CP-odd Higgs boson mass of 140 GeV.

  9. Pattern of tau hyperphosphorylation and neurotransmitter markers in the brainstem of senescent tau filament forming transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Morcinek, Kerstin; Köhler, Christoph; Götz, Jürgen; Schröder, Hannsjörg

    2013-02-25

    The early occurrence of brainstem-related symptoms, e.g. gait and balance impairment, apathy and depression in Alzheimer's disease patients suggests brainstem involvement in the initial pathogenesis. To address the question whether tau filament forming mice expressing mutated human tau mirror histopathological changes observed in Alzheimer brainstem, the degree and distribution of neurofibrillary lesions as well as the pattern of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons were investigated. The expression of the human tau transgene was observed in multiple brainstem nuclei, particularly in the magnocellular reticular formation, vestibular nuclei, cranial nerve motor nuclei, sensory trigeminal nerve nuclei, inferior and superior colliculi, periaqueductal and pontine gray matter, and the red nucleus. Most of the human tau-immunoreactive cell groups also showed tau hyperphosphorylation at the epitopes Thr231/Ser235 and Ser202/Thr205, while abnormal tau phosphorylation at the epitope Ser422 or silver stained structures were almost totally lacking. We found no obvious differences in distribution and density of cholinergic and monoaminergic neurons between tau-transgenic and wild type mice. Although numerous brainstem nuclei in our model expressed human tau protein, the development of neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads and ghost tangles was rare and likewise its distribution differed largely from Alzheimer's disease pattern. The number of monoaminergic neurons remained unchanged in the transgenic mice, while monoaminergic nuclei in Alzheimer brainstem showed a distinct neuronal loss. However, the distribution of pretangle-affected neurons in the tau-transgenic mice partly resembled those seen in progressive supranuclear palsy, presenting these animals as a model to examine brainstem pathogenesis of progressive supranuclear palsy. PMID:23261664

  10. Conformation Determines the Seeding Potencies of Native and Recombinant Tau Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K.; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J.; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Hutton, Michael L.; Szekeres, Philip G.; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled “prion-like” species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs 275VQIINK280 and 306VQIVYK311 abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  11. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta 42 ... being researched for their potential use as AD biomarkers. If someone has symptoms of dementia , a health ...

  12. Neuronal expression of pathological tau accelerates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation

    E-print Network

    Ossola, Bernardino; Zhao, Chao; Compston, Alastair; Pluchino, Stefano; Franklin, Robin J. M.; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation is an important therapeutic target to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously reported hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau in MS lesions...

  13. Measurement of \\mathcal{B}(\\tau^{-}\\-->\\bar{K^{0}}\\pi^{-}\

    SciTech Connect

    Wren, A

    2008-08-13

    A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 384.6 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II collider, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. From this they measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.840 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst))%. This result is the most precise measurement to date and is consistent with the world average.

  14. Argonne Tau-charm factory collider design study

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, L.C.; Crosbie, E.A.; Norem, J.

    1995-12-01

    The design approach and design principles for a Tau-charm Factory at Argonne were studied. These studies led to a set of preliminary parameters and tentative component features as presented in this paper.

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid A? to Tau Ratio and Postoperative Cognitive Change

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zhongcong; McAuliffe, Sayre; Swain, Celeste A.; Ward, Sarah A. P.; Crosby, Catherine A.; Zheng, Hui; Sherman, Janet; Dong, Yuanlin; Zhang, Yiying; Sunder, Neelakantan; Burke, Dennis; Washicosky, Kevin J.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Determination of biomarker and neuropathogenesis of postoperative cognitive change (POCC) or postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Background POCC is one of the most common postoperative complications in elderly patients. Whether preoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) ?-amyloid protein (A?) to tau ratio, an Alzheimer disease biomarker, is a biomarker for risk of POCC remains unknown. We therefore set out to assess the association between preoperative CSF A?42 or A?40 to tau ratio and POCC. Methods Patients who had total hip/knee replacement were enrolled. The CSF was obtained during the administration of spinal anesthesia. Cognitive tests were performed with these participants at 1 week before and at 1 week and 3 to 6 months after the surgery. Z scores of the changes from preoperative to postoperative on several key domains of the cognitive battery were determined. We then examined the association between preoperative CSF A?42/tau or A?40/tau ratio and the outcome measures described earlier, adjusting for age and sex. Results Among the 136 participants (mean age = 71 ± 5 years; 55% men), preoperative CSF A?42/tau ratio was associated with postoperative Hopkins Verbal Learning Test Retention [Z score 8.351; age, sex-adjusted (adj.) P = 0.003], and the Benton Judgment of Line= Orientation (Z score 1.242; adj. p = 0.007). A?40/tau ratio was associated with Brief Visuospatial Memory Test Total Recall (Z score = 1.045; adj. P = 0.044). Conclusions Preoperative CSF A?/tau ratio is associated with postoperative changes in specific cognitive domains. The presence of the Alzheimer's disease biomarker, specifically the A?/tau ratio, may identify patients at higher risk for cognitive changes after surgery. PMID:23732272

  16. Search for a low-mass scalar Higgs boson decaying to a tau pair in single-photon decays of ?(1S)

    E-print Network

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We search for a low-mass scalar CP-odd Higgs boson, A[superscript 0], produced in the radiative decay of the upsilon resonance and decaying into a ?[superscript +]?[superscript ?] pair: ?(1S) ? ?A[superscript 0]. The ...

  17. Tau protects microtubules in the axon from severing by katanin.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Liang; Yu, Wenqian; Andreadis, Athena; Luo, Minhua; Baas, Peter W

    2006-03-22

    Microtubules in the axon are more resistant to severing by katanin than microtubules elsewhere in the neuron. We have hypothesized that this is because of the presence of tau on axonal microtubules. When katanin is overexpressed in fibroblasts, the microtubules are severed into short pieces, but this phenomenon is suppressed by the coexpression of tau. Protection against severing is also afforded by microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2), which has a tau-like microtubule-binding domain, but not by MAP1b, which has a different microtubule-binding domain. The microtubule-binding domain of tau is required for the protection, but within itself, provides less protection than the entire molecule. When tau (but not MAP2 or MAP1b) is experimentally depleted from neurons, the microtubules in the axon lose their characteristic resistance to katanin. These results, which validate our hypothesis, also suggest a potential explanation for why axonal microtubules deteriorate in neuropathies involving the dissociation of tau from the microtubules. PMID:16554463

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Tau-Microtubule Interaction Using FRET

    PubMed Central

    Di Maïo, Isabelle L.; Barbier, Pascale; Allegro, Diane; Brault, Cédric; Peyrot, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the microtubule associated protein, tau and the microtubules is investigated. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay was used to determine the distance separating tau to the microtubule wall, as well as the binding parameters of the interaction. By using microtubules stabilized with Flutax-2 as donor and tau labeled with rhodamine as acceptor, a donor-to-acceptor distance of 54 ± 1 Å was found. A molecular model is proposed in which Flutax-2 is directly accessible to tau-rhodamine molecules for energy transfer. By titration, we calculated the stoichiometric dissociation constant to be equal to 1.0 ± 0.5 µM. The influence of the C-terminal tails of ??-tubulin on the tau-microtubule interaction is presented once a procedure to form homogeneous solution of cleaved tubulin has been determined. The results indicate that the C-terminal tails of ?- and ?-tubulin by electrostatic effects and of recruitment seem to be involved in the binding mechanism of tau. PMID:25196605

  19. The triple binary star EQ Tau with an active component

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Hu, S.-M.; Qian, S.-B.; He, J.-J. E-mail: likai@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-05-01

    New photometric data of EQ Tau observed in 2010 and 2013 are presented. Light curves obtained in 2000 and 2004 by Yuan and Qian and 2001 by Yang and Liu, together with our two newly determined sets of light curves, were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. The five sets of light curves exhibit very obvious variations, implying that the light curves of EQ Tau show a strong O'Connell effect. We found that EQ Tau is an A-type shallow contact binary with a contact degree of f = 11.8%; variable dark spots on the primary component of EQ Tau were also observed. Using 10 new times of minimum light, together with those collected from the literature, the orbital period change of EQ Tau was analyzed. We found that its orbital period includes a secular decrease (dP/dt = –3.63 × 10{sup –8} days yr{sup –1}) and a cyclic oscillation (A {sub 3} = 0.0058 days and P {sub 3} = 22.7 yr). The secular increase of the period can be explained by mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one or/and angular momentum loss due to a magnetic stellar wind. The Applegate mechanism cannot explain the cyclic orbital period change. A probable transit-like event was observed in 2010. Therefore, the cyclic orbital period change of EQ Tau may be due to the light time effect of a third body.

  20. Potent inhibition of tau fibrillization with a multivalent ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Darby, Michael V.; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-11-09

    Small-molecule inhibitors of tau fibrillization are under investigation as tools for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway and as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease. Established inhibitors include thiacarbocyanine dyes, which can inhibit recombinant tau fibrillization in the presence of anionic surfactant aggregation inducers. In an effort to increase inhibitory potency, a cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanine molecule containing two thiacarbocyanine moieties was synthesized and characterized with respect to tau fibrillization inhibitory activity by electron microscopy and ligand aggregation state by absorbance spectroscopy. Results showed that the inhibitory activity of the bis-thiacarbocyanine was qualitatively similar to a monomeric cyanine dye, but was more potent with 50% inhibition achieved at {approx}80 nM concentration. At all concentrations tested in aqueous solution, the bis-thiacarbocyanine collapsed to form a closed clamshell structure. However, the presence of tau protein selectively stabilized the open conformation. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of bis-thiacarbocyanine results from multivalency, and reveal a route to more potent tau aggregation inhibitors.

  1. Preliminary Measurement of B(tau- ---> K- pi0 nu/tau) Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatore, F.; Lyon, A.J.; /Manchester U.

    2005-07-08

    A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II accelerator, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. They measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.438 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst))%. This result is the world's most precise measurement of this branching fraction to date and is consistent with the world average.

  2. Fermionic construction of tau functions and random processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnad, J.; Orlov, A. Yu.

    2007-11-01

    Tau functions expressed as fermionic expectation values [E. Date, M. Jimbo, M. Kashiwara, T. Miwa, Transformation groups for soliton equations, in: M. Jimbo, T. Miwa (Eds.), Nonlinear Integrable Systems-Classical Theory and Quantum Theory, World Scientific, 1983, pp. 39-120] are shown to provide a natural and straightforward description of a number of random processes and statistical models involving hard core configurations of identical particles on the integer lattice, like a discrete version simple exclusion processes (ASEP), nonintersecting random walkers, lattice Coulomb gas models and others, as well as providing a powerful tool for combinatorial calculations involving paths between pairs of partitions. We study the decay of the initial step function within the discrete ASEP (d-ASEP) model as an example. For constant hopping rates we obtain Vershik-Kerov type of asymptotic configuration of particles.

  3. Tyrosine Nitration within the Proline-Rich Region of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Juan F.; Fu, Yifan; Vana, Laurel; Kanaan, Nicholas M.; Binder, Lester I.

    2011-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence suggests that nitrative injury contributes to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Previously, we showed in vitro that within the tau protein the N-terminal tyrosine residues (Y18 and Y29) are more susceptible to nitrative modifications than other tyrosine sites (Y197 and Y394). Using site-specific antibodies to nitrated tau at Y18 and Y29, we identified tau nitrated in both glial (Y18) and neuronal (Y29) tau pathologies. In this study, we report the characterization of two novel monoclonal antibodies, Tau-nY197 and Tau-nY394, recognizing tau nitrated at Y197 and Y394, respectively. By Western blot analysis, Tau-nY197 labeled soluble tau and insoluble paired helical filament proteins (PHF-tau) nitrated at Y197 from control and AD brain samples. Tau-nY394 failed to label soluble tau isolated from control or severe AD samples, but labeled insoluble PHF-tau to a limited extent. Immunohistochemical analysis using Tau-nY197 revealed the hallmark tau pathology associated with AD; Tau-nY394 did not detect any pathological lesions characteristic of the disorder. These data suggest that a subset of the hallmark pathological inclusions of AD contain tau nitrated at Y197. However, nitration at Y197 was also identified in soluble tau from all control samples, including those at Braak stage 0, suggesting that nitration at this site in the proline-rich region of tau may have normal biological functions in the human brain. PMID:21514440

  4. Search for charged Higgs bosons decaying via H+ -> tau nu in top quark pair events using pp collision data at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Dumlupinar U. /Gazi U. /TOBB ETU, Ankara /TAEK, Ankara /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington

    2012-04-01

    The results of a search for charged Higgs bosons are presented. The analysis is based on 4.6 fb{sup -1} of proton-proton collision data at {radical}s = 7 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using top quark pair events with a {tau} lepton in the final state. The data are consistent with the expected background from Standard Model processes. Assuming that the branching ratio of the charged Higgs boson to a {tau} lepton and a neutrino is 100%, this leads to upper limits on the branching ratio of top quark decays to a b quark and a charged Higgs boson between 5% and 1% for charged Higgs boson masses ranging from 90 GeV to 160 GeV, respectively. In the context of the m{sub h}{sup max} scenario of the MSSM, tan {beta} above 12-26, as well as between 1 and 2-6, can be excluded for charged Higgs boson masses between 90 GeV and 150 GeV.

  5. A search for the production of the final states. tau. sup +. tau. sup minus e sup + e sup minus ,. tau. sup +. tau. sup minus. mu. sup +. mu. sup minus , and. tau. sup +. tau. sup minus. pi. sup +. pi. sup minus in e sup + e sup minus collisions at radical s = 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    We have searched for the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar f}f, where f is either an electron, muon, or charged pion, at {radical}s = 29 GeV using the Mark 2 detector at the PEP storage ring. One candidate event is found while 2.3 events are expected from known processes. We would expect to see 11 events if the cross-section for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar f}f at {radical}s = 29 GeV were enhanced by the factor of 4.7 which the ALEPH collaboration reports for {radical}s = 91 GeV. we also look for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{bar f}f and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} {bar f}f, and for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} {gamma} using a similar analysis procedure and see the number of events predicted by the standard model. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Evidence for the appearance of atmospheric tau neutrinos in super-Kamiokande.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Marti, Ll; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Labarga, L; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Lopez, G D; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Martens, K; Schuemann, J; Vagins, M R; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E; Wilkes, R J

    2013-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data were fit with an unbinned maximum likelihood method to search for the appearance of tau leptons resulting from the interactions of oscillation-generated tau neutrinos in the detector. Relative to the expectation of unity, the tau normalization is found to be 1.42 ± 0.35(stat)(-0.12)(+0.14)(syst) excluding the no-tau-appearance hypothesis, for which the normalization would be zero, at the 3.8? level. We estimate that 180.1 ± 44.3(stat)(-15.2)(+17.8) (syst) tau leptons were produced in the 22.5 kton fiducial volume of the detector by tau neutrinos during the 2806 day running period. In future analyses, this large sample of selected tau events will allow the study of charged current tau neutrino interaction physics with oscillation produced tau neutrinos. PMID:23683190

  7. Modulation of tau phosphorylation within its microtubule-binding domain by cellular thiols.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S M; Johnson, G V

    1999-11-01

    Tau is a microtubule-stabilizing protein that is functionally modulated by alterations in its phosphorylation state. Because phosphorylation regulates both normal and pathological tau functioning, it is of importance to identify the signaling pathways that regulate tau phosphorylation in vivo. The present study examined changes in tau phosphorylation and function in response to modulation of cellular thiol content. Treatment of cells with phenylarsine oxide, which reacts with vicinal thiols, selectively increased tau phosphorylation within its microtubule-binding domain, at the non-Ser/Thr-Pro sites Ser262/356, while decreasing tau phosphorylation at Ser/ Thr-Pro sites outside this region. This increase in tau phosphorylation correlated with a decrease in the amount of tau associated with the cytoskeleton and decreased microtubule stability. Phenylarsine oxide-induced tau phosphorylation was inhibited by oxidants and by the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine. Although staurosporine completely eliminated the increase in tau phosphorylation at Ser262/356, as detected by immunostaining with 12E8, it had a comparatively minor effect on the changes in tau localization induced by phenylarsine oxide. The results suggest that regulation of cellular thiols is important for modulating tau phosphorylation and function in situ. Additionally, although phosphorylation of Ser262/356 decreases tau's interaction with the cytoskeleton, phosphorylation of these residues alone is not sufficient for the phenylarsine oxide-induced changes in tau localization. PMID:10537042

  8. Propagation of Tau Misfolding from the Outside to the Inside of a Cell*

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess; Jacks, Rachel L.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2009-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau in neurons and glia. Although Tau is normally considered an intracellular protein, Tau aggregates are observed in the extracellular space, and Tau peptide is readily detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. Tau aggregation occurs in many diseases, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. Tau pathology begins in discrete, disease-specific regions but eventually involves much larger areas of the brain. It is unknown how this propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. We hypothesize that extracellular Tau aggregates can transmit a misfolded state from the outside to the inside of a cell, similar to prions. Here we show that extracellular Tau aggregates, but not monomer, are taken up by cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates displace tubulin, co-localize with dextran, a marker of fluid-phase endocytosis, and induce fibrillization of intracellular full-length Tau. These intracellular fibrils are competent to seed fibril formation of recombinant Tau monomer in vitro. Finally, we observed that newly aggregated intracellular Tau transfers between co-cultured cells. Our data indicate that Tau aggregates can propagate a fibrillar, misfolded state from the outside to the inside of a cell. This may have important implications for understanding how protein misfolding spreads through the brains of tauopathy patients, and it is potentially relevant to myriad neurodegenerative diseases associated with protein misfolding. PMID:19282288

  9. Propagation of tau misfolding from the outside to the inside of a cell.

    PubMed

    Frost, Bess; Jacks, Rachel L; Diamond, Marc I

    2009-05-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau in neurons and glia. Although Tau is normally considered an intracellular protein, Tau aggregates are observed in the extracellular space, and Tau peptide is readily detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. Tau aggregation occurs in many diseases, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. Tau pathology begins in discrete, disease-specific regions but eventually involves much larger areas of the brain. It is unknown how this propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. We hypothesize that extracellular Tau aggregates can transmit a misfolded state from the outside to the inside of a cell, similar to prions. Here we show that extracellular Tau aggregates, but not monomer, are taken up by cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates displace tubulin, co-localize with dextran, a marker of fluid-phase endocytosis, and induce fibrillization of intracellular full-length Tau. These intracellular fibrils are competent to seed fibril formation of recombinant Tau monomer in vitro. Finally, we observed that newly aggregated intracellular Tau transfers between co-cultured cells. Our data indicate that Tau aggregates can propagate a fibrillar, misfolded state from the outside to the inside of a cell. This may have important implications for understanding how protein misfolding spreads through the brains of tauopathy patients, and it is potentially relevant to myriad neurodegenerative diseases associated with protein misfolding. PMID:19282288

  10. Observations of AA Tau requested to schedule XMM-Newton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2013-08-01

    Dr. Hans Moritz Guenther (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) has requested nightly observations of the classical T Tauri star AA Tau in order to schedule x-ray observations with XMM-Newton that have been planned for between 2013 August 15 and September 15. The purpose of the AAVSO observations is to determine whether AA Tau is at a suitable magnitude for the satellite observations. Taurus is difficult to observe during this time period but that is exactly why AAVSO assistance is needed! AA Tau is a morning object, and also, many of the professional ground-based telescopes are offline because of the US southwest monsoon season. Since it is critical to know the brightness of AA Tau, AAVSO observations will be truly essential. Nightly visual and snapshot (not more than once per night) observations beginning now and continuing through September 20 are needed. Coverage beginning ahead of the XMM window is requested because there is a one- to two-week lead time for the target to be inserted into the telescope schedule. Continuing the nightly observations a few days beyond the end of the XMM window will give better optical context for the x-ray data. AA Tau ranges between ~12.8V and ~16.1V; since December 2011 or earlier it has been at ~14.5V. The most recent observation in the AAVSO International Database shows it at 14.779V on 2013 Feb 5 (J. Roe, Bourbon, MO). Dr. Guenther writes, "AA Tau is surrounded by a thick accretion disk which is seen nearly edge-on. For decades the light curve of AA Tau showed regular eclipsing events when the accretion funnel rotated through the line of sight. However, earlier this year J. Bouvier and his group found that this behavior changed dramatically: AA Tau now seems to be deeply absorbed all the time (V band 14.5 mag). In collaboration with this group we will perform X-ray observations of AA Tau with the XMM-Newton satellite." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plo! tter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  11. Structure-activity relationship of cyanine tau aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward; Congdon, Erin E.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Duff, Karen E.; Kuret, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship for symmetrical cyanine inhibitors of human tau aggregation was elaborated using a filter trap assay. Antagonist activity depended on cyanine heterocycle, polymethine bridge length, and the nature of meso- and N-substituents. One potent member of the series, 3,3’-diethyl-9-methylthiacarbocyanine iodide (compound 11), retained submicromolar potency and had calculated physical properties consistent with blood-brain barrier and cell membrane penetration. Exposure of organotypic slices prepared from JNPL3 transgenic mice (which express human tau harboring the aggregation prone P301L tauopathy mutation) to compound 11 for one week revealed a biphasic dose response relationship. Low nanomolar concentrations decreased insoluble tau aggregates to half those observed in slices treated with vehicle alone. In contrast, high concentrations (?300 nM) augmented tau aggregation and produced abnormalities in tissue tubulin levels. These data suggest that certain symmetrical carbocyanine dyes can modulate tau aggregation in the slice biological model at concentrations well below those associated with toxicity. PMID:19432420

  12. Multinomial tau-leaping method for stochastic kinetic simulations.

    PubMed

    Pettigrew, Michel F; Resat, Haluk

    2007-02-28

    We introduce the multinomial tau-leaping (MtauL) method for general reaction networks with multichannel reactant dependencies. The MtauL method is an extension of the binomial tau-leaping method where efficiency is improved in several ways. First, tau-leaping steps are determined simply and efficiently using a priori information and Poisson distribution-based estimates of expectation values for reaction numbers over a tentative tau-leaping step. Second, networks are partitioned into closed groups of reactions and corresponding reactants in which no group reactant set is found in any other group. Third, product formation is factored into upper-bound estimation of the number of times a particular reaction occurs. Together, these features allow larger time steps where the numbers of reactions occurring simultaneously in a multichannel manner are estimated accurately using a multinomial distribution. Furthermore, we develop a simple procedure that places a specific upper bound on the total reaction number to ensure non-negativity of species populations over a single multiple-reaction step. Using two disparate test case problems involving cellular processes--epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and a lactose operon model--we show that the tau-leaping based methods such as the MtauL algorithm can significantly reduce the number of simulation steps thus increasing the numerical efficiency over the exact stochastic simulation algorithm by orders of magnitude. PMID:17343434

  13. Cholinesterase inhibitors may increase phosphorylated tau in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Katy A; Wilcock, Gordon K; Vinters, Harry V; Perry, Elaine K; Perry, Robert; Ballard, Clive G; Love, Seth

    2009-05-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In vitro and in animal studies, ChEIs have been shown to influence the processing of Abeta and the phosphorylation of tau, proteins that are the principal constituents of the plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, respectively, in AD brain. However, little is known about the effects of these drugs on Abeta and tau pathology in AD. Using avidin-biotin immunohistochemistry and computer-assisted image analysis, we compared Abeta and tau loads in the frontal and temporal cortices of 72 brains from matched cohorts of AD patients who had or had not received ChEIs. Patients treated with ChEIs had accumulated significantly more phospho-tau in their cerebral cortex than had untreated patients (P = 0.004). Abeta accumulation was reduced but not significantly. These data raise the possibility that increased tau phosphorylation may influence long-term clinical responsiveness to ChEIs. PMID:19240967

  14. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7fb-1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H??? decays or H?WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0, respectively.

  15. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau, and jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; et al.

    2013-09-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb?1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ? ? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. The observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsamples at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0 respectively.

  16. Tau-REx II: Retrieval of emission spectra

    E-print Network

    Waldmann, Ingo P; Rocchetto, Marco; Barton, Emma J; Yurchenko, Sergey N; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Tau-REx (Tau Retrieval of Exoplanets) is a novel, fully Bayesian atmospheric retrieval code custom built for extrasolar atmospheres. In Waldmann et al. (2015) the transmission spectroscopic case was introduced, here we present the emission spectroscopy spectral retrieval for the Tau-REx framework. Compared to transmission spectroscopy, the emission case is often significantly more degenerate due to the need to retrieve the full atmospheric temperature-pressure (TP) profile. This is particularly true in the case of current measurements of exoplanetary atmospheres, which are either of low signal-to-noise, low spectral resolution or both. Here we present a new way of combining two existing approaches to the modelling of the said TP profile: 1) the parametric profile, where the atmospheric TP structure is analytically approximated by a few model parameters, 2) the Layer-by-Layer approach, where individual atmospheric layers are modelled. Both these approaches have distinct advantages and disadvantages in terms of...

  17. A Model of the Accretion Disk Around AA Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinte, Christophe; Ménard, François

    2004-06-01

    The Classical T Tauri Star AA Tau shows quasi cyclic variations of brightness and polarization with a maximum polarization when the system is faintest. Bouvier et al. proposed a model where these variations should be ``eclipses'' produced by orbiting circumstellar material. The effects of a warp at the inner edge of the accretion disk and of hot spots on the stellar surface on the photometric and polarimetric light curves of AA Tau are studied through multiple scattering Monte-Carlo simulations. Constraints on disk parameters are drawn out, so as to determine whether the warp can be interpreted within the magnetospheric accretion theory. We find that the main features of AA Tau's photopolarimetric variations can be explained by the presence of a warp and that hot spots have a limited influence on them.

  18. Rescue of tau-induced synaptic transmission pathology by paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Erez, Hadas; Shemesh, Or A.; Spira, Micha E.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and electrophysiological studies of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other tauopathies have revealed that the onset of cognitive decline correlates better with synaptic dysfunctions than with hallmark pathologies such as extracellular amyloid-? plaques, intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau or neuronal loss. Recent experiments have also demonstrated that anti-cancer microtubule (MT)-stabilizing drugs can rescue tau-induced behavioral decline and hallmark neuron pathologies. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying tau-induced synaptic dysfunction as well as those involved in the rescue of cognitive decline by MTs-stabilizing drugs remain unclear. Here we began to study these mechanisms using the glutaminergic sensory-motoneuron synapse derived from Aplysia ganglia, electrophysiological methods, the expression of mutant-human tau (mt-htau) either pre or postsynaptically and the antimitotic drug paclitaxel. Expression of mt-htau in the presynaptic neurons led to reduced excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) amplitude generated by rested synapses within 3 days of mt-htau expression, and to deeper levels of homosynaptic depression. mt-htau-induced synaptic weakening correlated with reduced releasable presynaptic vesicle pools as revealed by the induction of asynchronous neurotransmitter release by hypertonic sucrose solution. Paclitaxel totally rescued tau-induced synaptic weakening by maintaining the availability of the presynaptic vesicle stores. Postsynaptic expression of mt-htau did not impair the above described synaptic-transmission parameters for up to 5 days. Along with earlier confocal microscope observations from our laboratory, these findings suggest that tau-induced synaptic dysfunction is the outcome of impaired axoplasmic transport and the ensuing reduction in the releasable presynaptic vesicle stores rather than the direct effects of mt-htau or paclitaxel on the synaptic release mechanisms. PMID:24574970

  19. Monitoring of Intracellular Tau Aggregation Regulated by OGA/OGT Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Nam, Ghilsoo; Ryoo, Nayeon; Rhim, Hyewhon; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation of tau has been considered as a key pathogenic mechanism inducing tau aggregation in multiple neurodegenerative disorders, collectively called tauopathies. Recent evidence showed that tau phosphorylation sites are protected with O-linked ?-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in normal brain. In pathological condition, tau is de-glycosylated and becomes a substrate for kinases. Despite the importance of O-GlcNAcylation in tau pathology, O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), and an enzyme catalyzing O-GlcNAc to tau, has not been carefully investigated in the context of tau aggregation. Here, we investigated intracellular tau aggregation regulated by BZX2, an inhibitor of OGT. Upon the inhibition of OGT, tau phosphorylation increased 2.0-fold at Ser199 and 1.5-fold at Ser396, resulting in increased tau aggregation. Moreover, the BZX2 induced tau aggregation was efficiently reduced by the treatment of Thiamet G, an inhibitor of O-GlcNAcase (OGA). Our results demonstrated the protective role of OGT in tau aggregation and also suggest the counter-regulatory mechanism of OGA and OGT in tau pathology. PMID:26343633

  20. Tangles, Toxicity, and Tau Secretion in AD – New Approaches to a Vexing Problem

    PubMed Central

    Gendreau, Kerry L.; Hall, Garth F.

    2013-01-01

    When the microtubule (MT)-associated protein tau is not bound to axonal MTs, it becomes hyperphosphorylated and vulnerable to proteolytic cleavage and other changes typically seen in the hallmark tau deposits (neurofibrillary tangles) of tau-associated neurodegenerative diseases (tauopathies). Neurofibrillary tangle formation is preceded by tau oligomerization and accompanied by covalent crosslinking and cytotoxicity, making tangle cytopathogenesis a natural central focus of studies directed at understanding the role of tau in neurodegenerative disease. Recent studies suggest that the formation of tau oligomers may be more closely related to tau neurotoxicity than the presence of the tangles themselves. It has also become increasingly clear that tau pathobiology involves a wide variety of other cellular abnormalities including a disruption of autophagy, vesicle trafficking mechanisms, axoplasmic transport, neuronal polarity, and even the secretion of tau, which is normally a cytosolic protein, to the extracellular space. In this review, we discuss tau misprocessing, toxicity and secretion in the context of normal tau functions in developing and mature neurons. We also compare tau cytopathology to that of other aggregation-prone proteins involved in neurodegeneration (alpha synuclein, prion protein, and APP). Finally, we consider potential mechanisms of intra- and interneuronal tau lesion spreading, an area of particular recent interest. PMID:24151487

  1. BAG3 facilitates the clearance of endogenous tau in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhinian; Brizzee, Corey; Johnson, Gail V W

    2015-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein that is found primarily in neurons, and in pathologic conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) it accumulates and contributes to the disease process. Because tau plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of AD and other tauopathies, and in AD mouse models reducing tau levels improves outcomes, approaches that facilitate tau clearance are being considered as therapeutic strategies. However, fundamental to the development of such interventions is a clearer understanding of the mechanisms that regulate tau clearance. Here, we report a novel mechanism of tau degradation mediated by the co-chaperone BAG3. BAG3 has been shown to be an essential component of a complex that targets substrates to the autophagy pathway for degradation. In rat primary neurons, activation of autophagy by inhibition of proteasome activity or treatment with trehalose resulted in significant decreases in tau and phospho-tau levels. These treatments also induced an upregulation of BAG3. Proteasome inhibition activated JNK, which was responsible for the upregulation of BAG3 and increased tau clearance. Inhibiting JNK or knocking down BAG3 blocked the proteasome inhibition-induced decreases in tau. Further, BAG3 overexpression alone resulted in significant decreases in tau and phospho-tau levels in neurons. These results indicate that BAG3 plays a critical role in regulating the levels of tau in neurons, and interventions that increase BAG3 levels could provide a therapeutic approach in the treatment of AD. PMID:25212465

  2. Traceless purification and desulfurization of tau protein ligation products.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Oliver; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Hackenberger, Christian P R

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel strategy for the traceless purification and synthetic modification of peptides and proteins obtained by native chemical ligation. The strategy involves immobilization of a photocleavable semisynthetic biotin-protein conjugate on streptavidin-coated agarose beads, which eliminates the need for tedious rebuffering steps and allows the rapid removal of excess peptides and additives. On-bead desulfurization is followed by delivery of the final tag-free protein product. The strategy is demonstrated in the isolation of a tag-free Alzheimer's disease related human tau protein from a complex EPL mixture as well as a triphosphorylated peptide derived from the C-terminus of tau. PMID:25404175

  3. Bilinear equations on Painleve tau functions from CFT

    E-print Network

    Bershtein, M A

    2014-01-01

    In 2012 Gamayun, Iorgov, Lisovyy conjectured an explicit expression for Painlev\\'e $\\tau$ function in terms of Liouville conformal blocks with central charge $c=1$. We prove that proposed expression satisfy Painlev\\'e $\\tau$ function bilinear equations (and therefore prove the conjecture). The proof is based on the embedding of direct sum of two Virasoro algebras to the sum of Majorana fermion and Super Virasoro algebra. By use of AGT correspondence these bilinear equations on conformal blocks can be interpreted as instanton counting on the minimal resolution of $\\mathbb{C}^2/\\mathbb{Z}_2$ (similar to Nakajima-Yoshioka blow-up equations).

  4. Atmospheric neutrino oscillations and tau neutrinos in ice

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, Gerardo; Mocioiu, Irina; Mena, Olga

    2010-06-01

    The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core Array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show here that cascade measurements in the Ice Cube Deep Core Array can provide strong evidence for tau neutrino appearance in atmospheric neutrino oscillations. Controlling systematic uncertainties will be the limiting factor in the analysis. A careful study of these tau neutrinos is crucial, since they constitute an irreducible background for astrophysical neutrino detection.

  5. Upper Limit on the Tau-Neutrino Mass

    E-print Network

    Baringer, Philip S.

    1986-03-10

    VOLUME 56, NUMBER 10 PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS 10 MARcH 1986 Upper Limit on the Tau-Neutrino Mass S. Abachi, C. Akerlof, P. Baringer, I. Beltrami, t'~ D. Blockus, G. Bonvicini, B. Brabson, B. G. Bylsma, J. Chapman, B. Cork, R. DeBonte, M. Derrick, D... in the high-resolution spectrome- ter at the SLAC e+e storage ring PEP, has been used to place an upper limit on the mass of the tau neutrino of 84 MeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level. PACS numbers: 14.60.6h, 13.35.+s In a previous paper' we established...

  6. Is phosphorylated tau unique to chronic traumatic encephalopathy? Phosphorylated tau in epileptic brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Puvenna, Vikram; Engeler, Madeline; Banjara, Manoj; Brennan, Chanda; Schreiber, Peter; Dadas, Aaron; Bahrami, Ashkon; Solanki, Jesal; Bandyopadhyay, Anasua; Morris, Jacqueline K; Bernick, Charles; Ghosh, Chaitali; Rapp, Edward; Bazarian, Jeffrey J; Janigro, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive traumatic brain injury (rTBI) is one of the major risk factors for the abnormal deposition of phosphorylated tau (PT) in the brain and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). CTE and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) affect the limbic system, but no comparative studies on PT distribution in TLE and CTE are available. It is also unclear whether PT pathology results from repeated head hits (rTBI). These gaps prevent a thorough understanding of the pathogenesis and clinical significance of PT, limiting our ability to develop preventative and therapeutic interventions. We quantified PT in TLE and CTE to unveil whether a history of rTBI is a prerequisite for PT accumulation in the brain. Six postmortem CTE (mean 73.3 years) and age matched control samples were compared to 19 surgically resected TLE brain specimens (4 months-58 years; mean 27.6 years). No history of TBI was present in TLE or control; all CTE patients had a history of rTBI. TLE and CTE brain displayed increased levels of PT as revealed by immunohistochemistry. No age-dependent changes were noted, as PT was present as early as 4 months after birth. In TLE and CTE, cortical neurons, perivascular regions around penetrating pial vessels and meninges were immunopositive for PT; white matter tracts also displayed robust expression of extracellular PT organized in bundles parallel to venules. Microscopically, there were extensive tau-immunoreactive neuronal, astrocytic and degenerating neurites throughout the brain. In CTE perivascular tangles were most prominent. Overall, significant differences in staining intensities were found between CTE and control (P<0.01) but not between CTE and TLE (P=0.08). pS199 tau analysis showed that CTE had the most high molecular weight tangle-associated tau, whereas epileptic brain contained low molecular weight tau. Tau deposition may not be specific to rTBI since TLE recapitulated most of the pathological features of CTE. PMID:26556772

  7. No full admission for tau to the exclusive prion club yet

    PubMed Central

    Polanco, Juan Carlos; Götz, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease and other so-called tauopathies, yet what causes this protein to aggregate and what renders it toxic is only slowly being revealed. Because tau spreads in a stereotypical pattern through the diseased brain, it has been proposed that it possesses prion-like properties, with aggregation-prone tau facilitating the conversion of “naïve” tau into “toxic” forms. The current study by Wegmann et al (2015) addresses whether tau fulfils classical “prion criteria” by assessing its spreading and toxicity in the absence of endogenous tau. Using different transgenic and viral paradigms, the authors demonstrate that, although tau still propagates in this scenario, there is a decrease in its misfolding and neurotoxicity. They therefore conclude that tau is not a genuine prion, at least when the current definition of these infectious proteins is applied. PMID:26553729

  8. Depletion of microglia and inhibition of exosome synthesis halt tau propagation.

    PubMed

    Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Medalla, Maria; Luebke, Jennifer; Haydar, Tarik; Wolozin, Benjamin; Butovsky, Oleg; Kügler, Sebastian; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of pathological tau protein is a major hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Tau protein spreads from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal region early in the disease. Microglia, the primary phagocytes in the brain, are positively correlated with tau pathology, but their involvement in tau propagation is unknown. We developed an adeno-associated virus-based model exhibiting rapid tau propagation from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus in 4 weeks. We found that depleting microglia dramatically suppressed the propagation of tau and reduced excitability in the dentate gyrus in this mouse model. Moreover, we demonstrate that microglia spread tau via exosome secretion, and inhibiting exosome synthesis significantly reduced tau propagation in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that microglia and exosomes contribute to the progression of tauopathy and that the exosome secretion pathway may be a therapeutic target. PMID:26436904

  9. Goodman and Kruskal's TAU-B Statistics: A Fortran-77 Subroutine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Kenneth J.; Mielke, Paul W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm and associated FORTRAN-77 computer subroutine are described for computing Goodman and Kruskal's tau-b statistic along with the associated nonasymptotic probability value under the null hypothesis tau=O. (Author)

  10. Depletion of microglia and inhibition of exosome synthesis halt tau propagation

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Hirohide; Ikezu, Seiko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Medalla, Maria; Luebke, Jennifer; Haydar, Tarik; Wolozin, Benjamin; Butovsky, Oleg; Kügler, Sebastian; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of pathological tau protein is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. Tau protein spreads from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal region early in the disease. Microglia, the primary phagocytes in the brain, are positively correlated with tau pathology, but their involvement in tau propagation is unknown. We developed an adeno-associated virus–based model exhibiting rapid tau propagation from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus in 4 weeks. We found that depleting microglia dramatically suppressed the propagation of tau and reduced excitability in the dentate gyrus in this mouse model. Moreover, we demonstrate that microglia spread tau via exosome secretion, and inhibiting exosome synthesis significantly reduced tau propagation in vitro and in vivo. These data suggest that microglia and exosomes contribute to the progression of tauopathy and that the exosome secretion pathway may be a therapeutic target. PMID:26436904

  11. Computational studies of tau protein : implications for the pathogenesis and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    E-print Network

    Huang, Austin V., 1980-

    2009-01-01

    Tau protein is the primary constituent of protein aggregates known as neurofibrillary tangles, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previous studies suggest that tau protein may play a contributing role in ...

  12. Soluble amyloid -protein dimers isolated from Alzheimer cortex directly induce Tau

    E-print Network

    Hayar, Abdallah

    Soluble amyloid -protein dimers isolated from Alzheimer cortex directly induce Tau. Insoluble fibrillar plaques of amyloid -proteins (A) and neurofibrillary deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins are the diagnostic lesions of AD, but their temporal mechanistic relationship has long been de

  13. Thermodynamics of the Interaction between Alzheimer's Disease Related Tau Protein and DNA

    PubMed Central

    Camero, Sergio; Benítez, María J.; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús; Jiménez, Juan S.

    2014-01-01

    Tau hyperphosphorylation can be considered as one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease and other tauophaties. Besides its well-known role as a microtubule associated protein, Tau displays a key function as a protector of genomic integrity in stress situations. Phosphorylation has been proven to regulate multiple processes including nuclear translocation of Tau. In this contribution, we are addressing the physicochemical nature of DNA-Tau interaction including the plausible influence of phosphorylation. By means of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) we measured the equilibrium constant and the free energy, enthalpy and entropy changes associated to the Tau-DNA complex formation. Our results show that unphosphorylated Tau binding to DNA is reversible. This fact is in agreement with the protective role attributed to nuclear Tau, which stops binding to DNA once the insult is over. According to our thermodynamic data, oscillations in the concentration of dephosphorylated Tau available to DNA must be the variable determining the extent of Tau binding and DNA protection. In addition, thermodynamics of the interaction suggest that hydrophobicity must represent an important contribution to the stability of the Tau-DNA complex. SPR results together with those from Tau expression in HEK cells show that phosphorylation induces changes in Tau protein which prevent it from binding to DNA. The phosphorylation-dependent regulation of DNA binding is analogous to the Tau-microtubules binding inhibition induced by phosphorylation. Our results suggest that hydrophobicity may control Tau location and DNA interaction and that impairment of this Tau-DNA interaction, due to Tau hyperphosphorylation, could contribute to Alzheimer's pathogenesis. PMID:25126942

  14. Insulin resistance is associated with higher cerebrospinal fluid tau levels in asymptomatic APOE ?4 carriers

    PubMed Central

    Starks, Erika J.; O'Grady, J. Patrick; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M.; Racine, Annie M.; Carlsson, Cindy M.; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C.; Puglielli, Luigi; Asthana, Sanjay; Dowling, N. Maritza; Gleason, Carey E.; Anderson, Rozalyn M.; Davenport-Sis, Nancy J.; DeRungs, LeAnn M.; Sager, Mark A.; Johnson, Sterling C.; Bendlin, Barbara B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance (IR) is linked with the occurrence of pathological features observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD), including neurofibrillary tangles and amyloid plaques. However, the extent to which IR is associated with AD pathology in the cognitively asymptomatic stages of preclinical AD remains unclear. Objective To determine the extent to which IR is linked with amyloid and tau pathology in late-middle-age. Method Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected from 113 participants enrolled in the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention study (mean age = 60.6 years), were assayed for AD-related markers of interest: A?42, P-Tau181, and T-Tau. IR was determined using the Homeostatic Model Assessment for Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Linear regression was used to test the effect of IR, and APOE ?4, on tau and amyloid pathology. We hypothesized that greater IR would be associated with higher CSF P-Tau181 and T-Tau, and lower CSF A?42. Results No significant main effects of HOMA-IR on P-Tau181, T-Tau, or A?42 were observed; however, significant interactions were observed between HOMA-IR and APOE ?4 on CSF markers related to tau. Among APOE ?4 carriers, higher HOMA-IR was associated with higher P-Tau181 and T-Tau. Among APOE ?4 non-carriers, HOMA-IR was negatively associated with P-Tau181 and T-Tau. We found no effects of IR on A?42 levels in CSF. Conclusion IR among asymptomatic APOE ?4 carriers was associated with higher P-Tau181 and T-Tau in late-middle age. The results suggest that IR may contribute to tau-related neurodegeneration in preclinical AD. The findings may have implications for developing prevention strategies aimed at modifying IR in mid-life. PMID:25812851

  15. Multinomial Tau-Leaping Method for Stochastic Kinetic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Pettigrew, Michel F.; Resat, Haluk

    2007-02-28

    We introduce the multinomial tau-leaping (MtL) method, an improved version of the binomial tau-leaping method, for general reaction networks. Improvements in efficiency are achieved in several ways. Firstly, tau-leaping steps are determined simply and efficiently using a-prior information. Secondly, networks are partitioned into closed groups of reactions and corresponding reactants in which no group reactant or reaction is found in any other group. Thirdly, product formation is factored into upper bound estimation of the number of times a particular reaction occurs. Together, these features allow for larger time steps where the numbers of reactions occurring simultaneously in a multi-channel manner are estimated accurately using a multinomial distribution. Using a wide range of test case problems of scientific and practical interest involving cellular processes, such as epidermal growth factor receptor signaling and lactose operon model incorporating gene transcription and translation, we show that tau-leaping based methods like the MtL algorithm can significantly reduce the number of simulation steps thus increasing the numerical efficiency over the exact stochastic simulation algorithm by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the simultaneous multi-channel representation capability of the MtL algorithm makes it a candidate for FPGA implementation or for parallelization in parallel computing environments.

  16. Structural Impact of Tau Phosphorylation at Threonine 231.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Martin; Kadavath, Harindranath; Biernat, Jacek; Ozenne, Valery; Blackledge, Martin; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau influences the assembly and stabilization of microtubules and is deregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. The high flexibility of Tau, however, has prevented an atomic-level description of its phosphorylation-induced structural changes. Employing an extensive set of distance and orientational restraints together with a novel ensemble calculation approach, we determined conformational ensembles of Tau fragments in the non-phosphorylated state and, when phosphorylated at T231/S235 or T231/S235/S237/S238, four important sites of phosphorylation in Alzheimer disease. Comparison of the molecular ensembles showed that phosphorylation of the regulatory T231 does not perturb the backbone conformation of the proximal microtubule-binding (225)KVAVVR(230) motif. Instead, phosphorylated T231 selectively engages in a salt bridge with R230 that can compete with the formation of intermolecular salt bridges to tubulin. Our study provides an ensemble description which will be useful for the analysis of conformational transitions in Tau and other intrinsically disordered proteins. PMID:26165593

  17. The Role of Tau in Neurodegenerative Diseases and Its Potential as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal deposition of proteins in and around neurons is a common pathological feature of many neurodegenerative diseases. Among these pathological proteins, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intraneuronal filaments in a spectrum of neurological disorders. The discovery that dominant mutations in the MAPT gene encoding tau are associated with familial frontotemporal dementia strongly supports abnormal tau protein as directly involved in disease pathogenesis. This and other evidence suggest that tau is a worthwhile target for the prevention or treatment of tau-associated neurodegenerative diseases, collectively called tauopathies. However, it is critical to understand the normal biological roles of tau, the specific molecular events that induce tau to become neurotoxic, the biochemical nature of pathogenic tau, the means by which pathogenic tau exerts neurotoxicity, and how tau pathology propagates. Based on known differences between normal and abnormal tau, a number of approaches have been taken toward the discovery of potential therapeutics. Key questions still remain open, such as the nature of the connection between the amyloid-? protein of Alzheimer's disease and tau pathology. Answers to these questions should help better understand the nature of tauopathies and may also reveal new therapeutic targets and strategies. PMID:24278740

  18. Learning and Memory Deficits upon TAU Accumulation in "Drosophila" Mushroom Body Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershin, Andreas; Pavlopoulos, Elias; Fitch, Olivia; Braden, Brittany C.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.; Skoulakis, Efthimios M. C.

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in the neuronal-specific microtubule-binding protein TAU are associated with several dementias and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the effects of elevated TAU accumulation on behavioral plasticity are unknown. We report that directed expression of wild-type vertebrate and "Drosophila" TAU in adult mushroom body neurons, centers for…

  19. Cleavage of tau by asparagine endopeptidase mediates the neurofibrillary pathology in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Song, Mingke; Liu, Xia; Kang, Seong Su; Kwon, Il-Sun; Duong, Duc M.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Hu, William T.; Liu, Zhixue; Wang, Jian-zhi; Cheng, Liming; Sun, Yi E.; Yu, Shan Ping; Levey, Allan I.; Ye, Keqiang

    2014-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), composed of truncated and hyperphosphorylated tau, are a common feature of numerous aging-related neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the molecular mechanisms mediating tau truncation and aggregation during aging remain elusive. Here we show that asparagine endopeptidase (AEP), a lysosomal cysteine proteinase, is activated during aging and proteolytically degrades tau, abolishes its microtubule assembly function, induces tau aggregation, and triggers neurodegeneration. AEP is upregulated and active during aging, and is activated in tau P301S transgenic mice and human AD brain, leading to tau truncation in NFTs. Deletion of AEP from tau P301S transgenic mice substantially reduces tau hyperphosphorylation, alleviates the synapse loss and rescues impaired hippocampal synaptic function and the cognitive deficits. Infection of uncleavable tau N255AN368A mutant rescues tau P301S-induced pathological and behavioral defects. Together, these observations indicate that AEP acts as a crucial mediator of tau-related clinical and neuropathological changes in neurodegenerative diseases. Inhibition of AEP may be therapeutically useful for treating tau-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25326800

  20. Detection of Earth-skimming UHE tau neutrino with the JEM-EUSO detector

    E-print Network

    Vankova, Galina; Bogomilov, Marian; Tsenov, Roumen; Bertaina, Mario; Santangelo, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The ultra high energy cosmic neutrinos are powerful astrophysical probes for both astrophysical mechanisms of particle acceleration and fundamental interactions. They open a window into the very distant and high-energy Universe that is difficult to access by any human means and devices. The possibility of detecting them in large exposure space-based apparatus, like JEM-EUSO, is an experimental challenge. In this paper we present an estimation of the feasibility of detection of UHE tau neutrino by the JEM-EUSO telescope. The interactions of tau-neutrino in sea water and Earth's crust have been investigated. The estimation of the propagation length and energy of the outgoing tau-lepton shows that if its decay occurs in the atmosphere close enough to the Earth's surface, e.g. below $\\sim$ $5 km$ altitude, the cascade is intensive enough and the generated light can be detected from space. We have evaluated the geometrical aperture of the JEM-EUSO detector for the Earth-skimming (horizontal and upward-going) tau-n...

  1. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau lepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with zero, one, or two or more jets using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, and to Higgs boson decays to tau lepton pairs or W boson pairs. Observed (expected) limits are set on the ratio of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio, relative to those predicted by the Standard Model, of 14 (22) at a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV and 7.7 (6.8) at 165 GeV.

  2. Common Origin of mu-tau and CP Breaking in Neutrino Seesaw, Baryon Asymmetry, and Hidden Flavor Symmetry

    E-print Network

    Hong-Jian He; Fu-Rong Yin

    2012-04-17

    We conjecture that all CP violations (both Dirac and Majorana types) arise from a common origin in neutrino seesaw. With this conceptually attractive and simple conjecture, we deduce that mu-tau breaking shares the common origin with all CP violations. We study the common origin of mu-tau and CP breaking in the Dirac mass matrix of seesaw Lagrangian (with right-handed neutrinos being mu-tau blind), which uniquely leads to inverted mass-ordering of light neutrinos. We then predict a very different correlation between the two small mu-tau breaking observables theta_{13}-0 and theta_{23}-45, which can saturate the present experimental upper limit on theta_{13}. This will be tested against our previous normal mass-ordering scheme by the on-going oscillation experiments. We also analyze the correlations of theta_{13} with Jarlskog invariant and neutrinoless double-beta-decay observable. From the common origin of CP and mu-tau breaking in the neutrino seesaw, we establish a direct link between the low energy CP violations and the cosmological CP violation for baryon asymmetry. With these we further predict a lower bound on theta_{13}, supporting the on-going probes of theta_{13} at Daya Bay, Double Chooz and RENO experiments. Finally, we analyze the general model-independent Z_2 x Z_2 symmetry structure of the light neutrino sector, and map it into the seesaw sector, where one of the Z_2's corresponds to the mu-tau symmetry and another the hidden symmetry Z_2^s (revealed in our previous work) which dictates the solar mixing angle \\theta_{12}. We derive the physical consequences of this Z_2^s and its possible partial violation in the presence of mu-tau breaking (without or with neutrino seesaw), regarding the theta_{12} determination and the correlation between mu-tau breaking observables.

  3. A refined reaction-diffusion model of tau-microtubule dynamics and its application in FDAP analysis.

    PubMed

    Igaev, Maxim; Janning, Dennis; Sündermann, Frederik; Niewidok, Benedikt; Brandt, Roland; Junge, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Fluorescence decay after photoactivation (FDAP) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) are well established approaches for studying the interaction of the microtubule (MT)-associated protein tau with MTs in neuronal cells. Previous interpretations of FDAP/FRAP data have revealed dwell times of tau on MTs in the range of several seconds. However, this is difficult to reconcile with a dwell time recently measured by single-molecule analysis in neuronal processes that was shorter by two orders of magnitude. Questioning the validity of previously used phenomenological interpretations of FDAP/FRAP data, we have generalized the standard two-state reaction-diffusion equations by 1), accounting for the parallel and discrete arrangement of MTs in cell processes (i.e., homogeneous versus heterogeneous distribution of tau-binding sites); and 2), explicitly considering both active (diffusion upon MTs) and passive (piggybacking upon MTs at rates of slow axonal transport) motion of bound tau. For some idealized cases, analytical solutions were derived. By comparing them with the full numerical solution and Monte Carlo simulations, the respective validity domains were mapped. Interpretation of our FDAP data (from processes of neuronally differentiated PC12 cells) in light of the heterogeneous formalism yielded independent estimates for the association (?2 ms) and dwell (?100 ms) times of tau to/on a single MT rather than in an MT array. The dwell time was shorter by orders of magnitude than that in a previous report where a homogeneous topology of MTs was assumed. We found that the diffusion of bound tau was negligible in vivo, in contrast to an earlier report that tau diffuses along the MT lattice in vitro. Methodologically, our results demonstrate that the heterogeneity of binding sites cannot be ignored when dealing with reaction-diffusion of cytoskeleton-associated proteins. Physiologically, the results reveal the behavior of tau in cellular processes, which is noticeably different from that in vitro. PMID:25468336

  4. Tau Reduction Does Not Prevent Motor Deficits in Two Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Meaghan; Koyama, Akihiko; Masliah, Eliezer; Mucke, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases are increasing in prevalence and cannot be prevented or cured. If they shared common pathogenic mechanisms, treatments targeting such mechanisms might be of benefit in multiple conditions. The tau protein has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diverse neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Tau reduction prevents cognitive deficits, behavioral abnormalities and other pathological changes in multiple AD mouse models. Here we examined whether tau reduction also prevents motor deficits and pathological alterations in two mouse models of PD, generated by unilateral striatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) or transgene-mediated neuronal expression of human wildtype ?-synuclein. Both models were evaluated on Tau+/+, Tau+/– and Tau–/– backgrounds in a variety of motor tests. Tau reduction did not prevent motor deficits caused by 6-OHDA and slightly worsened one of them. Tau reduction also did not prevent 6-OHDA-induced loss of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum. Similarly, tau reduction did not prevent motor deficits in ?-synuclein transgenic mice. Our results suggest that tau has distinct roles in the pathogeneses of AD and PD and that tau reduction may not be of benefit in the latter condition. PMID:22206005

  5. Altered phosphorylation of. tau. protein in heat-shocked rats and patients with Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Papasozomenos, S.C.; Yuan Su Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX )

    1991-05-15

    Six hours after heat shocking 2- to 3-month-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats at 42C for 15 min, the authors analyzed {tau} protein immunoreactivity in SDS extracts of cerebrums and peripheral nerves by using immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry with the anti-{tau} monoclonal antibody Tau-1, which recognizes a phosphate-dependent nonphosphorylated epitope, and with {sup 125}I-labeled protein A. In the cerebal extracts, the authors found altered phosphorylation of {tau} in heat-shocked females, characterized by a marked reduction in the amount of nonphosphorylated {tau}, a doubling of the ratio of total (phosphorylated plus nonphosphorylated) {tau} to nonphosphorylated {tau}, and the appearance of the slowest moving phosphorylated {tau} polypeptide (68 kDa). Similar, but milder, changes were observed in male rats. Quantitative immunoblot analysis of cortex and the underlying white matter with Tau-1 and {sup 125}I-labeled protein A showed that the amount of phosphorylated {tau} progressively increased in the Alzheimer disease-affected cerebral cortex, while concurrently a proportionally lesser amount of {tau} entered the white matter axons. The similar findings for the rat heat-shock model and Alzheimer disease suggest that life stressors may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

  6. miR-132/212 deficiency impairs tau metabolism and promotes pathological aggregation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pascal Y; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Jolivette, Francis; Lecours, Cynthia; Bisht, Kanchan; Goupil, Claudia; Dorval, Veronique; Parsi, Sepideh; Morin, Françoise; Planel, Emmanuel; Bennett, David A; Fernandez-Gomez, Francisco-Jose; Sergeant, Nicolas; Buée, Luc; Tremblay, Marie-Ève; Calon, Frédéric; Hébert, Sébastien S

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies comprise a large group of neurodegenerative diseases associated with the pathological aggregation of tau protein. While much effort has focused on understanding the function of tau, little is known about the endogenous mechanisms regulating tau metabolism in vivo and how these contribute to disease. Previously, we have shown that the microRNA (miRNA) cluster miR-132/212 is downregulated in tauopathies such as AD. Here, we report that miR-132/212 deficiency in mice leads to increased tau expression, phosphorylation and aggregation. Using reporter assays and cell-based studies, we demonstrate that miR-132 directly targets tau mRNA to regulate its expression. We identified GSK-3? and PP2B as effectors of abnormal tau phosphorylation in vivo. Deletion of miR-132/212 induced tau aggregation in mice expressing endogenous or human mutant tau, an effect associated with autophagy dysfunction. Conversely, treatment of AD mice with miR-132 mimics restored in part memory function and tau metabolism. Finally, miR-132 and miR-212 levels correlated with insoluble tau and cognitive impairment in humans. These findings support a role for miR-132/212 in the regulation of tau pathology in mice and humans and provide new alternatives for therapeutic development. PMID:26362250

  7. Anesthesia-induced hyperphosphorylation detaches 3-repeat tau from microtubules without affecting their stability in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Planel, Emmanuel; Krishnamurthy, Pavan; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Liu, Li; Herman, Mathieu; Kumar, Asok; Bretteville, Alexis; Figueroa, Helen Y.; Yu, Wai Haung; Whittington, Robert A.; Davies, Peter; Takashima, Akihiko; Nixon, Ralph A.; Duff, Karen E.

    2008-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease, tau is hyperphosphorylated, which is thought to detach it from microtubules (MTs), induce MT destabilization, and promote aggregation. Using a previously described in vivo model, we investigated whether hyperphosphorylation impacts tau function in wild-type and transgenic mice. We found that following anesthesia-induced hypothermia, MT-free tau was hyperphosphorylated, which impaired its ability to bind MTs and promote MT assembly. MT-bound tau was more resistant to hyperphosphorylation compared to free tau and tau did not dissociate from MTs in wild-type mice. However, 3-repeat tau detached from MT in the transgenic mice. Surprisingly, dissociation of tau from MTs did not lead to overt depolymerization of tubulin, and there was no collapse, or disturbance of axonal MT networks. These results indicate that, in vivo, a sub-population of tau bound to MTs does not easily dissociate under conditions that extensively phosphorylate tau. Tau remaining on the MTs under these conditions is sufficient to maintain MT network integrity. PMID:19036972

  8. A Search for B -> tau nu Recoiling Against B- -> D0 l- nu X

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-12-17

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} ({ell} = {tau}, {mu}, or e) in (458.9 {+-} 5.1) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. They search for these B decays in a sample of B{sup +}B{sup -} events where one B-meson is reconstructed as B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}X. Using the method of Feldman and Cousins, they obtain {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.7 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.2) x 10{sup -4}, which excludes zero at 2.3{sigma}. They interpret the central value in the context of the Standard Model and find the B meson decay constant to be f{sub B}{sup 2} = (62 {+-} 31) x 10{sup 3} MeV{sup 2}. They find no evidence for B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} and B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}} and set upper limits at the 90% C.L. {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}) < 0.8 x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -5}.

  9. Toxic tau oligomer formation blocked by capping of cysteine residues with 1,2-dihydroxybenzene groups.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Misato; Almeida, Osborne F X; Sumioka, Akio; Maeda, Sumihiro; Osada, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Saito, Akiko; Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Kimura, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Masaaki; Koyama, Hiroko; Yoshiike, Yuji; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Ihara, Yasuo; Takashima, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles, composed of hyperphosphorylated tau fibrils, are a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease; the neurofibrillary tangle load correlates strongly with clinical progression of the disease. A growing body of evidence indicates that tau oligomer formation precedes the appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and contributes to neuronal loss. Here we show that tau oligomer formation can be inhibited by compounds whose chemical backbone includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Specifically, we demonstrate that 1,2-dihydroxybenzene-containing compounds bind to and cap cysteine residues of tau and prevent its aggregation by hindering interactions between tau molecules. Further, we show that orally administered DL-isoproterenol, an adrenergic receptor agonist whose skeleton includes 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and which penetrates the brain, reduces the levels of detergent-insoluble tau, neuronal loss and reverses neurofibrillary tangle-associated brain dysfunction. Thus, compounds that target the cysteine residues of tau may prove useful in halting the progression of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. PMID:26671725

  10. High Angular Resolution Radio Observations of the HL/XZ Tau Region: Mapping the 50 AU Protoplanetary Disk Around HL Tau and Resolving XZ Tau S Into a 13 AU Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F.; Anglada, Guillem; Curiel, Salvador

    2009-03-01

    We present new 7 mm and archive 1.3 cm high angular resolution observations of the HL/XZ Tau region made with the Very Large Array. At 7 mm, the emission from HL Tau seems to arise in a clumpy disk with radius of the order of 25 AU. The 1.3 cm emission from XZ Tau shows the emission from a binary system with 0farcs3 (42 AU) separation, known from previous optical/IR observations. However, at 7 mm, the southern radio component resolves into a binary with 0farcs09 (13 AU) separation, suggesting that XZ Tau is actually a triple star system. We suggest that the remarkable ejection of gas from the XZ Tau system observed with the Hubble Space Telescope may be related to a periastron passage of this newly discovered close binary system.

  11. Passive immunotherapy of tauopathy targeting pSer413-tau: a pilot study in mice

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Tomohiro; Eguchi, Hiroshi; Kunori, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Yoichi; Taniguchi, Taizo; Mori, Hiroshi; Tomiyama, Takami

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cellular inclusions of hyperphosphorylated tau are a hallmark of tauopathies, which are neurodegenerative disorders that include Alzheimer's disease (AD). Active and passive immunization against hyperphosphorylated tau has been shown to attenuate phenotypes in model mice. We developed new monoclonal antibodies to hyperphosphorylated tau and sought high therapeutic efficacy for future clinical use. Methods Using more than 20 antibodies, we investigated which sites on tau are phosphorylated early and highly in the tauopathy mouse models tau609 and tau784. These mice display tau hyperphosphorylation, synapse loss, memory impairment at 6 months, and tangle formation and neuronal loss at 15 months. We generated mouse monoclonal antibodies to selected epitopes and examined their effects on memory and tau pathology in aged tau609 and tau784 mice by the Morris water maze and by histological and biochemical analyses. Results Immunohistochemical screening revealed that pSer413 is expressed early and highly. Monoclonal antibodies to pSer413 and to pSer396 (control) were generated. These antibodies specifically recognized pathological tau in AD brains but not normal tau in control brains according to Western blots. Representative anti-pSer413 and anti-pSer396 antibodies were injected intraperitoneally into 10–11- or 14-month-old mice once a week at 0.1 or 1 mg/shot 5 times. The anti-pSer413 antibody significantly improved memory, whereas the anti-pSer396 antibodies showed less effect. The cognitive improvement paralleled a reduction in the levels of tau hyperphosphorylation, tau oligomer accumulation, synapse loss, tangle formation, and neuronal loss. Interpretation These results indicate that pSer413 is a promising target in the treatment of tauopathy. PMID:25815351

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid P-Tau181P: Biomarker for Improved Differential Dementia Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Struyfs, Hanne; Niemantsverdriet, Ellis; Goossens, Joery; Fransen, Erik; Martin, Jean-Jacques; De Deyn, Peter P.; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the value of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau181P) in the Alzheimer’s disease (AD) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker panel for differential dementia diagnosis in autopsy confirmed AD and non-AD patients. The study population consisted of 140 autopsy confirmed AD and 77 autopsy confirmed non-AD dementia patients. CSF concentrations of amyloid-? peptide of 42 amino acids (A?1–42), total tau protein (T-tau), and P-tau181P were determined with single analyte ELISA-kits (INNOTEST®, Fujirebio, Ghent, Belgium). Diagnostic accuracy was assessed through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to obtain area under the curve (AUC) values and to define optimal cutoff values to discriminate AD from pooled and individual non-AD groups. ROC curve analyses were only performed on biomarkers and ratios that differed significantly between the groups. Pairwise comparison of AUC values was performed by means of DeLong tests. The A?1–42/P-tau181P ratio (AUC?=?0.770) performed significantly better than A?1–42 (AUC?=?0.677, P?=?0.004), T-tau (AUC?=?0.592, P?tau (AUC?=?0.678, P?=?0.001), while P-tau181P (AUC?=?0.720) performed significantly better than T-tau (AUC?=?0.592, P?tau181P (AUC?=?0.894) discriminated AD from frontotemporal dementia significantly better than A?1–42 (AUC?=?0.776, P?=?0.020) and T-tau (AUC?=?0.746, P?=?0.004), while P-tau181P/T-tau (AUC?=?0.958) significantly improved the differentiation between AD and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease as compared to A?1–42 (AUC?=?0.688, P?=?0.004), T-tau (AUC?=?0.874, P?=?0.040), and A?1–42/P-tau181P (AUC?=?0.760, P?=?0.003). In conclusion, this study demonstrates P-tau181P is an essential component of the AD CSF biomarker panel, and combined assessment of A?1–42, T-tau, and P-tau181P renders, to present date, the highest diagnostic power to discriminate between AD and non-AD dementias. PMID:26136723

  13. WEIGHING THE NON-TRANSITING HOT JUPITER {tau} Boo b

    SciTech Connect

    Rodler, F.; Ribas, I.; Lopez-Morales, M.

    2012-07-01

    We report the detection of the orbital velocity of non-transiting hot Jupiter {tau} Boo b. By employing high-resolution ground-based spectroscopy around 2.3 {mu}m during one half-night, we are able to detect carbon monoxide absorption lines produced in the planet atmosphere, which shift significantly in wavelength during the course of the observations due to the orbital motion of the planet. This detection of the planetary signal results in the determination of the orbital inclination as being i = 47{sup +7}{sub -6} deg and, furthermore, allows us to solve for the exact planetary mass, m{sub p} 5.6 {+-} 0.7 M{sub Jup}. This clearly confirms the planetary nature of the non-transiting companion to {tau} Boo.

  14. Neuronal expression of pathological tau accelerates oligodendrocyte progenitor cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Bernardino; Zhao, Chao; Compston, Alastair; Pluchino, Stefano; Franklin, Robin J M; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2016-03-01

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell (OPC) differentiation is an important therapeutic target to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously reported hyperphosphorylated and aggregated microtubule-associated protein tau in MS lesions, suggesting its involvement in axonal degeneration. However, the influence of pathological tau-induced axonal damage on the potential for remyelination is unknown. Therefore, we investigated OPC differentiation in human P301S tau (P301S-htau) transgenic mice, both in vitro and in vivo following focal demyelination. In 2-month-old P301S-htau mice, which show hyperphosphorylated tau in neurons, we found atrophic axons in the spinal cord in the absence of prominent axonal degeneration. These signs of early axonal damage were associated with microgliosis and an upregulation of IL-1? and TNF?. Following in vivo focal white matter demyelination we found that OPCs differentiated more efficiently in P301S-htau mice than wild type (Wt) mice. We also found an increased level of myelin basic protein within the lesions, which however did not translate into increased remyelination due to higher susceptibility of P301S-htau axons to demyelination-induced degeneration compared to Wt axons. In vitro experiments confirmed higher differentiation capacity of OPCs from P301S-htau mice compared with Wt mice-derived OPCs. Because the OPCs from P301S-htau mice do not ectopically express the transgene, and when isolated from newborn mice behave like Wt mice-derived OPCs, we infer that their enhanced differentiation capacity must have been acquired through microenvironmental priming. Our data suggest the intriguing concept that damaged axons may signal to OPCs and promote their differentiation in the attempt at rescue by remyelination. GLIA 2016;64:457-471. PMID:26576485

  15. Circumstellar Disk of HL Tau Revealed by CARMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W.; Mundy, Lee G.

    2011-10-01

    The physical properties of circumstellar disks around T Tauri stars - the so-called proto-planetary disks as the natal place of planets - are mainly studied by millimeter/submillimeter wavelength continuum, which is sensitive to dust thermal emission. We present high angular resolution (0.13 arc-second) imaging results of the T Tauri star HL Tau in 1.3 and 2.7 mm continua using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). Through simultaneous model fitting to both wavelength data in Bayesian inference with the standard viscous accretion disk model, we constrained its physical properties such as density distribution, dust opacity spectral index, disk mass, disk size, inclination angle, and position angle. In addition, we found that our millimeter data prefer a thin disk model, while mid-infrared emission of HL Tau needs a thick disk model. This implies that large grains have selectively been settled down into the midplane: a stratified structure. Furthermore, we found that the outer region of the HL Tau disk, between 50 and 100 AU, appears to be gravitationally unstable. However, we did not detect any compact signal supporting a protoplanet candidate claimed by 1.3 cm continuum observations of the Very Large Array.

  16. Tracking UVCS/SOHO Responsivity with Observations of ? Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valcu, Bogdan; Smith, Peter L.; Gardner, Larry D.; Raymond, John C.; Miralles, Mari-Paz; Kohl, John L.

    2007-06-01

    We have tracked the spectral responsivity of the ultraviolet channels of the UVCS (Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer) instrument on SOHO by repeated observations of a stable hot star. We demonstrate first that the ultraviolet spectral irradiance of the Be star ? Tau (HD 37202) for the 100- to 125-nm wavelength range has been sufficiently constant for our purposes when measured periodically over the course of the SOHO mission. We then use ? Tau as a radiometric transfer standard to determine an average decrease beginning in November of 1998 of 13.0% per year in the responsivity of the UVCS O vi channel for wavelengths near H i Ly ? and for a particular UVCS unvignetted aperture used for science observations. The calibration tracking method involves separating two ? Tau spectral regions that are overlapped on part of the detector. The change in the responsivity of UVCS/SOHO began in late 1998 as determined by comparison of simultaneous observations of the corona carried out with UVCS/SOHO and the freshly-calibrated UVCS instrument on the Spartan 201 satellite in early November of 1998.

  17. Is a massive tau neutrino just what cold dark matter needs?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Gyuk, Geza; Turner, Michael S.

    1994-01-01

    The cold dark matter (CDM) scenario for structure formation in the Universe is very attractive and has many successes; however, when its spectrum of density perturbations is normalized to the COBE anisotropy measurement the level of inhomogeneity predicted on small scales is too large. This can be remedied by a tau neutrino of mass 1 MeV - 10MeV and lifetime 0.1 sec - 100 sec whose decay products include electron neutrinos because it allows the total energy density in relativistic particles to be doubled without interfering with nucleosynthesis. The anisotropies predicted on the degree scale for 'tau CDM' are larger than standard CDM. Experiments at e(sup +/-) collides may be able to probe such a mass range.

  18. Frontotemporal lobar degeneration: old knowledge and new insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms of tau mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Giacomina; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) is a group of heterogeneous neurodegenerative diseases which includes tauopathies. In the central nervous system (CNS) tau is the major microtubule-associated protein (MAP) of neurons, promoting assembly and stabilization of microtubules (MTs) required for morphogenesis and axonal transport. Primary tauopathies are characterized by deposition of abnormal fibrils of tau in neuronal and glial cells, leading to neuronal death, brain atrophy and eventually dementia. In genetic tauopathies mutations of tau gene impair the ability of tau to bind to MTs, alter the normal ratio among tau isoforms and favor fibril formation. Recently, additional functions have been ascribed to tau and different pathogenetic mechanisms are then emerging. In fact, a role of tau in DNA protection and genome stability has been reported and chromosome aberrations have been found associated with tau mutations. Furthermore, newly structurally and functionally characterized mutations have suggested novel pathological features, such as a tendency to form oligomeric rather than fibrillar aggregates. Tau mutations affecting axonal transport and plasma membrane interaction have also been described. In this article, we will review the pathogenetic mechanisms underlying tau mutations, focusing in particular on the less common aspects, so far poorly investigated. PMID:26528178

  19. Structural Insight into Tau Protein's Paradox of Intrinsically Disordered Behavior, Self-Acetylation Activity, and Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yin; Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth; Wei, Guanghong

    2014-09-01

    Tau is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Recently, tau proteins were discovered to be able to catalyze self-acetylation, which may promote its pathological aggregation. Understanding the paradox of tau's random-like conformations, aggregation propensity, and enzymatic activity are challenging questions. We characterized the atomic structures of two truncated tau constructs, K18 and K19, consisting of, respectively, only the four- and three-repeats of tau protein, providing structural insights into tau's paradox. Extensive 4.8 ?s replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations of the tau proteins achieved quantitative correlation with experimental C? chemical shifts. Our results revealed (1) dynamically ordered conformations with close lysine-cysteine distances essential for tau self-acetylation and (2) high ?-sheet content and large hydrophobic surface exposure for the two critical hexapeptides ((275)VQIINK(280) and (306)VQIVYK(311)), crucial for tau aggregation. Together, they illuminate tau's perplexing behavior of how its disordered state can accomplish both roles. PMID:25206938

  20. Motor and cognitive deficits in aged tau knockout mice in two background strains

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently reported that Parkinsonian and dementia phenotypes emerge between 7-12 months of age in tau-/- mice on a Bl6/129sv mixed background. These observations were partially replicated by another group using pure Bl6 background tau-/- mice, but notably they did not observe a cognitive phenotype. A third group using Bl6 background tau-/- mice found cognitive impairment at 20-months of age. Results To reconcile the observations, here we considered the genetic, dietary and environmental variables in both studies, and performed an extended set of behavioral studies on 12-month old tau+/+, tau+/-, and tau-/- mice comparing Bl6/129sv to Bl6 backgrounds. We found that tau-/- in both backgrounds exhibited reduced tyrosine hydroxylase-positive nigral neuron and impaired motor function in all assays used, which was ameliorated by oral treatment with L-DOPA, and not confounded by changes in body weight. Tau-/- in the C57BL6/SV129 background exhibited deficits in the Y-maze cognition task, but the mice on the Bl6 background did not. Conclusions These results validate our previous report on the neurodegenerative phenotypes of aged tau-/- mice, and show that genetic background may impact the extent of cognitive impairment in these mice. Therefore excessive lowering of tau should be avoided in therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:25124182

  1. Autophagic degradation of tau in primary neurons and its enhancement by trehalose.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Ulrike; Wang, Yipeng; Kumar, Satish; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2012-10-01

    Modulating the tau level may represent a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD), as accumulating evidence shows that Abeta-induced neurodegeneration is mediated by tau. It is therefore important to understand the expression and degradation of tau in neurons. Recently we showed that overexpressed mutant tau and tau aggregates are degraded via the autophagic pathway in an N2a cell model. Here we investigated whether autophagy is involved in the degradation of endogenous tau in cultured primary neurons. We activated this pathway in primary neurons with trehalose, an enhancer of autophagy. This resulted in the reduction of endogenous tau protein. Tau phosphorylation at several sites elevated in AD pathology had little influence on its degradation by autophagy. Furthermore, by using a neuronal cell model of tauopathy, we showed that activation of autophagy suppresses tau aggregation and eliminates cytotoxicity. Notably, apart from activating autophagy, trehalose also inhibits tau aggregation directly. Thus, trehalose may be a good candidate for developing therapeutic strategies for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:22169203

  2. Tau Acts as a Mediator for Alzheimer's Disease-Related Synaptic Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Dezhi; Miller, Eric C.; Teravskis, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    The two histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are amyloid plaques containing multiple forms of A? and neurofibrillary tangles containing phosphorylated tau proteins. As mild cognitive impairment frequently occurs long before the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease, the scientific community has been increasingly interested in the roles of A? and tau in earlier cellular changes that lead to functional deficits. Therefore, great progress has recently been made in understanding how A? or tau causes synaptic dysfunction. However, the interaction between the A? and tau-initiated intracellular cascades that lead to synaptic dysfunction remains elusive. The cornerstone of the two decade-old hypothetical amyloid cascade model is that amyloid pathologies precede tau pathologies. Although the premise of A?-tau pathway remains valid, the model keeps evolving as new signaling events are discovered that lead to functional deficits and neurodegeneration. Recent progress has been made in understanding A?-PrPC-Fyn-mediated neurotoxicity and synaptic deficits. Although still elusive, many novel upstream and downstream signaling molecules have been found to modulate tau mislocalization and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here we will discuss the mechanistic interactions between A?-PrPC-mediated neurotoxicity and tau-mediated synaptic deficits in an updated amyloid cascade model with calcium and tau as the central mediators. PMID:24712999

  3. Tau Trimers Are the Minimal Propagation Unit Spontaneously Internalized to Seed Intracellular Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mirbaha, Hilda; Holmes, Brandon B; Sanders, David W; Bieschke, Jan; Diamond, Marc I

    2015-06-12

    Tau amyloid assemblies propagate aggregation from the outside to the inside of a cell, which may mediate progression of the tauopathies. The critical size of Tau assemblies, or "seeds," responsible for this activity is currently unknown, but this could be important for the design of effective therapies. We studied recombinant Tau repeat domain (RD) and Tau assemblies purified from Alzheimer disease (AD) brain composed largely of full-length Tau. Large RD fibrils were first sonicated to create a range of assembly sizes. We confirmed our ability to resolve stable assemblies ranging from n = 1 to >100 units of Tau using size exclusion chromatography, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, cross-linking followed by Western blot, and mass spectrometry. All recombinant Tau assemblies bound heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface, which are required for Tau uptake and seeding, because they were equivalently sensitive to inhibition by heparin and chlorate. However, cells only internalized RD assemblies of n ? 3 units. We next analyzed Tau assemblies from AD or control brains. AD brains contained aggregated species, whereas normal brains had predominantly monomer, and no evidence of large assemblies. HEK293 cells and primary neurons spontaneously internalized Tau of n ? 3 units from AD brain in a heparin- and chlorate-sensitive manner. Only n ? 3-unit assemblies from AD brain spontaneously seeded intracellular Tau aggregation in HEK293 cells. These results indicate that a clear minimum size (n = 3) of Tau seed exists for spontaneous propagation of Tau aggregation from the outside to the inside of a cell, whereas many larger sizes of soluble aggregates trigger uptake and seeding. PMID:25887395

  4. Accumulation of Aspartic Acid421- and Glutamic Acid391-Cleaved Tau in Neurofibrillary Tangles Correlates With Progression in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Basurto-Islas, Gustavo; Luna-Muñoz, Jose; Guillozet-Bongaarts, Angela L.; Binder, Lester I.; Mena, Raul; García-Sierra, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Truncations of tau protein at aspartic acid421 (D421) and glutamic acid391 (E391) residues are associated with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. Using immunohistochemistry with antibodies to D421- and E391-truncated tau (Tau-C3 and MN423, respectively), we correlated the presence of NFTs composed of these truncated tau proteins with clinical and neuropathologic parameters in 17 AD and 23 non-AD control brains. The densities of NFTs composed of D421- or E391-truncated tau correlated with clinical dementia index and Braak staging in AD. Glutamic acid391 tau truncation was prominent in the entorhinal cortex, whereas D421 truncation was prominent in the subiculum, suggesting that NFTs composed of either D421- or E391-truncated tau may be formed mutually exclusively in these areas. Both truncations were associated with the prevalence of the apolipoprotein E ?4 allele. By double labeling, intact tau in NFTs was commonly associated with D421-cleaved tau but not with E391-truncated tau; D421-cleaved tau was never associated with E391-truncated tau. These results indicate that tau is not randomly proteolyzed at different domains, and that proteolysis occurs sequentially from the C-terminus to inner regions of tau in AD progression. Identification of NFTs composed of tau at different stages of truncation may facilitate assessment of neurofibrillary pathology in AD. PMID:18431250

  5. Differential interaction and aggregation of 3-repeat and 4-repeat tau isoforms with 14-3-3{zeta} protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sadik, Golam; Tanaka, Toshihisa; Kato, Kiyoko; Yanagi, Kentaro; Kudo, Takashi; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2009-05-22

    Tau isoforms, 3-repeat (3R) and 4-repeat tau (4R), are differentially involved in neuronal development and in several tauopathies. 14-3-3 protein binds to tau and 14-3-3/tau association has been found both in the development and in tauopathies. To understand the role of 14-3-3 in the differential regulation of tau isoforms, we have performed studies on the interaction and aggregation of 3R-tau and 4R-tau, either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated, with 14-3-3{zeta}. We show by surface plasmon resonance studies that the interaction between unphosphorylated 3R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta} is {approx}3-folds higher than that between unphosphorylated 4R-tau and 14-3-3{zeta}. Phosphorylation of tau by protein kinase A (PKA) increases the affinity of both 3R- and 4R-tau for 14-3-3{zeta} to a similar level. An in vitro aggregation assay employing both transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy revealed the aggregation of unphosphorylated 4R-tau to be significantly higher than that of unphosphorylated 3R-tau following the induction of 14-3-3{zeta}. The filaments formed from 3R- and 4R-tau were almost similar in morphology. In contrast, the aggregation of both 3R- and 4R-tau was reduced to a similar low level after phosphorylation with PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that 14-3-3{zeta} exhibits a similar role for tau isoforms after PKA-phosphorylation, but a differential role for unphosphorylated tau. The significant aggregation of 4R-tau by 14-3-3{zeta} suggests that 14-3-3 may act as an inducer in the generation of 4R-tau-predominant neurofibrillary tangles in tauopathies.

  6. Novel diffusion barrier for axonal retention of Tau in neurons and its failure in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoyu; Kumar, Yatender; Zempel, Hans; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2011-01-01

    Missorting of Tau from axons to the somatodendritic compartment of neurons is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, but the mechanisms underlying normal sorting and pathological failure are poorly understood. Here, we used several Tau constructs labelled with photoconvertible Dendra2 to analyse its mobility in polarized neurons. This revealed a novel mechanism of sorting—a retrograde barrier in the axon initial segment (AIS) operating as cellular rectifier. It allows anterograde flow of axonal Tau but prevents retrograde flow back into soma and dendrites. The barrier requires binding of Tau to microtubules but does not require F-actin and thus is distinct from the sorting of membrane-associated proteins at the AIS. The barrier breaks down when Tau is phosphorylated in its repeat domain and detached from microtubules, for example, by the kinase MARK/Par1. These observations link the pathological hallmarks of Tau missorting and hyperphosphorylation in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22009197

  7. Human wild-type tau interacts with wingless pathway components and produces neurofibrillary pathology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jackson, George R; Wiedau-Pazos, Martina; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Wagle, Naveed; Brown, Carlos A; Massachi, Sasan; Geschwind, Daniel H

    2002-05-16

    Pathologic alterations in the microtubule-associated protein tau have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Here, we show that tau overexpression, in combination with phosphorylation by the Drosophila glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) homolog and wingless pathway component (Shaggy), exacerbated neurodegeneration induced by tau overexpression alone, leading to neurofibrillary pathology in the fly. Furthermore, manipulation of other wingless signaling molecules downstream from shaggy demonstrated that components of the Wnt signaling pathway modulate neurodegeneration induced by tau pathology in vivo but suggested that tau phosphorylation by GSK-3beta differs from canonical Wnt effects on beta-catenin stability and TCF activity. The genetic system we have established provides a powerful reagent for identification of novel modifiers of tau-induced neurodegeneration that may serve as future therapeutic targets. PMID:12062036

  8. [The testicular microtubule-associated protein Tau: Where, when during spermatogenesis?].

    PubMed

    Sigala, J; Jumeau, F; Buée, L; Sergeant, N; Mitchell, V

    2015-12-01

    The Tau protein (Tubulin Associated Unit) is a phosphoprotein of the microtubule-associated protein family (MAPs). Its role is the regulation of the microtubule polymerization. The Tau protein is naturally present in brain, heart, muscle, lung, kidney, pancreas and liver. An expression of Tau protein and RNA messengers was also highlighted in the testis that is an organ rich in microtubules. The role of microtubules is essential in the stabilization of the cellular shape and in cell divisions. In the testis, Tau protein could be involved in the division process of the spermatogenesis by acting on the microtubular dynamics in the arrangement of the spermatozoon polarity. This review synthesizes the current knowledge, the localization and the main functions of the Tau protein focused on the testis. The localization and the potential roles of the Tau protein during the spermatogenesis are discussed by emphasizing the link with the microtubular structures of seminiferous tubules. PMID:25908520

  9. Tau blocks traffic of organelles, neurofilaments, and APP vesicles in neurons and enhances oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Stamer, K.; Vogel, R.; Thies, E.; Mandelkow, E.; Mandelkow, E.-M.

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effect of microtubule-associated tau protein on trafficking of vesicles and organelles in primary cortical neurons, retinal ganglion cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Tau inhibits kinesin-dependent transport of peroxisomes, neurofilaments, and Golgi-derived vesicles into neurites. Loss of peroxisomes makes cells vulnerable to oxidative stress and leads to degeneration. In particular, tau inhibits transport of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into axons and dendrites, causing its accumulation in the cell body. APP tagged with yellow fluorescent protein and transfected by adenovirus associates with vesicles moving rapidly forward in the axon (?80%) and slowly back (?20%). Both movements are strongly inhibited by cotransfection with fluorescently tagged tau (cyan fluorescent protein–tau) as seen by two-color confocal microscopy. The data suggests a linkage between tau and APP trafficking, which may be significant in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:11901170

  10. The Ambiguous Relationship of Oxidative Stress, Tau Hyperphosphorylation, and Autophagy Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Li, Tao; Li, Ping; Wei, Nannan; Zhao, Zhiquan; Liang, Huimin; Ji, Xinying; Chen, Wenwu; Xue, Mengzhou; Wei, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The pathological hallmarks of AD are amyloid plaques [aggregates of amyloid-beta (A?)] and neurofibrillary tangles (aggregates of tau). Growing evidence suggests that tau accumulation is pathologically more relevant to the development of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD patients than A? plaques. Oxidative stress is a prominent early event in the pathogenesis of AD and is therefore believed to contribute to tau hyperphosphorylation. Several studies have shown that the autophagic pathway in neurons is important under physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, this pathway plays a crucial role for the degradation of endogenous soluble tau. However, the relationship between oxidative stress, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, autophagy dysregulation, and neuronal cell death in AD remains unclear. Here, we review the latest progress in AD, with a special emphasis on oxidative stress, tau hyperphosphorylation, and autophagy. We also discuss the relationship of these three factors in AD. PMID:26171115

  11. Tau Protein Modifications and Interactions: Their Role in Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Mietelska-Porowska, Anna; Wasik, Urszula; Goras, Marcelina; Filipek, Anna; Niewiadomska, Grazyna

    2014-01-01

    Tau protein is abundant in the central nervous system and involved in microtubule assembly and stabilization. It is predominantly associated with axonal microtubules and present at lower level in dendrites where it is engaged in signaling functions. Post-translational modifications of tau and its interaction with several proteins play an important regulatory role in the physiology of tau. As a consequence of abnormal modifications and expression, tau is redistributed from neuronal processes to the soma and forms toxic oligomers or aggregated deposits. The accumulation of tau protein is increasingly recognized as the neuropathological hallmark of a number of dementia disorders known as tauopathies. Dysfunction of tau protein may contribute to collapse of cytoskeleton, thereby causing improper anterograde and retrograde movement of motor proteins and their cargos on microtubules. These disturbances in intraneuronal signaling may compromise synaptic transmission as well as trophic support mechanisms in neurons. PMID:24646911

  12. Search for Neutral Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Bosons $H/A \\to \\tau \\tau$ produced in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV with the ATLAS Detector

    E-print Network

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons is performed using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ from $\\sqrt{s} = 13$ TeV proton-proton collisions recorded by the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The heavy resonance produced via gluon-fusion or $b$-associated production is assumed to decay to a $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ pair with at least one $\\tau$ lepton decaying hadronically. The search is performed in the mass range of 200 GeV - 1.2 TeV. The data are in good agreement with the background predicted by the Standard Model and hence results are given in terms of upper limits on the production cross section times branching fraction of a scalar boson as a function of its mass. The results are interpreted in a range of MSSM scenarios. The most stringent constraints on $\\tan\\beta$ for the search excludes $\\tan\\beta > 10$ for $m_A = 200$ GeV. This analysis improves on the limits of the previous ATLAS analysis, bas...

  13. Improved Bounds on the Electromagnetic Dipole Moments of the Tau Lepton

    E-print Network

    Rafel Escribano; Eduard Masso

    1996-09-20

    Using electroweak data and an effective Lagrangian approach we obtain stringent bounds on the tau anomalous magnetic moment, $-0.004 \\leq a_\\tau \\leq 0.006$, and on its electric dipole moment, $|d_\\tau| \\leq 1.1 \\times 10^{-17} e$ cm. This significantly improves our previous bounds. With the same method, we obtain limits on the dipole moments of other fermions.

  14. Measurement of sigma p anti-p --> Z . Br (Z --> 2tau) in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.

    2007-02-01

    We present a measurement of the inclusive production cross-section for Z bosons decaying to tau leptons in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use a channel with one hadronically-decaying and one electronically-decaying tau. This measurement is based on 350 pb{sup -1} of CDF Run II data. Using a sample of 504 opposite sign e{tau} events with a total expected background of 190 events, we obtain {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z) {center_dot} {Beta}(Z {yields} {tau}{tau}) = 263 {+-} 23(stat) {+-} 14(syst) {+-} 15(lumi) pb, in agreement with the next-to-next-to-leading order QCD prediction. This is the first CDF cross section measurement using hadronically-decaying taus in Run II.

  15. Neuronal uptake and propagation of a rare phosphorylated high-molecular-weight tau derived from Alzheimer's disease brain

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Shuko; Wegmann, Susanne; Cho, Hansang; DeVos, Sarah L.; Commins, Caitlin; Roe, Allyson D.; Nicholls, Samantha B.; Carlson, George A.; Pitstick, Rose; Nobuhara, Chloe K.; Costantino, Isabel; Frosch, Matthew P.; Müller, Daniel J.; Irimia, Daniel; Hyman, Bradley T.

    2015-01-01

    Tau pathology is known to spread in a hierarchical pattern in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain during disease progression, likely by trans-synaptic tau transfer between neurons. However, the tau species involved in inter-neuron propagation remains unclear. To identify tau species responsible for propagation, we examined uptake and propagation properties of different tau species derived from postmortem cortical extracts and brain interstitial fluid of tau-transgenic mice, as well as human AD cortices. Here we show that PBS-soluble phosphorylated high-molecular-weight (HMW) tau, though very low in abundance, is taken up, axonally transported, and passed on to synaptically connected neurons. Our findings suggest that a rare species of soluble phosphorylated HMW tau is the endogenous form of tau involved in propagation and could be a target for therapeutic intervention and biomarker development. PMID:26458742

  16. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV in dilepton final states containing a tau

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-06-01

    The top quark pair production cross section is measured in dilepton events with one electron or muon, and one hadronically decaying tau lepton from the decay t anti-t to (l nu(l)) (tau nu(tau)) b anti-b, where l can be either an electron or a muon. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.0 inverse femtobarns for the electron channel and 2.2 inverse femtobarns for the muon channel, collected by the CMS detector at the LHC. This is the first measurement of the t anti-t cross section explicitly including tau leptons in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV. The measured value sigma(t anti-t) = 143 +/- 14 (stat.) +/- 22 (syst.) +/- 3 (lumi.) pb is consistent with the standard model predictions.

  17. Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in muon plus tau final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; Lopes de Sa R.; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-04-20

    We present a search for the pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}), the lightest supersymmetric partners of the top quarks, in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Each scalar top quark is assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ({tilde {nu}}). We investigate final states arising from {tilde t}{sub 1}{ovr {tilde t}{sub 1}} {yields} b{bar b}{mu}{tau}{tilde {nu}}{tilde {nu}} and {tilde t}{sub 1}{ovr {tilde t}{sub 1}} {yields} b{bar b}{tau}{tau}{tilde {nu}}{tilde {nu}}. With no significant excess of events observed above the background expected from the standard model, we set exclusion limits on this production process in the (M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}, M{sub {tilde {nu}}}) plane.

  18. Synthetic Tau Fibrils Mediate Transmission of Neurofibrillary Tangles in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s-like Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Iba, Michiyo; Guo, Jing L.; McBride, Jennifer D.; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with tau pathologies, are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) comprised of filamentous tau protein. Although emerging evidence suggests tau pathology may be transmitted, we demonstrate here that synthetic tau fibrils are sufficient to transmit tau inclusions in a mouse model. Specifically, intracerebral inoculation of young PS19 mice overexpressing mutant human tau (P301S) with synthetic preformed fibrils (pffs) assembled from recombinant full length tau or truncated tau containing four microtubule binding repeats resulted in rapid induction of NFT-like inclusions which propagated from injected sites to connected brain regions in a time-dependent manner. Interestingly, injection of tau pffs into either hippocampus or striatum together with overlaying cortex gave rise to distinct pattern of spreading. Moreover, unlike tau pathology that spontaneously develops in old PS19 mice, the pff-induced tau inclusions more closely resembled AD NFTs because they were Thioflavin-S positive, acetylated and more resistant to proteinase K digestion. Taken together, our study demonstrates that synthetic tau pffs alone are capable of inducing authentic NFT-like tau aggregates and initiating prion-like spreading of tau pathology in a tauopathy mouse model. PMID:23325240

  19. Early clinical PET imaging results with the novel PHF-tau radioligand [F18]-T808.

    PubMed

    Chien, David T; Szardenings, A Katrin; Bahri, Shadfar; Walsh, Joseph C; Mu, Fanrong; Xia, Chunfang; Shankle, William R; Lerner, Alan J; Su, Min-Ying; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C

    2014-01-01

    Aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau (PHF-tau), such as neurofibrillary tangles, are linked to the degree of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. We have recently reported early clinical results of a novel PHF-tau targeting PET imaging agent, [F18]-T807. Since then, we have investigated a second novel PHF-tau targeting PET imaging agent, [F18]-T808, with different pharmacokinetic characteristics, which may be favorable for imaging Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. Here, we describe the first human brain images with [F18]-T808. PMID:23948934

  20. The role of extracellular Tau in the spreading of neurofibrillary pathology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel; Avila, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and several related disorders collectively known as tauopathies. Development of tau pathology is associated with progressive neuronal loss and cognitive decline. In the brains of AD patients, tau pathology spreads following an anatomically defined pattern. Mounting evidence strongly suggests that accumulation of abnormal tau is mediated through spreading of seeds of the protein from cell to cell and point at the involvement of extracellular tau species as the main agent in the interneuronal propagation of neurofibrillary lesions and spreading of tau toxicity throughout different brain regions in these disorders. That would support the concept that pathology initiates in a very small part of the brain many years before becoming symptomatic, spreading progressively to the whole brain within 10–20 years. Understanding the precise molecular mechanism underlying tau propagation is crucial for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. In this work, we will discuss recent research on the role of extracellular tau in the spreading of tau pathology, through synaptic and non-synaptic mechanisms. PMID:24795568

  1. Competing Interactions Stabilize Pro- and Anti-aggregant Conformations of Human Tau*

    PubMed Central

    Wegmann, Susanne; Schöler, Jonas; Bippes, Christian A.; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Aggregation of Tau into amyloid-like fibrils is a key process in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer. To understand how natively disordered Tau stabilizes conformations that favor pathological aggregation, we applied single-molecule force spectroscopy. Intramolecular interactions that fold polypeptide stretches of ?19 and ?42 amino acids in the functionally important repeat domain of full-length human Tau (hTau40) support aggregation. In contrast, the unstructured N terminus randomly folds long polypeptide stretches >100 amino acids that prevent aggregation. The pro-aggregant mutant hTau40?K280 observed in frontotemporal dementia favored the folding of short polypeptide stretches and suppressed the folding of long ones. This trend was reversed in the anti-aggregant mutant hTau40?K280/PP. The aggregation inducer heparin introduced strong interactions in hTau40 and hTau40?K280 that stabilized aggregation-prone conformations. We show that the conformation and aggregation of Tau are regulated through a complex balance of different intra- and intermolecular interactions. PMID:21498513

  2. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation. PMID:26720731

  3. A Novel Tau Mutation in Exon 12, p.Q336H, Causes Hereditary Pick Disease.

    PubMed

    Tacik, Pawel; DeTure, Michael; Hinkle, Kelly M; Lin, Wen-Lang; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Carlomagno, Yari; Pedraza, Otto; Rademakers, Rosa; Ross, Owen A; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Dickson, Dennis W

    2015-11-01

    Pick disease (PiD) is a frontotemporal lobar degeneration with distinctive neuronal inclusions (Pick bodies) that are enriched in 3-repeat (3R) tau. Although mostly sporadic, mutations in the tau gene (MAPT) have been reported. We screened 24 cases of neuropathologically confirmed PiD for MAPT mutations and found a novel mutation (c.1008G>C, p.Q336H) in 1 patient. Pathogenicity was confirmed on microtubule assembly and tau filament formation assays. The patient was compared with sporadic PiD and PiD associated with MAPT mutations from a review of the literature. The patient had behavioral changes at 55 years of age, followed by reduced verbal fluency, parkinsonism, and death at 63 years of age. His mother and maternal uncle had similar symptoms. Recombinant tau with p.Q336H mutation formed filaments faster than wild-type tau, especially with 3R tau. It also promoted more microtubule assembly than wild-type tau. We conclude that mutations in MAPT, including p.Q336H, can be associated with clinical, pathologic, and biochemical features that are similar to those in sporadic PiD. The pathomechanism of p.Q336H, and another previously reported variant at the same codon (p.Q336R), seems to be unique to MAPT mutations in that they not only predispose to abnormal tau filament formation but also facilitate microtubule assembly in a 3R tau-dependent manner. PMID:26426266

  4. Atmospheric Tau Neutrinos in a Multi-kiloton Liquid Argon Detector

    E-print Network

    Janet Conrad; Andre de Gouvea; Shashank Shalgar; Joshua Spitz

    2010-08-24

    An ultra-large Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber-based neutrino detector will have the uncommon ability to detect atmospheric tau neutrino events. This paper discusses the most promising modes for identifying charged current tau neutrino interactions, and shows that, with simple kinematic cuts, ~30 tau neutrinos can be isolated in a 100 kt*yr exposure, with greater than 4 sigma significance. This sample is sufficient to perform flux-averaged total cross-section and cross-section shape parameterization measurements -- the first steps toward using tau neutrinos to search for physics beyond the Standard Model.

  5. WATER VAPOR IN THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK OF DG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Podio, L.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Menard, F.; Pinte, C.; Codella, C.; Cabrit, S.; Nisini, B.; Sandell, G.; Williams, J. P.; Testi, L.; Woitke, P.

    2013-03-20

    Water is key in the evolution of protoplanetary disks and the formation of comets and icy/water planets. While high-excitation water lines originating in the hot inner disk have been detected in several T Tauri stars (TTSs), water vapor from the outer disk, where most water ice reservoirs are stored, was only reported in the nearby TTS TW Hya. We present spectrally resolved Herschel/HIFI observations of the young TTS DG Tau in the ortho- and para-water ground-state transitions at 557 and 1113 GHz. The lines show a narrow double-peaked profile, consistent with an origin in the outer disk, and are {approx}19-26 times brighter than in TW Hya. In contrast, CO and [C II] lines are dominated by emission from the envelope/outflow, which makes H{sub 2}O lines a unique tracer of the disk of DG Tau. Disk modeling with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo indicates that the strong UV field, due to the young age and strong accretion of DG Tau, irradiates a disk upper layer at 10-90 AU from the star, heating it up to temperatures of 600 K and producing the observed bright water lines. The models suggest a disk mass of 0.015-0.1 M{sub Sun }, consistent with the estimated minimum mass of the solar nebula before planet formation, and a water reservoir of {approx}10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} Earth oceans in vapor and {approx}100 times larger in the form of ice. Hence, this detection supports the scenario of ocean delivery on terrestrial planets by the impact of icy bodies forming in the outer disk.

  6. Legendre-Tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1983-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear functional differential equations are considered using the so called Legendre tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximations is made.

  7. Legendre-tau approximations for functional differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ito, K.; Teglas, R.

    1986-01-01

    The numerical approximation of solutions to linear retarded functional differential equations are considered using the so-called Legendre-tau method. The functional differential equation is first reformulated as a partial differential equation with a nonlocal boundary condition involving time-differentiation. The approximate solution is then represented as a truncated Legendre series with time-varying coefficients which satisfy a certain system of ordinary differential equations. The method is very easy to code and yields very accurate approximations. Convergence is established, various numerical examples are presented, and comparison between the latter and cubic spline approximation is made.

  8. A Sub-millimeterwave ``Flare'' from GG Tau?

    E-print Network

    Gerald H. Moriarty-Schieven; Harold M. Butner

    1996-07-30

    We have monitored the millimeter and submillimeter emission from the young stellar object GG Tau, a T Tauri binary system surrounded by a massive circumbinary disk. We find that between 1992 and 1994, the flux has increased significantly at 800, 1100, and 1300 microns, resulting in a steepening of the observed spectral energy distribution at those wavelengths. Such an increase appears consistent with a modest increase in disk luminosity (a factor of two). The increase in the effective disk temperature might arise from a slight change in the disk heating processes. Alternatively, the flux increase may reflect a sudden change in the underlying dust optical properties.

  9. HL Tau: 3-D Polarisation Modelling and Magnetic Field Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, P. W.; Fukagawa, M.; Tamura, M.; Chrysostomou, A.; Beckford, A. F.

    2005-12-01

    We describe 3-dimensional Monte Carlo modelling of HL Tau in the near infrared with aligned non-spherical grains. JHK linear polarimetry with 0.4-0.6 arcsec resolution from Subaru and UKIRT is fitted in detail, providing information about the structure of the system, the grain properties and perhaps also the magnetic field. Circular polarisation models are also presented, showing how near infrared circular polarimetry will provide the key to measuring magnetic field structure in protostars on the scale of the solar system, provided that circular polarimeters become available. This is illustrated with recently obtained circular polarimetry of the intermediate mass YSO HH135.

  10. HL Tau 76 after the XCOV13 Campaign: Progress Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolez, N.

    1998-03-01

    We present a short account of ongoing reduction and interpretation of the observations of HL Tau 76 obtained during the WET campaign of 1996. We also included in the discussion the results of several single-site observations, obtained between 1989 and 1996. In introduction, we give a short synopsis of works about the same star, published by several authors from 1968 to 1972: the comparison of those results with more recent observations gives a new and intriguing insight into the behavior of this extremely interesting object.

  11. TAU - A mission to a thousand astronomical units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nock, K. T.

    1987-01-01

    The potential of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) is investigated as the enabling technology for achieving a mission to a thousand astronomical units within 50 years duration. By means of a 1000 AU baseline, the primary objective is to make measurements of distances to the stars in the Galaxy and beyond. In addition, several deep space unique studies in astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and space plasma physics can be carried out. NEP technology requirements for a mission to 1000 AU are addressed. These technology requirements are compared with current plans for both nuclear space power and ion propulsion research. And finally an example TAU spacecraft system is described.

  12. Search for the Higgs boson in lepton, tau and jets final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.

    2013-09-17

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with an electron or muon and a hadronically decaying tau lepton in association with two or more jets using 9.7 fb–1 of Run II Fermilab Tevatron Collider data collected with the D0 detector. The analysis is sensitive to Higgs boson production via gluon fusion, associated vector boson production, and vector boson fusion, followed by the Higgs boson decay to tau lepton pairs or to W boson pairs. The ratios of 95% C.L. upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio to those predicted by the standard model are obtained for orthogonal subsamples that are enriched in either H ? ?? decays or H ? WW decays, and for the combination of these subsample limits. As a result, the observed and expected limit ratios for the combined subsample at a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV are 11.3 and 9.0, respectively.

  13. Sevoflurane induces Tau phosphorylation and glycogen synthase kinase 3? activation in young mice

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Guorong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Lei; Dong, Yuanlin; Yu, Buwei; Crosby, Gregory; Culley, Deborah J.; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2014-01-01

    Background Children with multiple exposures to anesthesia and surgery may have an increased risk of developing cognitive impairment. Sevoflurane is a commonly used anesthetic in children. Tau phosphorylation contributes to cognitive dysfunction. We therefore assessed the effects of sevoflurane on Tau phosphorylation and underlying mechanisms in young mice. Methods Six day-old wild-type (WT) and Tau knockout (KO) mice were exposed to sevoflurane. We determined the effects of the sevoflurane anesthesia on Tau phosphorylation, levels of the kinases and phosphatase related to Tau phosphorylation, interleukin-6, and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) in hippocampus, and cognitive function in both young WT and Tau KO mice. Results Anesthesia with 3% sevoflurane two hours daily for three days induced Tau phosphorylation (257% versus 100%, P=0.0025, n=6), enhanced activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?), the kinase related to Tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus of postnatal day 8 WT mice. The sevoflurane anesthesia decreased hippocampus PSD-95 levels and induced cognitive impairment in the postnatal day 31 mice. GSK3? inhibitor lithium inhibited the sevoflurane-induced GSK3? activation, Tau phosphorylation, elevated levels of interleukin-6 and cognitive impairment in the WT young mice. Finally, the sevoflurane anesthesia did not induce an elevation of interleukin-6 levels, reduction in PSD-5 levels in hippocampus, or cognitive impairment in Tau KO young mice. Conclusions These data suggested that sevoflurane induced Tau phosphorylation, GSK3? activation, elevation of interleukin-6 and reduction of PSD-95 levels in hippocampus of young mice, and cognitive impairment in the mice. Future studies will dissect the cascade relationship of these effects. PMID:24787352

  14. ?-Synuclein improves diagnostic and prognostic performance of tau and A? in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Jon B.; Korff, Ane; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Zhang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Lewy body diseases (LBD), e.g. Parkinson's disease (PD) dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), are common causes of geriatric cognitive impairments. In addition, AD and LBD are often found in the same patients at autopsy; therefore, biomarkers that can detect the presence of both pathologies in living subjects are needed. In this investigation, we report the assessment of ?-synuclein (?-syn) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and its association with CSF total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181), and amyloid beta1-42 (A?1-42) in subjects of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; n=389), with longitudinal clinical assessments. A strong correlation was noted between ?-syn and t-tau in controls, as well as in patients with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the correlation is not specific to subjects in the ADNI cohort, as it was also seen in PD patients and controls enrolled in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI; n=102). A bimodal distribution of CSF ?-syn levels was observed in the ADNI cohort, with high levels of ?-syn in the subjects with abnormally increased t-tau values. Although a correlation was also noted between ?-syn and p-tau181, there was a mismatch (?-syn-p-tau181-Mis), i.e. higher p-tau181 levels accompanied by lower ?-syn levels in a subset of ADNI patients. We hypothesize that this ?-syn-p-tau181-Mis is a CSF signature of concomitant LBD pathology in AD patients. Hence, we suggest that inclusion of measures of CSF ?-syn and calculation of ?-syn-p-tau181-Mis improves the diagnostic sensitivity/specificity of classic CSF AD biomarkers and better predicts longitudinal cognitive changes. PMID:23812319

  15. Determination of the Higgs CP-mixing angle in the tau decay channels at the LHC including the Drell-Yan background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Stefan; Bernreuther, Werner; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2014-11-01

    We investigate how precisely the CP nature of the 125 GeV Higgs-boson resonance can be unraveled at the LHC in its decays to pairs, . We use a method which allows one to determine the scalar-pseudoscalar Higgs mixing angle in this decay mode. This mixing angle can be extracted from the distribution of a signed angle, denoted by , which we analyze for the major charged-prong decays. For definiteness, we consider Higgs-boson production by gluon fusion at NLO QCD. We take into account also the irreducible background from Drell-Yan production, , at NLO QCD. We compute, for the signal and background reactions, angular and energy correlations of the charged prongs and analyze which type of cuts suppress the Drell-Yan background. An important feature of this background is that its contribution to the distribution of our observable is a flat line, also at NLO QCD. By separating the Drell-Yan events into two different sets, two different non-trivial distributions are obtained. Based on this observation we propose to use these sets for calibration purposes. By Monte Carlo simulation we study also the effect of measurement uncertainties on this distribution. We estimate that the Higgs mixing angle can be determined with our method to a precision of at the high-luminosity LHC (14 TeV) with an integrated luminosity of fb (3 ab).

  16. An exoplanet in orbit around tau^1 Gruis

    E-print Network

    Hugh R. A. Jones; R. Paul Butler; Chris G. Tinney; Geoff W. Marcy; Alan J. Penny; Chris McCarthy; Brad D. Carter

    2002-09-16

    We report the detection of a new candidate exoplanet around the metal-rich star tau^1 Gruis. With M sin $i$ = 1.23+/-0.18 M_JUP, a period of 1326+/-300 d and an orbit with an eccentricity of 0.14+/-0.14 it adds to the growing population of long period exoplanets with near-circular orbits. This population now comprises more than 20% of known exoplanets. When the companion to tau^1 Gruis is plotted together with all exoplanets found by the Anglo-Australian Planet Search and other radial velocity searches we find evidence for a peak in the number of short-period exoplanets, followed by a minimum of planets between around 7 and 50 days and then an apparent rise in the number of planets per unit radius that seems to set in by a hundred days, indicating more planets farther from the host star. This is very different from the gaussian-like period distribution found for stellar companions. This lends support to the idea that once a clearing in the inner protoplanetary disk develops, it halts the inward migration of planets. In particular, the smooth distribution of exoplanets arising from planetary migration through a disk is altered by an accumulation of exoplanets at the point where the disk has been cleared out.

  17. A spectrum of the veiled T Tauri star CY Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuewe, J. A.; Schultz, R.

    1994-01-01

    We present a flux calibrated spectrum of the star listed as CY Tau in the `General Catalog of Variable Stars 4th ed.' in the spectral range 3700 A less than or equal to lambda less than or equal to 6400 A with a resolution of approximately equals 15 A showing the Balmer-Series from H(sub beta) to H(sub 10) as well as the CaII H (in blend with H(sub epsilon) and K lines in emission. Apart from the emission lines the spectrum is composed of a continuum equivalent to that of an ordinary pre-main sequence star (i.e. a `naked' T Tau) of spectral type M2 V with emission lines plus a `blue' veiling continuum that can be described as black body radiation of temperature T(sub BL) approximately equals 7000K due to accretion onto a boundary layer at a rate of M-dot(sub acc) greater than or approximately = 2.18 10(exp -8) solar mass/a.

  18. {mu}-{tau} symmetry and radiatively generated leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kim, C. S.; Lee, Jake; Kang, Sin Kyu

    2007-01-01

    We consider a {mu}-{tau} symmetry in neutrino sectors realized at the GUT scale in the context of a seesaw model. In our scenario, the exact {mu}-{tau} symmetry realized in the basis where the charged lepton and heavy Majorana neutrino mass matrices are diagonal leads to vanishing lepton asymmetries. We find that, in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the seesaw model with large tan{beta}, the renormalization group (RG) evolution from the GUT scale to seesaw scale can induce a successful leptogenesis even without introducing any symmetry breaking terms by hand, whereas such RG effects lead to tiny deviations of {theta}{sub 23} and {theta}{sub 13} from {pi}/4 and zero, respectively. It is shown that the right amount of the baryon asymmetry {eta}{sub B} can be achieved via so-called resonant leptogenesis, which can be realized at rather low seesaw scale with large tan{beta} in our scenario so that the well-known gravitino problem is safely avoided.

  19. Spectropolarimetry of the Classical T Tauri Star BP Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.

    2013-10-01

    We implement a least-squares deconvolution (LSD) code to study magnetic fields on cool stars. We first apply our code to high-resolution optical echelle spectra of 53 Cam (a magnetic Ap star) and three well-studied cool stars (Arcturus, 61 Cyg A, and ? Boo A) as well as the Sun (by observing the asteroid Vesta) as tests of the code and the instrumentation. Our analysis is based on several hundred photospheric lines spanning the wavelength range 5000 Å to 9000 Å. We then apply our LSD code to six nights of data on the Classical T Tauri Star BP Tau. A maximum longitudinal field of 370 ± 80 G is detected from the photospheric lines on BP Tau. A 1.8 kG dipole tilted at 129° with respect to the rotation axis and a 1.4 kG octupole tilted at 104° with respect to the rotation axis, both with a filling factor of 0.25, best fit our LSD Stokes V profiles. Measurements of several emission lines (He I 5876 Å, Ca II 8498 Å, and 8542 Å) show the presence of strong magnetic fields in the line formation regions of these lines, which are believed to be the base of the accretion footpoints. The field strength measured from these lines shows night-to-night variability consistent with rotation of the star.

  20. SPECTROPOLARIMETRY OF THE CLASSICAL T TAURI STAR BP TAU

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei; Johns-Krull, Christopher M. E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2013-10-20

    We implement a least-squares deconvolution (LSD) code to study magnetic fields on cool stars. We first apply our code to high-resolution optical echelle spectra of 53 Cam (a magnetic Ap star) and three well-studied cool stars (Arcturus, 61 Cyg A, and ? Boo A) as well as the Sun (by observing the asteroid Vesta) as tests of the code and the instrumentation. Our analysis is based on several hundred photospheric lines spanning the wavelength range 5000 Å to 9000 Å. We then apply our LSD code to six nights of data on the Classical T Tauri Star BP Tau. A maximum longitudinal field of 370 ± 80 G is detected from the photospheric lines on BP Tau. A 1.8 kG dipole tilted at 129° with respect to the rotation axis and a 1.4 kG octupole tilted at 104° with respect to the rotation axis, both with a filling factor of 0.25, best fit our LSD Stokes V profiles. Measurements of several emission lines (He I 5876 Å, Ca II 8498 Å, and 8542 Å) show the presence of strong magnetic fields in the line formation regions of these lines, which are believed to be the base of the accretion footpoints. The field strength measured from these lines shows night-to-night variability consistent with rotation of the star.

  1. Weighted Hurwitz numbers and hypergeometric $\\tau$-functions: an overview

    E-print Network

    Harnad, J

    2015-01-01

    This is an overview of recent results on the use of 2D Toda $\\tau$-functions as generating functions for multiparametric families of weighted Hurwitz numbers. The Bose-Fermi equivalence composed with the characteristic map provides an isomorphism between the zero charge sector of the Fermionic Fock space and the direct sum of the centers of the group algebra of the symmetric groups $S_n$. Specializing the fermionic formula to the case of diagonal group elements gives $\\tau$-functions of hypergeometric type, for which the expansion over products of Schur functions is diagonal, with coefficients of {\\em content product} type. The corresponding abelian group action on the centre of the $S_n$ group algebra is determined by forming symmetric functions multiplicatively from a weight generating function $G(z)$ and evaluating on the Jucys-Murphy elements of the group algebra. The resulting central elements act diagonally on the basis of orthogonal idempotents and the eigenvalues $r^{G(z)}_\\lambda$ are the {\\em conten...

  2. The FK506-binding protein FKBP52 in vitro induces aggregation of truncated Tau forms with prion-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Giustiniani, Julien; Guillemeau, Kevin; Dounane, Omar; Sardin, Elodie; Huvent, Isabelle; Schmitt, Alain; Hamdane, Malika; Buée, Luc; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy; Baulieu, Etienne Emile; Chambraud, Béatrice

    2015-08-01

    Tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases associated with the pathologic aggregation of human brain Tau protein. Neuronal Tau is involved in microtubule (MT) formation and stabilization. We showed previously that the immunophilin FK506-binding protein of MW ?52 kDa (FKBP52) interferes with this function of full-length Tau and provokes aggregation of a disease-related mutant of Tau. To dissect the molecular interaction between recombinant human FKBP52 and Tau, here, we study the effect of FKBP52 on a functional Tau fragment (Tau-F4, Ser(208)-Ser(324)) containing part of the proline- rich region and MT-binding repeats. Therefore, we perform MT assembly and light-scattering assays, blue native PAGE analysis, electron microscopy, and Tau seeding experiments in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. We show that FKBP52 (6 µM) prevents MT formation generated by Tau-F4 (5 µM) and induces Tau-F4 oligomerization and aggregation. Electron microscopy analyses show granular oligomers and filaments of Tau-F4 after short-time FKBP52 incubation. We demonstrate that the terminal parts of Tau interfere with the effects of FKBP52. Finally, we find that FKBP52-induced Tau-F4 oligomers cannot only generate in vitro, direct conformational changes in full-length Tau and that their uptake into neuronal cells can equally lead to aggregation of wild-type endogenous Tau. This suggests a potential prion-like property of these particular Tau-F4 aggregates. Collectively, our results strengthen the hypothesis of FKBP52 involvement in the Tau pathogenicity process. PMID:25888602

  3. Averages of b-hadron, c-hadron, and tau-lepton Properties

    E-print Network

    The Heavy Flavor Averaging Group; D. Asner; Sw. Banerjee; R. Bernhard; S. Blyth; A. Bozek; C. Bozzi; D. G. Cassel; G. Cavoto; G. Cibinetto; J. Coleman; W. Dungel; T. J. Gershon; L. Gibbons; B. Golob; R. Harr; K. Hayasaka; H. Hayashii; C. -J. Lin; D. Lopes Pegna; R. Louvot; A. Lusiani; V. Luth; B. Meadows; S. Nishida; D. Pedrini; M. Purohit; M. Rama; M. Roney; O. Schneider; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; B. Shwartz; J. G. Smith; R. Tesarek; D. Tonelli; K. Trabelsi; P. Urquijo; R. Van Kooten

    2011-09-06

    This article reports world averages for measurements of b-hadron, c-hadron, and tau-lepton properties obtained by the Heavy Flavor Averaging Group (HFAG) using results available at least through the end of 2009. Some of the world averages presented use data available through the spring of 2010. For the averaging, common input parameters used in the various analyses are adjusted (rescaled) to common values, and known correlations are taken into account. The averages include branching fractions, lifetimes, neutral meson mixing parameters, CP violation parameters, and parameters of semileptonic decays.

  4. Dispersive evaluation of the second-class amplitude $\\tau\\to\\eta\\pi\

    E-print Network

    Descotes-Genon, S; Moussallam, B

    2013-01-01

    We reevaluate the two form factors relevant for the $\\eta\\pi$ second-class $\\tau$ decay mode, making systematic use of analyticity, unitarity, combined with updated inputs to the NLO chiral constraints. We focus, in particular, on the shape of the $\\rho$ resonance peak which is a background-free signature of a second-class current. Its dispersive construction requires the $\\eta\\pi\\to\\pi\\pi$ scattering amplitude which we derive from a family of Khuri-Treiman equations solutions constrained with accurate recent results on the $\\eta\\to3\\pi$ Dalitz plot.

  5. Magnetic activity and hot Jupiters of young Suns: the weak-line T Tauri stars V819 Tau and V830 Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, J.-F.; Hébrard, E.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Moutou, C.; Malo, L.; Grankin, K.; Vidotto, A. A.; Alencar, S. H. P.; Gregory, S. G.; Jardine, M. M.; Herczeg, G.; Morin, J.; Fares, R.; Ménard, F.; Bouvier, J.; Delfosse, X.; Doyon, R.; Takami, M.; Figueira, P.; Petit, P.; Boisse, I.; MaTYSSE Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We report results of a spectropolarimetric and photometric monitoring of the weak-line T Tauri stars (wTTSs) V819 Tau and V830 Tau within the MaTYSSE (Magnetic Topologies of Young Stars and the Survival of close-in giant Exoplanets) programme, involving the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. At ?3 Myr, both stars dissipated their discs recently and are interesting objects for probing star and planet formation. Profile distortions and Zeeman signatures are detected in the unpolarized and circularly polarized lines, whose rotational modulation we modelled using tomographic imaging, yielding brightness and magnetic maps for both stars. We find that the large-scale magnetic fields of V819 Tau and V830 Tau are mostly poloidal and can be approximated at large radii by 350-400 G dipoles tilted at ?30° to the rotation axis. They are significantly weaker than the field of GQ Lup, an accreting classical T Tauri star (cTTS) with similar mass and age which can be used to compare the magnetic properties of wTTSs and cTTSs. The reconstructed brightness maps of both stars include cool spots and warm plages. Surface differential rotation is small, typically ?4.4 times smaller than on the Sun, in agreement with previous results on wTTSs. Using our Doppler images to model the activity jitter and filter it out from the radial velocity (RV) curves, we obtain RV residuals with dispersions of 0.033 and 0.104 km s-1 for V819 Tau and V830 Tau, respectively. RV residuals suggest that a hot Jupiter may be orbiting V830 Tau, though additional data are needed to confirm this preliminary result. We find no evidence for close-in giant planet around V819 Tau.

  6. Two Novel Tau Antibodies Targeting the 396/404 Region Are Primarily Taken Up by Neurons and Reduce Tau Protein Pathology*

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiaping; Congdon, Erin E.; Sigurdsson, Einar M.

    2013-01-01

    Aggregated Tau proteins are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies. Recent studies from our group and others have demonstrated that both active and passive immunizations reduce Tau pathology and prevent cognitive decline in transgenic mice. To determine the efficacy and safety of targeting the prominent 396/404 region, we developed two novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with distinct binding profiles for phospho and non-phospho epitopes. The two mAbs significantly reduced hyperphosphorylated soluble Tau in long term brain slice cultures without apparent toxicity, suggesting the therapeutic importance of targeting the 396/404 region. In mechanistic studies, we found that neurons were the primary cell type that internalized the mAbs, whereas a small amount of mAbs was taken up by microglia cells. Within neurons, the two mAbs were highly colocalized with distinct pathological Tau markers, indicating their affinity toward different stages or forms of pathological Tau. Moreover, the mAbs were largely co-localized with endosomal/lysosomal markers, and partially co-localized with autophagy pathway markers. Additionally, the Fab fragments of the mAbs were able to enter neurons, but unlike the whole antibodies, the fragments were not specifically localized in pathological neurons. In summary, our Tau mAbs were safe and efficient to clear pathological Tau in a brain slice model. Fc-receptor-mediated endocytosis and the endosome/autophagosome/lysosome system are likely to have a critical role in antibody-mediated clearance of Tau pathology. PMID:24089520

  7. Truncated tau deregulates synaptic markers in rat model for human tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Santosh; Katina, Stanislav; Kovac, Andrej; Kazmerova, Zuzana; Novak, Michal; Zilka, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic failure and neurofibrillary degeneration are two major neuropathological substrates of cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Only a few studies have demonstrated a direct relationship between these two AD hallmarks. To investigate tau mediated synaptic injury we used rat model of tauopathy that develops extensive neurofibrillary pathology in the cortex. Using fractionation of cortical synapses, we identified an increase in endogenous rat tau isoforms in presynaptic compartment, and their mis-sorting to the postsynaptic density (PSD). Truncated transgenic tau was distributed in both compartments exhibiting specific phospho-pattern that was characteristic for each synaptic compartment. In the presynaptic compartment, truncated tau was associated with impairment of dynamic stability of microtubules which could be responsible for reduction of synaptic vesicles. In the PSD, truncated tau lowered the levels of neurofilaments. Truncated tau also significantly decreased the synaptic levels of A?40 but not A?42. These data show that truncated tau differentially deregulates synaptic proteome in pre- and postsynaptic compartments. Importantly, we show that alteration of A? can arise downstream of truncated tau pathology. PMID:25755633

  8. EFHD2 IS A NOVEL AMYLOID PROTEIN ASSOCIATED TO PATHOLOGICAL TAU IN ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer-Acosta, Yancy; Rodríguez-Cruz, Eva N.; Orange, François; De Jesús-Cortés, Hector; Madera, Bismark; Vaquer-Alicea, Jaime; Ballester, Juan; Guinel, Maxime J-F.; Bloom, George S.; Vega, Irving E.

    2013-01-01

    EFhd2 is a conserved calcium binding protein, abundant within the central nervous system. Previous studies identified EFhd2 associated with pathological forms of tau proteins in the tauopathy mouse model JNPL3, which expresses the human tauP301L mutant. This association was validated in human tauopathies, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the role that EFhd2 may play in tauopathies is still unknown. Here, we show that EFhd2 formed amyloid structures in vitro, a capability that is reduced by calcium ions. Electron microscopy (EM) analyses demonstrated that recombinant EFhd2 formed filamentous structures. EM analyses of sarkosyl insoluble fractions derived from human AD brains also indicated that EFhd2 co-localizes with aggregated tau proteins and formed granular structures. Immunohistological analyses of brain slices demonstrated that EFhd2 co-localizes with pathological tau proteins in AD brains, confirming the co-aggregation of EFhd2 and pathological tau. Furthermore, EFhd2’s coiled-coil domain mediated its self-oligomerization in vitro and its association with tau proteins in JNPL3 mouse brain extracts. The results demonstrate that EFhd2 is a novel amyloid protein associated with pathological tau proteins in AD brain and that calcium binding may regulate the formation of EFhd2’s amyloid structures. Hence, EFhd2 may play an important role in the pathobiology of tau-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23331044

  9. Electron, Muon, and Tau Heavy Lepton--Are These the Truly Elementary Particles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perl, Martin L.

    1980-01-01

    Discussed is the present concept of the ultimate nature of matter--the elementary particle. An explanation is given for why the lepton family of particles--the electron, muon, and tau--may be truly elementary. The tau lepton is described in more detail. (Author/DS)

  10. Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Oxidative Stress, a Critical Vicious Circle in Neurodegenerative Tauopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Alavi Naini, Seyedeh Maryam; Soussi-Yanicostas, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in brain, are pathological hallmarks of a large family of neurodegenerative disorders, named tauopathies, which include Alzheimer's disease. It has been shown that increased phosphorylation of tau destabilizes tau-microtubule interactions, leading to microtubule instability, transport defects along microtubules, and ultimately neuronal death. However, although mutations of the MAPT gene have been detected in familial early-onset tauopathies, causative events in the more frequent sporadic late-onset forms and relationships between tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration remain largely elusive. Oxidative stress is a further pathological hallmark of tauopathies, but its precise role in the disease process is poorly understood. Another open question is the source of reactive oxygen species, which induce oxidative stress in brain neurons. Mitochondria have been classically viewed as a major source for oxidative stress, but microglial cells were recently identified as reactive oxygen species producers in tauopathies. Here we review the complex relationships between tau pathology and oxidative stress, placing emphasis on (i) tau protein function, (ii) origin and consequences of reactive oxygen species production, and (iii) links between tau phosphorylation and oxidative stress. Further, we go on to discuss the hypothesis that tau hyperphosphorylation and oxidative stress are two key components of a vicious circle, crucial in neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:26576216

  11. Phosphorylation of human Tau protein by microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Schwalbe, Martin; Biernat, Jacek; Bibow, Stefan; Ozenne, Valéry; Jensen, Malene R; Kadavath, Harindranath; Blackledge, Martin; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2013-12-17

    Tau protein plays an important role in neuronal physiology and Alzheimer's neurodegeneration. Its abilities to aggregate abnormally, to bind to microtubules (MTs), and to promote MT assembly are all influenced by phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of serine residues in the KXGS motifs of Tau's repeat domain, crucial for MT interactions and aggregation, is facilitated most efficiently by microtubule-associated protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARKs). Here we applied high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance analysis to study the kinetics of phosphorylation of Tau by MARK2 and its impact on the structure and microtubule binding of Tau. We demonstrate that MARK2 binds to the N-terminal tail of Tau and selectively phosphorylates three major and five minor serine residues in the repeat domain and C-terminal tail. Structural changes induced by phosphorylation of Tau by MARK2 are highly localized in the proximity of the phosphorylation site and do not affect the global conformation, in contrast to phosphorylation in the proline-rich region. Furthermore, single-residue analysis of binding of Tau to MTs provides support for a model in which Tau's hot spots of MT interaction bind independently of each other and are differentially affected by phosphorylation. PMID:24251416

  12. Edinburgh Research Explorer Functional analysis of the rodent CK1tau mutation in the

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Functional analysis of the rodent CK1tau mutation in the circadian-Llerena, ME, Hindle, M, Le Bihan, T, O'Neill, JS & Millar, AJ 2013, 'Functional analysis of the rodent CK1tau immediately and investigate your claim. Download date: 04. Jul. 2015 #12;Functional analysis of the rodent CK1

  13. Tau post-translational modifications in wild-type and human amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Morris, Meaghan; Knudsen, Giselle M; Maeda, Sumihiro; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Ioanoviciu, Alexandra; Burlingame, Alma L; Mucke, Lennart

    2015-08-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Reducing tau levels ameliorates AD-related synaptic, network, and behavioral abnormalities in transgenic mice expressing human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP). We used mass spectrometry to characterize the post-translational modification of endogenous tau isolated from wild-type and hAPP mice. We identified seven types of tau modifications at 63 sites in wild-type mice. Wild-type and hAPP mice had similar modifications, supporting the hypothesis that neuronal dysfunction in hAPP mice is enabled by physiological forms of tau. Our findings provide clear evidence for acetylation and ubiquitination of the same lysine residues; some sites were also targeted by lysine methylation. Our findings refute the hypothesis of extensive O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of endogenous tau. The complex post-translational modification of physiological tau suggests that tau is regulated by diverse mechanisms. PMID:26192747

  14. Status of the Tau-Charm Facility and highlights of its physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1990-02-01

    In this paper I will first discuss the history and current status of the Tau-Charm Facility. I will then focus on the unique aspects of the heavy meson and tau physics program of such a facility, which motivates its construction and operation in the mid-1090's.

  15. Pericellular Innervation of Neurons Expressing Abnormally Hyperphosphorylated Tau in the Hippocampal Formation of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Garcia-Marin, Virginia; DeFelipe, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) represent one of the main neuropathological features in the cerebral cortex associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). This neurofibrillary lesion involves the accumulation of abnormally hyperphosphorylated or abnormally phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments (PHF-tau) within neurons. We have used immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy reconstructions to examine the distribution of PHF-tau-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and their perisomatic GABAergic and glutamatergic innervations in the hippocampal formation and adjacent cortex of AD patients. Furthermore, correlative light and electron microscopy was employed to examine these neurons and the perisomatic synapses. We observed two patterns of staining in PHF-tau-ir neurons, pattern I (without NFT) and pattern II (with NFT), the distribution of which varies according to the cortical layer and area. Furthermore, the distribution of both GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals around the soma and proximal processes of PHF-tau-ir neurons does not seem to be altered as it is indistinguishable from both control cases and from adjacent neurons that did not contain PHF-tau. At the electron microscope level, a normal looking neuropil with typical symmetric and asymmetric synapses was observed around PHF-tau-ir neurons. These observations suggest that the synaptic connectivity around the perisomatic region of these PHF-tau-ir neurons was apparently unaltered. PMID:20631843

  16. Cinnamon extract inhibits tau aggregation associated with Alzheimer’s Disease in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aqueous extract of Ceylon cinnamon (C. zeylanicum) was found to inhibit tau aggregation and filament formation, hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in vitro using brain cells taken from patients who died with AD. The extract also promoted complete disassembly of recombinant tau filaments, and ...

  17. RNA Binds to Tau Fibrils and Sustains Template-Assisted Growth

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tau fibrils are the main proteinacious components of neurofibrillary lesions in Alzheimer disease. Although RNA molecules are sequestered into these lesions, their relationship to Tau fibrils is only poorly understood. Such understanding, however, is important, as short fibrils can transfer between neurons and nonproteinacious factors including RNA could play a defining role in modulating the latter process. Here, we used sedimentation assays combined with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), fluorescence, and absorbance spectroscopy to determine the effects of RNA on Tau fibril structure and growth. We observe that, in the presence of RNA, three-repeat (3R) and four-repeat (4R) Tau form fibrils with parallel, in-register arrangement of ?-strands and exhibit an asymmetric seeding barrier in which 4R Tau grows onto 3R Tau seeds but not vice versa. These structural features are similar to those previously observed for heparin-induced fibrils, indicating that basic conformational properties are conserved, despite their being molecular differences of the nucleating agents. Furthermore, RNA sustains template-assisted growth and binds to the fibril surface and can be exchanged by heparin. These findings suggest that, in addition to mediating fibrillization, cofactors decorating the surface of Tau fibrils may modulate biological interactions and thereby influence the spreading of Tau pathology in the human brain. PMID:26177386

  18. The unfolded protein response mediates reversible tau phosphorylation induced by metabolic stress

    PubMed Central

    van der Harg, J M; Nölle, A; Zwart, R; Boerema, A S; van Haastert, E S; Strijkstra, A M; Hoozemans, J JM; Scheper, W

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) in close connection with early stages of tau pathology. Metabolic disturbances are strongly associated with increased risk for AD and are a potent inducer of the UPR. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic stress induces the phosphorylation of endogenous tau via activation of the UPR. Strikingly, upon restoration of the metabolic homeostasis, not only the levels of the UPR markers pPERK, pIRE1? and BiP, but also tau phosphorylation are reversed both in cell models as well as in torpor, a physiological hypometabolic model in vivo. Intervention in the UPR using the global UPR inhibitor TUDCA or a specific small-molecule inhibitor of the PERK signaling pathway, inhibits the metabolic stress-induced phosphorylation of tau. These data support a role for UPR-mediated tau phosphorylation as part of an adaptive response to metabolic stress. Failure to restore the metabolic homeostasis will lead to prolonged UPR activation and tau phosphorylation, and may thus contribute to AD pathogenesis. We demonstrate that the UPR is functionally involved in the early stages of tau pathology. Our data indicate that targeting of the UPR may be employed for early intervention in tau-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25165879

  19. Synaptic Amyloid-? Oligomers Precede p-Tau and Differentiate High Pathology Control Cases.

    PubMed

    Bilousova, Tina; Miller, Carol A; Poon, Wayne W; Vinters, Harry V; Corrada, Maria; Kawas, Claudia; Hayden, Eric Y; Teplow, David B; Glabe, Charles; Albay, Ricardo; Cole, Gregory M; Teng, Edmond; Gylys, Karen H

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-? (A?) and hyperphosphorylated tau (p-tau) aggregates form the two discrete pathologies of Alzheimer disease (AD), and oligomeric assemblies of each protein are localized to synapses. To determine the sequence by which pathology appears in synapses, A? and p-tau were quantified across AD disease stages in parietal cortex. Nondemented cases with high levels of AD-related pathology were included to determine factors that confer protection from clinical symptoms. Flow cytometric analysis of synaptosome preparations was used to quantify A? and p-tau in large populations of individual synaptic terminals. Soluble A? oligomers were assayed by a single antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Total in situ A? was elevated in patients with early- and late-stage AD dementia, but not in high pathology nondemented controls compared with age-matched normal controls. However, soluble A? oligomers were highest in early AD synapses, and this assay distinguished early AD cases from high pathology controls. Overall, synapse-associated p-tau did not increase until late-stage disease in human and transgenic rat cortex, and p-tau was elevated in individual A?-positive synaptosomes in early AD. These results suggest that soluble oligomers in surviving neocortical synaptic terminals are associated with dementia onset and suggest an amyloid cascade hypothesis in which oligomeric A? drives phosphorylated tau accumulation and synaptic spread. These results indicate that antiamyloid therapies will be less effective once p-tau pathology is developed. PMID:26718979

  20. RNA Protein Granules Modulate tau Isoform Expression and Induce Neuronal Sprouting*

    PubMed Central

    Moschner, Katharina; Sündermann, Frederik; Meyer, Heiko; da Graca, Abel Pereira; Appel, Neele; Paululat, Achim; Bakota, Lidia; Brandt, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The neuronal microtubule-associated protein Tau is expressed in different variants, and changes in Tau isoform composition occur during development and disease. Here, we investigate a potential role of the multivalent tau mRNA-binding proteins G3BP1 and IMP1 in regulating neuronal tau expression. We demonstrate that G3BP1 and IMP1 expression induces the formation of structures, which qualify as neuronal ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules and concentrate multivalent proteins and mRNA. We show that RNP granule formation leads to a >30-fold increase in the ratio of high molecular weight to low molecular weight tau mRNA and an ?12-fold increase in high molecular weight to low molecular weight Tau protein. We report that RNP granule formation is associated with increased neurite formation and enhanced process growth. G3BP1 deletion constructs that do not induce granule formation are also deficient in inducing neuronal sprouting or changing the expression pattern of tau. The data indicate that granule formation driven by multivalent proteins modulates tau isoform expression and suggest a morphoregulatory function of RNP granules during health and disease. PMID:24755223

  1. Tau Isoform-Specific Modulation of Kinesin-Driven Microtubule Gliding Rates and Trajectories as

    E-print Network

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    dementia, motor protein Introduction Tau is a neural microtubule (MT)-associated protein (MAP) that binds [Feinstein and Wilson, 2005]. Although there is only a single tau gene, alternative RNA splicing produces six located in the C-terminal half of the protein, and either zero, one, or two inserts located in the N

  2. The unfolded protein response mediates reversible tau phosphorylation induced by metabolic stress.

    PubMed

    van der Harg, J M; Nölle, A; Zwart, R; Boerema, A S; van Haastert, E S; Strijkstra, A M; Hoozemans, J Jm; Scheper, W

    2014-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in neurodegenerative tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) in close connection with early stages of tau pathology. Metabolic disturbances are strongly associated with increased risk for AD and are a potent inducer of the UPR. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic stress induces the phosphorylation of endogenous tau via activation of the UPR. Strikingly, upon restoration of the metabolic homeostasis, not only the levels of the UPR markers pPERK, pIRE1? and BiP, but also tau phosphorylation are reversed both in cell models as well as in torpor, a physiological hypometabolic model in vivo. Intervention in the UPR using the global UPR inhibitor TUDCA or a specific small-molecule inhibitor of the PERK signaling pathway, inhibits the metabolic stress-induced phosphorylation of tau. These data support a role for UPR-mediated tau phosphorylation as part of an adaptive response to metabolic stress. Failure to restore the metabolic homeostasis will lead to prolonged UPR activation and tau phosphorylation, and may thus contribute to AD pathogenesis. We demonstrate that the UPR is functionally involved in the early stages of tau pathology. Our data indicate that targeting of the UPR may be employed for early intervention in tau-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25165879

  3. Tau proteins in the temporal and frontal cortices in patients with vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B; Abdel-All, Zeinab; Mugica, Estibaliz Santiago; Li, Mosi; Craggs, Lucy J L; Oakley, Arthur E; Honer, William G; Kalaria, Raj N

    2015-02-01

    We previously reported that, in the brains of older patients with vascular dementia (VaD), there is a distinctive accumulation of detergent-extractable soluble amyloid-?, with a predominance of A?42 species. It is unclear, however, if tau proteins also accumulate in the brains of older VaD subjects. Using antibody-specific immunoassays, we assessed concentrations of total tau (t-tau) and phosphorylated tau protein, measured at 3 phosphorylated sites (i.e. Thr181, Ser202/Thr205, and Ser262), as well as synaptophysin in the temporal and frontal cortices of 18 VaD, 16 Alzheimer disease (AD), and 16 normal age-matched control subjects. There was selective loss of t-tau protein in VaD compared with controls and AD subjects (p < 0.021 and p < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, phosphorylated tau levels were similar to controls in VaD in both regions, but they were increased in the temporal lobes of patients with AD (p < 0.01 and p < 0.0001 for Ser202/Thr205 and Ser262 phosphorylated sites, respectively). The reduced t-tau in the VaD group was unrelated to any low-level neurofibrillary or amyloid pathology or age at death. These findings suggest that breaches of microvascular or microstructural tissue integrity subsequent to ischemic injury in older age may modify tau protein metabolism or phosphorylation and have effects on the burden of neurofibrillary pathology characteristic of AD. PMID:25575131

  4. Tau Oligomers: The Toxic Player at Synapses in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J.; Gerson, Julia; Castillo-Carranza, Diana L.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive disorder in which the most noticeable symptoms are cognitive impairment and memory loss. However, the precise mechanism by which those symptoms develop remains unknown. Of note, neuronal loss occurs at sites where synaptic dysfunction is observed earlier, suggesting that altered synaptic connections precede neuronal loss. The abnormal accumulation of amyloid-? (A?) and tau protein is the main histopathological feature of the disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that the small oligomeric forms of A? and tau may act synergistically to promote synaptic dysfunction in AD. Remarkably, tau pathology correlates better with the progression of the disease than A?. Recently, a growing number of studies have begun to suggest that missorting of tau protein from the axon to the dendrites is required to mediate the detrimental effects of A?. In this review we discuss the novel findings regarding the potential mechanisms by which tau oligomers contribute to synaptic dysfunction in AD. PMID:26696824

  5. Identification and characterization of natural antibodies against tau protein in an intravenous immunoglobulin product.

    PubMed

    Hromadkova, Lenka; Kolarova, Michala; Jankovicova, Barbora; Bartos, Ales; Ricny, Jan; Bilkova, Zuzana; Ripova, Daniela

    2015-12-15

    The latest therapeutic approaches to Alzheimer disease are using intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products. Therefore, the detailed characterization of target-specific antibodies naturally occurring in IVIG products is beneficial. We have focused on characterization of antibodies isolated against tau protein, a biomarker of Alzheimer's disease, from Flebogamma IVIG product. The analysis of IgG subclass distribution indicated skewing toward IgG3 in anti-tau-enriched IgG fraction. The evaluation of their reactivity and avidity with several recombinant tau forms was performed by ELISA and blotting techniques. Truncated non-phosphorylated tau protein (amino acids 155-421) demonstrated the highest reactivity and avidity index. We provide the first detailed insight into the reactivity of isolated natural antibodies against tau protein. PMID:26616881

  6. Ion Channel Formation by Tau Protein: Implications for Alzheimer’s Disease and Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the channel forming properties of other amyloid peptides, we employed planar lipid bilayers and atomic force microscopy to test tau for its ability to form ion permeable channels. Our results demonstrate that tau can form such channels, but only under acidic conditions. The channels formed are remarkably similar to amyloid peptide channels in their appearance, physical and electrical size, permanence, lack of ion selectivity, and multiple channel conductances. These channels differ from amyloid channels in their voltage dependence and resistance to blockade by zinc ion. These channels could explain tau’s pathologic role in disease by lowering membrane potential, dysregulating calcium, depolarizing mitochondria, or depleting energy stores. Tau might also combine with amyloid beta peptides to form toxic channels. PMID:26575330

  7. Ion Channel Formation by Tau Protein: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease and Tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nirav; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Azimov, Rustam; Kagan, Bruce L; Lal, Ratnesh

    2015-12-22

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Because of the channel forming properties of other amyloid peptides, we employed planar lipid bilayers and atomic force microscopy to test tau for its ability to form ion permeable channels. Our results demonstrate that tau can form such channels, but only under acidic conditions. The channels formed are remarkably similar to amyloid peptide channels in their appearance, physical and electrical size, permanence, lack of ion selectivity, and multiple channel conductances. These channels differ from amyloid channels in their voltage dependence and resistance to blockade by zinc ion. These channels could explain tau's pathologic role in disease by lowering membrane potential, dysregulating calcium, depolarizing mitochondria, or depleting energy stores. Tau might also combine with amyloid beta peptides to form toxic channels. PMID:26575330

  8. Reproductive Stage and Modulation of Stress-Induced Tau Phosphorylation in Female Rats.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Danielle; Ramos, Eugenia; Campbell, Shannon N; Morales, Teresa; Rissman, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Chronic stress is implicated as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. Although the specific mechanisms linking stress exposure and AD vulnerability have yet to be fully determined, our laboratory and others have shown that acute and repeated restraint stress in rodents leads to an increase in hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) and tau insolubility, a critical component of tau pathology in AD. Although tau phosphorylation induced by acute psychological stress is dependent on intact signaling through the type 1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor, how sex steroids or other modulators contribute to this effect is unknown. A naturally occurring attenuation of the stress response is observed in female rats at the end of pregnancy and throughout lactation. To test the hypothesis that decreased sensitivity to stress during lactation modulates stress-induced tau-P, cohorts of virgin, lactating and weaned female rats were subjected to 30 min of restraint stress or no stress (control) and were killed 20 min or 24 h after the episode. Exposure to restraint stress induced a significant decrease in tau-P in the hippocampus of lactating rats killed 20 min after stress compared to lactating controls and virgins subjected to stress treatment. Lactating rats killed 24hr after restraint stress exposure showed significant elevation in tau-P compared to lactating cohorts killed 20 min after stress. Levels of tau-P in these latter cohorts did not differ signficantly from control animals. Furthermore, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3-? levels were significantly decreased in stressed lactating animals at both timepoints. This suggests a steep, yet transient stress-induced dephosphorylation of tau, influenced by GSK3, in the hippocampus of lactating rats. PMID:26510116

  9. Anesthetic isoflurane increases phosphorylated tau levels mediated by caspase activation and A? generation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-01-01

    Anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to promote Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathogenesis by inducing caspase activation and accumulation of ?-amyloid (A?). Phosphorylation of tau protein is another important feature of AD neuropathogenesis. However, the effects of isoflurane on phosphorylated tau levels remain largely to be determined. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can increase phosphorylated tau levels. 5 to 8 month-old wild-type and AD transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg (APPswe, PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J] were treated with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours. The mice brain tissues were harvested at six, 12 and 24 hours after the anesthesia. For the in vitro studies, primary neurons from wild-type and the AD transgenic mice were exposed to 2% isoflurane for six hours, and were harvested at the end of anesthesia. The harvested brain tissues and neurons were subjected to Western blot analysis by which the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at Serine 262 (Tau-PS262) were determined. Here we show that the isoflurane anesthesia increased Tau-PS262 levels in brain tissues and primary neurons from the wild-type and AD transgenic mice. Moreover, the isoflurane anesthesia may induce a greater increase in Tau-PS262 levels in primary neurons and brain tissues from the AD transgenic mice. Finally, caspase activation inhibitor Z-VAD and A? generation inhibitor L-685,458 attenuated the isoflurane-induced increases in Tau-PS262 levels. In conclusion, clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia increases phosphorylated tau levels, which may result from the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and A? generation. These findings will promote more studies to determine the effects of anesthetics on tau phosphorylation. PMID:22745746

  10. Anesthetic Isoflurane Increases Phosphorylated Tau Levels Mediated by Caspase Activation and A? Generation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuanlin; Wu, Xu; Xu, Zhipeng; Zhang, Yiying; Xie, Zhongcong

    2012-01-01

    Anesthetic isoflurane has been shown to promote Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathogenesis by inducing caspase activation and accumulation of ?-amyloid (A?). Phosphorylation of tau protein is another important feature of AD neuropathogenesis. However, the effects of isoflurane on phosphorylated tau levels remain largely to be determined. We therefore set out to determine whether isoflurane can increase phosphorylated tau levels. 5 to 8 month-old wild-type and AD transgenic mice [B6.Cg-Tg (APPswe, PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J] were treated with 1.4% isoflurane for two hours. The mice brain tissues were harvested at six, 12 and 24 hours after the anesthesia. For the in vitro studies, primary neurons from wild-type and the AD transgenic mice were exposed to 2% isoflurane for six hours, and were harvested at the end of anesthesia. The harvested brain tissues and neurons were subjected to Western blot analysis by which the levels of phosphorylated tau protein at Serine 262 (Tau-PS262) were determined. Here we show that the isoflurane anesthesia increased Tau-PS262 levels in brain tissues and primary neurons from the wild-type and AD transgenic mice. Moreover, the isoflurane anesthesia may induce a greater increase in Tau-PS262 levels in primary neurons and brain tissues from the AD transgenic mice. Finally, caspase activation inhibitor Z-VAD and A? generation inhibitor L-685,458 attenuated the isoflurane-induced increases in Tau-PS262 levels. In conclusion, clinically relevant isoflurane anesthesia increases phosphorylated tau levels, which may result from the isoflurane-induced caspase activation and A? generation. These findings will promote more studies to determine the effects of anesthetics on tau phosphorylation. PMID:22745746

  11. Small misfolded Tau species are internalized via bulk endocytosis and anterogradely and retrogradely transported in neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jessica W; Herman, Mathieu; Liu, Li; Simoes, Sabrina; Acker, Christopher M; Figueroa, Helen; Steinberg, Joshua I; Margittai, Martin; Kayed, Rakez; Zurzolo, Chiara; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Duff, Karen E

    2013-01-18

    The accumulation of Tau into aggregates is associated with key pathological events in frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTD-Tau) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent data have shown that misfolded Tau can be internalized by cells in vitro (Frost, B., Jacks, R. L., and Diamond, M. I. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 12845-12852) and propagate pathology in vivo (Clavaguera, F., Bolmont, T., Crowther, R. A., Abramowski, D., Frank, S., Probst, A., Fraser, G., Stalder, A. K., Beibel, M., Staufenbiel, M., Jucker, M., Goedert, M., and Tolnay, M. (2009) Nat. Cell Biol. 11, 909-913; Lasagna-Reeves, C. A., Castillo-Carranza, D. L., Sengupta, U., Guerrero-Munoz, M. J., Kiritoshi, T., Neugebauer, V., Jackson, G. R., and Kayed, R. (2012) Sci. Rep. 2, 700). Here we show that recombinant Tau misfolds into low molecular weight (LMW) aggregates prior to assembly into fibrils, and both extracellular LMW Tau aggregates and short fibrils, but not monomers, long fibrils, nor long filaments purified from brain extract are taken up by neurons. Remarkably, misfolded Tau can be internalized at the somatodendritic compartment, or the axon terminals and it can be transported anterogradely, retrogradely, and can enhance tauopathy in vivo. The internalized Tau aggregates co-localize with dextran, a bulk-endocytosis marker, and with the endolysosomal compartments. Our findings demonstrate that exogenous Tau can be taken up by cells, uptake depends on both the conformation and size of the Tau aggregates and once inside cells, Tau can be transported. These data provide support for observations that tauopathy can spread trans-synaptically in vivo, via cell-to-cell transfer. PMID:23188818

  12. Small Misfolded Tau Species Are Internalized via Bulk Endocytosis and Anterogradely and Retrogradely Transported in Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jessica W.; Herman, Mathieu; Liu, Li; Simoes, Sabrina; Acker, Christopher M.; Figueroa, Helen; Steinberg, Joshua I.; Margittai, Martin; Kayed, Rakez; Zurzolo, Chiara; Di Paolo, Gilbert; Duff, Karen E.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of Tau into aggregates is associated with key pathological events in frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTD-Tau) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Recent data have shown that misfolded Tau can be internalized by cells in vitro (Frost, B., Jacks, R. L., and Diamond, M. I. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 12845–12852) and propagate pathology in vivo (Clavaguera, F., Bolmont, T., Crowther, R. A., Abramowski, D., Frank, S., Probst, A., Fraser, G., Stalder, A. K., Beibel, M., Staufenbiel, M., Jucker, M., Goedert, M., and Tolnay, M. (2009) Nat. Cell Biol. 11, 909–913; Lasagna-Reeves, C. A., Castillo-Carranza, D. L., Sengupta, U., Guerrero-Munoz, M. J., Kiritoshi, T., Neugebauer, V., Jackson, G. R., and Kayed, R. (2012) Sci. Rep. 2, 700). Here we show that recombinant Tau misfolds into low molecular weight (LMW) aggregates prior to assembly into fibrils, and both extracellular LMW Tau aggregates and short fibrils, but not monomers, long fibrils, nor long filaments purified from brain extract are taken up by neurons. Remarkably, misfolded Tau can be internalized at the somatodendritic compartment, or the axon terminals and it can be transported anterogradely, retrogradely, and can enhance tauopathy in vivo. The internalized Tau aggregates co-localize with dextran, a bulk-endocytosis marker, and with the endolysosomal compartments. Our findings demonstrate that exogenous Tau can be taken up by cells, uptake depends on both the conformation and size of the Tau aggregates and once inside cells, Tau can be transported. These data provide support for observations that tauopathy can spread trans-synaptically in vivo, via cell-to-cell transfer. PMID:23188818

  13. Formaldehyde at Low Concentration Induces Protein Tau into Globular Amyloid-Like Aggregates In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Chun Lai; Wei, Yan; Chen, Xinyong; Liu, Yan Ying; Dui, Wen; Liu, Ying; Davies, Martyn C.; Tendler, Saul J.B.; He, Rong Giao

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that neurodegeneration is closely related to misfolding and aggregation of neuronal tau. Our previous results show that neuronal tau aggregates in formaldehyde solution and that aggregated tau induces apoptosis of SH-SY5Y and hippocampal cells. In the present study, based on atomic force microscopy (AFM) observation, we have found that formaldehyde at low concentrations induces tau polymerization whilst acetaldehyde does not. Neuronal tau misfolds and aggregates into globular-like polymers in 0.01–0.1% formaldehyde solutions. Apart from globular-like aggregation, no fibril-like polymerization was observed when the protein was incubated with formaldehyde for 15 days. SDS-PAGE results also exhibit tau polymerizing in the presence of formaldehyde. Under the same experimental conditions, polymerization of bovine serum albumin (BSA) or ?-synuclein was not markedly detected. Kinetic study shows that tau significantly misfolds and polymerizes in 60 minutes in 0.1% formaldehyde solution. However, presence of 10% methanol prevents protein tau from polymerization. This suggests that formaldehyde polymerization is involved in tau aggregation. Such aggregation process is probably linked to the tau's special “worm-like” structure, which leaves the ?-amino groups of Lys and thiol groups of Cys exposed to the exterior. Such a structure can easily bond to formaldehyde molecules in vitro and in vivo. Polymerizing of formaldehyde itself results in aggregation of protein tau. Immunocytochemistry and thioflavin S staining of both endogenous and exogenous tau in the presence of formaldehyde at low concentrations in the cell culture have shown that formaldehyde can induce tau into amyloid-like aggregates in vivo during apoptosis. The significant protein tau aggregation induced by formaldehyde and the severe toxicity of the aggregated tau to neural cells may suggest that toxicity of methanol and formaldehyde ingestion is related to tau misfolding and aggregation. PMID:17637844

  14. Two Higgs Doublet Type III Seesaw with mu-tau symmetry at LHC

    E-print Network

    Priyotosh Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Manimala Mitra

    2009-06-29

    We propose a two Higgs doublet Type III seesaw model with $\\mu$-$\\tau$ flavor symmetry. We add an additional SU(2) Higgs doublet and three SU(2) fermion triplets in our model. The presence of two Higgs doublets allows for natural explanation of small neutrino masses with triplet fermions in the 100 GeV mass range, without fine tuning of the Yukawa couplings to extremely small values. The triplet fermions couple to the gauge bosons and can be thus produced at the LHC. We study in detail the effective cross-sections for the production and subsequent decays of these heavy exotic fermions. We show for the first time that the $\\mu$-$\\tau$ flavor symmetry in the low energy neutrino mass matrix results in mixing matrices for the neutral and charged heavy fermions that are not unity and which carry the flavor symmetry pattern. This flavor structure can be observed in the decays of the heavy fermions at LHC. The large Yukawa couplings in our model result in the decay of the heavy fermions into lighter leptons and Higgs with a decay rate which is about $10^{11}$ times larger than what is expected for the one Higgs Type III seesaw model with 100 GeV triplet fermions. The smallness of neutrino masses constrains the neutral Higgs mixing angle $\\sin\\alpha$ in our model in such a way that the heavy fermions decay into the lighter neutral CP even Higgs $h^0$, CP odd Higgs $A^0$ and the charged Higgs $H^\\pm$, but almost never to the heavier neutral CP even Higgs $H^0$. The small value for $\\sin\\alpha$ also results in a very long lifetime for $h^0$. This displaced decay vertex should be visible at LHC. We provide an exhaustive list of collider signature channels for our model and identify those that have very large effective cross-sections at LHC and almost no standard model background.

  15. Comparison of the Interferon-tau Expression from Primary Trophectoderm Outgrowths Derived from IVP, NT, and Parthenogenote Bovine Blastocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine interferon-tau (IFN-tau) is the “maternal recognition of pregnancy” hormone produced by trophectoderm cells of the pre-implantation stage bovine embryo. The expression of IFN-tau is essential for bovine embryo survival in the uterus, and, because somatic cell nuclear transfer (NT) embryos ap...

  16. A comparison between the diffusion-reaction and slow axonal transport models for predicting tau distribution along an axon.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, I A; Kuznetsov, A V

    2015-09-01

    This paper developed equations describing steady-state tau distributions for three versions of the diffusion-reaction model of tau transport: a model with constant kinetic rates, a model that additionally accounts for tau diffusion along microtubules (MTs) and a model with a modulated rate of tau attachment to MTs. We demonstrated that, for the model with constant kinetic rates, the concentration of free tau in the cytoplasm was determined by a single dimensionless parameter that represents the ratio of the diffusion time (the time it takes tau to diffuse from the axon hillock to the axon tip) to the half-life of tau. We also developed a model based on the hypothesis that tau is actively transported. Analytical solutions for some special situations were obtained. The model predictions were compared with experimentally measured tau distributions in axons reported in Black et al. (1996, J. Neurosc., 16: , 3601-3619), and based on these comparisons, we discussed the performance of various models. We demonstrated the significance of modulation of the tau attachment rate to MTs in the diffusion-reaction model. On the other hand, the active transport model predictions were consistent with experimental data even with constant kinetic rates. For short axons (up to 600 ?m in length) the predicted average transport velocity of tau was in the experimentally reported range for both the diffusion-reaction and active transport models, but for the active transport model the average tau velocity was larger. PMID:24573186

  17. PET Radioligands for Imaging of Tau Pathology: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Choe, Yearn Seong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, continues to soar with the rapid growth of the elderly population, thus creating an enormous social and economic burden. Although disease-modifying drugs to treat AD are not yet available, several candidate drugs are in clinical trials. Most of these drugs are expected to be effective at the early stages of the disease, and therefore the early and accurate diagnosis of AD will be a critical factor in efforts to improve the prognosis of patients with AD. This review focuses on lead radioligands developed to date and their preclinical data in order to facilitate the development of tau-specific positron emission tomography radioligands that are of great interest to the scientific community. PMID:26550043

  18. The Disks around Young Stellar Objects - HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trauger, John

    1994-01-01

    Circumstellar material has been detected at 1.3 mm around about 50% of the young (T<10^6 yr) stellar objects in the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. The observations permit an estimate of the material's spatial extent, mass and temperature, which are usually of sizes compatible with estimates of the conditions in the nebula which surrounded our sun prior to and during our planetary system formation (M of order 0.1 solar, T of order 100- 200 degrees and R of order 10 AU.). In the case of HL-Tau, a circumstellar disk has been resolved and shown to be in Keplerian rotation around the star. We propose to resolve the largest disks in scattered visible radiation with WFPC2. This will allow us to determine physical properties of the solid material such as its albedo, particle sizes, and spatial distribution.

  19. Preliminary results on two-dimensional interferometry of HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollestrup, Eric V.; Harvey, Paul M.

    1989-10-01

    Preliminary two-dimensional speckle interferometry results of HL Tau were found to be qualitatively similar to those found with one-dimensional slit scanning techniques; results consist of a resolved component (approximately 0.7 arcsec in size) and an unresolved component. Researchers are currently reducing the rest of the data (taken on three different telescopes and at three different wavelengths) and are also exploring other high resolution methods like the shift and add technique and selecting only the very best images for processing. The availability of even better two-dimensional arrays within the next couple of years promises to make speckle interferometry and other high resolution techniques very powerful and exiting tools for probing a variety of objects in the subarcsec regime.

  20. Genetic Modification of the Relationship between Phosphorylated Tau and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Koran, Mary Ellen I.; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.

    2014-01-01

    Background A subset of individuals present at autopsy with the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) having never manifest the clinical symptoms. We sought to identify genetic factors that modify the relationship between phosphorylated tau (PTau) and dilation of the lateral inferior ventricles. Methods We used data from 700 subjects enrolled in the AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). A genome-wide association study (GWAS) approach was used to identify PTau × single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) interactions. Variance explained by these interactions was quantified using hierarchical linear regression. Results Five SNPxPTau interactions passed a Bonferroni correction, one of which (rs4728029, POT1, 2.6% of variance) was consistent across ADNI-1 and ADNI-2/GO subjects. This interaction also showed a trend level association with memory performance and levels of interleukin-6-receptor. Conclusions Our results suggest that rs4728029 modifies the relationship between PTau and both ventricular dilation and cognition, perhaps through an altered neuroinflammatory response. PMID:24656848

  1. Zeros of the Jimbo, Miwa, Ueno tau function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, John

    1999-12-01

    We introduce a family of local deformations for meromorphic connections on P1 in the neighborhood of a higher rank (simple) singularity. Following the scheme in Malgrange [Mathematique et Physique, Progress in Mathematics (Birkhäuser, Boston, 1983), Vol. 37, pp. 381-400, ibid., pp. 401-426; ibid., pp. 427-438] we use these local models to prove that the zeros of the tau function, introduced by Jimbo, Miwa, and Ueno in their pioneering work on "Birkhoff" deformations at irregular singular points [Physica D 2, 306-352; 2, 407-448 (1981); 4, 26-46 (1983); Publ. RIMS Kyoto Univ. 17-2, 703-721 (1981)], occur at precisely those points in the deformation space at which a certain Birkhoff-Riemann-Hilbert problem fails to have a solution.

  2. Spectroscopy of V471 Tau. I. Review of basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bois, B.; Mochnacki, S.W.; Lanning, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the eclipsing binary V471 Tau are reported and analyzed. Data obtained mainly in the red band at Mt. Wilson Observatory and KPNO during the period 1975-1983 are compiled in extensive tables and graphs, and the radial velocity of the K dwarf component is determined using a Griffin-mask technique. Results discussed include: (1) distance 44 + or - 6 pc, (consistent with membership in the Hyades), (2) apparent period variation consistent with a third component, (3) emissionlike features affecting the radial-velocity determination, (4) transient features consistent with the presence of flares, and (5) phase-coherent variation in H-alpha (attributed to the action of the white-dwarf Lyman continuum emission on the K dwarf). 70 references.

  3. Isomonodromic $\\tau$-functions and $W_N$ conformal blocks

    E-print Network

    Gavrylenko, P

    2015-01-01

    We study the solution of the Schlesinger system for the 4-point $\\mathfrak{sl}_N$ isomonodromy problem and conjecture an expression for the isomonodromic $\\tau$-function in terms of 2d conformal field theory beyond the known $N=2$ Painlev\\'e VI case. We show that this relation can be used as an alternative definition of conformal blocks for the $W_N$ algebra and argue that the infinite number of arbitrary constants arising in the algebraic construction of $W_N$ conformal block can be expressed in terms of only a finite set of parameters of the monodromy data of rank $N$ Fuchsian system with three regular singular points. We check this definition explicitly for the known conformal blocks of the $W_3$ algebra and demonstrate its consistency with the conjectured form of the structure constants.

  4. A Search for UHE Tau Neutrinos with IceCube

    E-print Network

    IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; S. Buitink; K. S. Caballero-Mora; M. Carson; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; T. Degner; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; B. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare1; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin1; L. Paul; C. Pérez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; T. Schmidt; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte1; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine1; A. Silvestri; M. W. E. Smith; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; M. Stüer; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; M. Zoll

    2012-06-25

    The first dedicated search for ultra-high energy (UHE) tau neutrinos of astrophysical origin was performed using the IceCube detector in its 22-string configuration with an instrumented volume of roughly 0.25 km^3. The search also had sensitivity to UHE electron and muon neutrinos. After application of all selection criteria to approximately 200 live-days of data, we expect a background of 0.60 +/- 0.19 (stat.) $^{+0.56}_{-0.58}$ (syst.) events and observe three events, which after inspection emerge as being compatible with background but are kept in the final sample. Therefore, we set an upper limit on neutrinos of all-flavors from UHE astrophysical sources at 90% CL of $E^{2} \\Phi(\

  5. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau ---> omega pi - nu tau

    E-print Network

    Fisher, Peter H.

    We report an analysis of ?- decaying into ??-?? with ???(+)?-?(0) using a data sample containing nearly 320×106? pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents, ...

  6. {mu}-{tau} symmetry, sterile right-handed neutrinos, and leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Riazuddin

    2008-01-01

    Leptogenesis is studied in a seesaw model with {mu}-{tau} symmetry for SU{sub L}(2)-singlet right-handed neutrinos. It is shown that lepton asymmetry is not zero and is given by the square of the solar neutrino mass difference and can be of the right order of magnitude. Further it involves the same Majorana phase which appears in the neutrinoless double {beta}-decay. In this framework one of the right-handed seesaw partners of light neutrinos can be made massless. This can be identified with a sterile neutrino, once it acquires a tiny mass ({approx_equal}1 eV) when {mu}-{tau} symmetry is broken in the right-handed neutrino sector. The above mentioned sterile neutrino together with another one can be identified to explain the MiniBooNE and LSND results. The light 5x5 neutrino mass matrix is completely fixed if CP is conserved and so is the effective mass for neutrinoless double {beta}-decay.

  7. Tau accumulation in the nucleus accumbens in tangle-predominant dementia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tangle-predominant dementia (TPD) is characterized neuropathologically by numerous neurofibrillary tangles in the limbic areas with no or occasional senile plaques throughout the brain. TPD is an under-recognized disease, while it is a common cause of dementia in those over 80 years of age. In the present study, we describe hyperphosphorylated tau (tau) accumulation in the nucleus accumbens (Acb) in patients with TPD. Results We investigated immunohistochemically the brain tissues from 7 patients with TPD, 22 with Alzheimer disease (AD) and 11 non-demented aged subjects. In the Acb of all 7 TPD patients, a considerable number of tau positive neurons were found together with many neuropil threads. The tau deposits in the Acb were labeled with all the anti-tau antibodies used in the present study. They included conformational change-specific, phosphorylation-specific and phosphorylation-independent antibodies. The Acb consists of the predominant medium-sized neurons with a small number of large neurons. Both the cell types were affected by tau pathology in TPD. Tau accumulation in the majority of such neurons appeared to be pretangle-like, diffuse deposits with only occasional paired helical filament formation. Tau positive neurons were also found in the Acb in some AD and non-demented aged subjects but much fewer in the majority of cases. The immunoblot analyses of fresh frozen samples of the Acb and parahippocampal cortex from 3 TPD and 3 AD patients revealed that the insoluble tau in the Acb was a mixture of the 3- and 4-repeat isoforms. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first report on the occurrence of tau accumulation in the Acb in TPD. The Acb receives direct and massive projections from the hippocampal CA1 and subiculum where neurofibrillary tangles are known to occur more frequently in TPD than in AD. The prevalence of abnormal tau accumulation in the Acb in TPD may support the idea that abnormal tau aggregation propagates via neural circuits. In all but one TPD cases used in this study, delusion was a consistent clinical feature. Whether the Acb tau accumulation is related to the psychiatric symptoms in TPD may be an issue for further investigation. PMID:24708916

  8. Search for NMSSM Higgs bosons in the h ---> aa ---> mu mu mu mu, mu mu tau tau channels using p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-05-01

    We report on a first search for production of the lightest neutral CP-even Higgs boson (h) in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, where h decays to a pair of neutral pseudoscalar Higgs bosons (a), using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at Fermilab. The a bosons are required to either both decay to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} or one to {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and the other to {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}. No significant signal is observed, and we set limits on its production as functions of M{sub a} and M{sub h}.

  9. Sphingomyelin SM(d18:1/18:0) is Significantly Enhanced in Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples Dichotomized by Pathological Amyloid-?42, Tau, and Phospho-Tau-181 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Koal, Therese; Klavins, Kristaps; Seppi, Daniele; Kemmler, Georg; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a severe and chronic neurodegenerative disorder of the brain. The laboratory diagnosis is limited to the analysis of three biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): amyloid-?42 (A?42), total tau, and phospho-tau-181 (P-tau-181). However, there is a need to find more biomarkers in CSF that can improve the sensitivity and specificity. The aim of the present study was to analyze endogenous small metabolites (metabolome) in the CSF, which may provide potentially new insights into biochemical processes involved in AD. One hundred CSF samples were dichotomized by normal (n = 50) and pathological decreased A?42 and increased tau and P-tau-181 levels (n = 50; correlating to an AD-like pathology). These CSF samples were analyzed using the AbsoluteIDQ® p180 Kit (BIOCRATES Life Sciences), which included 40 acylcarnitines, 21 amino acids, 19 biogenic amines, 15 sphingolipids, and 90 glycerophospholipids. Our data show that two sphingomyelins (SM (d18:1/18:0) and SM (d18:1/18:1)), 5 glycerophospholipids (PC aa C32:0, PC aa C34:1, PC aa C36:1, PC aa C38:4 and PC aa C38:6), and 1 acylcarnitine (C3-DC-M/C5-OH) were significantly altered in the CSF with pathological “AD-like pathology”. Sphingomyelin SM (d18:1/18:0) proved to be a specific (76%) and sensitive (66%) biomarker with a defined cut-off of 546 nM. Correct diagnoses for 21 out of 32 unknown samples could be achieved using this SM (d18:1/18:0) cut-off value. In conclusion, the sphingolipid SM (d18:1/18:0) is significantly increased in CSF of patients displaying pathological levels of A?42, tau, and P-tau-181. PMID:25408209

  10. Sphingomyelin SM(d18:1/18:0) is significantly enhanced in cerebrospinal fluid samples dichotomized by pathological amyloid-?42, tau, and phospho-tau-181 levels.

    PubMed

    Koal, Therese; Klavins, Kristaps; Seppi, Daniele; Kemmler, Georg; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe and chronic neurodegenerative disorder of the brain. The laboratory diagnosis is limited to the analysis of three biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): amyloid-?42 (A?42), total tau, and phospho-tau-181 (P-tau-181). However, there is a need to find more biomarkers in CSF that can improve the sensitivity and specificity. The aim of the present study was to analyze endogenous small metabolites (metabolome) in the CSF, which may provide potentially new insights into biochemical processes involved in AD. One hundred CSF samples were dichotomized by normal (n = 50) and pathological decreased A?42 and increased tau and P-tau-181 levels (n = 50; correlating to an AD-like pathology). These CSF samples were analyzed using the AbsoluteIDQ® p180 Kit (BIOCRATES Life Sciences), which included 40 acylcarnitines, 21 amino acids, 19 biogenic amines, 15 sphingolipids, and 90 glycerophospholipids. Our data show that two sphingomyelins (SM (d18:1/18:0) and SM (d18:1/18:1)), 5 glycerophospholipids (PC aa C32:0, PC aa C34:1, PC aa C36:1, PC aa C38:4 and PC aa C38:6), and 1 acylcarnitine (C3-DC-M/C5-OH) were significantly altered in the CSF with pathological "AD-like pathology". Sphingomyelin SM (d18:1/18:0) proved to be a specific (76%) and sensitive (66%) biomarker with a defined cut-off of 546 nM. Correct diagnoses for 21 out of 32 unknown samples could be achieved using this SM (d18:1/18:0) cut-off value. In conclusion, the sphingolipid SM (d18:1/18:0) is significantly increased in CSF of patients displaying pathological levels of A?42, tau, and P-tau-181. PMID:25408209

  11. Characteristics of TBS-extractable hyperphosphorylated tau species: Aggregation intermediates in rTg4510 mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Sahara, Naruhiko; DeTure, Michael; Ren, Yan; Ebrahim, Abdul-Shukkur; Kang, Dongcheul; Knight, Joshua; Volbracht, Christiane; Pedersen, Jan Torleif; Dickson, Dennis W.; Yen, Shu-Hui; Lewis, Jada

    2012-01-01

    Conditional overexpression of four-repeat human tau containing the P301L missense mutation in the rTg4510 mouse model of tauopathy leads to progressive accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles and hyperphosphorylated, sarkosyl-insoluble tau species, which are biochemically comparable to abnormal tau characteristic of hereditary tauopathies termed FTDP-17. To fully understand the impact of tau species at different stages of self-assembly on neurodegeneration, we fractionated rTg4510 brain representing several stages of tauopathy to obtain TBS-extractable (S1), high salt/sarkosyl-extractable (S3), and sarkosyl-insoluble (P3) fractions. Under reducing condition, the S1 fraction was demonstrated by Western blotting to contain both 50–60 kDa normally-sized and 64 kDa tau. Both are thermo-stable, but the 64 kDa tau showed a higher degree of phosphorylation. Under non-reducing condition, nearly all TBS-extractable 64 kDa tau were detected as ~130 kDa species consistent with the size of dimer. Quantitative analysis showed ~80 times more 64 kDa tau in S1 than P3 fraction. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed tau-positive granules/short filaments in S1 fraction. These structures displayed MC1 immunoreactivities indicative of conformational/pathological change of tau. MC1 immunoreactivity was detected by dot blotting in samples from 2.5 month-old mice, whereas Ab39 immunoreactivity indicative of late stages of tau assembly was detected only in P3 fraction. Quantitative analysis also demonstrated a significant inverse correlation between brain weight and 64 kDa tau, but the level of TBS-extractable 64 kDa tau reflects neurodegeneration better than that of sarkosyl-insoluble 64 kDa tau. Together, the findings suggest that TBS-extractable 64 kDa tau production is a potential target for therapeutic intervention of tauopathies. PMID:22941973

  12. Low Serum Level ?-Synuclein and Tau Protein in Autism Spectrum Disorder Compared to Controls.

    PubMed

    Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Cetin, Ihsan; Tarakç?o?lu, Mahmut Cem; Özer, Ömer Faruk; Kaçar, Selma; Çimen, Behzat

    2015-12-01

    ?-Synuclein (?-syn) and tau proteins are thought to be related with the synaptic loss and cell death underlying several important neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of our study was to investigate serum ?-syn and tau levels in autism. Serum levels of ?-syn and tau were measured, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) severity was assessed at admission using the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) total score. The mean CARS score of the autism group on admission was 47.91 points (SD: 5.97). The results indicated that the mean serum ?-syn and serum tau levels were significantly (p?tau identified by Pearson correlation analysis (r?=?0.922, n?=?28, p?tau aggregation may lead to synaptic dysfunction, and this may contribute to either neuronal or synaptic dysfunction or neurodegeneration. Our preliminary study suggests that low levels of serum ?-syn and tau may be implicated in the relationship between synaptic activity and autism. PMID:26479762

  13. Leptonic CP violation induced by approximately {mu}-{tau} symmetric seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Teppei; Yasue, Masaki

    2008-04-01

    Assuming a minimal seesaw model with two heavy neutrinos (N), we examine effects of leptonic CP violation induced by approximate {mu}-{tau} symmetric interactions. As long as N is subject to the {mu}-{tau} symmetry, we can choose CP phases of Dirac mass terms without loss of generality in such a way that these phases arise from {mu}-{tau} symmetry breaking interactions. In the case that no phase is present in heavy neutrino mass terms, leptonic CP phases are controlled by two phases {alpha} and {beta}. The similar consideration is extended to N blind to the {mu}-{tau} symmetry. It is argued that N subject (blind) to the {mu}-{tau} symmetry necessarily describes the normal (inverted) mass hierarchy. We restrict ourselves to {mu}-{tau} symmetric textures giving the tribimaximal mixing and calculate flavor neutrino masses to estimate CP-violating Dirac and Majorana phases as well as neutrino mixing angles as functions of {alpha} and {beta}. Since {alpha} and {beta} are generated by {mu}-{tau} symmetry breaking interactions, the CP-violating Majorana phase tends to be suppressed and is found to be at most O(0.1) radian. On the other hand, the CP-violating Dirac phase tends to show a proportionality to {alpha} or to {beta}.

  14. Modulation and detection of tau aggregation with small-molecule ligands.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward; Honson, Nicolette S; Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Funk, Kristen E; Jensen, Jordan R; Kim, Sohee; Naphade, Swati; Kuret, Jeff

    2009-10-01

    Recent results from high-throughput and other screening approaches reveal that small molecules can directly interact with recombinant full-length tau monomers and fibrillar tau aggregates in three distinct modes. First, in the high concentration regime (>10 micromolar), certain anionic molecules such as Congo red efficiently promote tau filament formation through a nucleation-elongation mechanism involving a dimeric nucleus and monomer-mediated elongation. These compounds are useful for modeling tau aggregation in vitro and in biological models. Second, in the low concentration regime (<1 micromolar), other ligands, including cyanine dyes, display aggregation antagonist activity. Compounds that can prevent or reverse fibrillization are candidate modifiers of disease pathology. Finally, certain compounds bind mature tau fibrils with varying affinities at multiple binding sites without modulating the aggregation reaction. For some ligands, >10-fold selectivity for tau aggregates relative to filaments composed of beta-amyloid or alpha-synuclein can be demonstrated at the level of binding affinity. Together these observations suggest that small-molecules have utility for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway, for inhibiting neuritic lesion formation, and for selective pre-mortem detection of neurofibrillary lesions through whole brain imaging. PMID:19874263

  15. Modulation and detection of tau aggregation with small-molecule ligands

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward; Honson, Nicolette S.; Bandyopadhyay, Bhaswati; Funk, Kristen E.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Kim, Sohee; Naphade, Swati; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Recent results from high-throughput and other screening approaches reveal that small molecules can directly interact with recombinant full-length tau monomers and fibrillar tau aggregates in three distinct modes. First, in the high concentration regime (>10 micromolar), certain anionic molecules such as Congo red efficiently promote tau filament formation through a nucleation-elongation mechanism involving a dimeric nucleus and monomer-mediated elongation. These compounds are useful for modeling tau aggregation in vitro and in biological models. Second, in the low concentration regime (<1 micromolar), other ligands, including cyanine dyes, display aggregation antagonist activity. Compounds that can prevent or reverse fibrillization are candidate modifiers of disease pathology. Finally, certain compounds bind mature tau fibrils with varying affinities at multiple binding sites without modulating the aggregation reaction. For some ligands, >10-fold selectivity for tau aggregates relative to filaments composed of beta-amyloid or alpha-synuclein can be demonstrated at the level of binding affinity. Together these observations suggest that small-molecules have utility for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway, for inhibiting neuritic lesion formation, and for selective pre-mortem detection of neurofibrillary lesions through whole brain imaging. PMID:19874263

  16. Tau reduction prevents A?-induced axonal transport deficits by blocking activation of GSK3?

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jordan C.; Fomenko, Vira; Miyamoto, Takashi; Suberbielle, Elsa; Knox, Joseph A.; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H.; Yu, Gui-Qiu

    2015-01-01

    Axonal transport deficits in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are attributed to amyloid ? (A?) peptides and pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Genetic ablation of tau prevents neuronal overexcitation and axonal transport deficits caused by recombinant A? oligomers. Relevance of these findings to naturally secreted A? and mechanisms underlying tau’s enabling effect are unknown. Here we demonstrate deficits in anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria in primary neurons from transgenic mice expressing familial AD-linked forms of human amyloid precursor protein. We show that these deficits depend on A?1–42 production and are prevented by tau reduction. The copathogenic effect of tau did not depend on its microtubule binding, interactions with Fyn, or potential role in neuronal development. Inhibition of neuronal activity, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, or glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) activity or expression also abolished A?-induced transport deficits. Tau ablation prevented A?-induced GSK3? activation. Thus, tau allows A? oligomers to inhibit axonal transport through activation of GSK3?, possibly by facilitating aberrant neuronal activity. PMID:25963821

  17. Tau reduction prevents A?-induced axonal transport deficits by blocking activation of GSK3?.

    PubMed

    Vossel, Keith A; Xu, Jordan C; Fomenko, Vira; Miyamoto, Takashi; Suberbielle, Elsa; Knox, Joseph A; Ho, Kaitlyn; Kim, Daniel H; Yu, Gui-Qiu; Mucke, Lennart

    2015-05-11

    Axonal transport deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are attributed to amyloid ? (A?) peptides and pathological forms of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Genetic ablation of tau prevents neuronal overexcitation and axonal transport deficits caused by recombinant A? oligomers. Relevance of these findings to naturally secreted A? and mechanisms underlying tau's enabling effect are unknown. Here we demonstrate deficits in anterograde axonal transport of mitochondria in primary neurons from transgenic mice expressing familial AD-linked forms of human amyloid precursor protein. We show that these deficits depend on A?1-42 production and are prevented by tau reduction. The copathogenic effect of tau did not depend on its microtubule binding, interactions with Fyn, or potential role in neuronal development. Inhibition of neuronal activity, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor function, or glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) activity or expression also abolished A?-induced transport deficits. Tau ablation prevented A?-induced GSK3? activation. Thus, tau allows A? oligomers to inhibit axonal transport through activation of GSK3?, possibly by facilitating aberrant neuronal activity. PMID:25963821

  18. Beneficial effects of caffeine in a transgenic model of Alzheimer's disease-like tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Cyril; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Derisbourg, Maxime; Leboucher, Antoine; Demeyer, Dominique; Carrier, Sébastien; Schneider, Marion; Hamdane, Malika; Müller, Christa E; Buée, Luc; Blum, David

    2014-09-01

    Tau pathology found in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is crucial in cognitive decline. Epidemiologic evidences support that habitual caffeine intake prevents memory decline during aging and reduces the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. So far, experimental studies addressed the impact of caffeine in models mimicking the amyloid pathology of AD. However, in vivo effects of caffeine in a model of AD-like tauopathy remain unknown. Here, we evaluated effects of chronic caffeine intake (0.3 g/L through drinking water), given at an early pathologic stage, in the THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model of progressive AD-like tau pathology. We found that chronic caffeine intake prevents from the development of spatial memory deficits in tau mice. Improved memory was associated with reduced hippocampal tau phosphorylation and proteolytic fragments. Moreover, caffeine treatment mitigated several proinflammatory and oxidative stress markers found upregulated in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 animals. Together, our data support that moderate caffeine intake is beneficial in a model of AD-like tau pathology, paving the way for future clinical evaluation in AD patients. PMID:24780254

  19. Tau Reduction Prevents Disease in a Mouse Model of Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gheyara, Ania L; Ponnusamy, Ravikumar; Djukic, Biljana; Craft, Ryan J; Ho, Kaitlyn; Guo, Weikun; Finucane, Mariel M; Sanchez, Pascal E; Mucke, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    Objective Reducing levels of the microtubule-associated protein tau has shown promise as a potential treatment strategy for diseases with secondary epileptic features such as Alzheimer disease. We wanted to determine whether tau reduction may also be of benefit in intractable genetic epilepsies. Methods We studied a mouse model of Dravet syndrome, a severe childhood epilepsy caused by mutations in the human SCN1A gene encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel subunit Nav1.1. We genetically deleted 1 or 2 Tau alleles in mice carrying an Nav1.1 truncation mutation (R1407X) that causes Dravet syndrome in humans, and examined their survival, epileptic activity, related hippocampal alterations, and behavioral abnormalities using observation, electroencephalographic recordings, acute slice electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and behavioral assays. Results Tau ablation prevented the high mortality of Dravet mice and reduced the frequency of spontaneous and febrile seizures. It reduced interictal epileptic spikes in vivo and drug-induced epileptic activity in brain slices ex vivo. Tau ablation also prevented biochemical changes in the hippocampus indicative of epileptic activity and ameliorated abnormalities in learning and memory, nest building, and open field behaviors in Dravet mice. Deletion of only 1 Tau allele was sufficient to suppress epileptic activity and improve survival and nesting performance. Interpretation Tau reduction may be of therapeutic benefit in Dravet syndrome and other intractable genetic epilepsies. Ann Neurol 2014;76:443–456 PMID:25042160

  20. The twenty-four KDa C-terminal tau fragment increases with aging in tauopathy mice: implications of prion-like properties.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Motoi, Yumiko; Ishiguro, Koichi; Tabira, Takeshi; Kametani, Fuyuki; Hasegawa, Masato; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2015-11-15

    The truncated tau protein is a component of the neurofibrillary tangles found in the brains with tauopathies. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the truncated tau fragment causes neurodegeneration remain unknown. Tau pathology was recently suggested to spread through intercellular propagation, and required the formation of 'prion-like' species. We herein identified a new fragment of the tau protein that consisted of four binding domains and a C-terminal tail (Tau-CTF24), but lacked the N-terminal projection domain, and found that it increased with aging in tauopathy model mice (Tg601). Tau-CTF24-like fragments were also present in human brains with tauopathies. A mass spectroscopic analysis revealed that Tau-CTF24 was cleaved behind R242. The digestion of full-length tau (Tau-FL) by calpain produced Tau-CTF24 in vitro and calpain activity increased in old Tg601. Recombinant Tau-CTF24 accelerated heparin-induced aggregation and lost the ability to promote microtubule assembly. When insoluble tau from diseased brains or aggregated recombinant tau was introduced as seeds into SH-SY5Y cells, a larger amount of insoluble tau was formed in cells overexpressing Tau-CTF24 than in those overexpressing Tau-FL. Furthermore, lysates containing the Tau-CTF24 inclusion propagated to naive tau-expressing cells more efficiently than those containing the Tau-FL inclusion. Immunoblot and confocal microscopic analyses revealed that aggregated Tau-CTF24 bound to cells more rapidly and abundantly than aggregated Tau-FL. Our results suggest that Tau-CTF24 contributes to neurodegeneration by enhancing prion-like propagation as well as deteriorating the mechanisms involved in microtubule function. PMID:26374846

  1. Evaluation of prognostic and predictive value of microtubule associated protein tau in two independent cohorts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Microtubule associated proteins (MAPs) endogenously regulate microtubule stabilization and have been reported as prognostic and predictive markers for taxane response. The microtubule stabilizer, MAP-tau, has shown conflicting results. We quantitatively assessed MAP-tau expression in two independent breast cancer cohorts to determine prognostic and predictive value of this biomarker. Methods MAP-tau expression was evaluated in the retrospective Yale University breast cancer cohort (n = 651) using tissue microarrays and also in the TAX 307 cohort, a clinical trial randomized for TAC versus FAC chemotherapy (n = 140), using conventional whole tissue sections. Expression was measured using the AQUA method for quantitative immunofluorescence. Scores were correlated with clinicopathologic variables, survival, and response to therapy. Results Assessment of the Yale cohort using Cox univariate analysis indicated an improved overall survival (OS) in tumors with a positive correlation between high MAP-tau expression and overall survival (OS) (HR = 0.691, 95% CI = 0.489-0.974; P = 0.004). Kaplan Meier analysis showed 10-year survival for 65% of patients with high MAP-tau expression compared to 52% with low expression (P = .006). In TAX 307, high expression was associated with significantly longer median time to tumor progression (TTP) regardless of treatment arm (33.0 versus 23.4 months, P = 0.010) with mean TTP of 31.2 months. Response rates did not differ by MAP-tau expression (P = 0.518) or by treatment arm (P = 0.584). Conclusions Quantitative measurement of MAP-tau expression has prognostic value in both cohorts, with high expression associated with longer TTP and OS. Differences by treatment arm or response rate in low versus high MAP-tau groups were not observed, indicating that MAP-tau is not associated with response to taxanes and is not a useful predictive marker for taxane-based chemotherapy. PMID:21888627

  2. Alzheimer’s amyloid-? toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation are linked via RCAN1

    PubMed Central

    LLoret, A; Badia, MC; Giraldo, E; Ermak, G; Alonso, MD; Pallardó, FV; Davies, KJA; Viña, J

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-? peptide (A?) toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). How their molecular relationships may affect the etiology, progression, and severity of the disease, however, has not been elucidated. We now report that incubation of foetal rat cortical neurons with A? up-regulates expression of the Regulator of Calcineurin gene RCAN1, and this is mediated by A?-induced oxidative stress. Calcineurin (PPP3CA) is a serine-threonine phosphatase that dephosphorylates tau. RCAN1 proteins inhibit this phosphatase activity of calcineurin. Increased expression of RCAN1 also causes up-regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3?), a tau kinase. Thus, increased RCAN1 expression might be expected to decrease phospho-tau dephosphorylation (via calcineurin inhibition) and increase tau phosphorylation (via increased GSK3? activity). We find that, indeed, incubation of primary cortical neurons with A? results in increased phosphorylation of tau, unless RCAN1 gene expression is silenced, or antioxidants are added. Thus we propose a mechanism to link A? toxicity and tau hyperphosphorylation in AD: In our hypothesis, A? causes mitochondrial oxidative stress and increases production of reactive oxygen species, which result in an up-regulation of RCAN1 gene expression. RCAN1 proteins then both inhibit calcineurin and induce expression of GSK3?. Both mechanisms shift tau to a hyperphosphorylated state. We also find that lymphocytes from persons whose ApoE genotype is ?4/?4 (with high risk of developing AD) show higher levels of RCAN1 and phospho-tau than those carrying the ApoE ?3/?3 or ?3/?4 genotypes. Thus up-regulation of RCAN1 may be a valuable bio-marker for Alzheimer’s disease risk. PMID:21876249

  3. The Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk) Regulates Alzheimer Amyloid-? Production and Tau Hyperphosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Daniel; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Bachmeier, Corbin; Laco, Gary; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Lin, Yong; Jin, Chao; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that the L-type calcium channel (LCC) antagonist nilvadipine reduces brain amyloid-? (A?) accumulation by affecting both A? production and A? clearance across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Nilvadipine consists of a mixture of two enantiomers, (+)-nilvadipine and (?)-nilvadipine, in equal proportion. (+)-Nilvadipine is the active enantiomer responsible for the inhibition of LCC, whereas (?)-nilvadipine is considered inactive. Both nilvadipine enantiomers inhibit A? production and improve the clearance of A? across the BBB showing that these effects are not related to LCC inhibition. In addition, treatment of P301S mutant human Tau transgenic mice (transgenic Tau P301S) with (?)-nilvadipine reduces Tau hyperphosphorylation at several Alzheimer disease (AD) pertinent epitopes. A search for the mechanism of action of (?)-nilvadipine revealed that this compound inhibits the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk). We further validated Syk as a target-regulating A? by showing that pharmacological inhibition of Syk or down-regulation of Syk expression reduces A? production and increases the clearance of A? across the BBB mimicking (?)-nilvadipine effects. Moreover, treatment of transgenic mice overexpressing A? and transgenic Tau P301S mice with a selective Syk inhibitor respectively decreased brain A? accumulation and Tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD relevant epitopes. We show that Syk inhibition induces an increased phosphorylation of the inhibitory Ser-9 residue of glycogen synthase kinase-3?, a primary Tau kinase involved in Tau phosphorylation, by activating protein kinase A, providing a mechanism explaining the reduction of Tau phosphorylation at GSK3?-dependent epitopes following Syk inhibition. Altogether our data highlight Syk as a promising target for preventing both A? accumulation and Tau hyperphosphorylation in AD. PMID:25331948

  4. Functional genomic screen and network analysis reveal novel modifiers of tauopathy dissociated from tau phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ambegaokar, Surendra S.; Jackson, George R.

    2011-01-01

    A functional genetic screen using loss-of-function and gain-of-function alleles was performed to identify modifiers of tau-induced neurotoxicity using the 2N/4R (full-length) isoform of wild-type human tau expressed in the fly retina. We previously reported eye pigment mutations, which create dysfunctional lysosomes, as potent modifiers; here, we report 37 additional genes identified from ?1900 genes screened, including the kinases shaggy/GSK-3beta, par-1/MARK, CamKI and Mekk1. Tau acts synergistically with Mekk1 and p38 to down-regulate extracellular regulated kinase activity, with a corresponding decrease in AT8 immunoreactivity (pS202/T205), suggesting that tau can participate in signaling pathways to regulate its own kinases. Modifiers showed poor correlation with tau phosphorylation (using the AT8, 12E8 and AT270 epitopes); moreover, tested suppressors of wild-type tau were equally effective in suppressing toxicity of a phosphorylation-resistant S11A tau construct, demonstrating that changes in tau phosphorylation state are not required to suppress or enhance its toxicity. Genes related to autophagy, the cell cycle, RNA-associated proteins and chromatin-binding proteins constitute a large percentage of identified modifiers. Other functional categories identified include mitochondrial proteins, lipid trafficking, Golgi proteins, kinesins and dynein and the Hsp70/Hsp90-organizing protein (Hop). Network analysis uncovered several other genes highly associated with the functional modifiers, including genes related to the PI3K, Notch, BMP/TGF-? and Hedgehog pathways, and nuclear trafficking. Activity of GSK-3? is strongly upregulated due to TDP-43 expression, and reduced GSK-3? dosage is also a common suppressor of A?42 and TDP-43 toxicity. These findings suggest therapeutic targets other than mitigation of tau phosphorylation. PMID:21949350

  5. Trichloroacetic acid treatment as a tricky way for rapid purification of 1N/4R tau protein.

    PubMed

    Asadollahi, Kazem; Rafiee, Saharnaz; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Pooyan, Shahriar; Afrasiabi, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Tau protein consists of six different isoforms and each one has particular physiological roles. In order to analyze the specific function of each single isoforms, large quantity of highly purified tau isoforms is essential. Many studies have been done to purify tau isoforms by heat treatment, followed by perchloric acid and glycerol precipitation. We found out that 1N/4R tau is soluble in glycerol, that is why mentioned methods do not work for purifying this isoform. In this study, large amounts of active and highly purified (97%) 1N/4R tau protein has been prepared by utilization of trichloroacetic acid as precipitating agent. PMID:26481271

  6. Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    E-print Network

    J. Sparacino; M. G. Farías; P. W. Lamberti

    2013-02-11

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  7. Effect of the microtubule-associated protein tau on dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparacino, J.; Farías, M. G.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2014-02-01

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with nonmotile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al., Science 319, 1086 (2008), 10.1126/science.1152993] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduces experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  8. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-04-21

    Results of a search for H ? ?? decays are presented, based on the full set of proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC during 2011 and 2012. The data correspond to integrated luminosities of 4.5 fb–1 and 20.3 fb–1 at centre-of-mass energies of ?s=7 TeV and ?s=8 TeV respectively. All combinations of leptonic (? ? ???¯ with ? = e, ?) and hadronic (? ? hadrons ?) tau decays are considered. An excess of events over the expected background from other Standard Model processes is found with an observed (expected) significance of 4.5 (3.4) standardmore »deviations. This excess provides evidence for the direct coupling of the recently discovered Higgs boson to fermions. The measured signal strength, normalized to the Standard Model expectation, of ? = 1.43–0.37+0.43 is consistent with the predicted Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.« less

  9. Evidence for the Higgs-boson Yukawa coupling to tau leptons with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Agustoni, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allison, L. J.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X. S.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.;