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Sample records for tau decay tau

  1. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  2. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  3. tau. r arrow. omega. pi. nu. sub. tau. decay

    SciTech Connect

    Fajfer, S.; Suruliz, K. ); Oakes, R.J. )

    1992-08-01

    The decay width for {tau}{r arrow}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} is calculated using a general low-energy effective Lagrangian for pseudoscalar and vector mesons with U(3){times}U(3) chiral symmetry. The relevant couplings are determined empirically from vector-meson decays. A comparison with results coming from the vector-meson-dominance model is given.

  4. CP violation in hadronic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; Kiers, Ken; London, David; Szynkman, Alejandro; O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    2007-04-01

    We reexamine CP violation in the {delta}S=0 decays {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=2,3,4). We assume that the new physics (NP) is a charged Higgs boson. We show that there is no NP contribution to {tau}{yields}{pi}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which means that no CP violation is expected in this decay. On the other hand, NP can contribute to {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=3,4). These are dominated by the intermediate resonant decays {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{yields}{rho}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We show that the only sizeable CP-violating effects which are possible are in {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}{yields}4{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (polarization-dependent rate asymmetry) and {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (triple-product asymmetry)

  5. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; ,

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  6. Decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Burchat, P.R.

    1986-02-01

    Previous measurements of the branching fractions of the tau lepton result in a discrepancy between the inclusive branching fraction and the sum of the exclusive branching fractions to final states containing one charged particle. The sum of the exclusive branching fractions is significantly smaller than the inclusive branching fraction. In this analysis, the branching fractions for all the major decay modes are measured simultaneously with the sum of the branching fractions constrained to be one. The branching fractions are measured using an unbiased sample of tau decays, with little background, selected from 207 pb/sup -1/ of data accumulated with the Mark II detector at the PEP e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. The sample is selected using the decay products of one member of the ..gamma../sup +/..gamma../sup -/ pair produced in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation to identify the event and then including the opposite member of the pair in the sample. The sample is divided into subgroups according to charged and neutral particle multiplicity, and charged particle identification. The branching fractions are simultaneously measured using an unfold technique and a maximum likelihood fit. The results of this analysis indicate that the discrepancy found in previous experiments is possibly due to two sources. First, the leptonic branching fractions measured in this analysis are about one standard deviation higher than the world average. The measured leptonic branching fractions correspond to a tau lifetime of (3.0 +- 0.2) x 10/sup -13/ s. Secondly, the total branching fraction to one charged hadron plus at least one neutral particle is measured to be (7 +- 3)% higher than the branching fraction expected from a combination of previous measurements and theoretical predictions. It is shown that decay modes involving the eta are not expected to contribute more than 3% to this excess.

  7. B to tau Leptonic and Semileptonic Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, M.; /Brunel U.

    2011-11-17

    Decays of B mesons to states involving {tau} leptons can be used as a tool to search for the effects of new physics, such as those involving a charged Higgs boson. The experimental status of the decays B {yields} {tau}{nu} and B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu} is discussed, together with limits on new physics effects from current results. Leptonic and semileptonic decays of B mesons into states involving {tau} leptons remain experimentally challenging, but can prove a useful tool for constraining Standard Model parameters, and also offer to constrain the effects of any new physics that may exist including the presence of a charged Higgs boson.

  8. Crystal Ball results on tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1987-10-01

    This report reviews measurements and upper limit determinations for a number of exclusive 1-prong tau decay modes using the Crystal Ball detector. These results are important input to the apparent discrepancy between the topological and sum-of-exclusive branching fractions in 1-prong tau decays.

  9. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, Ian M.; /Victoria U.

    2010-03-16

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (8.83 {+-} 0.01 {+-} 0.13)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.273 {+-} 0.002 {+-} 0.009)%, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.1346 {+-} 0.0010 {+-} 0.0036)%, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.58 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -5} are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.42 {+-} 0.55 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -5}, a measurement of {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (3.39 {+-} 0.20 {+-} 0.28) x 10{sup -5} and an upper limit on {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}[ex.{phi}]) {le} 2.5 x 10{sup -6} {at} 905 CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is measured to be (6.531 {+-} 0.056 {+-} 0.093) x 10{sup -2} from which |V{sub us}| is determined to be 0.2255 {+-} 0.0023. The branching ratio {Beta}/({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (9.796 {+-} 0.016 {+-} 0.035) x 10{sup -1} is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of charged current lepton universality, g{sub {mu}}/g{sub e} = 1.0036 {+-} 0.0020. The branching ratios {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (3.882 {+-} 0.032 {+-} 0.057) x 10{sup -2}, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{nu}{sub {tau}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}) = (5.9545 {+-} 0.014 {+-} 0.061) x 10{sup -1} are measured which provide additional tests of charged current lepton universality, (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub {pi}} = 0.9856 {+-} 0.0057 and (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub K} = 0.9827 {+-} 0.0086 which can be combined to give (g{sub {tau}}/g{sub {mu}}){sub {pi}/K} = 0.9850 {+-} 0.0054. Any deviation of these measurements from the expected Standard Model values would be an indication of new physics.

  10. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  11. Measurement of the Cabibbo-suppressed decays tau. -->. K. nu. /sub tau/ and tau. -->. K. nu. /sub tau/+n. pi. /sup 0/

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.B.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Atwood, W.B.; Baillon, P.H.; Barish, B.C.; Bonneaud, G.R.; Courau, A.; Donaldson, G.J.; Dubois, R.; Duro, M.M.; Elsen, E.E.; Gao, S.G.; Huang, Y.Z.; Irwin, G.M.; Johnson, R.P.; Kichimi, H.; Kirkby, J.; Klem, D.E.; Koop, D.E.; Ludwig, J.; Ogawa, A.; Pal, T.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Pitthan, R.; Pollard, D.L.; Prescott, C.Y.; Rivkin, L.Z.; Rochester, L.S.; Sakuda, M.; Sherman, S.S.; Siskind, E.J.; Stroynowski, R.; Wang, S.Q.; Wojcicki, S.G.; Yamamoto, H.; Yan, W.G.; Young, C.C.

    1984-05-28

    The branching fractions for the Cabibbo-suppressed tau decays are measured using the DELCO detector at PEP. The results, R(tau..-->..K..nu../sub tau/) = (0.59 +- 0.18)% and R(tau..-->..K..nu../sub tau/+n..pi../sup 0/) = (1.71 +- 0.2 9)% including n = 0, are in agreement with the standard theory of sequential leptons and with tau-..mu..-e universality.

  12. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  13. Reconstruction and selection of Z{yields}{tau}{tau}{yields}{mu}+{tau}-jet+{nu}'s decays at the CMS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lusito, Letizia

    2010-12-22

    At the LHC, tau leptons are expected in final states of many important physics processes including Supersymmetry and the production of Higgs boson(s) and other exotic particles. An efficient and accurate {tau} reconstruction and identification are therefore an important part of the CMS physics programme. Z{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} decays are often considered the ''standard candle'' of tau reconstruction as they validate tau lepton identification and provide a test bench for Higgs searches (for which they constitute the main irreducible background). We describe techniques for selecting and reconstructing the Z{sup 0}{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}{yields}{mu}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}({bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}})+{tau}-jet{sup {-+}}{nu}{sub {tau}}({bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) events that were developed for the measurement of the Z production cross-section by the CMS experiment using 200 pb{sup -1} of the LHC collision data at the center-of-mass energy {radical}(s) 10 TeV. We validate these techniques using simulated events and present a data-driven method for estimating background contributions to this measurement.

  14. Measurement of the decays tau/sup -/. -->. rho/sup -/. nu. /sub tau/ and tau/sup -/. -->. K*/sup -/(892). nu. /sub tau/ using the Mark II detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.

    1980-08-01

    Measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabibbo-favored decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and the Cabibbo-suppressed decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(892)..nu../sub tau/ are presented. The energy dependence of the tau/sup +/tau/sup -/ production cross section is measured with the aid of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/, which yields a measurement M/sub tau/ = (1790 +- 40) MeV. A 2 sigma upper limit for the forbidden decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(1430)..nu../sub tau/ is also presented. 3 figures.

  15. Search for the rare decay B0-->tau+tau- at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; 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Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Martinez-Vidal, F; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, Ian J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissiere, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganit, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; Schott, G

    2006-06-23

    We present the results of a search for the decay B0-->tau+tau- in a data sample of (232+/-3)x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the standard model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain Beta(B0->tau+tau-)<4.1x10(-3) at the 90% confidence level. PMID:16907230

  16. Search for neutrinoless {tau} decays: {tau}{r_arrow}e{gamma} and {tau}{r_arrow}{mu}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, K.W.; Bellerive, A.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; McLean, K.W.; Patel, P.M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Darling, C.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; ONeill, J.J.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Savinov, V.; Smith, A.; Alam, M.S.; Athar, S.B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; Severini, H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Anastassov, A.; Blinov, S.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fujino, D.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M.B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Nemati, B.; Richichi, S.J.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Yurko, M.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Schaffner, S.F.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Frasconi, F.; Gao, M.

    1997-04-01

    A search for the lepton-family-number-violating decays {tau}{r_arrow}e{gamma} and {tau}{r_arrow}{mu}{gamma} has been performed using CLEO II data. No evidence of a signal has been found and the corresponding upper limits are B({tau}{r_arrow}e{gamma}){lt}2.7{times}10{sup {minus}6} and B({tau}{r_arrow}{mu}{gamma}){lt}3.0{times}10{sup {minus}6} at 90{percent} C.L. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  18. Measurement of the Semileptonic Decays B->D tau nu and B->D* tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes in certain scenarios. The data sample consists of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. They select events with a D or D* meson and a light lepton ({ell} = e or {mu}) recoiling against a fully reconstructed B meson. They perform a fit to the joint distribution of lepton momentum and missing mass squared to distinguish signal B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} ({tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}{nu}{sub {tau}}) events from the backgrounds, predominantly B {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}. They measure the branching-fraction ratios R(D) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and R(D*) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D* {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and, from a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, obtain the results R(D) = (41.6 {+-} 11.7 {+-} 5.2)% and R(D*) = (29.7 {+-} 5.6 {+-} 1.8)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Normalizing to measured B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} branching fractions, they obtain {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0.86 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.06)% and {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1.62 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.05)%, where the additional third uncertainty is from the normalization mode. They also present, for the first time, distributions of the lepton momentum, |P*{sub {ell}}|, and the squared momentum transfer, q{sup 2}.

  19. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; ,

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  20. Search for tau decays to the eta meson

    SciTech Connect

    Skwarnicki, T.

    1987-12-01

    Using a sample of 530,000 tau leptons collected by the Crystal Ball experiment at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring DORIS II, we have searched for tau decays to the eta meson. No eta signal is found in the inclusive analysis, tau ..-->.. eta X, of 1-prong decays, leading to the upper limits, BR(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/eta) <0.3%, BR(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/eta) <0.9%, BR(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/eta) <3.1%, BR(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/eta eta) <2.5% (95% CL). The decays, tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/eta and tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/eta, are also not found in the exclusive analyses, while BR(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/) = (22.7 +- 0.9 +- 3.0)% and BR(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/) = (7.0 +- 0.7 +- 1.4)% are measured in accord with the expectations. The hadronic final state, ..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/, is reconstructed in tau decays for the first time. The results are preliminary. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  1. First Search for {ital CP} Violation in Tau Lepton Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, S.J.; ONeill, J.J.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Smith, A.; Alam, M.S.; Athar, S.B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Schwarthoff, H.; Spencer, M.B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Richichi, S.J.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J.W.; Menson, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Yurko, M.; Glenn, S.; Kwon, Y.; Lyon, A.L.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Savinov, V.; Ugolini, D.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Artuso, M.; Azfar, F.; Efimov, A.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Wang, J.C.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; McLean, K.W.; Marka, S.; Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I.C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J.

    1998-11-01

    We have performed the first search for CP violation in tau lepton decay. CP violation in lepton decay does not occur in the minimal standard model but can occur in extensions such as the multi-Higgs doublet model. It appears as a characteristic difference between the {tau}{sup {minus}} and {tau}{sup +} decay angular distributions for the semileptonic decay modes such as {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup 0}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu} . We define an observable asymmetry to exploit this and find no evidence for any CP violation. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

  2. A Search for Neutrinoless Tau Decays to Three Leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, Jeffrey A.; ,

    2008-09-24

    Using approximately 350 million {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pair events recorded with the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center between 1999 and 2006, a search has been made for neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating tau decays to three lighter leptons. All six decay modes consistent with conservation of electric charge and energy have been considered. With signal selection efficiencies of 5-12%, we obtain 90% confidence level upper limits on the branching fraction {Beta}({tau} {yields} {ell}{ell}{ell}) in the range (4-8) x 10{sup -8}.

  3. CP Violation in Tau to K* Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, Mark; /Manchester U.

    2006-03-10

    A sample of {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sup {+-}} decays with K*{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, using 123.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is used to search for a direct CP violation effect in the charged Higgs sector. No evidence of CP violation is found and the imaginary part of the charged Higgs coupling, {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}), in the Multi-Higgs-Doublet-Model is found to be at -0.284 < {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}) < 0.200 at 90% Confidence Level. In addition the installation of the kk2f Monte Carlo generator into the BaBar software framework is described.

  4. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Higgs mediated lepton flavor violating tau decays {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma} in effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, J. I.; Tututi, E. S.; Toscano, J. J.

    2008-07-01

    The size of the branching ratios for the {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma} decays induced by a lepton flavor violating Higgs interaction H{tau}{mu} is studied in the framework of effective field theories. The best constraint on the H{tau}{mu} vertex, derived from the know measurement on the muon anomalous magnetic moment, is used to impose the upper bounds Br({tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma})<7.5x10{sup -10} and Br({tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma})<2.3x10{sup -12}, which are more stringent than current experimental limits on this class of transitions.

  6. Lepton-Flavor-Violating Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Marchiori, G.; /Paris, LPTHE

    2012-04-09

    We present the most recent searches for lepton-flavor-violating (LFV) {tau} decays in BABAR. We find no evidence of {tau} decaying to three charged leptons or to a charged lepton and a neutral meson (K{sub S}{sup 0}, {rho}, {phi}, K*{sup 0}, {bar K}*{sup 0}), and set upper limits on the corresponding branching fractions (BF) between 1.8 and 19 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level (CL).

  7. Sensitivity to the Higgs sector of SUSY-seesaw models via LFV tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.

    2010-02-10

    Here we study and compare the sensitivity to the Higgs sector of SUSY-seesaw models via the LFV tau decays: tau->3mu, tau->muK{sup +}K{sup -}, tau->mueta and tau->mu f{sub 0}. We emphasize that, at present, the two latter channels are the most efficient ones to test indirectly the Higgs particles.

  8. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  9. Lepton Flavour Violation in Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, F.F.; /Rutherford

    2011-11-07

    Recent results from {tau} physics studies at BABAR are presented with an emphasis on Lepton Flavour Violation measurements. The results from the current generation of B-meson Factories are already beginning to constrain the parameter space of models that go beyond the Standard Model. By the end of their data-taking, the current generation of B-meson factories will have produced nearly 2 billion {tau} pair decays. The physics potential of this legacy has only just begun to be exploited.

  10. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  11. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  12. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of Ds+ --> tau+ nutau decay.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G

    2008-04-25

    Using a sample of tagged D(s)(+) decays collected near the D(s)(*+/-)D(s)(-/+) peak production energy in e(+)e(-) collisions with the CLEO-c detector, we study the leptonic decay D(s)(+)-->tau(+)nu(tau) via the decay channel tau(+)-->e(+)nu(e)nu(tau). We measure B(D(s)(+)-->tau(+)nu(tau))=(6.17+/-0.71+/-0.34)%, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Combining this result with our measurements of D(s)(+)-->mu(+)nu(mu) and D(s)(+)-->tau(+)nu(tau) (via tau(+)-->pi(+)nu(tau)), we determine f(D(s))=(274+/-10+/-5) MeV. PMID:18518183

  13. Hadron structure in {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Roig, P.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the hadronization structure of both vector and axial-vector currents leading to {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays. At leading order in the 1/N{sub C} expansion, and considering only the contribution of the lightest resonances, we work out, within the framework of the resonance chiral Lagrangian, the structure of the local vertices involved in those processes. The couplings in the resonance theory are constrained by imposing the asymptotic behavior of vector and axial-vector spectral functions ruled by QCD. In this way we predict the hadron spectra and conclude that, contrary to previous assertions, the vector contribution dominates by far over the axial-vector one in all KK{pi} charge channels.

  14. Lepton Universality, |V(Us)| and Search for Second Class Current in Tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Swagato; /Victoria U.

    2011-11-10

    Several hundred million {tau} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Recent results on Charged Current Lepton Universality and two independent measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, K{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} and K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays, and a search for Second Class Current in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays are presented, where the charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  15. New determination of the Michel parameter in tau decay

    SciTech Connect

    Behrends, S.; Gentile, T.; Guida, J.M.; Guida, J.A.; Morrow, F.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Thorndike, E.H.; Tipton, P.; Besson, D.

    1985-11-01

    We have used the leptonic decays of the tau to determine the Lorentz structure of its decay vertex. We find the Michel parameter rho to be 0.71 +- 0.09 +- 0.03, which is consistent with V-A (rho = 0.75) and inconsistent with V+A. This measurement represents the first such analysis using muons in the final state.

  16. Search for CP Violation in the Decay tau- \\to pi- K^0_S (>= 0 pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-16

    We report a search for CP violation in the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}({>=} 0{pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} using a dataset of 437 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 476 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The CP-violating decay-rate asymmetry is determined to be (-0.45 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11)%, approximately three standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction of (0.33 {+-} 0.01)%.

  17. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  18. Production of eta and. omega. mesons in tau decay and a search for second-class currents

    SciTech Connect

    Baringer, P.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Behrends, S.; Guida, J.M.; Guida, J.A.; Morrow, F.; Poling, R.; Thorndike, E.H.

    1987-11-02

    The production of eta and ..omega.. mesons in tau decay has been studied with the CLEO detector. A sample of 42 000 e/sup +/e/sup -/..-->..tau/sup +/tau/sup -/ events at a mean ..sqrt..s of 10.5 GeV is used in the analysis. The branching ratio B(tau/sup -/..--> omega pi../sup -/..nu../sub tau/) is measured to be (1.60 +- 0.27 +- 0.41)%. No signal for eta production from tau decay is observed, resulting in 95%-confidence-level upper limits of 1.8% for B(tau/sup -/..-->..eta..pi../sup -/..nu../sub tau/), 2.1% for B(tau/sup -/..-->..eta..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/..nu../sub tau/), and 2.1% for inclusive eta production in tau decay. No evidence is found for decays proceeding via second-class currents.

  19. Measurement of sigma(ppbar->Z) Br(Z->tau+tau-) and search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau+tau- at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Galea, Cristina Florina; /Nijmegen U.

    2008-01-01

    The resonant production of tau-lepton pairs is as interesting for the study of Standard Model (SM) physics as the production of lighter leptons pairs. For new phenomena, such as Higgs boson production or in case new particles beyond the SM would arise, the detection of (resonant) pairs of tau leptons becomes much more interesting. This is due to the fact that tau leptons are much heavier than the other leptons, which increases the chance that these new phenomena would be observed first in this channel. Unfortunately their clean detection is far more difficult than that of muons or electrons. The cross section times branching ratio {sigma}{center_dot} Br for the process p{bar p} {yields} Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} was measured at {radical}s = 1.96 GeV using 1.0 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment. This measurement was performed in the channel in which one of the tau leptons decays to a muon and neutrinos, while the other decays either hadronically or to an electron and neutrinos. A set of 1511 events, of which about 20% estimated background, passed all selection criteria. The trigger and muon reconstruction efficiencies, as well as the efficiency for track reconstruction were obtained from data using the 'tag and probe' method on Z {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} events. The multijet background was estimated from the sample of events which passed all selection criteria but in which the muon and the tau candidate had the same charge. The W {yields} {mu}{nu} + jets background was modeled by Monte Carlo simulations, but normalized to data. All the other backgrounds, as well as the efficiency for Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} events were estimated using simulated events normalized to the theoretical calculations of cross sections at next-to-leading order or next-to-next-to-leading order. The energy of the tau candidates was corrected for the estimated response of the charged pions in the calorimeter, which is of the order 50-80%. Since the charged pion response in data was not well reproduced by the default simulation of hadronic interactions (Geisha), a different simulation (gCALOR) was used to obtain an estimated charged pion response consistent with the one measured in data. This tau energy correction method makes use of the superior resolution of the track momentum measurement compared to the resolution of the tau candidate energy as measured by the calorimeter, which leads to a better data--simulation agreement and a decrease of 10% in the resolution of the visible mass peak. The result of this measurement is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z) {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 240 {+-} 8(stat) {+-} 12(syst) {+-} 15(lumi) pb, in good agreement with the theoretical predictions of 241.6{sub -3.2}{sup +3.6} pb [79] or 251.9{sub -12}{sup +5.1} pb [93-95], as well as with other measurements performed by the D0 and CDF experiments in all channels in which the Z boson decays leptonically [96-100]. This is the most precise Z boson cross section measurement to date performed in the tau lepton channel at hadron colliders. The analysis demonstrates the ability of the D0 experiment to identify tau leptons decaying hadronically with good efficiency and high purity, a challenging task in p{bar p} collisions where the number of jets resembling tau leptons is very high. This achievement forms a solid basis for other analyses using hadronic tau lepton decays, such as the search for the Higgs boson decaying into tau-lepton pairs, which was performed for the last part of this thesis.

  20. Measurement of Cabibbo-Suppressed Tau Lepton Decays and the Determination of |Vus|

    SciTech Connect

    Schenk, Stefan; /SLAC

    2008-12-16

    This work presents simultaneous branching fraction measurements of the decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n = 0,1,2,3 and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} n{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} with n = 3,4. The analysis is based on a data sample of 427 x 10{sup 6} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector, which corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 464.4 fb{sup -1}. The measured values are {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (6.57 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -3}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.61 {+-} 0.03 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -3}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (5.05 {+-} 0.17 {+-} 0.44) x 10{sup -4}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.31 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.40) x 10{sup -4}, {Beta}({tau}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.263 {+-} 0.008 {+-} 0.078) x 10{sup -2} and {Beta}({tau}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (9.6 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 1.2) x 10{sup -4}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. All measurements are compatible with the current world averages whereas the uncertainties are significantly smaller by a factor of up to five. The determination of {Beta}({tau}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is the first measurement of this branching fraction. The measured branching fractions are combined with the current world averages. Using the new averages, an updated determination of |V{sub us}| from hadronic {tau} decays yields |V{sub us}| = 0.2146 {+-} 0.0025, which improves previous measurements by 19%. Its uncertainty is comparable to the one of the current world average from semileptonic kaon decays.

  1. Kaon content of three-prong decays of the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Eastman, J.J.

    1990-12-01

    We present a series of measurements involving the production of charged kaons in three-prong hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton. The data sample was obtained with the TPC/Two-Gamma detector facility at PEP. We set a limit on the branching fraction BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0}) < 0.26% at the 95% confidence level. The process {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup 0} is related via SU(3) to the second-class current decay {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}{pi}{sup {minus}}{eta}. We also present new measurements of the three-prong branching fractions BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.70 (+0.20/{minus}0.17)% and BR({tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} + neutrals) = 0.16 (+0.10/{minus}0.07)%. 68 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs.

  2. Search for Rare Multi-Pion Decays of the Tau Lepton Using the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonyan, Ruben

    2007-09-18

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to rare multi-pion final states is performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The analysis uses 232 fb-1 of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. In the search for the {tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay, we observe 10 events with an expected background of 6.5{sup +2.0}{sub -1.4} events. In the absence of a signal, we calculate the decay branching ratio upper limit {beta}({tau}- {yields} 3{pi}-2{pi}+2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. This is more than a factor of 30 improvement over the previously established limit. In addition, we search for the exclusive decay mode {tau}- {yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} with the further decay of {omega} {yields} {pi}-{pi}+{pi}{sup 0}. We observe 1 event, expecting 0.4{sup +1.0}{sub -0.4} background events, and calculate the upper limit {beta}{tau}-{yields} 2{omega}{pi}-{nu}{sub {tau}} < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This is the first upper limit for this mode.

  3. Search for doubly charged Higgs bosons with lepton-flavour-violating decays involving tau leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.

    2007-12-01

    The authors search for pair production of doubly charged Higgs particles (H{sup {+-}{+-}}) followed by decays into electron-tau (e{tau}) and muon-tau ({mu}{tau}) pairs using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 350 pb{sup -1} collected from {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II experiment. They search separately for cases where three or four final-state leptons are detected, and then combine the results into limits for each exclusive flavor decay mode of the H{sup {+-}{+-}}. Assuming 100% branching ratios of the H{sup {+-}{+-}} to left-handed e{tau} ({mu}{tau}) pairs, they set an H{sup {+-}{+-}} lower mass limit of 114 (112) GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level (C.L.).

  4. Search capability for {eta}{yields}{nu}{sub e,{tau}{nu}e,{tau}}decays in cubic-kilometer neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fazely, A. R.; Gunasingha, R. M.; Imlay, R. L.; Muhammad, K. D.; Ter-Antonyan, S. V.; Xu, X.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate the discovery potential of cubic-kilometer neutrino observatories such as IceCube to set stringent limits on the forbidden decays {eta}{yields}{nu}{sub e{nu}e} and {eta}{yields}{nu}{sub {tau}{nu}{tau}.} The signatures for these decays are cascade events resulting from the charged-current reactions of {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {tau},} {nu}{sub e}, and {nu}{sub {tau}}on nuclei in such detectors. Background cascade events are mainly due to {nu}{sub e}'s from atmospheric {mu}, K{sup +}, and K{sub S}{sup 0} decays and to a lesser extent from atmospheric {nu}{sub {mu}}neutral-current interactions with nuclei. A direct upper limit for the branching ratio {eta}{yields}{nu}{sub e,{tau}{nu}e,{tau}}of 6.1x10{sup -4} at 90% CL can be achieved.

  5. LFV in semileptonic {tau} decays and {mu}-e conversion in nuclei in SUSY-seesaw

    SciTech Connect

    Arganda, E.; Herrero, M.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, A.; Teixeira, A. M.

    2008-11-23

    Here we review the main results of LFV in the semileptonic tau decays {tau}{yields}{mu}PP(PP = {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}K{sup -}, K{sup 0}K-bar{sup 0}), {tau}{yields}{mu}P(P = {pi},{eta},{eta}'), and {tau}{yields}{mu}V(V = {rho},{phi}) as well as in {mu}-e conversion in nuclei within SUSY-seesaw scenarios, and compare our predictions with the present experimental bounds.

  6. Search for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decay tau -> electron gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U. /Basilicata U., Potenza

    2005-08-26

    A search for the non-conservation of lepton flavor in the decay {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma} has been performed with 2.07 x 10{sup 8} e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} events collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV. They find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching ratio of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 1.1 x 10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  7. Search for lepton flavor violation in the decay tau+/--->e+/-gamma.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; 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Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Schott, G; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2006-02-01

    A search for the nonconservation of lepton flavor in the decay tau+/--->e+/-gamma has been performed with 2.07x10(8) e+e--->tau+tau- events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP II storage ring at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV. We find no evidence for a signal and set an upper limit on the branching ratio of Beta(tau+/--->e+/-gamma)<1.1x10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:16486807

  8. Studies of the Strange Hadronic Tau Decay Tau- to K0(S) Pi- Nu-Tau Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, Andrew J.; /Manchester U. /SLAC

    2006-01-27

    A study of the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} (K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) using the BABAR detector is presented. Using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of data we measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.830 {+-} 0.005(stat) {+-} 0.042(syst))%, which is the world's most precise measurement to date of this branching ratio, and is consistent with the current world average. This preliminary result, unlike most of the {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) measurements already published, is systematics dominated and so the biggest future improvement to this number should come from reducing the systematic uncertainties in the analysis. A study of the K{pi} mass spectrum, from which the strange (K{pi}) spectral function can be measured, reveals excess contributions above the K*(892) tail at higher K{pi} mass. While in the past this has been thought to be due to K*(892) - K*(1410) interference, we find that the K*(1410), whose branching ratio to K{pi} is approximately 7%, seems insufficient to explain the excess mass observed in the data. Instead, we perform a fit using a K*(892) - K*(1680) interference model and find better agreement. The discrepancy that remains could be due to an s-wave contribution to the interference that is not parameterized in the model used, and/or detector smearing that is not accounted for in our fit. We also attempt to find an s-wave contribution to the K{pi} mass spectrum by searching for an sp-interference effect. While we find a hint that such an effect exists, we have neither the confidence in the statistics nor systematics in the higher K{pi} mass region to announce an observation. We conclude that it would be a worthwhile study to pursue.

  9. Developmental regulation of tau phosphorylation, tau kinases, and tau phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Run, Xiaoqin; Liang, Zhihou; Li, Yi; Liu, Fei; Liu, Ying; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Tau is a neuronal microtubule-associated protein. Its hyperphosphorylation plays a critical role in Alzheimer disease (AD). Expression and phosphorylation of tau are regulated developmentally, but its dynamic regulation and the responsible kinases or phosphatases remain elusive. Here, we studied the developmental regulation of tau in rats during development from embryonic day 15 through the age of 24 months. We found that tau expression increased sharply during the embryonic stage and then became relatively stable, whereas tau phosphorylation was much higher in developing brain than in mature brain. However, the extent of tau phosphorylation at seven of the 14 sites studied was much less in developing brain than in AD brain. Tau phosphorylation during development matched the period of active neurite outgrowth in general. Tau phosphorylation at various sites had different topographic distributions. Several tau kinases appeared to regulate tau phosphorylation collectively at overlapping sites, and the decrease of overall tau phosphorylation in adult brain might be due to the higher levels of tau phosphatases in mature brain. These studies provide new insight into the developmental regulation of site-specific tau phosphorylation and identify the likely sites required for the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in AD. PMID:19183272

  10. Search for anomalous couplings in the decay of polarized Z bosons to tau lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Torrence, E.C.

    1997-06-01

    Using a sample of 4,500 polarized Z decays to {tau} lepton pairs accumulated with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) in 1993-95, a search has been made for anomalous couplings in the neutral current reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}. A measurement of the CP violating Weak Electric Dipole Moment (WEDM) and the CP conserving Weak Magnetic Dipole Moment (WMDM) of the {tau} lepton has been performed by considering the transverse spin polarization of {tau} leptons produced at the Z pole. Using a maximum likelihood technique, the observed {tau} decay spectra in the e, {mu}, {pi}, and {rho} decay channels are used to infer the net transverse polarization of the underlying tau leptons, and a fit for the anomalous dipole moments is performed. No evidence for these dipole movements is observed, and limits are placed on both the real and imaginary parts of the WEDM and WMDM.

  11. Tau Charm Factory physics

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.H.

    1989-09-01

    Tau Charm Factories proposed for future machines will provide powerful and unique facilities to study a variety of physics topics: the tau lepton, charm mesons, charmonium and the J/{psi} decays. These topics cover the physics of the members of the first and second quark doublets and the third lepton doublet. A workshop held at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center reviewed the physics, the machine and the detector for such a facility. In this paper, highlights of this meeting will be reviewed. We will begin with a short sketch of the machine issues and then briefly describe topics in tau, charm and charmonium-J/{psi} physics. 49 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A study of the decays of tau leptons produced on the Z resonance at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Agasi, E.; Alekseev, G. D.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andreazza, A.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Apsimon, R. J.; Åsman, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barate, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Barrio, J. A.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M. J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Beeston, C. J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bocci, V.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borgeaud, P.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Bosworth, S.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenner, R. A.; Briand, H.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castelli, E.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chabaud, V.; Chan, A.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chaussard, L.; Chauveau, J.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Cirio, R.; Clara, M. P.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dagoret, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Daum, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; da Silva, W.; Defoix, C.; Delikaris, D.; Della Riccia, B. A.; Delorme, S.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; de Angelis, A.; de Beer, M.; de Boeck, H.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Fez Laso, M. D. M.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; Dijkstra, H.; di Ciaccio, L.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Eek, L.-O.; Eerola, P. A.-M.; Ehret, R.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.-P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fearnley, T. A.; Feindt, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K. A. J.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Galeazzi, G.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J.-P.; Giacomelli, P.; Gokieli, R.; Bolob, B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. 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J.; Klein, H.; Klempt, W.; Klovning, A.; Kluit, P.; Koch-Mehrin, A.; Koehne, J. H.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Kopf, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korytov, A. V.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, P. H.; Krolikowski, J.; Kronkvist, I.; Krstic, J.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Krupinski, W.; Kulka, K.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Levy, J. M.; Lieb, E.; Liko, D.; Lillethun, E.; Lindgren, J.; Lindner, R.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Los, M.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, J. J.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Maillard, J.; Maltezos, A.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Markou, A.; Maron, T.; Marti, S.; Mathis, L.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; Mc Kay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meola, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Mikulec, I.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Murray, W. J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Naraghi, F.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nijjhar, B.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nilsen, P. E. S.; Niss, P.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Ostankov, A.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Pain, R.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Pennanen, J.; Perevozchikov, V.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Pettersen, T. E.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Pingo, O.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, M.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roditi, I.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Ronnqvist, C.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, S.; Rossi, U.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Ruhlmann, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybicki, K.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, J.; Sannino, M.; Schael, S.; Schneider, H.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Segar, A. M.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siccama, I.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetti, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smith, G. R.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T. S.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Straver, J.; Strub, R.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tabarelli, T.; Tavernier, S.; Tchikilev, O.; Theodosiou, G. E.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Toet, D. Z.; Toker, O.; Torassa, E.; Tortora, L.; Trainor, M. T.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Trischuk, W.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turala, M.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Vander Velde, C.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van Doninck, W. K.; Varela, J.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Volponi, S.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Wehr, A.; Weierstall, M.; Weilhammer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Wikne, J.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Wormald, D.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yepes, P.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zuberi, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.; Zuniga, J.

    1992-12-01

    From the analysis of a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.63 pb-1 taken during the 1990 run of LEP at centre of mass energies between 88.2 GeV an 94.2 GeV, the tau decaystau ^ - to e^ - bar v_e v_tau ,tau ^ - to μ ^ - bar v_μ v_tau ,tau ^ - to π ^ - (K^ - )v_tau ,tau ^ - to ρ {}^ - v_tau and their charge conjugates have been studied. The following branching ratios have been measured;BR(tau ^ - to e^ - bar v_e v_tau ) = 18.6 ± 0.8(stat.) ± 0.6(sys.)% ,,BRleft( {tau ^ - to μ ^ - bar v_μ v_tau } right) = 17.4 ± 0.7 ± 0.6% ,, Br(τ- → π- (K-)vτ)=11.9±0.7±0.7%, BR (τ- → ρ- vτ)= 22.4±0.8±1.3%, in good agreement with world averages. The measured electronic and muonic branching ratios lead to a measurement of the strong coupling constant, αs (mτ) = 0.26{-0.12/+0.09}. Extrapolating the αs value from m τ to m Z yields αs (mZ) = 0.109{-0.028/+0.012}. The average polarization P τ of taus produced in Z → τs τs decays has also been measured using the above decay modes. The weighted mean of the polarizations obtained from the four decay modes is P τ=-0.24±0.07. This value of P τ gives, in the improved Born approximation, a ratio between the axial and vector coupling constants of the tau of υτ/aτ = 0.12 ± 0.04, and hence a value of the effective electroweak mixing parameter sin2 θW(m{Z/2}).

  13. Search for the Decay $\\tau^- \\rightarrow 3\\pi^- 2\\pi^+2\\pi^0 \

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-04-10

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to five charged and two neutral pions is performed using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses 232 fb{sup -1} of data at center-of-mass energies on or near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. We observe 10 events with an expected background of 6.5{sub -1.4}{sup +2.0} events. In the absence of a signal, we set the limit on the branching ratio {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} 3{pi}{sup -}2{pi}{sup +}2{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 3.4 x 10{sup -6} at the 90% confidence level. This is a significant improvement over the previously established limit. In addition, we search for the decay mode {tau}{sup -} {yields} 2{omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We observe 1 event with an expected background of 0.4{sub -0.4}{sup +1.0} events and calculate the upper limit {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} 2{omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 5.4 x 10{sup -7} at the 90% confidence level. This is the first upper limit for this mode.

  14. A Search for the Decay Modes B +/- to h +/- tau l

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.

    2012-07-20

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B{sup {+-}} {yields} h{sup {+-}} {tau}{ell} (h = K, {pi}; {ell} = e, {mu}) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472 million B{bar B} pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and {ell} candidates, we are able to fully determine the {tau} four-momentum. The resulting {tau} candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B{sup {+-}} {yields} h{sup {+-}} {tau}{ell} decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level of a few times 10{sup -5}.

  15. Lepton flavor violating {tau} decays in the type-III seesaw mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Chen, C.-H.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, the lepton flavor violating {tau}{yields}lP(V) (P, V={pi}{sup 0}, {eta}, {eta}{sup '}, {rho}{sup 0}, {omega}, {phi}) and {tau}{yields}3l (l=e, {mu}) decays are studied in the framework of the type-III seesaw model, in which new triplet fermions with a zero hypercharge (Y=0) interact with ordinary lepton doublets via Yukawa couplings, and affect tree-level leptonic Z-boson couplings. We investigate the experimental bound from the leptonic Z decay to get constraints on the existing parameters space. We predict that the upper limits on the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}lP(V) and {tau}{yields}3l can reach the experimental current limits.

  16. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $\\tau$ leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance larger than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.

  17. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $$\\tau$$ leptons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance largermore » than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.« less

  18. Search for Lepton Flavour Violating Decays Tau -> l Ks with the BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cenci, Riccardo; /SLAC

    2009-03-20

    We present the search for the lepton flavour violating decay {tau} {yields} lK{sup 0}{sub s} with the BaBar experiment data. This process and many other lepton flavour violating {tau} decays, like {tau} {yields} {mu}{gamma} and {tau} {yields} lll, are one of the most promising channel to search for evidence of new physics. According to the Standard Model and the neutrino mixing parameters, branching fractions are estimated well below 10{sup -14}, but many models of new physics allow for branching fractions values close to the present experimental sensitivity. This analysis is based on a data sample of 469fb{sup -1} collected by BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage ring from 1999 to 2007, equivalent to 431 millions of {tau} pairs. the BABAR experiment, initially designed for studying CP violation in B mesons, has demonstrated to be one of the most suitable environments for studying {tau} decays. The tracking system, the calorimeter and the particle identification of BABAR, together with the knowledge of the {tau} initial energy, allow an extremely powerful rejection of background events that, for this analysis, is better than 10{sup -9}. Being {tau} {yields} lK{sup 0}{sub s} a decay mode without neutrinos, the signal {tau} decay can be fully reconstructed. Kinematical constraints are used in a fit that provides a decay tree reconstruction with a high resolution. For this analysis MC simulated events play a decisive role for estimating the signal efficiency and study the residual background. High statistics MC sample are produced simulating detector conditions for different periods of data collection, in order to reduce any discrepancies with the data. When discrepancies can not be removed, we perform studies to compute a correction factor or an estimation of systematic errors that need to be included in the final measurement. A significant improvement of the current result can be reached only with a higher statistics and, therefore, with a new collider providing a luminosity from 10 to 100 times more than PEP-II. A new detector, with improved performance and able to collect data in a high background environment, is also requested to fully exploit the capability of such amount of data. In fact, only keeping the efficiency and the background as similar as possible to present ones, we will be able to scale almost linearly the estimated upper limit according to the luminosity. The strong potential of improvement for the search of lepton flavour violation {tau} decays makes the building of such a machine highly desirable.

  19. Observation of the Semileptonic Decays B to D*taunu and Evidence for B to D tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    B., Aubert

    2007-09-14

    We present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *0}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D{sup +}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and B{sup -} {yields} D{sup *+}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are potentially sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes, The data sample comprises 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4s) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector. From a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, we obtain the branching fractions {beta}(B {yields} D{sub {tau}}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0:86 {+-} 0:24 {+-} 0:11 {+-} 0:06)% and {beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1:62 {+-} 0:31 {+-} 0:10 {+-} 0:05)% (normalized for the {bar B}{sup 0}), , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and normalization-mode-related.

  20. Heavy scalar tau decays in the complex MSSM: a full one-loop analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemeyer, S.; Schappacher, C.

    2012-09-01

    We evaluate all two-body decay modes of the heavy scalar tau in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with complex parameters (cMSSM) and no generation mixing. The evaluation is based on a full one-loop calculation of all decay channels, also including hard and soft QED radiation. The renormalization of the relevant sectors is briefly reviewed. The dependence of the heavy scalar tau decay on the relevant cMSSM parameters is analyzed numerically, including also the decay to Higgs bosons and another scalar lepton or to a tau and the lightest neutralino. We find sizable contributions to many partial decay widths and branching ratios. They are mostly of {O}(5{-}10 %) of the tree-level results, but can go up to 20 %. These contributions are potentially important for the correct interpretation of scalar tau decays at the LHC and, if kinematically allowed, at the ILC or CLIC. The evaluation of the branching ratios of the heavy scalar tau will be implemented into the Fortran code FeynHiggs.

  1. Search for Higgs bosons decaying into tau pairs in ppbar collisions at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Mark A.; /Manchester U.

    2008-08-01

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying into tau pairs is presented using data in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. One of the tau leptons is identified via its decay into an electron or muon and the other via its decay into a hadronic final state. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of around 1.0 fb{sup -1}, were collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between April 2002 and February 2006. No significant excess of events above the background expectation is observed and limits on the cross section times branching ratio for neutral Higgs bosons decaying into tau pairs, p{bar p} {yields} {phi} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}, are set. The cross section limits are interpreted as exclusions in the parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model, resulting in exclusions in the range 40 < tan{beta} < 70 for M{sub A} < 200 GeV. Finally, the effect of Higgs bosons with a large total width is considered and the first model independent correction to the cross section limits for the width effect is presented.

  2. First Observation of the Decay {tau}{sup {minus}} {r_arrow} K{sup {asterisk}{minus}}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Bishai, M.; Chen, S.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Glenn, S.; Kwon, Y.; Lyon, A.L.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Savinov, V.; Ugolini, D.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Stroynowski, R.; Ye, J.; Wlodek, T.; Artuso, M.; Dambasuren, E.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Titov, A.; Viehhauser, G.; Wang, J.C.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; McLean, K.W.; Marka, S.; Xu, Z.; Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I.C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; Perera, L.P.; Zhou, G.J.; Chan, S.; Eigen, G.; Lipeles, E.; Miller, J.S.; Schmidtler, M.; Shapiro, A.; Sun, W.M.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Jaffe, D.E.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Potter, E.M.; Prell, S.; Sharma, V.; Asner, D.M.; Gronberg, J.; Hill, T.S.; Lange, D.J.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Roberts, D.; Behrens, B.H.; Ford, W.T.; Gritsan, A.; Krieg, H.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    The decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}{minus}}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} has been observed with the CLEOthinspthinspII detector. The K{sup {asterisk}{minus}} is reconstructed in two decay channels, K{sup {asterisk}{minus}}{r_arrow}K{sub S}{pi}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow} {pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and K{sup {asterisk}{minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0} . The {eta} is reconstructed from the decay {eta}{r_arrow}{gamma}{gamma} . The measured branching fraction is B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}{minus}} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(2.9{plus_minus} 0.8{plus_minus}0.4){times}10{sup {minus}4} . We also measure the inclusive branching fractions without requiring the K{sup {asterisk}} resonance, B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sub S}{pi}{sup {minus}}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.10 {plus_minus}0.35{plus_minus}0.11){times}10{sup {minus}4} and B({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(1.77 {plus_minus}0.56{plus_minus}0.71){times}10{sup {minus}4} . The results indicate that the K{sup {asterisk}{minus}} resonance dominates the K{sub S}{pi}{sup {minus}} mass spectrum. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  4. A Search for the Rare Leptonic B- to tau- anti-neutrino Recoiling against B+ to Decays to anti-D*0 l+ Lepton-neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Mousumi; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2006-10-17

    This thesis describes a search for the decay B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} in 231.8 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed exclusive semi-leptonic B decay (B{sup +} {yields} {bar D}*{sup 0} {ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}}) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} signal is performed in the following {tau} decay modes: {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}. They find no evidence of signal, and they set a preliminary upper limit on the branching fraction of {beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level (CL). This result is then combined with a statistically independent BABAR search for B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} to give a combined preliminary limit of {Beta}(B{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) < 2.6 x 10{sup -4} at 90% CL.

  5. What Renders TAU Toxic

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Xia, Di; Leinenga, Gerhard; Chew, Yee Lian; Nicholas, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    TAU is a microtubule-associated protein that under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) forms insoluble, filamentous aggregates. When 20 years after TAU’s discovery the first TAU transgenic mouse models were established, one declared goal that was achieved was the modeling of authentic TAU aggregate formation in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. However, as we review here, it has become increasingly clear that TAU causes damage much before these filamentous aggregates develop. In fact, because TAU is a scaffolding protein, increased levels and an altered subcellular localization (due to an increased insolubility and impaired clearance) result in the interaction of TAU with cellular proteins with which it would otherwise either not interact or do so to a lesser degree, thereby impairing their physiological functions. We specifically discuss the non-axonal localization of TAU, the role phosphorylation has in TAU toxicity and how TAU impairs mitochondrial functions. A major emphasis is on what we have learned from the four available TAU knock-out models in mice, and the knock-out of the TAU/MAP2 homolog PTL-1 in worms. It has been proposed that in human pathological conditions such as AD, a rare toxic TAU species exists which needs to be specifically removed to abrogate TAU’s toxicity and restore neuronal functions. However, what is toxic in one context may not be in another, and simply reducing, but not fully abolishing TAU levels may be sufficient to abrogate TAU toxicity. PMID:23772223

  6. Measurement of the Branching Fraction for D8+ rarr tau+nu_tau and Extraction of the Decay Constant f_D_s

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C.M.

    2010-06-04

    The branching fraction for the decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, is measured using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 427 fb{sup -1} collected at center of mass energies near 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. In the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} c{bar c} {yields} D*{sub s}{sup +} {bar D}{sub TAG}{bar K}X, the D*{sub s}{sup +} meson is reconstructed as a missing particle, and the subsequent decay D*{sub s}{sup +} {yields} D{sub s}{sup +}{gamma} yields an inclusive D{sub s}{sup +} data sample. Here {bar D}{sub TAG} refers to a fully reconstructed hadronic {bar D} decay, {bar K} is a K{sup -} or {bar K}{sup 0}, and X stands for any number of charged or neutral pions. The decay D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} is isolated also, and from ratio of event yields and known branching fractions, {Beta}(D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (4.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.4 {+-} 0.3)% is determined. The pseudoscalar decay constant is extracted to be f{sub D{sub s}} = (233 {+-} 13 {+-} 10 {+-} 7) MeV, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third results from the uncertainties on the external measurements used as input to the calculation.

  7. Two current experimental problems in heavy lepton physics: tau decay modes and close mass pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1987-08-01

    This paper investigates tau lepton decay modes and close-mass lepton pairs. The major part of the paper discusses branching functions from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Finally, the lack of experimental signatures of close-mass lepton pairs are reviewed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 11 tabs. (JDH)

  8. Tau and Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Gloria; Leugers, Chad J.

    2013-01-01

    Tauopathies are age-related neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the presence of aggregates of abnormally phosphorylated tau. As tau was originally discovered as a microtubule-associated protein, it has been hypothesized that neurodegeneration results from a loss of the ability of tau to associate with microtubules. However, tau has been found to have other functions aside from the promotion and stabilization of microtubule assembly. It is conceivable that such functions may be affected by the abnormal phosphorylation of tau and might have consequences for neuronal function or viability. This chapter provides an overview of tau structure, functions, and its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22482453

  9. A Search for the Decay B+ ---> Tau+ Nu/Tau at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-11-02

    Based on an 87-fb{sup -1} dataset collected by the Babar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B-Factory, a search for D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing has been made using the semileptonic decay modes D*{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}D{sup 0}, D{sup 0} {yields} Ke{nu} (+c.c.). The use of these modes allows unambiguous flavor tagging and a combined fit of the D{sup 0} decay time and D*{sup +}-D{sup 0} mass difference ({Delta}M) distributions. The high-statistics sample of unmixed semileptonic D{sup 0} decays is used to model the {Delta}M distribution and time-dependence of mixed events directly from the data. Neural networks are used to select events and reconstruct the D{sup 0}. A result consistent with no charm mixing has been obtained, R{sub mix} = 0.0023 {+-} 0.0012 {+-} 0.0004. This corresponds to an upper limit of R{sub mix} < 0.0042 (90% CL).

  10. Search for Lepton Flavour Violation (LFV) in Three-Body Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, M.; /Manchester U.

    2005-08-17

    The results of searches for Lepton Flavour Violating (LFV) decays at the BaBar detector located on the PEP-II collider, using data collected at an e{sup +}e{sup -} energy of 10.58 GeV, are presented. Upper limits at 90% Confidence Level (CL) are established in the range 1-3 x 10{sup -7} for six {tau} {yields} lll modes using 91.5 fb{sup -1} of data and in the range 0.7-4.8 x 10{sup -7} for fourteen {tau} {yields} lhh modes using 221.4 fb{sup -1} of data. The {tau} {yields} lhh results are preliminary.

  11. The form factors for hadronic tau decay using background field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Daiji; Lee, Kang Young; Morozumi, Takuya

    2014-08-01

    In the two body hadronic tau decays, such as τ → Kπ (η) ν, vector mesons play important role. Belle and Babar measured hadronic invariant mass spectrum of τ → Kπν decay. To compare the spectrum with theoretical prediction, we develop the chiral Lagrangian with vector mesons in [D. Kimura, K. Y. Lee and T. Morozumi, arxiv:arXiv:1201.1794 [hep-ph

  12. Search for High-Mass Resonances Decaying into Leptons of Different Flavor (e mu, e tau, mu tau) in p anti-p Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Yanjun; /Pennsylvania U.

    2008-10-01

    We present a search for high-mass resonances decaying into two leptons of different flavor: e{mu}, e{tau}, and {mu}{tau}. These resonances are predicted by several models beyond the standard model, such as the R-parity-violating MSSM. The search is based on 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF II) in proton anti-proton collisions. Our observations are consistent with the standard model expectations. The results are interpreted to set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma} x BR of {tilde {nu}}{sub {tau}} {yields} e{mu}, e{tau}, {mu}{tau}.

  13. Pathways of tau fibrillization.

    PubMed

    Kuret, Jeff; Chirita, Carmen N; Congdon, Erin E; Kannanayakal, Theresa; Li, Guibin; Necula, Mihaela; Yin, Haishan; Zhong, Qi

    2005-01-01

    New methods for analyzing tau fibrillization have yielded insights into the biochemical transitions involved in the process. Here we review the parallels between the sequential progression of tau fibrillization observed macroscopically in Alzheimer's disease (AD) lesions and the pathway of tau aggregation observed in vitro with purified tau preparations. In addition, pharmacological agents for further dissection of fibrillization mechanism and lesion formation are discussed. PMID:15615636

  14. The ATLAS Hadronic Tau Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brost, Elizabeth Caitlin

    2014-03-01

    As proton-proton collisions at the LHC reach luminosities close to 1034 cm-2 s-1, the strategies for triggering have become more important than ever for physics analyses. Simplistic single tau lepton triggers suffer from severe rate limitation, despite the sophisticated algorithms used in the tau identification. The development of further fast algorithms and the design of topological selections are the main challenges to allow a large program of physics analysis. The tau triggers provide many opportunities to study new physics beyond the Standard Model, and to get precise measurements of the properties of the Higgs boson decaying to tau-leptons. We present the performance of the hadronic tau trigger taken in Run 1 data with the ATLAS detector at sqrt(s) =8TeV p-p collision. One of the major challenges is to sustain high efficiencies in events with multiple interactions. To do this we introduced faster tracking methods, multivariate selection techniques, and new topological criteria in the software trigger. We present measurements of the trigger efficiency using Z to tau tau events as the application to searches for tau tau resonances, such as the Higgs boson searches. We also outline the upgrade plan expected for Run 2 for the 14(13) TeV LHC pp collisions.

  15. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Tau longitudinal polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} and its role in the search for the charged Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Ryoutaro

    2010-08-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of {tau} decay modes to the {tau} polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the {tau} polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu}. We find a relation between the decay rate and the {tau} polarization, and clarify the role of the {tau} polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

  17. Evidence for an excess of B to D(*) Tau Nu decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, David Nathan; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; So, R.Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V.E.; /more authors..

    2012-10-09

    Based on the full BABAR data sample, we report improved measurements of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}), where {ell} is either e or {mu}. These ratios are sensitive to new physics contributions in the form of a charged Higgs boson. We measure R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, which exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, our results disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. This excess cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model. We also report the observation of the decay {bar B} {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, with a significance of 6.8{sigma}.

  18. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  19. Lepton flavor violation in hadronic decays of the tau lepton in the simplest little Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lami, A.; Portolés, J.; Roig, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study lepton flavor violating hadron decays of the tau lepton within the simplest little Higgs model. Namely we consider τ →μ (P ,V ,P P ) where P and V are short for a pseudoscalar and a vector meson. We find that, in the most positive scenarios, branching ratios for these processes are predicted to be, at least, four orders of magnitude smaller than present experimental bounds.

  20. Search for CP Violation in $\\tau$ And D Decays With a $K^0_S$ in the Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Martinelli, Maurizio; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    I report the recent searches for CP violation in {tau} and D decays including a K{sub s}{sup 0} in the final state. The analyses herein shown are based on data samples recorded by BABAR and Belle experiments. A brief introduction on CP violation is followed by the summary of the experimental techniques and the results obtained for {tau} and D decays, respectively. Finally, an outlook on future development is provided.

  1. 2-3 symmetry: Flavor changing b, {tau} decays, and neutrino mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    2005-12-01

    The observed pattern of neutrino mixing may be the result of a 2-3({mu}-{tau}) symmetry in the leptonic sector. We consider a two Higgs doublet model with a 2-3 symmetry in the down-type quark and the charged lepton sector. The breaking of the 2-3 symmetry by the strange quark mass and the muon mass leads to flavor changing neutral currents in the quark sector and the charged lepton sector that are suppressed by m{sub s}/m{sub b} and m{sub {mu}}/m{sub {tau}} in addition to the mass of the heavy Higgs boson of the second Higgs doublet. A Higgs boson mass of m{sub H}{approx}600-900 GeV can explain the deviation from the standard model reported in several rare B decays. Predictions for other B decays are made, and a new CP phase is predicted in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing. The lepton flavor violating decays {tau}{yields}{mu}l(q)l(q) are below the experimental limits. The breaking of 2-3 symmetry in the lepton sector can lead to deviations of the atmospheric neutrino mixing angle from the maximal value by {approx}2 degrees.

  2. Measurement of Tau Lepton Branching Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, N.

    2003-12-19

    We present {tau}{sup -} lepton branching fraction measurements based on data from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at PEP. Using a sample of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} events, we examine the resonance structure of the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} system and obtain the first measurements of branching fractions for {tau}{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1270) and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1400). We also describe a complete set of branching fraction measurements in which all the decays of the {tau}{sup -} lepton are separated into classes defined by the identities of the charged particles and an estimate of the number of neutrals. This is the first such global measurement with decay classes defined by the four possible charged particle species, e, {mu}, {pi}, and K.

  3. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  4. Lifetime measurements and tau physics at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Gladney, L.D.

    1984-05-01

    Recent updates on the measurements of the tau and D/sup 0/ lifetimes by the Mark II Collaboration and on measurements of the tau and B-hadron lifetimes by the MAC Collaboration are presented. A new determination of an upper limit for the tau neutrino mass by the Mark II Collaboration and a recent measurement of Cabibbo-suppressed tau decay branching ratios from the DELCO Collaboration are also presented. 18 references.

  5. The Last Tangle of Tau

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Huiping; Johnson, Gail V.W.

    2009-01-01

    Tau aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer’s disease and tauopathies. There is ongoing debate about whether tau aggregation is toxic and which form of tau is toxic. Based on recent studies showing that mature tau tangles can be dissociated from neuronal loss and cognitive deficits, it can be hypothesized that the intermediate pre-fibrillar tau aggregate is the predominant neurotoxic tau species. The toxicity of tau aggregation includes loss of physiological functions of native tau and gain of pathological functions of pre-fibrillar tau species. Mature tau tangles per se might be relatively inert or even represent failed cytoprotective efforts of protein quality control machineries in response to accumulating toxic tau species. Further studies on the mechanisms of tau aggregation, the structure of intermediate tau forms and their toxicity are needed to settle this debate. PMID:18688096

  6. Measurements of Charged Current Lepton Universality and |Vus| using Tau Lepton Decays to e- v v, __- v v, pi- v and K- v

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-06-30

    Using 467 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector, they measure {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.9796 {+-} 0.0016 {+-} 0.0036), {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.5945 {+-} 0.0014 {+-} 0.0061), and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.03882 {+-} 0.00032 {+-} 0.00057), where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. From these precision {tau} measurements, they test the Standard Model assumption of {mu}-e and {tau}-{mu} charge current lepton universality and provide determinations of |V{sub us}| experimentally independent of the decay of a kaon.

  7. Measurement of the {tau} lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abt, I.; Ahn, C.J.; Akagi, T.; Allen, N.J.; Ash, W.W.; Aston, D.; Baird, K.G.; Baltay, C.; Band, H.R.; Barakat, M.B.; Baranko, G.; Bardon, O.; Barklow, T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Ben-David, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Bienz, T.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Blaylock, G.; Bogart, J.R.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.R.; Brau, J.E.; Breidenbach, M.; Bugg, W.M.; Burke, D.; Burnett, T.H.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Calcaterra, A.; Caldwell, D.O.; Calloway, D.; Camanzi, B.; Carpinelli, M.; Cassell, R.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Church, E.; Cohn, H.O.; Coller, J.A.; Cook, V.; Cotton, R.; Cowan, R.F.; Coyne, D.G.; D`Oliveira, A.; Damerell, C.J.S.; Daoudi, M.; De Sangro, R.; De Simone, P.; Dell`Orso, R.; Dima, M.; Du, P.Y.C.; Dubois, R.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Elia, R.; Etzion, E.; Falciai, D.; Fero, M.J.; Frey, R.; Furuno, K.; Gillman, T.; Gladding, G.; Gonzalez, S.; Hallewell, G.D.; Hart, E.L.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hedges, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Hildreth, M.D.; Huber, J.; Huffer, M.E.; Hughes, E.W.; Hwang, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jackson, D.J.; Jacques, P.; Jaros, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Johnson, J.R.; Johnson, R.A.; Junk, T.; Kajikawa, R.; Kalelkar, M.; Kang, H.J.; Karliner, I.; Kawahara, H.; Kendall, H.W.; Kim, Y.; King, M.E.; King, R.; Kofler, R.R.; Krishna, N.M.; Kroeger, R.S.; Labs, J.F.; Langston, M.; Lath, A.; Lauber, J.A.; Leith, D.W.G.; Liu, M.X.; Liu, X.; Loreti, M.; Lu, A.; Lynch, H.L.; Ma, J.; Mancinelli, G.; Manly, S.; Mantovani, G.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Maruyama, T.; Massetti, R.; Masuda, H.; Mazzucato, E.; McKemey, A.K.; Meadows, B.T.; Messner, R.; Mockett, P.M.; Moffeit, K.C.; Mours, B.; Mueller, G.; Muller, D.; Nagamine, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Nussbaum, M.; Ohnishi, Y.; Osborne, L.S.; Panvini, R.S.; Park, H.; Pavel, T.J.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Piemontese, L.; Pieroni, E.; Pitts, K.T.; Plano, R.J.; Prepost, R.; Prescott, C.Y.; Punkar, G.D.; Quigley, J.; Ratcliff, B.N.; Reeves, T.W.; Reidy, J.; Rensing, P.E.; Rochester, L.S.; Rothberg, J.E.; Rowson, P.C.; (The SLD Collabor..

    1995-11-01

    A measurement of the lifetime of the {tau} lepton has been made using a sample of 1671 {ital Z}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} decays collected by the SLD detector at the SLC. The measurement benefits from the small and stable collision region at the SLC and the precision pixel vertex detector of the SLD. Three analysis techniques have been used: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The combined result is {tau}{sub {tau}}=297{plus_minus}9 (stat){plus_minus}5(syst) fs.

  8. B ---> mu mu and B ---> tau nu decays

    SciTech Connect

    Scuri, Fabrizio; /INFN, Pisa

    2009-01-01

    An overview of the most recent experimental results on Branching Fractions of rare fully leptonic B decays is given; constraints on the parameters of some New Physics models are presented. Perspectives with new accelerator programs are discussed.

  9. Five-body leptonic decays of muon and tau leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Tlalpa, A.; Castro, G. López; Roig, P.

    2016-04-01

    We study the five-body decays {μ}-to {e}-{e}+{e}-{ν}_{μ }{overline{ν}}_e and {τ}-to {ℓ}-{ℓ}^' +}{ℓ}^' -}{ν}_{τ }{overline{ν}}_{ℓ } for ℓ, ℓ ' = e, μ within the Standard Model (SM) and in a general effective field theory description of the weak interactions at low energies. We compute the branching ratios and compare our results with two previous — mutually discrepan — SM calculations. By assuming a general structure for the weak currents we derive the expressions for the energy and angular distributions of the three charged leptons when the decaying lepton is polarized, which will be useful in precise tests of the weak charged current at Belle II. In these decays, leptonic T-odd correlations in triple products of spin and momenta — which may signal time reversal violation in the leptonic sector — are suppressed by the tiny neutrino masses. Therefore, a measurement of such T-violating observables would be associated to neutrinoless lepton flavor violating (LFV) decays, where this effect is not extremely suppressed. We also study the backgrounds that the SM five-lepton lepton decays constitute to searches of LFV L - → ℓ - ℓ '+ ℓ '- decays. Searches at high values of the invariant mass of the ℓ '+ ℓ '- pair look the most convenient way to overcome the background.

  10. Limits on tau lepton flavor violating decays in three charged leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-04-29

    A search for the neutrinoless, lepton-flavor violating decay of the {tau} lepton into three charged leptons has been performed using an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II collider. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1.8-3.3) x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  11. Search for lepton-flavor violation in the decay tau- --> l- l+ l-.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; LeClerc, C; Levi, M E; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Telnov, A V; Wenzel, W A; Ford, K; Harrison, T J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Abe, K; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Clark, P J; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Van Hoek, W C; Zhang, L; Harton, J L; Hu, T; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Colberg, T; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Khan, A; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Taylor, G P; Grenier, G J; Lee, S-J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Coleman, J P; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Kay, M; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; George, S; Green, M G; Kurup, A; Marker, C E; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Vaitsas, G; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hart, P A; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Raven, G; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'Jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Del Gamba, V; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Varnes, E W; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Xella, S M; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Di Lodovico, F; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2004-03-26

    A search for the lepton-flavor-violating decay of the tau into three charged leptons has been performed using 91.5 fb(-1) of data collected at an e(+)e(-)center-of-mass energy around 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the SLAC storage ring PEP-II. In all six decay modes considered, the numbers of events found in data are compatible with the background expectations. Upper limits on the branching fractions are set in the range (1-3)x10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:15089664

  12. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  13. Majoron emission in muon and tau decays revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, M.; Meyer, J.; Porod, W.; Vicente, A.

    2009-03-01

    In models where the breaking of lepton number is spontaneous a massless Goldstone boson, the Majoron (J), appears. We calculate the theoretically allowed range for the branching ratios of Majoron-emitting charged lepton decays, such as Br(??eJ) and Br(??eJ?), in a supersymmetric model with spontaneous breaking of R-parity. Br(??eJ) is maximal in the same region of parameter space for which the lightest neutralino decays mainly invisibly. A measurement of Br(??eJ) thus potentially provides information on R-parity violation complementary to accelerator searches. We also briefly discuss existing bounds and prospects for future improvements on the Majoron coupling to charged leptons.

  14. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  15. Reconstruction and identification of $\\tau$ lepton decays to hadrons and $\

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-10-27

    This paper describes the algorithms used by the CMS experiment to reconstruct and identify τ→ hadrons + vt decays during Run 1 of the LHC. The performance of the algorithms is studied in proton-proton collisions recorded at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The algorithms achieve an identification efficiency of 50–60%, with misidentification rates for quark and gluon jets, electrons, and muons between per mille and per cent levels.

  16. Tau in physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipeng; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that has a role in stabilizing neuronal microtubules and thus in promoting axonal outgrowth. Structurally, tau is a natively unfolded protein, is highly soluble and shows little tendency for aggregation. However, tau aggregation is characteristic of several neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies. The mechanisms underlying tau pathology and tau-mediated neurodegeneration are debated, but considerable progress has been made in the field of tau research in recent years, including the identification of new physiological roles for tau in the brain. Here, we review the expression, post-translational modifications and functions of tau in physiology and in pathophysiology. PMID:26631930

  17. Tau pathology and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Goedert, Michel

    2013-06-01

    The pathway leading from soluble and monomeric to hyperphosphorylated, insoluble and filamentous tau protein is at the centre of many human neurodegenerative diseases, collectively referred to as tauopathies. Dominantly inherited mutations in MAPT, the gene that encodes tau, cause forms of frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism, proving that dysfunction of tau is sufficient to cause neurodegeneration and dementia. However, most cases of tauopathy are not inherited in a dominant manner. The first tau aggregates form in a few nerve cells in discrete brain areas. These become self propagating and spread to distant brain regions in a prion-like manner. The prevention of tau aggregation and propagation is the focus of attempts to develop mechanism-based treatments for tauopathies. PMID:23684085

  18. A Measurement of the Michel Parameters in Leptonic Decays of the Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Darling, C.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; ONeill, J.J.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Savinov, V.; Smith, A.; Alam, M.S.; Athar, S.B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; Severini, H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Anastassov, A.; Blinov, S.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fujino, D.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M.B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.; Nemati, B.; Richichi, S.J.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Yurko, M.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Schaffner, S.F.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Frasconi, F.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Mukhin, Y.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; and others

    1997-06-01

    We have measured the spectral shape Michel parameters {rho} and {eta} using leptonic decays of the {tau} , recorded by the CLEO II detector. Assuming e-{mu} universality in the vectorlike couplings, we find {rho}{sub e{mu}}=0.735{plus_minus}0.013{plus_minus}0.008 and {eta}{sub e{mu}}=-0.015{plus_minus}0.061{plus_minus}0.062 , where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. We also present measurements for the parameters for e and {mu} final states separately. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Search for the Baryon and Lepton Number Violating Decays tau to Lambda h

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-11-28

    The authors have searched for the violation of baryon number B and lepton number L in the (B-L)-conserving modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}K{sup -} as well as the (B-L)-violating modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup -} using 237 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. They do not observe any signal and determine preliminary upper limits on the branching fractions {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}) < 5.9 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}) < 5.8 x 10{sup -8}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {bar {Lambda}}{sup 0}K{sup -}) < 7.2 x 10{sup -8}, and {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0}K{sup -}) < 15 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  20. Four-pion production in {tau} decays and e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation: An update

    SciTech Connect

    Czyz, Henryk; Kuehn, Johann H.; Wapienik, Agnieszka

    2008-06-01

    An improved description of four-pion production in electron-positron annihilation and in {tau}-lepton decays is presented. The model amplitude is fitted to recent data from BABAR which cover a wide energy range and which were obtained exploiting the radiative return. Predicting {tau}-decay distributions from e{sup +}e{sup -} data and comparing these predictions with ALEPH and CLEO results, the validity of isospin symmetry is confirmed within the present experimental errors. A good description of two- and three-pion subdistributions is obtained. Special emphasis is put on the predictions for {omega}{pi}({yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}) in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation and in {tau} decay. The model amplitude is implemented in the Monte Carlo generator PHOKHARA.

  1. Pfaffian and Determinantal Tau Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Leur, Johan W.; Orlov, Alexander Yu.

    2015-11-01

    Adler, Shiota and van Moerbeke observed that a tau function of the Pfaff lattice is a square root of a tau function of the Toda lattice hierarchy of Ueno and Takasaki. In this paper, we give a representation theoretical explanation for this phenomenon. We consider 2-BKP and two-component 2-KP tau functions. We shall show that a square of a BKP tau function is equal to a certain two-component KP tau function and a square of a 2-BKP tau function is equal to a certain two-component 2-KP tau function.

  2. Search for a Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau\\tau$ decay channel produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Totaro, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson decaying to tau lepton pairs, in the Tevatron proton-antiproton collisions at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV. The search is based on approximately 2.3 fb$^{-1}$ of CDF Run II data and is performed by considering the following signal processes: WH($\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$), ZH($\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$), qHq'$\\rightarrow$q$\\tau\\tau$q' and gg$\\rightarrow$H$\\rightarrow\\tau\\tau$. Events are selected by requiring an hadronic tau and one isolated electron or muon, coming from the leptonic decay of one of the two taus. In addition, at least one calorimeter jet must be present in the final state. We expect 921.8$\\pm$48.9 background events in the 1 jet channel and 159.4$\\pm$11.6 in the $\\ge$ 2 jets channel, while in data we observe 965 and 166 events, respectively. In order to improve the search sensitivity we employ a multivariate technique, based on a set of Boosted Decision Trees trained to get the best sep aration between signal and the dominant sources of background. We observe no evidence for a Higgs boson signal and therefore we set a 95\\% confidence level (C.L.) upper limit on the cross section relative to the SM predictions ($\\sigma/\\sigma_{\\mathrm{SM}}$). Results are presented for the Higgs boson mass varying from M$_\\mathrm{H}$ = 100 GeV/$c^2$ to M$_\\mathrm{H}$ = 150 GeV/$c^2$. For the mass hypothesis of 120 GeV/c$^2$ the observed limit is 27.2, while the corresponding expected value is 23.4$^{+9.8}_{-6.4}$.

  3. Search for the associated production of a b quark and a neutral supersymmetric Higgs boson that decays into tau pairs.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Camacho-Pérez, E; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2010-04-16

    We report results from a search for production of a neutral Higgs boson in association with a b quark. We search for Higgs decays to tau pairs with one tau subsequently decaying to a muon and the other to hadrons. The data correspond to 2.7 fb(-1) of pp collisions recorded by the D0 detector at square root(s)=1.96 TeV. The data are found to be consistent with background predictions. The result allows us to exclude a significant region of parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric model. PMID:20481981

  4. Search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay tau(-) -->l-(+)h+(-)h'(-).

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Martinez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2005-11-01

    A search for lepton-flavor and lepton-number violation in the decay of the tau lepton into one charged lepton and two charged hadrons is performed using 221.4 fb(-1) of data collected at an e+e- center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II storage ring. In all 14 decay modes considered, the observed data are compatible with background expectations, and upper limits are set in the range B(tau-->lhh')<(0.7 - 4.8) x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level. PMID:16383973

  5. Search for a low mass Standard Model Higgs boson in the $\\tau-\\tau$ decay channel in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-01-01

    We report on a search for the standard model Higgs boson decaying into pairs of {tau} leptons in p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The analyzed data sample was recorded by the CDFII detector and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 6.0 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed in the final state with one {tau} decaying leptonically and the second one identified through its semi-hadronic decay. Since no significant excess is observed, a 95% credibility level upper limit on the production cross section times branching ratio to the {tau}{tau} final state is set for hypothetical Higgs boson masses between 100 and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. For a Higgs boson of 120 GeV/c{sup 2} the observed (expected) limit is 14.6 (15.3) the predicted value.

  6. Tau-tubulin kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ikezu, Seiko; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2014-01-01

    Tau-tubulin kinase (TTBK) belongs to casein kinase superfamily and phosphorylates microtubule-associated protein tau and tubulin. TTBK has two isoforms, TTBK1 and TTBK2, which contain highly homologous catalytic domains but their non-catalytic domains are distinctly different. TTBK1 is expressed specifically in the central nervous system and is involved in phosphorylation and aggregation of tau. TTBK2 is ubiquitously expressed in multiple tissues and genetically linked to spinocerebellar ataxia type 11. TTBK1 directly phosphorylates tau protein, especially at Ser422, and also activates cycline-dependent kinase 5 in a unique mechanism. TTBK1 protein expression is significantly elevated in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains, and genetic variations of the TTBK1 gene are associated with late-onset Alzheimer’s disease in two cohorts of Chinese and Spanish populations. TTBK1 transgenic mice harboring the entire 55-kilobase genomic sequence of human TTBK1 show progression of tau accumulation, neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration when crossed with tau mutant mice. Our recent study shows that there is a striking switch in mononuclear phagocyte and activation phenotypes in the anterior horn of the spinal cord from alternatively activated (M2-skewed) microglia in P301L tau mutant mice to pro-inflammatory (M1-skewed) infiltrating peripheral monocytes by crossing the tau mice with TTBK1 transgenic mice. TTBK1 is responsible for mediating M1-activated microglia-induced neurotoxicity, and its overexpression induces axonal degeneration in vitro. These studies suggest that TTBK1 is an important molecule for the inflammatory axonal degeneration, which may be relevant to the pathobiology of tauopathy including AD. PMID:24808823

  7. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy √s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2–4%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured withmore » a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2–8%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton–proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.« less

  8. Identification and energy calibration of hadronically decaying tau leptons with the ATLAS experiment in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.

    2015-07-02

    This study describes the trigger and offline reconstruction, identification and energy calibration algorithms for hadronic decays of tau leptons employed for the data collected from pp collisions in 2012 with the ATLAS detector at the LHC center-of-mass energy √s=8 TeV. The performance of these algorithms is measured in most cases with Z decays to tau leptons using the full 2012 dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb–1. An uncertainty on the offline reconstructed tau energy scale of 2–4%, depending on transverse energy and pseudorapidity, is achieved using two independent methods. The offline tau identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2.5% for hadronically decaying tau leptons with one associated track, and of 4% for the case of three associated tracks, inclusive in pseudorapidity and for a visible transverse energy greater than 20 GeV. For hadronic tau lepton decays selected by offline algorithms, the tau trigger identification efficiency is measured with a precision of 2–8%, depending on the transverse energy. The performance of the tau algorithms, both offline and at the trigger level, is found to be stable with respect to the number of concurrent proton–proton interactions and has supported a variety of physics results using hadronically decaying tau leptons at ATLAS.

  9. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  10. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmore » parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.« less

  11. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  12. Hyperphosphorylation-Induced Tau Oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    In normal adult brain the microtubule associated protein (MAP) tau contains 23 phosphates per mol of the protein and at this level of phosphorylation it is a soluble cytosolic protein. The normal brain tau interacts with tubulin and promotes its assembly into microtubules and stabilizes these fibrils. In Alzheimer disease (AD) brain tau is three to fourfold hyperphosphorylated. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau binds to normal tau instead of the tubulin and this binding leads to the formation of tau oligomers. The tau oligomers can be sedimented at 200,000??g whereas the normal tau under these conditions remains in the supernatant. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau is capable of sequestering not only normal tau but also MAP MAP1 and MAP2 and causing disruption of the microtubule network promoted by these proteins. Unlike A? and prion protein (PrP) oligomers, tau oligomerization in AD and related tauopathies is hyperphosphorylation-dependent; in vitro dephosphorylation of AD P-tau with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibits and rehyperphosphorylation of the PP2A-AD P-tau with more than one combination of tau protein kinases promotes its oligomerization. In physiological assembly conditions the AD P-tau readily self-assembles into paired helical filaments. Missense tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently lead to tau oligomerization and neurofibrillary pathology by promoting its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Dysregulation of the alternative splicing of tau that alters the 1:1 ratio of the 3-repeat: 4-repeat taus such as in Down syndrome, Pick disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy leads to the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau. PMID:23966973

  13. The Search for B+ to Tau+ Nu(Tau) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, L.A.; /SLAC

    2007-01-08

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} using 288 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup o}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = 0.88{sub -0.67}{sup +0.68}(stat.) {+-} 0.11(syst.) x 10{sup -4} and extract an upper limit on the branching fraction, at the 90% confidence level, of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -4}. We calculate the product of the B meson decay constant and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.0{sub -3.6}{sup +2.3}(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.4}(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  14. Study of the Decay {ital {tau}}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}2{ital {pi} }{sup {minus}}{ital {pi}}{sup +} 3{ital {pi}}{sup 0}{ital {nu}}{sub {ital {tau} }}

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lee, S. .; ONeill, J.J.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Riehle, T.; Savinov, V.; Smith, A.; Alam, M.S.; Athar, S.B.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; Severini, H.; Timm, S.; Wappler, F.; Anastassov, A.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Hart, T.; Homoelle, D.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Spencer, M.B.; Sung, M.; Undrus, A.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Nemati, B.; Richichi, S.J.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Hinson, J.W.; Menon, N.; Miller, D.H.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.; Yurko, M.; Gibbons, L.; Glenn, S.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Jessop, C.P.; Lingel, K.; Marsiske, H.; Perl, M.L.; Ugolini, D.; Wang, R.; Zhou, X.; Coan, T.E.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Maravin, Y.; Narsky, I.; Shelkov, V.; Staeck, J.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Ye, J.; Artuso, M.; Efimov, A.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Schuh, S.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Viehhauser, G.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; McLean, K.W.; Marka, S.; Godang, R.; Kinoshita, K.; Lai, I.C.; Pomianowski, P.; Schrenk, S.; Bonvicini, G.; Cinabro, D.; Greene, R.; and others

    1997-11-01

    The decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}2{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup + }3{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} has been studied with the CLEOII detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. The branching fraction is measured to be (2.85{plus_minus}0.56{plus_minus}0.51){times}10{sup {minus}4} . The result is in good agreement with the isospin expectation but somewhat below the conserved-vector-current prediction. We have searched for resonance substructure in the decay. Within the statistical precision, the decay is saturated by the channels {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}2{pi}{sup 0 }{omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} , 2{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} , and {pi}{sup {minus}}2{pi}{sup 0}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} . This is the first observation of this {omega} decay mode and the branching fraction is measured to be (1.89{sup +0.74}{sub {minus}0.67}{plus_minus}0.40) {times}10{sup {minus}4} . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Implications of the ALEPH {tau} -Lepton Decay Data for Perturbative and Nonperturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Scha''fer, Thomas; Shuryak, Edward V.

    2001-04-30

    We use ALEPH data on hadronic {tau} decays in order to calculate Euclidean coordinate space correlation functions in the vector and axial-vector channels. The linear combination V-A receives no perturbative contribution and is quantitatively reproduced by the instanton liquid model. In the case of V+A the instanton calculation is in good agreement with the data once perturbative corrections are included. These corrections clearly show the evolution of {alpha}{sub s} . We also analyze the range of validity of the operator product expansion (OPE). We conclude that the range of validity of the OPE is limited to x{approx}<0.3 fm , whereas the instanton model describes the data over the entire range.

  16. Search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in pp over collisions with the D0 detector.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Krop, D; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Leveque, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; da Silva, W L Prado; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-08-15

    We present a search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons varphi decaying into tau+tau - final states in pp over collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 1 fb(-1), were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Limits on the production cross section times branching ratio are set. The results are interpreted in the minimal supersymmetric standard model yielding limits that are the most stringent to date at hadron colliders. PMID:18764524

  17. Searches for Z' and Higgs Bosons decaying into hadronic tau pairs at CMS/LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valls, Nil

    An elegant solution to the mystery of electroweak symmetry breaking and the origin of mass was proposed in the 1960s, yet it has taken several generations of particle accelerators and detectors to discover the first strong candidate for the socalled Higgs boson, which is implied by the theory. A positive identification would complete the Standard Model (SM), the most successful description of elementary particles and interactions to date. Searches for the SM Higgs boson production in association with top-quark pairs will provide additional information on the likely SM Higgs boson detection by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC in 2012, as well as the only means of directly measuring its coupling to top quarks. The first CMS search for the SM Higgs boson decaying into hadronic tau pairs in association with top-quark pairs is presented in this dissertation: with 19.4fb-1ofs=8TeVp-p collision data collected by the CMS experiment, the expected and observed upper limits on the product of the cross section and branching ratio for the tt H → tauh+ tauh-- process are roughly 13 times the SM background expectation. Solid experimental observations have exposed several limitations of the SM: it fails to provide a description of neutrino- avor mixing, cold dark matter candidates, gravitation, and the matter-antimatter asymmetry, for example. Numerous models in beyond-the-Standard-Model theories (e.g., grand unification, extra dimensions) suggest the existence of new neutral gauge (Z') bosons, some of which would appear with enhanced couplings to tau leptons. A search for sequential SM and ϕ-model Z' bosons decaying into tau pairs with 4.94+/-0.11fb-1ofs= 7TeVp-p collision data collected by the CMS experiment is also presented, the results of which show an incompatibility with such Z' bosons with masses below 1.4TeV/c2 and 1.1TeV/ c2 respectively at 95% C.L.

  18. Zinc Binding Directly Regulates Tau Toxicity Independent of Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunpeng; Wu, Zhihao; Cao, Yu; Lang, Minglin; Lu, Bingwei; Zhou, Bing

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Tau hyperphosphorylation is thought to underlie tauopathy. Working in a Drosophila tauopathy model expressing a human Tau mutant (hTauR406W, or Tau*), we show that zinc contributes to the development of Tau toxicity through two independent actions: by increasing Tau phosphorylation and, more significantly, by directly binding to Tau. Elimination of zinc binding through amino acid substitution of Cys residues has a minimal effect on phosphorylation levels yet essentially eliminates Tau toxicity. The toxicity of the zinc-binding-deficient mutant Tau* (Tau*C2A) and overexpression of native Drosophila Tau, also lacking the corresponding zinc-binding Cys residues, are largely impervious to zinc concentration. Importantly, restoration of zinc-binding ability to Tau* by introduction of a zinc-binding residue (His) into the original Cys positions restores zinc-responsive toxicities in proportion to zinc-binding affinities. These results indicate zinc binding is a substantial contributor to tauopathy and have implications for therapy development. PMID:25066125

  19. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  20. Tau physics with polarized beams

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.

    1995-11-01

    We present the first results on tau physics using polarized beams. These include measurements of the {tau} Michel parameters {xi} and {xi}{delta} and the {tau} neutrino helicity h{sub {nu}}. The measurements were performed using the SLD detector at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC).

  1. Impact of $\\tau$ polarization on the study of the MSSM charged Higgs bosons in top quark decays at the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Carena, Marcela S.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2005-07-01

    The process of top quark pair production at the ILC with subsequent decays of one of the top quarks to a charged Higgs boson and b-quark is considered. The charged Higgs decays to tau leptons whose polarization is the opposite to those coming from W bosons. This difference is reflected in the energy distributions of the tau decay products in the top quark rest frame, which can be reconstructed at the ILC using the recoil mass technique. We present an analysis including spin correlations, backgrounds, ISR/FSR and beamstrahlung, and show that a fit of the shape of the pion energy spectrum yields the charged Higgs boson mass with an accuracy of about 1 GeV.

  2. Potential synergy between tau aggregation inhibitors and tau chaperone modulators

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a soluble, microtubule-associated protein known to aberrantly form amyloid-positive aggregates. This pathology is characteristic for more than 15 neuropathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease. Finding therapeutics to reverse or remove this non-native tau state is of great interest; however, at this time only one drug is entering phase III clinical trials for treating tauopathies. Generally, tau manipulation by therapeutics can either directly or indirectly alter tau aggregation and stability. Drugs that bind and change the conformation of tau itself are largely classified as aggregation inhibitors, while drugs that alter the activity of a tau-effector protein fall into several categories, such as kinase inhibitors, microtubule stabilizers, or chaperone modulators. Chaperone inhibitors that have proven effective in tau models include heat shock protein 90 inhibitors, heat shock protein 70 inhibitors and activators, as well as inducers of heat shock proteins. While many of these compounds can alter tau levels and/or aggregation states, it is possible that combining these approaches may produce the most optimal outcome. However, because many of these compounds have multiple off-target effects or poor blood–brain barrier permeability, the development of this synergistic therapeutic strategy presents significant challenges. This review will summarize many of the drugs that have been identified to alter tau biology, with special focus on therapeutics that prevent tau aggregation and regulate chaperone-mediated clearance of tau. PMID:24041111

  3. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in association with b-quarks at the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Herner, Kenneth

    2009-06-01

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with a b-quark in 1.2 fb{sup -1} of data taken from June 2006 to August 2007 with the D0 detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The final state includes a muon, hadronically decaying tau and jet identified as coming from a b-quark. We set cross section times branching ratio limits on production of such neutral Higgs bosons {phi} in the mass range from 90 GeV/c{sup 2} to 160 GeV/c{sup 2}. Exclusion limits are set at the 95% Confidence Level for several supersymmetric scenarios.

  4. Search for MSSM Higgs decaying to tau pairs in ppbar collision at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Dongwook

    2006-05-01

    This thesis presents the search for neutral Minimal Supersymmetric extension of Standard Model (MSSM) Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs where one of the taus decays leptonically, and the other one hadronically. CDF Run II data with L{sub int} = 310 pb{sup -1} are used. There is no evidence of MSSM Higgs existence, which results in the upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} {phi}) x BR({phi} {yields} {tau}{tau}) in m{sub A} range between 115 and 250 GeV. These limits exclude some area in tan {beta} vs m{sub A} parameter space.

  5. Bilocal expansion of the Borel amplitude and the hadronic tau decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Lee, Taekoon

    2001-07-01

    The singular part of the Borel transform of a QCD amplitude near the infrared renormalon can be expanded in terms of higher order Wilson coefficients of the operators associated with the renormalon. In this paper we observe that this expansion gives nontrivial constraints on the Borel amplitude that can be used to improve the accuracy of the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude. In particular, we consider the Borel transform of the Adler function and its expansion around the first infrared renormalon due to the gluon condensate. Using the next-to-leading order (NLO) Wilson coefficient of the gluon condensate operator, we obtain an exact constraint on the Borel amplitude at the first IR renormalon. We then extrapolate, using judiciously chosen conformal transformations and Pade{prime} approximants, the ordinary perturbative expansion of the Borel amplitude in such a way that this constraint is satisfied. This procedure allows us to predict the O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 4}) coefficient of the Adler function, which gives a result consistent with the estimate by Kataev and Starshenko using a completely different method. We then apply this improved Borel amplitude to the tau decay width and obtain the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub z}{sup 2})=0.1193{+-}0.0007{sub exp.}{+-}0.0010{sub EW+CKM}{+-}0.0009{sub meth.}{+-}0.0003{sub evol.}. We then compare this result with those of other resummation methods.

  6. Search for lepton flavor violating decay $\\tau^- \\to \\ell^- \\ell^ \\ell^-$ at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Cervelli, Alberto

    2010-05-26

    The Standard Model (SM) is one of the most tested and verified physical theories of all time, present experimental observations are consistent with SM expectations. On the other hand SM can not explain many physical observations: the cosmological observations possibly infer the presence of dark matter which is clearly beyond the SM expectations; the SM Higgs model, while explaining the generation of fermion masses, can not explain the hierarchy problem and a non natural fine tuning of SM is needed to cancel out quadratic divergences in the Higgs boson mass. New physics (NP) beyond SM should hence be investigated: rising the energy above NP processes thresholds, and detecting new particles or new effects not predicted by the standard model directly, is one of the possible approaches; another approach is to make precision measurements of well known processes or looking for rare processes which involve higher order contribution from NP processes, this approach need higher luminosities with respect to the previous approach but lower beam energies. Search for Lepton Flavor Violation (LFV) in charged lepton decays is promising: neutrino physics provides indeed a clear and unambiguous evidence of LFV in the neutral lepton sector via mixing processes, which have been observed for the first time by the Homestake collaboration. We expect LFV in the charged sector as well, both in {mu} and {tau} sector, but current experimental searches for LFV processes did not find any evidence for those processes, and more results are expected to come from new experiments in the coming years.

  7. Tau Biology and Tau-Directed Therapies for Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bakota, Lidia; Brandt, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterised by a progressive loss of cognitive functions. Histopathologically, AD is defined by the presence of extracellular amyloid plaques containing Aβ and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. According to the now well-accepted amyloid cascade hypothesis is the Aβ pathology the primary driving force of AD pathogenesis, which then induces changes in tau protein leading to a neurodegenerative cascade during the progression of disease. Since many earlier drug trials aiming at preventing Aβ pathology failed to demonstrate efficacy, tau and microtubules have come into focus as prominent downstream targets. The article aims to develop the current concept of the involvement of tau in the neurodegenerative triad of synaptic loss, cell death and dendritic simplification. The function of tau as a microtubule-associated protein and versatile interaction partner will then be introduced and the rationale and progress of current tau-directed therapy will be discussed in the biological context. PMID:26729186

  8. Anesthesia and Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Robert A.; Bretteville, Alexis; Dickler, Maya F.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia and remains a growing worldwide health problem. As life expectancy continues to increase, the number of AD patients presenting for surgery and anesthesia will steadily rise. The etiology of sporadic AD is thought to be multifactorial, with environmental, biological and genetic factors interacting together to influence AD pathogenesis. Recent reports suggest that general anesthetics may be such a factor and may contribute to the development and exacerbation of this neurodegenerative disorder. Intra-neuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFT), composed of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau protein are one of the main neuropathological hallmarks of AD. Tau pathology is important in AD as it correlates very well with cognitive dysfunction. Lately, several studies have begun to elucidate the mechanisms by which anesthetic exposure might affect the phosphorylation, aggregation and function of this microtubule-associated protein. Here, we specifically review the literature detailing the impact of anesthetic administration on aberrant tau hyperphosphorylation as well as the subsequent development of neurofibrillary pathology and degeneration. PMID:23535147

  9. A Search for Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons in the Di-tau Decay Mode in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Amy Lynn

    2003-09-01

    A search for directly produced Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons has been performed in the di-tau decay channel in 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected by CDF during Run1b at the Tevatron. They search for events where one tau decays to an electron and the other tau decays hadronically. They perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for Higgs production in the high tan {beta} region of the m{sub A}-tan {beta} plane. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A} = 100 and tan {beta} = 50, they set a 95% confidence level upper limit at 891 pb compared to the theoretically predicted cross section of 122 pb. For events where the tau candidates are not back-to-back, they utilize a di-tau mass reconstruction technique for the first time on hadron collider data. Limits based on a likelihood binned in di-tau mass from non-back-to-back events alone are weaker than the limits obtained from the counting experiment using the full di-tau sample.

  10. A Search for B+ to tau+ nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-26

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} using 383 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {bar {nu}} and {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}. They measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.9 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.1(syst.)) x 10{sup -4}. In the absence of a significant signal, we calculate an upper limit at the 90% confidence level of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -4}. They calculate the product of the B meson decay constant f{sub B} and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.0}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  11. A measurement of the tau lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Agasi, E.; Aleksan, R.; Alekseev, G. D.; Algeri, A.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andreazza, A.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Apsimon, R. J.; Arnoud, Y.; Å, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barate, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Barrio, J. A.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M. J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Beeston, C. J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bocci, V.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Bosworth, S.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenner, R. A.; Briand, H.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Campion, R.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chabaud, V.; Chan, A.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chaussard, L.; Chauveau, J.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Clara, M. P.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Daum, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; Davies, J.; da Silva, W.; Defoix, C.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; de Angelis, A.; de Boeck, H.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Fez Laso, M. D. M.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; Dijkstra, H.; di Ciaccio, L.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Dupont, F.; Eek, L.-O.; Eerola, P. A.-M.; Ehret, R.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.-P.; Ershaidat, N.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K. A. J.; Fousset, J.-L.; Francon, S.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J.-P.; Giacomelli, P.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorski, M.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Grossetete, B.; Gumenyuk, S.; Guy, J.; Haedinger, U.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, M.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakansson, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hao, W.; Harris, F. J.; Hedberg, V.; Henkes, T.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T. L.; Hietanen, I.; Higgins, C. O.; Higon, E.; Hilke, H. J.; Hodgson, S. D.; Hofmokl, T.; Holmes, R.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holthuizen, D.; Honore, P. F.; Hooper, J. E.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huet, K.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Ioannou, P.; Iversen, P.-S.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, E. K.; Johnson, D.; Jonker, M.; Jonsson, L.; Juillot, P.; Kalkanis, G.; Kalmus, G.; Kapusta, F.; Karlsson, M.; Karvelas, E.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kesteman, J.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klein, H.; Klovning, A.; Kluit, P.; Koch-Mehrin, A.; Koehne, J. H.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korytov, A. V.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, P. H.; Krolikowski, J.; Kronkvist, I.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulka, K.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, J. M.; Lieb, E.; Liko, D.; Lindgren, J.; Lindner, R.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Los, M.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, J. J.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Maillard, J.; Maio, A.; Maltezos, A.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Markou, A.; Maron, T.; Marti, S.; Mathis, L.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Nay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meola, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Mikulec, I.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Murray, W. J.; Myatt, G.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nijjhar, B.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nilsen, P. E. S.; Niss, P.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Ostankov, A.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Pain, R.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parodi, F.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Pennanen, J.; Peralta, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Pettersen, T. E.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Pingot, O.; Plaszczynski, S.; Podobrin, O.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, M.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roditi, I.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Ronnqvist, C.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, S.; Rossi, U.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybin, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, J.; Sannino, M.; Schael, S.; Schneider, H.; Schulze, B.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Segar, A. M.; Seitz, A.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siccama, I.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smith, G. R.; Sosnowski, R.; Souza-Santos, D.; Spassoff, T. S.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Straver, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tabarelli, T.; Tchikilev, O.; Theodosiou, G. E.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Toet, D. Z.; Toker, O.; Tome, B.; Torassa, E.; Tortora, L.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Trischuk, W.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Vander Velde, C.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van der Heijden, M.; van Doninck, W. K.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vilanova, D.; Vincent, P.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Wehr, A.; Weierstall, M.; Weilhammer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yepes, P.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zuberi, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.; Zuniga, J.

    1993-03-01

    The tau lepton lifetime is measured using four different methods with the DELPHI detector. Three measurements using one prong decays are combined, accounting for correlations, resulting in ττ=298 +/-7 (stat.)+/-4 (syst.) fs while the decay length distribution of three prong decays gives ππ=298+/-13 (stat)+/-(syst.) fs. The combined result is ττ=298+/-7 fs. The ratio of the Fermi coupling constant from tau decay relative to that from muon decay is found to be 0.985+/-0.013, compatible with lepton universality.

  12. Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, A.; /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa

    2005-06-27

    The mean lifetime of the tau lepton is measured from the decay length distribution of 3-prong tau decays from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. A data sample of 80.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory is used for this measurement. The measured tau lifetime is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 289.40 {+-} 0.91 (stat.) {+-} 0.90 (syst.) fs. All the results are preliminary.

  13. A study of w boson decay charge asymmetry using hadronic tau decays in proton - anti-proton collisions at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    E.W Kuns

    2002-10-18

    This dissertation presents a measurement of the tau charge asymmetry in events where the taus are produced by W decays. This charge asymmetry appears as different rapidity distributions for positive and negative taus. Two competing effects generate tau charge asymmetry. The production mechanism for the W gauge boson generates a charge asymmetry which is a function of the ratio of parton distribution functions, d(x)=u(x), measured at x {approx} M{sub W}/{radical}s. This is the dominant effect for tau charge asymmetry at small rapidity. At higher rapidity, however, the competing charge asymmetry from parity violation in W decay to taus becomes dominant. This tau asymmetry measurement is consistent with the Standard Model with a x{sup 2} per degree of freedom equal to 2.5 for 4 degrees of freedom when the asymmetry measurement is folded about y = 0, taking advantage of the CP symmetry of the underlying physics, and 8.9 for 8 degrees of freedom when it is not. This measurement introduces some methods and variables of interest to future analyses using hadronic decay modes of taus. This work was done using the CDF detector in {bar p}p collisions at {radical} = 1.8 TeV at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator.

  14. Tau imaging in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Dani, M; Brooks, D J; Edison, P

    2016-06-01

    Aggregated tau protein is a major neuropathological substrate central to the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. In AD, it has been shown that the density of hyperphosphorylated tau tangles correlates closely with neuronal dysfunction and cell death, unlike β-amyloid. Until now, diagnostic and pathologic information about tau deposition has only been available from invasive techniques such as brain biopsy or autopsy. The recent development of selective in-vivo tau PET imaging ligands including [(18)F]THK523, [(18)F]THK5117, [(18)F]THK5105 and [(18)F]THK5351, [(18)F]AV1451(T807) and [(11)C]PBB3 has provided information about the role of tau in the early phases of neurodegenerative diseases, and provided support for diagnosis, prognosis, and imaging biomarkers to track disease progression. Moreover, the spatial and longitudinal relationship of tau distribution compared with β - amyloid and other pathologies in these diseases can be mapped. In this review, we discuss the role of aggregated tau in tauopathies, the challenges posed in developing selective tau ligands as biomarkers, the state of development in tau tracers, and the new clinical information that has been uncovered, as well as the opportunities for improving diagnosis and designing clinical trials in the future. PMID:26572762

  15. Tau physics at future facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, M. L.

    1994-12-01

    This paper discusses and projects the tau research which may be carried out at CESR, at BEPC, at the SLC, in the next few years at LEP 1, at the asymmetric B-factories under construction in Japan and the United States and, if built, a tau-charm factory. As the size of tau data sets increases, there is an increasing need to reduce the effects of systematic errors on the precision and search range of experiments. In most areas of tau physics there is a large amount of progress to be made, but in a few areas it will be difficult to substantially improve the precision of present measurements.

  16. Tau Physics at Future Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Martin L.

    1995-03-01

    This paper discusses and projects the tau research which may be carried out at CESR, at BEPC, at the SLC, in the next few years at LEP I, at the asymmetric B-factories under construction in Japan and the United States and, if built, a tau-charm factory. As the size of tau data sets increases, there is an increasing need to reduce the effects of systematic errors on the precision and search range of experiments. In most areas of tau physics there is a large amount of progress to be made, but in a few areas it will be difficult to substantially improve the precision of present measurements.

  17. Tau physics at future facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1994-12-01

    This paper dicusses and projects the tau research which may be carried out at CESR, at BEPC, at the SLC, in the next few years at LEP I, at the asymmetric B-factories under construction in Japan and the United States and, if built, a tau-charm factory. As the size of tau data sets increases, there is an increasing need to reduce the effects of systematic errors on the precision and search range of experiments. In most areas of tau physics there is a large amount of progress to be made, but in a few areas it will be difficult to substantially improve the precision of present measurements.

  18. Search for Neutral Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Bosons Decaying to Tau Pairs in pp Collisions at sqrt[s]=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2011-06-01

    A search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons in pp collisions at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns recorded by the CMS experiment. The search uses decays of the Higgs bosons to tau pairs. No excess is observed in the tau-pair invariant-mass spectrum. The resulting upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times branching fraction to tau pairs, as a function of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass, yield stringent new bounds in the MSSM parameter space.

  19. Measurements of the decays {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Prescott, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; (CLEO Colla..

    1995-11-20

    We use a data sample of 2.8{times}10{sup 6} produced {tau}-pair events, obtained with the CLEO II detector, to measure {ital B}{bold (}{tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}{bold )}, where {ital h} refers to either a charged {pi} or {ital K}. These branching fractions are measured with samples of lepton-tagged and 3 vs 3 events. We find {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}})=0.0951{plus_minus}0.0007 m*0.0020 and {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=0.0423{plus_minus} .0006{plus_minus}0.0022. We also measure {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{omega}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}})=0.0195{plus_minus}0.0007{plus_minus}0.0011 {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  20. UX Tau A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's rendition of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, located approximately 450 light-years away. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.

    Spitzer saw a gap in UX Tau A's disk that extends from 0.2 to 56 astronomical units (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The gap extends from the equivalent of Mercury to Pluto in our solar system, and is sandwiched between thick inner and outer disks on either side. Astronomers suspect that the gap was carved out by one or more forming planets.

    Such dusty disks are where planets are thought to be born. Dust grains clump together like snowballs to form larger rocks, and then the bigger rocks collide to form the cores of planets. When rocks revolve around their central star, they act like cosmic vacuum cleaners, picking up all the gas and dust in their path and creating gaps.

    Although gaps have been detected in disks swirling around young stars before, UX Tau A is special because the gap is sandwiched between two thick disks of dust. An inner thick dusty disk hugs the central star, then, moving outward, there is a gap, followed by another thick doughnut-shaped disk. Other systems with gaps contain very little to no dust near the central star. In other words, those gaps are more like big holes in the centers of disks.

    Some scientists suspect that these holes could have been carved out by a process called photoevaporation. Photoevaporation occurs when radiation from the central star heats up the gas and dust around it to the point where it evaporates away. The fact that there is thick disk swirling extremely close to UX Tau A's central star rules out the photoevaporation scenario. If photoevaporation from the star played a role, then large amounts of dust would not be floating so close to the star.

  1. Search for the Higgs Boson Decaying to Two Tau Leptons in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at a Center of Mass Energy of 1.96 Tev

    SciTech Connect

    Elagin, Andrey Lvovich

    2011-01-01

    A search for the Higgs boson decaying to $\\tau\\tau$ using 7.8~fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at 1.96~TeV collected with CDF II detector is presented. The search is sensitive to four production mechanisms of the Higgs boson: ggH, WH, ZH and VBF. Modes where one tau decay leptonically, and another decay, hadronically, are considered. Two novel techniques are developed and used in the search. A Probabilistic Particle Flow Algorithm is used for energy measurements of the hadronic tau candidates. The signal is discriminated from backgrounds by the Missing Mass Calculator, which allows for full invariant mass reconstruction of $\\tau\\tau$ pair. The data are found to be consistent with the background only hypothesis. Therefore a 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the Standard Model Higgs boson cross section was set. At $M_H$$=$120~GeV/$c^2$ observed limit is 14.9$\\times\\sigma_{SM}\\times Br(\\Htt)$.

  2. Search for Neutral MSSM Higgs Bosons Decaying to Pairs of Tau Leptons at Center of Mass Energy = 7 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis, Evan Klose

    2011-12-01

    This thesis describes a search for the Higgs boson, a new particle predicted by a theory called the minimal supersymmetric extension to the standard model (MSSM). The standard model of particle physics, the MSSM, and Higgs boson phenomenology are introduced briefly. The search presented in this thesis uses a single final state configuration, in which the Higgs boson decays to two tau leptons, with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos, and the other decaying to pions and a single neutrino. Two new methods are introduced in this analysis, the Tau Neural Classifier tau identification algorithm, and the Secondary Vertex fit tau pair mass reconstruction method. Both methods are discussed in detail. The analysis uses the 2010 dataset from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, which contains 36 pb-1 of integrated luminosity at a center of mass energy of 7 TeV. In total, 573 events are selected in the analysis. We fit the observed tau pair mass spectrum and measure the composition of the events. The result is compatible with the standard model expectation. No excess of signal events is observed, and we set an upper limit on the cross section times branching ratio of a Higgs boson. This limit is interpreted in the parameter space of the MSSM.

  3. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau- -> omega.pi-.nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-04-22

    We report an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 million {tau} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode.

  4. Test of the exponential decay law at short decay times using tau leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Bechtluft, J.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A. N.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bloomer, J. E.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B. T.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Burgard, C.; Brgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrisman, D.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L. A.; Dixit, M. S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fath, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Frtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S. M.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Horvth, D.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Karlen, D.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B. J.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, C.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Malik, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mttig, P.; McDonald, W. J.; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Mller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Omori, T.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palazzo, M.; Plinks, J.; Palmonari, F. M.; Pansart, J. P.; Psztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Rylko, R.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schrder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schulz, M.; Schtz, P.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Strumia, F.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Takeda, H.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; von Trne, E.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Vokurka, E. H.; Wckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xella, S.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; OPAL Collaboration

    1996-02-01

    Quantum mechanics predicts an exponential distribution for the decay time of massive particles. However, deviations are expected for decay times shorter than about 10 -13 s in models conjecturing the existence of hidden variables. Following a recent proposal, the decay length distribution of 5843 ? leptons decaying into 3 charged particles was analyzed in search of such a deviation. The deviation from an exponential distribution with respect to the number of decays present within the exponential form, expressed as the relative weight of an excess at zero decay length, was measured to be 1.1%1.4%3.5%. This result is consistent with zero deviation and leads to an upper limit of 8.5% and a lower limit of -6.3% at the 95% confidence level.

  5. Electronic branching ratio of the. tau. lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Sung, M.K.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Stroynowski, R.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Letson, T.; Mestayer, M.D.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.

    1992-06-01

    Using data accumulated by the CLEO I detector operating at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the ratio {ital R}={Gamma}({tau}{r arrow}{ital e}{bar {nu}}{sub {ital e}}{nu}{sub {tau}})/{Gamma}{sub 1}, where {Gamma}{sub 1} is the {tau} decay rate to final states with one charged particle. We find {ital R}=0.2231{plus minus}0.0044{plus minus}0.0073 where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Together with the measured topological one-charged-particle branching fraction, this yields the branching fraction of the {tau} lepton to electrons, {ital B}{sub {ital e}}=0.192{plus minus}0.004{plus minus}0.006.

  6. Bad Ac-etylated Tau.

    PubMed

    Hettinger, Jane C; Cirrito, John R

    2016-04-20

    By using a tau construct with two mimicked acetylation sites as identified in AD brains, Tracy et al. (2016) found that acetylated tau promotes synaptic dysfunction through disruption of postsynaptic KIBRA signaling pathways, actin dynamics, and AMPA receptor trafficking. PMID:27100190

  7. Reconstruction of tau leptons and prospects for SUSY in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zendler, Carolin

    2010-02-01

    Final states with tau leptons may play a special role among the broad variety of signatures for the production of supersymmetric particles at the LHC. The algorithms for tau reconstruction and identification are discussed, which are essential ingredients to reject the huge background from QCD processes. The status of analyses of SUSY tau lepton final states within the ATLAS experiment at the LHC are presented, which range from a study of semi-inclusive discovery prospects to more exclusive processes with two tau leptons from χ˜20 decays and their implications for the determination of SUSY parameters. Also, the prospects for exploiting tau lepton polarization are discussed.

  8. Tau Lepton Mass Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, P.; /UC, Irvine

    2009-08-05

    The authors present the preliminary results from the precision measurement of the mass of the tau lepton using 423 fb{sup -1} of data collected at BABAR. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the T{sup +} and T{sup -}, and obtain M{sub +}-M{sub -}/M{sub AVG} = (-3.5 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup -4}. This results in a limit of -5.6 x 10{sup -4} < M{sub +}-M{sub -}/M{sub AVG} < -1.4 x 10{sup -4} at 90% CL.

  9. Measurements of the {tau} mass and the mass difference of the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -} at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.

    2009-11-01

    We present the result from a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, we determine the mass to be 1776.68{+-}0.12(stat){+-}0.41(syst) MeV. We also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}}-M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}}=(-3.4{+-}1.3(stat){+-}0.3(syst))x10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  10. Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of AA Tau, DN Tau, UX Tau A, T Tau, RY Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Chugainov, P. F.; Weaver, W. B.; Stauffer, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a UBVRI photometric monitoring campaign for three classical T Tauri stars (AA Tau, DN Tau, and UX Tau A) and two weak emission line T Tauri stars (Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7). Observations were obtained at three sites during a core observing period spanning UT 1985 October 14 through UT 1985 December 25, with additional observations continuing until UT 1986 April 6. Concurrent spectrophotometric observations were obtained for all main program stars except Lk Ca 7 and additionally for T Tau, RW Aur, and RY Tau. Periodic photometric variability, assumed to be the stars' rotation periods, were found for AA Tau, DN Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7, respectively, as 8.2, 6.3, 3.4, and 5.7 days. Several U-filter flares were observed for Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7, which are strongly concentrated toward phases of minimum light. Correlations are found between H-alpha line strengths and V magnitudes for AA Tau and RY Tau. An analysis of absolute color variations of classical T Tauri stars confirms that hot spots are the predominant cause of these stars' variability. Our overall results are consistent with earlier findings that long-lived cool spots are responsible for most of the variability found for weak-emission T Tauri stars, while temporal hot spots are primarily responsible for the observed variability found in classical T Tauri stars.

  11. Sources of extracellular tau and its signaling.

    PubMed

    Avila, Jesús; Simón, Diana; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel; Pintor, Jesús; Hernández, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The pathology associated with tau protein, tauopathy, has been recently analyzed in different disorders, leading to the suggestion that intracellular and extracellular tau may itself be the principal agent in the transmission and spreading of tauopathies. Tau pathology is based on an increase in the amount of tau, an increase in phosphorylated tau, and/or an increase in aggregated tau. Indeed, phosphorylated tau protein is the main component of tau aggregates, such as the neurofibrillary tangles present in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients. It has been suggested that intracellular tau could be toxic to neurons in its phosphorylated and/or aggregated form. However, extracellular tau could also damage neurons and since neuronal death is widespread in Alzheimer's disease, mainly among cholinergic neurons, these cells may represent a possible source of extracellular tau. However, other sources of extracellular tau have been proposed that are independent of cell death. In addition, several ways have been proposed for cells to interact with, transmit, and spread extracellular tau, and to transduce signals mediated by this tau. In this work, we will discuss the role of extracellular tau in the spreading of the tau pathology. PMID:24531154

  12. Higgs Boson Decays to Tau Pairs at the ILC with the ILD Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Shin-ichi; Fujii, Keisuke; Suehara, Taikan; Takahashi, Tohru; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    The investigation of the Higgs boson, especially the verification of the mass generation mechanism, is one of the most important themes for particle physics after the discovery of the Higgs boson. To achieve this, the International Linear Collider (ILC) is proposed as a next generation electron-positron collider. We evaluate the measurement accuracy of the Higgs branching ratio into tau pairs at the ILC with a full simulation of the ILD detector concept. We assume a center-of-mass energy of √{s} = 250 GeV, beam polarizations of P(e - ,e + ) = ( - 0.8, + 0.3), and an integrated luminosity of 250 fb-1. We obtain the measurement accuracy Δ (σ \\cdot Br)/(σ \\cdot Br) = 3.5% for a Higgs boson mass of Mh = 120 GeV. The result scaled to Mh = 125 GeV is estimated to be 4.2%.

  13. Therapeutic strategies for tau mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Lee, Virginia M Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Based on the amyloid hypothesis, controlling ?-amyloid protein (A?) accumulation is supposed to suppress downstream pathological events, tau accumulation, neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. However, in recent clinical trials, A? removal or reducing A? production has shown limited efficacy. Moreover, while active immunisation with A? resulted in the clearance of A?, it did not prevent tau pathology or neurodegeneration. This prompts the concern that it might be too late to employ A? targeting therapies once tau mediated neurodegeneration has occurred. Therefore, it is timely and very important to develop tau directed therapies. The pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration are unclear but hyperphosphorylation, oligomerisation, fibrillisation and propagation of tau pathology have been proposed as the likely pathological processes that induce loss of function or gain of toxic function of tau, causing neurodegeneration. Here we review the strategies for tau directed treatments based on recent progress in research on tau and our understanding of the pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23085937

  14. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b-quarks at s**(1/2)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Herner, Kenneth Richard; /SUNY, Stony Brook

    2008-12-01

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with a b-quark in 1.6 fb{sup -1} of data taken from June 2006 to March 2008 with the D0 detector at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The final state includes a muon, hadronically decaying tau, and jet identified as coming from a b-quark. We set cross section times branching ratio limits on production of such neutral Higgs bosons {phi} in the mass range from 90 GeV to 160 GeV. Exclusion limits are set at the 95% Confidence Level for several supersymmetric scenarios.

  15. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A; O'Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D; Cosentino, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D; O'Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Lynch, Tim

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5' splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the 'missing' +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the 'stem' when the stem-loop model was first proposed and no mutations have been found within the 'loop' region as expected. Therefore we 'close the tau loop' having 'opened the loop' 21 years ago. PMID:26297556

  16. Interaction of Tau with Fe65 links tau to APP.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Christian; Canu, Nadia; Zambrano, Nicola; Serafino, Annalucia; Minopoli, Giuseppina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Amadoro, Giuseppina; Russo, Tommaso; Calissano, Pietro

    2005-03-01

    The beta-amyloid precursor protein APP and the microtubule-associated protein Tau play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the possible molecular events linking these two proteins are still unknown. Here, we show that Fe65, one of the ligands of the APP cytodomain, is associated with Tau in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization, and FRET experiments. Deletion studies indicated that the N-terminal domain of Tau and the PTB1 domain of Fe65 are required for this association. This interaction is regulated by the phosphorylation of Tau at selected sites, by glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), and requires an intact microtubule network. Furthermore, laser scanner microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation experiments provide preliminary evidence of possible complex(es) involving Tau, Fe65, APP. These findings open new perspectives for the study of the possible crosstalk between these proteins in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:15686969

  17. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  18. Tau protein: relevance to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lei, Peng; Ayton, Scott; Finkelstein, David I; Adlard, Paul A; Masters, Colin L; Bush, Ashley I

    2010-11-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein linked with neurodegenerative diseases. Humans express six different isoforms of tau; the longest containing four microtubule-binding repeat motifs in the C-terminal that are vital for what is considered the major biological function of tau, to stabilize microtubules and facilitate axonal transport. The capacity of tau to maintain its normal biological function is dependent upon its phosphorylation state. In Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, there is a hyperphosphorylation of tau that leads to the intracellular accumulation of tau in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. While the role of tau in Parkinson's disease has been understated for some time, here we summarize key genetic, pathological and biochemical evidence supporting a role for tau in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Toxic interactions with alpha synuclein may lead to hyperphosphorylation of tau and eventually to the deposition of both proteins in the disease. PMID:20678581

  19. Glial Tau Pathology in Tauopathies: Functional Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Kahlson, Martha A.; Colodner, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are a class of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the presence of hyperphosphorylated and aggregated tau pathology in neuronal and glial cells. Though the ratio of neuronal and glial tau aggregates varies across diseases, glial tau aggregates can populate the same degenerating brain regions as neuronal tau aggregates. While much is known about the deleterious consequences of tau pathology in neurons, the relative contribution of glial tau pathology to these diseases is less clear. Recent studies using a number of model systems implicate glial tau pathology in contributing to tauopathy pathogenesis. This review aims to highlight the functional consequences of tau overexpression in glial cells and explore the potential contribution of glial tau pathology in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:26884683

  20. Insulin dysfunction and Tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    El Khoury, Noura B.; Gratuze, Maud; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Bretteville, Alexis; Planel, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include senile plaques of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides (a cleavage product of the Amyloid Precursor Protein, or APP) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein assembled in paired helical filaments (PHF). NFT pathology is important since it correlates with the degree of cognitive impairment in AD. Only a small proportion of AD is due to genetic variants, whereas the large majority of cases (~99%) is late onset and sporadic in origin. The cause of sporadic AD is likely to be multifactorial, with external factors interacting with biological or genetic susceptibilities to accelerate the manifestation of the disease. Insulin dysfunction, manifested by diabetes mellitus (DM) might be such factor, as there is extensive data from epidemiological studies suggesting that DM is associated with an increased relative risk for AD. Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are known to affect multiple cognitive functions in patients. In this context, understanding the effects of diabetes on Tau pathogenesis is important since Tau pathology show a strong relationship to dementia in AD, and to memory loss in normal aging and mild cognitive impairment. Here, we reviewed preclinical studies that link insulin dysfunction to Tau protein pathogenesis, one of the major pathological hallmarks of AD. We found more than 30 studies reporting Tau phosphorylation in a mouse or rat model of insulin dysfunction. We also payed attention to potential sources of artifacts, such as hypothermia and anesthesia, that were demonstrated to results in Tau hyperphosphorylation and could major confounding experimental factors. We found that very few studies reported the temperature of the animals, and only a handful did not use anesthesia. Overall, most published studies showed that insulin dysfunction can promote Tau hyperphosphorylation and pathology, both directly and indirectly, through hypothermia. PMID:24574966

  1. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks decaying to a tau lepton and a b quark in 1.96 TeV ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Khotilovich, Vadim, G.; /Texas A-M

    2008-05-01

    I present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in an R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario using 322 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. I assume each {tilde t}{sub 1} decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark, with branching ratio {beta}, and search for final states containing either an electron or a muon from a leptonic {tau} decay, a hadronically decaying {tau} lepton, and two or more jets. Two candidate events pass my final selection criteria, consistent with the expectation from standard model processes. I present upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio squared {sigma}({tilde t}{sub 1}{bar {tilde t}}{sub 1}) x {beta}{sup 2} as a function of the stop mass m({tilde t}{sub 1}). Assuming {beta} = 1, I set a 95% confidence level limit m({tilde t}{sub 1}) > 153 GeV=c{sup 2}. These limits are also fully applicable to the case of a pair produced third generation scalar leptoquark that decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark.

  2. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks decaying to a tau lepton and a bottom quark in 1.96-TeV proton-antiproton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotilovich, Vadim

    I present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks ( t˜1 ) in an R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario using 322 pb-1 of pp collisions at s = 1.96 TeV collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. I assume each t˜1 decays into a tau lepton and a b quark, with branching ratio beta, and search for final states containing either an electron or a muon from a leptonic tau decay, a hadronically decaying tau lepton, and two or more jets. Two candidate events pass my final selection criteria, consistent with the expectation from standard model processes. I present upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio squared sigma( t˜1t˜ ¯1 ) x beta2 as a function of the stop mass m( t˜1 ). Assuming beta = 1, I set a 95% confidence level limit m( t˜1 ) > 153 GeV/c2. These limits are also fully applicable to the case of a pair produced third generation scalar leptoquark that decays into a tau lepton and a b quark.

  3. Tau in Alzheimer Disease and Related Tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge

    2011-01-01

    Tau is the major microtubule associated protein (MAP) of a mature neuron. The other two neuronal MAPs are MAP1 and MAP2. An established function of MAPs is their interaction with tubulin and promotion of its assembly into microtubules and stabilization of the microtubule network. The microtubule assembly promoting activity of tau, a phosphoprotein, is regulated by its degree of phosphorylation. Normal adult human brain tau contains 23 moles phosphate/mole of tau protein. Hyperphosphorylation of tau depresses this biological activity of tau. In Alzheimer disease (AD) brain tau is ?three to four-fold more hyperphosphorylated than the normal adult brain tau and in this hyperphosphorylated state it is polymerized into paired helical filaments ([PHF) admixed with straight filaments (SF) forming neurofibrillary tangles. Tau is transiently hyperphosphorylated during development and during anesthesia and hypothermia but not to the same state as in AD brain. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in AD brain is distinguished from transiently hyperphosphorylated tau by its ability (1) to sequester normal tau, MAP1 and MAP2 and disrupt microtubules, and (2) to self-assemble into PHF/SF. The cytosolic abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau, because of oligomerization, unlike normal tau, is sedimentable and on self-assembly into PHF/SF, loses its ability to sequester normal MAPs. Some of the tau in AD brain is truncated which also promotes its self-assembly. Tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently promote its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Thus, the AD abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau (1) is distinguishable from both normal and transiently hyperphosphorylated taus, and (2) is inhibitory when in a cytosolic/oligomeric state but not when it is self-assembled into PHF/SF. Inhibition of abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau offers a promising therapeutic target for AD and related tauopathies. PMID:20678074

  4. The dipion mass spectrum in e+e- annihilation and tau decay: Isospin symmetry breaking effects from the (rho, omega, phi) mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Benayoun, M.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Leitner, O.; O'Connell, H.B.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    A way to explain the puzzling difference between the pion form factor as measured in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations and in {tau} decays is discussed. We show that isospin symmetry breaking, beside the already identified effects, produces also a full mixing between the {rho}{sup 0}, {omega} and {phi} mesons which generates an isospin 0 component inside the {rho}{sup 0} meson. This effect, not accounted for in current treatments of the problem, seems able to account for the apparent mismatch between e{sup +}e{sup -} and {tau} data below the {phi} mass.

  5. Search for neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in pp collisions at √s=7 TeV.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kiesenhofer, W; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Teischinger, F; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Benucci, L; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Devroede, O; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Hreus, T; Marage, P E; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Adler, V; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Walsh, S; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Ceard, L; Cortina Gil, E; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; Delaere, C; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Hollar, J; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Damiao, D De Jesus; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; Da Costa, E M; Martins, C De Oliveira; De Souza, S Fonseca; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Oguri, V; Da Silva, W L Prado; Santoro, A; Do Amaral, S M Silva; Sznajder, A; De Araujo, F Torres Da Silva; Dias, F A; Tomei, T R Fernandez Perez; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Marinho, F; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Tcholakov, V; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Karadzhinova, A; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Zang, J; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Guo, S; Guo, Y; Li, W; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhang, L; Zhu, B; Zou, W; Cabrera, A; Moreno, B Gomez; Rios, A A Ocampo; Oliveros, A F Osorio; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Attikis, A; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Assran, Y; Khalil, S; Mahmoud, M A; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Azzolini, V; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Shreyber, I; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Broutin, C; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dahms, T; Dobrzynski, L; Elgammal, S; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Wyslouch, B; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Cardaci, M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Ferro, C; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Greder, S; Juillot, P; Karim, M; Le Bihan, A-C; Mikami, Y; Van Hove, P; Fassi, F; Mercier, D; Baty, C; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Bedjidian, M; Bondu, O; Boudoul, G; Boumediene, D; Brun, H; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sordini, V; Tosi, S; Tschudi, Y; Verdier, P; Lomidze, D; Anagnostou, G; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Jussen, R; Klein, K; Merz, J; Mohr, N; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Ata, M; Bender, W; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Erdmann, M; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Klimkovich, T; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Magass, C; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Tonutti, M; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Ahmad, W Haj; Heydhausen, D; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Rennefeld, J; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Thomas, M; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Martin, M Aldaya; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Cakir, A; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Katsas, P; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Krämer, M; Krücker, D; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Olzem, J; Pitzl, D; Raspereza, A; Raval, A; Rosin, M; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Sen, N; Spiridonov, A; Stein, M; Tomaszewska, J; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Autermann, C; Blobel, V; Bobrovskyi, S; Draeger, J; Enderle, H; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Lange, J; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pietsch, N; Sander, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schröder, M; Schum, T; Schwandt, J; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Barth, C; Bauer, J; Buege, V; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Komaragiri, J R; Kuhr, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F-P; Schmanau, M; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Troendle, D; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Weiler, T; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kesisoglou, S; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Manolakos, I; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Ntomari, E; Petrakou, E; Gouskos, L; Mertzimekis, T J; Panagiotou, A; Stiliaris, E; Evangelou, I; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Aranyi, A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Hajdu, C; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Kapusi, A; Krajczar, K; Sikler, F; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Molnar, J; Palinkas, J; Szillasi, Z; Veszpremi, V; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Bansal, S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Dhingra, N; Gupta, R; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A P; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Bhattacharya, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; 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Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Duru, F; Lae, C K; McCliment, E; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Norbeck, E; Olson, J; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bonato, A; Eskew, C; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Rappoccio, S; Swartz, M; Tran, N V; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Grachov, O; Kenny Iii, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Wood, J S; Zhukova, V; Barfuss, A F; Bolton, T; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Wan, Z; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Wright, D; Baden, A; Boutemeur, M; Eno, S C; Ferencek, D; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kirn, M; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Rossato, K; Rumerio, P; Santanastasio, F; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Twedt, E; Alver, B; Bauer, G; Bendavid, J; Busza, W; Butz, E; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Everaerts, P; Ceballos, G Gomez; Goncharov, M; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y-J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Wenger, E A; Xie, S; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dudero, P R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Shipkowski, S P; Smith, K; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Boeriu, O; Chasco, M; Reucroft, S; Swain, J; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Kubik, A; Odell, N; Ofierzynski, R A; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Antonelli, L; Berry, D; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Kolberg, T; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Ziegler, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Gu, J; Hill, C; Killewald, P; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Rodenburg, M; Williams, G; Adam, N; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Gerbaudo, D; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hunt, A; Jones, J; Laird, E; Pegna, D Lopes; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zuranski, A; Acosta, J G; Huang, X T; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Oliveros, S; Vargas, J E Ramirez; Zatserklyaniy, A; Alagoz, E; Barnes, V E; Bolla, G; Borrello, L; Bortoletto, D; Everett, A; Garfinkel, A F; Gutay, L; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Laasanen, A T; Leonardo, N; Liu, C; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Boulahouache, C; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Chung, Y S; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Flacher, H; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Gotra, Y; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Barker, A; Duggan, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Hits, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Patel, R; Richards, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Eusebi, R; Gilmore, J; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Nguyen, C N; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Bardak, C; Damgov, J; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Appelt, E; Brownson, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Gabella, W; Issah, M; Johns, W; Kurt, P; Maguire, C; Melo, A; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Lamichhane, P; Mattson, M; Milstène, C; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Dasu, S; Efron, J; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Palmonari, F; Reeder, D; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M

    2011-06-10

    A search for neutral minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) Higgs bosons in pp collisions at the LHC at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV is presented. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36  pb(-1) recorded by the CMS experiment. The search uses decays of the Higgs bosons to tau pairs. No excess is observed in the tau-pair invariant-mass spectrum. The resulting upper limits on the Higgs boson production cross section times branching fraction to tau pairs, as a function of the pseudoscalar Higgs boson mass, yield stringent new bounds in the MSSM parameter space. PMID:21770497

  6. Usp14 Deficiency Increases Tau Phosphorylation without Altering Tau Degradation or Causing Tau-Dependent Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Youngnam N.; Chen, Ping-Chung; Watson, Jennifer A.; Walters, Brandon J.; Phillips, Scott E.; Green, Karen; Schmidt, Robert; Wilson, Julie A.; Johnson, Gail V.; Roberson, Erik D.; Dobrunz, Lynn E.; Wilson, Scott M.

    2012-01-01

    Regulated protein degradation by the proteasome plays an essential role in the enhancement and suppression of signaling pathways in the nervous system. Proteasome-associated factors are pivotal in ensuring appropriate protein degradation, and we have previously demonstrated that alterations in one of these factors, the proteasomal deubiquitinating enzyme ubiquitin-specific protease 14 (Usp14), can lead to proteasome dysfunction and neurological disease. Recent studies in cell culture have shown that Usp14 can also stabilize the expression of over-expressed, disease-associated proteins such as tau and ataxin-3. Using Usp14-deficient axJ mice, we investigated if loss of Usp14 results in decreased levels of endogenous tau and ataxin-3 in the nervous system of mice. Although loss of Usp14 did not alter the overall neuronal levels of tau and ataxin-3, we found increased levels of phosphorylated tau that correlated with the onset of axonal varicosities in the Usp14-deficient mice. These changes in tau phosphorylation were accompanied by increased levels of activated phospho-Akt, phosphorylated MAPKs, and inactivated phospho-GSK3β. However, genetic ablation of tau did not alter any of the neurological deficits in the Usp14-deficient mice, demonstrating that increased levels of phosphorylated tau do not necessarily lead to neurological disease. Due to the widespread activation of intracellular signaling pathways induced by the loss of Usp14, a better understanding of the cellular pathways regulated by the proteasome is required before effective proteasomal-based therapies can be used to treat chronic neurological diseases. PMID:23144711

  7. First measurement of sigma (p anti-p ---> Z) . Br (Z ---> tau tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2004-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section for Z production times the branching fraction to {tau} leptons, {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}), in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the channel in which one {tau} decays into {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and the other into hadrons + {nu}{sub {tau}} or e{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 226 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The final sample contains 2008 candidate events with an estimated background of 55%. From this they obtain {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 237 {+-} 15(stat) {+-} 18(sys) {+-} 15(lum) pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  8. Characterization of tau fibrillization in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohua; Brunden, Kurt R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2010-01-01

    Background The assembly of tau proteins into paired helical filaments, the building blocks of neurofibrillary tangles, is linked to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease and related tauopathies. A greater understanding of this assembly process could identify targets for the discovery of drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders. Using recombinant human tau, we have delineated events leading to the conversion of normal soluble tau into tau fibrils Methods Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy methodologies were utilized to determine the structure of tau assemblies that formed when soluble tau was incubated with heparin for increasing lengths of time. Results Tau initially oligomerizes into spherical nucleation units of 18–21 nm diameter that appear to assemble linearly into nascent fibrils. Among the earliest tau fibrils are species that resemble a string of beads formed by linearly aligned spheres that with time seem to coalesce to form straight and twisted ribbon-like filaments, as well as paired-helical filaments similar to those found in human tauopathies. An analysis of fibril cross-sections at later incubation times revealed three fundamental axial structural features. Conclusions By monitoring tau fibrillization, we show that different tau filament morphologies co-exist. Temporal changes in the predominant tau structural species suggest that tau fibrillization involves the generation of structural intermediates, resulting in the formation of tau fibrils with verisimilitude to their authentic human counterparts. PMID:20298971

  9. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5?months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE. PMID:22879004

  10. Tau Splicing and the Intricacies of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Andreadis, Athena

    2011-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule associated protein that fulfills several functions critical for neuronal formation and health. Tau discharges its functions by producing multiple isoforms via regulated alternative splicing. These isoforms modulate tau function in normal brain by altering the domains of the protein, thereby influencing its localization, conformation and post-translational modifications and hence its availability and affinity for microtubules and other ligands. Disturbances in tau expression result in disruption of the neuronal cytoskeleton and formation of tau structures (neurofibrillary tangles) found in brains of dementia sufferers. More specifically, aberrations in tau splicing regulation directly cause several neurodegenerative diseases which lead to dementia. In this review, I present our cumulative knowledge of tau splicing regulation in connection with neurodegeneration and also briefly go over the still-extensive list of questions that are connected to tau (dys)function. PMID:21604267

  11. Alzheimer disease hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates hydrophobically.

    PubMed

    Ruben, G C; Ciardelli, T L; Grundke-Iqbal, I; Iqbal, K

    1997-11-01

    The chemical interaction that condenses the hyperphosphorylated protein tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD P-tau) into neurofibrillary tangles and cripples synaptic transmission remains unknown. Only beta-sheet, positive ion salt bridges between phosphates, and hydrophobic association can create tangles of just AD P-tau. We have correlated transmission electron microscope (TEM) images of tau aggregation with different percentages of beta-sheet in aqueous suspensions of tau while using buffers that block dispositive or tripositive ionic bridges between intermolecular phosphates. Circular dichroism (CD) studies were performed at different temperatures from 5-85 degrees C using AD P-tau, AD P-tau dephosphorylated with hydrofluoric acid (HF AD P-tau) or alkaline phosphatase (AP AD P-tau), and recombinant human tau with 3-repeats and two amino terminal inserts (R-39) and using bovine tau (B tau) isolated without heat or acid treatment. Secondary structure was estimated from CD spectra at 5 degrees C using the Lincomb algorithm. Each preparation except one demonstrated an inverse temperature transition, Ti, in the CD at 197 nm. No correlation was found between beta-sheet content and aggregation, leaving only hydrophobic interaction as the remaining possibility. Thirteen of 21 possible phosphorylation sites in AD P-tau lie adjacent to positive residues in tau's primary structure. Occupation of five to nine phosphate sites on AD P-tau appears sufficient to reduce or neutralize tau's basic character. AD P-tau's hydrophobic character is indicated by its low inverse temperature transition, Ti. The Ti for AD P-tau was 24.5 degrees C or 28 degrees C, whereas for B tau with three phosphates it was 32 degrees C, for unphosphorylated tau R-39 it was 38 degrees C, and for dephosphorylated HF AD P-tau it was 37.5 degrees C. The hydrophobic protein elastin and its analogs coalesce and precipitate at their Ti of 24-29 degrees C, well below body temperature. We hypothesize that AD P-tau causes tangle accumulation by this mechanism. PMID:9329157

  12. Characterization of the in vitro phosphorylation of human tau by tau protein kinase II (cdk5/p20) using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lund, E T; McKenna, R; Evans, D B; Sharma, S K; Mathews, W R

    2001-02-01

    Hyperphosphorylated tau is an integral part of the neurofibrillary tangles that form within neuronal cell bodies, and tau protein kinase II is reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recently, we reported that tau protein kinase II (cdk5/p20)-phosphorylated human tau inhibits microtubule assembly, and tau protein kinase II (cdk5/p20) phosphorylation of microtubule-associated tau results in dissociation of phosphorylated tau from the microtubules and tubulin depolymerization. In the studies reported here, a combination of mass spectrometric techniques was used to study the phosphorylation of human recombinant tau by recombinant tau protein kinase II (cdk5/p20) in vitro. The extent of phosphorylation was determined by measuring the molecular mass of phosphorylated tau using mass spectrometry. Reaction of human recombinant tau with tau protein kinase II (cdk5/p20) resulted in the formation of two major species containing either five or six phosphate groups. The specific amino acid residues phosphorylated were determined by analyzing tryptic peptides by tandem mass spectrometry via either MALDI/TOF post-source decay or by electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Based on these experiments, we conclude that tau protein kinase II (cdk5/p20) can phosphorylate human tau at Thr(181), Thr(205), Thr(212), Thr(217), Ser(396) and Ser(404). PMID:11181841

  13. Mutated tau binds less avidly to microtubules than wildtype tau in living cells.

    PubMed

    Nagiec, E W; Sampson, K E; Abraham, I

    2001-02-01

    Some forms of genetically inherited dementia, including frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), are caused by mutations in tau. We have examined several mutations in the microtubule-binding portion of tau for their effect on microtubule binding, cellular distribution and cytoskeletal structure in mammalian cells. Using constructs coding for mutant (P301L and V337M) and wildtype human tau fused to a green fluorescent protein analog (EGFP) we followed the disposition of tau in live cells after transient transfection using confocal microscopy. Most of the tau protein localized to structures that resembled microtubules or microtubule bundles and co-localized with tubulin. At 3 days post-transfection mutant tau proteins showed a higher abundance of free tau in the cytoplasm than did wildtype tau. Cells expressing the P301L mutation showed proportionally more cytoplasmic localization of tau. Confirming these results, fractionated cells with mutant tau had a higher percentage of tau in the cytoplasmic compartment as compared to the cytoskeletal compartment. Cells with wildtype tau had most tau in the cytoskeletal fraction. Because the mutations (V337M, P301L) are associated with genetic tauopathies, these results suggest that a factor in disease etiology of genetic tauopathies and other dementias with altered tau is a greater abundance of tau in the cytoplasm due to decreased binding to microtubules. This increased cytoplasmic presence may be a significant factor in promoting tau aggregation. PMID:11170176

  14. Interaction of tau with the RNA-Binding Protein TIA1 Regulates tau Pathophysiology and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vanderweyde, Tara; Apicco, Daniel J; Youmans-Kidder, Katherine; Ash, Peter E A; Cook, Casey; Lummertz da Rocha, Edroaldo; Jansen-West, Karen; Frame, Alissa A; Citro, Allison; Leszyk, John D; Ivanov, Pavel; Abisambra, Jose F; Steffen, Martin; Li, Hu; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2016-05-17

    Dendritic mislocalization of microtubule associated protein tau is a hallmark of tauopathies, but the role of dendritic tau is unknown. We now report that tau interacts with the RNA-binding protein (RBP) TIA1 in brain tissue, and we present the brain-protein interactome network for TIA1. Analysis of the TIA1 interactome in brain tissue from wild-type (WT) and tau knockout mice demonstrates that tau is required for normal interactions of TIA1 with proteins linked to RNA metabolism, including ribosomal proteins and RBPs. Expression studies show that tau regulates the distribution of TIA1, and tau accelerates stress granule (SG) formation. Conversely, TIA1 knockdown or knockout inhibits tau misfolding and associated toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons, while overexpressing TIA1 induces tau misfolding and stimulates neurodegeneration. Pharmacological interventions that prevent SG formation also inhibit tau pathophysiology. These studies suggest that the pathophysiology of tauopathy requires an intimate interaction with RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27160897

  15. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  16. Removing endogenous tau does not prevent tau propagation yet reduces its neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wegmann, Susanne; Maury, Eduardo A; Kirk, Molly J; Saqran, Lubna; Roe, Allyson; DeVos, Sarah L; Nicholls, Samantha; Fan, Zhanyun; Takeda, Shuko; Cagsal-Getkin, Ozge; William, Christopher M; Spires-Jones, Tara L; Pitstick, Rose; Carlson, George A; Pooler, Amy M; Hyman, Bradley T

    2015-12-14

    In Alzheimer's disease and tauopathies, tau protein aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles that progressively spread to synaptically connected brain regions. A prion-like mechanism has been suggested: misfolded tau propagating through the brain seeds neurotoxic aggregation of soluble tau in recipient neurons. We use transgenic mice and viral tau expression to test the hypotheses that trans-synaptic tau propagation, aggregation, and toxicity rely on the presence of endogenous soluble tau. Surprisingly, mice expressing human P301Ltau in the entorhinal cortex showed equivalent tau propagation and accumulation in recipient neurons even in the absence of endogenous tau. We then tested whether the lack of endogenous tau protects against misfolded tau aggregation and toxicity, a second prion model paradigm for tau, using P301Ltau-overexpressing mice with severe tangle pathology and neurodegeneration. Crossed onto tau-null background, these mice had similar tangle numbers but were protected against neurotoxicity. Therefore, misfolded tau can propagate across neural systems without requisite templated misfolding, but the absence of endogenous tau markedly blunts toxicity. These results show that tau does not strictly classify as a prion protein. PMID:26538322

  17. Evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}with a semileptonic tagging method

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Inami, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mori, T.; Ohshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Aihara, H.; Aulchenko, V.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B.; Zhilich, V.; Zyukova, O.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Mohanty, G. B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a measurement of the decay B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}using a data sample containing 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. A sample of B{sup +}B{sup -} pairs are tagged by reconstructing one B{sup +} meson decaying semileptonically. We detect the B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}candidate in the recoil. We obtain a signal with a significance of 3.6 standard deviations including systematic uncertainties, and measure the branching fraction to be B(B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}})=[1.54{sub -0.37}{sup +0.38}(stat){sub -0.31}{sup +0.29}(syst)]x10{sup -4}. This result confirms the evidence for B{sup -{yields}{tau}-{nu}}{sub {tau}}obtained in a previous Belle measurement that used a hadronic B tagging method.

  18. A Simple Model to Study Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Alexander L.; Hernández, Félix; Ávila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins play a role in the stabilization of microtubules, but in pathological conditions, tauopathies, tau is modified by phosphorylation and can aggregate into aberrant aggregates. These aggregates could be toxic to cells, and different cell models have been used to test for compounds that might prevent these tau modifications. Here, we have used a cell model involving the overexpression of human tau in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. In human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing tau in a stable manner, we have been able to replicate the phosphorylation of intracellular tau. This intracellular tau increases its own level of phosphorylation and aggregates, likely due to the regulatory effect of some growth factors on specific tau kinases such as GSK3. In these conditions, a change in secreted tau was observed. Reversal of phosphorylation and aggregation of tau was found by the use of lithium, a GSK3 inhibitor. Thus, we propose this as a simple cell model to study tau pathology in nonneuronal cells due to their viability and ease to work with. PMID:26949341

  19. Advances in tau-based drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Wendy; Pooler, Amy M.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and some frontotemporal dementias, are neurodegenerative diseases characterised by pathological lesions comprised of tau protein. There is currently a significant and urgent unmet need for disease-modifying therapies for these conditions and recently attention has turned to tau as a potential target for intervention. Areas covered Increasing evidence has highlighted pathways associated with tau-mediated neurodegeneration as important targets for drug development. Here, the authors review recently published papers in this area and summarise the genetic and pharmacological approaches that have shown efficacy in reducing tau-associated neurodegeneration. These include the use of agents to prevent abnormal tau processing and increase tau clearance, therapies targeting the immune system, and the manipulation of tau pre-mRNA to modify tau isoform expression. Expert opinion Several small molecule tau-based treatments are currently being assessed in clinical trials, the outcomes of which are eagerly awaited. Current evidence suggests that therapies targeting tau are likely, at least in part, to form the basis of an effective and safe treatment for Alzheimer’s disease and related neurodegenerative disorders in which tau deposition is evident. PMID:22003359

  20. Searches for the Decays B0 to l+- tau-+ and B+ to l+ nu(L=e,mu) using Hadronic Tag Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R.N.; ,

    2008-01-30

    We present searches for the leptonic decays B{sup +} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{nu} and the lepton flavor violating decays B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{tau}{sup {-+}}, where {ell} = e, {mu}, with data collected by the BABAR experiment at SLAC. This search demonstrates a novel technique in which we fully reconstruct the accompanying {bar B} in {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} events, and look for a monoenergetic lepton from the signal B decay. The signal yield is extracted from a fit to the signal lepton candidate momentum distribution in the signal B rest frame. Using a data sample of approximately 378 million B{bar B} pairs (342 fb{sup -1}), we find no evidence of signal in any of the decay modes. Branching fraction upper limits of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}) < 5.2 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}) < 5.6 x 10{sup -6}, {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} e{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 2.8 x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) < 2.2 x 10{sup -5}, are obtained at 90% confidence level.

  1. Measurement of the tau lepton mass by the Beijing Spectrometer (BES) Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Soderstrom, E.; BES Collaboration

    1992-11-01

    The mass of the {tau} lepton has been measured at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider using the Beijing Spectrometer. A search near threshold for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} was performed. Candidate events were identified by requiring that one {tau} decay via {tau} {yields} e{nu}{bar {nu}}, and the other via {tau} {yields} {mu}{nu}{bar {nu}}. The mass value, obtained from a fit to the energy dependence of the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} cross section, is m{sub {tau}} = 1776.9{sub -0.5}{sup +0.4} {plus_minus} 0.2 MeV.

  2. Search for squark production in events with jets, hadronically decaying tau leptons and missing transverse energy at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-05-01

    A search for supersymmetric partners of quarks is performed in the topology of multijet events accompanied by at least one tau lepton decaying hadronically and large missing transverse energy. Approximately 1 fb-1 of ppbar collision data from the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV recorded by the D0 detector is analyzed. Results are combined with the previously published D0 inclusive search for squarks and gluinos. No evidence of physics beyond the standard model is found and lower limits on the squark mass up to 410 GeV are derived in the framework of minimal supergravity with tan(beta)=15, A{sub 0}=-2m{sub 0} and mu<0, in the region where decays to tau leptons dominate. Gaugino masses m{sub 1/2} are excluded up to 172 GeV.

  3. TTBK2: A Tau Protein Kinase beyond Tau Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jung-Chi; Yang, T. Tony; Weng, Rueyhung Roc; Kuo, Ching-Te; Chang, Chih-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Tau tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a kinase known to phosphorylate tau and tubulin. It has recently drawn much attention due to its involvement in multiple important cellular processes. Here, we review the current understanding of TTBK2, including its sequence, structure, binding sites, phosphorylation substrates, and cellular processes involved. TTBK2 possesses a casein kinase 1 (CK1) kinase domain followed by a ~900 amino acid segment, potentially responsible for its localization and substrate recruitment. It is known to bind to CEP164, a centriolar protein, and EB1, a microtubule plus-end tracking protein. In addition to autophosphorylation, known phosphorylation substrates of TTBK2 include tau, tubulin, CEP164, CEP97, and TDP-43, a neurodegeneration-associated protein. Mutations of TTBK2 are associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 11. In addition, TTBK2 is essential for regulating the growth of axonemal microtubules in ciliogenesis. It also plays roles in resistance of cancer target therapies and in regulating glucose and GABA transport. Reported sites of TTBK2 localization include the centriole/basal body, the midbody, and possibly the mitotic spindles. Together, TTBK2 is a multifunctional kinase involved in important cellular processes and demands augmented efforts in investigating its functions. PMID:25950000

  4. Rescue from tau-induced neuronal dysfunction produces insoluble tau oligomers

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Catherine M.; Quraishe, Shmma; Hands, Sarah; Sealey, Megan; Mahajan, Sumeet; Allan, Douglas W.; Mudher, Amritpal

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of highly phosphorylated tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies. Nevertheless, animal models demonstrate that tau-mediated dysfunction/toxicity may not require large tau aggregates but instead may be caused by soluble hyper-phosphorylated tau or by small tau oligomers. Challenging this widely held view, we use multiple techniques to show that insoluble tau oligomers form in conditions where tau-mediated dysfunction is rescued in vivo. This shows that tau oligomers are not necessarily always toxic. Furthermore, their formation correlates with increased tau levels, caused intriguingly, by either pharmacological or genetic inhibition of tau kinase glycogen-synthase-kinase-3beta (GSK-3β). Moreover, contrary to common belief, these tau oligomers were neither highly phosphorylated, and nor did they contain beta-pleated sheet structure. This may explain their lack of toxicity. Our study makes the novel observation that tau also forms non-toxic insoluble oligomers in vivo in addition to toxic oligomers, which have been reported by others. Whether these are inert or actively protective remains to be established. Nevertheless, this has wide implications for emerging therapeutic strategies such as those that target dissolution of tau oligomers as they may be ineffective or even counterproductive unless they act on the relevant toxic oligomeric tau species. PMID:26608845

  5. A DNA damage-activated checkpoint kinase phosphorylates tau and enhances tau-induced neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Iijima-Ando, Kanae; Zhao, LiJuan; Gatt, Anthony; Shenton, Christopher; Iijima, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule associated protein tau is detected in the brains of individuals with a range of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). An imbalance in phosphorylation and/or dephosphorylation of tau at disease-related sites has been suggested to initiate the abnormal metabolism and toxicity of tau in disease pathogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying abnormal phosphorylation of tau in AD are not fully understood. Here, we show that the DNA damage-activated Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) is a novel tau kinase and enhances tau toxicity in a transgenic Drosophila model. Overexpression of Drosophila Chk2 increases tau phosphorylation at Ser262 and enhances tau-induced neurodegeneration in transgenic flies expressing human tau. The non-phosphorylatable Ser262Ala mutation abolishes Chk2-induced enhancement of tau toxicity, suggesting that the Ser262 phosphorylation site is involved in the enhancement of tau toxicity by Chk2. In vitro kinase assays revealed that human Chk2 and a closely related checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) directly phosphorylate human tau at Ser262. We also demonstrate that Drosophila Chk2 does not modulate the activity of the fly homolog of microtubule affinity regulating kinase, which has been shown to be a physiological tau Ser262 kinase. Since accumulation of DNA damage has been detected in the brains of AD patients, our results suggest that the DNA damage-activated kinases Chk1 and Chk2 may be involved in tau phosphorylation and toxicity in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:20159774

  6. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation; Lighting-Up Tau-Tau Interaction in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tak, HyeJin; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Joo Hyun; Baik, Ja-Hyun; Kim, YoungSoo; Kim, Dong Jin; Grailhe, Regis; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal tau aggregation is a pathological hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders and it is becoming apparent that soluble tau aggregates play a key role in neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Despite this pathological importance, there is currently no single method that allows monitoring soluble tau species in living cells. In this regard, we developed a cell-based sensor that visualizes tau self-assembly. By introducing bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) technique to tau, we were able to achieve spatial and temporal resolution of tau-tau interactions in a range of states, from soluble dimers to large aggregates. Under basal conditions, tau-BiFC cells exhibited little fluorescence intensity, implying that the majority of tau molecules exist as monomers. Upon chemically induced tau hyperphosphorylation, BiFC fluorescence greatly increased, indicating an increased level of tau-tau interactions. As an indicator of tau assembly, our BiFC sensor would be a useful tool for investigating tau pathology. PMID:24312574

  7. Measurement of the branching fraction for $\\tau\\to\\eta K\

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-12

    The authors report on analyses of tau lepton decays {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, with {eta} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, using 470 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment at PEP-II, collected at center-of-mass energies at and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They measure the branching fraction for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay mode, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (1.42 {+-} 0.11(stat) {+-} 0.07(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, and report a 95% confidence level upper limit for the second-class current process {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 9.9 x 10{sup -5}.

  8. Glycation alter the process of Tau phosphorylation to change Tau isoforms aggregation property.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kefu; Liu, Yutong; Li, Lingyun; Qin, Peibin; Iqbal, Javed; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2016-02-01

    The risk of tauopathies depends in part on the levels and modified composition of six Tau isoforms in the human brain. Abnormal phosphorylation of the Tau protein and the shift of the ratio of 3R Tau to 4R Tau are presumed to result in neurofibrillary pathology and neurodegeneration. Glycation has recently been linked to dementia and metabolic syndrome. To determine the contribution of Tau protein glycation and phosphorylation on Tau aggregation propensity, the assembled kinetics were examined in vitro using Thioflavin T fluorescence assays. We found that glycation and phosphorylation have different effects on aggregation propensity in different Tau isoforms. Different Tau proteins play important parts in each tauopathies, but 3R0N, fetal Tau protein, has no effect on tauopathies. Conversely, 4R2N has more modified sites and a higher tendency to aggregate, playing the most important role in 4R tauopathies. Finally, Glycation, which could modulate Tau phosphorylation, may occur before any other modification. It also regulates the 3R to 4R ratio and promotes 4R2N Tau protein aggregation. Decreasing the sites of glycation, as well as shifting other Tau proteins to 3R0N Tau proteins has potential therapeutic implications for tauopathies. PMID:26655600

  9. The acetylation of tau inhibits its function and promotes pathological tau aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Guo, Jing L.; Hurtado, David E.; Kwong, Linda K.; Mills, Ian P.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M. Y.

    2011-01-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau promotes neuronal survival through binding and stabilization of MTs. Phosphorylation regulates tau–microtubule interactions and hyperphosphorylation contributes to the aberrant formation of insoluble tau aggregates in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies1. However, other pathogenic post-translational tau modifications have not been well characterized. Here we demonstrate that tau acetylation inhibits tau function via impaired tau–microtubule interactions and promotes pathological tau aggregation. Mass spectrometry analysis identified specific lysine residues, including lysine 280 (K280) within the microtubule-binding motif as the major sites of tau acetylation. Immunohistochemical and biochemical studies of brains from tau transgenic mice and patients with AD and related tauopathies showed that acetylated tau pathology is specifically associated with insoluble, Thioflavin-positive tau aggregates. Thus, tau K280 acetylation in our studies was only detected in diseased tissue, suggesting it may have a role in pathological tau transformation. This study suggests that tau K280 acetylation is a potential target for drug discovery and biomarker development for AD and related tauopathies. PMID:21427723

  10. Improved measurement of absolute branching fraction of D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect

    Onyisi, P. U. E.; Rosner, J. L.; Alexander, J. P.; Cassel, D. G.; Duboscq, J. E.; Ehrlich, R.; Fields, L.; Galik, R. S.; Gibbons, L.; Gray, R.; Gray, S. W.; Hartill, D. L.; Heltsley, B. K.; Hertz, D.; Hunt, J. M.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kreinick, D. L.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Ledoux, J.; Mahlke-Krueger, H.

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the leptonic decay D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, via the decay channel {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, using a sample of tagged D{sub s}{sup +} decays collected near the D{sub s}*{sup {+-}}D{sub s}{sup {+-}} peak production energy in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions with the CLEO-c detector. We obtain B(D{sub s}{sup +}{yields}{tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}})=(5.30{+-}0.47{+-}0.22)% and determine the decay constant f{sub D{sub s}}=(252.5{+-}11.1{+-}5.2) MeV, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  11. Reconstruction of Higgs bosons in the di-tau channel via 3-prong decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripaios, Ben; Nagao, Keiko; Nojiri, Mihoko; Sakurai, Kazuki; Webber, Bryan

    2013-03-01

    We propose a method for reconstructing the mass of a particle, such as the Higgs boson, decaying into a pair of τ leptons, of which one subsequently undergoes a 3-prong decay. The kinematics is solved using information from the visible decay products, the missing transverse momentum, and the 3-prong τ decay vertex, with the detector resolution taken into account using a likelihood method. The method is shown to give good discrimination between a 125 GeV Higgs boson signal and the dominant backgrounds, such as Z 0 decays to ττ and W ± plus jets production. As a result, we find an improvement, compared to existing methods for this channel, in the discovery potential, as well as in measurements of the Higgs boson mass and production cross section times branching ratio.

  12. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-05-01

    A search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons {Phi} decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} final states in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 325 pb{sup -1}, were collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Since no excess compared to the expectation from standard model processes is found, limits on the production cross section times branching ratio are set. The results are combined with those obtained from the D0 search for {Phi}b({bar b}) {yields} b{bar b}b({bar b}) and are interpreted in the minimal supersymmetric standard model.

  13. A measurement of the tau Michel parameters at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Quigley, J.

    1997-05-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the tau Michel parameters. This measurement utilizes the highly polarized SLC electron beam to extract these quantities directly from the measured tau decay spectra using the 1993--95 SLD sample of 4,528 tau pair events. The results are {rho}{sup e} = 0.71 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.05, {xi}{sup e} = 1.16 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.06, and ({xi}{delta}){sup e} = 0.85 {+-} 0.43 {+-} 0.08 for tau decays to electrons and {rho}{sup {mu}} = 0.54 {+-} 0.28 {sup {minus}} 0.14, {eta}{sup {mu}} = {minus}0.59 {+-} 0.82 {+-} 0.45, {xi}{sup {mu}} = 0.75 {+-} 0.50 {+-} 0.14, and ({xi}{delta}){sup {mu}} = 0.82 {+-} 0.32 {+-} 0.07 for tau decays to muons. Combining all leptonic tau decays gives {rho} = 0.72 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.03, {xi} = 1.05 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 0.04, and {Xi}{delta} = 0.88 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.04. These results agree well with the current world average and the Standard Model.

  14. Measurement of the tau polarisation at the Z resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Mours, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Alemany, R.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fenandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Mattison, T.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Quattromini, M.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, W.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Blucher, E.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Haywood, S.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lohse, T.; Lusiani, A.; Martinez, M.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miotto, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Perlas, J. A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Redlinger, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Badaud, F.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; El Fellous, R.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Prulhière, F.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Ikeda, M.; Lannutti, J.; Levinthal, D.; Mermikides, M.; Sawyer, L.; Wasserbaech, S.; Antonelli, A.; Baldini, R.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; D'Ettorre-Piazzoli, B.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Picchi, P.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Belk, A. T.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Dugeay, S.; Greene, A. M.; Hassaed, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Nash, J.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Fouque, G.; Orteu, S.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Rotscheidt, H.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jaffe, D. E.; Janot, P.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zhang, Z.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Carter, J. M.; Green, M. G.; March, P. V.; Mir, Ll. M.; Medcalf, T.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; West, L. R.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Edwards, M.; Fisher, S. M.; Jones, T. J.; Norton, P. R.; Salmon, D. P.; Thompson, J. C.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Steeg, F.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Aubert, J.-J.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Papalexiou, S.; Payre, P.; Roos, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Perrier, F.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Ashman, J. G.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Carney, R. E.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Hatfield, F.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Cinabro, D.; Conway, J. S.; Cowen, D. F.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Jared, R. C.; Leclaire, B. W.; Lishka, C.; Pan, Y. B.; Pater, J. R.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.

    1993-09-01

    Using 18.8 pb-1 of data collected in 1990 and 1991, ALEPH has measured the tau polarisation in the decay modes τ→ ev bar v, τ→μ v bar v, τ→πν, τ→ρν and τ→ a 1ν, using both the individual tau decay kinematics and the event acollinearity. The measurement of the tau polarisation as a function of the production polar angle yields the two parameters A τ and A e , where A l =2 g {/v l } g {/A l }/( g {/v l })2+( g {/A l })2] The results A τ=0.143±0.023 and A e =0.120±0.026 are consistent with the hypothesis of electron-tau universality. Assuming universality yields a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle sin2θ{/w eff}=0.2332±0.0022.

  15. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  16. Tau imaging: early progress and future directions.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, Victor L; Fodero-Tavoletti, Michelle T; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Use of selective in-vivo tau imaging will enable improved understanding of tau aggregation in the brain, facilitating research into causes, diagnosis, and treatment of major tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal syndrome, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and some variants of frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Neuropathological studies of Alzheimer's disease show a strong association between tau deposits, decreased cognitive function, and neurodegenerative changes. Selective tau imaging will allow the in-vivo exploration of such associations and measure the global and regional changes in tau deposits over time. Such imaging studies will comprise non-invasive assessment of the spatial and temporal pattern of tau deposition over time, providing insight into the role tau plays in ageing and helping to establish the relation between cognition, genotype, neurodegeneration, and other biomarkers. Once validated, selective tau imaging might be useful as a diagnostic, prognostic, and progression biomarker, and a surrogate marker for the monitoring of efficacy and patient recruitment for anti-tau therapeutic trials. PMID:25496902

  17. Formation and Propagation of Tau Oligomeric Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Julia E.; Kayed, Rakez

    2013-01-01

    Tau misfolding and aggregation leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which have long been considered one of the main pathological hallmarks for numerous neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). However, recent studies completed both in vitro and in vivo suggest that intermediate forms of tau, known as tau oligomers, between the monomeric form and NFTs are the true toxic species in disease and the best targets for anti-tau therapies. However, the exact mechanism by which the spread of pathology occurs is unknown. Evidence suggests that tau oligomers may act as templates for the misfolding of native tau, thereby seeding the spread of the toxic forms of the protein. Recently, researchers have reported the ability of tau oligomers to enter and exit cells, propagating from disease-affected regions to unaffected areas. While the mechanism by which the spreading of misfolded tau occurs has yet to be elucidated, there are a few different models which have been proposed, including cell membrane stress and pore-formation, endocytosis and exocytosis, and non-traditional secretion of protein not enclosed by a membrane. Coming to an understanding of how toxic tau species seed and spread through the brain will be crucial to finding effective treatments for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:23882255

  18. Measurement of the tau lepton polarisation at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DELPHI Collaboration; Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Ricca, G. Della; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M. C. Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R. Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation P of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value P=-0.164±0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  19. Measurement of the tau lepton polarisation at LEP2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; da Silva, W.; Dedovich, D.; Ricca, G. Della; de Angelis, A.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Maria, N.; de Min, A.; de Paula, L.; di Ciaccio, L.; di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Santo, M. C. Espirito; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Herr, H.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Nulty, R. Mc; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Rames, J.; Read, A.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; van Dam, P.; van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.; Delphi Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    A first measurement of the average polarisation Pτ of tau leptons produced in e+e- annihilation at energies significantly above the Z resonance is presented. The polarisation is determined from the kinematic spectra of tau hadronic decays. The measured value Pτ = - 0.164 ± 0.125 is consistent with the Standard Model prediction for the mean LEP energy of 197 GeV.

  20. TAUOLA for simulation of tau decay and production: perspectives for precision low energy and LHC applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wąs, Z.

    2011-09-01

    The status of Monte Carlo system for the simulation of τ-lepton production and decay in high-energy accelerator experiments is reviewed. Since the previous τ-lepton conference in 2008 some practical modifications have been introduced: (i) For the TAUOLA Monte Carlo generator of τ-lepton decays, automated and simultaneous use of many versions of form-factors for the calculation of optional weights for fits was developed and checked to work in the Belle and BaBar software environment. Work on alternative parametrizations of hadronic decays is advanced. (ii) the TAUOLA universal interface based on HepMC (the C++ event record) is now public. A similar interface for PHOTOS is now also public. (iii) Extension of the PHOTOS Monte Carlo for QED bremsstrahlung in decays featuring kernels based on complete first order matrix element are gradually becoming widely available thanks to properties of the new, HepMC based interface. (iv) Systematic tests of the programs with the help of MC-TESTER are now available for FORTRAN and C++ users. The results presented here illustrate the status of the projects performed in collaboration with Nadia Davidson, Piotr Golonka, Gizo Nanava, Tomasz Przedziński, Olga Shekhovtsova, Elżbieta Richter-W̨as, Pablo Roig, Qingjun Xu and others.

  1. Caspase-cleaved tau exhibits rapid memory impairment associated with tau oligomers in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Kim, YoungDoo; Choi, Hyunwoo; Lee, WonJae; Park, Hyejin; Kam, Tae-In; Hong, Se-Hoon; Nah, Jihoon; Jung, Sunmin; Shin, Bora; Lee, Huikyong; Choi, Tae-Yong; Choo, Hyosun; Kim, Kyung-Keun; Choi, Se-Young; Kayed, Rakez; Jung, Yong-Keun

    2016-03-01

    In neurodegenerative diseases like AD, tau forms neurofibrillary tangles, composed of tau protein. In the AD brain, activated caspases cleave tau at the 421th Asp, generating a caspase-cleaved form of tau, TauC3. Although TauC3 is known to assemble rapidly into filaments in vitro, a role of TauC3 in vivo remains unclear. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse expressing human TauC3 using a neuron-specific promoter. In this mouse, we found that human TauC3 was expressed in the hippocampus and cortex. Interestingly, TauC3 mice showed drastic learning and spatial memory deficits and reduced synaptic density at a young age (2-3months). Notably, tau oligomers as well as tau aggregates were found in TauC3 mice showing memory deficits. Further, i.p. or i.c.v. injection with methylene blue or Congo red, inhibitors of tau aggregation in vitro, and i.p. injection with rapamycin significantly reduced the amounts of tau oligomers in the hippocampus, rescued spine density, and attenuated memory impairment in TauC3 mice. Together, these results suggest that TauC3 facilitates early memory impairment in transgenic mice accompanied with tau oligomer formation, providing insight into the role of TauC3 in the AD pathogenesis associated with tau oligomers and a useful AD model to test drug candidates. PMID:26704708

  2. Observation of tau neutrino appearance in the CNGS beam with the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opera Collaboration; Agafonova, N.; Aleksandrov, A.; Anokhina, A.; Aoki, S.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Asada, T.; Bender, D.; Bertolin, A.; Bozza, C.; Brugnera, R.; Buonaura, A.; Buontempo, S.; Büttner, B.; Chernyavsky, M.; Chukanov, A.; Consiglio, L.; D'Ambrosio, N.; de Lellis, G.; de Serio, M.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; di Crescenzo, A.; di Ferdinando, D.; di Marco, N.; Dmitrievski, S.; Dracos, M.; Duchesneau, D.; Dusini, S.; Dzhatdoev, T.; Ebert, J.; Ereditato, A.; Fini, R. A.; Fukuda, T.; Galati, G.; Garfagnini, A.; Giacomelli, G.; Goellnitz, C.; Goldberg, J.; Gornushkin, Y.; Grella, G.; Guler, M.; Gustavino, C.; Hagner, C.; Hara, T.; Hayakawa, T.; Hollnagel, A.; Hosseini, B.; Ishida, H.; Ishiguro, K.; Jakovcic, K.; Jollet, C.; Kamiscioglu, C.; Kamiscioglu, M.; Katsuragawa, T.; Kawada, J.; Kawahara, H.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Kitagawa, N.; Klicek, B.; Kodama, K.; Komatsu, M.; Kose, U.; Kreslo, I.; Lauria, A.; Lenkeit, J.; Ljubicic, A.; Longhin, A.; Loverre, P.; Malenica, M.; Malgin, A.; Mandrioli, G.; Matsuo, T.; Matveev, V.; Mauri, N.; Medinaceli, E.; Meregaglia, A.; Meyer, M.; Mikado, S.; Miyanishi, M.; Monacelli, P.; Montesi, M. C.; Morishima, K.; Muciaccia, M. T.; Naganawa, N.; Naka, T.; Nakamura, M.; Nakano, T.; Nakatsuka, Y.; Niwa, K.; Ogawa, S.; Okateva, N.; Olshevsky, A.; Omura, T.; Ozaki, K.; Paoloni, A.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Pasqualini, L.; Pastore, A.; Patrizii, L.; Pessard, H.; Pistillo, C.; Podgrudkov, D.; Polukhina, N.; Pozzato, M.; Pupilli, F.; Roda, M.; Roganova, T.; Rokujo, H.; Rosa, G.; Ryazhskaya, O.; Sato, O.; Schembri, A.; Shakiryanova, I.; Shchedrina, T.; Sheshukov, A.; Shibuya, H.; Shiraishi, T.; Shoziyoev, G.; Simone, S.; Sioli, M.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spinetti, M.; Stanco, L.; Starkov, N.; Stellacci, S. M.; Stipcevic, M.; Strolin, P.; Takahashi, S.; Tenti, M.; Terranova, F.; Tioukov, V.; Tufanli, S.; Umemoto, A.; Vilain, P.; Vladimirov, M.; Votano, L.; Vuilleumier, J. L.; Wilquet, G.; Wonsak, B.; Yoon, C. S.; Yaguchi, I.; Yoshimoto, M.; Zemskova, S.; Zghiche, A.

    2014-10-01

    The OPERA experiment is searching for ν _μ rArr ν _tau oscillations in appearance mode, i.e., via the direct detection of tau leptons in ν _tau charged-current interactions. The evidence of ν _μ rArr ν _tau appearance has been previously reported with three ν _tau candidate events using a sub-sample of data from the 2008-2012 runs. We report here a fourth ν _tau candidate event, with the tau decaying into a hadron, found after adding the 2012 run events without any muon in the final state to the data sample. Given the number of analyzed events and the low background, ν _μ rArr ν _tau oscillations are established with a significance of 4.2σ.

  3. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  4. Analysis of BaBar data for three meson tau decay modes using the Tauola generator

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhovtsova, Olga

    2014-11-24

    The hadronic current for the τ⁻ → π⁻π⁺π⁻ντ decay calculated in the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory with an additional modification to include the σ meson is described. In addition, implementation into the Monte Carlo generator Tauola and fitting strategy to get the model parameters using the one-dimensional distributions are discussed. The results of the fit to one-dimensional mass invariant spectrum of the BaBar data are presented.

  5. The microtubule-associated tau protein has intrinsic acetyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Todd J; Friedmann, Dave; Hwang, Andrew W; Marmorstein, Ronen; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2013-06-01

    Tau proteins are the building blocks of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) found in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease. Recently, we demonstrated that tau is extensively post-translationally modified by lysine acetylation, which impairs normal tau function and promotes pathological aggregation. Identifying the enzymes that mediate tau acetylation could provide targets for future therapies aimed at reducing the burden of acetylated tau. Here, we report that mammalian tau proteins possess intrinsic enzymatic activity capable of catalyzing self-acetylation. Functional mapping of tau acetyltransferase activity followed by biochemical analysis revealed that tau uses catalytic cysteine residues in the microtubule-binding domain to facilitate tau lysine acetylation, thus suggesting a mechanism similar to that employed by MYST-family acetyltransferases. The identification of tau as an acetyltransferase provides a framework to further understand tau pathogenesis and highlights tau enzymatic activity as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:23624859

  6. Tau assembly in inducible transfectants expressing wild-type or FTDP-17 tau.

    PubMed

    DeTure, Michael; Ko, Li-Wen; Easson, Colin; Yen, Shu-Hui

    2002-11-01

    Conditional expression systems for 4-repeat wild-type (WT) tau or the corresponding mutants V337M and R406W were established in human neuroglioma H4 cells to study the effect of tau mutations on the physicochemical properties of tau, and to develop a cellular model for the formation of filamentous tau characteristic of frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) and Alzheimer's disease. Upon induction tau expression increased, reaching maximal levels at 5 to 7 days. WT tau was phosphorylated at amino acids T181, S202/T205, T231, and S396/S404. The R406W mutation decreased tau phosphorylation at each of these sites as did the V337M mutation except for S396/S404 sites that increased. Most tau in postnuclear cell lysates was recovered in the supernatant fraction after centrifugation at 200,000 x g. The amount of tau in the pellet fraction increased more in mutant transfectants compared to WT when the induction was extended beyond 5 days. This particulate tau could be partially extracted with salt, Triton X-100, or sarkosyl. Of the transfectants, R406W had the highest proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau by day 7. This insoluble fraction was thioflavin S-positive and contained 15- to 5-nm-wide filaments with tau immunoreactivities. The R406W filaments were more abundant than those detected in similar preparations from WT or V337M transfectants. At the light microscopy level, most tau was found with microtubules, or diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm, but none of this appeared thioflavin S-positive. The results suggest that conditional tau transfectants are in a pretangle stage making them an attractive model system for studying intracellular tangle accumulation and for testing potential therapeutic agents as inhibitors for tau aggregation. PMID:12414518

  7. Csf p-tau181/tau ratio as biomarker for TDP pathology in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Borroni, Barbara; Benussi, Alberto; Archetti, Silvana; Galimberti, Daniela; Parnetti, Lucilla; Nacmias, Benedetta; Sorbi, Sandro; Scarpini, Elio; Padovani, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the CSF phospho-Tau181/total-Tau (p/t-Tau) ratio to distinguish between the two main forms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD): FTLD with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) and FTLD with Tau inclusions (FTLD-Tau). CSF p/t-Tau ratio was examined in 79 FTLD patients with predictable neuropathology, i.e. Tau (affected by progressive supranuclear palsy or carriers of mutations within the MAPT gene) or TDP-43 (carriers of mutations within granulin, C9orf72, TARDBP genes or affected by FTD with motor neuron disease). FTLD patients were randomly grouped in a training cohort (n = 39) to assess the best CSF p/t-Tau cut-off score according to ROC analysis, and a validation cohort (n = 40) to evaluate accuracy values of the identified marker. Results showed that, in the training cohort, we found a significantly reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio in FTLD-TDP relative to FTLD-Tau. ROC analysis for p/t-Tau ratio was 0.873 and cut-off score of 0.136 allowed to differentiate FTLD-TDP and FTLD-Tau with 81.8% sensitivity and 88.2% specificity, respectively. Analysis in the validation cohort showed CSF p/t-Tau ratio < 0.136 to distinguish FTLD-TDP from FTLD-Tau with 83.3% specificity and 63.6% sensitivity, respectively. The positive predictive value of detecting TDP neuropathology was 82.4%. In conclusion, a reduced CSF p/t-Tau ratio represents a viable biomarker to correctly identify TDP pathology in FTLD. PMID:25352065

  8. Measurement of the tau lepton lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acton, P. D.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Allport, P. P.; Anderson, K. J.; Arcelli, S.; Ashton, P.; Astbury, A.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bahan, G. A.; Baines, J. T. M.; Ball, A. H.; Banks, J.; Barker, G. J.; Barlow, R. J.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Beck, A.; Becker, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Binder, U.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Boden, B.; Bosch, H. M.; Bougerolle, S.; Brabson, B. B.; Breuker, H.; Brown, R. M.; Brun, R.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlton, D. G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Cohen, I.; Collins, W. J.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooper, M.; Couch, M.; Coupland, M.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G. M.; De Jong, S.; Debu, P.; del Pozo, L. A.; Deninno, M. M.; Dieckmann, A.; Dittmar, M.; Dixit, M. S.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dumas, D. J. P.; Eckerlin, G.; Elcombe, P. A.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Fong, D. G.; Fukunaga, C.; Gaidot, A.; Ganel, O.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; McGowan, R. F.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Giacomelli, G.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Grant, F. C.; Hagemann, J.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Harrison, P. F.; hart, J.; Hattersley, P. M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Heflin, E.; Hemingway, R. J.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinshaw, D. A.; Ho, C.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Holl, B.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Hou, S. R.; Howarth, C. P.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Humbert, R.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ihssen, H.; Imrie, D. C.; Janissen, A. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jobes, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; Kleinwort, C.; Klem, D. E.; Kobayashi, T.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Köpke, L.; Kral, J. F.; Kowalewski, R.; Kreutzmann, H.; von Krogh, J.; Kroll, J.; Kuwano, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lamarche, F.; Larson, W. J.; Layter, J. G.; Le Du, P.; Leblanc, P.; Lee, A. M.; Lehto, M. H.; Lellouch, D.; Lennert, P.; Leroy, C.; Letts, J.; Levegrün, S.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Lorah, J. M.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X. C.; Ludwig, J.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Maringer, G.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Mättig, P.; Maur, U.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T. J.; McNutt, J. R.; Meijers, F.; Menszner, D.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Middleton, R. P.; Mikenberg, G.; Mildenberger, J.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Moisan, C.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Moss, M. W.; Mouthuy, T.; Nellen, B.; Nguyen, H. H.; Nozaki, M.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neill, B. P.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogg, M.; Ogren, H. O.; Oh, H.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Pansart, J. P.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Paschievici, P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pawley, S. J.; Pfister, P.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pitman, D.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Pouladdej, A.; Prebys, E.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Quast, G.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Riles, K.; Robins, S. A.; Robinson, D.; Rollnik, A.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossberg, S.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sanghera, S.; Sasaki, M.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Schappert, W.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; von der Schmitt, H.; Schreiber, S.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shen, B. C.; Sherwood, P.; Shypit, R.; Simon, A.; Singh, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Stier, H. E.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thackray, N. J.; Transtromer, G.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turner, M. F.; Tysarczyk-Niemeyer, G.; Van den plas, D.; Van Kooten, R.; VanDalen, G. J.; Vasseur, G.; Virtue, C. J.; Wagner, A.; Wahl, C.; Walker, J. P.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weisz, S.; Wermes, N.; Weymann, M.; Whalley, M. A.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter, I.; Winterer, V.-H.; Wood, N. C.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yaari, R.; Yang, Y.; Yekutieli, G.; Yurko, M.; Zacharov, I.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.; OPAL Collaboration

    1991-12-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured using two independent techniques; an impact parameter analysis of the 1-prong decays and a decay length analysis of the 3-prong decays. Approximately 5 000 Z 0 decays to τ+τ- have been selected from the data collected with the OPAL detector at LEP during 1990. The results of the two statistically independent measurements are, respectively, τ1=0.293 ± 0.013 (stat.)±0.013 (syst.) ps and τ3=0.327±0.017 (stat.)±0.011 (syst.) ps. After combining the statistical and systematic errors for each analysis in quadrature, the weighted average lifetime is calculated to be ττ=0.308 ± 0.013 ps.

  9. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  10. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-01-01

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE. PMID:22879004

  11. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  12. CHIP-ping away at tau.

    PubMed

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2007-03-01

    Protein accumulation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative disorders. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), a hyperphosphorylated form of the protein tau (p-tau) forms intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles. Deposits of p-tau have also been found in the brains of patients with Down's syndrome, supranuclear palsy, and prion disease. Mutations in tau have been causally associated with at least one inherited neurologic disorder, frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), implying that tau abnormalities by themselves can be a primary cause of degenerative diseases of the CNS. Removal of these p-tau species may occur by both chaperone-mediated refolding and degradation. In this issue of the JCI, Dickey and colleagues show that a cochaperone protein, carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), in a complex with Hsp90 plays an important role in the removal of p-tau (see the related article beginning on page 648). Pharmacologic manipulation of Hsp90 may be used to alleviate p-tau accumulation in disease. PMID:17332887

  13. Tau pathology in two Dutch families with mutations in the microtubule-binding region of tau.

    PubMed

    Spillantini, M G; Crowther, R A; Kamphorst, W; Heutink, P; van Swieten, J C

    1998-11-01

    Different mutations in the microtubule-associated tau protein gene have recently been identified in several families with hereditary frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonism (FTDP-17) linked to chromosome 17q21-22. Some families show neuronal and glial deposits containing hyperphosphorylated tau in several brain regions. We have investigated the presence of tau deposits by using a panel of anti-tau antibodies in three brains of a family with the P301L mutation (HFTD1) and in another family with the G272V mutation (HFTD2) of the tau gene. Numerous intracytoplasmic tau deposits in neurons, glial cells, and neurites were found in hippocampal formation, neocortex, and substantia nigra. These deposits in three patients from HFTD1 consisted of slender twisted filaments 15 nm wide with variable periodicity and a few straight filaments. Tau extracted from these filaments appeared as two major bands of 64 and 68 kd and a minor band of 72 kd that, after alkaline phosphatase treatment, proved to consist mainly of 4-repeat tau isoforms and one of the 3-repeat isoforms. In three patients from HFTD2 numerous Pick-like bodies were present. The conclusion is that the type and distribution of tau deposits in HFTD1 and HFTD2, the physical structure of filaments, and tau isoform composition in HFTD1 differ from Alzheimer's disease and an FTDP-17 family with a V337M mutation in the tau gene. PMID:9811325

  14. Microglial internalization and degradation of pathological tau is enhanced by an anti-tau monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenjie; Liu, Wencheng; Hu, Xiaoyan; Hanna, Mary; Caravaca, April; Paul, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia have been shown to contribute to the clearance of brain amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the major component of amyloid plaques, in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it is not known whether microglia play a similar role in the clearance of tau, the major component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). We now report that murine microglia rapidly internalize and degrade hyperphosphorylated pathological tau isolated from AD brain tissue in a time-dependent manner in vitro. We further demonstrate that microglia readily degrade human tau species released from AD brain sections and eliminate NFTs from brain sections of P301S tauopathy mice. The anti-tau monoclonal antibody MC1 enhances microglia-mediated tau degradation in an Fc-dependent manner. Our data identify a potential role for microglia in the degradation and clearance of pathological tau species in brain and provide a mechanism explaining the potential therapeutic actions of passively administered anti-tau monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26057852

  15. Large tau and tau neutrino electric dipole moments in models with vectorlike multiplets

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Tarek; Nath, Pran

    2010-02-01

    It is shown that the electric dipole moment of the {tau} lepton several orders of magnitude larger than predicted by the standard model can be generated from mixings in models with vectorlike mutiplets. The electric dipole moment (EDM) of the {tau} lepton arises from loops involving the exchange of the W, the charginos, the neutralinos, the sleptons, the mirror leptons, and the mirror sleptons. The EDM of the Dirac {tau} neutrino is also computed from loops involving the exchange of the W, the charginos, the mirror leptons, and the mirror sleptons. A numerical analysis is presented, and it is shown that the EDMs of the {tau} lepton and the {tau} neutrino which lie just a couple of orders of magnitude below the sensitivity of the current experiment can be achieved. Thus the predictions of the model are testable in an improved experiment on the EDM of the {tau} and the {tau} neutrino.

  16. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  17. Tau pathology-mediated presynaptic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Moreno, H; Morfini, G; Buitrago, L; Ujlaki, G; Choi, S; Yu, E; Moreira, J E; Avila, J; Brady, S T; Pant, H; Sugimori, M; Llinás, R R

    2016-06-14

    Brain tauopathies are characterized by abnormal processing of tau protein. While somatodendritic tau mislocalization has attracted considerable attention in tauopathies, the role of tau pathology in axonal transport, connectivity and related dysfunctions remains obscure. We have previously shown using the squid giant synapse that presynaptic microinjection of recombinant human tau protein (htau42) results in failure of synaptic transmission. Here, we evaluated molecular mechanisms mediating this effect. Thus, the initial event, observed after htau42 presynaptic injection, was an increase in transmitter release. This event was mediated by calcium release from intracellular stores and was followed by a reduction in evoked transmitter release. The effect of htau42 on synaptic transmission was recapitulated by a peptide comprising the phosphatase-activating domain of tau, suggesting activation of phosphotransferases. Accordingly, findings indicated that htau42-mediated toxicity involves the activities of both GSK3 and Cdk5 kinases. PMID:27012611

  18. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M.; Lau, Dawn H.W.; Mórotz, Gábor M.; De Vos, Kurt J.; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:26459111

  19. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies. PMID:26459111

  20. The environmental toxin arsenite induces tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Giasson, Benoit I; Sampathu, Deepak M; Wilson, Christina A; Vogelsberg-Ragaglia, Vanessa; Mushynski, Walter E; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2002-12-24

    Abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau polymers known as paired helical filaments constitute one of the major characteristic lesions that lead to the demise of neurons in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we demonstrate that the environmental toxin arsenite causes a significant increase in the phosphorylation of several amino acid residues (Thr-181, Ser-202, Thr-205, Thr-231, Ser-262, Ser-356, Ser-396, and Ser-404) in tau, which are also hyperphosphorylated under pathological conditions. Complementary phosphopeptide mapping revealed a dramatic increase in the (32)P-labeling of many peptides in tau following arsenite treatment. Although arsenite activates extracellular-signal regulated kinases-1/-2 and stress-activated protein kinases, these enzymes did not contribute to the arsenite-increased phosphorylation, nor did they appear to normally modify tau in vivo. Tau phosphorylation induced by arsenite did not involve glycogen synthase kinase-3 or protein phosphatase-1 or -2, but the activity responsible for tau hyperphosphorylation could be inhibited with the protein kinase inhibitor roscovitine. The effects of arsenite on the phosphorylation of some tau mutations (DeltaKappa280, V337M, and R406W) associated with frontal-temporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 was analyzed. The unchallenged and arsenite-induced phosphorylation of some mutant proteins, especially R406W, was altered at several phosphorylation sites, indicating that these mutations can significantly affect the structure of tau in vivo. Although the major kinase(s) involved in aberrant tau phosphorylation remains elusive, these results indicate that environmental factors, such as arsenite, may be involved in the cascade leading to deregulation of tau function associated with neurodegeneration. PMID:12484777

  1. Characteristics of Tau and Its Ligands in PET Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Ryuichi; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furumoto, Shozo; Tago, Tetsuro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Tau deposition is one of the neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease as well as in other neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies. Recent efforts to develop selective tau radiopharmaceuticals have allowed the visualization of tau deposits in vivo. In vivo tau imaging allows the assessment of the regional distribution of tau deposits in a single human subject over time for determining the pathophysiology of tau accumulation in aging and neurodegenerative conditions as well as for application in drug discovery of anti-dementia drugs as surrogate markers. However, tau deposits show complicated characteristics because of different isoform composition, histopathology, and ultrastructure in various neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, since tau radiopharmaceuticals possess different chemotype classes, they may show different binding characteristics with heterogeneous tau deposits. In this review, we describe the characteristics of tau deposits and their ligands that have β-sheet binding properties, and the status of tau imaging in clinical studies. PMID:26751494

  2. Intracellular and extracellular roles for tau in neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Hanger, Diane P; Lau, Dawn H W; Phillips, Emma C; Bondulich, Marie K; Guo, Tong; Woodward, Benjamin W; Pooler, Amy M; Noble, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Tau has a well-established role as a microtubule-associated protein, in which it stabilizes the neuronal cytoskeleton. This function of tau is influenced by tau phosphorylation state, which is significantly increased in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Disruptions to the cytoskeleton in disease-affected neurons include reduced length and numbers of stable microtubules, and their diminished stability is associated with increased tau phosphorylation in disease. Tau is also localized in the nucleus and plasma membrane of neurons, where it could have roles in DNA repair and cell signaling. Most recently, potential roles for extracellular tau have been highlighted. The release of tau from neurons is a physiological process that can be regulated by neuronal activity and extracellular tau may play a role in inter-neuronal signaling. In addition, recent studies have suggested that the misfolding of tau in diseased brain leads to abnormal conformations of tau that can be taken up by neighboring neurons. Such a mechanism may be responsible for the apparent prion-like spreading of tau pathology through the brain, which occurs in parallel with clinical progression in the tauopathies. The relationship between tau localization in neurons, tau release, and tau uptake remains to be established, as does the function of extracellular tau. More research is needed to identify disease mechanisms that drive the release and propagation of pathogenic tau and to determine the impact of extracellular tau on cognitive decline in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24595196

  3. Phosphorylated tau and the neurodegenerative foldopathies.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S; Shimura, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    Many studies have implicated phosphorylated tau in the Alzheimer disease process. However, the cellular fate of phosphorylated tau has only recently been described. Recent work has shown that tau phosphorylation at substrate sites for the kinases Cdk5 and GSK3-beta can trigger the binding of tau to the chaperones Hsc70 and Hsp27. The binding of phosphorylated tau to Hsc70 implied that the complex may be a substrate for the E3 ligase CHIP and this possibility was experimentally verified. The presence of this system in cells suggests that phosphorylated tau may hold toxic dangers for cell viability, and the response of the cell is to harness a variety of protective mechanisms. These include binding to chaperones, which may prevent more toxic conformations of the protein, ubiquitination which will direct the protein to the proteasome, segregation of tau aggregates from the cellular machinery, and recruitment of Hsp27 which will confer anti-apoptotic properties to the cell. PMID:15615647

  4. Proteopathic tau seeding predicts tauopathy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Brandon B; Furman, Jennifer L; Mahan, Thomas E; Yamasaki, Tritia R; Mirbaha, Hilda; Eades, William C; Belaygorod, Larisa; Cairns, Nigel J; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2014-10-14

    Transcellular propagation of protein aggregates, or proteopathic seeds, may drive the progression of neurodegenerative diseases in a prion-like manner. In tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, this model predicts that tau seeds propagate pathology through the brain via cell-cell transfer in neural networks. The critical role of tau seeding activity is untested, however. It is unknown whether seeding anticipates and correlates with subsequent development of pathology as predicted for a causal agent. One major limitation has been the lack of a robust assay to measure proteopathic seeding activity in biological specimens. We engineered an ultrasensitive, specific, and facile FRET-based flow cytometry biosensor assay based on expression of tau or synuclein fusions to CFP and YFP, and confirmed its sensitivity and specificity to tau (∼ 300 fM) and synuclein (∼ 300 pM) fibrils. This assay readily discriminates Alzheimer's disease vs. Huntington's disease and aged control brains. We then carried out a detailed time-course study in P301S tauopathy mice, comparing seeding activity versus histological markers of tau pathology, including MC1, AT8, PG5, and Thioflavin S. We detected robust seeding activity at 1.5 mo, >1 mo before the earliest histopathological stain. Proteopathic tau seeding is thus an early and robust marker of tauopathy, suggesting a proximal role for tau seeds in neurodegeneration. PMID:25261551

  5. Optimization and Performance of the ATLAS Tau Trigger with Cosmics Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamim, Mansoora

    2010-04-01

    Tau lepton, being the heaviest of all known leptons (mT = 1776.84 ± 0.17MeV), is of special importance. Due to its short lifetime, with (cT = 87.11μm), it decays inside the beam pipe. The identification of tau is, therefore, done through its decay products inside the detector. A tau jet can be identified through the presence of a well collimated calorimeter cluster with a small number of associated tracks. The tau lepton decays into electron or muons 35% of the time, while 65% of its decays include hadrons, mostly pions. The events where tau decays into leptons can be triggered by low ET threshold electron or muon trigger. A dedicated tau trigger has been designed and implemented at the ATLAS experiment to select events where a tau lepton decays into hadrons. Triggering on tau events will not only help in understanding the standard model (SM) processes during early running but will also increase the discovery potential of the ATLAS detector through searches for Higgs boson and supersymmetric particles at high luminosities. The cosmics-ray data at ATLAS have provided a valuable handle to optimize and commission the ATLAS detector before beam collisions. In this process the ATLAS tau trigger algorithms have been exercised and the hardware-based first level rates studied.

  6. Intracerebral injection of preformed synthetic tau fibrils initiates widespread tauopathy and neuronal loss in the brains of tau transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Peeraer, Eve; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Van Kolen, Kristof; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Mahieu, Michel; Duytschaever, Hilde; Ver Donck, Luc; Torremans, An; Sluydts, Ellen; Van Acker, Nathalie; Kemp, John A.; Mercken, Marc; Brunden, Kurt R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Dewachter, Ilse; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated fibrillized tau are found in numerous tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that tau pathology can be transmitted from cell-to-cell; however the mechanisms involved in the initiation of tau fibrillization and spreading of disease linked to progression of tau pathology are poorly understood. We show here that intracerebral injections of preformed synthetic tau fibrils into the hippocampus or frontal cortex of young tau transgenic mice expressing mutant human P301L tau induces tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation around the site of injection, as well as a time-dependent propagation of tau pathology to interconnected brain areas distant from the injection site. Furthermore, we show that the tau pathology as a consequence of injection of tau preformed fibrils into the hippocampus induces selective loss of CA1 neurons. Together, our data confirm previous studies on the seeded induction and the spreading of tau pathology in a different tau transgenic mouse model and reveals neuronal loss associated with seeded tau pathology in tau transgenic mouse brain. These results further validate the utility of the tau seeding model in studying disease transmission, and provide a more complete in vivo tauopathy model with associated neurodegeneration which can be used to investigate the mechanisms involved in tau aggregation and spreading, as well as aid in the search for disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. PMID:25220759

  7. NMR observation of Tau in Xenopus oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Jean-François; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Amniai, Laziza; Leroy, Arnaud; Landrieu, Isabelle; Rousseau-Lescuyer, Arlette; Vilain, Jean-Pierre; Lippens, Guy

    2008-06-01

    The observation by NMR spectroscopy of microinjected 15N-labelled proteins into Xenopus laevis oocytes might open the way to link structural and cellular biology. We show here that embedding the oocytes into a 20% Ficoll solution maintains their structural integrity over extended periods of time, allowing for the detection of nearly physiological protein concentrations. We use these novel conditions to study the neuronal Tau protein inside the oocytes. Spectral reproducibility and careful comparison of the spectra of Tau before and after cell homogenization is presented. When injecting Tau protein into immature oocytes, we show that both its microtubule association and different phosphorylation events can be detected.

  8. FTDP-17 tau mutations decrease the susceptibility of tau to calpain I digestion.

    PubMed

    Yen, S; Easson, C; Nacharaju, P; Hutton, M; Yen, S H

    1999-11-12

    Frontal temporal dementia and Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is caused by splice site and missense mutations in the tau gene, and characterized by the accumulation of filamentous tau in cerebral neurons and glia. The missense mutations reduce the ability of tau to promote microtubule assembly and increase the ability of tau to form filaments. In this report we demonstrate that mutants V337M and R406W are less susceptible than mutant P301L or corresponding wild type tau to degradation by calpain I. The differences were at least in part due to changes in accessibility of a cleavage site located about 100 amino acids off the carboxy-terminus. The results suggest that the pathogenesis of some forms of FTDP-17 may involve tau accumulation due to decreased proteolytic degradation. PMID:10561502

  9. Missense tau mutations identified in FTDP-17 have a small effect on tau-microtubule interactions.

    PubMed

    DeTure, M; Ko, L W; Yen, S; Nacharaju, P; Easson, C; Lewis, J; van Slegtenhorst, M; Hutton, M; Yen, S H

    2000-01-17

    Frontotemporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is a group of related disorders frequently characterized by the formation of tau inclusions in neurons and glial cells. To determine whether the formation of tau inclusions in FTDP-17 results from an alteration in the ability of mutant tau to maintain the microtubule (MT) system, we compared wild type four-repeat tau with three FTDP-17 mutants (P301L, V337M and R406W) for their ability to bind MT, promote MT assembly and bundling. According to in vitro binding and assembly assays, P301L is the only mutant that demonstrates a small, yet significant reduction, in its affinity for MT while both P301L and R406W have a small reduction in their ability to promote tubulin assembly. Based on studies of neuroblastoma and CHO cells transfected with GFP-tagged tau DNA constructs, both mutant and wild type tau transfectants were indistinguishable in the distribution pattern of tau in terms of co-localization with MT and generation of MT bundles. These results suggest that missense mutation of tau gene do not have an immediate impact on the integrity of MT system, and that exposure of affected neurons to additional insults or factors (e.g., aging) may be needed to initiate the formation of tau inclusions in FTDP-17. PMID:10627302

  10. Formation of filamentous tau aggregations in transgenic mice expressing V337M human tau.

    PubMed

    Tanemura, K; Akagi, T; Murayama, M; Kikuchi, N; Murayama, O; Hashikawa, T; Yoshiike, Y; Park, J M; Matsuda, K; Nakao, S; Sun, X; Sato, S; Yamaguchi, H; Takashima, A

    2001-12-01

    Formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is the most common feature in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we report the formation of filamentous tau aggregations having a beta-sheet structure in transgenic mice expressing mutant human tau. These mice contain a tau gene with a mutation of the frontotemporal dementia parkinsonism (FTDP-17) type, in which valine is substituted with methionine residue 337. The aggregation of tau in these transgenic mice satisfies all histological criteria used to identify NFTs common to human neurodegenerative diseases. These mice, therefore, provide a preclinical model for the testing of therapeutic drugs for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders that exhibit NFTs. PMID:11741399

  11. Anti-tau antibody reduces insoluble tau and decreases brain atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Jiang, Hong; Mahan, Thomas E; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Diamond, Marc I; Holtzman, David M

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously found a strong reduction in tau pathology and insoluble tau in P301S tau transgenic mice following intracerebroventricular infusion of the anti-tau antibody HJ8.5. We sought to determine the effects of HJ8.5 in the same model following peripheral administration. Methods The primary objective was to determine if HJ8.5 administered at a dose of 50 mg kg−1 week−1 by intraperitoneal (IP) injection to 6-month-old P301S mice for 3 months would influence phospho-tau (p-tau) accumulation, tau insolubility, and neurodegeneration. Results Treatment with HJ8.5 at 50 mg/kg showed a very strong decrease in detergent-insoluble tau. Importantly, HJ8.5 significantly reduced the loss of cortical and hippocampal tissue volumes compared to control treated mice. HJ8.5 treatment reduced hippocampal CA1 cellular layer staining with the p-tau antibody AT8 and thio-S-positive tau aggregates in piriform cortex and amygdala. Moreover, mice treated with HJ8.5 at 50 mg/kg showed a decrease in motor/sensorimotor deficits compared to vehicle-treated mice. Some effects of HJ8.5, including reduction in brain atrophy, and p-tau immunostaining were also seen with a dose of 10 mg kg−1 week−1. In BV2-microglial cells, we observed significantly higher uptake of P301S tau aggregates in the presence of HJ8.5. HJ8.5 treatment also resulted in a large dose-dependent increase of tau in the plasma. Interpretation Our results indicate that systemically administered anti-tau antibody HJ8.5 significantly decreases insoluble tau, decreases brain atrophy, and improves motor/sensorimotor function in a mouse model of tauopathy. These data further support the idea that anti-tau antibodies should be further assessed as a potential treatment for tauopathies. PMID:25815354

  12. Park2-null/tau transgenic mice reveal a functional relationship between parkin and tau.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Rosa; Navarro, Paloma; Gallego, Eva; Avila, Jesus; de Yebenes, Justo G; Sanchez, Marina P

    2008-03-01

    Mutations, haplotypes, and polymorphisms of tau and Park-2 genes constitute risk factors for developing tauopathies. In order to analyze the possible relationship between parkin and tau we generated a double-mutant mouse deficient for Park-2 expression and overexpressing a mutant tau protein (hTauVLW). Mice develop normally, although the median survival rate is considerably reduced with respect to wild type (45%). Aggregates of phosphorylated tau in neurons and reactive gliosis are quite abundant in cortex and hippocampus of these mice. Moreover, while in young transgenic mice the hTauVLW immunostained transgene product is observed in both cell bodies and dendrites, the hTauVLW mutant protein is only detected in the neuronal cell bodies when Park-2 gene is additionally deleted. Moreover, DNA fragmentation was detected by the TUNEL method, and cerebral atrophy is also present in these regions. The levels of phosphorylated tau and Hsp70 are increased in the double-mutant mice, while CHIP expression in hippocampus is lower when the Park-2 gene is deleted. Thus, the combination of Park-2 gene deletion with hTauVLW transgene overexpression in mice produces serious neuropathological effects, which reflect the existence of some relationship between both proteins. PMID:18376058

  13. Orbital motions and light curves of young binaries XZ Tau and VY Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Zharova, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Malogolovets, E. V.; Roe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The results of our speckle interferometric observations of young binaries VY Tau and XZ Tau are presented. For the first time, we found a relative displacement of VY Tau components as well as a preliminary orbit for XZ Tau. It appeared that the orbit is appreciably non-circular and is inclined by i ≲ 47◦ from the plane of the sky. It means that the rotation axis of XZ Tau A and the axis of its jet are significantly non-perpendicular to the orbital plane. We found that the average brightness of XZ Tau had been increasing from the beginning of the last century up to the mid-thirties and then it decreased by Δ B > 2 mag. The maximal brightness has been reached significantly later on the time of periastron passage. The total brightness of XZ Tau's components varied in a non-regular way from 1970 to 1985 when eruptions of hot gas from XZ Tau A presumably had occurred. In the early nineties the variations became regular following which a chaotic variability had renewed. We also report that a flare activity of VY Tau has resumed after 40 yr pause, parameters of the previous and new flares are similar, and the flares are related with the A component.

  14. Promotion of hyperphosphorylation by frontotemporal dementia tau mutations.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Alejandra del C; Mederlyova, Anna; Novak, Michal; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2004-08-13

    Mutations in the tau gene are known to cosegregate with the disease in frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). However, the molecular mechanism by which these mutations might lead to the disease is not understood. Here, we show that four of the FTDP-17 tau mutations, R406W, V337M, G272V, and P301L, result in tau proteins that are more favorable substrates for phosphorylation by brain protein kinases than the wild-type, largest four-repeat protein tau4L and tau4L more than tau3L. In general, at all the sites studied, mutant tau proteins were phosphorylated faster and to a higher extent than tau4L and tau4L > tau3L. The most dramatic difference found was in the rate and level of phosphorylation of tau4L(R406W) at positions Ser-396, Ser-400, Thr-403, and Ser-404. Phosphorylation of this mutant tau was 12 times faster and 400% greater at Ser-396 and less than 30% at Ser-400, Thr-403, and Ser-404 than phosphorylation of tau4L. The mutated tau proteins polymerized into filaments when 4-6 mol of phosphate per mol of tau were incorporated, whereas wild-type tau required approximately 10 mol of phosphate per mol of protein to self-assemble. Mutated and wild-type tau proteins were able to sequester normal tau upon incorporation of approximately 4 mol of phosphate per mol of protein, which was achieved at as early as 30 min of phosphorylation in the case of mutant tau proteins. These findings taken together suggest that the mutations in tau might cause neurodegeneration by making the protein a more favorable substrate for hyperphosphorylation. PMID:15190058

  15. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  16. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  17. The winds from HL Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-04-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disk, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be an ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the ALMA Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disk. With these high resolution (˜1″) ALMA observations of CO (J=1-0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the red-shifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disk, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of order 2.4 km s-1.

  18. ATLAS Search for SM H{yields}{tau}{tau} in the VBF Production Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Hanninger, Guilherme Nunes

    2008-11-23

    This article discusses the search for the Standard Model Higgs boson produced in vector boson fusion and subsequent decay into {tau} pairs with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. This analysis is based on Monte Carlo signal and background samples simulated with a detailed detector description and the entire trigger chain. Preliminary results are reported including the expected discovery potential with 30 fb{sup -1} of data as well as the 95% expected signal exclusion with 10 fb{sup -1}.

  19. A measurement of the lifetime of the tau lepton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adami, F.; Adye, T.; Akesson, T.; Alekseev, G. D.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Apsimon, R.-J.; Åsman, B.; Astier, P.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Bartl, W.; Battaglia, M.; Bates, M. J.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Beeston, C. J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benlloch, J. M.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bibby, J. H.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonapart, M.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Boratav, M.; Borgeaud, P.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenner, R. A.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Campagne, J.-E.; Campion, A.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castelli, E.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chan, A.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Cirio, R.; Clara, M. P.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crosland, N.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dagoret, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; de Angelis, A.; de Beer, M.; de Boeck, H.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Fez Laso, M. D. M.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; Defoix, C.; Delikaris, D.; Delorme, S.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; Derkaoui, J.; di Ciaccio, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Dulinski, W.; Eek, L.-O.; Eerola, P. A.-M.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.-P.; Falaleev, V.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Folegati, P.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K. A. J.; Forsbach, H.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Gago, J. M.; Galeazzi, G.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazos, E. N.; Gerber, J.-P.; Giacomelli, P.; Glitza, K.-W.; Gokieli, R.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorski, M.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Gros, M.-H.; Grosdidier, G.; Gross, E.; Grossetete, B.; Gumenyuk, S.; Guy, J.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, M.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakansson, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Harris, F. J.; Heck, B. W.; Henkes, T.; Herbst, I.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hietanen, I.; Higgins, C. O.; Higon, E.; Hilke, H. J.; Hodgson, S. D.; Hofmokl, T.; Holmes, R.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holthuizen, D.; Honore, P. F.; Hooper, J. E.; Horisberger, R.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Husson, D.; Hyams, B. D.; Ioannou, P.; Isenhower, D.; Iversen, P.-S.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, E. K.; Johnson, D.; Jonker, M.; Jonsson, L.; Juillot, P.; Kalkanis, G.; Kalmus, G.; Kantardjian, G.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kesteman, J.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klein, H.; Klempt, W.; Klovning, A.; Kluit, P.; Koehne, J. H.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Kopf, M.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korytov, A. V.; Korzen, B.; Kostukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kreuzberger, T.; Krolikowski, J.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Krupinski, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Liko, D.; Lieb, E.; Lillethun, E.; Lindgren, J.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Llosa, R.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Los, M.; Loukas, D.; Lounis, A.; Lozano, J. J.; Lucock, R.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Maillard, J.; Maltezos, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Markou, A.; Marti, S.; Mathis, L.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Matveev, M.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Menichetti, E.; Meola, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Muller, H.; Murray, W. J.; Myatt, G.; Naraghi, F.; Nau-Korzen, U.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nijjhar, B.; Nikolaenko, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Ostankov, A.; Ouraou, A.; Pain, R.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pape, L.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Perevozchikov, V.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Pingot, O.; Pinsent, A.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Pyyhtia, J.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, M.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roditi, I.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Ronnqvist, C.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, U.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Ruhlmann, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybicki, K.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanchez, J.; Sannino, M.; Schaeffer, M.; Schael, S.; Schneider, H.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Scuri, F.; Segar, A. M.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetto, F.; Simonetto, F.; Sissakian, A. N.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smith, G. R.; Smirnov, N.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T. S.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stubenrauch, C. J.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tabarelli, T.; Tavernier, S.; Theodosiou, G. E.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Toet, D. Z.; Tortora, L.; Trainor, M. T.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Trischuk, W.; Tristam, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turala, M.; Turchetta, R.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, B.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V. A.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van Doninck, W. K.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vander Velde, C.; Varela, J.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vibert, L.; Vilanova, D.; Vlasov, E. V.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Volponi, S.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Weilhammer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Wikne, J.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Wormald, D.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yepes, P.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.; Zuniga, J.

    1991-09-01

    The lifetime of the tau lepton has been measured by two independent methods using a silicon microvertex detector installed in the DELPHI detector. The signed impact parameter distribution of the one prong decays yielded a lifetime of ττ = 321 +/- 36 (stat.) +/- 16 (syst.) fs, while the decay length distribution of three prong decays gave the result ττ = 310 +/- 31 (stat.) +/- 9 (syst.) fs. The final value of the combined result was ττ = 314 +/- 25 fs. The ratio of the Fermi coupling constant from tau decay relative to that from muon decay was found to be 0.95 +/- 0.04, compatible with the hypothesis of lepton universality.

  20. Rapamycin attenuates the progression of tau pathology in P301S tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, Sefika; Fraser, Graham; Castets, Perrine; Schaeffer, Véronique; Skachokova, Zhiva; Breu, Karin; Clavaguera, Florence; Sinnreich, Michael; Kappos, Ludwig; Goedert, Michel; Tolnay, Markus; Winkler, David Theo

    2013-01-01

    Altered autophagy contributes to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies, for which curative treatment options are still lacking. We have recently shown that trehalose reduces tau pathology in a tauopathy mouse model by stimulation of autophagy. Here, we studied the effect of the autophagy inducing drug rapamycin on the progression of tau pathology in P301S mutant tau transgenic mice. Rapamycin treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cortical tau tangles, less tau hyperphosphorylation, and lowered levels of insoluble tau in the forebrain. The favourable effect of rapamycin on tau pathology was paralleled by a qualitative reduction in astrogliosis. These effects were visible with early preventive or late treatment. We further noted an accumulation of the autophagy associated proteins p62 and LC3 in aged tangle bearing P301S mice that was lowered upon rapamycin treatment. Thus, rapamycin treatment defers the progression of tau pathology in a tauopathy animal model and autophagy stimulation may constitute a therapeutic approach for patients suffering from tauopathies. PMID:23667480

  1. The future of tau physics and tau-charm detector and factory design

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1991-02-01

    Future research on the tau lepton requires large statistics, thorough investigation of systematic errors, and direct experimental knowledge of backgrounds. Only a tau-charm factory with a specially designed detector can provide all the experimental conditions to meet these requirements. This paper is a summary of three lectures delivered at the 1991 Lake Louise Winter Institute.

  2. Tau protein binds to pericentromeric DNA: a putative role for nuclear tau in nucleolar organization.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Marcela K; Shestakova, Elena; Mansuroglu, Zeyni; Maccioni, Ricardo B; Bonnefoy, Eliette

    2006-05-15

    The microtubule-associated tau protein participates in the organization and integrity of the neuronal cytoskeleton. A nuclear form of tau has been described in neuronal and non-neuronal cells, which displays a nucleolar localization during interphase but is associated with nucleolar-organizing regions in mitotic cells. In the present study, based on immunofluorescence, immuno-FISH and confocal microscopy, we show that nuclear tau is mainly present at the internal periphery of nucleoli, partially colocalizing with the nucleolar protein nucleolin and human AT-rich alpha-satellite DNA sequences organized as constitutive heterochromatin. By using gel retardation, we demonstrate that tau not only colocalizes with, but also specifically binds to, AT-rich satellite DNA sequences apparently through the recognition of AT-rich DNA stretches. Here we propose a functional role for nuclear tau in relation to the nucleolar organization and/or heterochromatinization of a portion of RNA genes. Since nuclear tau has also been found in neurons from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), aberrant nuclear tau could affect the nucleolar organization during the course of AD. We discuss nucleolar tau associated with AT-rich alpha-satellite DNA sequences as a potential molecular link between trisomy 21 and AD. PMID:16638814

  3. Passive Immunization with Phospho-Tau Antibodies Reduces Tau Pathology and Functional Deficits in Two Distinct Mouse Tauopathy Models

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M.; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S.; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F.; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Brunden, Kurt R.; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:25933020

  4. Curcumin improves tau-induced neuronal dysfunction of nematodes.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, Tomohiro; Xie, Ce; Yoshimura, Satomi; Shinzaki, Yuki; Yoshina, Sawako; Kage-Nakadai, Eriko; Mitani, Shohei; Ihara, Yasuo

    2016-03-01

    Tau is a key protein in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, which are categorized as tauopathies. Because the extent of tau pathologies is closely linked to that of neuronal loss and the clinical symptoms in Alzheimer's disease, anti-tau therapeutics, if any, could be beneficial to a broad spectrum of tauopathies. To learn more about tauopathy, we developed a novel transgenic nematode (Caenorhabditis elegans) model that expresses either wild-type or R406W tau in all the neurons. The wild-type tau-expressing worms exhibited uncoordinated movement (Unc) and neuritic abnormalities. Tau accumulated in abnormal neurites that lost microtubules. Similar abnormalities were found in the worms that expressed low levels of R406W-tau but were not in those expressing comparative levels of wild-type tau. Biochemical studies revealed that tau is aberrantly phosphorylated but forms no detergent-insoluble aggregates. Drug screening performed in these worms identified curcumin, a major phytochemical compound in turmeric, as a compound that reduces not only Unc but also the neuritic abnormalities in both wild-type and R406W tau-expressing worms. Our observations suggest that microtubule stabilization mediates the antitoxicity effect of curcumin. Curcumin is also effective in the worms expressing tau fragment, although it does not prevent the formation of tau-fragment dimers. These data indicate that curcumin improves the tau-induced neuronal dysfunction that is independent of insoluble aggregates of tau. PMID:26923403

  5. Simulated Cytoskeletal Collapse via Tau Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sendek, Austin; Fuller, Henry R.; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv R. P.; Cox, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i) taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii) removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii) a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06–0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse. PMID:25162587

  6. Search for Pair Production of Scalar Top Quarks Decaying to a tau Lepton and a b Quark in ppbar Collisions at sqrt{s}=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Brigliadori, L.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Bologna U. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U., Math. Dept. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U.

    2008-02-01

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in an R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario using 322 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the upgraded Collider Detector at Fermilab. We assume each {tilde t}{sub 1} decays into a {tau} lepton and a b quark with a branching ratio {beta}, and that the final state contains either an electron or a muon from a leptonic {tau} decay, a hadronically decaying {tau} lepton, and two or more jets. Two candidate events pass our final selection criteria, consistent with the expectation from standard model processes. We present upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio squared {sigma}({tilde t}{sub 1}{bar {tilde t}}{sub 1}) x {beta}{sup 2} as a function of the stop mass m({tilde t}{sub 1}). Assuming {beta} = 1, we set a 95% confidence level limit m({tilde t}{sub 1}) > 153 GeV=c{sup 2} obtained using a next-to-leading order cross section. These limits are also fully applicable to the case of a pair produced third generation scalar leptoquark decaying into a {tau} lepton and a b quark.

  7. A Search for supersymmetric Higgs bosons in the di-tau decay mode in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.8-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; Affolder, Anthony A.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amidei, D.; Anikeev, K.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bachacou, H.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Baroiant, S.; Barone, M.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne, PHY /INFN, Bologna /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys. /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U., EFI /Chicago U. /Dubna, JINR /Duke U. /Fermilab /Florida U. /Frascati /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Hiroshima U.

    2005-06-01

    A search for direct production of Higgs bosons in the di-tau decay mode is performed with 86.3 {+-} 3.5 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during the 1994-1995 data taking period of the Tevatron. We search for events where one tau decays to an electron plus neutrinos and the other tau decays hadronically. We perform a counting experiment and set limits on the cross section for supersymmetric Higgs boson production where tan {beta} is large and m{sub A} is small. For a benchmark parameter space point where m{sub A{sup 0}} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and tan {beta} = 50, we limit the production cross section multiplied by the branching ratio to be less than 77.9 pb at the 95% confidence level compared to theoretically predicted value of 11.0 pb. This is the first search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs at a hadron collider.

  8. Neurodegeneration with tau accumulation in a transgenic mouse expressing V337M human tau.

    PubMed

    Tanemura, Kentaro; Murayama, Miyuki; Akagi, Takumi; Hashikawa, Tsutomu; Tominaga, Takashi; Ichikawa, Michinori; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Takashima, Akihiko

    2002-01-01

    Formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is a common neuropathological feature found in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease. We have developed a transgenic (Tg) mouse expressing mutant human tau (V337M), derived from frontotemporal dementia parkinsonism-17. V337M Tg mice revealed tau aggregations in the hippocampus, which fulfills the histological criteria for NFTs in human neurodegenerative diseases. Concurrent with the accumulation of RNA and phosphorylated tau, neurons exhibited morphological characteristics of degenerating neurons, which include a loss of microtubules, accumulation of ribosomes, plasma and nuclear membrane ruffling, and swelling of the Golgi network. Thus, mutant tau induces neuronal degeneration associated with the accumulation of RNA and phosphorylated tau. The functional consequences of this neuronal degeneration was evidenced by the reduction of hippocampal neural activity and behavioral abnormality in Tg mice. PMID:11756496

  9. Search for W‧ decaying to tau lepton and neutrino in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Edelhäuser, L.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knochel, A.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Seidel, M.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Kassel, F.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Banerjee, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sudhakar, K.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Chhibra, S. S.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Branca, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Kanishchev, K.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Broccolo, G.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; de Remigis, P.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. 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W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Verzetti, M.; Demortier, L.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Christian, A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Gomber, B.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-04-01

    The first search for a heavy charged vector boson in the final state with a tau lepton and a neutrino is reported, using 19.7 fb-1 of LHC data at √{ s} = 8 TeV. A signal would appear as an excess of events with high transverse mass, where the standard model background is low. No excess is observed. Limits are set on a model in which the W‧ decays preferentially to fermions of the third generation. These results substantially extend previous constraints on this model. Masses below 2.0 to 2.7 TeV are excluded, depending on the model parameters. In addition, the existence of a W‧ boson with universal fermion couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level, for W‧ masses below 2.7 TeV. For further reinterpretation a model-independent limit on potential signals for various transverse mass thresholds is also presented.

  10. Search for W' decaying to tau lepton and neutrino in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-08-19

    We found that the first search for a heavy charged vector boson in the final state with a tau lepton and a neutrino is reported, using 19.7 fb-1 of LHC data at √s = 8 TeV. A signal would appear as an excess of events in kinematic regions where the standard model background is low. No excess is observed. Limits are set on a model in which the W' decays preferentially to fermions of the third generation. Our results substantially extend previous constraints on this model. Masses below 2.0 to 2.7 TeV are excluded, depending on the model parameters. In addition, the existence of a W' boson with universal fermion couplings is excluded at 95% confidence level, for W' masses below 2.7 TeV.

  11. Search for astrophysical tau neutrinos in three years of IceCube data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Groh, J. C.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Middlemas, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stanisha, N. A.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.; IceCube Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory has observed a diffuse flux of TeV-PeV astrophysical neutrinos at 5.7 σ significance from an all-flavor search. The direct detection of tau neutrinos in this flux has yet to occur. Tau neutrinos become distinguishable from other flavors in IceCube at energies above a few hundred TeV, when the cascade from the tau neutrino charged current interaction becomes resolvable from the cascade from the tau lepton decay. This paper presents results from the first dedicated search for tau neutrinos with energies between 214 TeV and 72 PeV in the full IceCube detector. The analysis searches for IceCube optical sensors that observe two separate pulses in a single event—one from the tau neutrino interaction and a second from the tau decay. No candidate events were observed in three years of IceCube data. For the first time, a differential upper limit on astrophysical tau neutrinos is derived around the PeV energy region, which is nearly 3 orders of magnitude lower in energy than previous limits from dedicated tau neutrino searches.

  12. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  13. Inhibition of tau fibrillization by oleocanthal via reaction with the amino groups of tau

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenkai; Sperry, Jeffrey B.; Crowe, Alex; Trojanowski, John Q.; Smith, Amos B.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that promotes microtubule assembly and stability. In Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies, tau fibrillizes and aggregates into neurofibrillary tangles. Recently, oleocanthal isolated from extra virgin olive oil was found to display non-steroidal anti-inflammatory activity similar to ibuprofen. Since our unpublished data indicates an inhibitory effect of oleocanthal on Aβ fibrillization, we reasoned that it might inhibit tau fibrillization as well. Herein we demonstrate that oleocanthal abrogates fibrillization of tau by locking tau into the naturally unfolded state. Using PHF6 consisting of the amino acid residues VQIVYK, a hexapeptide within the third repeat of tau that is essential for fibrillization, we show that oleocanthal forms an adduct with the lysine via initial Schiff base formation. Structure and function studies demonstrate that the two aldehyde groups of oleocanthal are required for the inhibitory activity. These two aldehyde groups show certain specificity when titrated with free lysine and oleocanthal does not significantly affect the normal function of tau. These findings provide a potential scheme for the development of novel therapies for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:19549281

  14. Structural Determinants of Tau Aggregation Inhibitor Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cisek, Katryna; Huseby, Carol J.; Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Small-molecule Tau aggregation inhibitors are under investigation as potential therapeutic agents against Alzheimer disease. Many such inhibitors have been identified in vitro, but their potency-driving features, and their molecular targets in the Tau aggregation pathway, have resisted identification. Previously we proposed ligand polarizability, a measure of electron delocalization, as a candidate descriptor of inhibitor potency. Here we tested this hypothesis by correlating the ground state polarizabilities of cyanine, phenothiazine, and arylmethine derivatives calculated using ab initio quantum methods with inhibitory potency values determined in the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer under reducing conditions. A series of rhodanine analogs was analyzed as well using potency values disclosed in the literature. Results showed that polarizability and inhibitory potency directly correlated within all four series. To identify putative binding targets, representative members of the four chemotypes were added to aggregation reactions, where they were found to stabilize soluble, but SDS-resistant Tau species at the expense of filamentous aggregates. Using SDS resistance as a secondary assay, and a library of Tau deletion and missense mutants as targets, interaction with cyanine was localized to the microtubule binding repeat region. Moreover, the SDS-resistant phenotype was completely dependent on the presence of octadecyl sulfate inducer, but not intact PHF6/PH6* hexapeptide motifs, indicating that cyanine interacted with a species in the aggregation pathway prior to nucleus formation. Together the data suggest that flat, highly polarizable ligands inhibit Tau aggregation by interacting with folded species in the aggregation pathway and driving their assembly into soluble but highly stable Tau oligomers. PMID:24072703

  15. Microtubule-associated protein tau in bovine retinal photoreceptor rod outer segments: comparison with brain tau

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Akio; Nishizawa, Yuji; Matsuura, Isao; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Bondarenko, Vladimir A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a possible involvement of abnormal tau in some retinal degenerative diseases. The common view in these studies is that these retinal diseases share the mechanism of tau-mediated degenerative diseases in brain and that information about these brain diseases may be directly applied to explain these retinal diseases. Here we collectively examine this view by revealing three basic characteristics of tau in the rod outer segment (ROS) of bovine retinal photoreceptors, i.e., its isoforms, its phosphorylation mode and its interaction with microtubules, and by comparing them with those of brain tau. We find that ROS contains at least four isoforms: three are identical to those in brain and one is unique in ROS. All ROS isoforms, like brain isoforms, are modified with multiple phosphate molecules; however, ROS isoforms show their own specific phosphorylation pattern, and these phosphorylation patterns appear not to be identical to those of brain tau. Interestingly, some ROS isoforms, under the normal conditions, are phosphorylated at the sites identical to those in Alzheimer’s patient isoforms. Surprisingly, a large portion of ROS isoforms tightly associates with a membranous component(s) other than microtubules, and this association is independent of their phosphorylation states. These observations strongly suggest that tau plays various roles in ROS and that some of these functions may not be comparable to those of brain tau. We believe that knowledge about tau in the entire retinal network and/or its individual cells are also essential for elucidation of tau-mediated retinal diseases, if any. PMID:23712071

  16. Emission line variability of DR Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isobe, Syuzo; Norimoto, Yuji; Kawakami, Hajime

    Results of CCD observations of DR Tau which show emission line variability are presented. The time dependent variation of the H-beta line and its associated features observed on 1988 December 11 (upper part) and on December 12 (lower part) are illustrated. The present observations indicate that the time-dependent variation of DR Tau's emission line and the inverse P-Cygni absorption line cannot be readily explained by the simple models with gas contraction and gas ejection proposed in previous studies.

  17. Tau/Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Test (Alzheimer Biomarkers)

    MedlinePlus

    ... as: Alzheimer Biomarkers Formal name: Tau Protein and Amyloid Beta 42 Peptide Related tests: Phosporylated Tau (P- ... continues to evolve. For instance, multiple variants of amyloid beta protein, such as Aß40 and Aß38, have ...

  18. Cell-based Models To Investigate Tau Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sungsu; Haque, Md. Mamunul; Kim, Dohee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of abnormal tau aggregates in neuron is an important pathological signature in multiple neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Tau is a neuron specific microtubule-associated protein that regulates microtubule stability, which is critical for axonal outgrowth and synaptic plasticity. In a pathological condition, tau dissociates from microtubules and forms insoluble aggregates called neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The accumulation of NFTs in neuron directly correlates with microtubule dysfunction and neuronal degeneration. Due to the pathophysiological importance of tau, great efforts have been made to understand tau aggregation processes and find therapeutics to halt or reverse the processes. However, progress has been slow due to the lack of a suitable method for monitoring tau aggregation. In this mini-review, we will review the conventional methods for studying tau aggregation, and introduce recent cell-based sensor approaches that allow monitoring tau aggregation in living cells. PMID:25505502

  19. Atmospheric tau neutrinos in a multikiloton liquid argon detector

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Janet; Gouvea, Andre de; Shalgar, Shashank; Spitz, Joshua

    2010-11-01

    An ultralarge liquid argon time projection chamber based neutrino detector will have the uncommon ability to detect atmospheric {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{tau} events. This paper discusses the most promising modes for identifying charged current {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{tau}, and shows that, with simple kinematic cuts, {approx}30 {nu}{sub {tau}}+{nu}{tau} interactions can be isolated in a 100 kt{center_dot}yr exposure, with greater than 4{sigma} significance. This sample is sufficient to perform flux-averaged total cross-section and cross-section shape parametrization measurements--the first steps toward using {nu}{sub {tau}}/{nu}{tau} to search for physics beyond the standard model.

  20. Tau neurotoxicity and rescue in animal models of human Tauopathies.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva Maria

    2016-02-01

    Pathological Tau is a hallmark of various neuronal disorders and spreads in the brain of Alzheimer patients in a well-defined manner. Beside Tau's main function in stabilizing microtubules for axonal transport, a variety of novel functions for neurons and glia have emerged recently. Tau regulates the susceptibility to hyperexcitation and plays a role in neuron-glia contact formation. Studies implicate soluble oligomeric species of Tau, rather than insoluble aggregates, as more detrimental to proper neuronal function. Tau is not exclusively intracellular; instead Tau can be released into the extracellular space. This has led to the hypothesis of a prion-disease like mechanism to explain the stereotypical progression of Tau. Targeting pathological Tau with antibodies or aggregation inhibitors may help to prevent pathology. PMID:26431808

  1. Tau physics at p{bar p} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Konigsberg, J.

    1993-01-01

    Tau detection techniques in hadron colliders are discussed together with the measurements and searches performed so far. We also underline the importance tau physics has in present and future collider experiments.

  2. A precision measurement of the Z{sup 0} lineshape parameters for the process Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect

    Lahmann, R.

    1996-12-31

    In this dissertation, a measurement of the partial decay width of the process Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} using data collected during 1993 and 1994 at the OPAL detector at CERN is described. The cross sections of this process at three center-of-mass energies near the Z{sup 0} resonance were determined, and from a fit to those cross sections, the mass of the Z{sup 0}, its total decay width and its partial decay width into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} final states were determined as M{sub Z} = 91.183 {+-} 0.020 GeV, {Lambda}{sub tot} = 2.514 {+-} 0.018 GeV and {Lambda}{sub {tau}{tau}} = 84.54 {+-} 0.59 MeV. Using published results for M{sub Z}, and {Lambda}{sub tot} with higher accuracy, a value for the partial decay width of {Lambda}{sub {tau}{tau}} = 84.02 {+-} 0.20 MeV was obtained. Further using published results for the decay width of the Z{sup 0} into quark pair final states, the invisible decay width of the Z{sup 0} was determined as {Lambda}{sub inv} = 496.9 {+-} 4.1 MeV, and the number of neutrino generations was determined as N{sub {nu}} = 2.974 {+-} 0.025(exp) {+-} 0.007 (m{sub top}, M{sub Higgs}). All results were found to be in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions and were consistent with the assumption of lepton universality within the Standard Model framework.

  3. Are Tau Aggregates Toxic or Protective in Tauopathies?

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Catherine M.; Mudher, Amrit

    2013-01-01

    Aggregation of highly phosphorylated tau into aggregated forms such as filaments and neurofibrillary tangles is one of the defining pathological hallmarks of Alzheimers disease and other tauopathies. Hence therapeutic strategies have focused on inhibition of tau phosphorylation or disruption of aggregation. However, animal models imply that tau-mediated dysfunction and toxicity do not require aggregation but instead are caused by soluble hyper-phosphorylated tau. Over the years, our findings from a Drosophila model of tauopathy have reinforced this. We have shown that highly phosphorylated wild-type human tau causes behavioral deficits resulting from synaptic dysfunction, axonal transport disruption, and cytoskeletal destabilization in vivo. These deficits are evident in the absence of neuronal death or filament/tangle formation. Unsurprisingly, both pharmacological and genetic inhibition of GSK-3? rescue these tau phenotypes. However, GSK-3? inhibition also unexpectedly increases tau protein levels, and produces insoluble granular tau oligomers. As well as underlining the growing consensus that tau toxicity is mediated by a highly phosphorylated soluble tau species, our findings further show that not all insoluble tau aggregates are toxic. Some tau aggregates, in particular tau oligomers, are non-toxic, and may even be protective against tau toxicity in vivo. This has serious implications for emerging therapeutic strategies to dissolve tau aggregates, which might be ineffective or even counter-productive. In light of this, it is imperative to identify the key toxic tau species and to understand how it mediates dysfunction and degeneration so that the effective disease-modifying therapies can be developed. PMID:23964266

  4. Elimination of spurious eigenvalues in the Chebyshev tau spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.; Murray, B. T.; Boisvert, R. F.

    1990-01-01

    A very simple modification is presented for the Chebyshev tau method which can eliminate spurious eigenvalues, proceeding from a consideration of the vorticity-streamfunction reformulation of the Chebyshev tau method and the Chebyshev-Galerkin method, which have no spurious modes. Consideration of a model problem indicates that these two approaches are equivalent, and that they reduce to the present modification of the tau method. This modified tau method also eliminates spurious eigenvalues from the Orr-Sommerfeld equation.

  5. A Measurement of the charged-current interaction cross section of the tau neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Maher, Emily O'Connor; /Minnesota U.

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab experiment E872 (DONUT) was designed to make the first observation of the tau neutrino charged-current interaction. Using a hybrid emulsion-spectrometer detector, the tau lepton was identified by its single-prong or trident decay. Six interactions were observed, of which five were in the deep inelastic scattering region. These five interaction were used to measure the charged-current cross section of the tau neutrino. To minimize uncertainties, the tau neutrino cross section was measured relative to the electron neutrino cross section. The result {sigma}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}N}{sup const}/{sigma}{sub {nu}{sub e}N}{sup const} = 0.77 {+-} 0.39 is consistent with 1.0, which is predicted by lepton universality. The tau neutrino cross section was also measured for 115 GeV neutrinos, which was the average energy of the interacted tau neutrinos. The result {sigma}{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}N}{sup exp} = 45 {+-} 21 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} is consistent with the standard model prediction calculated in this thesis, {sigma}{sub {tau}N}{sup SM} = 48 {+-} 5 x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2}.

  6. Loss of Axonal Mitochondria Promotes Tau-Mediated Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's Disease–Related Tau Phosphorylation Via PAR-1

    PubMed Central

    Iijima-Ando, Kanae; Sekiya, Michiko; Suzuki, Emiko; Lu, Bingwei; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and toxicity of a microtubule-associated protein tau are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, what pathological conditions trigger tau abnormality in AD is not fully understood. A reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axon has been implicated in AD. In this study, we investigated whether and how loss of axonal mitochondria promotes tau phosphorylation and toxicity in vivo. Using transgenic Drosophila expressing human tau, we found that RNAi–mediated knockdown of milton or Miro, an adaptor protein essential for axonal transport of mitochondria, enhanced human tau-induced neurodegeneration. Tau phosphorylation at an AD–related site Ser262 increased with knockdown of milton or Miro; and partitioning defective-1 (PAR-1), the Drosophila homolog of mammalian microtubule affinity-regulating kinase, mediated this increase of tau phosphorylation. Tau phosphorylation at Ser262 has been reported to promote tau detachment from microtubules, and we found that the levels of microtubule-unbound free tau increased by milton knockdown. Blocking tau phosphorylation at Ser262 site by PAR-1 knockdown or by mutating the Ser262 site to unphosphorylatable alanine suppressed the enhancement of tau-induced neurodegeneration caused by milton knockdown. Furthermore, knockdown of milton or Miro increased the levels of active PAR-1. These results suggest that an increase in tau phosphorylation at Ser262 through PAR-1 contributes to tau-mediated neurodegeneration under a pathological condition in which axonal mitochondria is depleted. Intriguingly, we found that knockdown of milton or Miro alone caused late-onset neurodegeneration in the fly brain, and this neurodegeneration could be suppressed by knockdown of Drosophila tau or PAR-1. Our results suggest that loss of axonal mitochondria may play an important role in tau phosphorylation and toxicity in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22952452

  7. Riluzole rescues glutamate alterations, cognitive deficits, and tau pathology associated with P301L tau expression.

    PubMed

    Hunsberger, Holly C; Weitzner, Daniel S; Rudy, Carolyn C; Hickman, James E; Libell, Eric M; Speer, Rebecca R; Gerhardt, Greg A; Reed, Miranda N

    2015-10-01

    Hyperexcitability of the hippocampus is a commonly observed phenomenon in the years preceding a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our previous work suggests a dysregulation in glutamate neurotransmission may mediate this hyperexcitability, and glutamate dysregulation correlates with cognitive deficits in the rTg(TauP301L)4510 mouse model of AD. To determine whether improving glutamate regulation would attenuate cognitive deficits and AD-related pathology, TauP301L mice were treated with riluzole (~ 12.5 mg/kg/day p.o.), an FDA-approved drug for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that lowers extracellular glutamate levels. Riluzole-treated TauP301L mice exhibited improved performance in the water radial arm maze and the Morris water maze, associated with a decrease in glutamate release and an increase in glutamate uptake in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis 3 (CA3), and cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) regions of the hippocampus. Riluzole also attenuated the TauP301L-mediated increase in hippocampal vesicular glutamate transporter 1, which packages glutamate into vesicles and influences glutamate release; and the TauP301L-mediated decrease in hippocampal glutamate transporter 1, the major transporter responsible for removing glutamate from the extracellular space. The TauP301L-mediated reduction in PSD-95 expression, a marker of excitatory synapses in the hippocampus, was also rescued by riluzole. Riluzole treatment reduced total levels of tau, as well as the pathological phosphorylation and conformational changes in tau associated with the P301L mutation. These findings open new opportunities for the development of clinically applicable therapeutic approaches to regulate glutamate in vulnerable circuits for those at risk for the development of AD. PMID:26146790

  8. Trans-cellular Propagation of Tau Aggregation by Fibrillar Species*

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22461630

  9. Escitalopram Ameliorates Forskolin-Induced Tau Hyperphosphorylation in HEK239/tau441 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Wang, Yan-Juan; Gong, Wei-Gang; Zhou, Qi-Da; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of escitalopram (a widely used and highly efficacious antidepressant from the SSRI class) on tau hyperphosphorylation, HEK293/tau441 cells were pretreated with 4 μM of forskolin for 2 h. Then we treated the cells with different doses of escitalopram (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 μM) for 22 h. We measured the phosphorylation level of tau by Western blotting. It was shown that escitalopram could protect tau from hyperphosphorylation induced by pharmacological activation of protein kinase A (PKA) at a dose of 20, 40, and 80 μM in vitro. Interestingly, the same dose of escitalopram could also increase the level of serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β (inactive form) and the phosphorylation level of Akt at Ser473 (active form) with no significant change in the level of total GSK-3β and Akt. Unexpectedly, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor (5-HT1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not decrease forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Our results suggest that escitalopram can ameliorate forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation, which is not through the typical 5-HT1A pathway, and Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway is involved. These findings may support an effective role of antidepressants in the prevention of dementia associated with depression in patients. PMID:25687330

  10. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ∼60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ≳0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ⊕}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  11. Resolved Multifrequency Radio Observations of GG Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Sean M.; Chandler, Claire J.; Isella, Andrea; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Pérez, L. M.; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Linz, H.; Mundy, L. G.; Sargent, A. I.; Storm, S.; Testi, L.

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ~60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales gsim0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M ⊕, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle "trap") located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  12. Resolved Multifrequency Radio Observations of GG Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Sean M.; Chandler, Claire J.; Isella, Andrea; Birnstiel, Tilman; Rosenfeld, Katharine; Wilner, David J.; Perez, Laura M.; Ricci, Luca; Carpenter, John M.

    2014-06-01

    We present sub-arcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a narrow (FWHM of 60 AU) circumbinary ring centered at a radius of 235 AU. We find no evidence for a radial gradient in the ring spectrum, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 earth masses, at a temperature of 20--30 K. We show how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle "trap") located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  13. A search for charged higgs boson decays of the top quark using hadronic decays of the tau lepton in proton-antiproton collisions at square root s = 1.8 TeV at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    L.S. Groer

    1999-01-26

    The Standard Model predicts the existence of one neutral scalar Higgs boson, which is a remnant of the mechanism that breaks the SU(2){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} electroweak symmetry and generates masses for the heavy vector bosons and fermions. Many extensions to the Standard Model predict two or more Higgs doublets, resulting in a larger spectrum of Higgs bosons including a charged Higgs boson (H{sup {+-}}). For a light charged Higgs boson mass, the top decay into a charged Higgs boson and bottom quark might occur. This thesis presents results of a direct search for this top quark decay mode via the charged Higgs decay to a tau lepton and tau-neutrino, using the hadronic decays of the tau leptons. The search data consist of 100 pb{sup -1} of Run 1 data collected between 1992-1995 at the CDF detector, from p{anti p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV produced at Fermilab's Tevatron accelerator. A total of seven events are observed in two search channels with an expected background contribution of 7.4{+-}2.0 events coming from fake taus (5.4{+-}1.5), heavy vector boson decays with jets (1.9{+-}1.3) and dibosons(0.08{+-}0.06). Lacking evidence for a signal, we set limits on charged Higgs production at the 95% confidence level in the charged Higgs mass plane versus tan{beta}(a parameter of the theory) for a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c{sup 2} and for top production cross sections ({sigma}{sub t{anti t}}) of 5.0 and 7.5 pb, assuming the Type-II Two-Higgs-Doublet-Model. For large tan{beta}, this analysis excludes a charged Higgs boson of mass below 147(158)GeV/c{sup 2} for {sigma}{sub t{anti t}}=5.0(7.5)pb. Using the Standard Model measured top quark cross section from CDF, this limit increases to 168 GeV/c{sup 2} and we also exclude a branching fraction of top decays via this charged Higgs mode of greater than 43% for charged Higgs masses below 168 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  14. Curcumin Suppresses Soluble Tau Dimers and Corrects Molecular Chaperone, Synaptic, and Behavioral Deficits in Aged Human Tau Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Gant, Dana J.; Alaverdyan, Mher; Teng, Edmond; Hu, Shuxin; Chen, Ping-Ping; Maiti, Panchanan; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying Tau-related synaptic and cognitive deficits and the interrelationships between Tau species, their clearance pathways, and synaptic impairments remain poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we examined these interrelationships in aged non-mutant genomic human Tau mice, with established Tau pathology and neuron loss. We also examined how these interrelationships changed with an intervention by feeding mice either a control diet or one containing the brain permeable beta-amyloid and Tau aggregate binding molecule curcumin. Transgene-dependent elevations in soluble and insoluble phospho-Tau monomer and soluble Tau dimers accompanied deficits in behavior, hippocampal excitatory synaptic markers, and molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins (HSPs)) involved in Tau degradation and microtubule stability. In human Tau mice but not control mice, HSP70, HSP70/HSP72, and HSP90 were reduced in membrane-enriched fractions but not in cytosolic fractions. The synaptic proteins PSD95 and NR2B were reduced in dendritic fields and redistributed into perikarya, corresponding to changes observed by immunoblot. Curcumin selectively suppressed levels of soluble Tau dimers, but not of insoluble and monomeric phospho-Tau, while correcting behavioral, synaptic, and HSP deficits. Treatment increased PSD95 co-immunoprecipitating with NR2B and, independent of transgene, increased HSPs implicated in Tau clearance. It elevated HSP90 and HSC70 without increasing HSP mRNAs; that is, without induction of the heat shock response. Instead curcumin differentially impacted HSP90 client kinases, reducing Fyn without reducing Akt. In summary, curcumin reduced soluble Tau and elevated HSPs involved in Tau clearance, showing that even after tangles have formed, Tau-dependent behavioral and synaptic deficits can be corrected. PMID:23264626

  15. T-Tau and P-Tau in Brain and Blood from Natural and Experimental Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Richard; Chang, Binggong; Petersen, Robert; Chiu, Allen; Davies, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic abnormalities are prominent in prion disease pathogenesis and are responsible for functional deficits. The microtubule associated protein, Tau, binds to and stabilizes microtubules in axons ensuring axonal transport of synaptic components. Tau phosphorylation reduces its affinity for microtubules leading to their instability and resulting in disrupted axonal transport and synaptic dysfunction. We report on the levels of total Tau (T-Tau) and phosphorylated Tau (P-Tau), measured by highly sensitive laser-based immunoassays, in the central nervous system and biofluids from experimentally transmitted prion disease in mice and natural cases of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (sCJD) in humans. We found that, in contrast to sCJD where only the levels of T-Tau in brain are increased, both T-Tau and P-Tau are increased in the brains of symptomatic mice experimentally infected with the ME7, 139A and 22L mouse-adapted scrapie strains. The increased levels of T-Tau in sCJD brain, compared to control samples, were also observed in patient plasma. In contrast, there was no detectable increase in T-Tau and P-Tau in plasma from symptomatic experimentally infected mice. Furthermore, our data suggests that in mice showing clinical signs of prion disease the levels and/or ratios of T-Tau and P-Tau are only a useful parameter for differentiating the mouse-adapted scrapie strains that differ in the extent of disease. We conclude that the neuropathogenesis associated with P-Tau and synaptic dysfunction is similar for at least two of the mouse-adapted scrapie strains tested but may differ between sporadic and experimentally transmitted prion diseases. PMID:26630676

  16. The disk around the brown dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Di Francesco, James; Duchêne, Gaspard; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-10

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} and <2.7 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  17. The Disk around the Brown Dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Duchêne, Gaspard; Di Francesco, James; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-01

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10-4 M ⊙ (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10-4 M ⊙ and <2.7 × 10-4 M ⊙, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  18. Tau Oligomers Impair Artificial Membrane Integrity and Cellular Viability*

    PubMed Central

    Flach, Katharina; Hilbrich, Isabel; Schiffmann, Andrea; Gärtner, Ulrich; Krüger, Martin; Leonhardt, Marion; Waschipky, Hanka; Wick, Lukas; Arendt, Thomas; Holzer, Max

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau is mainly expressed in neurons, where it binds and stabilizes microtubules. In Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, Tau protein has a reduced affinity toward microtubules. As a consequence, Tau protein detaches from microtubules and eventually aggregates into β-sheet-containing filaments. The fibrillization of monomeric Tau to filaments is a multistep process that involves the formation of various aggregates, including spherical and protofibrillar oligomers. Previous concepts, primarily developed for Aβ and α-synuclein, propose these oligomeric intermediates as the primary cytotoxic species mediating their deleterious effects through membrane permeabilization. In the present study, we thus analyzed whether this concept can also be applied to Tau protein. To this end, viability and membrane integrity were assessed on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and artificial phospholipid vesicles, treated with Tau monomers, Tau aggregation intermediates, or Tau fibrils. Our findings suggest that oligomeric Tau aggregation intermediates are the most toxic compounds of Tau fibrillogenesis, which effectively decrease cell viability and increase phospholipid vesicle leakage. Our data integrate Tau protein into the class of amyloidogenic proteins and enforce the hypothesis of a common toxicity-mediating mechanism for amyloidogenic proteins. PMID:23129775

  19. APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis in human cerebral cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, Steven; Evans, Lewis D B; Andersson, Therese; Portelius, Erik; Smith, James; Dias, Tatyana B; Saurat, Nathalie; McGlade, Amelia; Kirwan, Peter; Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2015-05-01

    Accumulation of Aβ peptide fragments of the APP protein and neurofibrillary tangles of the microtubule-associated protein tau are the cellular hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate the relationship between APP metabolism and tau protein levels and phosphorylation, we studied human-stem-cell-derived forebrain neurons with genetic forms of AD, all of which increase the release of pathogenic Aβ peptides. We identified marked increases in intracellular tau in genetic forms of AD that either mutated APP or increased its dosage, suggesting that APP metabolism is coupled to changes in tau proteostasis. Manipulating APP metabolism by β-secretase and γ-secretase inhibition, as well as γ-secretase modulation, results in specific increases and decreases in tau protein levels. These data demonstrate that APP metabolism regulates tau proteostasis and suggest that the relationship between APP processing and tau is not mediated solely through extracellular Aβ signaling to neurons. PMID:25921538

  20. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b quarks in $$p\\bar{p}$$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$$ TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-09-12

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb-1. This production mode can be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model (SM) such as in its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) at high tanß. We search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos and the other to hadrons. The data are found to be consistent with SM expectations, and we set upper limitsmore » on the cross section times branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range from 90 to 320 GeV/c2. We interpret our result in the MSSM parameter space, excluding tanß values down to 25 for Higgs boson masses below 170 GeV/c2.« less

  1. Search for Neutral Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model Higgs Bosons Decaying to Tau Pairs Produced in Association with b Quarks in pp Collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Abbott, B.; Gutierrez, P.; Jayasinghe, A.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.; Strauss, M.; Svoisky, P.; Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, S.; Mondal, N. K.; Adams, M.; Bazterra, V.

    2011-09-16

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}. This production mode can be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model (SM) such as in its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) at high tan{beta}. We search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos and the other to hadrons. The data are found to be consistent with SM expectations, and we set upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range from 90 to 320 GeV/c{sup 2}. We interpret our result in the MSSM parameter space, excluding tan{beta} values down to 25 for Higgs boson masses below 170 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  2. Search for neutral Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs produced in association with b quarks in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-09-12

    We report results from a search for neutral Higgs bosons produced in association with b quarks using data recorded by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb-1. This production mode can be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model (SM) such as in its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM) at high tanß. We search for Higgs bosons decaying to tau pairs with one tau decaying to a muon and neutrinos and the other to hadrons. The data are found to be consistent with SM expectations, and we set upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio in the Higgs boson mass range from 90 to 320 GeV/c2. We interpret our result in the MSSM parameter space, excluding tanß values down to 25 for Higgs boson masses below 170 GeV/c2.

  3. PE859, a Novel Tau Aggregation Inhibitor, Reduces Aggregated Tau and Prevents Onset and Progression of Neural Dysfunction In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, Michiaki; Hijikuro, Ichiro; Fujita, Yuki; Wu, Xiaofeng; Nakayama, Shinichi; Sakata, Yoko; Noguchi, Yuji; Ogo, Makoto; Akasofu, Shigeru; Ito, Yoshimasa; Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Tsuchiya, Nobuhiko; Tanaka, Naoki; Takahashi, Takashi; Sugimoto, Hachiro

    2015-01-01

    In tauopathies, a neural microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) is abnormally aggregated and forms neurofibrillary tangle. Therefore, inhibition of the tau aggregation is one of the key approaches for the treatment of these diseases. Here, we have identified a novel tau aggregation inhibitor, PE859. An oral administration of PE859 resulted in the significant reduction of sarkosyl-insoluble aggregated tau along with the prevention of onset and progression of the motor dysfunction in JNPL3 P301L-mutated human tau transgenic mice. These results suggest that PE859 is useful for the treatment of tauopathies. PMID:25659102

  4. Tau Monoclonal Antibody Generation Based on Humanized Yeast Models

    PubMed Central

    Rosseels, Joëlle; Van den Brande, Jeff; Violet, Marie; Jacobs, Dirk; Grognet, Pierre; Lopez, Juan; Huvent, Isabelle; Caldara, Marina; Swinnen, Erwin; Papegaey, Anthony; Caillierez, Raphaëlle; Buée-Scherrer, Valerie; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Lippens, Guy; Colin, Morvane; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Winderickx, Joris

    2015-01-01

    A link between Tau phosphorylation and aggregation has been shown in different models for Alzheimer disease, including yeast. We used human Tau purified from yeast models to generate new monoclonal antibodies, of which three were further characterized. The first antibody, ADx201, binds the Tau proline-rich region independently of the phosphorylation status, whereas the second, ADx215, detects an epitope formed by the Tau N terminus when Tau is not phosphorylated at Tyr18. For the third antibody, ADx210, the binding site could not be determined because its epitope is probably conformational. All three antibodies stained tangle-like structures in different brain sections of THY-Tau22 transgenic mice and Alzheimer patients, and ADx201 and ADx210 also detected neuritic plaques in the cortex of the patient brains. In hippocampal homogenates from THY-Tau22 mice and cortex homogenates obtained from Alzheimer patients, ADx215 consistently stained specific low order Tau oligomers in diseased brain, which in size correspond to Tau dimers. ADx201 and ADx210 additionally reacted to higher order Tau oligomers and presumed prefibrillar structures in the patient samples. Our data further suggest that formation of the low order Tau oligomers marks an early disease stage that is initiated by Tau phosphorylation at N-terminal sites. Formation of higher order oligomers appears to require additional phosphorylation in the C terminus of Tau. When used to assess Tau levels in human cerebrospinal fluid, the antibodies permitted us to discriminate patients with Alzheimer disease or other dementia like vascular dementia, indicative that these antibodies hold promising diagnostic potential. PMID:25540200

  5. Bimodal modulation of tau protein phosphorylation and conformation by extracellular Zn2+ in human-tau transfected cells.

    PubMed

    Boom, Alain; Authelet, Michèle; Dedecker, Robert; Frédérick, Christelle; Van Heurck, Roxane; Daubie, Valery; Leroy, Karelle; Pochet, Roland; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Abnormal homeostasis of heavy metals is a well-documented physiopathological mechanism in Alzheimer's disease. An exacerbation of these abnormalities is best illustrated in the amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease brain tissue, in which zinc reaches the enormous concentration of 1000 microM. Zinc in the plaques is thought to originate from impaired glutamatergic neurons distributed in the associative cortex and limbic structures of normal brain. Although the characteristics of zinc binding to Abeta and its role in promotion of Abeta aggregation have been intensively studied, the contribution of zinc to the development of tau pathology remains elusive. To further document the effect of zinc we have investigated the modifications of tau phosphorylation, conformation and association to microtubules induced by zinc in clonal cell lines expressing a human tau isoform. A bimodal dose dependent effect of zinc was observed. At 100 microM zinc induced a tau dephosphorylation on the PHF-1 epitope, and at higher zinc concentrations induced the appearance of the abnormal tau conformational epitope MC1 and reduced the electrophoretic mobility of tau, known to be associated to increased tau phosphorylation. High zinc concentrations also increased glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) phosphorylation on tyrosine 216, a phosphorylation associated with increased activity of this tau kinase. Live imaging of tau-EGFP expressing cells demonstrated that high zinc concentrations induced a release of tau from microtubules. These results suggest that zinc plays a significant role in the development of tau pathology associated to Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19111579

  6. Single-molecule tracking of tau reveals fast kiss-and-hop interaction with microtubules in living neurons

    PubMed Central

    Janning, Dennis; Igaev, Maxim; Sündermann, Frederik; Brühmann, Jörg; Beutel, Oliver; Heinisch, Jürgen J.; Bakota, Lidia; Piehler, Jacob; Junge, Wolfgang; Brandt, Roland

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule-associated phosphoprotein tau regulates microtubule dynamics and is involved in neurodegenerative diseases collectively called tauopathies. It is generally believed that the vast majority of tau molecules decorate axonal microtubules, thereby stabilizing them. However, it is an open question how tau can regulate microtubule dynamics without impeding microtubule-dependent transport and how tau is also available for interactions other than those with microtubules. Here we address this apparent paradox by fast single-molecule tracking of tau in living neurons and Monte Carlo simulations of tau dynamics. We find that tau dwells on a single microtubule for an unexpectedly short time of ∼40 ms before it hops to the next. This dwell time is 100-fold shorter than previously reported by ensemble measurements. Furthermore, we observed by quantitative imaging using fluorescence decay after photoactivation recordings of photoactivatable GFP–tagged tubulin that, despite this rapid dynamics, tau is capable of regulating the tubulin–microtubule balance. This indicates that tau's dwell time on microtubules is sufficiently long to influence the lifetime of a tubulin subunit in a GTP cap. Our data imply a novel kiss-and-hop mechanism by which tau promotes neuronal microtubule assembly. The rapid kiss-and-hop interaction explains why tau, although binding to microtubules, does not interfere with axonal transport. PMID:25165145

  7. Tau Ser262 phosphorylation is critical for Aβ42-induced tau toxicity in a transgenic Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Koichi; Gatt, Anthony; Iijima-Ando, Kanae

    2010-01-01

    The amyloid-β 42 (Aβ42) peptide has been suggested to promote tau phosphorylation and toxicity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Using transgenic Drosophila expressing both human Aβ42 and tau, we show here that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays a critical role in Aβ42-induced tau toxicity. Co-expression of Aβ42 increased tau phosphorylation at AD-related sites including Ser262, and enhanced tau-induced neurodegeneration. In contrast, formation of either sarkosyl-insoluble tau or paired helical filaments was not induced by Aβ42. Co-expression of Aβ42 and tau carrying the non-phosphorylatable Ser262Ala mutation did not cause neurodegeneration, suggesting that the Ser262 phosphorylation site is required for the pathogenic interaction between Aβ42 and tau. We have recently reported that the DNA damage-activated Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2) phosphorylates tau at Ser262 and enhances tau toxicity in a transgenic Drosophila model. We detected that expression of Chk2, as well as a number of genes involved in DNA repair pathways, was increased in the Aβ42 fly brains. The induction of a DNA repair response is protective against Aβ42 toxicity, since blocking the function of the tumor suppressor p53, a key transcription factor for the induction of DNA repair genes, in neurons exacerbated Aβ42-induced neuronal dysfunction. Our results demonstrate that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 is crucial for Aβ42-induced tau toxicity in vivo, and suggest a new model of AD progression in which activation of DNA repair pathways is protective against Aβ42 toxicity but may trigger tau phosphorylation and toxicity in AD pathogenesis. PMID:20466736

  8. Balmer decrements of T Tau stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katysheva, N. A.

    1981-04-01

    The relative intensities of Balmer lines calculated on the basis of Sobolev's probability method (1947) and the observed decrements of T Tau stars in the catalog of Cohen and Kuhi (1979) are compared with spectral classes between K5 and M5. For the group of stars, G5-K5, studied by Grinin (1980), emission was found to be predominantly of an envelope type, with less of a part played by chromospheric radiation. In K5-M5 stars, however, the envelope makes a smaller contribution to the total radiation, and most of the emission arises in the dense gas at the surface of the star. A comparison of the Balmer decrements of T Tau stars of different spectral classes and flare stars shows that in a transition to stars of lower luminosity, the role of chromospheric radiation increases.

  9. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  10. Tau Cassiopeiae: Not a Variable Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percy, John R.

    1985-12-01

    Tau Cassiopeiae (K1IIIa) appears to be non-variable in light and velocity, despite published indications to the contrary. The origin and propagation of the claims of variability are relevant, in a broader context, to (1) the certification and documentation of stellar variability and (2) the nature of the more than 200 suspected K-giant variable stars in the Yale Catalogue of Bright Stars.

  11. Prompt {nu}{sub {tau}} fluxes in present and future {tau} neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    We use a nonperturbative QCD approach, the quark-gluon string model, to compute the {tau}-neutrino fluxes produced by fixed target pA collisions (where A is a target material) for incident protons of energies ranging from 120 to 800 GeV. The purpose of this calculation is to estimate {ital in a consistent way} the prompt background for the {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation search in the on-going {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation search experiments CHORUS and NOMAD, as well as the expected prompt background in future experiments, such as COSMOS at Fermilab and a possible second-generation {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} search experiment at the CERN SPS. In addition, we compute the number of {nu}{sub {tau}} interactions expected by the experiment E872 at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Ligand-dependent inhibition and reversal of tau filament formation.

    PubMed

    Chirita, Carmen; Necula, Mihaela; Kuret, Jeff

    2004-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule associated protein tau. Because animal model studies suggest that a toxic gain of function accompanies tau aggregation in neurons, selective pharmacological inhibitors of the process may have utility in slowing neurodegeneration. Here, the properties of a candidate small molecule inhibitor of tau fibrillization, 3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-[2-[[3-(2-hydroxyethyl)-5-methoxy-2-benzothiazolylidene]methyl]-1-butenyl]-5-methoxybenzothiazolium (N744), were characterized in vitro using transmission electron microscopy. N744 inhibited arachidonic acid-induced aggregation of full-length, four-repeat tau protein at substoichiometric concentrations relative to total tau and with an IC(50) of approximately 300 nM. Inhibition was accompanied by a dose-dependent decrease in the number concentration of filaments, suggesting that N744 interfered with tau filament nucleation. Stoichiometric concentrations of N744 also promoted tau disaggregation when added to mature synthetic filaments. Disaggregation followed first-order kinetics and was accompanied by a steady decrease in filament number, suggesting that N744 promoted endwise loss of tau molecules with limited filament breakage. N744 at substoichiometric concentrations did not inhibit Abeta and alpha-synuclein aggregation, indicating it was tau selective under these conditions. Because of its activity in vitro, N744 may offer a pharmacological approach to the role of tau fibrillization in neurodegeneration. PMID:15005623

  13. Hsc70 Rapidly Engages Tau after Microtubule Destabilization*

    PubMed Central

    Jinwal, Umesh K.; O'Leary, John C.; Borysov, Sergiy I.; Jones, Jeffrey R.; Li, Qingyou; Koren, John; Abisambra, Jose F.; Vestal, Grant D.; Lawson, Lisa Y.; Johnson, Amelia G.; Blair, Laura J.; Jin, Ying; Miyata, Yoshinari; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2010-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein Tau plays a crucial role in regulating the dynamic stability of microtubules during neuronal development and synaptic transmission. In a group of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, conformational changes in Tau are associated with the initial stages of disease pathology. Folding of Tau into the MC1 conformation, where the amino acids at residues 79 interact with residues 312342, is one of the earliest pathological alterations of Tau in Alzheimer disease. The mechanism of this conformational change in Tau and the subsequent effect on function and association to microtubules is largely unknown. Recent work by our group and others suggests that members of the Hsp70 family play a significant role in Tau regulation. Our new findings suggest that heat shock cognate (Hsc) 70 facilitates Tau-mediated microtubule polymerization. The association of Hsc70 with Tau was rapidly enhanced following treatment with microtubule-destabilizing agents. The fate of Tau released from the microtubule was found to be dependent on ATPase activity of Hsc70. Microtubule destabilization also rapidly increased the MC1 folded conformation of Tau. An in vitro assay suggests that Hsc70 facilitates formation of MC1 Tau. However, in a hyperphosphorylating environment, the formation of MC1 was abrogated, but Hsc70 binding to Tau was enhanced. Thus, under normal circumstances, MC1 formation may be a protective conformation facilitated by Hsc70. However, in a diseased environment, Hsc70 may preserve Tau in a more unstructured state, perhaps facilitating its pathogenicity. PMID:20308058

  14. Polymeric alkylpyridinium salts permit intracellular delivery of human Tau in rat hippocampal neurons: requirement of Tau phosphorylation for functional deficits.

    PubMed

    Koss, Dave J; Robinson, Lianne; Mietelska-Porowska, Anna; Gasiorowska, Anna; Sepčić, Kristina; Turk, Tom; Jaspars, Marcel; Niewiadomska, Grazyna; Scott, Roderick H; Platt, Bettina; Riedel, Gernot

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from tauopathies including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) present with intra-neuronal aggregation of microtubule-associated protein Tau. During the disease process, Tau undergoes excessive phosphorylation, dissociates from microtubules and aggregates into insoluble neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), accumulating in the soma. While many aspects of the disease pathology have been replicated in transgenic mouse models, a region-specific non-transgenic expression model is missing. Complementing existing models, we here report a novel region-specific approach to modelling Tau pathology. Local co-administration of the pore-former polymeric 1,3-alkylpyridinium salts (Poly-APS) extracted from marine sponges, and synthetic full-length 4R recombinant human Tau (hTau) was performed in vitro and in vivo. At low doses, Poly-APS was non-toxic and cultured cells exposed to Poly-APS (0.5 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml; ~22 µM) had normal input resistance, resting-state membrane potentials and Ca(2+) transients induced either by glutamate or KCl, as did cells exposed to a low concentration of the phosphatase inhibitor Okadaic acid (OA; 1 nM, 24 h). Combined hTau loading and phosphatase inhibition resulted in a collapse of the membrane potential, suppressed excitation and diminished glutamate and KCl-stimulated Ca(2+) transients. Stereotaxic infusions of Poly-APS (0.005 µg/ml) and hTau (1 µg/ml) bilaterally into the dorsal hippocampus at multiple sites resulted in hTau loading of neurons in rats. A separate cohort received an additional 7-day minipump infusion of OA (1.2 nM) intrahippocampally. When tested 2 weeks after surgery, rats treated with Poly-APS+hTau+OA presented with subtle learning deficits, but were also impaired in cognitive flexibility and recall. Hippocampal plasticity recorded from slices ex vivo was diminished in Poly-APS+hTau+OA subjects, but not in other treatment groups. Histological sections confirmed the intracellular accumulation of hTau in CA1 pyramidal cells and along their processes; phosphorylated Tau was present only within somata. This study demonstrates that cognitive, physiological and pathological symptoms reminiscent of tauopathies can be induced following non-mutant hTau delivery into CA1 in rats, but functional consequences hinge on increased Tau phosphorylation. Collectively, these data validate a novel model of locally infused recombinant hTau protein as an inducer of Tau pathology in the hippocampus of normal rats; future studies will provide insights into the pathological spread and maturation of Tau pathology. PMID:26070304

  15. Distinct FTDP-17 missense mutations in tau produce tau aggregates and other pathological phenotypes in transfected CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Vogelsberg-Ragaglia, V; Bruce, J; Richter-Landsberg, C; Zhang, B; Hong, M; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    2000-12-01

    Multiple tau gene mutations are pathogenic for hereditary frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), with filamentous tau aggregates as the major lesions in the CNS of these patients. Recent studies have shown that bacterially expressed recombinant tau proteins with FTDP-17 missense mutations cause functional impairments, i.e., a reduced ability of mutant tau to bind to or promote the assembly of microtubules. To investigate the biological consequences of FTDP-17 tau mutants and assess their ability to form filamentous aggregates, we engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell lines to stably express tau harboring one or several different FTDP-17 mutations and showed that different tau mutants produced distinct pathological phenotypes. For example, delta K, but not several other single tau mutants (e.g., V337 M, P301L, R406W), developed insoluble amorphous and fibrillar aggregates, whereas a triple tau mutant (VPR) containing V337M, P301L, and R406W substitutions also formed similar aggregates. Furthermore, the aggregates increased in size over time in culture. Significantly, the formation of aggregated delta K and VPR tau protein correlated with reduced affinity of these mutants to bind microtubules. Reduced phosphorylation and altered proteolysis was also observed in R406W and delta K tau mutants. Thus, distinct pathological phenotypes, including the formation of insoluble filamentous tau aggregates, result from the expression of different FTDP-17 tau mutants in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells and implies that these missense mutations cause diverse neurodegenerative FTDP-17 syndromes by multiple mechanisms. PMID:11102510

  16. Distinct FTDP-17 Missense Mutations in Tau Produce Tau Aggregates and Other Pathological Phenotypes in Transfected CHO Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vogelsberg-Ragaglia, Vanessa; Bruce, Jennifer; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane; Zhang, Bin; Hong, Ming; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2000-01-01

    Multiple tau gene mutations are pathogenic for hereditary frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), with filamentous tau aggregates as the major lesions in the CNS of these patients. Recent studies have shown that bacterially expressed recombinant tau proteins with FTDP-17 missense mutations cause functional impairments, i.e., a reduced ability of mutant tau to bind to or promote the assembly of microtubules. To investigate the biological consequences of FTDP-17 tau mutants and assess their ability to form filamentous aggregates, we engineered Chinese hamster ovary cell lines to stably express tau harboring one or several different FTDP-17 mutations and showed that different tau mutants produced distinct pathological phenotypes. For example, ΔK, but not several other single tau mutants (e.g., V337 M, P301L, R406W), developed insoluble amorphous and fibrillar aggregates, whereas a triple tau mutant (VPR) containing V337M, P301L, and R406W substitutions also formed similar aggregates. Furthermore, the aggregates increased in size over time in culture. Significantly, the formation of aggregated ΔK and VPR tau protein correlated with reduced affinity of these mutants to bind microtubules. Reduced phosphorylation and altered proteolysis was also observed in R406W and ΔK tau mutants. Thus, distinct pathological phenotypes, including the formation of insoluble filamentous tau aggregates, result from the expression of different FTDP-17 tau mutants in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells and implies that these missense mutations cause diverse neurodegenerative FTDP-17 syndromes by multiple mechanisms. PMID:11102510

  17. Physics of a high luminosity collider operated near charm and tau pair thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Schindler, R.H.

    1989-06-01

    The current plans for a high luminosity e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider between 3.0 and 4.4 GeV/c/sup 2/ are described. Such a dedicated facility (The Tau-Charm Factory), operating near tau-pair and charm thresholds would allow studies of the decay of the third generation tau-lepton and the second generation c-quark with unprecedented precision and control of systematics. The charm physics of such a facility is discussed. 24 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Search for Second-Class Currents in \\tau^-\\to\\omega\\pi^-\

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, Antimo; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, Bjarne; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Cahn, Robert N.; Jacobsen, R.G.; /LBL, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /Consorzio Milano Ricerche /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Napoli Seconda U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /Banca di Roma /Frascati /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2008-09-03

    We report on an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using data containing nearly 320 million tau pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and set an upper limit at 0.69% at a 90% confidence level for the ratio of second- to first-class currents.

  19. The Role of Tau in Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Rodrigo; Baglietto-Vargas, David; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Tau, the microtubule-associated protein, forms insoluble filaments that accumulate as neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Under physiological conditions, tau regulates the assembly and maintenance of the structural stability of microtubules. In the diseased brain, however, tau becomes abnormally hyperphosphorylated, which ultimately causes the microtubules to disassemble, and the free tau molecules aggregate into paired helical filaments. A large body of evidence suggests that tau hyperphosphorylation results from perturbation of cellular signaling, mainly through imbalance in the activities of different protein kinases and phosphatases. In AD, it appears that A plays a pivotal role in triggering this imbalance. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the role of tau in AD and other tauopathies, and highlight key issues that need to be addressed to improve the success of developing novel therapies. PMID:20553310

  20. PET Imaging of Tau Deposition in the Aging Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Schöll, Michael; Lockhart, Samuel N; Schonhaut, Daniel R; O'Neil, James P; Janabi, Mustafa; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Baker, Suzanne L; Vogel, Jacob W; Faria, Jamie; Schwimmer, Henry D; Rabinovici, Gil D; Jagust, William J

    2016-03-01

    Tau pathology is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) but also occurs in normal cognitive aging. Using the tau PET agent (18)F-AV-1451, we examined retention patterns in cognitively normal older people in relation to young controls and AD patients. Age and β-amyloid (measured using PiB PET) were differentially associated with tau tracer retention in healthy aging. Older age was related to increased tracer retention in regions of the medial temporal lobe, which predicted worse episodic memory performance. PET detection of tau in other isocortical regions required the presence of cortical β-amyloid and was associated with decline in global cognition. Furthermore, patterns of tracer retention corresponded well with Braak staging of neurofibrillary tau pathology. The present study defined patterns of tau tracer retention in normal aging in relation to age, cognition, and β-amyloid deposition. PMID:26938442

  1. Tau as a therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, Diana S.; Ward, Sarah M.; Lancia, Jody K.; Patterson, Kristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein thought to help modulate the stability of neuronal microtubules. In tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease and several frontotemporal dementias, tau is abnormally modified and misfolded resulting in its disassociation from microtubules and the generation of pathological lesions characteristic for each disease. A recent surge in the population of people with neurodegenerative tauopathies has highlighted the immense need for disease-modifying therapies for these conditions, and new attention has focused on tau as a potential target for intervention. In the current work we summarize evidence linking tau to disease pathogenesis and review recent therapeutic approaches aimed at ameliorating tau dysfunction. The primary therapeutic tactics considered include kinase inhibitors and phosphatase activators, immunotherapies, small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation, and microtubule-stabilizing agents. Although the evidence for tau-based treatments is encouraging, additional work is undoubtedly needed to optimize each treatment strategy for the successful development of safe and effective therapeutics. PMID:22790092

  2. Search for {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation in the CHORUS experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Toshito, T.

    1997-06-15

    We are searching for {nu}{sub {mu}} to {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation via the observation of the decay of the tau lepton generated in charged current interactions of {nu}{sub {tau}}. The beam exposure started in May 1994 and will finish in Nov. 1997. A partial sample of neutrino interactions reconstructed by the electronic detector have been located in the emulsion target and analyzed to search for tau decays. No candidate has been observed. This result translates in an upper limit on the oscillation parameter sin{sup 2} 2{theta}=4.5x10{sup -3}. Within 2 years, a sensitivity to sin{sup 2} 2{theta}=2x10{sup -4} will be reached.

  3. Tau reconstruction methods at an electron-positron collider in the search for new physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinmian; Williams, Anthony G.

    2016-04-01

    By exploiting the relatively long lifetime of the tau lepton, we propose several novel methods for searching for new physics at an electron-positron collider. We consider processes that involve final states consisting of a tau lepton pair plus two missing particles. The mass and spin of the new physics particles can be measured in 3-prong tau decays. The tau polarization, which reflects the coupling to new physics, can be measured from the τ →π ν decay channel using the impact parameter distribution of the charged pion. We also discuss the corresponding backgrounds for these measurements, the next-to-leading order (NLO) effects, and the implications of finite detector resolution.

  4. A precise measurement of the tau polarization and its forward-backward asymmetry at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A. N.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bloomer, J. E.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B. T.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R. M.; Burckhart, H. J.; Burgard, C.; Brgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chrisman, D.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Desch, K.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Evans, H. G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fath, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Frtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S. M.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Gruw, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hoare, J.; Hobson, P. R.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Horvth, D.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Ingram, M. R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C. R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T. R.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B. J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S. R.; Layter, J. G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, C.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Malik, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mttig, P.; McDonald, W. J.; McKenna, J.; McKigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; McPherson, R. A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Mller, U.; Neal, H. A.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Omori, T.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Plinks, J.; Pansart, J. P.; Psztor, G.; Pater, J. R.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Przysiezniak, H.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D. R.; Rylko, R.; Sarkisyan, E. K. G.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schrder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schulz, M.; Schtz, P.; Scott, W. G.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Steiert, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Strumia, F.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S. D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M. A.; von Trne, E.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vasseur, G.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Vokurka, E. H.; Wckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; White, J. S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.

    1996-09-01

    A measurement of the ? lepton polarization and its forward-backward asymmetry at the Z0 resonance using the OPAL detector is described. The measurement is based on analyses of ?????, ???(K)??,tau to ebar ? _e ? _tau ,tau to ? bar ? _? ? _tau and ??a1 ? ? decays from a sample of 89075 e+e-? ? + ? - candidates corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 117 pb-1. Assuming that the ? lepton decays according to V-A theory, we measure the average ? polarization at ? s=MZ to be =(-13.00.90.9)% and the ? polarization forward-backward asymmetry to be A{pol/FB}=(-9.41.00.4)%, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. These results are consistent with the hypothesis of lepton universality and, when combined, can be expressed as a measurement of sin2 ? {eff/lept}=0.23340.0012 within the context of the Standard Model.

  5. Tau: The Center of a Signaling Nexus in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shahzad S.; Bloom, George S.

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein whose misfolding, hyper-phosphorylation, loss of normal function and toxic gain of function are linked to several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). This review discusses the role of tau in amyloid-β (Aβ) induced toxicity in AD. The consequences of tau dysfunction, starting from the axon and concluding at somadendritic compartments, will be highlighted. PMID:26903798

  6. MSUT2 is a determinant of susceptibility to tau neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Chris R; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James B; Kraemer, Brian C

    2011-05-15

    Lesions containing abnormal aggregated tau protein are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathy disorders. How aggregated tau leads to dementia remains enigmatic, although neuronal dysfunction and loss clearly contribute. We previously identified sut-2 as a gene required for tau neurotoxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. Here, we further explore the role of sut-2 and show that overexpression of SUT-2 protein enhances tau-induced neuronal dysfunction, neurotoxicity and accumulation of insoluble tau. We also explore the relationship between sut-2 and its human homolog, mammalian SUT-2 (MSUT2) and find both proteins to be predominantly nuclear and localized to SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Using a cell culture model for the accumulation of pathological tau, we find that high tau levels lead to increased expression of MSUT2 protein. We analyzed MSUT2 protein in age-matched post-mortem brain samples from AD patients and observe a marked decrease in overall MSUT2 levels in the temporal lobe of AD patients. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from AD cases shows a clear reduction in neuronal MSUT2 levels in brain regions affected by tau pathology, but little change in regions lacking tau pathology. RNAi knockdown of MSUT2 in cultured human cells overexpressing tau causes a marked decrease in tau aggregation. Both cell culture and post-mortem tissue studies suggest that MSUT2 levels may influence neuronal vulnerability to tau toxicity and aggregation. Thus, neuroprotective strategies targeting MSUT2 may be of therapeutic interest for tauopathy disorders. PMID:21355046

  7. MSUT2 is a determinant of susceptibility to tau neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Chris R.; Greenup, Lynne; Leverenz, James B.; Kraemer, Brian C.

    2011-01-01

    Lesions containing abnormal aggregated tau protein are one of the diagnostic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathy disorders. How aggregated tau leads to dementia remains enigmatic, although neuronal dysfunction and loss clearly contribute. We previously identified sut-2 as a gene required for tau neurotoxicity in a transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. Here, we further explore the role of sut-2 and show that overexpression of SUT-2 protein enhances tau-induced neuronal dysfunction, neurotoxicity and accumulation of insoluble tau. We also explore the relationship between sut-2 and its human homolog, mammalian SUT-2 (MSUT2) and find both proteins to be predominantly nuclear and localized to SC35-positive nuclear speckles. Using a cell culture model for the accumulation of pathological tau, we find that high tau levels lead to increased expression of MSUT2 protein. We analyzed MSUT2 protein in age-matched post-mortem brain samples from AD patients and observe a marked decrease in overall MSUT2 levels in the temporal lobe of AD patients. Analysis of post-mortem tissue from AD cases shows a clear reduction in neuronal MSUT2 levels in brain regions affected by tau pathology, but little change in regions lacking tau pathology. RNAi knockdown of MSUT2 in cultured human cells overexpressing tau causes a marked decrease in tau aggregation. Both cell culture and post-mortem tissue studies suggest that MSUT2 levels may influence neuronal vulnerability to tau toxicity and aggregation. Thus, neuroprotective strategies targeting MSUT2 may be of therapeutic interest for tauopathy disorders. PMID:21355046

  8. Temperature and toxic Tau in Alzheimer's disease: new insights

    PubMed Central

    Carrettiero, Daniel Carneiro; Santiago, Fernando Enrique; Motzko-Soares, Anna Carolina Parracho; Almeida, Maria Camila

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common dementia in the elderly, is characterized by cognitive impairment and severe autonomic symptoms such as disturbance in core body temperature (Tc), which may be predictors or early events in AD onset. Inclusions of phosphorylated Tau (p-Tau) are a hallmark of AD and other neurodegenerative disorders called “Tauopathies.” Animal and human studies show that anesthesia augments p-Tau levels through reduction of Tc, with implications for AD. Additionally, hypothermia impairs memory and cognitive function. The molecular networks related to Tc that are associated with AD remain poorly characterized. Under physiological conditions, Tau binds microtubules, promoting their assembly and stability. The dynamically regulated Tau-microtubule interaction plays an important role in structural remodeling of the cytoskeleton, having important functions in neuronal plasticity and memory in the hippocampus. Hypothermia-induced increases in p-Tau levels are significant, with an 80% increase for each degree Celsius below normothermic conditions. Although the effects of temperature on Tau phosphorylation are evident, its effects on p-Tau degradation remain poorly understoodWe review information concerning the mechanisms of Tau regulation of neuron plasticity via its effects on microtubule dynamics, with focus on pathways regulating the abundance of phosphorylated Tau species.  We highlight the effects of temperature on molecular mechanisms influencing the development of Tau-related diseases. Specifically, we argue that cold might preferentially affects central nervous system structures that are highly reliant upon plasticity, such as the hippocampus, and that the effect of cold on Tau phosphorylation may constitute a pathology-initiating trigger leading to neurodegeneration. PMID:27227069

  9. A role for FKBP52 in Tau protein function

    PubMed Central

    Chambraud, Béatrice; Sardin, Elodie; Giustiniani, Julien; Dounane, Omar; Schumacher, Michael; Goedert, Michel; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile

    2010-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein, which is widely expressed in the central nervous system, predominantly in neurons, where it regulates microtubule dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. The aberrant assembly of Tau is the hallmark of several human neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies. They include Alzheimer’s disease, Pick’s disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. Several abnormalities in Tau, such as hyperphosphorylation and aggregation, alter its function and are central to the pathogenic process. Here, we describe biochemical and functional interactions between FKBP52 and Tau. FKBP52 is a member of the FKBP (FK506-binding protein) family that comprises intracellular protein effectors of immunosuppressive drugs (such as FK506 and rapamycin). We found that FKBP52, which is abundant in brain, binds directly and specifically to Tau, especially in its hyperphosphorylated form. The relevance of this observation was confirmed by the colocalization of both proteins in the distal part of the axons of cortical neurons and by the antagonistic effect of FKBP52 on the ability of Tau to promote microtubule assembly. Overexpression of FKBP52 in differentiated PC12 cells prevented the accumulation of Tau and resulted in reduced neurite length. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for FKBP52 in Tau function and may help to decipher and modulate the events involved in Tau-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:20133804

  10. A role for FKBP52 in Tau protein function.

    PubMed

    Chambraud, Béatrice; Sardin, Elodie; Giustiniani, Julien; Dounane, Omar; Schumacher, Michael; Goedert, Michel; Baulieu, Etienne-Emile

    2010-02-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein, which is widely expressed in the central nervous system, predominantly in neurons, where it regulates microtubule dynamics, axonal transport, and neurite outgrowth. The aberrant assembly of Tau is the hallmark of several human neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as tauopathies. They include Alzheimer's disease, Pick's disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, and frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. Several abnormalities in Tau, such as hyperphosphorylation and aggregation, alter its function and are central to the pathogenic process. Here, we describe biochemical and functional interactions between FKBP52 and Tau. FKBP52 is a member of the FKBP (FK506-binding protein) family that comprises intracellular protein effectors of immunosuppressive drugs (such as FK506 and rapamycin). We found that FKBP52, which is abundant in brain, binds directly and specifically to Tau, especially in its hyperphosphorylated form. The relevance of this observation was confirmed by the colocalization of both proteins in the distal part of the axons of cortical neurons and by the antagonistic effect of FKBP52 on the ability of Tau to promote microtubule assembly. Overexpression of FKBP52 in differentiated PC12 cells prevented the accumulation of Tau and resulted in reduced neurite length. Taken together, these findings indicate a role for FKBP52 in Tau function and may help to decipher and modulate the events involved in Tau-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:20133804

  11. Tau approximation techniques for identification of coefficients in parabolic PDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Wade, J. G.

    1989-01-01

    A variant of the Tau method, called the weak Tau method, is developed on the basis of the weak form of the PDE for use in least-squares parameter estimation; also presented is a suitable abstract convergence framework. The emphasis is on the theoretical framework that allows treatment of the weak Tau method when it is applied to a wide class of inverse problems, including those for diffusion-advection equations, the Fokker-Planck model for population dynamics, and damped beam equations. Extensive numerical testing of the weak Tau method has demonstrated that it compares quite favorably with existing methods.

  12. CHIP and Hsp70 regulate tau ubiquitination, degradation and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Petrucelli, Leonard; Dickson, Dennis; Kehoe, Kathryn; Taylor, Julie; Snyder, Heather; Grover, Andrew; De Lucia, Michael; McGowan, Eileen; Lewis, Jada; Prihar, Guy; Kim, Jungsu; Dillmann, Wolfgang H; Browne, Susan E; Hall, Alexis; Voellmy, Richard; Tsuboi, Yoshio; Dawson, Ted M; Wolozin, Benjamin; Hardy, John; Hutton, Mike

    2004-04-01

    Molecular chaperones, ubiquitin ligases and proteasome impairment have been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, which are characterized by accumulation of abnormal protein aggregates (e.g. tau and alpha-synuclein respectively). Here we report that CHIP, an ubiquitin ligase that interacts directly with Hsp70/90, induces ubiquitination of the microtubule associated protein, tau. CHIP also increases tau aggregation. Consistent with this observation, diverse of tau lesions in human postmortem tissue were found to be immunopositive for CHIP. Conversely, induction of Hsp70 through treatment with either geldanamycin or heat shock factor 1 leads to a decrease in tau steady-state levels and a selective reduction in detergent insoluble tau. Furthermore, 30-month-old mice overexpressing inducible Hsp70 show a significant reduction in tau levels. Together these data demonstrate that the Hsp70/CHIP chaperone system plays an important role in the regulation of tau turnover and the selective elimination of abnormal tau species. Hsp70/CHIP may therefore play an important role in the pathogenesis of tauopathies and also represents a potential therapeutic target. PMID:14962978

  13. Tutorial guide to the tau lepton and close-mass lepton pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1988-10-01

    This is a tutorial guide to present knowledge of the tau lepton, to the tau decay mode puzzle, and to present searches for close-mass lepton pairs. The test is minimal; the emphasis is on figures, tables and literature references. It is based on a lecture given at the 1988 International School of Subnuclear Physics: The Super World III. 54 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Probing lepton flavour violation via neutrinoless $${\\tau \\longrightarrow 3\\mu }$$ τ → 3 μ decays with the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-26

    This article presents the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to the lepton-flavour-violating decays of τ→3μ. A method utilising the production of τ leptons via W→τν decays is used. This method is applied to the sample of 20.3 fb-1 of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV collected by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No event is observed passing the selection criteria, and the observed (expected) upper limit on the τ lepton branching fraction into three muons, Br(τ→3μ), is 3.76×10-7 (3.94×10-7 ) at 90 % confidence level.

  15. Prospects of constraining the Higgs boson's C P nature in the tau decay channel at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Stefan; Bernreuther, Werner; Kirchner, Sebastian

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how precisely the C P nature of the 125 GeV Higgs boson h , parametrized by a scalar-pseudoscalar Higgs mixing angle ϕτ, can be determined in h →τ-τ+ decay with subsequent τ -lepton decays to charged prongs at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We combine two methods in order to define an observable φCP * which is sensitive to ϕτ: We use the ρ -decay plane method for τ∓→ρ∓ and the impact parameter method for all other major τ decays. For estimating the precision with which ϕτ can be measured at the LHC (13 TeV) we take into account the τ-τ+ background from Drell-Yan production and perform a Monte Carlo simulation of measurement uncertainties on the φCP * signal and background distributions. We obtain that the mixing angle ϕτ can be determined with an uncertainty of Δ ϕτ≃1 5 ° (9°) at the LHC with an integrated luminosity of 150 fb-1 (500 fb-1 ), and with Δ ϕτ≈4 ° with 3 ab-1 . Future measurements of ϕτ yield direct information on whether or not there is an extended Higgs-boson sector with Higgs-sector C P violation. We analyze this in the context of a number of two-Higgs-doublet extensions of the Standard Model, namely the so-called aligned model and conventional two-Higgs-doublet extensions with tree-level neutral flavor conservation.

  16. Measurement of cross-section (p anti-p --> Z0) x BF (Z0 --> tau anti-tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the D0 detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Duensing, Silke

    2004-04-01

    In this thesis the first measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p}) {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{bar {tau}} with the D0 detector at the Tevatron is presented. The tau pair candidates are recorded by the D0 detector using p{bar p} interactions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Events in which one tau decays into a muon and the other tau final state is hadronic with one charged particle are selected for this analysis. The selection criteria for the hadronic tau decay are based on the tau final state, hence for two channels of one-prong taus: single charged pion ({tau}{sub {pi}}) and rho decays ({tau}{sub {rho}}). The selection is based on simple cuts on a number of discriminating variables and the cut values have been optimized for the best cross section measurement. Of hadronic tau candidates that have been reconstructed as {tau}{sub {pi}} candidates, 0.801 {+-} 0.017 {+-} 0.066 pass the selection cut; in the case of {tau}{sub {rho}} taus, the selection efficiency is 0.676 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.009. Of all QCD jets that are reconstructed as hadronic tau candidates, 0.0093 {+-} 0.0002 pass the {tau}{sub {pi}} selection cuts and 0.0122 {+-} 0.0002 the {tau}{sub {rho}} cuts. The cross section has been measured to be 274 {+-} 121 {+-} 40 {+-} 27 pb in the {mu}{tau}{sub {pi}} channel and 273 {+-} 40{sub -23}{sup +18} {+-} 27 pb in the {mu}{tau}{sub {rho}} channel, resulting in a combined measurement of {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{bar {tau}}) = 273 {+-} 38{sub -23}{sup +19} {+-} 27 pb which agrees with the SM prediction within errors. The errors are dominated by the statistical error as only the first data taken with the D0 detector in Run II was used. Due to the small set of tau candidates, the calorimeter energy scale could not yet be determined using data and this uncertainty is the largest systematic effect on the measurement. Another large contribution arises from the uncertainty of 10% on the luminosity measurement. This is expected to decrease significantly in the future. It was demonstrated that the currently available tools are sufficient to use tau leptons in the measurement of a SM process. This opens the door to the use of hadronic tau decays in the search for new particles, like SUSY particles, that decay preferentially to tau leptons in a number of models or the Higgs boson of either the SM or extended model. Doing physics at the Tevatron as the accelerator at the current energy frontier is our current best hope to find the yet elusive Higgs boson and will allow to either find proof of physics beyond the Standard Model or tighten the constraints on these models.

  17. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Maruko-Otake, Akiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Sekiya, Michiko; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). β-amyloid (Aβ) lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27023670

  18. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kanae; Maruko-Otake, Akiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Sekiya, Michiko; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). β-amyloid (Aβ) lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27023670

  19. Discovering the Higgs bosons of minimal supersymmetry with tau leptons and a bottom quark

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, Chung; Dicus, Duane A.; Malhotra, Rahul; Wang Yili

    2008-05-01

    We investigate the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider or at the Fermilab Tevatron of neutral Higgs bosons through the channel where the Higgs are produced together with a single bottom quark and the Higgs decays into a pair of tau leptons, bg{yields}b{phi}{sup 0}{yields}b{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}, {phi}{sup 0}=h{sup 0}, H{sup 0}, A{sup 0}. We work within the framework of the minimal supersymmetric model. The dominant physics background from the production of b{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}, j{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} (j=g,u,d,s,c), bbW{sup +}W{sup -}, W+2j, and Wbj is calculated with realistic acceptance cuts and efficiencies. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar (A{sup 0}) and the heavier CP-even scalar (H{sup 0}) Higgs bosons with masses up to one TeV.

  20. Intermediate overtone oscillations of Tau CYG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkritichian, D. E.; Fedotov, Y. T.; Romanov, Y. S.

    1995-01-01

    According to GCVS (Kholopov et al, 1985) classification Tau Cyg (V=3.70m, F0 IV) is a Delta Scuti type pulsating variable star. However, as is seen from history of its investigations (Paraskevopulos, 1921; Henroteau, 1922; Abt, 1961; Pant et al., 1968; Breger, 1969; Millis, 1969; Fesen, 1973; Bartolini and Dapergolas, 1980; Andrievski and Garbusov, 1987), the conclusions made by different investigators on pulsational activity are ambiguous, and the question on the variability character and possible periodicities remains unsolved for the present, in spite of the stars brightness and the facility for its observations.

  1. Truncation of tau at E391 Promotes Early Pathological Changes in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Pamela J.; Kraemer, Brian C.; Robinson, Linda; Leverenz, James B.; Raskind, Murray; Schellenberg, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of tau at glutamic acid 391 (E391) is linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). This C-terminal truncated tau species exists in neurofibrillary tangles and abnormal neurites in the brains of AD patients and may potentiate tau polymerization. We generated a mouse model that expresses human tau truncated at E391 to begin to elucidate the role of this C-terminal truncated tau species in the development of tau pathology. Our results show that truncated but otherwise wild type human tau is sufficient to drive pre-tangle pathological changes in tau, including accumulation of insoluble tau, somatodendritic redistribution, formation of pathological conformations, and dual phosphorylation of tau at sites associated with AD pathology. In addition, these mice exhibit atypical neuritic tau immunoreactivity, including abnormal neuritic processes and dystrophic neurites. These results suggest that changes in tau proteolysis can initiate tauopathy. PMID:22002427

  2. Search for the standard model Higgs boson in tau final states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; Backusmayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cuplov, V; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-06-26

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson using hadronically decaying tau leptons, in 1 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider. We select two final states: tau+/- plus missing transverse energy and b jets, and tau+ tau- plus jets. These final states are sensitive to a combination of associated W/Z boson plus Higgs boson, vector boson fusion, and gluon-gluon fusion production processes. The observed ratio of the combined limit on the Higgs production cross section at the 95% C.L. to the standard model expectation is 29 for a Higgs boson mass of 115 GeV. PMID:19659068

  3. Pseudophosphorylation of tau protein directly modulates its aggregation kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward; Kim, Sohee; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Kuret, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of tau protein is associated with neurofibrillary lesion formation in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases. It fosters lesion formation by increasing the concentration of free tau available for aggregation and by directly modulating the tau aggregation reaction. To clarify how negative charge incorporation into tau directly affects aggregation behavior, the fibrillization of pseudophosphorylation mutant T212E prepared in a full-length four-repeat tau background was examined in vitro as a function of time and submicromolar tau concentrations using electron microscopy assay methods. Kinetic constants for nucleation and extension phases of aggregation were then estimated by direct measurement and mathematical simulation. Kinetic analysis revealed that pseudophosphorylation increased tau aggregation rate by increasing the rate of filament nucleation. In addition, it increased aggregation propensity by stabilizing mature filaments against disaggregation. The data suggest that incorporation of negative charge into the T212 site can directly promote tau filament formation at multiple steps in the aggregation pathway. PMID:20974297

  4. Biochemistry and Cell Biology of Tau Protein in Neurofibrillary Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Tau represents the subunit protein of one of the major hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), the neurofibrillary tangles, and is therefore of major interest as an indicator of disease mechanisms. Many of the unusual properties of Tau can be explained by its nature as a natively unfolded protein. Examples are the large number of structural conformations and biochemical modifications (phosphorylation, proteolysis, glycosylation, and others), the multitude of interaction partners (mainly microtubules, but also other cytoskeletal proteins, kinases, and phosphatases, motor proteins, chaperones, and membrane proteins). The pathological aggregation of Tau is counterintuitive, given its high solubility, but can be rationalized by short hydrophobic motifs forming β structures. The aggregation of Tau is toxic in cell and animal models, but can be reversed by suppressing expression or by aggregation inhibitors. This review summarizes some of the structural, biochemical, and cell biological properties of Tau and Tau fibers. Further aspects of Tau as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target, its involvement in other Tau-based diseases, and its histopathology are covered by other chapters in this volume. PMID:22762014

  5. Identification of nuclear. tau. isoforms in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, P.A.; Howard, T.H.; Castleberry, R.P.; Binder, L.I. )

    1990-11-01

    The {tau} proteins have been reported only in association with microtubules and with ribosomes in situ, in the normal central nervous system. In addition, {tau} has been shown to be an integral component of paired helical filaments, the principal constituent of the neurofibrillary tangles found in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and of most aged individuals with Down syndrome (trisomy 21). The authors report here the localization of the well-characterized Tau-1 monoclonal antibody to the nucleolar organizer regions of the acrocentric chromosomes and to their interphase counterpart, the fibrillar component of the nucleolus, in human neuroblastoma cells. Similar localization to the nucleolar organizer regions was also observed in other human cell lines and in one monkey kidney cell line but was not seen in non-primate species. Immunochemically, they further demonstrated the existence of the entire {tau} molecule in the isolated nuclei of neuroblastoma cells. Nuclear {tau} proteins, like the {tau} proteins of the paired helical filaments, cannot be extracted in standard SDS-containing electrophoresis sample buffer but require pretreatment with formic acid prior to immunoblot analysis. This work indicates that {tau} may function in processes not directly associated with microtubules and that highly insoluble complexes of {tau} may also play a role in normal cellular physiology.

  6. Tau is essential to β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Mark; Dawson, Hana N.; Binder, Lester I.; Vitek, Michael P.; Ferreira, Adriana

    2002-01-01

    Senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the two hallmark lesions of Alzheimer's disease, are the results of the pathological deposition of proteins normally present throughout the brain. Senile plaques are extracellular deposits of fibrillar β-amyloid peptide (Aβ); neurofibrillary tangles represent intracellular bundles of self-assembled hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Although these two lesions are often present in the same brain areas, a mechanistic link between them has yet to be established. In the present study, we analyzed whether tau plays a key role in fibrillar Aβ-induced neurite degeneration in central neurons. Cultured hippocampal neurons obtained from wild-type, tau knockout, and human tau transgenic mice were treated with fibrillar Aβ. Morphological analysis indicated that neurons expressing either mouse or human tau proteins degenerated in the presence of Aβ. On the other hand, tau-depleted neurons showed no signs of degeneration in the presence of Aβ. These results provide direct evidence supporting a key role for tau in the mechanisms leading to Aβ-induced neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. In addition, the analysis of the composition of the cytoskeleton of tau-depleted neurons suggested that the formation of more dynamic microtubules might confer resistance to Aβ-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:11959919

  7. Methylglyoxal induces tau hyperphosphorylation via promoting AGEs formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Jia-Zhao; Jiang, Xia; Lv, Bing-Ling; Cheng, Xiang-Shu; Du, Lai-Ling; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhou, Xin-Wen

    2012-12-01

    The hyperphosphorylated tau is a major protein component of neurofibrillary tangle, which is one of hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the level of methylglyoxal (MG) is significantly increased in the AD brains, the role of MG in tau phosphorylation is still not reported. Here, we found that MG could induce tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites in neuroblastoma 2a cells under maintaining normal cell viability. MG treatment increased the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and p38 MAPK were activated, whereas the level and activity of JNK, Erk1/2, cdk5, and PP2A were not altered after MG treatment. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK-3β or p38 attenuated the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Aminoguanidine, a blocker of AGEs formation, could effectively reverse the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. These data suggest that MG induces AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation through AGEs formation involving RAGE up-regulation and GSK-3β activation and p38 activation is also partially involved in MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Thus, targeting MG may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation. PMID:22798221

  8. Tau-adaptivity for nonsmooth processes in heterogeneous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J.; Adams, M.; Knepley, M.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a form of adaptivity based on FAS multigrid and related to the "frozen τtau technique proposed by Achi Brandt, allowing fine grid work to be avoided in regions with nearly-linear behavior, despite arbitrarily rough coefficients. We investigate indicators for reuse of τtau, practicality of dynamic load balancing, and experiment with localized plastic yielding in lithosphere dynamics.

  9. The tau and beyond: Future research on heavy leptons

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    This paper outlines directions for future experimental research on the tau and tau neutrino. Present limits on the existence of heavier charged leptons are reviewed, with emphasis on the close-mass lepton pair concept. 44 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Measurement of the {ital {tau}} Neutrino Helicity and Michel Parameters in Polarized {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, R.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Coller, J.A.; Hedges, S.J.; Johnson, A.S.; Shank, J.T.; Whitaker, J.S.; Allen, N.J.; Cotton, R.; Dervan, P.J.; Hasan, A.; McKemey, A.K.; Watts, S.J.; Caldwell, D.O.; Lu, A.; Yellin, S.J.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Coyne, D.G.; Fernandez, J.P.; Liu, X.; Reinertsen, P.L.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B.A.; Williams, D.A.; DOliveira, A.; Johnson, R.A.; Meadows, B.T.; Nussbaum, M.; Dima, M.; Harton, J.L.; Smy, M.B.; Wilson, R.J.; Baranko, G.; Fahey, S.; Fan, C.; Krishna, N.M.; Lauber, J.A.; Nauenberg, U.; Wagner, D.L.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Rowson, P.C.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Camanzi, B.; Mazzucato, E.; Piemontese, L.; Calcaterra, A.; De Sangro, R.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gladding, G.; Karliner, I.; Shapiro, G.; Steiner, H.; Bardon, O.; Burrows, P.N.; Busza, W.; Cowan, R.F.; Dong, D.N.; Fero, M.J.; Gonzalez, S.; Kendall, H.W.; Lath, A.; Lia, V.; Osborne, L.S.; Quigley, J.; Taylor, F.E.; Torrence, E.; Verdier, R.; Williams, D.C.; and others

    1997-06-01

    We present a new measurement of the {tau} neutrino helicity h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} and the {tau} Michel parameters {rho} , {eta} , {xi} , and the product {delta}{xi} . The analysis exploits the highly polarized SLC electron beam to extract these quantities directly from a measurement of the {tau} decay spectra, using the 1993{endash}1995 SLD data sample of 4328 e{sup +}e{sup -}{r_arrow}Z{sup 0}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} events. From the decays {tau}{r_arrow}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{r_arrow}{rho}{nu}{sub {tau}} we obtain a combined value h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}=-0.93{plus_minus}0.10{plus_minus} 0.04 . The leptonic decay channels yield combined values of {rho}=0.72{plus_minus}0.09{plus_minus}0.03 , {xi}=1.05{plus_minus}0.35{plus_minus}0.04 , and {delta}{xi}=0.88{plus_minus}0.27{plus_minus}0.04 . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Comparative biochemistry of tau in progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, FTDP-17 and Pick's disease.

    PubMed

    Buée, L; Delacourte, A

    1999-10-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders referred to as tauopathies have cellular hyperphosphorylated tau protein aggregates in the absence of amyloid deposits. Comparative biochemistry of tau aggregates shows that they differ in both phosphorylation and content of tau isoforms. The six tau isoforms found in human brain contain either three (3R) or four microtubule-binding domains (4R). In Alzheimer's disease, all six tau isoforms are abnormally phosphorylated and aggregate into paired helical filaments. They are detected by immunoblotting as a major tau triplet (tau55, 64 and 69). In corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, only 4R-tau isoforms aggregate into twisted and straight filaments respectively. They appear as a major tau doublet (tau64 and 69). Finally, in Pick's disease, only 3R-tau isoforms aggregate into random coiled filaments. They are characterized by another major tau doublet (tau55 and 64). These differences in tau isoforms may be related to either the degeneration of particular cell populations in a given disorder or aberrant cell trafficking of particular tau isoforms. Finally, recent findings provide a direct link between a genetic defect in tau and its abnormal aggregation into filaments in fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, demonstrating that tau aggregation is sufficient for nerve cell degeneration. Thus, tau mutations and polymorphisms may also be instrumental in many neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:10517507

  12. Antibody-Derived In Vivo Imaging of Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Krishnaswamy, Senthilkumar; Lin, Yan; Rajamohamedsait, Wajitha J.; Rajamohamedsait, Hameetha B.; Krishnamurthy, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies or their derivatives as imaging probes for pathological tau protein have great potential, but have not been well studied. In particular, smaller, single-chain-variable antibody fragments (scFv's) are attractive for detecting tau lesions in live subjects. Here, we generated libraries of scFv's and identified numerous phospho-tau-selective scFv's. Peripheral injection of one of these scFv's consistently resulted in a strong in vivo brain signal in transgenic tauopathy mice, but not in wild-type or amyloid-β plaque mice. The parent tau antibody provided similar results, albeit with a weaker signal intensity. The imaging signal correlated very well with colocalization of the probe with intraneuronal tau aggregates. Both were associated with markers of endosomes, autophagosomes, and lysosomes, suggesting their interaction in these degradation pathways. Such specific antibody-derived imaging probes have great potential as diagnostic markers for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. PMID:25505335

  13. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  14. Mechanisms of tau and Aβ-induced excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pallo, Susanne P; DiMaio, John; Cook, Alexis; Nilsson, Bradley; Johnson, Gail V W

    2016-03-01

    Excitotoxicity was originally postulated to be a late stage side effect of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD)-related neurodegeneration, however more recent studies indicate that it may occur early in AD and contribute to the neurodegenerative process. Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ), the main components of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and amyloid plaques, have been implicated in cooperatively and independently facilitating excitotoxicity. Our study investigated the roles of tau and Aβ in AD-related excitotoxicity. In vivo studies showed that tau knockout (tau(-/-)) mice were significantly protected from seizures and hippocampal superoxide production induced with the glutamate analog, kainic acid (KA). We hypothesized that tau accomplished this by facilitating KA-induced Ca(2+) influx into neurons, however lentiviral tau knockdown failed to ameliorate KA-induced Ca(2+) influx into primary rat cortical neurons. We further investigated if tau cooperated with Aβ to facilitate KA-induced Ca(2+) influx. While Aβ biphasically modulated the KA-induced Cacyt(2+) responses, tau knockdown continued to have no effect. Therefore, tau facilitates KA-induced seizures and superoxide production in a manner that does not involve facilitation of Ca(2+) influx through KA receptors (KAR). On the other hand, acute pretreatment with Aβ (10min) enhanced KA-induced Ca(2+) influx, while chronic Aβ (24h) significantly reduced it, regardless of tau knockdown. Given previously published connections between Aβ, group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and KAR regulation, we hypothesized that Aβ modulates KAR via a G-protein coupled receptor pathway mediated by group 1mGluRs. We found that Aβ did not activate group 1mGluRs and inhibition of these receptors did not reverse Aβ modulation of KA-induced Ca(2+) influx. Therefore, Aβ biphasically regulates KAR via a mechanism that does not involve group 1mGluR activation. PMID:26731336

  15. Amyloid and tau cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Because of the emerging intersections of HIV infection and Alzheimer's disease, we examined cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers related of amyloid and tau metabolism in HIV-infected patients. Methods In this cross-sectional study we measured soluble amyloid precursor proteins alpha and beta (sAPPα and sAPPβ), amyloid beta fragment 1-42 (Aβ1-42), and total and hyperphosphorylated tau (t-tau and p-tau) in CSF of 86 HIV-infected (HIV+) subjects, including 21 with AIDS dementia complex (ADC), 25 with central nervous system (CNS) opportunistic infections and 40 without neurological symptoms and signs. We also measured these CSF biomarkers in 64 uninfected (HIV-) subjects, including 21 with Alzheimer's disease, and both younger and older controls without neurological disease. Results CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ concentrations were highly correlated and reduced in patients with ADC and opportunistic infections compared to the other groups. The opportunistic infection group but not the ADC patients had lower CSF Aβ1-42 in comparison to the other HIV+ subjects. CSF t-tau levels were high in some ADC patients, but did not differ significantly from the HIV+ neuroasymptomatic group, while CSF p-tau was not increased in any of the HIV+ groups. Together, CSF amyloid and tau markers segregated the ADC patients from both HIV+ and HIV- neuroasymptomatics and from Alzheimer's disease patients, but not from those with opportunistic infections. Conclusions Parallel reductions of CSF sAPPα and sAPPβ in ADC and CNS opportunistic infections suggest an effect of CNS immune activation or inflammation on neuronal amyloid synthesis or processing. Elevation of CSF t-tau in some ADC and CNS infection patients without concomitant increase in p-tau indicates neural injury without preferential accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau as found in Alzheimer's disease. These biomarker changes define pathogenetic pathways to brain injury in ADC that differ from those of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20028512

  16. The Excitotoxin Quinolinic Acid Induces Tau Phosphorylation in Human Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Kaka; Cullen, Karen M.; Braidy, Nady; Brew, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    Some of the tryptophan catabolites produced through the kynurenine pathway (KP), and more particularly the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA), are likely to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously shown that the KP is over activated in AD brain and that QA accumulates in amyloid plaques and within dystrophic neurons. We hypothesized that QA in pathophysiological concentrations affects tau phosphorylation. Using immunohistochemistry, we found that QA is co-localized with hyperphosphorylated tau (HPT) within cortical neurons in AD brain. We then investigated in vitro the effects of QA at various pathophysiological concentrations on tau phosphorylation in primary cultures of human neurons. Using western blot, we found that QA treatment increased the phosphorylation of tau at serine 199/202, threonine 231 and serine 396/404 in a dose dependent manner. Increased accumulation of phosphorylated tau was also confirmed by immunocytochemistry. This increase in tau phosphorylation was paralleled by a substantial decrease in the total protein phosphatase activity. A substantial decrease in PP2A expression and modest decrease in PP1 expression were observed in neuronal cultures treated with QA. These data clearly demonstrate that QA can induce tau phosphorylation at residues present in the PHF in the AD brain. To induce tau phosphorylation, QA appears to act through NMDA receptor activation similar to other agonists, glutamate and NMDA. The QA effect was abrogated by the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. Using PCR arrays, we found that QA significantly induces 10 genes in human neurons all known to be associated with AD pathology. Of these 10 genes, 6 belong to pathways involved in tau phosphorylation and 4 of them in neuroprotection. Altogether these results indicate a likely role of QA in the AD pathology through promotion of tau phosphorylation. Understanding the mechanism of the neurotoxic effects of QA is essential in developing novel therapeutic strategies for AD. PMID:19623258

  17. Search for MSSM Higgs Bosons in Tau Final States with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Wan-Ching; /Manchester U.

    2010-09-01

    The cross-section times branching ratio of the Higgs boson decaying to {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} final state in the Standard Model (SM) is too small to play any role in the SM Higgs boson searches. This, however, is different in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), which predicts two Higgs doublets leading to five Higgs bosons: a pair of charged Higgs boson (H{sup {+-}}); two neutral CP-even Higgs bosons (h,H) and a CP-odd Higgs boson (A). A search for the production of neutral Higgs bosons decaying into {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} final states in p{bar p} collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV is presented in this thesis. One of the two {tau} leptons is required to decay into a muon while the other decays hadronically. The integrated luminosity is L = 1.0-5.36 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider from 2002 to 2009 in the Run II.

  18. Heterotypic seeding of Tau fibrillization by pre-aggregated Abeta provides potent seeds for prion-like seeding and propagation of Tau-pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Bruno; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Buist, Arjan; Bird, Matthew; Wang, Peng; Vanoosthuyse, Alexandre; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verheyen, An; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Noël; Baatsen, Peter; Moechars, Diederik; Dewachter, Ilse

    2016-04-01

    Genetic, clinical, histopathological and biomarker data strongly support Beta-amyloid (Aβ) induced spreading of Tau-pathology beyond entorhinal cortex (EC), as a crucial process in conversion from preclinical cognitively normal to Alzheimer's Disease (AD), while the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In vivo preclinical models have reproducibly recapitulated Aβ-induced Tau-pathology. Tau pathology was thereby also induced by aggregated Aβ, in functionally connected brain areas, reminiscent of a prion-like seeding process. In this work we demonstrate, that pre-aggregated Aβ can directly induce Tau fibrillization by cross-seeding, in a cell-free assay, comparable to that demonstrated before for alpha-synuclein and Tau. We furthermore demonstrate, in a well-characterized cellular Tau-aggregation assay that Aβ-seeds cross-seeded Tau-pathology and strongly catalyzed pre-existing Tau-aggregation, reminiscent of the pathogenetic process in AD. Finally, we demonstrate that heterotypic seeded Tau by pre-aggregated Aβ provides efficient seeds for induction and propagation of Tau-pathology in vivo. Prion-like, heterotypic seeding of Tau fibrillization by Aβ, providing potent seeds for propagating Tau pathology in vivo, as demonstrated here, provides a compelling molecular mechanism for Aβ-induced propagation of Tau-pathology, beyond regions with pre-existing Tau-pathology (entorhinal cortex/locus coeruleus). Cross-seeding along functional connections could thereby resolve the initial spatial dissociation between amyloid- and Tau-pathology, and preferential propagation of Tau-pathology in regions with pre-existing 'silent' Tau-pathology, by conversion of a 'silent' Tau pathology to a 'spreading' Tau-pathology, observed in AD. PMID:26739002

  19. Exonic point mutations of human tau enhance its toxicity and cause characteristic changes in neuronal morphology, tau distribution and tau phosphorylation in the lamprey cellular model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Jung, Cheolwha; Lee, Gloria; Hall, Garth F

    2009-01-01

    Exonic mutations in the gene coding for human tau cause familial neurofibrillary degenerative diseases (tauopathies) which exhibit mutation-specific characteristics. It is thus unclear whether such mutations have similar effects on tau structure and function in vivo and if they act via similar cytopathological mechanisms in vulnerable neuron types. We have previously shown that overexpressing wild type human tau isoforms in identified giant neurons (ABCs) of the lamprey CNS results in characteristic, stereotyped cytopathological changes in these cells over several weeks. Here, we use this model to compare the cytopathological consequences of expressing wild type and exonic mutant tau isoforms (P301L, G272V, V337M, and R406W) at a high level of resolution. We show that each of the four exonic htau mutations tested accelerate degeneration in ABCs when compared to their WT parent isoforms, and that the patterns of human tau distribution, phosphorylation and cytopathology, while similar, vary characteristically from one another among both WT and mutant isoforms in a single identified neuron in situ. Our results therefore suggest that at least some of the differences between the effects of these mutations in humans are due to cell autonomous, mutation specific differences in the cytopathological mechanism of tau-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:19158426

  20. Intraneuronal tau aggregation precedes diffuse plaque deposition, but amyloid-β changes occur before increases of tau in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Braak, Heiko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Del Tredici, Kelly; Blennow, Kaj

    2013-11-01

    In comparison to the levels in age and gender-matched controls, reduced levels of pathological amyloid-β protein in cerebrospinal fluid routinely precede the onset of Alzheimer's disease-related symptoms by several years, whereas elevated soluble abnormal tau fractions (phosphorylated tau, total tau protein) in cerebrospinal fluid are detectable only with the onset and progression of clinical symptoms. This sequence of events in cerebrospinal fluid (amyloid-β changes detectable prior to abnormal tau changes) contrasts with that in which both proteins develop in the brain, where intraneuronal tau inclusions (pretangles, neurofibrillary tangles, neuropil threads) appear decades before the deposition of amyloid-β plaques (diffuse plaques, neuritic plaques). This viewpoint attempts to address questions arising in connection with this apparent sequential discrepancy-questions and issues for which there are currently no clear-cut answers. PMID:23756600

  1. Imbalance of Hsp70 family variants fosters tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jinwal, Umesh K.; Akoury, Elias; Abisambra, Jose F.; O'Leary, John C.; Thompson, Andrea D.; Blair, Laura J.; Jin, Ying; Bacon, Justin; Nordhues, Bryce A.; Cockman, Matthew; Zhang, Juan; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Bo; Borysov, Sergiy; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Zweckstetter, Markus; Dickey, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    Dysfunctional tau accumulation is a major contributing factor in tauopathies, and the heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) seems to play an important role in this accumulation. Several reports suggest that Hsp70 proteins can cause tau degradation to be accelerated or slowed, but how these opposing activities are controlled is unclear. Here we demonstrate that highly homologous variants in the Hsp70 family can have opposing effects on tau clearance kinetics. When overexpressed in a tetracycline (Tet)-based protein chase model, constitutive heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) and inducible Hsp72 slowed or accelerated tau clearance, respectively. Tau synergized with Hsc70, but not Hsp72, to promote microtubule assembly at nearly twice the rate of either Hsp70 homologue in reconstituted, ATP-regenerating Xenopus extracts supplemented with rhodamine-labeled tubulin and human recombinant Hsp72 and Hsc70. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy with human recombinant protein revealed that Hsp72 had greater affinity for tau than Hsc70 (I/I0 ratio difference of 0.3), but Hsc70 was 30 times more abundant than Hsp72 in human and mouse brain tissue. This indicates that the predominant Hsp70 variant in the brain is Hsc70, suggesting that the brain environment primarily supports slower tau clearance. Despite its capacity to clear tau, Hsp72 was not induced in the Alzheimer's disease brain, suggesting a mechanism for age-associated onset of the disease. Through the use of chimeras that blended the domains of Hsp72 and Hsc70, we determined that the reason for these differences between Hsc70 and Hsp72 with regard to tau clearance kinetics lies within their C-terminal domains, which are essential for their interactions with substrates and cochaperones. Hsp72 but not Hsc70 in the presence of tau was able to recruit the cochaperone ubiquitin ligase CHIP, which is known to facilitate the ubiquitination of tau, describing a possible mechanism of how the C-termini of these homologous Hsp70 variants can differentially regulate tau triage. Thus, efforts to promote Hsp72 expression and inhibit Hsc70 could be therapeutically relevant for tauopathies.Jinwal, U. K., Akoury, E., Abisambra, J. F., O'Leary, J. C., III, Thompson, A. D., Blair, L. J., Jin, Y., Bacon, J., Nordhues, B. A., Cockman, M., Zhang, J., Li, P., Zhang, B., Borysov, S., Uversky, V. N., Biernat, J., Mandelkow, E., Gestwicki, J. E., Zweckstetter, M., Dickey, C. A. Imbalance of Hsp70 family variants fosters tau accumulation. PMID:23271055

  2. Measurement of the inclusive branching fraction tau/sup -/. -->. nu/sub tau/. pi. /sup -/. pi. /sup 0/ + neutral meson(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.

    1986-12-01

    This dissertation measures an inclusive branching fraction of (13.9 +- 2.0/sub -2.4//sup +2.1/)% for the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu/sub tau/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/ + nh/sup 0/ where h/sup 0/ is a ..pi../sup 0/ or an eta and n greater than or equal to 1. The data sample, obtained with the TPC detector facility at PEP, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 72 pb/sup -1/ at 29 GeV center of mass energy. The measured value for this branching fraction is somewhat greater than the theoretical prediction and, taking errors into account, resolves the present difference between the inclusive and the sum of the exclusive tau/sup -/ branching fractions into one charged prong. In addition, a lower limit of 8.3% (95% CL) is placed on the branching fraction B(tau/sup -/ ..-->.. nu/sub tau/..pi../sup -/..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/).

  3. High statistics search for v{sub e}({bar v}{sub e}){r_arrow}v{sub {tau}}({bar v}{sub {tau}}) oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.A.; Vakili, M.; Romosan, A.; Arroyo, C.G.; Bazarko, A.O.; Conrad, J.; Kim, J.H.; King, B.J.; Lefmann, W.C.; McNulty, C.; Mishra, S.R.; Quintas, P.Z.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; Bernstein, R.H.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Yu, J.; Naples, D.; Bolton, T.; de Barbaro, L.; Schellman, H.; Drucker, R.B.; de Barbaro, P.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Harris, D.A.; McFarland, K.S.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Yang, U.K.; Kinnel, T.; Smith, W.H.

    1999-02-01

    We present new limits on v{sub e}({bar v}{sub e}){r_arrow}v{sub {tau}}({bar v}{sub {tau}}) and v{sub e}({bar v}{sub e}){r_arrow}v{sub s} oscillations by searching for v{sub e} disappearance in the high-energy wideband CCFR neutrino beam. Sensitivity to v{sub {tau}} appearance comes from {tau} decay modes in which a large fraction of the energy deposited is electromagnetic. The beam is composed primarily of v{sub {mu}}({bar v}{sub {mu}}), but this analysis uses the 2.3{percent} v{sub e}({bar v}{sub e}) component of the beam. Electron neutrino energies range from 30 to 600 GeV and flight lengths vary from 0.9 to 1.4 km. This limit improves the sensitivity of existing limits for v{sub e}{r_arrow}v{sub {tau}} at high {Delta}m{sup 2} and obtains a lowest 90{percent} confidence upper limit in sin{sup 2}2{alpha} of 9.9{times}10{sup {minus}2} at {Delta}m{sup 2}{approximately}125 eV{sup 2}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. The DF Tau T Tauri Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright-Garba, Nuria Meilani Laure; Prato, Lisa A.; Allen, Thomas; Biddle, Lauren; Avilez, Ian; Schaefer, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Most stars form in multiple systems. Despite this, there are observed differences in properties of stars formed within close proximity of each other. This makes obtaining images and spectra of resolved components in systems for individual analysis desirable. DF Tau is a young, low-mass, visual binary in the Taurus star-forming region with a semi-major axis of ~13 AU. With Adaptive Optics, we are able to acquire high-resolution spectroscopic and imaging data of the primary and secondary stars. We find the primary and secondary differ in a number of characteristics, including vsini and disk presence. This is in spite of the stars having identical spectral types. We are in the process of mapping the ~44-year orbit, and here we present our latest imaging and spectroscopic data.

  5. Anionic micelles and vesicles induce tau fibrillization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chirita, Carmen N; Necula, Mihaela; Kuret, Jeff

    2003-07-11

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule-associated protein tau. In vitro, fibrillization of recombinant tau can be induced by treatment with various agents, including phosphotransferases, polyanionic compounds, and fatty acids. Here we characterize the structural features required for the fatty acid class of tau fibrillization inducer using recombinant full-length tau protein, arachidonic acid, and a series of straight chain anionic, cationic, and nonionic detergents. Induction of measurable tau fibrillization required an alkyl chain length of at least 12 carbons and a negative charge consisting of carboxylate, sulfonate, or sulfate moieties. All detergents and fatty acids were micellar at active concentrations, due to a profound, taudependent depression of their critical micelle concentrations. Anionic surfaces larger than detergent micelles, such as those supplied by phosphatidylserine vesicles, also induced tau fibrillization with resultant filaments originating from their surface. These data suggest that anionic surfaces presented as micelles or vesicles can serve to nucleate tau fibrillization, that this mechanism underlies the activity of fatty acid inducers, and that anionic membranes may serve this function in vivo. PMID:12730214

  6. Elimination of spurious eigenvalues in the Chebyshev tau spectral method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfadden, G. B.; Murray, B. T.; Boisvert, R. F.

    1989-01-01

    Spectral methods have been used to great advantage in hydrodynamic stability calculations; the concepts are described in Orszag's seminal application of the Chebyshev tau method to the Orr-Sommerfeld equation for plane Poiseuille flow in 1971. Orszag discusses both the Chebyshev Galerkin and the Chebyshev tau methods, but presents results for the tau method, which is easier to implement than the Galerkin method. The tau method has the disadvantage that two unstable eigenvalues are produced that are artifacts of the discretization. An extremely simple modification to the Chebyshev tau method is presented which eliminates the spurious eigenvalues. First a simplified model of the Orr-Sommerfeld equation discussed by Gottlieb and Orszag was studied. Then the Chebyshev tau method is considered, which has two spurious eigenvalues, and then a modification which eliminates them is described. Finally, results for the Orr-Sommerfeld equation are considered where the modified tau method also eliminates the spurious eigenvalues. The simplicity of the modification makes it a convenient alternative to other approaches to the problem.

  7. Early Axonopathy Preceding Neurofibrillary Tangles in Mutant Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Karelle; Bretteville, Alexis; Schindowski, Katharina; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Yilmaz, Zehra; Buée, Luc; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by brain and spinal cord involvement often show widespread accumulations of tau aggregates. We have generated a transgenic mouse line (Tg30tau) expressing in the forebrain and the spinal cord a human tau protein bearing two pathogenic mutations (P301S and G272V). These mice developed age-dependent brain and hippocampal atrophy, central and peripheral axonopathy, progressive motor impairment with neurogenic muscle atrophy, and neurofibrillary tangles and had decreased survival. Axonal spheroids and axonal atrophy developed early before neurofibrillary tangles. Neurofibrillary inclusions developed in neurons at 3 months and were of two types, suggestive of a selective vulnerability of neurons to form different types of fibrillary aggregates. A first type of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles, more abundant in the forebrain, were composed of ribbon-like 19-nm-wide filaments and twisted paired helical filaments. A second type of tau and neurofilament-positive neurofibrillary tangles, more abundant in the spinal cord and the brainstem, were composed of 10-nm-wide neurofilaments and straight 19-nm filaments. Unbiased stereological analysis indicated that total number of pyramidal neurons and density of neurons in the lumbar spinal cord were not reduced up to 12 months in Tg30tau mice. This Tg30tau model thus provides evidence that axonopathy precedes tangle formation and that both lesions can be dissociated from overt neuronal loss in selected brain areas but not from neuronal dysfunction. PMID:17690183

  8. Structure and Pathology of Tau Protein in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kolarova, Michala; García-Sierra, Francisco; Bartos, Ales; Ricny, Jan; Ripova, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia. In connection with the global trend of prolonging human life and the increasing number of elderly in the population, the AD becomes one of the most serious health and socioeconomic problems of the present. Tau protein promotes assembly and stabilizes microtubules, which contributes to the proper function of neuron. Alterations in the amount or the structure of tau protein can affect its role as a stabilizer of microtubules as well as some of the processes in which it is implicated. The molecular mechanisms governing tau aggregation are mainly represented by several posttranslational modifications that alter its structure and conformational state. Hence, abnormal phosphorylation and truncation of tau protein have gained attention as key mechanisms that become tau protein in a pathological entity. Evidences about the clinicopathological significance of phosphorylated and truncated tau have been documented during the progression of AD as well as their capacity to exert cytotoxicity when expressed in cell and animal models. This paper describes the normal structure and function of tau protein and its major alterations during its pathological aggregation in AD. PMID:22690349

  9. TOC1: characterization of a selective oligomeric tau antibody.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sarah M; Himmelstein, Diana S; Lancia, Jody K; Fu, Yifan; Patterson, Kristina R; Binder, Lester I

    2013-01-01

    The work presented herein addresses a specific portion of the tau pathology, pre-fibrillar oligomers, now thought to be important pathological components in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. In previous work, we generated an antibody against purified recombinant cross-linked tau dimers, called Tau Oligomeric Complex 1 (TOC1). TOC1 recognizes tau oligomers and its immunoreactivity is elevated in Alzheimer's disease brains. In this report, we expand upon the previous study to show that TOC1 selectively labels tau oligomers over monomers or polymers, and that TOC1 is also reactive in other neurodegenerative tauopathies. Using a series of deletion mutants spanning the tau molecule, we further demonstrate that TOC1 has one continuous epitope located within amino acids 209-224, in the so-called proline rich region. Together with the previous study, our data indicates that TOC1 is a conformation-dependent antibody whose epitope is revealed upon dimerization and oligomerization, but concealed again as polymers form. This characterization of the TOC1 antibody further supports its potential as a powerful biochemical tool that can be used to better investigate the involvement of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23979027

  10. TOC1: Characterization of a Selective Oligomeric Tau Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Sarah M.; Himmelstein, Diana S.; Lancia, Jody K.; Fu, Yifan; Patterson, Kristina R.; Binder, Lester I.

    2016-01-01

    The work presented herein addresses a specific portion of the tau pathology, pre-fibrillar oligomers, now thought to be important pathological components in Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. In previous work, we generated an antibody against purified recombinant cross-linked tau dimers, called Tau Oligomeric Complex 1 (TOC1). TOC1 recognizes tau oligomers and its immunoreactivity is elevated in Alzheimer’s disease brains. In this report, we expand upon the previous study to show that TOC1 selectively labels tau oligomers over monomers or polymers, and that TOC1 is also reactive in other neurodegenerative tauopathies. Using a series of deletion mutants spanning the tau molecule, we further demonstrate that TOC1 has one continuous epitope located within amino acids 209–224, in the so-called proline rich region. Together with the previous study, our data indicates that TOC1 is a conformation-dependent antibody whose epitope is revealed upon dimerization and oligomerization, but concealed again as polymers form. This characterization of the TOC1 antibody further supports its potential as a powerful biochemical tool that can be used to better investigate the involvement of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23979027

  11. Dysregulation of Tau Phosphorylation in Mouse Brain during Excitotoxic Damage

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhihou; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes of tau phosphorylation and tau-related protein kinases and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in the mouse brain during excitotoxicity induced by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg kainic acid (KA). We found that KA-induced excitotoxicity led to transient dephosphorylation of tau (within 6 hr post-injection), followed by sustained hyperphosphorylation of tau at multiple sites that are hyperphosphorylated in AD brain. The initial dephosphorylation of tau may result from activation of PP2A, and the sustained hyperphosphorylation may be due mainly to activation of cdk5 and down-regulation of PP2A during the later phase. Because abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau plays a crucial role in neurodegeneration and in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, our results suggest that glutamate receptor–mediated excitotoxicity might contribute to AD partially via promoting abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in AD brain. PMID:19363259

  12. Dysregulation of tau phosphorylation in mouse brain during excitotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhihou; Liu, Fei; Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we investigated the dynamic changes of tau phosphorylation and tau-related protein kinases and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in the mouse brain during excitotoxicity induced by intraperitoneal injection of 20 mg/kg kainic acid (KA). We found that KA-induced excitotoxicity led to transient dephosphorylation of tau (within 6 hr post-injection), followed by sustained hyperphosphorylation of tau at multiple sites that are hyperphosphorylated in AD brain. The initial dephosphorylation of tau may result from activation of PP2A, and the sustained hyperphosphorylation may be due mainly to activation of cdk5 and down-regulation of PP2A during the later phase. Because abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau plays a crucial role in neurodegeneration and in the formation of neurofibrillary tangles, our results suggest that glutamate receptor-mediated excitotoxicity might contribute to AD partially via promoting abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau in AD brain. PMID:19363259

  13. Tau leaping of stiff stochastic chemical systems via local central limit approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yushu; Rathinam, Muruhan

    2013-06-01

    Stiffness manifests in stochastic dynamic systems in a more complex manner than in deterministic systems; it is not only important for a time-stepping method to remain stable but it is also important for the method to capture the asymptotic variances accurately. In the context of stochastic chemical systems, time stepping methods are known as tau leaping. Well known existing tau leaping methods have shortcomings in this regard. The implicit tau method is far more stable than the trapezoidal tau method but underestimates the asymptotic variance. On the other hand, the trapezoidal tau method which estimates the asymptotic variance exactly for linear systems suffers from the fact that the transients of the method do not decay fast enough in the context of very stiff systems. We propose a tau leaping method that possesses the same stability properties as the implicit method while it also captures the asymptotic variance with reasonable accuracy at least for the test system S{sub 1}?S{sub 2}. The proposed method uses a central limit approximation (CLA) locally over the tau leaping interval and is referred to as the LCLA-?. The CLA predicts the mean and covariance as solutions of certain differential equations (ODEs) and for efficiency we solve these using a single time step of a suitable low order method. We perform a mean/covariance stability analysis of various possible low order schemes to determine the best scheme. Numerical experiments presented show that LCLA-? performs favorably for stiff systems and that the LCLA-? is also able to capture bimodal distributions unlike the CLA itself. The proposed LCLA-? method uses a split implicit step to compute the mean update. We also prove that any tau leaping method employing a split implicit step converges in the fluid limit to the implicit Euler method as applied to the fluid limit differential equation.

  14. Study of t anti-t production in tau jets channel at CDFII using neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Amerio, Silvia; /Trento U.

    2005-12-01

    CDF (Collider Detector at Fermilab) is a particle detector located at Fermi National Laboratories, near Chicago. it allows to study decay products of p{bar p} collisions at center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. During its first period of data taking (RunI), CDF observed for the first time the top quark (1995). The current period of data taking (RunII) is devoted to precise measurements of top properties and to search for new physics. This thesis work is about the top decay channel named {tau} + jets. A t{bar t} pair decays in two W bosons and two b quarks. In a {tau} + jets event, one out of the two W decays into two jets of hadrons, while the other produces a {tau} lepton and a neutrino; the {tau} decays semileptonically in one or more charged and neutral pions while b quarks hadronize producing two jets of particles. Thus the final state of a {tau} + jets event has this specific signature: five jets, one {tau}-like, i.e. narrow and with low track multiplicity, two from b quarks, two from a W boson and a large amount of missing energy from two {tau} neutrinos. They search for this signal in 311 pb{sup -1} of data collected with TOP{_}MULTIJET trigger. They use neural networks to separate signal from background and on the selected sample they perform a t{bar t} production cross section measurement. The thesis is structured as follows: in Chapter 1 they outline the physics of top and {tau}, concentrating on their discovery, production mechanisms and current physics results involving them. Chapter 2 is devoted to the description of the experimental setup: the accelerator complex first and CDF detector then. The trigger system is described in Chapter 3, while Chapter 4 shows how particles are reconstructed exploiting information from different CDF subdetectors. With Chapter 5 they begin to present their analysis: we use a feed forward neural network based on a minimization algorithm developed in Trento University, called Reactive Taboo Search (RTS), especially designed to rapidly escape from local minima. Using this neural network, they explore two techniques to select t{bar t} {yields} {tau} + jets events, the first based on a single net, the second on two neural networks in cascade; both techniques are described in Chapter 6, together with the variables used as inputs for the nets. Finally, in Chapter 7 they present a method to measure cross section on the sample of events selected by neural networks.

  15. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of astroglial tau pathology in the aged brain, facilitating communication among neuropathologists and researchers, and informing interpretation of clinical biomarkers and imaging studies that focus on tau-related indicators. PMID:26659578

  16. Tau function of the CKP hierarchy and nonlinearizable virasoro symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liang; Wu, Chao-Zhong

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a single tau function that represents the C-type Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (CKP) hierarchy in a generalized Hirota ‘bilinear’ equation. The actions on the tau function by additional symmetries for the hierarchy are also calculated, which involve strictly more than a central extension of the w^C_\\infty -algebra. As an application, for Drinfeld-Sokolov hierarchies associated to affine Kac-Moody algebras of type C, we obtain a formula to compute the obstacles in linearizing their Virasoro symmetries and hence prove the Virasoro symmetries to be nonlinearizable when acting on the tau function.

  17. Adaptive deployment of model reductions for tau-leaping simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sheng; Fu, Jin; Petzold, Linda R.

    2015-05-01

    Multiple time scales in cellular chemical reaction systems often render the tau-leaping algorithm inefficient. Various model reductions have been proposed to accelerate tau-leaping simulations. However, these are often identified and deployed manually, requiring expert knowledge. This is time-consuming and prone to error. In previous work, we proposed a methodology for automatic identification and validation of model reduction opportunities for tau-leaping simulation. Here, we show how the model reductions can be automatically and adaptively deployed during the time course of a simulation. For multiscale systems, this can result in substantial speedups.

  18. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Samuel J; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J; Bose, Suchira

    2016-01-20

    The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are seed-competent. Here, we have dissected the molecular characteristics of seed-competent tau species from the TgP301S tau mouse model using various biochemical techniques and assessed their seeding ability in cell and animal models. We found that sucrose gradient fractions from brain lysates seeded cellular tau aggregation only when large (>10 mer) aggregated, hyperphosphorylated (AT8- and AT100-positive) and nitrated tau was present. In contrast, there was no detectable seeding by fractions containing small, oligomeric (<6 mer) tau. Immunodepletion of the large aggregated AT8-positive tau strongly reduced seeding; moreover, fractions containing these species initiated the formation and spreading of filamentous tau pathology in vivo, whereas fractions containing tau monomers and small oligomeric assemblies did not. By electron microscopy, seed-competent sucrose gradient fractions contained aggregated tau species ranging from ring-like structures to small filaments. Together, these findings indicate that a range of filamentous tau aggregates are the major species that underlie the spreading of tau pathology in the P301S transgenic model. Significance statement: The spread of tau pathology from neuron to neuron is postulated to account for, or at least to contribute to, the overall propagation of tau pathology during the development of human tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to characterize the native tau species responsible for this process of seeding and pathology spreading. Here, we use several biochemical techniques to dissect the molecular characteristics of native tau protein conformers from TgP301S tau mice and show that seed-competent tau species comprise small fibrils capable of seeding tau pathology in cell and animal models. Characterization of seed-competent tau gives insight into disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions. PMID:26791207

  19. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Samuel J.; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V.; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G.; Murray, Tracey K.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are seed-competent. Here, we have dissected the molecular characteristics of seed-competent tau species from the TgP301S tau mouse model using various biochemical techniques and assessed their seeding ability in cell and animal models. We found that sucrose gradient fractions from brain lysates seeded cellular tau aggregation only when large (>10 mer) aggregated, hyperphosphorylated (AT8- and AT100-positive) and nitrated tau was present. In contrast, there was no detectable seeding by fractions containing small, oligomeric (<6 mer) tau. Immunodepletion of the large aggregated AT8-positive tau strongly reduced seeding; moreover, fractions containing these species initiated the formation and spreading of filamentous tau pathology in vivo, whereas fractions containing tau monomers and small oligomeric assemblies did not. By electron microscopy, seed-competent sucrose gradient fractions contained aggregated tau species ranging from ring-like structures to small filaments. Together, these findings indicate that a range of filamentous tau aggregates are the major species that underlie the spreading of tau pathology in the P301S transgenic model. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The spread of tau pathology from neuron to neuron is postulated to account for, or at least to contribute to, the overall propagation of tau pathology during the development of human tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to characterize the native tau species responsible for this process of seeding and pathology spreading. Here, we use several biochemical techniques to dissect the molecular characteristics of native tau protein conformers from TgP301S tau mice and show that seed-competent tau species comprise small fibrils capable of seeding tau pathology in cell and animal models. Characterization of seed-competent tau gives insight into disease mechanisms and therapeutic interventions. PMID:26791207

  20. Conformation Determines the Seeding Potencies of Native and Recombinant Tau Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K.; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J.; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Hutton, Michael L.; Szekeres, Philip G.; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled “prion-like” species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs 275VQIINK280 and 306VQIVYK311 abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  1. Conformation determines the seeding potencies of native and recombinant Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J; Isaacs, Adrian M; Hutton, Michael L; Szekeres, Philip G; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled "prion-like" species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs (275)VQIINK(280) and (306)VQIVYK(311) abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  2. Pathological tau phenotypes. The weight of mutations, polymorphisms, and differential neuronal vulnerabilities.

    PubMed

    Mailliot, C; Bussière, T; Hamdane, M; Sergeant, N; Caillet, M L; Delacourte, A; Buée, L

    2000-01-01

    In tauopathies, comparative biochemistry of tau aggregates shows that they differ in both phosphorylation and content of tau isoforms. Six tau isoforms are found in human brain that contain either three (3R) or four microtubule-binding domains (4R). In Alzheimer's disease, all six of the tau isoforms are phosphorylated and aggregate into paired helical filaments. They are detected by immunoblotting as a major tau triplet (tau 55, 64, and 69). In corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, only phosphorylated 4R-tau isoforms aggregate and appear as a major tau doublet (tau 64 and 69). In Pick's disease, only phosphorylated 3R-tau isoforms aggregate into filaments and are characterized by another major tau doublet (tau 55 and 64). Finally, recent findings provide a direct link between a genetic defect in tau and its abnormal aggregation into filaments in frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17. In the present study, the question of a relationship between tau isoforms and cell morphology is raised. To answer this question, stably transfected human neuroblastoma SY5Y cell lines with either 3R- or 4R-tau isoforms are established. Cell morphology and tau phosphorylation were modified, suggesting that cells undergo profound changes in their metabolism and viability. PMID:11193138

  3. Starvation and inhibition of lysosomal function increased tau secretion by primary cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Nguyen-Vi; Plouffe, Vanessa; Rémillard-Labrosse, Gaudeline; Planel, Emmanuel; Leclerc, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that human tau can be secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells, an event linked to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain. In the present study, we confirmed that under physiological conditions, one tau-positive band was detected in the culture medium with an anti-tau antibody recognizing total tau and the Tau-1 antibody directed against unphosphorylated tau. We then examined whether tau secretion was modified upon insults. Tau secretion was increased by starvation [Earle's Balanced Salt Solution (EBSS)], inhibition of lysosomal function (leupeptin) and when both of these conditions were superimposed, this combined treatment having the most important effects on tau secretion. Interestingly, the pattern of tau secretion was distinct from that of control neurons when neurons were treated either with EBSS alone or EBSS + leupeptin. In these conditions, three tau-positive bands were detected in the culture medium. Two of these three bands were immunoreactive to Tau-1 antibody revealing that at least two tau species were released upon these treatments. Collectively, our results indicate that insults such as nutrient deprivation and lysosomal dysfunction observed in neurodegenerative diseases could result in an increase of tau secretion and propagation of tau pathology in the brain. PMID:25030297

  4. Acetylation of the KXGS motifs in tau is a critical determinant in modulation of tau aggregation and clearance

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Casey; Carlomagno, Yari; Gendron, Tania F.; Dunmore, Judy; Scheffel, Kristyn; Stetler, Caroline; Davis, Mary; Dickson, Dennis; Jarpe, Matthew; DeTure, Michael; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau in neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) is a neuropathological hallmark of tauopathies, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, but effective therapies directly targeting the tau protein are currently lacking. Herein, we describe a novel mechanism in which the acetylation of tau on KXGS motifs inhibits phosphorylation on this same motif, and also prevents tau aggregation. Using a site-specific antibody to detect acetylation of KXGS motifs, we demonstrate that these sites are hypoacetylated in patients with AD, as well as a mouse model of tauopathy, suggesting that loss of acetylation on KXGS motifs renders tau vulnerable to pathogenic insults. Furthermore, we identify histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) as the enzyme responsible for the deacetylation of these residues, and provide proof of concept that acute treatment with a selective and blood–brain barrier-permeable HDAC6 inhibitor enhances acetylation and decreases phosphorylation on tau's KXGS motifs in vivo. As such, we have uncovered a novel therapeutic pathway that can be manipulated to block the formation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:23962722

  5. Lost after translation: missorting of Tau protein and consequences for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zempel, Hans; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated-protein that is sorted into neuronal axons in physiological conditions. In Alzheimer disease (AD) and other tauopathies, Tau sorting mechanisms fail and Tau becomes missorted into the somatodendritic compartment. In AD, aberrant amyloid-β (Aβ) production might trigger Tau missorting. The physiological axonal sorting of Tau depends on the developmental stage of the neuron, the phosphorylation state of Tau and the microtubule cytoskeleton. Disease-associated missorting of Tau is connected to increased phosphorylation and aggregation of Tau, and impaired microtubule interactions. Disease-causing mechanisms involve impaired transport, aberrant kinase activation, non-physiological interactions of Tau, and prion-like spreading. In this review we focus on the physiological and pathological (mis)sorting of Tau, the underlying mechanisms, and effects in disease. PMID:25223701

  6. Tau polarization measurements at the LHC in supersymmetric models with a long-lived stau

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano, Ryuichiro; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi

    2010-08-01

    Supersymmetry (SUSY) with a long-lived stau is an attractive scenario in the LHC experiments because one can directly observe stau tracks in each SUSY event, and thus precise measurements of SUSY particle masses are possible. In this scenario, we discuss the possibility to observe/measure parity violation in interactions among SUSY particles. Such a measurement will be important in determining the spins and chiralities of SUSY particles. We use the last step of the cascade-decay chain: {chi}{sup 0{yields}{tau}}(tilde sign){tau}{yields}{tau}(tilde sign)(l{nu}{nu}), where the polarization of the tau lepton can be determined statistically by looking at the energy distribution of the final state lepton. Comparing with the theoretical formula of the neutralino differential decay width, one can extract the size of parity violation in the interaction vertices among the stau, the tau lepton, and the neutralino. We perform a Monte Carlo simulation to see if the effect is visible at the LHC experiments.

  7. Tau as a Therapeutic Target for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Krishnamurthy, Pavan K.

    2012-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and are primarily composed of aggregates of hyperphosphorylated forms of the microtubule associated protein tau. It is likely that an imbalance of kinase and phosphatase activities leads to the abnormal phosphorylation of tau and subsequent aggregation. The wide ranging therapeutic approaches that are being developed include to inhibit tau kinases, to enhance phosphatase activity, to promote microtubule stability, and to reduce tau aggregate formation and/or enhance their clearance with small molecule drugs or by immunotherapeutic means. Most of these promising approaches are still in preclinical development whilst some have progressed to Phase II clinical trials. By pursuing these lines of study, a viable therapy for AD and related tauopathies may be obtained. PMID:21679154

  8. Planet Formation in the GG Tau A System?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutrey, A.

    2015-12-01

    Located at 140 pc, the environment of the young hierarchical TTauri star system GG Tau A remains a unique laboratory to study tidal interactions and planet formation. We report new ALMA observations of the triple star GG Tau A performed at 0.5mm and in CO J=6-5 at resolution of 0.3 arcsecond. These new images resolve out the massive and narrow dust ring and reveal that a large amount of CO gas is streaming inside the cavity or the gravitationally unstable area. The dust and gas disk surrounding GG Tau Aa which is separated by 35 AU from the binary GG Tau Ab, would not survive without regular replenishment form these streamers.

  9. Crab-crossing in a Tau-Charm facility

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, G.A.; Paterson, J.M.; Kheifets, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: crab-crossing; horizontal versus vertical beam crossing; a crab-crossing arrangement for a Tau-Charm facility; tolerance; and beam loading and average current limitations. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab. (LSP)

  10. Is tau ready for admission to the prion club?

    PubMed

    Hall, Garth F; Patuto, Brian A

    2012-07-01

    Aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative disease, such as α synuclein and β amyloid, now appear to share key prion-like features with mammalian prion protein, such as the ability to recruit normal proteins to aggregates and to translocate between neurons. These features may shed light on the genesis of stereotyped lesion development patterns in conditions such as Alzheimer disease and Lewy Body dementia. We discuss the qualifications of tau protein as a possible "prionoid" mediator of lesion spread based on recent characterizations of the secretion, uptake and transneuronal transfer of human tau isoforms in a variety of tauopathy models, and in human patients. In particular, we consider (1) the possibility that prionoid behavior of misprocessed tau in neurodegenerative disease may involve other aggregation-prone proteins, including PrP itself, and (2) whether "prionlike" tau lesion propagation might include mechanisms other than protein-protein templating. PMID:22561167

  11. Acetylated tau, a novel pathological signature in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, David J.; Cohen, Todd J.; Grossman, Murray; Arnold, Steven E.; Xie, Sharon X.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    The microtubule-binding protein, tau, is the major component of neurofibrillary inclusions characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and related neurodegenerative tauopathies. When tau fibrillizes, it undergoes abnormal post-translational modifications resulting in decreased solubility and altered microtubule-stabilizing properties. Recently, we reported that the abnormal acetylation of tau at lysine residue 280 is a novel, pathological post-translational modification. Here, we performed detailed immunohistochemistry to further examine acetylated-tau expression in Alzheimer's disease and other major tauopathies. Immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody specific for acetylated-tau at lysine 280 was conducted on 30 post-mortem central nervous system regions from patients with Alzheimer's disease (10 patients), corticobasal degeneration (5 patients), and progressive supranuclear palsy (5 patients). Acetylated-tau pathology was compared with the sequential emergence of other tau modifications in the Alzheimer's disease hippocampus using monoclonal antibodies to multiple well-characterized tau epitopes. All cases studied showed significant acetylated-tau pathology in a distribution pattern similar to hyperphosphorylated-tau. Acetylated-tau pathology was largely in intracellular, thioflavin-S-positive tau inclusions in Alzheimer's disease, and also thioflavin-S-negative pathology in corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy. Acetylated-tau was present throughout all stages of Alzheimer's disease pathology, but was more prominently associated with pathological tau epitopes in moderate to severe-stage cases. These temporal and morphological immunohistochemical features suggest acetylation of tau at this epitope is preceded by early modifications, including phosphorylation, and followed by later truncation events and cell death in Alzheimer's disease. Acetylation of tau at lysine 280 is a pathological modification that may contribute to tau-mediated neurodegeneration by both augmenting losses of normal tau properties (reduced solubility and microtubule assembly) as well as toxic gains of function (increased tau fibrillization). Thus, inhibiting tau acetylation could be a disease-modifying target for drug discovery target in tauopathies. PMID:22366796

  12. Loss of tau rescues inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N.; Cardona, Astrid E.; Ransohoff, Richard M.; Lamb, Bruce T.; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Neuroinflammation is one of the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Activated microglia spatially coexist with microtubule-associated protein tau (Mapt or tau)-burdened neurons in the brains of human AD and non-AD tauopathies. Numerous studies have suggested that neuroinflammation precedes tau pathology and that induction or blockage of neuroinflammation via lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or anti-inflammatory compounds (such as FK506) accelerate or block tau pathology, respectively in several animal models of tauopathy. We have previously demonstrated that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation via deficiency of the microglia-specific chemokine (fractalkine) receptor, CX3CR1, promotes tau pathology and neurodegeneration in a mouse model of LPS-induced systemic inflammation. Here, we demonstrate that tau mediates the neurotoxic effects of LPS in Cx3cr1−/− mice. First, Mapt+/+ neurons displayed elevated levels of Annexin V (A5) and TUNEL (markers of neurodegeneration) when co-cultured with LPS-treated Cx3cr1−/−microglia, which is rescued in Mapt−/− neurons. Second, a neuronal population positive for phospho-S199 (AT8) tau in the dentate gyrus is also positive for activated or cleaved caspase (CC3) in the LPS-treated Cx3cr1−/− mice. Third, genetic deficiency for tau in Cx3cr1−/− mice resulted in reduced microglial activation, altered expression of inflammatory genes and a significant reduction in the number of neurons positive for CC3 compared to Cx3cr1−/−mice. Finally, Cx3cr1−/−mice exposed to LPS displayed a lack of inhibition in an open field exploratory behavioral test, which is rescued by tau deficiency. Taken together, our results suggest that pathological alterations in tau mediate inflammation-induced neurotoxicity and that deficiency of Mapt is neuroprotective. Thus, therapeutic approaches toward either reducing tau levels or blocking neuroinflammatory pathways may serve as a potential strategy in treating tauopathies. PMID:26089772

  13. Measurements of the Top Anti-Top Production Cross Section and Top Quark Mass in the Hadronically Decaying Tau + Jets Decay Channel at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, Daryl Curtis

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we present the first exclusive observation of the t-t → hadronic τ + jets decay channel. Using these events, we measure the t-t pair production cross section and the top quark mass in 2.2 fb-1 of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab provides collisions of protons and anti-protons at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV and is one of only two accelerators in the world with enough energy to produce top quarks. With a branching fraction of nearly 10%, the hadronic τ + jets decay channel is the third largest t-t decay mode, and it has only been minimally explored. This the first measurement of the t-t pair production cross section in this decay channel at CDF and the first measurement of the top quark mass in this decay channel in the world. The analysis introduces a new method to recover the total momentum of the ν produced in the τ decay and an artificial neural network to reduce the contribution from the largest background source, QCD multijet background. The t-t pair production cross section is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function which compares the number of observed events to the number of expected events for a given t-t cross section. The top quark mass is extracted by minimizing a negative log likelihood function built from signal and ii background probabilities which are based on the matrix elements for t-t production and decay and W + 4 parton production, respectively. Using events selected with exactly 1 hadronically decaying τ, exactly 4 jets with at least 1 identified as having originated from a b quark, and large missing transverse energy, we measure the t-t pair production cross section to be 8.8 ± 3.3 (stat.) ± 2.2 (syst.) pb and the top quark mass to be 172.7±9.3 (stat.) ±3.7 (syst.) GeV. We find both values to be in good agreement with previous measurements in other t-t decay channels, and the cross section to be consistent with next-to-leading order theoretical predictions.

  14. Physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Taeko; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau is one of the major pathological events in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other related neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Mutations in the tau gene MAPT are a cause of FTDP-17, and the mutated tau proteins are hyperphosphorylated in patient brains. Thus, it is important to determine the molecular mechanism of hyperphosphorylation of tau to understand the pathology of these diseases collectively called tauopathy. Tau is phosphorylated at many sites via several protein kinases, and a characteristic is phosphorylation at Ser/Thr residues in Ser/Thr-Pro sequences, which are targeted by proline-directed protein kinases such as ERK, GSK3β, and Cdk5. Among these kinases, Cdk5 is particularly interesting because it could be abnormally activated in AD. Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), but in contrast to the major Cdks, which promote cell cycle progression in proliferating cells, Cdk5 is activated in post-mitotic neurons via the neuron-specific activator p35. Cdk5-p35 plays a critical role in brain development and physiological synaptic activity. In contrast, in disease brains, Cdk5 is thought to be hyperactivated by p25, which is the N-terminal truncated form of p35 and is generated by cleavage with calpain. Several reports have indicated that tau is hyperphosphorylated by Cdk5-p25. However, normal and abnormal phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5 is still not completely understood. In this article, we summarize the physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau via Cdk5. PMID:25076872

  15. Physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Taeko; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau is one of the major pathological events in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other related neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Mutations in the tau gene MAPT are a cause of FTDP-17, and the mutated tau proteins are hyperphosphorylated in patient brains. Thus, it is important to determine the molecular mechanism of hyperphosphorylation of tau to understand the pathology of these diseases collectively called tauopathy. Tau is phosphorylated at many sites via several protein kinases, and a characteristic is phosphorylation at Ser/Thr residues in Ser/Thr-Pro sequences, which are targeted by proline-directed protein kinases such as ERK, GSK3β, and Cdk5. Among these kinases, Cdk5 is particularly interesting because it could be abnormally activated in AD. Cdk5 is a member of the cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), but in contrast to the major Cdks, which promote cell cycle progression in proliferating cells, Cdk5 is activated in post-mitotic neurons via the neuron-specific activator p35. Cdk5-p35 plays a critical role in brain development and physiological synaptic activity. In contrast, in disease brains, Cdk5 is thought to be hyperactivated by p25, which is the N-terminal truncated form of p35 and is generated by cleavage with calpain. Several reports have indicated that tau is hyperphosphorylated by Cdk5-p25. However, normal and abnormal phosphorylation of tau by Cdk5 is still not completely understood. In this article, we summarize the physiological and pathological phosphorylation of tau via Cdk5. PMID:25076872

  16. Tau therapeutic strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Churcher, Ian

    2006-01-01

    The two classical pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease are deposits of aggregated beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. In addition to Abeta pathology, an invariant trait of Alzheimer's disease, disruption of tau processing is a necessary event in the neurotoxic cascade which eventually leads to neuronal death and subsequent dementia. Tau is a neuronal, microtubule-bound protein which becomes hyperphosphorylated as a result of an imbalance of the kinase and phosphatase activities which normally tightly regulate its phosphorylation. In addition to this pathogenic hyperphosphorylation, tau dissociates from microtubules and self-aggregates to form insoluble oligomers which progress to the macroscopic tangles evident in post mortem Alzheimer's disease tissue. Subsequent toxicity may ensue either as a direct toxic effect of free tau oligomers or as a result of altered microtubule-dependent processes. In order to intervene pharmacologically in this disease process, much effort has been expended in order to identify and inhibit the kinases responsible for pathogenic hyperphosphorylation and many candidate kinases have been investigated including glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3), cyclin-dependant kinase-5 (Cdk-5), MAPK family members (extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 [Erk-1 and 2], MEK [MAP kinase kinase], c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases (JNKs) and p38), casein kinase, calcium calmodulin-dependant kinase II (CaMK-II), microtubule affinity regulating kinase (MARK), protein kinase A (PKA/cAMP-dependant protein kinase) and others. Focus has also fallen upon the role of the phosphatases responsible for dephosphorylation of tau. This review will describe the tau-related etiology of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies as well as the therapeutic strategies to inhibit the hyperphosphorylation of tau. PMID:16712493

  17. Potent inhibition of tau fibrillization with a multivalent ligand

    PubMed Central

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Darby, Michael V.; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of tau fibrillization are under investigation as tools for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway and as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease. Established inhibitors include thiacarbocyanine dyes, which can inhibit recombinant tau fibrillization in the presence of anionic surfactant aggregation inducers. In an effort to increase inhibitory potency, a cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanine molecule containing two thiacarbocyanine moieties was synthesized and characterized with respect to tau fibrillization inhibitory activity by electron microscopy and ligand aggregation state by absorbance spectroscopy. Results showed that the inhibitory activity of the bis-thiacarbocyanine was qualitatively similar to a monomeric cyanine dye, but was more potent with 50% inhibition achieved at ~80 nM concentration. At all concentrations tested in aqueous solution, the bis-thiacarbocyanine collapsed to form a closed clamshell structure. However, the presence of tau protein selectively stabilized the open conformation. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of bis-thiacarbocyanine results from multivalency, and reveal a route to more potent tau aggregation inhibitors. PMID:17854770

  18. The triple binary star EQ Tau with an active component

    SciTech Connect

    Li, K.; Hu, S.-M.; Qian, S.-B.; He, J.-J. E-mail: likai@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-05-01

    New photometric data of EQ Tau observed in 2010 and 2013 are presented. Light curves obtained in 2000 and 2004 by Yuan and Qian and 2001 by Yang and Liu, together with our two newly determined sets of light curves, were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. The five sets of light curves exhibit very obvious variations, implying that the light curves of EQ Tau show a strong O'Connell effect. We found that EQ Tau is an A-type shallow contact binary with a contact degree of f = 11.8%; variable dark spots on the primary component of EQ Tau were also observed. Using 10 new times of minimum light, together with those collected from the literature, the orbital period change of EQ Tau was analyzed. We found that its orbital period includes a secular decrease (dP/dt = –3.63 × 10{sup –8} days yr{sup –1}) and a cyclic oscillation (A {sub 3} = 0.0058 days and P {sub 3} = 22.7 yr). The secular increase of the period can be explained by mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one or/and angular momentum loss due to a magnetic stellar wind. The Applegate mechanism cannot explain the cyclic orbital period change. A probable transit-like event was observed in 2010. Therefore, the cyclic orbital period change of EQ Tau may be due to the light time effect of a third body.

  19. The Triple Binary Star EQ Tau with an Active Component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.; Qian, S.-B.; Hu, S.-M.; He, J.-J.

    2014-05-01

    New photometric data of EQ Tau observed in 2010 and 2013 are presented. Light curves obtained in 2000 and 2004 by Yuan & Qian and 2001 by Yang & Liu, together with our two newly determined sets of light curves, were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. The five sets of light curves exhibit very obvious variations, implying that the light curves of EQ Tau show a strong O'Connell effect. We found that EQ Tau is an A-type shallow contact binary with a contact degree of f = 11.8%; variable dark spots on the primary component of EQ Tau were also observed. Using 10 new times of minimum light, together with those collected from the literature, the orbital period change of EQ Tau was analyzed. We found that its orbital period includes a secular decrease (dP/dt = -3.63 × 10-8 days yr-1) and a cyclic oscillation (A 3 = 0.0058 days and P 3 = 22.7 yr). The secular increase of the period can be explained by mass transfer from the more massive component to the less massive one or/and angular momentum loss due to a magnetic stellar wind. The Applegate mechanism cannot explain the cyclic orbital period change. A probable transit-like event was observed in 2010. Therefore, the cyclic orbital period change of EQ Tau may be due to the light time effect of a third body.

  20. Potent inhibition of tau fibrillization with a multivalent ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Jensen, Jordan R.; Darby, Michael V.; Kuret, Jeff

    2007-11-09

    Small-molecule inhibitors of tau fibrillization are under investigation as tools for interrogating the tau aggregation pathway and as potential therapeutic agents for Alzheimer's disease. Established inhibitors include thiacarbocyanine dyes, which can inhibit recombinant tau fibrillization in the presence of anionic surfactant aggregation inducers. In an effort to increase inhibitory potency, a cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanine molecule containing two thiacarbocyanine moieties was synthesized and characterized with respect to tau fibrillization inhibitory activity by electron microscopy and ligand aggregation state by absorbance spectroscopy. Results showed that the inhibitory activity of the bis-thiacarbocyanine was qualitatively similar to a monomeric cyanine dye, but was more potent with 50% inhibition achieved at {approx}80 nM concentration. At all concentrations tested in aqueous solution, the bis-thiacarbocyanine collapsed to form a closed clamshell structure. However, the presence of tau protein selectively stabilized the open conformation. These results suggest that the inhibitory activity of bis-thiacarbocyanine results from multivalency, and reveal a route to more potent tau aggregation inhibitors.

  1. Specific Profile of Tau Isoforms in Argyrophylic Grain Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rbano, Alberto; Cuadros, Raquel; Calero, Miguel; Hernndez, Flix; Avila, Jess

    2013-01-01

    Argyrophylic grain disease (AGD) is a neurodegenerative condition that has been classified among the sporadic tauopathies. Entities in this group present intracellular aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau, giving rise to characteristic neuronal and glial inclusions. In different tauopathies, the proportion of several tau isoforms present in the aggregates shows specific patterns. AGD has been tentatively classified in the 4R group (predominance of 4R tau isoforms) together with progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. Picks disease is included in the 3R group (predominance of 3R isoforms), whereas tau pathology of Alzheimers disease represents and intermediate group (3 or 4 repeats [3R plus 4R, respectively] isoforms). In this work, we have analyzed tau present in aggregates isolated from brain samples of patients with argyrophylic grain disease. Our results indicate that the main tau isoform present in aggregates obtained from patients with AGD is a hyperphosphorylated isoform containing exons 2 and 10 but lacking exon 3. PMID:25157208

  2. Tau triage decisions mediated by the chaperone network.

    PubMed

    Cook, Casey; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    The pathological accumulation of the microtubule-binding protein tau is linked to an increasing number of neurodegenerative conditions associated with aging, though the mechanisms by which tau accumulates in disease are unclear. In this review, we will summarize our previous research assessing the mechanism of action, as well as the therapeutic potential of Hsp90 inhibition for the treatment of tauopathies. Specifically, we describe the development of a high-throughput screening approach to identify and rank compounds, and demonstrate the selective elimination of aberrant p-tau species in the brain following treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor. Additionally, we identify CHIP as an essential component of the Hsp90 chaperone complex that mediates tau degradation, and present evidence to suggest that CHIP functions to identify and sequester neurotoxic tau species. Finally, we discuss recent data identifying an additional mechanism by which CHIP modulates protein triage decisions involving Hsp90. Specifically, CHIP indirectly regulates Hsp90 chaperone activity by modulating steady-state levels of the Hsp90 deacetylase, HDAC6, thus influencing both the acetylation state and function of Hsp90. Thus future research directions will focus on the manipulation of this network to promote degradation of pathogenic tau species in disease. PMID:22596270

  3. Quantitative analysis of tau-microtubule interaction using FRET.

    PubMed

    Di Maïo, Isabelle L; Barbier, Pascale; Allegro, Diane; Brault, Cédric; Peyrot, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the microtubule associated protein, tau and the microtubules is investigated. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay was used to determine the distance separating tau to the microtubule wall, as well as the binding parameters of the interaction. By using microtubules stabilized with Flutax-2 as donor and tau labeled with rhodamine as acceptor, a donor-to-acceptor distance of 54 ± 1 Å was found. A molecular model is proposed in which Flutax-2 is directly accessible to tau-rhodamine molecules for energy transfer. By titration, we calculated the stoichiometric dissociation constant to be equal to 1.0 ± 0.5 µM. The influence of the C-terminal tails of αβ-tubulin on the tau-microtubule interaction is presented once a procedure to form homogeneous solution of cleaved tubulin has been determined. The results indicate that the C-terminal tails of α- and β-tubulin by electrostatic effects and of recruitment seem to be involved in the binding mechanism of tau. PMID:25196605

  4. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  5. Acetylation mimic of lysine 280 exacerbates human Tau neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Burnouf, Sylvie; Dols, Jacqueline; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction and accumulation of the microtubule-associated human Tau (hTau) protein into intraneuronal aggregates is observed in many neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reversible lysine acetylation has recently emerged as a post-translational modification that may play an important role in the modulation of hTau pathology. Acetylated hTau species have been observed within hTau aggregates in human AD brains and multi-acetylation of hTau in vitro regulates its propensity to aggregate. However, whether lysine acetylation at position 280 (K280) modulates hTau-induced toxicity in vivo is unknown. We generated new Drosophila transgenic models of hTau pathology to evaluate the contribution of K280 acetylation to hTau toxicity, by analysing the respective toxicity of pseudo-acetylated (K280Q) and pseudo-de-acetylated (K280R) mutant forms of hTau. We observed that mis-expression of pseudo-acetylated K280Q-hTau in the adult fly nervous system potently exacerbated fly locomotion defects and photoreceptor neurodegeneration. In addition, modulation of K280 influenced total hTau levels and phosphorylation without changing hTau solubility. Altogether, our results indicate that pseudo-acetylation of the single K280 residue is sufficient to exacerbate hTau neurotoxicity in vivo, suggesting that acetylated K280-hTau species contribute to the pathological events leading to neurodegeneration in AD. PMID:26940749

  6. Templated misfolding of Tau by prion-like seeding along neuronal connections impairs neuronal network function and associated behavioral outcomes in Tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Ris, Laurence; Wang, Peng; Villers, Agnès; Peeraer, Eve; Buist, Arjan; Terwel, Dick; Baatsen, Peter; Oyelami, Tutu; Pierrot, Nathalie; Casteels, Cindy; Bormans, Guy; Kienlen-Campard, Pascal; Octave, Jean-Nöel; Moechars, Diederik; Dewachter, Ilse

    2015-06-01

    Prion-like seeding and propagation of Tau-pathology have been demonstrated experimentally and may underlie the stereotyped progression of neurodegenerative Tauopathies. However, the involvement of templated misfolding of Tau in neuronal network dysfunction and behavioral outcomes remains to be explored in detail. Here we analyzed the repercussions of prion-like spreading of Tau-pathology via neuronal connections on neuronal network function in TauP301S transgenic mice. Spontaneous and GABA(A)R-antagonist-induced neuronal network activity were affected following templated Tau-misfolding using synthetic preformed Tau fibrils in cultured primary neurons. Electrophysiological analysis in organotypic hippocampal slices of Tau transgenic mice demonstrated impaired synaptic transmission and impaired long-term potentiation following Tau-seed induced Tau-aggregation. Intracerebral injection of Tau-seeds in TauP301S mice, caused prion-like spreading of Tau-pathology through functionally connected neuroanatomical pathways. Electrophysiological analysis revealed impaired synaptic plasticity in hippocampal CA1 region 6 months after Tau-seeding in entorhinal cortex (EC). Furthermore, templated Tau aggregation impaired cognitive function, measured in the object recognition test 6 months post-seeding. In contrast, Tau-seeding in basal ganglia and subsequent spreading through functionally connected neuronal networks involved in motor control, resulted in motoric deficits reflected in clasping and impaired inverted grid hanging, not significantly affected following Tau-seeding in EC. Immunostaining, biochemical and electron microscopic analysis in the different models suggested early pathological forms of Tau, including Tau-oligomers, rather than fully mature neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) as culprits of neuronal dysfunction. We here demonstrate for the first time using in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models, that prion-like spreading of Tau-misfolding by Tau seeds, along unique neuronal connections, causes neuronal network dysfunction and associated behavioral dysfunction. Our data highlight the potential relevance of this mechanism in the symptomatic progression in Tauopathies. We furthermore demonstrate that the initial site of Tau-seeding thereby determines the behavioral outcome, potentially underlying the observed heterogeneity in (familial) Tauopathies, including in TauP301 mutants. PMID:25862635

  7. Tau-Directed Drug Discovery for Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Tauopathies: A Focus on Tau Assembly Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Brunden, Kurt R.; Ballatore, Carlo; Crowe, Alex; Smith, Amos B.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2009-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau forms insoluble filaments that deposit as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other related neurodegenerative disorders. The presence of both NFTs and amyloid β (Aβ)-containing senile plaques within the brain is required to confirm the diagnosis of AD. However, the demonstration that familial AD can be caused by mutations that result in increased Aβ production has resulted in AD drug discovery strategies that are largely focused on reducing brain Aβ levels, with substantially less emphasis on tau-directed approaches. This trend may be changing, as there are an increasing number of research programs that are exploring ways to reduce NFTs in AD and related tauopathies. We briefly review recent advances in tau-based drug discovery, with an emphasis on the identification of compounds that inhibit the assembly of tau into multimers and fibrils. PMID:19744482

  8. Tau-directed drug discovery for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies: a focus on tau assembly inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brunden, Kurt R; Ballatore, Carlo; Crowe, Alex; Smith, Amos B; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2010-06-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau forms insoluble filaments that deposit as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brains of those with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other related neurodegenerative disorders. The presence of both NFTs and amyloid beta (Abeta)-containing senile plaques within the brain is required to confirm the diagnosis of AD. However, the demonstration that familial AD can be caused by mutations that result in increased Abeta production has resulted in AD drug discovery strategies that are largely focused on reducing brain Abeta levels, with substantially less emphasis on tau-directed approaches. This trend may be changing, as there are an increasing number of research programs that are exploring ways to reduce NFTs in AD and related tauopathies. We briefly review recent advances in tau-based drug discovery, with an emphasis on the identification of compounds that inhibit the assembly of tau into multimers and fibrils. PMID:19744482

  9. Elemental abundance analyses with DAO spectrograms. XXIX. The mercury-manganese stars 53 Tau, ? Tau, ? Crv, and ? Her

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Caliskan, H.; Gulliver, A. F.; Teker, A.

    2006-02-01

    We performed elemental abundances analyses of the mercury-manganese (HgMn) stars 53 Tau, ? Tau, and ? Crv consistent with previous studies of similar stars in this series. The derived v sin i values for the last two stars are 59 and 32 km s-1, respectively, both of which are greater than those of HgMn stars previously studied. For 53 Tau this analysis using selected wavelength regions replaces one performed with coadded photographic spectra. A stricter upper limit is placed on any Hg II ?3984 line. The abundances of ? Tau are usually greater than those of ? Crv. But the later star has a Hg II ?3984 line which the former lacks. Our analysis of ? Her, which was performed with spectrograms obtained with CCD detectors, is extended by using additional spectrograms to increase the range of wavelengths covered longward of ?4800. Minor changes in the derived abundances result.

  10. Preliminary Measurement of B(tau- ---> K- pi0 nu/tau) Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Salvatore, F.; Lyon, A.J.; /Manchester U.

    2005-07-08

    A preliminary measurement of the branching fraction {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) is made using 124.4 fb{sup -1} of e{sup +}e{sup -} collision data provided by the PEP-II accelerator, operating primarily at {radical}s = 10.58 GeV, and recorded using the BABAR detector. They measure: {Beta}({tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = (0.438 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.022(syst))%. This result is the world's most precise measurement of this branching fraction to date and is consistent with the world average.

  11. Limit on the diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy tau neutrinos with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Abraham, J.; De La Vega, G.; Garcia, B.; Videla, M.; Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Assis, P.; Brogueira, P.; Conceicao, R.; Goncalves, P.; Pimenta, M.; Santo, C. E.; Tome, B.; Aglietta, M.; Bonino, R.; Castellina, A.; Chiavassa, A.; Fulgione, W.; Gorgi, A.; Lucero, A.

    2009-05-15

    Data collected at the Pierre Auger Observatory are used to establish an upper limit on the diffuse flux of tau neutrinos in the cosmic radiation. Earth-skimming {nu}{sub {tau}} may interact in the Earth's crust and produce a {tau} lepton by means of charged-current interactions. The {tau} lepton may emerge from the Earth and decay in the atmosphere to produce a nearly horizontal shower with a typical signature, a persistent electromagnetic component even at very large atmospheric depths. The search procedure to select events induced by {tau} decays against the background of normal showers induced by cosmic rays is described. The method used to compute the exposure for a detector continuously growing with time is detailed. Systematic uncertainties in the exposure from the detector, the analysis, and the involved physics are discussed. No {tau} neutrino candidates have been found. For neutrinos in the energy range 2x10{sup 17} eVtau}}}/dE{sub {nu}}<9x10{sup -8} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}.

  12. Bending tau into shape: the emerging role of peptidyl prolyl-isomerases in tauopathies

    PubMed Central

    Koren, John; Jinwal, Umesh K.; Davey, Zachary; Kiray, Janine; Arulselvam, Karthik; Dickey, Chad A.

    2012-01-01

    The Hsp90-associated cis-trans peptidyl-prolyl isomerase—FK506 binding protein 51 (FKBP51)—was recently found to co-localize with the microtubule (MT)-associated protein tau in neurons and physically interact with tau in brain tissue from humans who died from Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau pathologically aggregates in neurons, a process that is closely linked with cognitive deficits in AD. Tau typically functions to stabilize and bundle MTs. Cellular events like calcium influx destabilize MTs, disengaging tau. This excess tau should be degraded, but sometimes it is stabilized and forms higher-order aggregates, a pathogenic hallmark of tauopathies. FKBP51 was also found to increase in forebrain neurons with age, further supporting a novel role for FKBP51 in tau processing. This, combined with compelling evidence that the prolyl isomerase Pin1 regulates tau stability and phosphorylation dynamics, suggests an emerging role for isomerization in tau pathogenesis. PMID:21523562

  13. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau protein at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease recapitulates phosphorylation during development.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Goedert M; Jakes R; Crowther RA; Six J; Lübke U; Vandermeeren M; Cras P; Trojanowski JQ; Lee VM

    1993-06-01

    Tau is a neuronal phosphoprotein whose expression is developmentally regulated. A single tau isoform is expressed in fetal human brain but six isoforms are expressed in adult brain, with the fetal isoform corresponding to the shortest of the adult isoforms. Phosphorylation of tau is also developmentally regulated, as fetal tau is phosphorylated at more sites than adult tau. In Alzheimer disease, the six adult tau isoforms become abnormally phosphorylated and form the paired helical filament, the major fibrous component of the characteristic neurofibrillary lesions. We show here that Ser-202 (in the numbering of the longest human brain tau isoform) is a phosphorylation site that distinguishes fetal from adult tau and we identify it as one of the abnormal phosphorylation sites in Alzheimer disease. The abnormal phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 in Alzheimer disease thus recapitulates normal phosphorylation during development.

  14. Evidence for the appearance of atmospheric tau neutrinos in super-Kamiokande.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Marti, Ll; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueno, K; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Labarga, L; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T M; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Lopez, G D; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Yokoyama, M; Totsuka, Y; Martens, K; Schuemann, J; Vagins, M R; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E; Wilkes, R J

    2013-05-01

    Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data were fit with an unbinned maximum likelihood method to search for the appearance of tau leptons resulting from the interactions of oscillation-generated tau neutrinos in the detector. Relative to the expectation of unity, the tau normalization is found to be 1.42 0.35(stat)(-0.12)(+0.14)(syst) excluding the no-tau-appearance hypothesis, for which the normalization would be zero, at the 3.8? level. We estimate that 180.1 44.3(stat)(-15.2)(+17.8) (syst) tau leptons were produced in the 22.5 kton fiducial volume of the detector by tau neutrinos during the 2806 day running period. In future analyses, this large sample of selected tau events will allow the study of charged current tau neutrino interaction physics with oscillation produced tau neutrinos. PMID:23683190

  15. Developing Therapeutic Approaches to Tau, Selected Kinases, and Related Neuronal Protein Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Brunden, Kurt R.; Hutton, Michael; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2011-01-01

    A hallmark of the Alzheimer disease (AD) brain is the presence of inclusions within neurons that are comprised of fibrils formed from the microtubule-stabilizing protein tau. The formation of misfolded multimeric tau species is believed to contribute to the progressive neuron loss and cognitive impairments of AD. Moreover, mutations in tau have been shown to cause a form of frontotemporal lobar degeneration in which tau neuronal inclusions observed in the brain are similar to those seen in AD. Here we review the more compelling strategies that are designed to reduce the contribution of misfolded tau to AD neuropathology, including those directed at correcting a possible loss of tau function resulting from sequestration of cellular tau and to minimizing possible gain-of-function toxicities caused by multimeric tau species. Finally, we discuss the challenges and potential benefits of tau-directed drug discovery programs. PMID:22229117

  16. Critical Role of Acetylation in Tau-Mediated Neurodegeneration and Cognitive Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Won; Chen, Xu; Tracy, Tara E; Li, Yaqiao; Zhou, Yungui; Wang, Chao; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Minami, S. Sakura; Defensor, Erwin; Mok, Sue Ann; Sohn, Peter Dongmin; Schilling, Birgit; Cong, Xin; Ellerby, Lisa; Gibson, Bradford W.; Johnson, Jeffrey; Krogan, Nevan; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Gestwicki, Jason; Masliah, Eliezer; Verdin, Eric; Gan, Li

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), are neurodegenerative diseases in which tau fibrils accumulate. Recent evidence supports soluble tau species as the major toxic species. How soluble tau accumulates and how it causes neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we identified tau acetylation at K174 as an early change in AD brains and as a critical determinant in tau homeostasis and toxicity in mice. An acetyl-mimicking mutant (K174Q) slows down tau turnover and induces cognitive deficits in vivo. The acetyltransferase p300-induced tau acetylation is inhibited by a prescription drug salsalate/salicylate, which enhances tau turnover and reduces tau levels. In the PS19 transgenic mouse model of FTD, administering salsalate after disease onset inhibited p300 activity, lowered ac-K174 and total tau levels, rescued tau-induced memory deficits and prevented hippocampal atrophy. The tau-lowering and protective effects of salsalate/salicylate are diminished in neurons expressing K174Q tau. Targeting tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy against human tauopathies. PMID:26390242

  17. Proteasome Inhibition Drives HDAC6-Dependent Recruitment of Tau to Aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Chris R.

    2011-01-01

    Lesions containing aggregated and hyperphosphorylated tau protein are characteristic of neurodegenerative tauopathies. We have developed a cellular model of pathological tau deposition and clearance by overexpressing wild type human tau in HEK293 cells. When proteasome activity is inhibited, HEK293/tau cells accumulate tau protein in structures that bear many of the hallmarks of aggresomes. These include recruitment of tau into large spherical inclusions, accumulation of the retrograde motor protein dynein at the centrosome, formation of an intermediate filament cage around inclusions, and clustering of mitochondria at the aggresome. Tau aggresomes form rapidly and can be cleared upon relief of proteasome inhibition. We observe recruitment of pathological misfolded phospho-tau species to aggresomes. Immunoblotting reveals accumulation of detergent insoluble aggregated tau species. Knockdown of histone deacetylase 6, a protein known to interact with tau, reveals a requirement for HDAC6 activity in tau aggresome formation. Direct observation of the accumulation and clearance of abnormal tau species will allow us to dissect the cellular and molecular mechanisms at work in clearing aggresomal tau and its similarity to disease relevant pathological tau clearance mechanisms. PMID:21340680

  18. Alzheimer’s disease imaging with a novel Tau targeted near infrared ratiometric probe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye-Yeong; Sengupta, Urmi; Shao, Pin; Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Kayed, Rakez; Bai, Mingfeng

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) have long been recognized as one of the pathological hallmarks in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recent studies, however, showed that soluble aggregated Tau species, especially hyperphosphorylated Tau oligomers, which are formed at early stage of AD prior to the formation of NFT, disrupted neural system integration. Unfortunately, little is known about Tau aggregates, and few Tau targeted imaging probe has been reported. Successful development of new imaging methods that can visualize early stages of Tau aggregation specifically will obviously be important for AD imaging, as well as understanding Tau-associated neuropathology of AD. Here, we report the first NIR ratiometric probe, CyDPA2, that targets Tau aggregates. The specificity of CyPDA2 to aggregated Tau was evaluated with in vitro hyperphosphorylated Tau proteins (pTau), as well as ex vivo Tau samples from AD human brain samples and the tauopathy transgenic mouse model, P301L. The characteristic enhancements of absorption ratio and fluorescence intensity in CyDPA2 were observed in a pTau concentration-dependent manner. In addition, fluorescence microscopy and gel staining studies demonstrated CyDPA2-labeled Tau aggregates. These data indicate that CyDPA2 is a promising imaging probe for studying Tau pathology and diagnosing AD at an early stage. PMID:23526074

  19. Molecular Mechanism of Pin1-Tau Recognition and Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Eichner, Timo; Kutter, Steffen; Labeikovsky, Wladimir; Buosi, Vanessa; Kern, Dorothee

    2016-05-01

    Human peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) Pin1 plays key roles in developmental processes, cell proliferation, and neuronal function. Extensive phosphorylation of the microtubule binding protein tau has been implicated in neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease. For the past 15years, these two players have been the focus of an enormous research effort to unravel the biological relevance of their interplay in health and disease, resulting in a series of proposed molecular mechanism of how Pin1 catalysis of tau results in biological phenotypes. Our results presented here refute these mechanisms of Pin1 action. Using NMR, isothermal calorimetry (ITC), and small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), we dissect binding and catalysis on multiple phosphorylated tau with particular emphasis toward the Alzheimer's associated AT180 tau epitope containing phosphorylated THR231 and SER235. We find that phosphorylated (p-) SER235-PRO, but not pTHR231-PRO, is exclusively catalyzed by full-length Pin1 and isolated PPIase domain. Importantly, site-specific measurements of Pin1-catalysis of CDK2/CycA-phosphorylated full-length tau reveal a number of sites that are catalyzed simultaneously with different efficiencies. Furthermore, we show that the turnover efficiency at pSER235 by Pin1 is independent of both the WW domain and phosphorylation on THR231. Our mechanistic results on site-specific binding and catalysis together with the lack of an increase of dephosphorylation rates by PP2A counter a series of previously published models for the role of Pin1 catalysis of tau in Alzheimer's disease. Together, our data reemphasize the complicated scenario between binding and catalysis of multiple phosphorylated tau by Pin1 and the need for directly linking biological phenotypes and residue-specific turnover in Pin1 substrates. PMID:26996941

  20. Planet formation in multiple stellar systems: GG Tau A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Folco, E.; Dutrey, A.; Guilloteau, S.; Le Bouquin, J.-B.; Lacour, S.; Berger, J.-P.; Köhler, R.; Piétu, V.

    2014-12-01

    GG Tau is a hierarchical quadruple system of young, low-mass stars. Because of its well-studied bright circumbinary ring of dust and gas surrounding the main binary GG Tau A, it is a unique laboratory to study planet formation in the disturbed environment of binary/multiple stellar systems. We have started a large observing program of GG Tau A that combines several high-resolution instruments in a multi-wavelength approach. We have recently reported the detection of a new low-mass companion in GG Tau A that turns out to itself be a triple system. This discovery was possible thanks to the very high angular resolution of the near-IR instrument PIONIER on the VLT interferometer, and was confirmed with sub-aperture masking techniques on VLT/NaCo. The detected close binary GG Tau Ab (ρ = 0.032'', or about 5 AU) provides a natural explanation for two enigmas: the discrepancy between the dynamical mass and the spectral type estimates in GG Tau A, and the absence of dust thermal emission in the vicinity of the Ab component. GRAVITY will provide the adequate angular resolution to complete the astrometric characterization of the close binary in the next 10 years. With now 5 coeval low-mass stars, GG Tau is an ideal laboratory to calibrate stellar evolution tracks at young ages (few Myr). Beyond this peculiar system, GRAVITY also has a strong potential to study the impact of multiplicity on the existence of disks, and in fine on planet formation mechanisms in multiple systems.

  1. Elevated levels of soluble total and hyperphosphorylated tau result in early behavioral deficits and distinct changes in brain pathology in a new tau transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Flunkert, S; Hierzer, M; Lffler, T; Rabl, R; Neddens, J; Duller, S; Schofield, E L; Ward, M A; Posch, M; Jungwirth, H; Windisch, M; Hutter-Paier, B

    2013-01-01

    Tauopathies, characterized by hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein, include frontotemporal dementias and Alzheimer's disease. To explore disease mechanisms and investigate potential treatments, we generated a transgenic (tg) mouse line overexpressing human tau441 with V337M and R406W mutations. Biochemical characterization of these TMHT (Thy-1 mutated human tau) mice showed a significant increase in human transgene expression relative to endogenous murine tau by Western blot and multi-array immunosorbent assay. Only soluble total tau and phosphorylated tau (ptau at residue Thr(181), Ser(199), Thr(231) and Thr(235)), but not insoluble total tau and ptau were increased. Application of the Phospho-Tau SRM assay revealed that phosphorylation at Ser(396) and Ser(404) in soluble tau in the presence of the R406W mutation was at baseline levels in the cortex of TMHT mice compared to non-tg littermates. Histological analyses showed a progressive increase in human tau protein in the amygdala over age, while hippocampal tau levels remained constant from 2 months onwards. Behavioral testing of TMHT mice in the Morris water maze revealed a distinct progressive spatial learning impairment starting already at 5 months of age. Furthermore, we showed that the TMHT mice have early olfactory deficits. These impairments are unbiased by any motor disturbance or lack of motivation. Our results prove that combination of the V337M and R406W mutations of tau accelerates human tau phosphorylation and induces tau pathology as well as cognitive deficits, making this model a suitable tool for basic research on tau as well as in vivo drug testing. PMID:22797329

  2. Difference between the tau protein of Alzheimer paired helical filament core and normal tau revealed by epitope analysis of monoclonal antibodies 423 and 7.51.

    PubMed Central

    Novak, M; Jakes, R; Edwards, P C; Milstein, C; Wischik, C M

    1991-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau that is incorporated into paired helical filaments (PHFs) undergoes some form of aberrant posttranslational processing in Alzheimer disease. Difficulties in deciding which changes are critical for PHF formation stem in part from the lack of immunochemical markers specific for PHF tau. The only monoclonal antibody (mAb) that is known to react with PHF tau but not with the predominant normal adult tau species is mAb 423. Another mAb (7.51, described in this paper) recognizes a segment of tau that is included in the minimal recognition unit required by mAb 423. Unlike 423, which is PHF tau-specific, mAb 7.51 recognizes all PHF core-derived tau as well as native soluble tau and recombinant tau expressed in bacteria and so serves as a generic tau marker. Both epitopes are in the 12-kDa fragment released from the Pronase-resistant core of the PHF (which encompasses the tandem repeat region). The mAb 7.51 epitope requires segments located in the last two repeats, which are common to all tau isoforms. The mAb 423 epitope requires sequences located near both the N and the C terminus of the 12-kDa fragment common to three- and four-repeat tau isoforms. Fragments denatured by concentrated formic acid and SDS regain 423 reactivity when denaturing agents are removed. Since the primary amino acid sequences of PHF tau and normal tau are identical in the repeat region, we conclude that 423 reactivity also requires a modification(s) occurring within an approximately 90-residue segment that are not present in tau proteins so far described in the human brain. Images PMID:1712107

  3. A search for the production of the final states. tau. sup +. tau. sup minus e sup + e sup minus ,. tau. sup +. tau. sup minus. mu. sup +. mu. sup minus , and. tau. sup +. tau. sup minus. pi. sup +. pi. sup minus in e sup + e sup minus collisions at radical s = 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    We have searched for the reaction e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar f}f, where f is either an electron, muon, or charged pion, at {radical}s = 29 GeV using the Mark 2 detector at the PEP storage ring. One candidate event is found while 2.3 events are expected from known processes. We would expect to see 11 events if the cross-section for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}{bar f}f at {radical}s = 29 GeV were enhanced by the factor of 4.7 which the ALEPH collaboration reports for {radical}s = 91 GeV. we also look for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{bar f}f and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} {bar f}f, and for e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}} {gamma} using a similar analysis procedure and see the number of events predicted by the standard model. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of tau protein microtubule-binding motifs in complex with Tau5 and DC25 antibody Fab fragments

    PubMed Central

    Cehlar, Ondrej; Skrabana, Rostislav; Kovac, Andrej; Kovacech, Branislav; Novak, Michal

    2012-01-01

    The Alzheimers disease-associated protein tau is an intrinsically disordered protein with no preferred structure in solution. Under physiological conditions, tau binds to microtubules and regulates their dynamics, whereas during the development of neurodegeneration tau dissociates from microtubules, misfolds and creates highly insoluble deposits. To elucidate the determinants of tau-protein misfolding, tau peptides from microtubule-binding motifs were crystallized in complexes with Fab fragments of specific monoclonal antibodies. The crystals diffracted to 1.69? resolution and gave complete data sets using a synchrotron X-ray source. Molecular replacement was used to solve the phase problem. PMID:23027743

  5. Remodeling of the conformational ensemble of the repeat domain of tau by an aggregation enhancer.

    PubMed

    Akoury, Elias; Mukrasch, Marco D; Biernat, Jacek; Tepper, Katharina; Ozenne, Valery; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Blackledge, Martin; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Misfolding of the microtubule-associated protein Tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders. Because of the dynamic nature of the Tau protein, little is known about the changes in Tau structure that occur during misfolding. Here we studied the structural consequences upon binding of the repeat domain of Tau, which plays a key role in pathogenic aggregation, to an aggregation enhancer. By combining NMR experiments with molecular simulations we show that binding of the aggregation enhancer polyglutamic acid remodels the conformational ensemble of Tau. Our study thus provides insight into an early event during misfolding of Tau. PMID:26940799

  6. Tau Phosphorylation at Serine 396 Residue Is Required for Hippocampal LTD

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Philip; Piers, Thomas; Yi, Jee-Hyun; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Huh, Seonghoo; Park, Se Jin; Ryu, Jong Hoon; Whitcomb, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Tau is required for the induction of long-term depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Here we probe the role of tau in LTD, finding that an AMPA receptor internalization mechanism is impaired in tau KO mice, and that LTD causes specific phosphorylation at the serine 396 and 404 residues of tau. Surprisingly, we find that phosphorylation at serine 396, specifically, is critical for LTD but has no role in LTP. Finally, we show that tau KO mice exhibit deficits in spatial reversal learning. These findings underscore the physiological role for tau at the synapse and identify a behavioral correlate of its role in LTD. PMID:25810511

  7. Mutation-specific functional impairments in distinct tau isoforms of hereditary FTDP-17.

    PubMed

    Hong, M; Zhukareva, V; Vogelsberg-Ragaglia, V; Wszolek, Z; Reed, L; Miller, B I; Geschwind, D H; Bird, T D; McKeel, D; Goate, A; Morris, J C; Wilhelmsen, K C; Schellenberg, G D; Trojanowski, J Q; Lee, V M

    1998-12-01

    Tau proteins aggregate as cytoplasmic inclusions in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and hereditary frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). Over 10 exonic and intronic mutations in the tau gene have been identified in about 20 FTDP-17 families. Analyses of soluble and insoluble tau proteins from brains of FTDP-17 patients indicated that different pathogenic mutations differentially altered distinct biochemical properties and stoichiometry of brain tau isoforms. Functional assays of recombinant tau proteins with different FTDP-17 missense mutations implicated all but one of these mutations in disease pathogenesis by reducing the ability of tau to bind microtubules and promote microtubule assembly. PMID:9836646

  8. Epitope mapping and structural basis for the recognition of phosphorylated tau by the anti-tau antibody AT8.

    PubMed

    Malia, Thomas J; Teplyakov, Alexey; Ernst, Robin; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Lacy, Eilyn R; Liu, Xuesong; Vandermeeren, Marc; Mercken, Marc; Luo, Jinquan; Sweet, Raymond W; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-04-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau becomes abnormally phosphorylated in Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies and forms aggregates of paired helical filaments (PHF-tau). AT8 is a PHF-tau-specific monoclonal antibody that is a commonly used marker of neuropathology because of its recognition of abnormally phosphorylated tau. Previous reports described the AT8 epitope to include pS202/pT205. Our studies support and extend previous findings by also identifying pS208 as part of the binding epitope. We characterized the phosphoepitope of AT8 through both peptide binding studies and costructures with phosphopeptides. From the cocrystal structure of AT8 Fab with the diphosphorylated (pS202/pT205) peptide, it appeared that an additional phosphorylation at S208 would also be accommodated by AT8. Phosphopeptide binding studies showed that AT8 bound to the triply phosphorylated tau peptide (pS202/pT205/pS208) 30-fold stronger than to the pS202/pT205 peptide, supporting the role of pS208 in AT8 recognition. We also show that the binding kinetics of the triply phosphorylated peptide pS202/pT205/pS208 was remarkably similar to that of PHF-tau. The costructure of AT8 Fab with a pS202/pT205/pS208 peptide shows that the interaction interface involves all six CDRs and tau residues 202-209. All three phosphorylation sites are recognized by AT8, with pT205 acting as the anchor. Crystallization of the Fab/peptide complex under acidic conditions shows that CDR-L2 is prone to unfolding and precludes peptide binding, and may suggest a general instability in the antibody. Proteins 2016; 84:427-434. © 2016 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26800003

  9. Evidence for an intermediate in tau filament formation.

    PubMed

    Chirita, Carmen N; Kuret, Jeff

    2004-02-17

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule-associated protein tau. In vitro, fibrillization of full-length, unphosphorylated recombinant tau can be induced under near-physiological conditions by treatment with various agents, including anionic surfactants. Here we examine the pathway through which anionic surfactants promote tau fibrillization using a combination of electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. Protein and surfactant first interacted in solution to form micelles, which then provided negatively charged surfaces that accumulated tau aggregates. Surface aggregation of tau protein was followed by the time-dependent appearance of a thioflavin S reactive intermediate that accumulated over a period of hours. The intermediate was unstable in the absence of anionic surfaces, suggesting it was not filamentous. Fibrillization proceeded after intermediate formation with classic nucleation-dependent kinetics, consisting of lag phase followed by the exponential increase in filament lengths, followed by an equilibrium phase reached in approximately 24 h. The pathway did not require protein insertion into the micelle hydrophobic core or conformational change arising from mixed micelle formation, because anionic microspheres constructed from impermeable polystyrene were capable of qualitatively reproducing all aspects of the fibrillization reaction. It is proposed that the progression from amorphous aggregation through intermediate formation and fibrillization may underlie the activity of other inducers such as hyperphosphorylation and may be operative in vivo. PMID:14769048

  10. Structure-activity relationship of cyanine tau aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Edward; Congdon, Erin E.; Honson, Nicolette S.; Duff, Karen E.; Kuret, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    A structure-activity relationship for symmetrical cyanine inhibitors of human tau aggregation was elaborated using a filter trap assay. Antagonist activity depended on cyanine heterocycle, polymethine bridge length, and the nature of meso- and N-substituents. One potent member of the series, 3,3’-diethyl-9-methylthiacarbocyanine iodide (compound 11), retained submicromolar potency and had calculated physical properties consistent with blood-brain barrier and cell membrane penetration. Exposure of organotypic slices prepared from JNPL3 transgenic mice (which express human tau harboring the aggregation prone P301L tauopathy mutation) to compound 11 for one week revealed a biphasic dose response relationship. Low nanomolar concentrations decreased insoluble tau aggregates to half those observed in slices treated with vehicle alone. In contrast, high concentrations (≥300 nM) augmented tau aggregation and produced abnormalities in tissue tubulin levels. These data suggest that certain symmetrical carbocyanine dyes can modulate tau aggregation in the slice biological model at concentrations well below those associated with toxicity. PMID:19432420

  11. Tau aggregation and toxicity in tauopathic neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Honson, Nicolette S.; Kuret, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Since its discovery as a structural component of neurofibrillary lesions of Alzheimer's disease more than twenty years ago, tau protein has been implicated in the cascade of events associated with neurodegeneration. Specifically, the “tau hypothesis” posits that misfunction of tau, which occurs in response to unknown stimuli, results in its intracellular assembly into filaments that eventually prove toxic to the cells that produce them. The tau hypothesis is supported by numerous neuropathological and genetic observations of authentic human disease cases. However, experiments designed to study aggregate toxicity in biological models suggest that some aggregate species may be inert or could potentially serve a neuroprotective function. Distinguishing these possibilities experimentally has been complicated by currently available biological models, which do not fully recapitulate aggregation conditions seen in disease. Additional model systems which better approximate physiological conditions may help elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in aggregation associated toxicity. Here we examine the accumulated evidence linking aggregation and neurodegeneration, and experimental approaches to the problem of tau aggregation-mediated toxicity. PMID:18688092

  12. Oligomer Formation of Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylated in Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Katharina; Biernat, Jacek; Kumar, Satish; Wegmann, Susanne; Timm, Thomas; Hübschmann, Sabrina; Redecke, Lars; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Müller, Daniel J.; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation (“hyperphosphorylation”) and aggregation of Tau protein are hallmarks of Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies, but their causative connection is still a matter of debate. Tau with Alzheimer-like phosphorylation is also present in hibernating animals, mitosis, or during embryonic development, without leading to pathophysiology or neurodegeneration. Thus, the role of phosphorylation and the distinction between physiological and pathological phosphorylation needs to be further refined. So far, the systematic investigation of highly phosphorylated Tau was difficult because a reliable method of preparing reproducible quantities was not available. Here, we generated full-length Tau (2N4R) in Sf9 cells in a well defined phosphorylation state containing up to ∼20 phosphates as judged by mass spectrometry and Western blotting with phospho-specific antibodies. Despite the high concentration in living Sf9 cells (estimated ∼230 μm) and high phosphorylation, the protein was not aggregated. However, after purification, the highly phosphorylated protein readily formed oligomers, whereas fibrils were observed only rarely. Exposure of mature primary neuronal cultures to oligomeric phospho-Tau caused reduction of spine density on dendrites but did not change the overall cell viability. PMID:25339173

  13. Oligomerization of the protein tau in the Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the microtubule associated protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically disordered protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules, which are an essential component of the cytoskeleton of the axon. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats that are critical for aggregation as well. In this study, we focus on the aggregation propensity of different segments of the microtubule binding region as well as post-translational modifications that can alter tau dynamics and structure. We have performed replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the ensemble of conformations of the monomer and small oligomers as well as how these structures are stabilized or destabilized by mutations and post-translational modifications.

  14. Tau Based Therapeutic Approaches for Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Boutajangout, Allal; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of aggregated, hyperphosphorylated tau as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and neuropil threads (NT) are cardinal features of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The other lesions found in AD include amyloid plaques and congophilic amyloid angiopathy, both associated with the extracellular accumulation of the amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. AD is the most common cause of dementia globally. Currently there are no effective means to treat AD or even to slow it down. The dominant theory for the causation of AD is the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which suggests that the aggregation of Aβ as oligomers and amyloid plaques is central to the pathogenesis of AD. Numerous therapies have been developed directed to Aβ relate pathology, in particular various immunotherapeutic approaches. So far all of these have failed in clinical trials. Recently there has been more focus on therapy directed to tau related pathology, which correlates better with the cognitive status of patients, compared to the amyloid burden. Immunotherapeutic targeting of tau pathology has showed great potential to treat tau pathologies in mouse models of AD. A number of studies have shown the efficacy of both passive and active immunization. This review summarizes recent advances on therapy targeting pathological tau protein, in particular focusing on immunotherapeutic approaches which are showing great promise. PMID:24732638

  15. P70 S6 kinase mediates tau phosphorylation and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jin-Jing; An, Wen-Lin; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Nishimura, Takeshi; Norberg, Jan; Benedikz, Eirikur; Götz, Jürgen; Winblad, Bengt

    2006-01-01

    Currently, we found that the 70-kDa p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) directly phosphorylates tau at S262, S214, and T212 sites in vitro. By immunoprecipitation, p-p70S6K (T421/S424) showed a close association with p-tau (S262 and S396/404). Zinc-induced p70S6K activation could only upregulate translation of total S6 and tau but not global proteins in SH-SY5Y cells. The requirement of p70S6K activation was confirmed in the SH-SY5Y cells that overexpress wild-type htau40. Level of p-p70S6K (T421/S424) was only significantly correlated with p-tau at S262, S214, and T212, but not T212/S214, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. These suggested that p70S6K might contribute to tau related pathologies in AD brains. PMID:16364302

  16. Multiple-motor based transport and its regulation by Tau.

    PubMed

    Vershinin, Michael; Carter, Brian C; Razafsky, David S; King, Stephen J; Gross, Steven P

    2007-01-01

    Motor-based intracellular transport and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of a cell. Disruption of transport is linked to Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. However, many fundamental aspects of transport are poorly understood. An important issue is how cells achieve and regulate efficient long-distance transport. Mounting evidence suggests that many in vivo cargoes are transported along microtubules by more than one motor, but we do not know how multiple motors work together or can be regulated. Here we first show that multiple kinesin motors, working in conjunction, can achieve very long distance transport and apply significantly larger forces without the need of additional factors. We then demonstrate in vitro that the important microtubule-associated protein, tau, regulates the number of engaged kinesin motors per cargo via its local concentration on microtubules. This function of tau provides a previously unappreciated mechanism to regulate transport. By reducing motor reattachment rates, tau affects cargo travel distance, motive force, and cargo dispersal. We also show that different isoforms of tau, at concentrations similar to those in cells, have dramatically different potency. These results provide a well defined mechanism for how altered tau isoform levels could impair transport and thereby lead to neurodegeneration without the need of any other pathway. PMID:17190808

  17. Tau and Caspase 3 as Targets for Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Idan-Feldman, Anat; Ostritsky, Regina; Gozes, Illana

    2012-01-01

    The peptide drug candidate NAP (davunetide) has demonstrated protective effects in various in vivo and in vitro models of neurodegeneration. NAP was shown to reduce tau hyperphosphorylation as well as to prevent caspase-3 activation and cytochrome-3 release from mitochondria, both characteristic of apoptotic cell death. Recent studies suggest that caspases may play a role in tau pathology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of NAP on tau hyperphosphorylation and caspase activity in the same biological system. Our experimental setup used primary neuronal cultures subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), with and without NAP or caspase inhibitor. Cell viability was assessed by measuring mitochondrial activity (MTS assay), and immunoblots were used for analyzing protein level. It was shown that apoptosis was responsible for all cell death occurring following ischemia, and NAP treatment showed a concentration-dependent protection from cell death. Ischemia caused an increase in the levels of active caspase-3 and hyperphosphorylated tau, both of which were prevented by either NAP or caspase-inhibitor treatment. Our data suggest that, in this model system, caspase activation may be an upstream event to tau hyperphosphorylation, although additional studies will be required to fully elucidate the cascade of events. PMID:22693678

  18. Identification of structural determinants on tau protein essential for its pathological function: novel therapeutic target for tau immunotherapy in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pathologically modified tau protein is the main feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Therefore, immunotherapies that target mis-disordered tau represent a promising avenue for the disease-modifying treatment of AD. In this report, we present our discovery of (1) a novel target for tau immunotherapy; (2) monoclonal antibody DC8E8, which neutralizes this target; and (3) the results of efficacy studies of DC8E8 in a murine model of tauopathy. Methods In vitro tau oligomerisation assays were used for the selection of antibodies. The therapeutic efficacy of DC8E8 was evaluated in transgenic mice. The structure of the DC8E8 epitope was determined by X-ray crystallography. Results Screening of a panel of monoclonal antibodies for their inhibitory activity in an in vitro pathological tau–tau interaction assay yielded DC8E8, which reduced the amount of oligomeric tau by 84%. DC8E8 recognised all developmental stages of tau pathology in AD human brains, including pretangles and intra- and extracellular tangles. Treatment with DC8E8 in a mouse AD model expressing mis-disordered human tau significantly reduced the amount of insoluble oligomerised tau and the number of early and mature neurofibrillary tangles in the transgenic mouse brains. By using a panel of tau-derived peptides in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we identified the tau domain essential for pathological tau–tau interaction, which is targeted by DC8E8. The antibody was capable of binding to four highly homologous and yet independent binding regions on tau, each of which is a separate epitope. The X-ray structure of the DC8E8 Fab apo form, solved at 3.0 Å, suggested that the four DC8E8 epitopes form protruding structures on the tau molecule. Finally, by kinetic measurements with surface plasmon resonance, we determined that antibody DC8E8 is highly discriminatory between pathological and physiological tau. Conclusions We have discovered defined determinants on mis-disordered truncated tau protein which are responsible for tau oligomerisation leading to neurofibrillary degeneration. Antibody DC8E8 reactive with these determinants is able to inhibit tau–tau interaction in vitro and in vivo. DC8E8 is able to discriminate between the healthy and diseased tau proteome, making its epitopes suitable targets, and DC8E8 a suitable candidate molecule, for AD immunotherapy. PMID:25478018

  19. Prion-like properties of Tau protein: the importance of extracellular Tau as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Brandon B; Diamond, Marc I

    2014-07-18

    Work over the past 4 years indicates that multiple proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases, especially Tau and α-synuclein, can propagate aggregates between cells in a prion-like manner. This means that once an aggregate is formed it can escape the cell of origin, contact a connected cell, enter the cell, and induce further aggregation via templated conformational change. The prion model predicts a key role for extracellular protein aggregates in mediating progression of disease. This suggests new therapeutic approaches based on blocking neuronal uptake of protein aggregates and promoting their clearance. This will likely include therapeutic antibodies or small molecules, both of which can be developed and optimized in vitro prior to preclinical studies. PMID:24860099

  20. Sustained high levels of neuroprotective, high molecular weight, phosphorylated tau in the longest-lived rodent

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Miranda E.; Garbarino, Valentina R.; Salinas, Angelica; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Tau protein is primarily expressed in neuronal axons and modulates microtubule stability. Tau phosphorylation, aggregation and subcellular mislocalization coincide with neurodegeneration in numerous diseases, including Alzheimer's disease [AD]. During AD pathogenesis, tau misprocessing accompanies Aß accumulation; however, AD animal models, despite elevated Aß, fail to develop tauopathy. To assess whether lack of tau pathology is linked to short lifespan common to most AD models, we examined tau processing in extraordinarily long-lived, mouse-sized naked mole-rats (NMR; ~32 years), which express appreciable levels of Aß throughout life. NMRs, like other mammals, displayed highest tau phosphorylation during brain development. While tau phosphorylation decreased with aging, unexpectedly adult NMRs had higher levels than transgenic mice overexpressing mutant human tau. However, in sharp contrast with the somatodendritic accumulation of misprocessed tau in the transgenic mice, NMRs maintain axonal tau localization. Intriguingly, the adult NMR tau protein is 88kDa, much larger than 45-68kDa tau expressed in other mammals. We propose that this 88kDa tau protein may offer exceptional microtubule stability and neuroprotection against lifelong elevated Aß. PMID:25576082

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy characterization of interaction of Tau with DNA and its regulation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Haoling; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Benhelli-Mokrani, Houda; Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Buée, Luc; Lippens, Guy; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Galas, Marie-Christine; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2015-02-24

    The capacity of endogenous Tau to bind DNA has been recently identified in neurons under physiological or oxidative stress conditions. Characterization of the protein domains involved in Tau-DNA complex formation is an essential