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Sample records for tbc failure mechanisms

  1. TBC-Domain GAPs for Rab GTPases Accelerate GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Finger Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Pan,X.; Eathiraj, S.; Lambright, D.

    2006-01-01

    Rab GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by cycling between inactive (GDP-bound) and active (GTP-bound) conformations. The duration of the active state is limited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate the slow intrinsic rate of GTP hydrolysis. Proteins containing TBC (Tre-2, Bub2 and Cdc16) domains are broadly conserved in eukaryotic organisms and function as GAPs for Rab GTPases as well as GTPases that control cytokinesis. An exposed arginine residue is a critical determinant of GAP activity in vitro and in vivo. It has been expected that the catalytic mechanism of TBC domains would parallel that of Ras and Rho family GAPs. Here we report crystallographic, mutational and functional analyses of complexes between Rab GTPases and the TBC domain of Gyp1p. In the crystal structure of a TBC-domain-Rab-GTPase-aluminium fluoride complex, which approximates the transition-state intermediate for GTP hydrolysis, the TBC domain supplies two catalytic residues in trans, an arginine finger analogous to Ras/Rho family GAPs and a glutamine finger that substitutes for the glutamine in the DxxGQ motif of the GTPase. The glutamine from the Rab GTPase does not stabilize the transition state as expected but instead interacts with the TBC domain. Strong conservation of both catalytic fingers indicates that most TBC-domain GAPs may accelerate GTP hydrolysis by a similar dual-finger mechanism.

  2. Scale Adhesion, Sulfur Content, and TBC Failure on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2002-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main effects of sulfur impurity content on the cyclic oxidation resistance of single crystal superalloys, with emphasis on scale and TBC adhesion. Eleven hundred degrees C cyclic oxidation of PWA 1480 produces scale spallation leading to a weight loss of more than 30 Mg/sq cm after 500 one-hr cycles for a sulfur content of 6 ppmw. The sulfur content was reduced to levels below 0.1 ppmw by hydrogen annealing, resulting in weight gains of only 0.5 to 1.0 Mg/sq cm after 1000 one-hr cycles. Samples were produced with various sulfur contents by adjusting the annealing temperature, time, and sample thickness (i.e., diffusion product Dt/L(exp 2)). The subsequent cyclic oxidation behavior, mapped over a sulfur content/thickness diagram, shows a transition to adherent behavior at sulfur levels equivalent to 1 monolayer of total segregation. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Failure mechanisms in MEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2003-07-01

    MEMS components by their very nature have different and unique failure mechanisms than their macroscopic counterparts. This paper discusses failure mechanisms observed in various MEMS components and technologies. MEMS devices fabricated using bulk and surface micromachining process technologies are emphasized. MEMS devices offer uniqueness in their application, fabrication, and functionality. Their uniqueness creates various failure mechanisms not typically found in their bulk or IC counterparts. In ICs, electrical precautions are taken to mitigate failure. In MEMS, both electrical and mechanical precautions must be enacted to reduce the risk of failure and increased reliability. Unlike ICs, many MEMS components are designed to interact with their environment, making the fabrication, testing, and packaging processes critical for the success of the device.

  4. Fracture Mechanics and Failure Analysis

    E-print Network

    New South Wales, University of

    and brittle failure mechanisms 12 Cyclic fatigue failure mechanism 13 Stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement, fracture criteria in design, fracture assisted crack growth. Assignment2 Linear Elastic Analysis Airy stress function, crack tip stresses, finite

  5. Thermo-mechanical Fatigue Failure of Thermal Barrier Coated Superalloy Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Rajivgandhi; Mori, Yuzuru; Yamagishi, Satoshi; Okazaki, Masakazu

    2015-09-01

    Failure behavior of thermal barrier coated (TBC) Ni-based superalloy specimens were studied from the aspect of the effect of bond coat material behavior on low cycle fatigue (LCF) and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) at various temperatures and under various loading conditions. Initially, monotonic tensile tests were carried out on a MCrAlY alloy bond coat material in the temperature range of 298 K to 1273 K (25 °C to 1000 °C). Special attention was paid to understand the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Next, LCF and TMF tests were carried out on the thermal barrier coated Ni-based alloy IN738 specimen. After these tests, the specimens were sectioned to understand their failure mechanisms on the basis of DBTT of the bond coat material. Experimental results demonstrated that the LCF and TMF lives of the TBC specimen were closely related to the DBTT of the bond coat material, and also the TMF lives were different from those of LCF tests. It has also been observed that the crack density in the bond coat in the TBC specimen was significantly dependent on the test conditions. More importantly, not only the number of cracks but also the crack penetration probability into substrate were shown to be sensitive to the DBTT.

  6. Ubiquitination and degradation of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 is regulated by protein palmitoylation

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Chen; Lange, Jeffrey J.; Samovski, Dmitri; Su, Xiong; Liu, Jialiu; Sundaresan, Sinju; Stahl, Philip D.

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •Hominoid-specific oncogene TBC1D3 is targeted to plasma membrane by palmitoylation. •TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. •TBC1D3 palmitoylation governs growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. •Post-translational modifications may regulate oncogenic properties of TBC1D3. -- Abstract: Expression of the hominoid-specific oncoprotein TBC1D3 promotes enhanced cell growth and proliferation by increased activation of signal transduction through several growth factors. Recently we documented the role of CUL7 E3 ligase in growth factors-induced ubiquitination and degradation of TBC1D3. Here we expanded our study to discover additional molecular mechanisms that control TBC1D3 protein turnover. We report that TBC1D3 is palmitoylated on two cysteine residues: 318 and 325. The expression of double palmitoylation mutant TBC1D3:C318/325S resulted in protein mislocalization and enhanced growth factors-induced TBC1D3 degradation. Moreover, ubiquitination of TBC1D3 via CUL7 E3 ligase complex was increased by mutating the palmitoylation sites, suggesting that depalmitoylation of TBC1D3 makes the protein more available for ubiquitination and degradation. The results reported here provide novel insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern TBC1D3 protein degradation. Dysregulation of these mechanisms in vivo could potentially result in aberrant TBC1D3 expression and promote oncogenesis.

  7. Mechanisms of Heart Failure in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Ebong, Imo A.; Goff, David C.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Chen, Haiying; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and its prevalence continues to rise. Because obesity has been linked with heart failure, the increasing prevalence of obesity may presage further rise in heart failure in the future. Obesity-related factors are estimated to cause 11% of heart failure cases in men and 14% in women. Obesity may result in heart failure by inducing hemodynamic and myocardial changes that lead to cardiac dysfunction, or due to an increased predisposition to other heart failure risk factors. Direct cardiac lipotoxicity has been described where lipid accumulation in the heart results in cardiac dysfunction inexplicable of other heart failure risk factors. In this overview, we discussed various pathophysiological mechanisms that could lead to heart failure in obesity, including the molecular mechanisms underlying cardiac lipotoxicity. We defined the obesity paradox and enumerated various premises for the paradoxical associations observed in the relationship between obesity and heart failure. PMID:25434909

  8. The lustering of TBC-2

    SciTech Connect

    Diver, R.B.; Jones, S.; Robb, S.; Mahoney, A.R.

    1995-05-01

    Two test bed concentrators (TBCs) were designed to provide high-performance test beds for advanced solar receivers and converters. However, the second-surface silvered-glass mirror facets on the TBCs, which were originally manufactured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, have experienced severe silver corrosion. To restore reflectance, TBC-2 was refurbished with a lustering technique developed at Sandia National Laboratories. In the lustering technique, second-surface silvered thin-glass mirrors were applied over the corroded facets, thereby increasing the dish reflectivity and raising the available power of TBC-2 from approximately 70 to 78 kW{sub t}. Degradation of the original optical accuracy of the TBC facets was determined to be minimal. Lustering was chosen over facet replacement because of the lower cost, the anticipated improvement in corrosion resistance, and the shorter project duration. This report includes background information, details of the lustering process, and test results from TBC-2 characterization, both before and after lustering.

  9. Stresses and Cracking During Chromia-Spinel-NiO Cluster Formation in TBC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Robert; Gupta, Mohit; Broitman, Esteban; Jonnalagadda, Krishna Praveen; Nylén, Per; Lin Peng, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are used in gas turbines to reduce the temperatures in the underlying substrate. There are several mechanisms that may cause the TBC to fail; one of them is cracking in the coating interface due to extensive oxidation. In the present study, the role of so called chromia-spinel-NiO (CSN) clusters in TBC failure was studied. Such clusters have previously been found to be prone to cracking. Finite element modeling was performed on a CSN cluster to find out at which stage of its formation it cracks and what the driving mechanisms of cracking are. The geometry of a cluster was obtained from micrographs and modeled as close as possible. Nanoindentation was performed on the cluster to get the correct Young's moduli. The volumetric expansion associated with the formation of NiO was also included. It was found that the cracking of the CSN clusters is likely to occur during its last stage of formation as the last Ni-rich core oxidizes. Furthermore, it was shown that the volumetric expansion associated with the oxidation only plays a minor role and that the main reason for cracking is the high coefficient of thermal expansion of NiO.

  10. Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, Brian

    2014-09-30

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to provide thermal insulation for the hottest components in gas turbines. Zirconia stabilized with 7wt% yttria (7YSZ) is the most common ceramic top coat used for turbine blades. The 7YSZ coating can be degraded from the buildup of fly-ash deposits created in the power-generation process. Fly ash from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can result from coal-based syngas. TBCs are also exposed to harsh gas environments containing CO2, SO2, and steam. Degradation from the combined effects of fly ash and harsh gas atmospheres has the potential to severely limit TBC lifetimes. The main objective of this study was to use lab-scale testing to systematically elucidate the interplay between prototypical deposit chemistries (i.e., ash and its constituents, K2SO4, and FeS) and environmental oxidants (i.e., O2, H2O and CO2) on the degradation behavior of advanced TBC systems. Several mechanisms of early TBC failure were identified, as were the specific fly-ash constituents responsible for degradation. The reactivity of MCrAlY bondcoats used in TBC systems was also investigated. The specific roles of oxide and sulfate components were assessed, together with the complex interplay between gas composition, deposit chemistry and alloy reactivity. Bondcoat composition design strategies to mitigate corrosion were established, particularly with regard to controlling phase constitution and the amount of reactive elements the bondcoat contains in order to achieve optimal corrosion resistance.

  11. Field failure mechanisms for photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumas, L. N.; Shumka, A.

    1981-01-01

    Beginning in 1976, Department of Energy field centers have installed and monitored a number of field tests and application experiments using current state-of-the-art photovoltaic modules. On-site observations of module physical and electrical degradation, together with in-depth laboratory analysis of failed modules, permits an overall assessment of the nature and causes of early field failures. Data on failure rates are presented, and key failure mechanisms are analyzed with respect to origin, effect, and prospects for correction. It is concluded that all failure modes identified to date are avoidable or controllable through sound design and production practices.

  12. Modeling Different Failure Mechanisms in Metals 

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Liang

    2012-02-14

    . This work consists of three parts corresponding to three different failure mechanisms in metals, i.e., the localized necking in sheet metals, the bifurcation in bulk and sheet metals, and the ductile fracture induced by the void nucleation, growth...

  13. To the mechanisms of failure wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, G. I.; Bless, S. J.; Savinykh, A. S.; Razorenov, S. V.; Chen, T.; Rajendran, A.

    2008-11-01

    Results of shock-wave experiments with free and prestressed samples of K8 and K14 crown glasses are presented. Controlled confinement pressure on the specimen of around 200 MPa was provided by installing a shrink-fit metal sleeve on the lateral surface of the sample disk. Results of measurements of the free surface velocity histories show that prestressing leads to earlier stopping of the failure wave. Thus, the compressive transverse stress increases the failure threshold that is in agreement with existing criteria of compressive fracture. However, sensitivity of the failure threshold to the confinement stress value is not as high as it could be expected. Measurements of the refractive indexes for the particles from the failure wave zone of recovered glass samples have shown their small increase whereas no index change for particles from the residual zone was found. It has been concluded that irreversible densification makes essential contribution to the mechanism of failure of glasses.

  14. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form them.

  15. Sulfur and Moisture Effects on Alumina Scale and TBC Spallation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2007-01-01

    It has been well established that a few ppmw sulfur impurity may segregate to the interface of thermally grown alumina scales and the underlying substrate, resulting in bond degradation and premature spallation. This has been shown for NiAl and NiCrAl-based alloys, bare single crystal superalloys, or coated superalloys. The role of reactive elements (especially Y) has been to getter the sulfur in the bulk and preclude interfacial segregation. Pt additions are also very beneficial, however a similar thermodynamic explanation does not apply. The purpose of the present discussion is to highlight some observations of these effects on Rene'142, Rene'N5, PWA1480, and PWA1484. For PWA1480, we have mapped cyclic oxidation and spallation in terms of potential sulfur interfacial layers and found that a cumulative amount of about one monolayer is sufficient to degrade long term adhesion. Depending on substrate thickness, optimum performance occurs if sulfur is reduced below about 0.2-0.5 ppmw. This is accomplished in the laboratory by hydrogen annealing or commercially by melt-fluxing. Excellent 1150 C cyclic oxidation is thus demonstrated for desulfurized Rene'142, Rene'N5, and PWA1484. Alternatively, a series of N5 alloys provided by GE-AE have shown that as little as 15 ppmw of Y dopant was effective in providing remarkable scale adhesion. In support of a Y-S gettering mechanism, hydrogen annealing was unable to desulfurize these alloys from their initial level of 5 ppmw S. This impurity and critical doping level corresponds closely to YS or Y2S3 stoichiometry. In many cases, Y-doped alloys or alloys with marginal sulfur levels exhibit an oxidative sensitivity to the ambient humidity called Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS). After substantial scale growth, coupled with damage from repeated cycling, cold samples may spall after a period of time, breathing on them, or immersing them in water. While stress corrosion arguments may apply, we propose that the underlying cause is related to a hydrogen embrittlement reaction: Al alloy + 3 H2O = Al(OH)3 + 3H(+) + 3e(-). This mechanism is derived from an analogous moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement mechanism originally shown for Ni3Al and FeAl intermetallics. Consequently, a cathodic hydrogen charging technique was used to demonstrate that electrolytic de-scaling occurs for these otherwise adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped Rene'N5, in support of hydrogen effects. Finally, some TBC observations are discussed in light of all of the above. Plasma sprayed 8YSZ coatings, produced on PWA1484 without a bond coat, were found to survive more than 1000 1-hr cycles at 1100 C when desulfurized to below 0.1 ppmw. At higher sulfur (1.2 ppmw) levels, moisture sensitivity and delayed TBC failure, referred to as Desk Top Spallation, occurred at just 200 hr. Despite a large degree of scatter, a factor of 5 in life improvement is indicated for desulfurized samples in cyclic furnace tests, confirming the beneficial effect of low sulfur alloys on model TBC systems. (DTS and moisture effects are also observed on commercially applied PVD 7YSZ coatings on Rene'N5+Y with Pt-aluminide bond coats). These types of catastrophic failure were subverted on the model system by segmenting the substrate into a network of 0.010 high ribs, spaced in. apart, prior to plasma spraying. No failures occurred after 1000 cycles at 1150 C or after 2000 cycles at 1100 C, even after water immersion. The benefit is described in terms of elasticity models and a critical buckling stress.

  16. Generic failure mechanisms in adhesive bonds

    E-print Network

    Hass, Philipp; Niemz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The failure of adhesive bondlines has been studied at the microscopic level via tensile tests. Stable crack propagation could be generated by means of samples with improved geometry, which made in-situ observations possible. The interaction of cracks with adhesive bondlines under various angles to the crack propagation was the focus of this study as well as the respective loading situations for the adhesives UF, PUR, and PVAc, which have distinctly different mechanical behaviors. It is shown how adhesive properties influence the occurrence of certain failure mechanisms and determine their appearance and order of magnitude. With the observed failure mechanisms, it becomes possible to predict the propagation path of a crack through the specimen.

  17. Enigmatic Moisture Effects on Al2O3 Scale and TBC Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Alumina scale adhesion to high temperature alloys is known to be affected primarily by sulfur segregation and reactive element additions. However adherent scales can become partially compromised by excessive strain energy and cyclic cracking. With time, exposure of such scales to moisture can lead to spontaneous interfacial decohesion, occurring while the samples are maintained at ambient conditions. Examples of this Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS) are presented for NiCrAl and single crystal superalloys, becoming more severe with sulfur level and cyclic exposure conditions. Similarly, delayed failure or Desk Top Spallation (DTS) results are reviewed for TBC s, culminating in the water drop failure test. Both phenomena are discussed in terms of moisture effects on bulk alumina and bulk aluminides. A mechanism is proposed based on hydrogen embrittlement and is supported by a cathodic hydrogen charging experiment. Hydroxylation of aluminum from the alloy interface appears to be the relevant basic reaction.

  18. Basic failure mechanisms in advanced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullin, J. V.; Mazzio, V. F.; Mehan, R. L.

    1971-01-01

    Fundamental failure mechanisms in carbon-epoxy composites were studied for more reliable prediction of the performance of these materials. Single and multiple fiber specimens were tested under tensile loads, and the sequence of failure events was observed. Parameters such as resin crack sensitivity, fiber surface treatment and variations in fibers from batch to batch are being evaluated. The analysis of bulk composite fracture processes using acoustic emission techniques is being studied in order to correlate microscopic observations with bulk composite behavior. Control of the fracture process through matrix and interface modification is being attempted, and study of failure processes in composite/metal specimens is being conducted. Most of the studies involved DEN 438 epoxy novolac as the matrix, but some experiments are now underway using the higher temperature resin ERLA 4617.

  19. Role of failure-mechanism identification in accelerated testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. M.; Barker, D.; Dasgupta, A.; Arora, A.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerated life testing techniques provide a short-cut method to investigate the reliability of electronic devices with respect to certain dominant failure mechanisms that occur under normal operating conditions. However, accelerated tests have often been conducted without knowledge of the failure mechanisms and without ensuring that the test accelerated the same mechanism as that observed under normal operating conditions. This paper summarizes common failure mechanisms in electronic devices and packages and investigates possible failure mechanism shifting during accelerated testing.

  20. Cyclic Failure Mechanisms of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coating Systems Under Thermal Gradient Test Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Plasma-sprayed ZrO2-8wt%Y2O3 and mullite+BSAS/Si multilayer thermal and environmental barrier coating (TBC-EBC) systems on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) substrates were thermally cyclic tested under high thermal gradients using a laser high-heat-flux rig in conjunction with furnace exposure in water-vapor environments. Coating sintering and interface damage were assessed by monitoring the real-time thermal conductivity changes during the laser heat-flux tests and by examining the microstructural changes after exposure. Sintering kinetics of the coating systems were also independently characterized using a dilatometer. It was found that the coating failure involved both the time-temperature dependent sintering and the cycle frequency dependent cyclic fatigue processes. The water vapor environments not only facilitated the initial coating conductivity increases due to enhanced sintering and interface reaction, but also promoted later conductivity reductions due to the accelerated coating cracking and delamination. The failure mechanisms of the coating systems are also discussed based on the cyclic test results and are correlated to the sintering and thermal stress behavior under the thermal gradient test conditions.

  1. Failure Analysis and Mechanisms of Failure of Fibrous Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, A. K. (compiler); Shuart, M. J. (compiler); Starnes, J. H., Jr. (compiler); Williams, J. G. (compiler)

    1983-01-01

    The state of the art of failure analysis and current design practices, especially as applied to the use of fibrous composite materials in aircraft structures is discussed. Deficiencies in these technologies are identified, as are directions for future research.

  2. A Micro-Indentation Method for Assessment of TBC Bond Coat Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, C.; Alvin, M.A.; Kang, B.S.

    2007-09-01

    Under elevated temperatures, the presence of high thermal stresses along or within thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) can lead to the development of creep cavities and wedge cracks which can ultimately form microcracks and result in interfacial debonding in the TBC bond coat region. Defects detection on the subsurface TBC layers has shown some progress by using laser scattering and other non-destructive testing (NDT) methods. However, the difficulty of determining interfacial debonding and degradation assessment of the TBC remains a significant hurdle to overcome due to the TBC’s complex multi-layer structure, and frequently rough surface morphology. The TBC has high attenuation, high porosity, and many interfaces of different materials, which are the challenges that need to be overcome by the NDT techniques. Based on our recent research development of a Transparent Indenter Measurement (TIM) method, we have further developed a simplified micro-indentation technique for mechanical property degradation measurement and debonding/spallation detection of TBC bond coat in this research effort. NETL bond-coated coupons were subjected to cumulative rapid thermal cycling, and after every 100 high temperature thermal cycles, micro-indentation tests were conducted on bond-coat superalloy and single crystal coupons. Preliminary test results showed that the measured surface stiffness responses of the NETL bond coat decreased with exposure to continued thermal cycling. Currently these data are being correlated with microstructural analyses to address potential degradation and/or spalling of the applied NETL bond coat.

  3. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. "The weekend effect" or "DeskTop Spallation" (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that 'embrittle' the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  4. Moisture-Induced TBC Spallation on Turbine Blade Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James

    2011-01-01

    Delayed failure of TBCs is a widely observed laboratory phenomenon, although many of the early observations went unreported. The weekend effect or DeskTop Spallation (DTS) is characterized by initial survival of a TBC after accelerated laboratory thermal cycling, then failure by exposure to ambient humidity or water. Once initiated, failure can occur quite dramatically in less than a second. To this end, the water drop test and digital video recordings have become useful techniques in studies at NASA (Smialek, Zhu, Cuy), DECHMA (Rudolphi, Renusch, Schuetze), and CNRS Toulouse/SNECMA (Deneux, Cadoret, Hervier, Monceau). In the present study the results for a commercial turbine blade, with a standard EB-PVD 7YSZ TBC top coat and Pt-aluminide diffusion bond coat are reported. Cut sections were intermittently oxidized at 1100, 1150, and 1200 C and monitored by weight change and visual appearance. Failures were distributed widely over a 5-100 hr time range, depending on temperature. At some opportune times, failure was captured by video recording, documenting the appearance and speed of the moisture-induced spallation process. Failure interfaces exhibited alumina scale grains, decorated with Ta-rich oxide particles, and alumina inclusions as islands and streamers. The phenomenon is thus rooted in moisture-induced delayed spallation (MIDS) of the alumina scale formed on the bond coat. In that regard, many studies show the susceptibility of alumina scales to moisture, as long as high strain energy and a partially exposed interface exist. The latter conditions result from severe cyclic oxidation conditions, which produce a highly stressed and partially damaged scale. In one model, it has been proposed that moisture reacts with aluminum in the bond coat to release hydrogen atoms that embrittle the interface. A negative synergistic effect with interfacial sulfur is also invoked.

  5. Mechanical failure mechanisms in ceramic sliding and rolling contacts

    SciTech Connect

    Braza, J.F.; Cheng, H.S.; Fine, M.E.; Gangopadhyay, A.K.; Keer, L.M.

    1989-01-01

    In aiding engineers and material scientists to develop more wear resistant ceramics, the wear properties, wear characteristics, and modes of failure must be better understood. The purpose of this paper is to examine fundamentals of the wear of ceramics, to present methodology needed to describe wear mechanisms in ceramics, and to point out where experimental research is needed to guide theoretical work. The stresses at asperities and pores, and the stresses due to thermal gradients are briefly explored to show the complexity of developing wear models. Definitions of wear modes are proposed to clarify usage of terminology. Finally, research recommendations are given to aid present and future researchers who are presently investigating and planning on entering this field. 46 refs.

  6. Failure and fatigue mechanisms in composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, B. W.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Mclaughlin, P. V., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A phenomenological description of microfailure under monotonic and cyclic loading is presented, emphasizing the significance of material inhomogeneity for the analysis. Failure in unnotched unidirectional laminates is reviewed for the cases of tension, compression, shear, transverse normal, and combined loads. The failure of notched composite laminates is then studied, with particular attention paid to the effect of material heterogeneity on load concentration factors in circular holes in such laminates, and a 'materials engineering' shear-lay type model is presented. The fatigue of notched composites is discussed with the application of 'mechanistic wearout' model for determining crack propagation as a function of the number of fatigue cycles.-

  7. Thesaurus of terms for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.

    1973-01-01

    A Thesaurus of approximately 700 subject terms used to describe the six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure is presented. The initial criteria for the selection of terms are their significance and frequency of use in the literature describing the mechanics of structural failure. The purpose of the Thesaurus is to provide the Aerospace Safety Research and Data Institute a list of key works and identifiers that afford effective retrieval of information regarding failure modes and mechanisms for aerospace structures. The Thesaurus includes both a conventional listing of subject terms and a Key Words In Context (KWIC) listing.

  8. Corrosion of NiCoCrAlY Coatings and TBC Systems Subjected to Water Vapor and Sodium Sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, Robert; Yuan, Kang; Li, Xin-Hai; Lin Peng, Ru

    2015-08-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are commonly used in gas turbines for protection against high-temperature degradation. Penetration of the ceramic top coat by corrosive species may cause corrosion damage on the underlying NiCoCrAlY bond coat and cause failure of the TBC system. In the current study, four oxidation/corrosion conditions were tried: (i) lab air, (ii) water vapor, (iii) sodium sulfate deposited on the specimens, and (iv) water vapor + sodium sulfate. The test was done at 750 °C in a cyclic test rig with 48 h cycles. The corrosion damage was studied on NiCoCrAlY-coated specimens, thin APS TBC specimens, and thick APS TBC specimens. Water vapor was found to have very minor influence on the oxidation, while sodium sulfate increased the TGO thickness both for NiCoCrAlY specimens and TBC-coated specimens; the influence of the TBC thickness was found to be very small. Sodium sulfate promoted thicker TGO; more Cr-rich TGO; the formation of Y oxides, and internally, Y sulfides; pore formation in the coating as well as in the substrate; and the formation of a Cr-depleted zone in the substrate.

  9. Failure mechanism characterization of platinum alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.; Mcfarlen, W. T.

    1986-01-01

    This article describes procedures and results of testing performed on a platinum/10-percent rhodium, thin-wall tubular product. The purpose of the testing was to develop exemplar SEM fractographs to be used to characterize failures under various environmental conditions. Conditions evaluated for the platinum alloys included high temperature, hydrogen environment, braze metal contamination, and cyclic loading.

  10. In Vitro Analysis of Mechanisms Underlying Age-Dependent Failure

    E-print Network

    regeneration failure was similar to that observed in normal P12 tissue. Several in vitro treatments enhancedIn Vitro Analysis of Mechanisms Underlying Age-Dependent Failure of Axon Regeneration AZIZ HAFIDI,1 regenerate across a lesion in organotypic cultures from postnatal day (P) 6 gerbils, but this regenerative

  11. Failure mechanisms in lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, John Francis

    Lithium-ion batteries have become one of the leading candidates for energy storage in electric and hybrid-electric vehicles due to their high energy and power densities. However, the life of this class of rechargeable cells is limited, and is usually considerably shorter than the requirement for an economically feasible alternative to the internal combustion engine. The goal of this research is to explore specific mechanisms for cell failure via mathematical modeling of phenomena that occur in a broad assortment of lithium-ion cells. The theoretical framework of the models presented here is general enough to be applicable to most lithium-ion cells and even electrochemical cells that fall outside the realm of lithium-ion technology, but the properties and parameters that are used are specific enough that quantitative predictions can be made. Specifically, models for passive-film growth at the electrode/electrolyte interface and for particle fracture are presented. In addition, we discuss a framework for describing and understanding various types of capacity fade. Finally, we optimize the design of a lithium-titanate based cell using an existing full-cell model and compare its performance to that of a graphite based cell. The passive-film model indicates that the extent of film growth and impedance rise in a cell should depend strongly upon the state of charge (SOC) at which a battery is stored. We further show that current efficiency increases with the rate at which a cell is charged, although the cycling range of the cell decreases as the current is raised due to the impedance of the film. The particle-fracture model elucidates the conditions under which both graphitic and lithium-manganese-oxide particles surpass their yield strength, at which point cracking is initiated and particle fragmentation may occur. Higher rates of charge and larger particle size generally lead to a higher likelihood of fracture, although this dependence is absent in materials that undergo a two-phase transition. Pressure diffusion and nonidealities embodied in solid-state diffusion and the kinetics of lithium insertion are included in the model, and are shown to have significant impact on the results. Variations in the thermodynamic factor with lithium content result in local SOCs at which the stress in the material is much higher than would be predicted for an ideal solution. The implications of these variations, including the possibility of selecting SOC windows for battery operation that minimize stress, are examined in detail. The high-rate performance of cells with lithium-titanate negative electrodes can be enhanced, relative to cells with graphitic negative electrodes, through the selection of active material of small particle size. The high potential of the lithium-titanate electrode prevents many of the undesirable side reactions that occur in graphitic electrodes, including passive-film formation and lithium deposition. We conclude that the lithium-titanate electrode is probably the more attractive candidate for hybrid-electric-vehicle and other high-power applications.

  12. 77 FR 34457 - Pipeline Safety: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ... from a failure of a mechanical fitting used to repair or reinforce a joint. Question 15, ``Apparent... or reinforce a joint. The apparent cause options under Part C, Question 15 (Apparent Cause of...

  13. Some corrosion failure mechanisms of AMTEC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alger, D.L.

    1997-12-31

    Simulated models of four existing types of alkali metal thermoelectric converter (AMTEC) devices were chosen for this study. Each cell model was analyzed to determine whether metal is dissolved by sodium from cell materials and is deposited in regions that can degrade performance of the cell. Results of the study show that each cell model has at least one failure mode caused by dissolution of metal from the AMTEC surfaces.

  14. Failure mechanisms of fibrin-based surgical tissue adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra, David Hugh

    A series of studies was performed to investigate the potential impact of heterogeneity in the matrix of multiple-component fibrin-based tissue adhesives upon their mechanical and biomechanical properties both in vivo and in vitro. Investigations into the failure mechanisms by stereological techniques demonstrated that heterogeneity could be measured quantitatively and that the variation in heterogeneity could be altered both by the means of component mixing and delivery and by the formulation of the sealant. Ex vivo tensile adhesive strength was found to be inversely proportional to the amount of heterogeneity. In contrast, in vivo tensile wound-closure strength was found to be relatively unaffected by the degree of heterogeneity, while in vivo parenchymal organ hemostasis in rabbits was found to be affected: greater heterogeneity appeared to correlate with an increase in hemostasis time and amount of sealant necessary to effect hemostasis. Tensile testing of the bulk sealant showed that mechanical parameters were proportional to fibrin concentration and that the physical characteristics of the failure supported a ductile mechanism. Strain hardening as a function of percentage of strain, and strain rate was observed for both concentrations, and syneresis was observed at low strain rates for the lower fibrin concentration. Blister testing demonstrated that burst pressure and failure energy were proportional to fibrin concentration and decreased with increasing flow rate. Higher fibrin concentration demonstrated predominately compact morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, demonstrating shear or viscous failure in a viscoelastic rubbery adhesive. The lower fibrin concentration sealant exhibited predominately fractal morphology debonds with cohesive failure loci, supporting an elastoviscous material condition. The failure mechanism for these was hypothesized and shown to be flow-induced ductile fracture. Based on these findings, the failure mechanism was stochastic in nature because the mean failure energy and burst pressure values were not predictive of locus and morphology. Instead, flow rate and fibrin concentration showed the most predictive value, with the outcome best described as a probability distribution rather than a specific deterministic outcome.

  15. Mechanism of electrical shorting failure mode in resistive switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohn, Andrew J.; Mickel, Patrick R.; Marinella, Matthew J.

    2014-07-01

    The electrical shorting failure mode in resistive switching is characterized by the inability to increase the resistance electrically and is one of the most common failures observed in these devices. We show that vacancy accumulation at the inert electrode is a likely cause of the electrical shorting failure mode. A detailed description is provided of the specific effect of injected oxygen vacancies from the reactive electrode and from the secondary reservoir that is formed at the inert electrode during an electrical shorting failure. We present quantitative theoretical and experimental analysis of the failure mechanism while suggesting approaches and conditions for prevention and recovery. The approach also provides an analytical description of sub-saturation vacancy injection during normal operation while experimentally showing the range of conditions where this behavior dominates.

  16. IMPERMEABLE THIN Al2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2002-06-30

    In order to improve the hot corrosion resistance of conventional YSZ TBC system (YSZ/CoNiCrAlY/Inconel 601), an overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was sprayed on the surface of TBC samples by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray techniques. The TBC preparation in Japan was based on our technical requirement by plasma spray. Bond coat CoNiCrAlY and the YSZ was produced by low-pressure plasma spray and air plasma spray respectively. Hot corrosion tests were carried out on the TBC with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in molten salts mixtures (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at 950 C for 10h. The microstructures of TBC and overlay before and after exposure were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It has been found that TBC reacted with V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to form YVO{sub 4}. A substantial amount of M-phase was formed due to the leaching of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} from YSZ. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay coating sprayed by HVOF was dense, continues and adherent to the TBC even after exposure to the molten salts. As a result, overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can prevent the YSZ from the attack by molten salts containing vanadium and arrest the penetration of salts into the YSZ along porous and cracks in the YSZ TBC. Accordingly, the amount of M-phase formed in TBC with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay was significantly lower than that in conventional YSZ TBC system. In the next period, the hot corrosion tests of TBC with EB-PVD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating under Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5%V{sub 2}O{sub 5} will be again performed at 950 C. However before hot corrosion tests, the post-annealing will be carried at 1273K for 1h in order to transform the as-sputtered {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay to crystalline {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. In addition, the effect of coating thickness on corrosion resistance and the mechanisms of cracking of EB-PVD alumina layer during hot corrosion will be also investigated.

  17. Mechanisms of fatigue failure in thermal spray coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, R.; Hadfield, M.

    2002-09-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to ascertain the fatigue failure modes of thermal spray coatings in rolling/sliding contact. These failure modes outline the design requirements of thermal spray coatings for high-stress tribological applications including impact and point or line contact loading. Recently, a number of scientific studies have addressed the fatigue performance and durability of thermal spray coatings in rolling/sliding contact, but investigations on the mechanisms of these failures are seldom reported. The understanding of such failure mechanisms is, however, critical in optimizing the generic design of these overlay coatings. This study takes a holistic approach to summarize the results of ongoing research on various cermet (WC-Co) and ceramic (Al2O3) coatings deposited by detonation gun (D-Gun), high-velocity oxyfuel (HVOF), and high-velocity plasma spraying (HVPS) techniques, in a range of coating thickness (20-250 µm) on various steel substrates to deliver an overview of the various competing failure modes. Results indicate four distinct modes of fatigue failure in thermal spray cermet and ceramic coatings: abrasion, delamination, bulk failure, and spalling. The influences of coating process, thickness, materials, properties of substrate materials, and prespray conditions on these fatigue failure modes are also discussed. A modified four-ball machine was used to investigate these failure modes under various tribological conditions of contact stress and lubrication regimes in conventional steel and hybrid ceramic contact configurations. Results are discussed in terms of pre- and post-test surface examination of rolling elements using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microscopy analysis (EPMA), and surface interferometry, as well as subsurface observations using x-ray diffraction (XRD), residual stress analysis, and dye-penetrant investigations.

  18. Mechanical failure probability of glasses in Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinser, Donald L.; Wiedlocher, David E.

    1992-01-01

    Results of five years of earth-orbital exposure on mechanical properties of glasses indicate that radiation effects on mechanical properties of glasses, for the glasses examined, are less than the probable error of measurement. During the 5 year exposure, seven micrometeorite or space debris impacts occurred on the samples examined. These impacts were located in locations which were not subjected to effective mechanical testing, hence limited information on their influence upon mechanical strength was obtained. Combination of these results with micrometeorite and space debris impact frequency obtained by other experiments permits estimates of the failure probability of glasses exposed to mechanical loading under earth-orbit conditions. This probabilistic failure prediction is described and illustrated with examples.

  19. Migratory gold resistive shorts - Chemical aspects of a failure mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, F. J.; Griswold, T. W.; Clendening, P. J.

    1975-01-01

    Integrated-circuit devices using the Ti/W/Au metal system are subject to failure mechanisms based on electrolytic corrosion. The migratory gold resistive short (MGRS) failure mode is one example of this mechanism and results in the formation of filamentary or dendritic deposits of gold between adjacent stripes on the IC chip. This reaction requires the presence of a sufficient amount of water, a bias voltage between adjacent stripes, and the activation of the cathodic (-) stripe. Gold ions are transported from anode to cathode through a film of moisture adsorbed on the surface of the chip; halide ions are probably involved in the transfer. Their presence is verified experimentally by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Some of the chemical and electrostatic factors involved in the MGRS mechanism are discussed in this paper, including the questions of a threshold level of moisture and contamination.

  20. Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brian

    1999-03-01

    OAK B188 Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature. This summary refers to work done in approximately the twelve months to the present in our contract ''Failure Mechanisms for Ceramic Matrix Textile Composites at High Temperature,'' which commenced in August, 1997. Our activities have consisted mainly of measurements of creep-controlled crack growth in ceramic matrix composites (CMCS) at high temperature; imaging of deformation fields in textile CMCS; the assessment of mechanisms of damage in textile composites, especially those with through-thickness reinforcement; the formulation of models of delamination crack growth under fatigue in textile composites; analytical models of the bridging traction law for creeping fibers in a CMC at high temperature; and an analytical model of a bridging fiber tow in a textile composite.

  1. Register of experts for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    This register is comprised of a list of approximately 300 experts from approximately 90 organizations who have published results of theoretical and/or experimental research related to six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure: (1) life prediction for structural materials, (2) fracture toughness testing, (3) fracture mechanics analysis; (4) hydrogen embrittlement; (5) protective coatings; and (6) composite materials. The criteria for the selection of names for the register are recent contributions to the literature, participation in or support of relevant research programs, and referral by peers. Each author included is listed by organizational affiliation, address, and principal field of expertise. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures. The register includes two indexes; an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with whom they are affiliated.

  2. Assessing mechanical vulnerability in water distribution networks under multiple failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardi, Luigi; Ugarelli, Rita; Røstum, Jon; Giustolisi, Orazio

    2014-03-01

    Understanding mechanical vulnerability of water distribution networks (WDN) is of direct relevance for water utilities since it entails two different purposes. On the one hand, it might support the identification of severe failure scenarios due to external causes (e.g., natural or intentional events) which result into the most critical consequences on WDN supply capacity. On the other hand, it aims at figure out the WDN portions which are more prone to be affected by asset disruptions. The complexity of such analysis stems from the number of possible scenarios with single and multiple simultaneous shutdowns of asset elements leading to modifications of network topology and insufficient water supply to customers. In this work, the search for the most disruptive combinations of multiple asset failure events is formulated and solved as a multiobjective optimization problem. The higher vulnerability failure scenarios are detected as those causing the lower supplied demand due to the lower number of simultaneous failures. The automatic detection of WDN topology, subsequent to the detachments of failed elements, is combined with pressure-driven analysis. The methodology is demonstrated on a real water distribution network. Results show that, besides the failures causing the detachment of reservoirs, tanks, or pumps, there are other different topological modifications which may cause severe WDN service disruptions. Such information is of direct relevance to support planning asset enhancement works and improve the preparedness to extreme events.

  3. Register of experts for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.

    1973-01-01

    A list of approximately 150 experts from approximately 60 organizations who have published results of theoretical and/or experimental research related to six problem areas in the mechanics of structural failure is presented. Each author included is listed by organizational affiliation, address and principal field of expertise. The initial criteria for the selection of names for the register are recent contributions to the literature, participation in or support of relevant research programs, and referral by peers. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures. The Register includes two indexes: an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with whom they are affiliated.

  4. Influence of EB-PVD TBC Microstructure on Thermal Barrier Coating System Performance Under Cyclic Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Leyens, C.; Pint, B.A.; Schulz, U.; Wright, I.G.

    1999-04-12

    The lifetimes of electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) with three different microstructures of the Y2O3-stabilized ZrO, YSZ) ceramic top layer were investigated in lh thermal cycles at 1100 and 1150°C in flowing oxygen. Single crystal alloys CMSX-4 and Rene N5 that had been coated with an EB-PVD NiCoCrAlY bond coat were chosen as substrate materials. At 1150°C all samples failed after 80-100, lh cycles, predominantly at the bond coat/alumina interface after cooling down from test temperature. The alumina scale remained adherent to the YSZ after spallation. Despite the different YSZ microstructures no clear tendency regarding differences in spallation behavior were observed at 1150°C. At 1100°C the minimum lifetime was 750 , lh cycles for CMSX-4, whereas the first Rene N5 specimen failed after 1750, lh cycles. The longest TBC lifetime on CMSX-4 substrates was 1250, lh cycles, whereas the respective Rene N5 specimens have not yet failed after 2300, lh cycles. The failure mode at 1100°C was identical to that at 115O?C, i.e. the TBC spalled off the surface exposing bare metal after cooling. Even though not all specimens have failed to date, the available results at 1100°C suggested that both, the substrate alloy chemistry and the YSZ microstructure significantly affect the spallation resistance of the TBC.

  5. 49 CFR 191.12 - Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure...-RELATED CONDITION REPORTS § 191.12 Distribution Systems: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reports Each mechanical fitting failure, as required by § 192.1009, must be submitted on a Mechanical Fitting...

  6. Effect of Increased Water Vapor Levels on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Garner, George Walter; Lowe, Tracie M; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased water vapor levels on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycle tests were performed at 1150 C in air with 10 vol.% water vapor (similar to natural gas combustion) and 90 vol.%. Either Pt diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide bond coatings were applied to specimens from the same batch of a commercial second-generation single-crystal superalloy and commercial vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats were applied. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure to compare the average lifetimes obtained in dry O{sub 2}, using the same superalloy batch and coating types. Average lifetimes with Pt diffusion coatings were unaffected by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the average lifetime of Pt-modified aluminide coatings was reduced by more than 50% with 10% water vapor but only slightly reduced by 90% water vapor. Based on roughness measurements from similar specimens without a YSZ coating, the addition of 10% water vapor increased the rate of coating roughening more than 90% water vapor. Qualitatively, the amount of {beta}-phase depletion in the coatings exposed in 10% water vapor did not appear to be accelerated.

  7. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Moya, N.; Shaffer, R. A.; Smith, D. M.

    1973-01-01

    A bibliography of approximately 1500 reference citations related to six problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures is presented. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the ten year period 1962-1972 and is largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the six problem areas: (1) life prediction of structural materials; (2) fracture toughness data; (3) fracture mechanics analysis; (4) hydrogen embrittlement; (5) protective coatings; and (6) composite materials. An author index is included.

  8. IMPERMEABLE THIN AL2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2002-01-31

    In order to improve the hot corrosion resistance of conventional YSZ TBC system, the overlay of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on the TBC by EB-PVD techniques. Hot corrosion tests were carried out on the TBC with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in molten salts mixtures (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at 950 C for 10h. The microstructures of TBC and overlay before and after exposure were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It has been found that TBC will react with V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to form YVO{sub 4}. A substantial amount of M-phase was formed due to the leaching of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} from YSZ. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay coating deposited by EB-PVD was dense, continues and adherent to the TBC. As a result, overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can prevent the YSZ from the attack by molten salts containing vanadium and arrest the penetration of salts into the YSZ along porous and cracks in the YSZ TBC, although there were some cracks in overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating and at the interface between alumina and zirconia formed during hot corrosion tests due to the presence of tensile stress in the alumina coating. In the next reporting period, we will study the mechanisms of cracking of the overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and finish the hot corrosion tests of TBC with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating deposited by high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique. The hot corrosion test of TBC with EB-PVD deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating will be again performed. However before hot corrosion tests, a post-annealing will be carried out in vacuum (residual pressure 10{sup -3} Pa) at 1273K for 1h in order to transform the as-sputtered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay to crystalline {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay.

  9. Failure analysis for micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Tangyunyong, P.; Barton, D.L.

    1997-10-01

    Micro-Electrical Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is an emerging technology with demonstrated potential for a wide range of applications including sensors and actuators for medical, industrial, consumer, military, automotive and instrumentation products. Failure analysis (FA) of MEMS is critically needed for the successful design, fabrication, performance analysis and reliability assurance of this new technology. Many devices have been examined using techniques developed for integrated circuit analysis, including optical inspection, scanning laser microscopy (SLM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM), infrared (IR) microscopy, light emission (LE) microscopy, acoustic microscopy and acoustic emission analysis. For example, the FIB was used to microsection microengines that developed poor performance characteristics. Subsequent SEM analysis clearly demonstrated the absence of wear on gear, hub, and pin joint bearing surfaces, contrary to expectations. Another example involved the use of infrared microscopy for thermal analysis of operating microengines. Hot spots were located, which did not involve the gear or hub, but indicated contact between comb structures which drive microengines. Voltage contrast imaging proved useful on static and operating MEMS in both the SEM and the FIB and identified electrostatic clamping as a potentially significant contributor to failure mechanisms in microengines. This work describes MEMS devices, FA techniques, failure modes, and examples of FA of MEMS.

  10. Progressive damage and failure of thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoqun

    2001-07-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) provide thermal insulation to high temperature superalloys. TBCs consist of an outer ceramic layer that provides good thermal insulation due to the low thermal conductivity of the ceramic used, and the inner metallic bond coat layer that provides needed oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy. The microstructure of the bond coat changed from high aluminum concentration beta-(Ni, Pt)Al phase, which has a very good oxidation resistance, to beta-(Ni, Pt)Al plus gamma'-(Ni, Pt)3Al dual phase microstructure due to oxidation and interdiffusion between the bond coat and the substrate during the thermal test in air. The microstructure change influenced the oxidation behavior of the bond coat. Less protective oxide (Ni-rich) formed on gamma'-(Ni, Pt)3Al due to depletion of aluminum, and the oxide scale on gamma '-(Ni, Pt)3Al had less adhesion to the bond coat. The TGO layer and bond coat experienced high residual radial stresses during cool down from oxidation temperature due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the different layers. The high residual stress initiated the microcracks in TGO layer, the TBC/TGO interface and the TGO/bond coat interface as well. The evolution of damage in TBCs resulted in local loss in adhesion of the coating during thermal cycling. The formation and evolution of micro-decohesion was the key failure mechanism of TBC for long term thermal cycling. Thermal wave imaging technique as a non-destructive and non-contact method was successfully used to monitor the health of TBC. The results reveal that there was no major delamination in TBC specimens during thermal tests, but thermal wave amplitude of TBCs increased with number of cycles. Buckling and spalling processes were final events at thermal tests and did not control the lifetime of TBC.

  11. Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic

    E-print Network

    Grujicic, Mica

    Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found limit, failure mechanisms, friction stir welding 1. Introduction In the context of military tactical

  12. The role of microstructure and phase distribution in the failure mechanisms and life prediction model for PSZ coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisson, R. D., Jr.; Sone, Ichiro; Biederman, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Partially Stabilized Zirconia (PSZ) may become widely used for Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC). Failure of these coatings can occur due to thermal fatigue in oxidizing atmospheres. The failure is due to the strains that develop due to thermal gradients, differences in thermal expansion coefficients, and oxidation of the bond coating. The role of microstructure and the cubic, tetragonal, and monoclinic phase distribution in the strain development and subsequent failure will be discussed. An X-ray diffraction technique for accurate determination of the fraction of each phase in PSZ will be applied to understanding the phase transformations and strain development. These results will be discussed in terms of developing a model for life prediction in PSZ coatings during thermal cycling.

  13. A Précis of Some Recent Developments in Computational Failure Mechanics

    E-print Network

    De Borst, R; Askes, Harm; Gutiérrez, Miguel A; Remmers, Joris J C; Wells, G N

    2002-01-01

    on which the discontinuity has been superimposed. The discontinuous field is represented by the smooth field u˜ and the Heaviside function H?d , centered at the discontinuity plane ?d . The displacement decomposition in eq. (10) has a structure similar... in computational failure mechanics, Int. J. Num. Meth. Eng., 52 (2001) 63-95. [14] J.C. Simo, J. Oliver, F. Armero, An analysis of strong discontinuities induced by softening rela- tions in rate-independent solids, Comp. Mech., 12 (1993) 277-296. [15] R. Larsson, K...

  14. Failure mechanisms of DC and capacitive RF MEMS switches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Steven T.; Zabinski, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) radio frequency (RF) switches hold great promise in a myriad of commercial, aerospace, and military applications including cellular phones and phased array antennas. However, there is limited understanding of the factors determining the performance and reliability of these devices. Fundamental studies of hot-switched DC (gold versus gold) and capacitive (gold versus silicon nitride) MEMS RF switch contacts were conducted in a controlled air environment at MEMS-scale forces using a micro/nanoadhesion apparatus as a switch simulator. This paper reviews key experimental results from the switch simulator and how they relate to failure mechanisms of MEMS switches. For DC switch contacts, electric current had a profound effect on deformation mechanisms, adhesion, contact resistance (R), and reliability/durability. At low current (1-10 ?A), junction growth/force relaxation, slightly higher R, and switching induced adhesion growth were prominent. At high current (1-10 mA), asperity melting, slightly lower R, and shorting were present. Adhesion increased during cycling at low current and was linked to the creation of smooth contact surfaces, increased van der Waals interaction, and chemical bonding. Surface roughening by nanowire formation (which also caused shorting) prevented adhesion at high current. Aging of the contacts in air led to hydrocarbon adsorption and less adhesion. Studies of capacitive switches demonstrated that excessive adhesion was the primary failure mechanism and that both mechanical and electrical effects were contributing factors. The mechanical effect is adhesion growth with cycling due to surface smoothening, which allows increased van der Waals interaction and chemical bonding. The electrical effect on adhesion is due to electrostatic force associated with trapped parasitic charge in the dielectric, and was only observed after operating the switch at 40 V bias and above. The two effects are additive; however, the electrical effect was not present until the surfaces were worn smooth by cycling. Surface smoothening increases the electric field in the dielectric, which results in trapped charges, alterations in electrostatic force, and higher adhesion. Excessive adhesion can explain decreased lifetime at high bias voltage previously reported with actual capacitive MEMS switches. Switch sticking, self actuation, failure to actuate, and self release can all be explained by the experimental results.

  15. Mechanisms and pathways of growth failure in primordial dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Klingseisen, Anna; Jackson, Andrew P.

    2011-01-01

    The greatest difference between species is size; however, the developmental mechanisms determining organism growth remain poorly understood. Primordial dwarfism is a group of human single-gene disorders with extreme global growth failure (which includes Seckel syndrome, microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism I [MOPD] types I and II, and Meier-Gorlin syndrome). Ten genes have now been identified for microcephalic primordial dwarfism, encoding proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes including genome replication (ORC1 [origin recognition complex 1], ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), DNA damage response (ATR [ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related]), mRNA splicing (U4atac), and centrosome function (CEP152, PCNT, and CPAP). Here, we review the cellular and developmental mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of these conditions and address whether further study of these genes could provide novel insight into the physiological regulation of organism growth. PMID:21979914

  16. Failure Mechanisms in Sand over a Deep Active Trapdoor Yuri D. Costa1

    E-print Network

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    : Failures; Arches; Buried pipes; Model tests; Sand, Soil type. Introduction The redistribution of stresses flexible and rigid pipes undergoing a localized loss of support. Failure mechanisms in the longitudinal of the failure mechanisms was found to be affected by the stress level and backfill density. Higher stress levels

  17. Mechanisms of compressive failure in woven composites and stitched laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, B. N.; Dadkhah, M. S.; Inman, R. V.; Morris, W. L.; Schroeder, S.

    1992-01-01

    Stitched laminates and angle interlock woven composites have been studied in uniaxial, in-plane, monotonic compression. Failure mechanisms have been found to depend strongly on both the reinforcement architecture and the degree of constraint imposed by the loading grips. Stitched laminates show higher compressive strength, but are brittle, possessing no load bearing capacity beyond the strain for peak load. Post-mortem inspection shows a localized shear band of buckled and broken fibers, which is evidently the product of an unstably propagating kink band. Similar shear bands are found in the woven composites if the constraint of lateral displacements is weak; but, under strong constraint, damage is not localized but distributed throughout the gauge section. While the woven composites tested are weaker than the stitched laminates, they continue to bear significant loads to compressive strains of approx. 15 percent, even when most damage is confined to a shear band.

  18. IMPERMEABLE THIN AL2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2002-01-31

    The project started on September 1, 2001. During last 4 months, one post-doctor has been hired for this project. We have received TBC samples (YSZ/CoNiCrAlY/ Inconel 601) from Tohoku University, Japan, while processing of the TBC samples was delayed in GE Corp. Research and Development. The TBC preparation in Japan was based on our technical requirement by plasma spray. Bond coat CoNiCrAlY and the YSZ was produced by low-pressure plasma spray and air plasma spray respectively. The morphology of the surface and the microstructure of cross-section of the sample was observed and analyzed by SEM and EDX. XRD was also used to detect the phases in the YSZ. Currently we are processing the overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on the TBC samples by EB-PVD and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray techniques in collaboration with Penn State University and State University of New York at Stony Brook. We will finish comparing the hot corrosion behavior of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/YSZ/CoNiCrAlY/superalloy system with the YSZ/CoNiCrAlY/superalloy system. The mechanism of hot corrosion will be investigated. The processing-structure-properties relationship of the overlays will be determined.

  19. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

  20. Evolution of Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) Rab GTPase-activating proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gabernet-Castello, Carme; O'Reilly, Amanda J.; Dacks, Joel B.; Field, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases serve as major control elements in the coordination and definition of specific trafficking steps and intracellular compartments. Rab activity is modulated in part by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), and many RabGAPs share a Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC)–domain architecture, although the majority of TBC proteins are poorly characterized. We reconstruct the evolutionary history of the TBC family using ScrollSaw, a method for the phylogenetic analysis of pan-eukaryotic data sets, and find a sophisticated, ancient TBC complement of at least 10 members. Significantly, the TBC complement is nearly always smaller than the Rab cohort in any individual genome but also suggests Rab/TBC coevolution. Further, TBC-domain architecture has been well conserved in modern eukaryotes. The reconstruction also shows conservation of ancestral TBC subfamilies, continuing evolution of new TBCs, and frequent secondary losses. These patterns give additional insights into the sculpting of the endomembrane system. PMID:23485563

  1. Evolution of Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) Rab GTPase-activating proteins.

    PubMed

    Gabernet-Castello, Carme; O'Reilly, Amanda J; Dacks, Joel B; Field, Mark C

    2013-05-01

    Rab GTPases serve as major control elements in the coordination and definition of specific trafficking steps and intracellular compartments. Rab activity is modulated in part by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), and many RabGAPs share a Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC)-domain architecture, although the majority of TBC proteins are poorly characterized. We reconstruct the evolutionary history of the TBC family using ScrollSaw, a method for the phylogenetic analysis of pan-eukaryotic data sets, and find a sophisticated, ancient TBC complement of at least 10 members. Significantly, the TBC complement is nearly always smaller than the Rab cohort in any individual genome but also suggests Rab/TBC coevolution. Further, TBC-domain architecture has been well conserved in modern eukaryotes. The reconstruction also shows conservation of ancestral TBC subfamilies, continuing evolution of new TBCs, and frequent secondary losses. These patterns give additional insights into the sculpting of the endomembrane system. PMID:23485563

  2. Failure of Standard Quantum Mechanics for the Description of Compound Quantum Entities

    E-print Network

    Aerts, Diederik

    Failure of Standard Quantum Mechanics for the Description of Compound Quantum Entities Diederik that proves that two separated quantum entities cannot be described by means of standard quantum mechanics of this result indicates a failure of standard quantum mechanics, and not just some peculiar shortcoming due

  3. Mechanisms of subcellular remodeling in heart failure due to diabetes.

    PubMed

    Dhalla, Naranjan S; Takeda, Nobuakira; Rodriguez-Leyva, Delfin; Elimban, Vijayan

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is not only associated with heart failure but there also occurs a loss of the positive inotropic effect of different agents. It is now becoming clear that cardiac dysfunction in chronic diabetes is intimately involved with Ca(2+)-handling abnormalities, metabolic defects and impaired sensitivity of myofibrils to Ca(2+) in cardiomyocytes. On the other hand, loss of the inotropic effect in diabetic myocardium is elicited by changes in signal transduction mechanisms involving hormone receptors and depressions in phosphorylation of various membrane proteins. Ca(2+)-handling abnormalities in the diabetic heart occur mainly due to defects in sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange, Na(+)-H(+) exchange, Ca(2+)-channels and Ca(2+)-pump activities as well as changes in sarcoplasmic reticular Ca(2+)-uptake and Ca(2+)-release processes; these alterations may lead to the occurrence of intracellular Ca(2+) overload. Metabolic defects due to insulin deficiency or ineffectiveness as well as hormone imbalance in diabetes are primarily associated with a shift in substrate utilization and changes in the oxidation of fatty acids in cardiomyocytes. Mitochondria initially seem to play an adaptive role in serving as a Ca(2+) sink, but the excessive utilization of long-chain fatty acids for a prolonged period results in the generation of oxidative stress and impairment of their function in the diabetic heart. In view of the activation of sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin system as well as platelet aggregation, endothelial dysfunction and generation of oxidative stress in diabetes and blockade of their effects have been shown to attenuate subcellular remodeling, metabolic derangements and signal transduction abnormalities in the diabetic heart. On the basis of these observations, it is suggested that oxidative stress and subcellular remodeling due to hormonal imbalance and metabolic defects play a critical role in the genesis of heart failure during the development of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:23436108

  4. Deformation and Failure Mechanisms of Shape Memory Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Samantha Hayes

    2015-04-15

    The goal of this research was to understand the fundamental mechanics that drive the deformation and failure of shape memory alloys (SMAs). SMAs are difficult materials to characterize because of the complex phase transformations that give rise to their unique properties, including shape memory and superelasticity. These phase transformations occur across multiple length scales (one example being the martensite-austenite twinning that underlies macroscopic strain localization) and result in a large hysteresis. In order to optimize the use of this hysteretic behavior in energy storage and damping applications, we must first have a quantitative understanding of this transformation behavior. Prior results on shape memory alloys have been largely qualitative (i.e., mapping phase transformations through cracked oxide coatings or surface morphology). The PI developed and utilized new approaches to provide a quantitative, full-field characterization of phase transformation, conducting a comprehensive suite of experiments across multiple length scales and tying these results to theoretical and computational analysis. The research funded by this award utilized new combinations of scanning electron microscopy, diffraction, digital image correlation, and custom testing equipment and procedures to study phase transformation processes at a wide range of length scales, with a focus at small length scales with spatial resolution on the order of 1 nanometer. These experiments probe the basic connections between length scales during phase transformation. In addition to the insights gained on the fundamental mechanisms driving transformations in shape memory alloys, the unique experimental methodologies developed under this award are applicable to a wide range of solid-to-solid phase transformations and other strain localization mechanisms.

  5. IMPERMEABLE THIN AL2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2002-08-31

    In order to improve the hot corrosion resistance of conventional YSZ TBC system, a dense and continues overlay of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating of about 25 {micro}m thick was deposited on the surface of TBC by EB-PVD and high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray techniques. Hot corrosion tests were carried out on the TBC with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in molten salts mixtures (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5% V{sub 2}O5) at 950 C for 10h. The microstructures of TBC and overlay before and after exposure were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). It has been found that TBC will react with V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to form YVO{sub 4}. A substantial amount of M-phase of ZrO{sub 2} was formed due to the leaching of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} from YSZ. During hot corrosion test, there were no significant interactions between overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating and molten salts. After exposure, the alumina coating, especially produced by HVOF, was still very dense and cover the surface of YSZ, although they had been translated to {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from original {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. As a result, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay coating decreased the penetration of salts into the YSZ and prevented the YSZ from the attack by molten salts containing vanadium. Accordingly, only a few M-phase was formed in YSZ TBC, compared with TBC without overlay coating. The penetration of salts into alumina coating was thought to be through microcracks formed in overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating and at the interface between alumina and zirconia due to the presence of tensile stress in the alumina coating. In the next year, we will study the mechanisms of cracking of the overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer. The hot corrosion test of TBC with EB-PVD deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating will be again performed. However before hot corrosion tests, the post-annealing will be carried out in vacuum (residual pressure 10{sup -3} Pa) at 1273K for 1h in order to transform the as-sputtered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay to crystalline {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. The effect of thickness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating on hot corrosion resistance will also be investigated. We will prepare Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating by sol-gel method. The corrosion resistance of TBC with sol-gel Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating will be determined and discussed with the results of TBC with EB-PVD and HVOF Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating.

  6. Failure Criterion for Brick Masonry: A Micro-Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawa, Marek

    2015-02-01

    The paper deals with the formulation of failure criterion for an in-plane loaded masonry. Using micro-mechanics approach the strength estimation for masonry microstructure with constituents obeying the Drucker-Prager criterion is determined numerically. The procedure invokes lower bound analysis: for assumed stress fields constructed within masonry periodic cell critical load is obtained as a solution of constrained optimization problem. The analysis is carried out for many different loading conditions at different orientations of bed joints. The performance of the approach is verified against solutions obtained for corresponding layered and block microstructures, which provides the upper and lower strength bounds for masonry microstructure, respectively. Subsequently, a phenomenological anisotropic strength criterion for masonry microstructure is proposed. The criterion has a form of conjunction of Jaeger critical plane condition and Tsai-Wu criterion. The model proposed is identified based on the fitting of numerical results obtained from the microstructural analysis. Identified criterion is then verified against results obtained for different loading orientations. It appears that strength of masonry microstructure can be satisfactorily described by the criterion proposed.

  7. Mechanisms of renal hyporesponsiveness to BNP in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Feridooni, Tiam; Hotchkiss, Adam; Kruzliak, Peter; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-06-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a member of the family of vasoactive peptides, is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory peptide that contributes to blood pressure and volume homeostasis. These attributes make BNP an ideal drug that could aid in diuresing a fluid-overloaded patient who had poor or worsening renal function. Despite the potential benefits of BNP, accumulating evidence suggests that simply increasing the amount of circulating BNP does not necessarily increase natriuresis in patients with heart failure (HF). Moreover, despite high BNP levels, natriuresis falls when HF progresses from a compensated to a decompensated state, suggesting the emergence of renal resistance to BNP. Although likely multifactorial, several mechanisms have been proposed to explain renal hyporesponsiveness in HF, including, but not limited to, decreased renal BNP availability, down-regulation of natriuretic peptide receptors, and altered BNP intracellular signal transduction pathways. Thus, a better understanding of renal hyporesponsiveness in HF is required to devise strategies to develop novel agents and technologies that directly restore renal BNP efficiency. It is hoped that development of these new therapeutic approaches will serve to limit sodium retention in patients with HF, which may ultimately delay the progression to overt HF. PMID:25881664

  8. Failure mechanisms during melt injection along dykes in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Robert S.; Agustsdottir, Thorbjorg; Greenfield, Tim; Green, Robert; Brandsdottir, Bryndis; Woods, Jennifer; Pugh, David

    2015-04-01

    We show moment tensor solutions from seismicity produced during two extremely well monitored dyke injections in the mid-crust of Iceland. They demonstrate failure by double couple mechanisms with little or no volumetric component. The inferred failure planes are consistently orientated parallel to the dyke, from which we infer that the seismicity is produced primarily by breaking chilled magma emplaced during an earlier injection episode. The first dyke injection was at Upptyppingar in 2007 in the Northern Rift Zone of Iceland. Melt was injected in the mid-crust from 17.5 to 13.5 km depth over a 9 month period before freezing in situ. The dyke was inclined with a dip of approximately 50 degrees. The second dyke was injected sub-horizontally from Bárðarbunga at a depth of about 7 km over a two week period in late August 2014 until it erupted 45 km away in Holuhraun. The Holuhraun eruption precisely reoccupied old craters from a late eighteenth century (c. 1797) eruption. The petrology of the eighteenth century basalts suggests that the melt also came from Bárðarbunga. It is likely therefore that the 2014 dyke closely followed the earlier eighteenth century dyke path. Both dyke injections were monitored by a dense seismic network of broad-band three-component seismic stations deployed and operated from 2006 to the present by the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Institute of Earth Sciences, University of Iceland. These enable well constrained hypocentral locations and moment tensor solutions to be made. At its present peak the network consists of over 75 broadband seismometers. Fifteen additional seismometers were deployed in the days immediately following the onset of the dyke injection, including four seismometers on the Vatnajökull ice cap beneath which the dyke propagated and the remainder on Holuhraun surrounding the eventual eruption site: indeed two of the seismometers had to be rescued shortly before they were encroached by the advancing lava in the days following the onset of the eruption. The opportunity to deploy seismometers directly above the dyke and around the dyke tip mean that the earthquake locations are unusually well constrained.

  9. Failure mechanisms in ductile and brittle materials during Taylor impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, D. D.; Willmott, G. R.; Walley, S. M.; Field, J. E.

    2003-09-01

    Taylor impact tests were performed on ductile and brittle materials metals and the results indicate that failure is initiated by the coalescence of lateral release waves behind the incident shock formed upon impact. The failure process in the ductile materials involves nucleation and growth of voids and in the brittle materials it is shear-induced micro-cracking.

  10. Respiratory Failure and Mechanical Ventilation in the Pregnant Patient.

    PubMed

    Schwaiberger, David; Karcz, Marcin; Menk, Mario; Papadakos, Peter J; Dantoni, Susan E

    2016-01-01

    Fewer than 2% of all peripartal patients need intensive care unit admission. But due to some anatomic and physiologic changes in pregnancy, respiratory failure can be promoted. This article reviews several obstetric and nonobstetric diseases that lead to respiratory failure and the treatment of these. Furthermore, invasive and noninvasive ventilation in pregnancy is discussed and suggestions of medication during ventilation are given. PMID:26600446

  11. Mechanics-based statistics of failure risk of quasibrittle structures and size effect

    E-print Network

    Mechanics-based statistics of failure risk of quasibrittle structures and size effect on safety activation energy Maxwell­Boltzmann scaling Engineering structures must be designed for extremely low failure, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208 Contributed by Zdenek P. Bazant, April 4, 2006 In mechanical design

  12. Mechanisms of Cardiotoxicity and the Development of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S

    2015-12-01

    Cardiotoxicity is a broad term that refers to the negative effects of toxic substances on the heart. Cancer drugs can cause cardiotoxicity by effects on heart cells, thromboembolic events, and/or hypertension that can lead to heart failure. Rheumatoid arthritis biologics may interfere with ischemic preconditioning and cause/worsen heart failure. Long-term and heavy alcohol use can result in oxidative stress, apoptosis, and decreased contractile protein function. Cocaine use results in sympathetic nervous system stimulation of heart and smooth muscle cells and leads to cardiotoxicity and evolution of heart failure. The definition of cardiotoxicity is likely to evolve along with knowledge about detecting subclinical myocardial injury. PMID:26567492

  13. Non-destructive microwave evaluation of TBC delamination induced by acute angle laser drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sezer, H. K.; Li, Lin; Wu, Z.; Anderson, B.; Williams, P.

    2007-01-01

    Laser drilling has been applied to the production of cooling holes of various size and angles in the modern aerospace gas turbine components such as turbine blades, nozzle guide vanes, combustion chambers and afterburner. These parts are usually made of heat resistant nickel superalloys. The superalloy substrate is coated with yttria-stabilized zirconia thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) to protect them from reaching excessive temperatures in hot engine environments. Drilling the parts at acute angles to the surface is complicated because (i) multiple layers are being drilled through, (ii) the melt ejection and heat flow patterns around the hole are non-symmetrical and (iii) the drilling distance is greater than when drilling normal to the surface. In a previous investigation by the authors, delamination of TBC was addressed as a main problem of angled drilling and mechanisms involved were discussed. Characterization of delamination cracks was normally performed via metallographic techniques. It involves sectioning the samples using an abrasive cutting machine, grinding with successively finer silicon carbide paper up to the centre of the hole and polishing to allow optical microscopic analysis of the cracks. However, clamping and sectioning process of thermal-spray-coated workpieces can introduce cracks in brittle coatings due to the drag of the cut-off wheels. Hence, it is not possible to decide if the delamination is caused as a result of post-process sectioning or laser drilling. In this paper, a microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) technique is employed to evaluate the integrity of TBC after acute angle laser drilling. An Agilent 8510 XF network analyser operating over the frequency range of 45 MHz to 110 GHz was used to measure the amplitude and phase variations of scattered waves. The results significantly indicated the existence of delamination of 1-1.5 mm long at the TBC/substrate interface on the leading edge part of an acute-angled hole laser drilled using a 400 W Nd:YAG laser.

  14. Register of specialized sources for information on mechanics of structural failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Denny, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Specialized information sources that generate information relative to six problem areas in aerospace mechanics of structural failure are identified. Selection for inclusion was based upon information obtained from the individual knowledge and professional contacts of Martin Marietta Aerospace staff members and the information uncovered by the staff of technical reviewers. Activities listed perform basic or applied research related to the mechanics of structural failure and publish the results of such research. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy reference form, original sources for dependable information regarding failure modes and mechanisms of aerospace structures.

  15. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transient fiberglass-epoxy birefringent material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental study is reported in which a nondestructive technique involving the use of a transparent fiberglass-epoxy composite birefringent material has been used to investigate compression failure mechanisms in graphite-epoxy laminates. It is shown that the birefringency and transparency of the fiberglass-epoxy material permits regions of high stress to be located and the mechanisms of local failure propagation to be identified within the laminate. The material may also be useful for studying stress fields and for identifying failure initiation and propagation mechanisms in a wide variety of composite-structure problems.

  16. Dynamic failure mechanics Ares J. Rosakis*, G. Ravichandran

    E-print Network

    Rosakis, Ares J.

    is the study of failure phenomena in the presence of high local strain rates. Such phenomena can be divided of velocity (displacement gradient/strain rate) discontinuities across narrow rapidly expanding regions loading. They can be classi®ed as `steady state' dynamic (high but constant speeds) and `transient dynamic

  17. 76 FR 5494 - Pipeline Safety: Mechanical Fitting Failure Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-01

    ... INFORMATION: I. Background The DIMP Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) published on June 25, 2008, (73 FR... 4, 2009, (74 FR 63906) PHMSA deleted the proposed requirement to report plastic pipe failures but..., 2009, (74 FR 69286) PHMSA extended the comment period to February 4, 2010, as requested by the...

  18. Mechanical behavior and localized failure modes in a porous basalt from the Azores

    E-print Network

    Fortin, Jérôme

    Mechanical behavior and localized failure modes in a porous basalt from the Azores S. Loaiza,1 J September 2012; accepted 9 September 2012; published 11 October 2012. [1] Basaltic rocks are the main behavior and the failure modes of a porous basalt, with an initial connected porosity of 18%. Results were

  19. Trends in Tests and Failure Mechanisms in Deep Sub-Micron Technologies

    E-print Network

    identifies the testing and failure trends resulting from new directions in IC design. Then, Section 4 of IC production process The figure shows three main stages: the IC design stage, the IC manufacturingTrends in Tests and Failure Mechanisms in Deep Sub-Micron Technologies Said Hamdioui Zaid Al

  20. Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation and glycosaminoglycan loss

    E-print Network

    Zand, Robert

    Mechanisms of bioprosthetic heart valve failure: Fatigue causes collagen denaturation heart valve (BPHV) degeneration, characterized by extracellular matrix deterioration, remod- eling; FTIR spectroscopy; in vitro ac- celerated fatigue; bioprosthetic heart valve degeneration

  1. Failure criteria used in a probabilistic fracture mechanics code

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, T.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Two criteria are implemented in a piping reliability analysis code to assess the stability of crack growth in pipes. One is the critical net section stress criterion. It is simple and convenient but its application is limited to very ductile materials. The other is the tearing modulus stability criterion. This criterion has a solid technical base. However, calculating the J-integral, J, and the associated tearing modulus, T, usually requires a complicated finite element method (FEM). In this piping reliability code, existing J and T solutions in tabular or formula form instead of the FEM are used for computational efficiency. These two failure criteria are discussed and compared in terms of their effects on the estimation of pipe failure probability. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  2. MECHANISMS OF INITIAL ENDPLATE FAILURE IN THE HUMAN VERTEBRAL BODY

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Aaron J.; Lee, Gideon L.; Keaveny, Tony M.

    2010-01-01

    Endplate failure occurs frequently in osteoporotic vertebral fractures and may be related to the development of high tensile strain. To determine whether the highest tensile strains in the vertebra occur in the endplates, and whether such high tensile strains are associated with the material behavior of the intervertebral disc, we used micro-CT-based finite element analysis to assess tissue-level strains in twenty-two elderly human vertebrae (81.5 ± 9.6 years) that were compressed through simulated intervertebral discs. In each vertebra, we compared the highest tensile and compressive strains across the different compartments: endplates, cortical shell, and trabecular bone. The influence of the Poisson-type expansion of the disc on the results was determined by compressing the vertebrae a second time in which we suppressed Poisson expansion. We found that the highest tensile strains occurred within the endplates whereas the highest compressive strains occurred within the trabecular bone. The ratio of strain to assumed tissue-level yield strain was highest for the endplates, indicating that the endplates had the greatest risk of initial failure. Suppressing the Poisson expansion of the disc decreased the amount of highly tensile-strained tissue in the endplates by 79.4 ± 11.3%. These results indicate that the endplates are at the greatest risk of initial failure due to the development of high tensile strains, and that such high tensile strains are associated with the Poisson expansion of the disc. We conclude that initial failure of the vertebra is associated with high tensile strains in the endplates, which in turn are influenced by the material behavior of the disc. PMID:20817162

  3. Laboratory and 3-D-distinct element analysis of failure mechanism of slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2014-09-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient details. There are however increasing interest on the consequences after the initiation of failure which includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more details and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanism and the post-failure mechanism of slope will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  4. Failure mechanisms in laminated carbon/carbon composites under biaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grape, J.A.; Gupta, V.

    1995-07-01

    The failure mechanisms of 2D carbon/carbon (C/C) woven laminates have been determined under inplane biaxial compression loads, and the associated failure envelopes that account for the effect of matrix-type and loading directions were also obtained. The failure was in the form of micro-kinking of fiber bundles, interspersed with localized interply delaminations to form an overall shear fault. The shear fault was aligned with the major axis of loading except at above 75% of balanced biaxial compressive stress where failure occurred along both axes. Although the biaxial strength varied significantly with the ratio of in-plane principal stresses, R, there was no variation in the local failure mechanisms. Accordingly, it was found that the samples fail upon achieving a critical strain along the primary axis of loading.

  5. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms for BGA and CSP Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies. Acceleration induced failure mechanisms varied from conventional surface mount (SM) failures for CSPs. Examples of unrealistic life projections for other CSPs are also presented. The cumulative cycles to failure for ceramic BGA assemblies performed under different conditions, including plots of their two Weibull parameters, are presented. The results are for cycles in the range of -30 C to 100 C, -55 C to 100 C, and -55 C to 125 C. Failure mechanisms as well as cycles to failure for thermal shock and thermal cycling conditions in the range of -55 C to 125 C were compared. Projection to other temperature cycling ranges using a modified Coffin-Manson relationship is also presented.

  6. Mission Failure Probability Calculations for Critical Function Mechanizations

    E-print Network

    Koopman, Philip

    the task of deriv- ing mechanizations: steering, braking, sensors, engine, processing, communication. Initially, components exhibit high "infant mortality" due to the presence of manufacturing faults that were

  7. Mechanisms and management of diuretic resistance in congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    De Bruyne, L K M

    2003-01-01

    Diuretic drugs are used almost universally in patients with congestive heart failure, most frequently the potent loop diuretics. Despite their unproven effect on survival, their indisputable efficacy in relieving congestive symptoms makes them first line therapy for most patients. In the treatment of more advanced stages of heart failure diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention despite the use of appropriate doses. Diuretic resistance may be caused by decreased renal function and reduced and delayed peak concentrations of loop diuretics in the tubular fluid, but it can also be observed in the absence of these pharmacokinetic abnormalities. When the effect of a short acting diuretic has worn off, postdiuretic salt retention will occur during the rest of the day. Chronic treatment with a loop diuretic results in compensatory hypertrophy of epithelial cells downstream from the thick ascending limb and consequently its diuretic effect will be blunted. Strategies to overcome diuretic resistance include restriction of sodium intake, changes in dose, changes in timing, and combination diuretic therapy. PMID:12782772

  8. Defect induced plasticity and failure mechanism of boron nitride nanotubes under tension

    SciTech Connect

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M. Ghosh, Debraj

    2014-07-28

    The effects of Stone-Wales (SW) and vacancy defects on the failure behavior of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) under tension are investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff-Brenner potential is used to model the atomic interaction and the temperature is maintained close to 300?K. The effect of a SW defect is studied by determining the failure strength and failure mechanism of nanotubes with different radii. In the case of a vacancy defect, the effect of an N-vacancy and a B-vacancy is studied separately. Nanotubes with different chiralities but similar diameter is considered first to evaluate the chirality dependence. The variation of failure strength with the radius is then studied by considering nanotubes of different diameters but same chirality. It is observed that the armchair BNNTs are extremely sensitive to defects, whereas the zigzag configurations are the least sensitive. In the case of pristine BNNTs, both armchair and zigzag nanotubes undergo brittle failure, whereas in the case of defective BNNTs, only the zigzag ones undergo brittle failure. An interesting defect induced plastic behavior is observed in defective armchair BNNTs. For this nanotube, the presence of a defect triggers mechanical relaxation by bond breaking along the closest zigzag helical path, with the defect as the nucleus. This mechanism results in a plastic failure.

  9. Intestinal endotoxemia as a pathogenetic mechanism in liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Han, De-Wu

    2002-01-01

    Liver injury induced by various pathogenic factors (such as hepatitis virus, ethanol, drugs and hepatotoxicants, etc.) through their respective special pathogenesis is referred to as “primary liver injury” (PLI). Liver injury resulted from endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) and the activation of Kupffer cells by LPS while intestinal endotoxemia (IETM) occurred during the occurrence and development of hepatitis is named the “secondary liver injury” (SLI).The latter which has lost their own specificities of primary pathogenic factors is ascribed to IETM. The “secondary liver injury” is of important action and impact on development and prognosis of hepatitis. More severe IETM commonly results in excessive inflammatory responses, with serious hepatic necrosis, further severe hepatitis and even induces acute liver failure. The milder IETM successively precipitates a cascade, including repeated and persistent hepatocytic impairment accompanied by infiltration of inflammatory cells, hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocarcinoma. Generally, the milder IETM ends with chronic hepatic failure. If PLI caused by various pathogenic factors through their independent specific mechanismis regarded as “the first hit” on liver, then SLI mediated by different chemical mediators from KCs activated by IETM in the course of hepatitis is “the second hit” on liver. Thus, fusing and overlapping of the primary and scondary liver injuries determine and influeuce the complexity of the illness and outcome of the patient with hepatitis. For this reason, the viewpoint of “SLI” induced by the “second hit” on liver inflicted by IETM suggests that medical professionals should attach great importance to both “PLI” and “SLI” caused by IETM. That is, try to adjust the function of KSs and eliminate endotoxemia of the patient. PMID:12439906

  10. Failure of thick, low density air plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helminiak, Michael Aaron

    This research was directed at developing fundamental understandings of the variables that influence the performance of air plasma sprayed (APS) yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Focus was placed on understanding how and why each variable influenced the performance of the TBC system along with how the individual variables interacted with one another. It includes research on the effect of surface roughness of NiCoCrAlY bond coats deposited by argon-shrouded plasma spraying, the interdiffusion behavior of bond coats coupled to commercial superalloys, and the microstructural and compositional control of APS topcoats to maximize the coating thicknesses that can be applied without spallation. The specimens used for this research were prepared by Praxair Surface Technologies and have been evaluated using cyclic oxidation and thermal shock tests. TBC performance was sensitive to bond coat roughness with the rougher bond coats having improved cyclic performance than the smoother bond coats. The explanation being the rough bond coat surface hindered the propagation of the delamination cracks. The failure mechanisms of the APS coatings were found to depend on a combination of the topcoat thickness, topcoat microstructure and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between the superalloy and topcoat. Thinner topcoats tended to fail at the topcoat/TGO interface due to bond coat oxidation whereas thicker topcoats failed within the topcoat due to the strain energy release rate of the thicker coating exceeding the fracture strength of the topcoat. Properties of free-standing high and conventional purity YSZ topcoats of both a lowdensity (LD) and dense-vertically fissure (DVF) microstructures were evaluated. The densification rate and phase evolution were sensitive to the YSZ purity and the starting microstructure. Increasing the impurity content resulted in enhanced sintering and phase decomposition rates, with the exception of the conventional-purity DVF which exhibited a density decrease during sintering. A combination of the DVF and LD topcoat microstructures (dual TBC) resulted in significant increase in cyclic durability. A 1275 mum thick dual TBC coating was found to have a comparable furnace cyclic life to that of a 100 im LD TBC.

  11. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA-subroutine process simulation was able to capture the important aspects of the thermo-mechanical cycle that influence the thermal and stress gradients in the shell.

  12. Stress analysis of slope failure using the Discrete Element Method: Mechanical controls on landslide sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, O.; Morgan, J. K.; Dugan, B.

    2009-12-01

    We carry out numerical simulations using the Discrete Element Method (DEM) to understand the controls and mechanisms of slope failure and resulting landslide size distribution. Our modeled 2D slopes are constructed of numerous spheres simulating mechanically homogeneous material with friction and cohesion. This approach enables us to simulate earth-like materials and behaviors, as discontinuities and heterogeneities can develop and propagate as the material undergoes yield and failure. Appealingly, the material properties and rheologies can evolve over time, and can be tracked in detail throughout the simulated process. Our initial results demonstrate that landslide size and failure mode are strongly dependent upon the Factor of Safety (FS), defined as the ratio of resisting stresses to driving stresses. When material strength is low (FS<< 1), landslides encompass the entire slope height. With increasing material strength, the landslides encompass decreasing proportions of the lower slopes, until they vanish close to stabilization of the slope at FS=1. As natural landslides commonly encompass large portions of failing slopes, we argue that they occur under conditions of FS< 1, at least by the completion of the failure process. Therefore in reality, slope failure occurs as a dynamic process in which failure initiates at FS~1, but FS decreases as a fracture surface propagates with loss of cohesion, resulting in larger landslides than would be predicted for FS=1. To examine the mechanical causes of slope failure in more detail, we probed the stress field in a modeled slope throughout the initial failure process, within the framework of critical state soil mechanics. We are able to constrain the yield surface and failure conditions (i.e., critical state line) of the slope material in the 3D differential stress - mean stress - porosity space, and to map stress paths of individual material elements within this domain. Failure initiates at the slope-foot, where slope material loses cohesion and disintegrates. The failure surface propagates upwards at about 100 m/sec, forming a discrete sliding plane that separates the disintegrated and intact materials. The propagation of the failure surface is detected as a reduction in mean stress as the landslide undergoes tensile failure and disintegration. This stress evolution is well-resolved in plots of progressive changes in the normalized strength ratio (i.e., differential stress/mean stress) for the failing slope. Initial failure occurs at a high normalized strength ratios, consistent with brittle failure (along the Hvorslev surface), whereupon the strength ratio decreases toward the critical state line, consistent with post-failure weakening to reach residual strength of the rock. Significant downward slope movement occurs only after the failure surface and associated drop in the normalized strength ratio has reached the top of the slope. Our approach demonstrates the utility of mapping out the evolving stress conditions in the critical state mechanics framework to better predict the complex evolution of deforming slopes, thereby obtaining clearer insights into the mechanisms that constrain landslide failure modes, geometries, and resulting size distributions.

  13. Mechanical Performance and Failure Mechanism of Thick-walled Composite Connecting Rods Fabricated by Resin Transfer Molding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Luo, Chuyang; Zhang, Daijun; Li, Xueqin; Qu, Peng; Sun, Xiaochen; Jia, Yuxi; Yi, Xiaosu

    2015-08-01

    A resin transfer molding technique was used to fabricate thick-walled composite connecting rods, and then the mechanical performance of the connecting rod was studied experimentally, at the same time the stress and failure index distributions were simulated numerically. The experimental results show that under a tensile load, the connecting rod first cracks near the vertex of the triangle areas at the two ends, and then the damage propagates along the interface between the main bearing beam and the triangle area as well as along the round angle of the triangle area. Whereas under a compressive load, the delamination primarily occurs at the corner of the U-shaped flange, and the final destruction is caused by the fracture of fibers in the main bearing beam. The simulated results reveal that the tensile failure is originated from the delamination at the round angle transition areas of the T-joints, and the failure strength is determined by the interlaminar strength. Whereas the compressive failure is caused by the fracture of fibers in the main bearing beam, and the failure strength of the structure is determined by the longitudinal compressive strength of the composite material. The simulated results are basically consistent with the experimental results. Hence the mechanical performance and failure mechanism of the complicated composite structure are revealed in great detail through the coupling of the two kinds of research methods, which is helpful for the optimal design of composite structures.

  14. Dynamic Failure of a Lamina Meshwork in Cell Nuclei under Extreme Mechanical Deformation

    E-print Network

    Buehler, Markus J.

    Dynamic Failure of a Lamina Meshwork in Cell Nuclei under Extreme Mechanical Deformation Zhao Qin protein meshwork at the inner nuclear membrane. It confers mechanical strength to the cell's nucleus and also sustains the overall structural integrity of the cell. The rupture of nuclear lamina is involved

  15. A Probabilistic-Micro-mechanical Methodology for Assessing Zirconium Alloy Cladding Failure

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Y.M.; Chan, K.S.; Riha, D.S.

    2007-07-01

    Cladding failure of fuel rods caused by hydride-induced embrittlement is a reliability concern for spent nuclear fuel after extended burnup. Uncertainties in the cladding temperature, cladding stress, oxide layer thickness, and the critical stress value for hydride reorientation preclude an assessment of the cladding failure risk. A set of micro-mechanical models for treating oxide cracking, blister cracking, delayed hydride cracking, and cladding fracture was developed and incorporated in a computer model. Results obtained from the preliminary model calculations indicate that at temperatures below a critical temperature of 318.5 deg. C [605.3 deg. F], the time to failure by delayed hydride cracking in Zr-2.5%Nb decreased with increasing cladding temperature. The overall goal of this project is to develop a probabilistic-micro-mechanical methodology for assessing the probability of hydride-induced failure in Zircaloy cladding and thereby establish performance criteria. (authors)

  16. Failure mechanisms of laminates transversely loaded by bolt push-through

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, W. A., Jr.; Williams, J. G.

    1985-01-01

    Stiffened composite panels proposed for fuselage and wing design utilize a variety of stiffener-to-skin attachment concepts including mechanical fasteners. The attachment concept is an important factor influencing the panel's strength and can govern its performance following local damage. Mechanical fasteners can be an effective method for preventing stiffener-skin separation. One potential failure mode for bolted panels occurs when the bolts pull through the stiffener attachment flange or skin. The resulting loss of support by the skin to the stiffener and by the stiffener to the skin can result in local buckling and subsequent panel collapse. The characteristic failure modes associated with bolt push-through failure are described and the results of a parametric study of the effects that different material systems, boundary conditions, and laminates have on the forces and displacements required to cause damage and bolt pushthrough failure are presented.

  17. Observation of Joule Heating-Assisted Electromigration Failure Mechanisms for Dual Damascene Cu/SiO? Interconnects

    E-print Network

    Chang, Choon Wai

    Failure mechanisms observed in electromigration (EM) stressed dual damascene Cu/SiO? interconnects trees were studied and simulated. Failure sites with â??melt patch’ or â??crater’ are common for test structures in the top ...

  18. Wellbore failure mechanisms in shales: Prediction and prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Gazaniol, D.; Forsans, T.; Boisson, M.J.F.; Piau, J.M.

    1995-07-01

    Shale stability is still one of the most important problems faced during drilling. Until recently, stability problems were most often attributed to shale swelling; however, recent research shows that several mechanisms are involved and that their relative importance can be estimated. This paper presents a review of these mechanisms, including pore-pressure diffusion, plasticity, anisotropy, capillary effects, osmosis, and physicochemical alteration. Pore-pressure diffusion into the rock in the vicinity of the wellbore (transition from undrained to drained behavior) appears to be of major importance in these very-low-permeability rocks. Plasticity is discussed in terms of modeling. Compared with simple elastic models, modeling of plasticity can simulate the actual behavior of wellbore better. The behavior of different types of muds is discussed while taking these phenomena into consideration, and the practical use of rock-mechanics models is also addressed.

  19. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  20. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandan; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael; Pellicciotti, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations referenced in detail in the NESC final report [1] including identified lessons learned to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  1. Chemical Modification of Tb@C82 by Copper(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions

    E-print Network

    Wang, Jianbo

    Chemical Modification of Tb@C82 by Copper(I)-Catalyzed Cycloadditions Lai Feng, Xiaomei Zhang properties of EMF and provided the means of multiple functionalization for EMF. Herein, a copper(I) catalyst (Cu(MeCN)4PF6)9 mediated reaction of Tb@C82 with R-diazocarbonyl compounds (1 in Scheme 1) to produce

  2. An autonomous recovery mechanism against optical distribution network failures in EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liem, Andrew Tanny; Hwang, I.-Shyan; Nikoukar, AliAkbar

    2014-10-01

    Ethernet Passive Optical Network (EPON) is chosen for servicing diverse applications with higher bandwidth and Quality-of-Service (QoS), starting from Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH), FTTB (business/building) and FTTO (office). Typically, a single OLT can provide services to both residential and business customers on the same Optical Line Terminal (OLT) port; thus, any failures in the system will cause a great loss for both network operators and customers. Network operators are looking for low-cost and high service availability mechanisms that focus on the failures that occur within the drop fiber section because the majority of faults are in this particular section. Therefore, in this paper, we propose an autonomous recovery mechanism that provides protection and recovery against Drop Distribution Fiber (DDF) link faults or transceiver failure at the ONU(s) in EPON systems. In the proposed mechanism, the ONU can automatically detect any signal anomalies in the physical layer or transceiver failure, switching the working line to the protection line and sending the critical event alarm to OLT via its neighbor. Each ONU has a protection line, which is connected to the nearest neighbor ONU, and therefore, when failure occurs, the ONU can still transmit and receive data via the neighbor ONU. Lastly, the Fault Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation for recovery mechanism is presented. Simulation results show that our proposed autonomous recovery mechanism is able to maintain the overall QoS performance in terms of mean packet delay, system throughput, packet loss and EF jitter.

  3. Influence of Martensite Mechanical Properties on Failure Mode and Ductility of Dual Phase Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, the effects of the mechanical properties of the martensite phase on the failure mode and ductility of dual phase (DP) steels are investigated using a micromechanics-based finite element method. Actual microstructures of DP sheet steels obtained from scanning electron microscopy are used as representative volume element (RVE) in two-dimensional plane-stress finite element calculations. Failure is predicted as plastic strain localization in the RVE during deformation. The mechanical properties of the ferrite and martensite phases in a commercial DP 980 steel are obtained based on the in-situ X-ray diffraction measurements of a uniaxial tensile test. Computations are then conducted on the RVE in order to investigate the influence of the martensite mechanical properties and volume fraction on the macroscopic behavior and failure mode of DP steels. The computations show that, as the strength and volume fraction of the martensite phase increase, the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of DP steels increases but the UTS strain and failure strain decrease. These results agree well with the general experimental observations on DP steels. Additionally, shear dominant failure modes usually develop for DP steels with lower martensite strengths, whereas split failure modes typically develop for DP steels with higher martensite strengths.

  4. Immune mechanisms in acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Krenkel, Oliver; Mossanen, Jana C.

    2014-01-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (N-acetyl-p-aminophenol, APAP), also termed paracetamol, can cause severe liver damage, ultimately leading to acute liver failure (ALF) with the need of liver transplantation. APAP is rapidly taken up from the intestine and metabolized in hepatocytes. A small fraction of the metabolized APAP forms cytotoxic mitochondrial protein adducts, leading to hepatocyte necrosis. The course of disease is not only critically influenced by dose of APAP and the initial hepatocyte damage, but also by the inflammatory response following acetaminophen-induced liver injury (AILI). As revealed by mouse models of AILI and corresponding translational studies in ALF patients, necrotic hepatocytes release danger-associated-molecular patterns (DAMPs), which are recognized by resident hepatic macrophages, Kupffer cell (KC), and neutrophils, leading to the activation of these cells. Activated hepatic macrophages release various proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-? or IL-1?, as well as chemokines (e.g., CCL2) thereby further enhancing inflammation and increasing the influx of immune cells, like bone-marrow derived monocytes and neutrophils. Monocytes are mainly recruited via their receptor CCR2 and aggravate inflammation. Infiltrating monocytes, however, can mature into monocyte-derived macrophages (MoMF), which are, in cooperation with neutrophils, also involved in the resolution of inflammation. Besides macrophages and neutrophils, distinct lymphocyte populations, especially ?? T cells, are also linked to the inflammatory response following an APAP overdose. Natural killer (NK), natural killer T (NKT) and T cells possibly further perpetuate inflammation in AILI. Understanding the complex interplay of immune cell subsets in experimental models and defining their functional involvement in disease progression is essential to identify novel therapeutic targets for human disease. PMID:25568858

  5. Mechanical failure modes of chronically implanted planar silicon-based neural probes for laminar recording.

    PubMed

    Kozai, Takashi D Y; Catt, Kasey; Li, Xia; Gugel, Zhannetta V; Olafsson, Valur T; Vazquez, Alberto L; Cui, X Tracy

    2015-01-01

    Penetrating intracortical electrode arrays that record brain activity longitudinally are powerful tools for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. However, regardless of the technology used, signals recorded by these electrodes degrade over time. The failure mechanisms of these electrodes are understood to be a complex combination of the biological reactive tissue response and material failure of the device over time. While mechanical mismatch between the brain tissue and implanted neural electrodes have been studied as a source of chronic inflammation and performance degradation, the electrode failure caused by mechanical mismatch between different material properties and different structural components within a device have remained poorly characterized. Using Finite Element Model (FEM) we simulate the mechanical strain on a planar silicon electrode. The results presented here demonstrate that mechanical mismatch between iridium and silicon leads to concentrated strain along the border of the two materials. This strain is further focused on small protrusions such as the electrical traces in planar silicon electrodes. These findings are confirmed with chronic in vivo data (133-189 days) in mice by correlating a combination of single-unit electrophysiology, evoked multi-unit recordings, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy from traces and electrode sites with our modeling data. Several modes of mechanical failure of chronically implanted planar silicon electrodes are found that result in degradation and/or loss of recording. These findings highlight the importance of strains and material properties of various subcomponents within an electrode array. PMID:25453935

  6. Mechanical failure modes of chronically implanted planar silicon-based neural probes for laminar recording

    PubMed Central

    Kozai, Takashi D. Y.; Catt, Kasey; Li, Xia; Gugel, Zhannetta V.; Olafsson, Valur T.; Vazquez, Alberto L.; Cui, X. Tracy

    2014-01-01

    Penetrating intracortical electrode arrays that record brain activity longitudinally are powerful tools for basic neuroscience research and emerging clinical applications. However, regardless of the technology used, signals recorded by these electrodes degrade over time. The failure mechanisms of these electrodes are understood to be a complex combination of the biological reactive tissue response and material failure of the device over time. While mechanical mismatch between the brain tissue and implanted neural electrodes have been studied as a source of chronic inflammation and performance degradation, the electrode failure caused by mechanical mismatch between different material properties and different structural components within a device have remained poorly characterized. Using Finite Element Model (FEM) we simulate the mechanical strain on a planar silicon electrode. The results presented here demonstrate that mechanical mismatch between iridium and silicon leads to concentrated strain along the border of the two materials. This strain is further focused on small protrusions such as the electrical traces in planar silicon electrodes. These findings are confirmed with chronic in vivo data (133–189 days) in mice by correlating a combination of single-unit electrophysiology, evoked multi-unit recordings, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy from traces and electrode sites with our modeling data. Several modes of mechanical failure of chronically implanted planar silicon electrodes are found that result in degradation and/or loss of recording. These findings highlight the importance of strains and material properties of various subcomponents within an electrode array. PMID:25453935

  7. Failure mechanisms of concrete slab-soil double-layer structure subjected to underground explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Z.; Zhang, W.; Cho, C.; Han, X.

    2014-09-01

    The failure mechanism of a concrete slab-soil double-layer structure subjected to an underground explosion was investigated by experimental and numerical methods in this paper. Two underground explosion depths of 150 and 350 mm were tested. The typical failure modes such as the conoid spall of concrete, the bulge of the concrete slab and the cavity in the soil were obtained experimentally. Numerical simulations of the experiments were performed using a hydrodynamic code to analyze the effects of both the stress wave and the expansion of the blast products. Based on the experimental and numerical results, the effects of explosive depth, blast wave front and expansion of the blast products on the failure modes and failure mechanisms were discussed. The underground explosion process at different explosion depths was also analyzed. The results show that attenuation of the stress wave in the soil is significant. The blast wave front and the expansion of the blast products play different roles at different explosion depths. At the explosion depth of 150 mm, the failure mode is mainly caused by a point load induced by the blast wave front, whereas at the depth of 350 mm a sphere-shaped load resulting from the expansion of the blast products is a key factor for failure.

  8. Identification of fundamental deformation and failure mechanisms in armor ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Andrea Marie

    Indentation of a surface with a hard sphere can be used to examine micromechanical response of a wide range of materials and has been shown to generate loading conditions resembling early stages of ballistic impact events. Cracking morphologies also show similarities, particularly with formation of cone cracks at the contact site. The approach in this thesis is to use this indentation technique to characterize contact damage and deformation processes in armor ceramics, as well as identify the role of cone cracking and inelastic behavior. To accomplish these objectives, an instrumented indentation system was designed and fabricated, extending depth-sensing capabilities originally developed for nano-indentation to higher forces. This system is also equipped with an acoustic emission system to detect onset of cone cracking and subsequent failure. Once calibrated and verified the system was used to evaluate elastic modulus and cone crack initiation forces of two commercial float glasses. As-received air and tin surfaces of soda-lime-silica and borosilicate float glass were tested to determine differences in elastic and fracture behavior. Information obtained from load--displacement curves and visual inspection of indentation sites were used to determine elastic modulus, and conditions for onset of cone cracking as a function of surface roughness. No difference in reduced modulus or cone cracking loads on as-received air and tin surfaces were observed. Abraded surfaces showed the tin surface to be slightly more resistant to cone cracking. A study focusing on the transition from elastic to inelastic deformation in two transparent fine-grained polycrystalline spinels with different grain sizes was then conducted. Congruent experiments included observations on evolution of damage, examinations of sub-surface damage and inspection of remnant surface profiles. Indentation stress--strain behavior obtained from load--displacement curves revealed a small difference in yielding and strain-hardening behavior given the significant grain size difference. Directly below the indentation sites, regions of grain boundary cracking, associated with the inelastic zone, were identified in both spinels. Comparison of Meyer hardness and in-situ hardness showed a discrepancy at low loads, a result of elastic recovery. Elastic-plastic indentation behavior of the two spinels was then compared to behavior of a transparent large-grained aluminum oxinitirde (AlON) and a small-grained sintered aluminum nitride (AlN). Subsurface indentation damage revealed transitions from intergranular to transgranular fracture in the two spinels, AlON showed a transition from multiple cleavage microcracks to transgranular fracture while AlN exhibited only intergranular fracture. Analysis of indentation stress-strain results showed a slight difference in yielding behaviors of the two spinels and AlON whereas AlN showed a much lower yield value comparatively. Slight differences in strain-hardening behavior were observed. When comparing indentation stress--strain energy density and work of indentation a linear correlation was observed and a clear distinction could be made between materials. Therefore, it is suggested by the work in this thesis that instrumented spherical indentation could serve as a useful method of evaluating armor materials, particularly when behavior is described using indentation stress and strain, as this is a useful way to evaluate onset and development of inelastic deformation under high contact pressures and self-confining stresses. Additionally, it proposes that comparison of the work of indentation and indentation strain energy density approaches provide a good foundation for evaluating and comparing a materials penetration resistance.

  9. Impermeable thin AI2O3 overlay for TBC protection from sulfate and vanadate attack in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2005-01-31

    25 {micro}m and a 2 {micro}m thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay were deposited by HVOF thermal spray and by sol-gel coating method, respectively, onto to the surface of YSZ coating. Indenter test was employed to investigate the spalling of YSZ with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay after hot corrosion. The results showed that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay acted as a barrier against the infiltration of the molten salt into the YSZ coating during exposure, thus significantly reduced the amount of M-phase of ZrO{sub 2} in YSZ coating. Thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay will increase compressive stress and failure in TBC. During next reporting time, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay will be deposited on the YSZ surface by the composite-sol-gel route (CSG). Hot corrosion tests will be carried out on the TBC.

  10. Investigating Deformation and Failure Mechanisms in Nanoscale Multilayer Metallic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zbib, Hussein M; Bahr, David F

    2014-10-22

    Over the history of materials science there are many examples of materials discoveries that have made superlative materials; the strongest, lightest, or toughest material is almost always a goal when we invent new materials. However, often these have been a result of enormous trial and error approaches. A new methodology, one in which researchers design, from the atoms up, new ultra-strong materials for use in energy applications, is taking hold within the science and engineering community. This project focused on one particular new classification of materials; nanolaminate metallic composites. These materials, where two metallic materials are intimately bonded and layered over and over to form sheets or coatings, have been shown over the past decade to reach strengths over 10 times that of their constituents. However, they are not yet widely used in part because while extremely strong (they don’t permanently bend), they are also not particularly tough (they break relatively easily when notched). Our program took a coupled approach to investigating new materials systems within the laminate field. We used computational materials science to explore ways to institute new deformation mechanisms that occurred when a tri-layer, rather than the more common bi-layer system was created. Our predictions suggested that copper-nickel or copper-niobium composites (two very common bi-layer systems) with layer thicknesses on the order of 20 nm and then layered 100’s of times, would be less tough than a copper-nickel-niobium metallic composite of similar thicknesses. In particular, a particular mode of permanent deformation, cross-slip, could be activated only in the tri-layer system; the crystal structure of the other bi-layers would prohibit this particular mode of deformation. We then experimentally validated this predication using a wide range of tools. We utilized a DOE user facility, the Center for Integrated Nanotechnology (CINT), to fabricate, for the first time, these tri-layer composites. CINT formed nanolaminate composites were tested in tension, with bulge testing, using nanoindentation, and using micro-compression testing to demonstrate that the tri-layer films were indeed tougher and hardened more during deformation (they got stronger as we deformed them) than equivalent bi-layers. The seven graduate students, 4 post-docs and research faculty, and the two faculty co-PI’s were able to create a collaborated computational prediction and experimental validation team to demonstrate the benefits of this class of materials to the community. The computational work crossed from atomistic to bulk simulations, and the experiments coupled form nm-scale to the mm scale; closely matching the simulations. The simulations provided viable mechanisms that explained the observed results, and new experimental results were used to push the boundaries of the simulation tools. Over the life of the 7 years of this program we proved that tri-layer nanolaminate metallic composite systems exceeded the mechanical performance of bi-layer systems if the right materials were chosen, and that the mechanism responsible for this was tied to the cross slip of dislocations. With 30 journal publications resulting from this work we have broadly disseminated this family of results to the scientific community.

  11. Toward Optimum Scale and TBC Adhesion on Single Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    1998-01-01

    Single crystal superalloys exhibit excellent cyclic oxidation resistance if their sulfur content is reduced from typical impurity levels of approximately 5 ppmw to below 0.5 ppmw. Excellent alumina scale adhesion was documented for PWA 1480 and PWA 1484 without yttrium additions. Hydrogen annealing produced effective desulfurization of PWA 1480 to less than 0.2 ppmw and was also used to achieve controlled intermediate levels. The direct relationship between cyclic oxidation behavior and sulfur content was shown. An adhesion criterion was proposed based on the total amount of sulfur available for interfacial segregation, e.g., less than or equal to 0.2 ppmw S will maximize adhesion for a 1 mm thick sample. PWA 1484, melt desulfurized to 0.3 ppmw S, also exhibited excellent cyclic oxidation resistance and encouraging TBC lives (10 mils of 8YSZ, plasma sprayed without a bond coat) in 1100 C cyclic oxidation tests.

  12. The microstructural mechanism of electromigration failure in narrow interconnects of Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Choongun

    1993-04-01

    This thesis reports a study of the mechanism of electromigration failure in Al-2Cu-1Si thin-film conducting lines on Si. Samples were patterned from 0.5 {mu}m thick vapor-deposited films with various mean grain sizes (G), and had lines widths (W) of 1.3, 2, 4 and 6 {mu}m. The lines were aged at various conditions to change the Cu-precipitate distribution and were tested to failure at T = 225{degrees}C and j = 2.5 {times} 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. Some samples were tested over a range of substrate temperatures, current densities and current reversal times. Aging produces an initially dense distribution of metastable {Theta}{prime} (Al{sub 2}Cu; coherent) in the grain interiors, with stable {Theta} (Al{sub 2}Cu; incoherent) at the grain boundaries. The intragranular {theta}{prime} is gradually absorbed into the grain boundary precipitates. In the wide lines the mean time to failure increases slowly and monotonically with pre-aging time and current reversal time. The failure mode is the formation and coalescence of voids that form on grain boundaries with an apparent activation energy of 0.65 eV. In the narrow lines, the lines failed by a transgranular-slit mechanism with an activation energy near 0.93 eV. The distribution of the polygranular segments and the kinetics of failure varies with the linewidths. Failure occurs after Cu has been swept from the grains that fail. Pre-aging the line to create a more stable distribution of Cu significantly increases the time to failure. When the density of intragranular {Theta}-phase precipitates is maximized, the transgranular-slit failure mechanism is suppressed, and the bamboo grain fails by diffuse thinning to rupture. The results from the current reversal test indicate that the time to sweep Cu in the polygranular segments is longer for longer polygranular segments. Thus the time to first failure in an array of lines is much longer than predicted by a log-normal fit to the distribution of failure times.

  13. Understanding cracking failures of coatings: A fracture mechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Ryong

    A fracture mechanics analysis of coating (paint) cracking was developed. A strain energy release rate (G(sub c)) expression due to the formation of a new crack in a coating was derived for bending and tension loadings in terms of the moduli, thicknesses, Poisson's ratios, load, residual strain, etc. Four-point bending and instrumented impact tests were used to determine the in-situ fracture toughness of coatings as functions of increasing baking (drying) time. The system used was a thin coating layer on a thick substrate layer. The substrates included steel, aluminum, polycarbonate, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS), and Noryl. The coatings included newly developed automotive paints. The four-point bending configuration promoted nice transversed multiple coating cracks on both steel and polymeric substrates. The crosslinked type automotive coatings on steel substrates showed big cracks without microcracks. When theoretical predictions for energy release rate were compared to experimental data for coating/steel substrate samples with multiple cracking, the agreement was good. Crosslinked type coatings on polymeric substrates showed more cracks than theory predicted and the G(sub c)'s were high. Solvent evaporation type coatings on polymeric substrates showed clean multiple cracking and the G(sub c)'s were higher than those obtained by tension analysis of tension experiments with the same substrates. All the polymeric samples showed surface embrittlement after long baking times using four-point bending tests. The most apparent surface embrittlement was observed in the acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) substrate system. The impact properties of coatings as a function of baking time were also investigated. These experiments were performed using an instrumented impact tester. There was a rapid decrease in G(sub c) at short baking times and convergence to a constant value at long baking times. The surface embrittlement conditions and an embrittlement toughness were found upon impact loading. This analysis provides a basis for a quantitative approach to measuring coating toughness.

  14. Some Aspects of the Failure Mechanisms in BaTiO3-Based Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, David Donhang; Sampson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to gain insight into possible failure mechanisms in BaTiO3-based ceramic capacitors that may be associated with the reliability degradation that accompanies a reduction in dielectric thickness, as reported by Intel Corporation in 2010. The volumetric efficiency (microF/cm3) of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) has been shown to not increase limitlessly due to the grain size effect on the dielectric constant of ferroelectric ceramic BaTiO3 material. The reliability of an MLCC has been discussed with respect to its structure. The MLCCs with higher numbers of dielectric layers will pose more challenges for the reliability of dielectric material, which is the case for most base-metal-electrode (BME) capacitors. A number of MLCCs manufactured using both precious-metal-electrode (PME) and BME technology, with 25 V rating and various chip sizes and capacitances, were tested at accelerated stress levels. Most of these MLCCs had a failure behavior with two mixed failure modes: the well-known rapid dielectric wearout, and so-called 'early failures." The two failure modes can be distinguished when the testing data were presented and normalized at use-level using a 2-parameter Weibull plot. The early failures had a slope parameter of Beta >1, indicating that the early failures are not infant mortalities. Early failures are triggered due to external electrical overstress and become dominant as dielectric layer thickness decreases, accompanied by a dramatic reduction in reliability. This indicates that early failures are the main cause of the reliability degradation in MLCCs as dielectric layer thickness decreases. All of the early failures are characterized by an avalanche-like breakdown leakage current. The failures have been attributed to the extrinsic minor construction defects introduced during fabrication of the capacitors. A reliability model including dielectric thickness and extrinsic defect feature size is proposed in this presentation. The model can be used to explain the Intel-reported reliability degradation in MLCCs with respect to the reduction of dielectric thickness. It can also be used to estimate the reliability of a MLCC based on its construction and microstructure parameters such as dielectric thickness, average grain size, and number of dielectric layers. Measures for preventing early failures are also discussed in this document.

  15. Brittle Failure Mechanism in Thermoelectric Skutterudite CoSb3 Guodong Li,,,

    E-print Network

    Goddard III, William A.

    Brittle Failure Mechanism in Thermoelectric Skutterudite CoSb3 Guodong Li,,,§ Qi An,,§ Wenjuan Li thermoelectric efficiency, but the low fracture strength is a serious consideration for commercial applications they have little effect on the Sb-rings. 1. INTRODUCTION Thermoelectric (TE) power generation devices

  16. Mechanisms of Ytterbium Monosilicate/Mullite/Silicon Coating Failure During Thermal Cycling in Water Vapor

    E-print Network

    Wadley, Haydn

    Mechanisms of Ytterbium Monosilicate/Mullite/Silicon Coating Failure During Thermal Cycling in Water Vapor Bradley T. Richards,, Matthew R. Begley,§ and Haydn N.G. Wadley Department of Materials thermal cycling between 1316°C and 110°C in a 90% H2O/10% O2 environment flowing at 4.4 cm/s, it was found

  17. Failure mechanisms of polyimide and perfluoroalkoxy films under high frequency pulses

    E-print Network

    Southampton, University of

    Failure mechanisms of polyimide and perfluoroalkoxy films under high frequency pulses Weijun Yin1 of polyimide and perfluoroalkoxy high temperature films under unipolar and bipolar repetitive pulses of art high temperature insulation materials, such as polyimide (PI), and perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) films

  18. Effect of Substrate Surface Finish on the Lubrication and Failure Mechanisms of Molybdenum Disulfide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrates were rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  19. Effect of substrate surface finish on the lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed (burnished) MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes - polished, sanded, and sandblasted - as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrate was rough, flat plateaus were created during 'run-in' and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and a deposit site for wear debris. In moist air, the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic-colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X-ray diffraction to consist primarily of alpha-iron and MoO3 powders. In dry argon, the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of the MoS2 film from the contact region by transverse flow. Analysis of the wear debris on the wear track at failure showed it consisted mainly of alpha-iron and some residual MoS2. No molybdenum oxides were found.

  20. Lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films. 2: Effect of substrate roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    An optical microscope was used to study the lubrication and failure mechanisms of rubbed MoS2 films applied to three substrate surface finishes; polished, sanded, and sandblasted as a function of sliding distance. The lubrication mechanism was the plastic flow of thin films of MoS2 between flat plateaus on the rider and on the metallic substrate. If the substrate was rough, flat plateaus were created during run-in and the MoS2 flowed across them. Wear life was extended by increasing surface roughness since valleys in the roughened substrate served as reservoirs for MoS2 and as deposit sites for wear debris. In moist air the failure mechanism was the transformation of metallic colored MoS2 films to a black, powdery material that was found by X-ray diffraction to be alpha iron, MoO3, and possibly FeMoO3. In dry argon the failure mechanism was the gradual depletion of MoS2 from the contact region by transverse flow, and the wear debris on the track at failure was alpha iron, residual MoS2, and possibly FeS.

  1. Failure strain and mechanical property data for the Type IIIA waste tank liners

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J.K.

    1992-06-01

    The SRS Waste Tanks at the Savannah River Site to be employed in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process are undergoing a structural evaluation in order to define their response to a hypothetical deflagration accident. This report provides mechanical property data to support the structural analyses, and characterizes the impact of mechanical property variability and materials degradation on the failure strain of the primary liner.

  2. Dynamic tensile failure mechanics of the musculoskeletal neck using a cadaver model.

    PubMed

    Yliniemi, Eno M; Pellettiere, Joseph A; Doczy, Erica J; Nuckley, David J; Perry, Chris E; Ching, Randal P

    2009-05-01

    Although the catapult phase of pilot ejections has been well characterized in terms of human response to compressive forces, the effect of the forces on the human body during the ensuing ejection phases (including windblast and parachute opening shock) has not been thoroughly investigated. Both windblast and parachute opening shock have been shown to induce dynamic tensile forces in the human cervical spine. However, the human tolerance to such loading is not well known. Therefore, the main objective of this research project was to measure human tensile neck failure mechanics to provide data for computational modeling, anthropometric test device development, and improved tensile injury criteria. Twelve human cadaver specimens, including four females and eight males with a mean age of 50.1+/-9 years, were subjected to dynamic tensile loading through the musculoskeletal neck until failure occurred. Failure load, failure strain, and tensile stiffness were measured and correlated with injury type and location. The mean failure load for the 12 specimens was 3100+/-645 N, mean failure strain was 16.7+/-5.4%, and mean tensile stiffness was 172+/-54.5 N/mm. The majority of injuries (8) occurred in the upper cervical spine (Oc-C3), and none took place in the midcervical region (C3-C5). The results of this study assist in filling the existing void in dynamic tensile injury data and will aid in developing improved neck injury prevention strategies. PMID:19388771

  3. Failure Mechanisms During Isothermal Fatigue of SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, P. K.; Bartolotta, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Failure mechanisms during isothermal fatigue of unidirectional SiC/Ti-24Al-11Nb (at.%) composites have been determined by microstructural analysis of samples from tests interrupted prior to the end of life and from tests conducted to failure. Specimens from three regions of life were examined based on the maximum strain from a fatigue life diagram: Region 1 (high strain), Region 2 (mid-strain) and Region 3 (low strain). Crack lengths were also measured from interrupted samples and compared based on temperature (23-815 C), region of life and numbers of cycles. Region 1 was controlled by fiber-dominated failure. A transition zone was observed between Regions 1 and 2 due to competition between failure mechanisms. Failure in Region 2 was generally described as surface-initiated cracking with varying amounts of fiber bridging. However, the specific descriptions of crack propagation through the fibers and matrix varied with strain and temperature over this broad region. Region 3 exhibited endurance behaviour at 23 C with no cracking after lO(exp 6) cycles. However at 425 C, surface-initiated cracking was observed after 10(exp 6) cycles with fractured fibers in the crack wake. If endurance behaviour exists for conditions of isothermal fatigue in air at temperatures of greater than or equal to 425 C, it may only be found at very low strains and at greater than 10(exp 6) cycles.

  4. IMPERMEABLE THIN Al2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2003-03-10

    In order to improve the hot corrosion resistance of conventional YSZ TBC system, a thin and dense {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay has been deposited on the YSZ surface by the composite-sol-gel route (CSG). The YSZ substrates were dipped with boehmite sol containing calcined {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles, dried to form a gel film and calcined at 1200 C to form {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. Hot corrosion tests were carried out on the TBCs with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in molten salt mixtures (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5% V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at 950 C for 10 hours. The results showed that besides a thin and dense alumina overlay with the thickness of about 100-500 nm formed on the YSZ surface, the microcracks and porous near the surface in YSZ was also occupied by alumina because of penetration of the low viscosity precursor. As a result, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay remarkably refrained the infiltration of the molten salt into the YSZ coating. The amount of M-phase in the TBC coating with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay was substantially reduced comparing to that without alumina overlay. In the next reporting period, we will prepare the alumina overlay by CSG route with different thickness and study the hot corrosion mechanism of YSZ TBC with thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay coating produced by CSG.

  5. Deletion of the Rab GAP Tbc1d1 modifies glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hargett, Stefan R; Walker, Natalie N; Hussain, Syed S; Hoehn, Kyle L; Keller, Susanna R

    2015-08-01

    Tbc1d1 is a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) implicated in regulating intracellular retention and cell surface localization of the glucose transporter GLUT4 and thus glucose uptake in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Tbc1d1 is most abundant in skeletal muscle but is expressed at varying levels among different skeletal muscles. Previous studies with male Tbc1d1-deficient (Tbc1d1(-/-)) mice on standard and high-fat diets established a role for Tbc1d1 in glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis. Here we describe similar, but also additional abnormalities in male and female Tbc1d1(-/-) mice. We corroborate that Tbc1d1 loss leads to skeletal muscle-specific and skeletal muscle type-dependent abnormalities in GLUT4 expression and glucose uptake in female and male mice. Using subcellular fractionation, we show that Tbc1d1 controls basal intracellular GLUT4 retention in large skeletal muscles. However, cell surface labeling of extensor digitorum longus muscle indicates that Tbc1d1 does not regulate basal GLUT4 cell surface exposure as previously suggested. Consistent with earlier observations, female and male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice demonstrate increased energy expenditure and skeletal muscle fatty acid oxidation. Interestingly, we observe sex-dependent differences in in vivo phenotypes. Female, but not male, Tbc1d1(-/-) mice have decreased body weight and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance, but only male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice show increased lipid clearance after oil gavage. We surmise that similar changes at the tissue level cause differences in whole-body metabolism between male and female Tbc1d1(-/-) mice and between male Tbc1d1(-/-) mice in different studies due to variations in body composition and nutrient handling. PMID:26015432

  6. Dynamic failure mechanisms in armor grade ceramics (the effect of lateral confinement and membrane restraint)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarva, Sai Sushilkumar

    Light weight ceramics such as SiC and Al2O3, have been used in impact related applications such as integrated armor for more than a decade and are an excellent prospect for the next-generation multi-functional armor systems. It is known that ceramics fail under a wide variety of failure modes ranging from brittle to ductile depending on the deformation conditions, such as the strain rate and the state of stress. The dynamic properties are dependent on the underlying failure mechanisms. The underpinning mechanisms of compression failure and their effect on the mechanical properties have been examined over a range of deformation rates from quasi-static to ballistic strain rates. Under moderate confining pressures [˜350 MPa] and at moderate deformation rates [strain-rates up to a few thousand per second], occurring during quasi-static and Hopkinson bar experiments, brittle failure involves initiation of micro-cracks at dominant micro-flaws and pre-existing micro-cracks and their subsequent interactive growth leading to axial splitting, faulting or a mixture of brittle-ductile failure. Experimental results relating to SiC have been compared to a wing-crack array model, developed by Nemat-Nasser and Deng, which describes the influence of microstructure on the dynamic behavior of materials. Under extreme conditions of stress, attained during shock impact, ceramics pulverize into fine powder. Classical crack-growth models seem inadequate for representing the actual failure initiation and evolution. Experiments have also been conducted to study the ballistic performance and failure of ceramic tiles. It has been observed that the defeat capability can be vastly improved by restraining the impact-face of ceramic tiles with a membrane of suitable tensile strength. The comparative effect of restraint by materials such as E-glass/epoxy pre-preg, carbon-fiber/epoxy pre-preg and Ti-3%Al-2.5%V alloy has been studied. Tungsten heavy alloy was used as the projectile material. The ballistic efficiency was improved by nearly 20% for a mere 2% increase in areal density. High-speed photography, flash radiography, microscopy and numerical simulations provide insight into the failure mechanisms.

  7. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  8. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1983-01-01

    Results of an ongoing research program into the reliability of terrestrial solar cells are presented. Laboratory accelerated testing procedures are used to identify failure/degradation modes which are then related to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. In the most recent tests, ten different types of production cells, both with and without encapsulation, from eight different manufacturers were subjected to a variety of accelerated tests. Results indicated the presence of a number of hitherto undetected failure mechanisms, including Schottky barrier formation at back contacts and loss of adhesion of grid metallization. The mechanism of Schottky barrier formation is explained by hydrogen, formed by the dissociation of water molecules at the contact surface, diffusing to the metal semiconductor interface. This same mechanism accounts for the surprising increase in sensitivity to accelerated stress conditions that was observed in some cells when encapsulated.

  9. Compression failure mechanisms of single-ply, unidirectional, carbon-fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Jong-Bae; Nairn, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A single-ply composite compression test was used to study compression failure mechanisms as a function of fiber type, matrix type, and interfacial strength. Composites made with low- and intermediate-modulus fibers (Hercules AS4 and IM7) in either an epoxy (Hercules 3501-6) or a thermoplastic (ULTEM and LARC-TPI) matrix failed by kink banding and out-of-plane slip. The failures proceeded by rapid and catastrophic damage propagation across the specimen width. Composites made with high-modulus fibers (Hercules HMS4/3501-6) had a much lower compression strength. Their failures were characterized by kink banding and longitudinal splitting. The damage propagated slowly across the specimen width. Composites made with fibers treated to give low interfacial strength had low compression strength. These composites typically failed near the specimen ends and had long kink bands.

  10. Charpy impact properties and failure mechanism of 3D MWK composites at room and cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dian-sen; Jiang, Nan; Zhao, Chuang-qi; Jiang, Lei; Tan, Yi

    2014-07-01

    The charpy impact experiments on the 3D MWK (Multi-axial warp knitted) composites with four different fiber architectures are performed at room (20 °C) and liquid nitrogen temperatures (as low as -196 °C). Macro-Fracture morphology and SEM micrographs are examined to understand the impact deformation and failure mechanism. The results show that the impact properties decrease significantly with the increase of the fiber ply angle at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. Meanwhile, the impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature has been improved significantly than that at room temperature. Moreover, the fiber architecture has remarkable effect on the impact damage and failure patterns of composites at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. At liquid nitrogen temperature, the matrix solidification and the interfacial adhesion capacity increase greatly, which effectively hinders the stress wave propagation. However, more micro-cracks appear and the brittle failure feature becomes more obvious.

  11. Mechanical behaviour and failure modes in the Whakaari (White Island volcano) hydrothermal system, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Pernin, Noémie; Jacquemard, Laura; Baud, Patrick; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Gilg, H. Albert; Letham-Brake, Mark; Mayer, Klaus; Jolly, Arthur D.; Reuschlé, Thierry; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-03-01

    Volcanic hydrothermal systems host a prodigious variety of physico-chemical conditions. The physico-chemical state and mechanical behaviour of rocks within is correspondingly complex and often characterised by vast heterogeneity. Here, we present uniaxial and triaxial compression experiments designed to investigate the breadth of mechanical behaviour and failure modes (dilatant or compactant) for hydrothermally-altered lava and ash tuff deposits from Whakaari (White Island volcano) in New Zealand, a volcano with a well-documented and very active hydrothermal system. Our deformation experiments show that the failure mode of low porosity lava remains dilatant over a range of depths (up to pressures corresponding to depths of about 2 km). Upon failure, shear fractures, the result of the coalescence of dilatational microcracks, are universally present. The high porosity ash tuffs switch however from a dilatant to a compactant failure mode (driven by progressive distributed pore collapse) at relatively low pressure (corresponding to a depth of about 250 m). We capture the salient features of the dynamic conditions (e.g., differential stress, effective pressure) in a schematic cross section for the Whakaari hydrothermal system and map, for the different lithologies, areas susceptible to either dilatant vs. compactive modes of failure. The failure mode will impact, for example, the evolution of rock physical properties (e.g., porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity) and the nature of the seismicity accompanying periods of unrest. We outline accordingly the potential implications for the interpretation of seismic signals, outgassing, ground deformation, and the volcanic structural stability for Whakaari and similar hydrothermally-active volcanoes worldwide.

  12. Fatigue of the Resin-Enamel Bonded Interface and the Mechanisms of Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yahyazadehfar, Mobin; Mutluay, Mustafa Murat; Majd, Hessam; Ryou, Heonjune; Arola, Dwayne

    2013-01-01

    The durability of adhesive bonds to enamel and dentin and the mechanisms of degradation caused by cyclic loading are important to the survival of composite restorations. In this study a novel method of evaluation was used to determine the strength of resin-enamel bonded interfaces under both static and cyclic loading, and to identify the mechanisms of failure. Specimens with twin interfaces of enamel bonded to commercial resin composite were loaded in monotonic and cyclic 4-point flexure to failure within a hydrated environment. Results for the resin-enamel interface were compared with those for the resin composite (control) and values reported for resin-dentin adhesive bonds. Under both modes of loading the strength of the resin-enamel interface was significantly (p?0.0001) lower than that of the resin composite and the resin-dentin bonded interface. Fatigue failure of the interface occurred predominately by fracture of enamel, adjacent to the interface, and not due to adhesive failures. In the absence of water aging or acid production of biofilms, the durability of adhesive bonds to enamel is lower than that achieved in dentin bonding. PMID:23571321

  13. Epigenetic activation of a cryptic TBC1D16 transcript enhances melanoma progression by targeting EGFR.

    PubMed

    Vizoso, Miguel; Ferreira, Humberto J; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Carmona, F Javier; Martínez-Cardús, Anna; Girotti, Maria Romina; Villanueva, Alberto; Guil, Sonia; Moutinho, Catia; Liz, Julia; Portela, Anna; Heyn, Holger; Moran, Sebastian; Vidal, August; Martinez-Iniesta, Maria; Manzano, Jose L; Fernandez-Figueras, Maria Teresa; Elez, Elena; Muñoz-Couselo, Eva; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Berrocal, Alfonso; Pontén, Fredrik; Oord, Joost van den; Gallagher, William M; Frederick, Dennie T; Flaherty, Keith T; McDermott, Ultan; Lorigan, Paul; Marais, Richard; Esteller, Manel

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer-related deaths, and, among common tumor types, melanoma is one with great potential to metastasize. Here we study the contribution of epigenetic changes to the dissemination process by analyzing the changes that occur at the DNA methylation level between primary cancer cells and metastases. We found a hypomethylation event that reactivates a cryptic transcript of the Rab GTPase activating protein TBC1D16 (TBC1D16-47 kDa; referred to hereafter as TBC1D16-47KD) to be a characteristic feature of the metastatic cascade. This short isoform of TBC1D16 exacerbates melanoma growth and metastasis both in vitro and in vivo. By combining immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we identified RAB5C as a new TBC1D16 target and showed that it regulates EGFR in melanoma cells. We also found that epigenetic reactivation of TBC1D16-47KD is associated with poor clinical outcome in melanoma, while conferring greater sensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors. PMID:26030178

  14. Electrochemical corrosion failure mechanism of M152 steel under a salt-spray environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Pan; Xiao, Kui; Ding, Kang-kang; Wang, Xu; Yan, Li-dan; Mao, Cheng-liang; Dong, Chao-fang; Li, Xiao-gang

    2015-11-01

    The corrosion failure mechanism of M152 was studied using the neutral salt-spray test to better understand the corrosion behavior of 1Cr12Ni3Mo2VN (M152), provide a basis for the optimization of material selection, and prevent the occurrence of failure. Moreover, the mechanism was investigated using the mass loss method, polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), stereology microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that M152 steel suffers severe corrosion, especially pitting corrosion, in a high-salt-spray environment. In the early stage of the experiment, the color of the corrosion products was mainly orange. The products then gradually evolved into a dense, brown substance, which coincided with a decrease of corrosion rate. Correspondingly, the EIS spectrum of M152 in the late test also exhibited three time constants and presented Warburg impedance at low frequencies.

  15. Mechanical characterization of damage and failure in polymeric foams and glass/epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Theresa Hiromi

    The mechanical characterization including evolution of damage and failure of foams and composites are becoming increasingly important, as they form the basic components of sandwich structures. Sandwich structures consist of two faceplates that surround a core material. In many modern applications, faceplates and cores are typically comprised of composite materials and polymeric foam, respectively. Knowledge of the failure behavior of these individual components is necessary for understanding the failure behavior and design of sandwich structures. A systematic investigation of the damage evolution and failure behavior of foams and composites was conducted using a variety of experimental techniques.In-situ ultrasonic measurements were used to track the damage behavior in PVC polymeric foams with densities ranging from 130 to 250 kg/m3. The wave speeds were measured by two quartz piezoelectric shear transducers with a resonant frequency of 5 MHz in the transmission mode. A fixture was developed and constructed to protect the transducers during compression, while allowing them to take sound speed measurements of the sample along the axis of the load train. This fixture was placed in a servo-hydraulic MTS (Materials Testing System) machine, where the load-displacement response of the foam was recorded. A digital image correlation (DIC) method was used to capture the progression of failure under compression. Two dominant failure modes, elastic buckling and plastic collapse, were identified - and their onsets corresponded to the change in elastic wave speeds in the material, measured by the in-situ ultrasonic technique.The transverse response of S-Glass/Epoxy unidirectional composites was investigated under varying degrees of confinement and strain rates. The experimental setup utilizes a fixture that allowed for independent measurement of the three principal stresses in a confined specimen. A servo-hydraulic materials testing system and a Kolsky (split Hopkinson) pressure bar generated strain rates between 10-3 to 104 s-1. Post-test scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations suggest that under transverse loading at low-strain rates, confinement contributes to localized band formation. In addition, micrographs indicated that macroscopic transverse failure is dominated by shear stress, and occurs within these localized bands. These shear dominated failure bands were found inclined in a direction approximately 35 degrees to the direction of loading. Implications of this orientation deviation of failure bands from maximum shear trajectories at 45 degrees are discussed in reference to the state of confinement.

  16. Bibliography of information on mechanics of structural failure (hydrogen embrittlement, protective coatings, composite materials, NDE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This bibliography is comprised of approximately 1,600 reference citations related to four problem areas in the mechanics of failure in aerospace structures. The bibliography represents a search of the literature published in the period 1962-1976, the effort being largely limited to documents published in the United States. Listings are subdivided into the four problem areas: Hydrogen Embrittlement; Protective Coatings; Composite Materials; and Nondestructive Evaluation. An author index is included.

  17. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°. PMID:26143351

  18. Damage mechanisms and failure modes of cortical bone under components of physiological loading.

    PubMed

    George, W T; Vashishth, D

    2005-09-01

    Fatigue damage development in cortical bone was investigated in vitro under different mechanical components of physiological loading including tension, compression, and torsion. During each test, stress and strain data were collected continuously to monitor and statistically determine the occurrence of the primary, secondary, and tertiary stages associated with fatigue and/or creep failure of bone. The resultant microdamage and failure modes were identified by histological and fractographic analysis, respectively. The tensile group demonstrated Mode I cracking and the three classic stages of fatigue and creep suggesting a low crack initiation threshold, steady crack propagation and final failure by coalescence of microcracks. In contrast, the compressive group displayed Mode II cracking and a two-stage fatigue behavior with limited creep suggesting a high crack initiation threshold followed by a sudden fracture. The torsion group also displayed a two-stage fatigue profile but demonstrated extensive damage from mixed mode (Modes II and III) microcracking and predominant time-dependent damage. Thus, fatigue behavior of bone was found to be uniquely related to the individual mechanical components of physiological loading and the latter determined the specific damage mechanisms associated with fatigue fracture. PMID:16140189

  19. An investigation of planar failure mechanisms of rock slope using distinct element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özge Dinç, ?aziye; Sinan I??k, Nihat; Karaca, Zeki

    2015-04-01

    Our research project presents planar failure mechanisms of rock masses having different rock materials and discontinuity properties in slopes that are designed in different dip angles and heights. For this purpose, the distinct element methods are used for rock masses deformed under the static and dynamic loads based on their structural components such as joint, crack, bedding and foliation planes. In this work, the numerical modeling technique on PFC2D (particle flow code produced by Itasca) has been used that has advantages over other modeling methods since it effectively creates synthetic rock masses with the smooth-joint model approach. From the methodological perspective, the intact rock samples are initially created by particles with confined micro-parameters, afterwards they are subjected to uniaxial compressive and Brazilian tests. Following to this, joint properties of rock masses are determined by smooth-joint modeling. These rock masses are assigned to the slopes with different dip angles and heights and then slope stability analysis are performed. The controlling role of each property of a discontinuity (e.g. roughness, spacing etc.) and the intact properties (?c, ?t etc.) on the movements and failure mechanisms are investigated correspondingly. Our preliminary results suggest how persistence of a discontinuity plays a primary role in the occurence of the planar failure mechanisms and the stability process.

  20. Relationship Between Pre-failure and Post-failure Mechanical Properties of Rock Material of Different Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutluo?lu, Levent; Öge, ?brahim Ferid; Karpuz, Celal

    2015-01-01

    Under compression, gathering data related to the post-failure part of the stress-strain curve requires stiff servo-controlled testing systems. In unconfined conditions, data related to the post-peak region of the intact rock parameters are not common as pre-peak and peak state parameters of stress-strain behavior. For problems involving rock in the failed state around structures, proper choice of plastic constitutive laws and post-failure parameters is important for the modeling of the failed state. The aim is to relate commonly used intact rock parameters of pre-failure (tangent modulus E i and secant modulus E s) and peak strength ( ? ci) states to parameters of the post-failure state under unconfined compression. Post-failure parameters are the drop modulus ( D pf), representing the slope of the falling portion in brittle state, residual strength ( ? cr), and dilatancy angle ( ?°). Complete stress-strain curves were generated for various intact rock of different origin. Seventy-three post-failure tests were conducted. Samples included in the testing program were chosen to represent rocks of different origin. Specimens of granite, rhyodacite, dunite, quartzite series, glauberite, argillite, marl, and lignite were used in the tests. The results from the pre-failure and peak state testing parts were processed and compared to the post-failure stress-strain parameters. For the estimation of post-failure parameters in terms of the pre-peak and peak states, the functional relations were assessed. It was found that the drop modulus D pf increases with rock strength ? ci, following a power function with an approximate power of two. With an exponential trend, the D pf/ E s ratio increases with decreasing E i/ ? ci ratio. Relations estimating the residual strength and dilatancy from the pre-peak and peak state parameters are in logarithmic and exponential functional forms, respectively.

  1. Mechanism of failure of the Cabrol procedure: A computational fluid dynamic analysis.

    PubMed

    Poullis, M; Pullan, M

    2015-12-01

    Sudden failure of the Cabrol graft is common and frequently fatal. We utilised the technique of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis to evaluate the mechanism of failure and potentially improve on the design of the Cabrol procedure. CFD analysis of the classic Cabrol procedure and a number of its variants was performed. Results from this analysis was utilised to generate further improved geometric options for the Cabrol procedure. These were also subjected to CFD analysis. All current Cabrol and variations of the Cabrol procedure are predicated by CFD analysis to be prone to graft thrombosis, secondary to stasis around the right coronary artery button. The right coronary artery flow characteristics were found to be the dominant reason for Cabrol graft failure. A simple modification of the Cabrol geometry is predicated to virtually eliminate any areas of blood stasis, and graft failure. Modification of the Cabrol graft geometry, due to CFD analysis may help reduce the incidence of graft thrombosis. A C shaped Cabrol graft with the right coronary button anastomosed to its side along its course from the aorta to the left coronary button is predicted to have the least thrombotic tendency. Clinical correlation is needed. PMID:26508722

  2. Failure mechanisms of polycrystalline diamond compact drill bits in geothermal environments

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, E.R.; Pope, L.E.

    1981-09-01

    Over the past few years the interest in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drill bits has grown proportionately with their successful use in drilling oil and gas wells in the North Sea and the United States. This keen interest led to a research program at Sandia to develop PDC drill bits suitable for the severe drilling conditions encountered in geothermal fields. Recently, three different PDC drill bits were tested using either air or mud drilling fluids: one in the laboratory with hot air, one in the Geysers field with air, and one in the Geysers field with mud. All three tests were unsuccessful due to failure of the braze joint used to attach the PDC drill blanks to the tungsten carbide studs. A post-mortem failure analysis of the defective cutters identified three major failure mechanisms: peripheral nonbonding caused by braze oxidation during the brazing step, nonbonding between PDC drill blanks and the braze due to contamination prior to brazing, and hot shortness. No evidence was found to suggest that the braze failures in the Geysers field tests were caused by frictional heating. In addition, inspection of the PDC/stud cutter assemblies using ultrasonic techniques was found to be ineffective for detecting the presence of hot shortness in the braze joint.

  3. IMPERMEABLE THIN Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2004-03-31

    To improve the hot corrosion resistance of YSZ thermal barrier coatings, a 25 {micro}m thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay were deposited by HVOF thermal spray, respectively, onto to the surface of YSZ coating. In the next reporting period, we will measure or calculate the residue stress within Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay and YSZ coating to study the mechanism of effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay on spalling of YSZ coating. However, due to the thermal expansion mismatch between YSZ coating and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay, such surface modification using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay might deteriorate strain tolerance of the TBC. In the present work, in order to investigate the effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay on residual stress developed in the samples during cooling after hot corrosion at high temperature, Finite Element method (FEM) was employed to determine the detailed stress states in the test specimens after cooling. The results showed that there is no high stress concentration at the interface between the YSZ and the bond coat for TBCs system without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. On the other hand, the maximum compressive stress with a value of approximately, -330 MPa occurred within the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. The maximum tensile stress in YSZ coat near the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay is in the range of 10-133 MPa. The maximum compressive stress of approximately -160 MPa occurred near the YSZ-bond coat interface. X axis stress play a dominant role in influencing the coating failure and spalling. In the next reporting period, we will study the thickness of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay on hot corrosion resistance and spalling of YSZ coating.

  4. Service failure of hot-stage turbine blades: The role and mechanisms of oxidation ratcheting

    SciTech Connect

    Oldfield, W.; Oldfield, F.M. )

    1993-10-01

    Surface-connected porosity in current military aircraft hot-stage turbine engine blades is associated with blade failure. Oxidation ratcheting is suggested as the failure mechanism. Statistical comparison of new and used blade populations showed that for blades cast with an equiaxed structure, the porosity in new blades was associated with crack formation on the concave surface of the used blades. The pores did not tend to develop into cracks on the compressed (convex) surface of the blade. Insufficient suitable data on directionally solidified blades prevented similar statistical correlations. However, metallography of the directionally solidified blades showed that the in-service cracks were related to oxidation inside surface-connected pores and that the cracks were oriented in the same direction as the (axial) casting pores. Thus, the proposed failure mechanism through ratcheting is based on the following insights: (1) the blades are thermally cycled as a normal part of service; (2) the hot blades expand and the open pores are filled with oxide; (3) when the blade is cooled, thermal contraction of the metal is greater than the oxide, causing compressive stress and yield-, and (4) thermal expansion of the blades opens the pores again, since yield relaxed compressive stress at low temperature. These insights were supported by metallographic and computer-simulation studies which showed that the pores grow 20 to 50 pct in width per 100 missions (about 90 hours of operation) for a military aircraft on a typical mission profile.

  5. Failure mechanism of shear-wall dominant multi-story buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yuksel, S.B.; Kalkan, E.

    2008-01-01

    The recent trend in the building industry of Turkey as well as in many European countries is towards utilizing the tunnel form (shear-wall dominant) construction system for development of multi-story residential units. The tunnel form buildings diverge from other conventional reinforced concrete (RC) buildings due to the lack of beams and columns in their structural integrity. The vertical load-carrying members of these buildings are the structural-walls only, and the floor system is a flat plate. Besides the constructive advantages, tunnel form buildings provide superior seismic performance compared to conventional RC frame and dual systems as observed during the recent devastating earthquakes in Turkey (1999 Mw 7.4 Kocaeli, Mw 7.2 Duzce, and 2004 Mw 6.5 Bingol). With its proven earthquake performance, the tunnel form system is becoming the primary construction technique in many seismically active regions. In this study, a series of nonlinear analyses were conducted using finite element (FE) models to augment our understanding on their failure mechanism under lateral forces. In order to represent the nonlinear behavior adequately, The FE models were verified with the results of experimental studies performed on three dimensional (3D) scaled tunnel form building specimens. The results of this study indicate that the structural walls of tunnel form buildings may exhibit brittle flexural failure under lateral loading, if they are not properly reinforced. The global tension/compression couple triggers this failure mechanism by creating pure axial tension in the outermost shear-walls.

  6. Failure Mechanism of Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries in Liquid Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Dongping; Shao, Yuyan; Lozano, Terence J.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Graff, Gordon L.; Polzin, Bryant; Zhang, Jiguang; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saenz, Natalio T.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, lithium anode has re-attracted broad interest because of the necessity of employing lithium metal in the next-generation battery technologies such as lithium sulfur (Li-S) and lithium oxygen (Li-O2) batteries. Fast capacity degradation and safety issue associated with rechargeable lithium metal batteries have been reported, although the fundamental understanding on the failure mechanism of lithium metal at high charge rate is still under debate due to the complicated interfacial chemistry between lithium metal and electrolyte. Herein, we demonstrate that, at high current density, the quick growth of porous solid electrolyte interphase towards bulk lithium, instead of towards the separator, dramatically builds up the cell impedance that directly leads to the cell failure. Understanding the lithium metal failure mechanism is very critical to gauge the various approaches used to address the stability and safety issues associated with lithium metal anode. Otherwise, all cells will fail quickly at high rates before the observation of any positive effects that might be brought from adopting the new strategies to protect lithium.

  7. Failure mechanisms and lifetime prediction methodology for polybutylene pipe in water distribution system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiqun

    Polybutylene (PB) is a semicrystalline thermoplastics. It has been widely used in potable water distribution piping system. However, field practice shows that failure occurs much earlier than the expected service lifetime. What are the causes and how to appropriately evaluate its lifetime motivate this study. In this thesis, three parts of work have been done. First is the understanding of PB, which includes material thermo and mechanical characterization, aging phenomena and notch sensitivity. The second part analyzes the applicability of the existing lifetime testing method for PB. It is shown that PB is an anomaly in terms of the temperature-lifetime relation because of the fracture mechanism transition across the testing temperature range. The third part is the development of the methodology of lifetime prediction for PB pipe. The fracture process of PB pipe consists of three stages, i.e., crack initiation, slow crack growth (SCG) and crack instability. The practical lifetime of PB pipe is primarily determined by the duration of the first two stages. The mechanism of crack initiation and the quantitative estimation of the time to crack initiation are studied by employing environment stress cracking technique. A fatigue slow crack growth testing method has been developed and applied in the study of SCG. By using Paris-Erdogan equation, a model is constructed to evaluate the time for SCG. As a result, the total lifetime is determined. Through this work, the failure mechanisms of PB pipe has been analyzed and the lifetime prediction methodology has been developed.

  8. Investigation of failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited by EB-PVD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid, M. R.; Abbas, Musharaf

    2013-06-01

    Failure mechanism of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) prepared by electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technique owing to formation of micro cracks was investigated. The TBCs were deposited on the Ni-based super alloy IN-100 and the micro cracks were observed within the top ceramic coat of thermally cycled TBCs at 1050°C. It was observed that these cracks propagate in the ceramic coat in the direction normal to interface while no cracks were observed in the bond coat. SEM/EDS studies revealed that some non-uniform oxides were formed on the interface between ceramic top and metallic bond coat just below the cracks. Study proposed that the cracks were initiated due to stress owing to big difference in Pilling-Bed worth ratio of non-uniform oxides as well as thermal stress, which caused the formation of cracks in top ceramic coat leading to failure of TBCs

  9. Pharmacologic Options for the Management of Systolic Heart Failure: Examining Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Howlett, Jonathan G; Borer, Jeffrey; Liu, Peter P; Mehra, Mandeep R; Pfeffer, Marc; Swedberg, Karl; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2015-10-01

    The optimal management of systolic heart failure includes combination therapy to influence myocardial remodelling favourably by affecting neurohormonal activation and underlying maladaptive pathophysiological pathways. These medications include modulators of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (eg, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists) and ?-adrenergic receptor blockers. In addition, an agent with a distinct and complementary mechanism of bradycardic action, the selective pacemaker-current (If) inhibitor ivabradine, provides further reduction of heart rate. Also, a new drug that incorporates neprilysin inhibition combined with angiotensin receptor blockade shows incremental effectiveness. The primary goal of this review is to provide a mechanistic explanation of the complementary role of therapeutic interventions in modulating pathways leading to progressive systolic heart failure. A secondary goal is to summarize the key findings of the pivotal clinical trials that have demonstrated the efficacy of these agents in this population. PMID:26095932

  10. Lubrication and failure mechanisms of molybdenum disulfide films. 1: Effect of atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Friction, wear, and wear lives of rubbed molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 films applied to sanded 440C HT steel surfaces were evaluated in moist air, dry air, and dry argon. Optical microscope observations were made as a function of sliding distance to determine the effect of moisture and oxygen on the lubricating and failure mechanisms of MoS2 films. In general, the lubrication process consisted of the formation of a thin, metallic colored, coalesced film of MoS2 that flowed between the surfaces in relative motion. In air, failure was due to the transformation of the metallic colored, coalesced films to a black, powdery material. Water in the air appeared to accelerate the transformation rate. In argon, no transformation of MoS2 was observed with the microscope, but cracking and spalling of the coalesced film occurred and resulted in the gradual depletion of the film.

  11. A numerical study on intended and unintended failure mechanisms in blanking of sandwich plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Soyarslan, C.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2013-05-01

    Metal-polymer-metal sandwich plates are widely used in the automotive and aerospace industry. As for different applications the sandwich plates can be divided into two types. They are sound-damping laminates with a polymer core much thinner than the metallic faces and low-density laminates with a core thickness of approximately 40-60% of the total thickness. One frequent process step in production of parts made of these plates is the blanking process whose hereditary effects draw the limits of further forming stages or service performance and life; e.g. the failure of the adhesive in the thermoplastic polymer interface affects the sound-damping efficiency intensively. With this motivation, we present FE simulation of an axi-symmetric blanking process of steel/polyethylene/steel sound-damping laminates. The mechanical behavior of the metallic layers was characterized by finite strain rate independent elasto-plasticity where progressive material deterioration and fracture are given account for using continuum damage mechanics (CDM). This material model is made accessible via implementations as VUMAT subroutines for ABAQUS/Explicit. Possible failure of the thermoplastic polymer which may lead to delamination of the metallic layers is modeled using ABAQUS built-in cohesive zone elements. The results show that existing intended and unintended failure modes, e.g. blanking of the metallic and thermoplastic polymer constituents as well as failure of polymer layer under shear and compression, can be effectively studied with the proposed framework for process enhancement. As a future work, a damage coupled nonlinear visco-elastic constitutive model will be devised for the simulation of the thermoplastic layer in low-density laminates.

  12. Strain Shielding from Mechanically Activated Covalent Bond Formation during Nanoindentation of Graphene Delays the Onset of Failure

    E-print Network

    Kumar, Sandeep

    Mechanical failure of an ideal crystal is dictated either by an elastic instability or a soft-mode instability. Previous interpretations of nanoindentation experiments on suspended graphene sheets, however, indicate an ...

  13. Methods And Systms For Analyzing The Degradation And Failure Of Mechanical Systems

    DOEpatents

    Jarrell, Donald B. (Kennewick, WA); Sisk, Daniel R. (Richland, WA); Hatley, Darrel D. (Kennewick, WA); Kirihara, Leslie J. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA)

    2005-02-08

    Methods and systems for identifying, understanding, and predicting the degradation and failure of mechanical systems are disclosed. The methods include measuring and quantifying stressors that are responsible for the activation of degradation mechanisms in the machine component of interest. The intensity of the stressor may be correlated with the rate of physical degradation according to some determinable function such that a derivative relationship exists between the machine performance, degradation, and the underlying stressor. The derivative relationship may be used to make diagnostic and prognostic calculations concerning the performance and projected life of the machine. These calculations may be performed in real time to allow the machine operator to quickly adjust the operational parameters of the machinery in order to help minimize or eliminate the effects of the degradation mechanism, thereby prolonging the life of the machine. Various systems implementing the methods are also disclosed.

  14. Laboratory and 3-D distinct element analysis of the failure mechanism of a slope under external surcharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, N.; Cheng, Y. M.

    2015-01-01

    Landslide is a major disaster resulting in considerable loss of human lives and property damages in hilly terrain in Hong Kong, China and many other countries. The factor of safety and the critical slip surface for slope stabilization are the main considerations for slope stability analysis in the past, while the detailed post-failure conditions of the slopes have not been considered in sufficient detail. There is however increasing interest in the consequences after the initiation of failure that includes the development and propagation of the failure surfaces, the amount of failed mass and runoff and the affected region. To assess the development of slope failure in more detail and to consider the potential danger of slopes after failure has initiated, the slope stability problem under external surcharge is analyzed by the distinct element method (DEM) and a laboratory model test in the present research. A more refined study about the development of failure, microcosmic failure mechanisms and the post-failure mechanisms of slopes will be carried out. The numerical modeling method and the various findings from the present work can provide an alternate method of analysis of slope failure, which can give additional information not available from the classical methods of analysis.

  15. Frequency-dependent failure mechanisms of nanocrystalline gold interconnect lines under general alternating current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, X. M.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, G. P.

    2014-09-01

    Thermal fatigue failure of metallization interconnect lines subjected to alternating currents (AC) is becoming a severe threat to the long-term reliability of micro/nanodevices with increasing electrical current density/power. Here, thermal fatigue failure behaviors and damage mechanisms of nanocrystalline Au interconnect lines on the silicon glass substrate have been investigated by applying general alternating currents (the pure alternating current coupled with a direct current (DC) component) with different frequencies ranging from 0.05 Hz to 5 kHz. We observed both thermal fatigue damages caused by Joule heating-induced cyclic strain/stress and electromigration (EM) damages caused by the DC component. Besides, the damage formation showed a strong electrically-thermally-mechanically coupled effect and frequency dependence. At lower frequencies, thermal fatigue damages were dominant and the main damage forms were grain coarsening with grain boundary (GB) cracking/voiding and grain thinning. At higher frequencies, EM damages took over and the main damage forms were GB cracking/voiding of smaller grains and hillocks. Furthermore, the healing effect of the reversing current was considered to elucidate damage mechanisms of the nanocrystalline Au lines generated by the general AC. Lastly, a modified model was proposed to predict the lifetime of the nanocrystalline metal interconnect lines, i.e., that was a competing drift velocity-based approach based on the threshold time required for reverse diffusion/healing to occur.

  16. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    SciTech Connect

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  17. User-defined Material Model for Thermo-mechanical Progressive Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    Previously a user-defined material model for orthotropic bimodulus materials was developed for linear and nonlinear stress analysis of composite structures using either shell or solid finite elements within a nonlinear finite element analysis tool. Extensions of this user-defined material model to thermo-mechanical progressive failure analysis are described, and the required input data are documented. The extensions include providing for temperature-dependent material properties, archival of the elastic strains, and a thermal strain calculation for materials exhibiting a stress-free temperature.

  18. [Chronic cervical vagal stimulation : Mechanisms of action and clinical relevance for heart failure].

    PubMed

    Kuschyk, J; Doesch, C; Akin, I; Borggrefe, M; Roeger, S

    2015-11-01

    Increased sympathetic nerve activity and reduced vagal activity are associated with increased mortality in patients after myocardial infarction and patients with chronic heart failure; furthermore, vagal withdrawal has been documented to precede acute decompensation. Experimental studies have indicated that increased parasympathetic activity by means of vagal stimulation may reduce mortality in animal models of postinfarction sudden cardiac death and of chronic heart failure. First clinical results have demonstrated that chronic vagus nerve stimulation in heart failure patients with severe systolic dysfunction appears to be safe and tolerable and may improve the quality of life and left ventricular (LV) function. Vagus nerve stimulation gives rise to these potential clinical benefits by multiple mechanisms of action, including reduced heart rate, restoration of heart rate variability and baroreflex sensitivity, suppression of proinflammatory cytokines and antiarrhythmic effects. First clinical results suggest that vagal nerve stimulation is safe and tolerable and could lead to a marked clinical improvement but discrepancies in the findings due to different study designs warrant further discussion. PMID:26555481

  19. Development Testing and Subsequent Failure Investigation of a Spring Strut Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dervan, Jared; Robertson, Brandon; Staab, Lucas; Culberson, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Commodities are transferred between the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) crew module (CM) and service module (SM) via an external umbilical that is driven apart with spring-loaded struts after the structural connection is severed. The spring struts must operate correctly for the modules to separate safely. There was no vibration testing of strut development units scoped in the MPCV Program Plan; therefore, any design problems discovered as a result of vibration testing would not have been found until the component qualification. The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) and Lockheed Martin (LM) performed random vibration testing on a single spring strut development unit to assess its ability to withstand qualification level random vibration environments. Failure of the strut while exposed to random vibration resulted in a follow-on failure investigation, design changes, and additional development tests. This paper focuses on the results of the failure investigations including identified lessons learned and best practices to aid in future design iterations of the spring strut and to help other mechanism developers avoid similar pitfalls.

  20. On the failure load and mechanism of polycrystalline graphene by nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Z. D.; Wan, Q.; Pei, Q. X.; Quek, S. S.; Liu, Z. S.; Zhang, Y. W.; Shenoy, V. B.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoindentation has been recently used to measure the mechanical properties of polycrystalline graphene. However, the measured failure loads are found to be scattered widely and vary from lab to lab. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of nanoindentation on polycrystalline graphene at different sites including grain center, grain boundary (GB), GB triple junction, and holes. Depending on the relative position between the indenter tip and defects, significant scattering in failure load is observed. This scattering is found to arise from a combination of the non-uniform stress state, varied and weakened strengths of different defects, and the relative location between the indenter tip and the defects in polycrystalline graphene. Consequently, the failure behavior of polycrystalline graphene by nanoindentation is critically dependent on the indentation site, and is thus distinct from uniaxial tensile loading. Our work highlights the importance of the interaction between the indentation tip and defects, and the need to explicitly consider the defect characteristics at and near the indentation site in polycrystalline graphene during nanoindentation. PMID:25500732

  1. Manipulating failure mechanism of rapid prototyped scaffolds by changing nodal connectivity and geometry of the pores.

    PubMed

    Amirkhani, Soodeh; Bagheri, Reza; Zehtab Yazdi, Alireza

    2012-11-15

    The performance of cellular solids in biomedical applications relies strongly on a detailed understanding of the effects of pore topology on mechanical properties. This study aims at characterizing the failure mechanism of scaffolds based on nodal connectivity (number of struts that meet in joints) and geometry of the pores. Plastic models of scaffolds having the same relative density but different cubic and trigonal unit cells were designed and then fabricated via three dimensional (3-D) printing. Unit cells were repeated in different arrangements in 3-D space. An in-situ imaging technique was utilized to study the progressive deformation of the scaffold models. Different nodal connectivities resulted in a wide range of compressive behaviors in scaffold models, from elastic-plastic to fully brittle. The Maxwell necessary criterion for rigidity was used to explain mechanical behavior of the scaffolds. Nodal connectivity of 4 satisfied Maxwell's criterion for rigidity in the examined structures. In a stress-strain curve of scaffolds with cubic unit cells and nodal connectivities of 3 and 4, pore deformation was observed after yielding. On the other hand, scaffolds with trigonal unit cells and nodal connectivities of 4 and 6, exhibited brittle behavior in the absence of pore deformation. These results highlight the role of nodal connectivity on failure mechanism and subsequently mechanical performance of scaffolds. This study reveals that appropriate pore geometry can provide sufficient condition for rigidity when Maxwell's necessary condition is satisfied. In addition, this study demonstrates that Maxwell's criterion can be used in pre-designing of pore geometries for scaffolds with distinct nodal connectivities. PMID:22985476

  2. DEFORMATION AND FRACTURE OF POORLY CONSOLIDATED MEDIA - Borehole Failure Mechanisms in High-Porosity Sandstone

    SciTech Connect

    Bezalel c. Haimson

    2005-06-10

    We investigated failure mechanisms around boreholes and the formation of borehole breakouts in high-porosity sandstone, with particular interest to grain-scale micromechanics of failure leading to the hitherto unrecognized fracture-like borehole breakouts and apparent compaction band formation in poorly consolidated granular materials. We also looked at a variety of drilling-related factors that contribute to the type, size and shape of borehole breakouts. The objective was to assess their effect on the ability to establish correlations between breakout geometry and in situ stress magnitudes, as well as on borehole stability prediction, and hydrocarbon/water extraction in general. We identified two classes of medium to high porosity (12-30%) sandstones, arkosic, consisting of 50-70% quartz and 15 to 50% feldspar, and quartz-rich sandstones, in which quartz grain contents varied from 90 to 100%. In arkose sandstones critical far-field stress magnitudes induced compressive failure around boreholes in the form of V-shaped (dog-eared) breakouts, the result of dilatant intra-and trans-granular microcracking subparallel to both the maximum horizontal far-field stress and to the borehole wall. On the other hand, boreholes in quartz-rich sandstones failed by developing fracture-like breakouts. These are long and very narrow (several grain diameters) tabular failure zones perpendicular to the maximum stress. Evidence provided mainly by SEM observations suggests a failure process initiated by localized grain-bond loosening along the least horizontal far-field stress springline, the packing of these grains into a lower porosity compaction band resembling those discovered in Navajo and Aztec sandstones, and the emptying of the loosened grains by the circulating drilling fluid starting from the borehole wall. Although the immediate several grain layers at the breakout tip often contain some cracked or even crushed grains, the failure mechanism enabled by the formation of the compaction band is largely non-dilatant, a major departure from the dilatant mechanism observed in Tablerock sandstone. The experimental results suggest that unlike our previous assertion, the strength of grain bonding and the mineral composition, rather than the porosity, are major factors in the formation of compaction bands and the ensuing fracture-like breakouts. Some breakout dimensions in all rocks were correlatable to the far-field principal stresses, and could potentially be used (in conjunction with other information) as indicators of their magnitudes. However, we found that several factors can significantly influence breakout geometry. Larger boreholes and increased drilling-fluid flow rates produce longer fracture-like breakouts, suggesting that breakouts in field-scale wellbores could reach considerable lengths. On the other hand, increased drilling-fluid weight and increased drill-bit penetration rate resulted in a decrease in breakout length. These results indicate that breakout growth can be controlled to some degree by manipulating drilling variables. Realizing how drilling variables impact borehole breakout formation is important in understanding the process by which breakouts form and their potential use as indicators of the far-field in situ stress magnitudes and as sources of sand production. As our research indicates, the final breakout size and mechanism of formation can be a function of several variables and conditions, meaning there is still much to be understood about this phenomenon.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Bacteroidales Strain TBC1, a Novel Isolate from a Methanogenic Wastewater Treatment System

    PubMed Central

    Tourlousse, Dieter M.; Matsuura, Norihisa; Sun, Liwei; Toyonaga, Mayu; Kuroda, Kyohei; Ohashi, Akiko; Cruz, Rodrigo; Yamaguchi, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We report here the draft genome sequence of Bacteroidales strain TBC1, isolated from a methanogenic wastewater treatment system. The draft genome has a size of 4,514,407 bp and a G+C content of 46.7%. The predicted genomic content provides the basis for characterizing the metabolism and ecological strategies of strain TBC1. PMID:26450737

  4. A procedure for combining acoustically induced and mechanically induced loads (first passage failure design criterion)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, D. R.; Henricks, W.

    1983-01-01

    The combined load statistics are developed by taking the acoustically induced load to be a random population, assumed to be stationary. Each element of this ensemble of acoustically induced loads is assumed to have the same power spectral density (PSD), obtained previously from a random response analysis employing the given acoustic field in the STS cargo bay as a stationary random excitation. The mechanically induced load is treated as either (1) a known deterministic transient, or (2) a nonstationary random variable of known first and second statistical moments which vary with time. A method is then shown for determining the probability that the combined load would, at any time, have a value equal to or less than a certain level. Having obtained a statistical representation of how the acoustic and mechanical loads are expected to combine, an analytical approximation for defining design levels for these loads is presented using the First Passage failure criterion.

  5. Mechanisms and Clinical Consequences of Untreated Central Sleep Apnea in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Khayat, Rami; Ponikowski, Piotr; Augostini, Ralph; Stellbrink, Christoph; Mianulli, Marcus; Abraham, William T.

    2015-01-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is a highly prevalent, though often unrecognized, comorbidity in patients with heart failure (HF). Data from HF population studies suggest that it may present in 30% to 50% of HF patients. CSA is recognized as an important contributor to the progression of HF and to HF-related morbidity and mortality. Over the past 2 decades, an expanding body of research has begun to shed light on the pathophysiologic mechanisms of CSA. Armed with this growing knowledge base, the sleep, respiratory, and cardiovascular research communities have been working to identify ways to treat CSA in HF with the ultimate goal of improving patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. In this paper, we examine the current state of knowledge about the mechanisms of CSA in HF and review emerging therapies for this disorder. PMID:25572513

  6. Testing and Failure Mechanisms of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.; Hawkins-Reynolds, Ebony

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as specific spacecraft orientations in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and low beta angle Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents the results of testing that occurred from March through September of 2010 and builds on testing that occurred during the previous year.

  7. Failure Mechanism for Fast-Charged Lithium Metal Batteries with Liquid Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Lv, DP; Shao, YY; Lozano, T; Bennett, WD; Graff, GL; Polzin, B; Zhang, JG; Engelhard, MH; Saenz, NT; Henderson, WA; Bhattacharya, P; Liu, J; Xiao, J

    2014-09-11

    In recent years, the Li metal anode has regained a position of paramount research interest because of the necessity for employing Li metal in next-generation battery technologies such as Li-S and Li-O-2. Severely limiting this utilization, however, are the rapid capacity degradation and safety issues associated with rechargeable Li metal anodes. A fundamental understanding of the failure mechanism of Li metal at high charge rates has remained elusive due to the complicated interfacial chemistry that occurs between Li metal and liquid electrolytes. Here, it is demonstrated that at high current density the quick formation of a highly resistive solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) entangled with Li metal, which grows towards the bulk Li, dramatically increases up the cell impedance and this is the actual origin of the onset of cell degradation and failure. This is instead of dendritic or mossy Li growing outwards from the metal surface towards/through the separator and/or the consumption of the Li and electrolyte through side reactions. Interphase, in this context, refers to a substantive layer rather than a thin interfacial layer. Discerning the mechanisms and consequences for this interphase formation is crucial for resolving the stability and safety issues associated with Li metal anodes.

  8. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM's have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation. Nomenclature

  9. Development, Testing, and Failure Mechanisms of a Replicative Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Hansen, Scott; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Low Lunar Orbit (LLO). Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. One advantage that PCM s have over evaporators in this scenario is that they do not use a consumable. Wax PCM units have been baselined for the Orion thermal control system and also provide risk mitigation for the Altair Lander. However, the use of water as a PCM has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. An ice PCM heat exchanger that replicates the thermal energy storage capacity of an existing wax PCM unit was fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion are investigated. This paper presents the results to date of this investigation.

  10. Blood markers of oxidative stress predict weaning failure from mechanical ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Verona, Cléber; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; Teixeira, Cassiano; Medeiros, Tássia M; Alabarse, Paulo V; Salomon, Tiago B; Shüller, Ártur K; Maccari, Juçara G; Condessa, Robledo Leal; Oliveira, Roselaine P; Rios Vieira, Silvia R; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-01-01

    Patients undergoing mechanical ventilation (MV) often experience respiratory muscle dysfunction, which complicates the weaning process. There is no simple means to predict or diagnose respiratory muscle dysfunction because diagnosis depends on measurements in muscle diaphragmatic fibre. As oxidative stress is a key mechanism contributing to MV-induced respiratory muscle dysfunction, the aim of this study was to determine if differences in blood measures of oxidative stress in patients who had success and failure in a spontaneous breathing trial (SBT) could be used to predict the outcome of MV. This was a prospective analysis of MV-dependent patients (?72 hrs; n = 34) undergoing a standard weaning protocol. Clinical, laboratory and oxidative stress analyses were performed. Measurements were made on blood samples taken at three time-points: immediately before the trial, 30 min. into the trial in weaning success (WS) patients, or immediately before return to MV in weaning failure (WF) patients, and 6 hrs after the trial. We found that blood measures of oxidative stress distinguished patients who would experience WF from patients who would experience WS. Before SBT, WF patients presented higher oxidative damage in lipids and higher antioxidant levels and decreased nitric oxide concentrations. The observed differences in measures between WF and WS patients persisted throughout and after the weaning trial. In conclusion, WF may be predicted based on higher malondialdehyde, higher vitamin C and lower nitric oxide concentration in plasma. PMID:25854285

  11. An investigation on mechanical failure of hip joint using finite element method.

    PubMed

    Sofuoglu, Hasan; Cetin, Mehmet Emin

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study how the stress distributions of the hip joint's components were changed if the activity was switched from walking to stair climbing for three different prostheses types subjected to either concentrated or distributed load. In the scope of the study, three different cemented prostheses, namely, Charnley, Muller, and Hipokrat were used for cemented total hip arthroplasty (THA) reconstruction. The finite element modeling of the hip joint with prosthesis was developed for both hip contact and muscle forces during walking and stair climbing activities. The finite element analyses were then pursued for both concentrated and distributed loading conditions applied statically on these models. Maximum von Mises stresses and strains occurred on the cortical and trabecular layers of bones; prosthesis and cement mantle were determined in order to investigate the mechanical failure of cemented THA reconstruction subjected to the different femoral loading and the activity conditions. This study showed that prosthesis, loading, and activity types had a significant effect on the stresses of components of the hip joint utilized for predicting mechanical failure of the cemented THA reconstruction. PMID:25996481

  12. Mechanical Circulatory Support for End-Stage Heart Failure in Repaired and Palliated Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Joseph B; Pauliks, Linda B; Myers, John L; Ündar, Akif

    2011-01-01

    Approximately one in one hundred children is born with congenital heart disease. Most can be managed with corrective or palliative surgery but a small group will develop severe heart failure, leaving cardiac transplantation as the ultimate treatment option. Unfortunately, due to the inadequate number of available donor organs, only a small number of patients can benefit from this therapy, and mortality remains high for pediatric patients awaiting heart transplantation, especially compared to adults. The purpose of this review is to describe the potential role of mechanical circulatory support in this context and to review current experience. For patients with congenital heart disease, ventricular assist devices are most commonly used as a bridge to cardiac transplantation, an application which has been shown to have several important advantages over medical therapy alone or support with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, including improved survival to transplant, less exposure to blood products with less immune sensitization, and improved organ function. While these devices may improve wait list mortality, the chronic shortage of donor organs for children is likely to remain a problem into the foreseeable future. Therefore, there is great interest in the development of mechanical ventricular assist devices as potential destination therapy for congenital heart disease patients with end-stage heart failure. This review first discusses the experience with the currently available ventricular assist devices in children with congenital heart disease, and then follows to discuss what devices are under development and may reach the bedside soon. PMID:22548033

  13. Mechanics-Based Definition of Safety Factors Against Flow Failure in Unsaturated Shallow Slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscarnera, G.; Lizarraga-Barrera, J.

    2014-12-01

    Physical models for landslide forecasting rely on the combination of hydrologic models for water infiltration and stability criteria based on infinite slope mechanics. Such concepts can be used to derive safety factors for shallow landsliding, in which the mobilization of the soil cover is associated with the attainment of critical values of pore water pressures expressed as a function of the frictional strength. While such models capture the role of important geomorphic features and geotechnical properties, their performance depends on the validity of the postulate of frictional failure. As a result, the safety factors do not to consider a broader range of solid-fluid interactions promoting different slope failure mechanisms, such as flow slides. This work combines principles of soil stability, unsaturated soil mechanics and plasticity theory to derive an alternative set of safety factors. While frictional slips are included in the study as a particular case, the proposed analytical methodology can also be applied to cases in which an increase in degree of saturation promotes liquefaction instabilities, i.e. possible transitions from solid- to fluid-like response. The study shows that the incorporation of principles of unsaturated soil mechanics into slope stability analyses generates suction-dependent coefficients that alter the value of the safety factors. As a result, while the proposed approach can still be combined with standard hydrologic models simulating the evolution of pore pressures in the near-surface, it can also provide a spatially distributed assessment of evolving safety conditions in landscapes susceptible to landslides of the flow type.

  14. Probing the intrinsic failure mechanism of fluorinated amorphous carbon film based on the first-principles calculations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ren-hui; Wang, Li-ping; Lu, Zhi-bin

    2015-01-01

    Fluorinated amorphous carbon films exhibit superlow friction under vacuum, but are prone to catastrophic failure. Thus far, the intrinsic failure mechanism remains unclear. A prevailing view is that the failure of amorphous carbon film results from the plastic deformation of substrates or strong adhesion between two contacted surfaces. In this paper, using first-principles and molecular dynamics methodology, combining with compressive stress-strain relation, we firstly demonstrate that the plastic deformation induces graphitization resulting in strong adhesion between two contacted surfaces under vacuum, which directly corresponds to the cause of the failure of the films. In addition, sliding contact experiments are conducted to study tribological properties of iron and fluorinated amorphous carbon surfaces under vacuum. The results show that the failure of the film is directly attributed to strong adhesion resulting from high degree of graphitization of the film, which are consistent with the calculated results. PMID:25803202

  15. Impact of mechanical- and maintenance-induced failures of main reactor coolant pump seals on plant safety

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M A; Boccio, J L; Mitra, S

    1985-12-01

    This document presents an investigation of the safety impact resulting from mechanical- and maintenance-induced reactor coolant pump (RCP) seal failures in nuclear power plants. A data survey of the pump seal failures for existing nuclear power plants in the US from several available sources was performed. The annual frequency of pump seal failures in a nuclear power plant was estimated based on the concept of hazard rate and dependency evaluation. The conditional probability of various sizes of leak rates given seal failures was then evaluated. The safety impact of RCP seal failures, in terms of contribution to plant core-melt frequency, was also evaluated for three nuclear power plants. For leak rates below the normal makeup capacity and the impact of plant safety were discussed qualitatively, whereas for leak rates beyond the normal make up capacity, formal PRA methodologies were applied. 22 refs., 17 figs., 19 tabs.

  16. How can health literacy influence outcomes in heart failure patients? Mechanisms and interventions.

    PubMed

    Westlake, Cheryl; Sethares, Kristen; Davidson, Patricia

    2013-09-01

    Health literacy is discussed in papers from 25 countries where findings suggest that approximately a third up to one half of the people in developed countries have low health literacy. Specifically, health literacy is the mechanism by which individuals obtain and use health information to make health decisions about individual treatments in the home, access care in the community, promote provider-patient interactions, structure self-care, and navigate health care programs both locally and nationally. Further, health literacy is a key determinant of health and a critical dimension for assessing individuals' needs, and, importantly, their capacity for self-care. Poorer health knowledge/status, more medication errors, costs, and higher rates of morbidity, readmissions, emergency room visits, and mortality among patients with health illiteracy have been demonstrated. Individuals at high risk for low health literacy include the elderly, disabled, Blacks, those with a poverty-level income, some or less high school education, either no insurance or Medicare or Medicaid, and those for whom English is a second language. As a consequence, health literacy is a complex, multifaceted, and evolving construct including aspects of social, psychological, cultural and economic circumstances. The purpose of this paper is to describe the mechanisms and consequences of health illiteracy. Specifically, the prevalence, associated demographics, and models of health literacy are described. The mechanism of health illiteracy's influence on outcomes in heart failure is proposed. Tools for health literacy assessment are described and compared. Finally, the health outcomes and general interventions to enhance the health outcomes in heart failure are discussed. PMID:23873404

  17. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Ferritic Steels: Deformation and Failure Mechanisms and Challenges in the Oil and Gas Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Neeraj, T.

    2014-08-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of steels continues to be an area of interest for the oil and gas (O&G) industry. Despite significant research, the mechanism(s) governing failure in the presence of hydrogen remains to be fully resolved. This article attempts to highlight key features of one recently proposed mechanism, with emphasis on the evolution of hydrogen induced damage leading to failure. It also discusses areas for future research in HE. Finally, an attempt is made to highlight the challenges posed by HE in the O&G industry service.

  18. Simulation of localization failure with strain-gradient-enhanced damage mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiyuan; Zhao, Jidong; Liu, Yuangao; Yang, Qiang

    2002-07-01

    Strain gradient implies an important characteristic in localized damage deformation, which can be observed in the softening state of brittle materials, and strain gradients constitute the basic behaviours of localization failure area of the materials. The most important point in strain gradient is its damaging function including an internal length scale, which can be used to express the scale effects of mechanical responses of brittle rock mass. By extending the strain gradient theory and introducing an intrinsic material length scale into the constitutive law, the authors develop an isotropic damage model as well as a micro-crack-based anisotropic damage model for rock-like materials in this paper. The proposed models were used to simulate the damage localization under uniaxial tension and plain strain compression, respectively. The simulated results well illustrated the potential of these models in dealing with the well-known mesh-sensitivity problem in FEM. In the computation, elements with C1 continuity have been implemented to incorporate the proposed models for failure localization. When regular rectangle elements are encountered, the coupling between finite difference method (FDM) and conventional finite element method (FEM) is used to avoid large modification to the existing FEM code, and to obtain relatively higher efficiency and reasonably good accuracy. Application of the anisotropic model to the 3D-non-linear FEM analysis of Ertan arch dam has been conducted and the results of its numerical simulation coincide well with those from the failure behaviours obtained by Ertan geophysical model test. In this paper, new applications of gradient theories and models for a feasible approach to simulate localized damage in brittle materials are presented.

  19. Deformation and failure mechanisms in titanium-aluminum-vanadium/titanium carbide particulate and layered composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagoner Johnson, Amy Jaye

    Composite materials are attractive for high performance applications due to their high specific strengths. The compressive deformation behavior of Ti-6Al-4V (Ti64) and Ti64/TiC particulate and layered composites was studied for ballistic applications at strain rates from 0.1 s-1 to 1000 s-1 and strengthening and failure mechanisms were identified. The behavior of Ti64 with the equiaxed and Widmanstatten microstructures was characterized in order to interpret data from the composite materials. The interstitial content was determined to influence yield stress more than grain size. True stress - true strain behavior at 0.1 s-1 was influenced by damage accumulation while at 1.0 s-1 and 10 s-1 behavior was more influenced by thermal softening occurring in regions of intense inhomogeneous deformation. The aspect ratio of the laths in the Widmanstatten microstructure facilitated softening and failure compared to the equiaxed microstructure due to the available shear and crack paths. Failure occurred by fracture along adiabatic shear bands at 10 s-1. The yield strength of the particulate composites increased significantly with the addition of only 1%TiC. TEM results showed a carbon deficiency in the TiC. Carbon in solution was the most potent strengthening mechanism. Load transfer and an increased dislocation density contributed to a much lesser degree. Grain size and subgrain size refinement were not considered to be important strengthening mechanisms. Samples tested at high strain rates failed along adiabatic shear bands at smaller strains than those to which the monolithic material was tested. Two symmetric three-layered composites consisting of Ti64 and Ti64/10%TiC were fabricated and tested. Grain growth occurred across the layer-interface, eliminating the interface. Both layered structures had higher strengths than the Ti64 and more damage resistance than Ti64/10TiC. Large cracks were deflected away from the interface. A simple finite element model accounted for the engineering stress-strain behavior and the macroscopic specimen shape-change.

  20. Sharp symmetry-change marks the mechanical failure transition of glasses

    PubMed Central

    Denisov, Dmitry V.; Dang, Minh Triet; Struth, Bernd; Zaccone, Alessio; Wegdam, Gerard H.; Schall, P.

    2015-01-01

    Glasses acquire their solid-like properties by cooling from the supercooled liquid via a continuous transition known as the glass transition. Recent research on soft glasses indicates that besides temperature, another route to liquify glasses is by application of stress that drives relaxation and flow. Here, we show that unlike the continuous glass transition, the failure of glasses to applied stress occurs by a sharp symmetry change that reminds of first-order equilibrium transitions. Using simultaneous x-ray scattering during the oscillatory rheology of a colloidal glass, we identify a sharp symmetry change from anisotropic solid to isotropic liquid structure at the crossing of the storage and loss moduli. Concomitantly, intensity fluctuations sharply acquire Gaussian distributions characteristic of liquids. Our observations and theoretical framework identify mechanical failure as a sharp atomic affine-to-nonaffine transition, providing a new conceptual paradigm of the oscillatory yielding of this technologically important class of materials, and offering new perspectives on the glass transition. PMID:26403482

  1. Mechanical circulatory support for right heart failure: current technology and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Po-Lin; Parker, Jack; Egger, Christina; Autschbach, Rüdiger; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2012-04-01

    The increasing global prevalence of congestive heart failure is a major healthcare concern, accounting for a high morbidity rate worldwide. In particular, isolated right heart dysfunction after cardiotomy has a poor prognosis and is associated with a high mortality rate. The occurrence of postoperative right heart failure may develop in more than 40% of patients undergoing implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) and cardiac transplantation. To date, mechanical cardiac assistance in the form of VADs has become accepted as a therapeutic solution for end-stage patients when a donor heart is not available. However, right ventricular (RV) assistance is still in the early phase of development when compared with LVAD technology. State-of-the-art RVADs, both in clinical use and under development, are reviewed in this manuscript. Clinical RVADs include the extracorporeal pulsatile Abiomed BVS 5000 and AB5000, Thoratec PVAD, MEDOS VAD, BerlinHeart Excor, the percutaneous continuous flow CentriMag and TandemHeart systems, and the implantable Thoratec IVAD. Devices on the horizon, including the wear-free implantable DexAide and the minimally invasive Impella RD, are additionally reviewed. In addition to the current status of RV assistance, as well as the device categorization, the outlook and considerations for successful development of future RVADs were discussed. PMID:22150419

  2. Linking Seismicity at Depth to the Mechanics of a Lava Dome Failure - a Forecasting Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvage, R. O.; Neuberg, J. W.; Murphy, W.

    2014-12-01

    Soufriere Hills volcano (SHV), Montserrat has been in a state of ongoing unrest since 1995. Prior to eruptions, an increase in the number of seismic events has been observed. We use the Material Failure Law (MFL) (Voight, 1988) to investigate how an accelerating number of low frequency seismic events are related to the timing of a large scale dome collapse in June 1997. We show that although the forecasted timing of a dome collapse may coincide with the known timing, the accuracy of the application of the MFL to the data is poor. Using a cross correlation technique we show how characterising seismicity into similar waveform "families'' allows us to focus on a single process at depth and improve the reliability of our forecast. A number of families are investigated to assess their relative importance. We show that despite the timing of a forecasted dome collapse ranging between several hours of the known timing of collapse, each of the families produces a better forecast in terms of fit to the seismic acceleration data than when using all low frequency seismicity. In addition, we investigate the stability of such families between major dome collapses (1997 and 2003), assessing their potential for use in real-time forecasting. Initial application of Grey's Incidence Analysis suggests that a key parameter influencing the potential for a large scale slumping on the dome of SHV is the rate of low frequency seismicity associated with magma movement and dome growth. We undertook numerical modelling of an andesitic dome with a hydrothermally altered layer down to 800m. The geometry of the dome is based on SHV prior to the collapse of 2003. We show that a critical instability is reached once slope angles exceed 25°, corresponding to a summit height of just over 1100m a.s.l.. The geometry of failure is in close agreement with the identified failure plane suggesting that the input mechanical properties are broadly consistent with reality. We are therefore able to compare different failure geometries based on edifice geomorphology and determine a Factor of Safety associated with such scenarios. This modelling would be extremely useful in a holistic forecasting approach within a volcanic environment. Reference: Voight, B. (1988). A method for prediction of volcanic eruptions. Nature, 332: 125-130.

  3. Failure Mechanisms and Life Prediction of Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings under Thermal Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zju, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis J.; Miller, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBCs) will play an increasingly important role in gas turbine engines because of their ability to further raise engine temperatures. However, the issue of coating durability is of major concern under high-heat-flux conditions. In particular, the accelerated coating delamination crack growth under the engine high heat-flux conditions is not well understood. In this paper, a laser heat flux technique is used to investigate the coating delamination crack propagation under realistic temperature-stress gradients and thermal cyclic conditions. The coating delamination mechanisms are investigated under various thermal loading conditions, and are correlated with coating dynamic fatigue, sintering and interfacial adhesion test results. A coating life prediction framework may be realized by examining the crack initiation and propagation driving forces for coating failure under high-heat-flux test conditions.

  4. Durable mechanical circulatory support in advanced heart failure: a critical care cardiology perspective.

    PubMed

    Lala, Anuradha; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2013-11-01

    Though cardiac transplantation for advanced heart disease patients remains definitive therapy for patients with advanced heart failure, it is challenged by inadequate donor supply, causing durable mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to slowly become a new primary standard. Selecting appropriate patients for MCS involves meeting a number of prespecifications as is required in evaluation for cardiac transplant candidacy. As technology evolves to bring forth more durable smaller devices, selection criteria for appropriate MCS recipients will likely expand to encompass a broader, less sick population. The "Holy Grail" for MCS will be a focus on clinical recovery and explantation of devices rather than the currently more narrowly defined indications of bridge to transplantation or lifetime device therapy. PMID:24188222

  5. [Mechanical therapy of terminal renal failure--outdated, proven and new procedures].

    PubMed

    Gurland, H J

    1986-01-31

    The arsenal of mechanical techniques, which is presently a part of the nephrological daily routine, has become so extensive, that it seems essential to differentiate between those methods which are out-dated, proven, or new. This differentiation can be summarized as follows: The subcutaneous Cimino fistula is preferred in 95% of dialysis patients. The Scribner shunt remains applicable for exceptional situations. In peritoneal dialysis the flexible Teckhoff catheter has replaced the "repeated puncture technique" which used rigid teflon catheters. Hemodialysis, especially in its cost efficient application as limited care or home dialysis, has proven itself reliable and now accounts for the majority of treatments. Hemofiltration and hemodiafiltration offer significant advantages, however, their application is growing slowly, apparently due to the higher costs involved. CAPD represents an alternative treatment which is applicable to 10% of end-stage renal failure patients. PMID:3962320

  6. Mechanical Properties and Failure Investigation of Metallic Open Lattice Cellular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labeas, George N.; Sunaric, Milan M.; Ptochos, Vangelis P.

    A generic open lattice cellular structure under compressive loading is investigated by means of numerical analysis. The cellular structure is produced of stainless steel sheets using the punching and folding technique. The Finite Element method is used to derive the most important structural core properties, i.e. elasticity modulus, plateau stress and compaction strain, as well as to study the non-linear response and complex failure processes that occur as the core collapses in compression. Two concurrent Finite Element models are developed, a simple beam element model and a more complicated shell element model. The results obtained from simulations of the structure under compressive loading using the two versions of the FE modeling are compared to results of quasi — static compression experimental tests. The influence of geometrical parameters and strut cross section parameters on the core structure mechanical properties is parametrically studied.

  7. Crystal Structures of Human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 (AS160) RabGTPase-activating Protein (RabGAP) Domains Reveal Critical Elements for GLUT4 Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    S Park; W Jin; S Shoelson

    2011-12-31

    We have solved the x-ray crystal structures of the RabGAP domains of human TBC1D1 and human TBC1D4 (AS160), at 2.2 and 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Like the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP domain, whose structure was solved previously in complex with mouse Rab33B, the human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 domains both have 16 {alpha}-helices and no {beta}-sheet elements. We expected the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure to predict the corresponding interfaces between cognate mammalian RabGAPs and Rabs, but found that residues were poorly conserved. We further tested the relevance of this model by Ala-scanning mutagenesis, but only one of five substitutions within the inferred binding site of the TBC1D1 RabGAP significantly perturbed catalytic efficiency. In addition, substitution of TBC1D1 residues with corresponding residues from Gyp1p did not enhance catalytic efficiency. We hypothesized that biologically relevant RabGAP/Rab partners utilize additional contacts not described in the yeast Gyp1p/mouse Rab33B structure, which we predicted using our two new human TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 structures. Ala substitution of TBC1D1 Met{sup 930}, corresponding to a residue outside of the Gyp1p/Rab33B contact, substantially reduced catalytic activity. GLUT4 translocation assays confirmed the biological relevance of our findings. Substitutions with lowest RabGAP activity, including catalytically dead RK and Met{sup 930} and Leu{sup 1019} predicted to perturb Rab binding, confirmed that biological activity requires contacts between cognate RabGAPs and Rabs beyond those in the yeast Gyp1p RabGAP/mouse Rab33B structure.

  8. Nonlinear elastic behavior and failure mechanism of polyhedral graphite particles undergoing uniaxial compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B.; Zhang, P.; Fu, Q. Q.; Li, X. F.; Zhao, X.; Song, X. L.

    2014-08-01

    Load-displacement responses and ultimate strength of polyhedral graphite particles (PGPs) undergoing in situ nano-compression at ambient temperature have been studied. The dynamic responses of PGPs to uniaxial loads exhibit a typical nonlinear elastic behavior for graphitic nanomaterials. Based on the analysis of stress-strain relationship, the intrinsic strength is slightly larger than actual ultimate strength, indicating the mechanical properties influenced by the initial defects in PGPs. For a given case, compressive Young's modulus E and third-order elastic modulus D achieve to 12.8 GPa and -13.9 GPa, respectively. Weibull probability analysis confirmed its broad range of structural defects inside PGPs and mechanical properties are sensitive to initial defects. The values of ultimate strength of tested PGPs with diameter of 150-400 nm fall within 2-4.5 GPa, which are in the range between shear elastic modulus C44 of turbo-g (minimum) and C44 of hex-g (maximum) in the literature. The deformation and failure mechanisms are discussed and rationalized in terms of structural factors and elastic moduli of perfect graphite crystals.

  9. The unsteady nature of sea cliff retreat due to mechanical abrasion, failure and comminution feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, Shaun W.; Adams, Peter N.; Limber, Patrick W.

    2014-08-01

    Sea cliff retreat is often linked to large waves, heavy precipitation and seismic events, but the specific operative mechanics have not been well constrained. In particular, what is the role of mechanical abrasion by beach sediments in cliff/platform evolution and how does it relate to the episodic nature of cliff retreat observed at certain locations? Here we present a simple, numerical model of sea cliff retreat that incorporates mechanical abrasion of a basal notch, threshold-controlled failure of the cantilevered block, and a feedback mechanism wherein retreat is dependent on the rate of sediment comminution within the surf zone. Using shore platform and cliff characteristics found in two coastal settings (the central California coast and the English North Sea coast), the model produces retreat rates comparable to those observed via field measurements. The highest retreat rates coincide with the steepest shore platforms and increasing wave height. Steeper platforms promote wave access to the cliff toe and, correspondingly, the receding cliff face produces additional accommodation space for the platform beach, preserving the erosive efficacy of the beach sediments. When exposed to energetic wave forcing, the slope of the inner platform segment controls retreat rates for concave platforms, whereas the slope of the outer platform segment exerts greater control for convex platforms. Platform beaches approached a long-term dynamic equilibrium on the concave profiles, leading to more consistent and steady retreat. Platform beaches were ephemeral on convex profiles, mirroring observed sand wave (Ord) migration on the Holderness coast, UK. These findings agree with previous field observations and support mechanical abrasion as a viable cause of temporal heterogeneity in cliff retreat rate for both coastlines.

  10. Shale Failure Mechanics and Intervention Measures in Underground Coal Mines: Results From 50 Years of Ground Control Safety Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ground control research in underground coal mines has been ongoing for over 50 years. One of the most problematic issues in underground coal mines is roof failures associated with weak shale. This paper will present a historical narrative on the research the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health has conducted in relation to rock mechanics and shale. This paper begins by first discussing how shale is classified in relation to coal mining. Characterizing and planning for weak roof sequences is an important step in developing an engineering solution to prevent roof failures. Next, the failure mechanics associated with the weak characteristics of shale will be discussed. Understanding these failure mechanics also aids in applying the correct engineering solutions. The various solutions that have been implemented in the underground coal mining industry to control the different modes of failure will be summarized. Finally, a discussion on current and future research relating to rock mechanics and shale is presented. The overall goal of the paper is to share the collective ground control experience of controlling roof structures dominated by shale rock in underground coal mining. PMID:26549926

  11. TBC1D9B functions as a GTPase-activating protein for Rab11a in polarized MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Luciana I.; Liao, Yong; Ruiz, Wily G.; Clayton, Dennis R.; Li, Min; Liu, Yong-Jian; Jiang, Yu; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Apodaca, Gerard; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Rab11a is a key modulator of vesicular trafficking processes, but there is limited information about the guanine nucleotide-exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) that regulate its GTP-GDP cycle. We observed that in the presence of Mg2+ (2.5 mM), TBC1D9B interacted via its Tre2-Bub2-Cdc16 (TBC) domain with Rab11a, Rab11b, and Rab4a in a nucleotide-dependent manner. However, only Rab11a was a substrate for TBC1D9B-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. At limiting Mg2+ concentrations (<0.5 mM), Rab8a was an additional substrate for this GAP. In polarized Madin–Darby canine kidney cells, endogenous TBC1D9B colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes but less so with EEA1-positive early endosomes, transferrin-positive recycling endosomes, or late endosomes. Overexpression of TBC1D9B, but not an inactive mutant, decreased the rate of basolateral-to-apical IgA transcytosis—a Rab11a-dependent pathway—and shRNA-mediated depletion of TBC1D9B increased the rate of this process. In contrast, TBC1D9B had no effect on two Rab11a-independent pathways—basolateral recycling of the transferrin receptor or degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Finally, expression of TBC1D9B decreased the amount of active Rab11a in the cell and concomitantly disrupted the interaction between Rab11a and its effector, Sec15A. We conclude that TBC1D9B is a Rab11a GAP that regulates basolateral-to-apical transcytosis in polarized MDCK cells. PMID:25232007

  12. TBC1D9B functions as a GTPase-activating protein for Rab11a in polarized MDCK cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Luciana I; Liao, Yong; Ruiz, Wily G; Clayton, Dennis R; Li, Min; Liu, Yong-Jian; Jiang, Yu; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Apodaca, Gerard; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2014-11-15

    Rab11a is a key modulator of vesicular trafficking processes, but there is limited information about the guanine nucleotide-exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) that regulate its GTP-GDP cycle. We observed that in the presence of Mg(2+) (2.5 mM), TBC1D9B interacted via its Tre2-Bub2-Cdc16 (TBC) domain with Rab11a, Rab11b, and Rab4a in a nucleotide-dependent manner. However, only Rab11a was a substrate for TBC1D9B-stimulated GTP hydrolysis. At limiting Mg(2+) concentrations (<0.5 mM), Rab8a was an additional substrate for this GAP. In polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells, endogenous TBC1D9B colocalized with Rab11a-positive recycling endosomes but less so with EEA1-positive early endosomes, transferrin-positive recycling endosomes, or late endosomes. Overexpression of TBC1D9B, but not an inactive mutant, decreased the rate of basolateral-to-apical IgA transcytosis--a Rab11a-dependent pathway--and shRNA-mediated depletion of TBC1D9B increased the rate of this process. In contrast, TBC1D9B had no effect on two Rab11a-independent pathways--basolateral recycling of the transferrin receptor or degradation of the epidermal growth factor receptor. Finally, expression of TBC1D9B decreased the amount of active Rab11a in the cell and concomitantly disrupted the interaction between Rab11a and its effector, Sec15A. We conclude that TBC1D9B is a Rab11a GAP that regulates basolateral-to-apical transcytosis in polarized MDCK cells. PMID:25232007

  13. The renal nerves in chronic heart failure: efferent and afferent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, Alicia M.; Pellegrino, Peter R.; Zucker, Irving H.

    2015-01-01

    The function of the renal nerves has been an area of scientific and medical interest for many years. The recent advent of a minimally invasive catheter-based method of renal denervation has renewed excitement in understanding the afferent and efferent actions of the renal nerves in multiple diseases. While hypertension has been the focus of much this work, less attention has been given to the role of the renal nerves in the development of chronic heart failure (CHF). Recent studies from our laboratory and those of others implicate an essential role for the renal nerves in the development and progression of CHF. Using a rabbit tachycardia model of CHF and surgical unilateral renal denervation, we provide evidence for both renal efferent and afferent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of CHF. Renal denervation prevented the decrease in renal blood flow observed in CHF while also preventing increases in Angiotensin-II receptor protein in the microvasculature of the renal cortex. Renal denervation in CHF also reduced physiological markers of autonomic dysfunction including an improvement in arterial baroreflex function, heart rate variability, and decreased resting cardiac sympathetic tone. Taken together, the renal sympathetic nerves are necessary in the pathogenesis of CHF via both efferent and afferent mechanisms. Additional investigation is warranted to fully understand the role of these nerves and their role as a therapeutic target in CHF. PMID:26300788

  14. Failure of Mineralized Collagen Microfibrils Using Finite Element Simulation Coupled to Mechanical Quasi-brittle Damage

    E-print Network

    Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Hambli, Ridha; 10.1016/j.proeng.2011.04.526

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a multiscale heterogeneous materiel of which principal function is to support the body structure and to resist mechanical loading and fractures. Bone strength does not depend only on the quantity and quality of bone which is characterized by the geometry and the shape of bones but also on the mechanical proprieties of its compounds, which have a significant influence on its deformation and failure. This work aim to use a 3D nano-scale finite element model coupled to the concept of quasi-brittle damage with the behaviour law isotropic elasticity to investigate the fracture behaviour of composite materiel collagen-mineral (mineralized collagen microfibril). Fracture stress-number of cross-links and damping capacity-number of cross-links curves were obtained under tensile loading conditions at different densities of the mineral phase. The obtained results show that number of cross-links as well as the density of mineral has an important influence on the strength of microfibrils which in turn clarify the ...

  15. [Non-invasive positive pressure mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory failure].

    PubMed

    Scala, R

    2000-10-01

    Known for two centuries, positive pressure non invasive mechanical ventilation (VMNPP) has been widely applied in acute respiratory failure (IRA) only in the last ten years. The fact that VMNPP is able to improve gas exchange by avoiding endotracheal intubation and its complications is the most attractive aspect in both general and respiratory intensive care units and in the respiratory ward. Characteristics of VMNPP (interface, ventilator and modality of ventilation), the side where it is performed as well as severity of IRA, underlying disease, and the team's experience are important factors which influence outcome. The addition of VMNPP to conventional medical therapy reduces the need for IE, mortality and hospitalisation in a selected population of BPCO patients in IRA. As there are no available data for comparison between invasive mechanical ventilation (VMI) and VMNPP, the latter has not to be considered as an alternative to VMI but able to prevent it and, even if VMNPP fails, it may be used as a weaning technique. In IRA due to other than BPCO diseases VMNPP seems not to be more effective than standard treatment in avoiding IE but it may give efficient support with fewer complications as compared to VMI. Acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema and "terminal" diseases represent some of the most interesting application fields of VMNPP in non-BPCO patients. According to the latest literature data, in this review history, technique, advantages, limits, indications, nursing and cost of VMNPP are examined. PMID:11194980

  16. Mechanical behavior and localized failure modes in a porous basalt from the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, S.; Fortin, J.; Schubnel, A.; Gueguen, Y.; Vinciguerra, S.; Moreira, M.

    2012-10-01

    Basaltic rocks are the main component of the oceanic upper crust, thus of potential interest for water and geothermal resources, storage of CO2 and volcanic edifice stability. In this work, we investigated experimentally the mechanical behavior and the failure modes of a porous basalt, with an initial connected porosity of 18%. Results were acquired under triaxial compression experiments at confining pressure in the range of 25-200 MPa on water saturated samples. In addition, a purely hydrostatic test was also performed to reach the pore collapse critical pressure P*. During hydrostatic loading, our results show that the permeability is highly pressure dependent, which suggests that the permeability is mainly controlled by pre-existing cracks. When the sample is deformed at pressure higher than the pore collapse pressure P*, some very small dilatancy develops due to microcracking, and an increase in permeability is observed. Under triaxial loading, two modes of deformation can be highlighted. At low confining pressure (Pc < 50 MPa), the samples are brittle and shear localization occurs. For confining pressure > 50 MPa, the stress-strain curves are characterized by strain hardening and volumetric compaction. Stress drops are also observed, suggesting that compaction may be localized. The presence of compaction bands is confirmed by our microstructure analysis. In addition, the mechanical data allows us to plot the full yield surface for this porous basalt, which follows an elliptic cap as previously observed in high porosity sandstones and limestones.

  17. Mechanisms of decompensation and organ failure in cirrhosis: From peripheral arterial vasodilation to systemic inflammation hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Mauro; Moreau, Richard; Angeli, Paolo; Schnabl, Bernd; Arroyo, Vicente

    2015-11-01

    The peripheral arterial vasodilation hypothesis has been most influential in the field of cirrhosis and its complications. It has given rise to hundreds of pathophysiological studies in experimental and human cirrhosis and is the theoretical basis of life-saving treatments. It is undisputed that splanchnic arterial vasodilation contributes to portal hypertension and is the basis for manifestations such as ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, but the body of research generated by the hypothesis has revealed gaps in the original pathophysiological interpretation of these complications. The expansion of our knowledge on the mechanisms regulating vascular tone, inflammation and the host-microbiota interaction require a broader approach to advanced cirrhosis encompassing the whole spectrum of its manifestations. Indeed, multiorgan dysfunction and failure likely result from a complex interplay where the systemic spread of bacterial products represents the primary event. The consequent activation of the host innate immune response triggers endothelial molecular mechanisms responsible for arterial vasodilation, and also jeopardizes organ integrity with a storm of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Thus, the picture of advanced cirrhosis could be seen as the result of an inflammatory syndrome in contradiction with a simple hemodynamic disturbance. PMID:26192220

  18. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) scintigraphy detects impaired myocardial sympathetic neuronal transport function of canine mechanical-overload heart failure

    SciTech Connect

    Rabinovitch, M.A.; Rose, C.P.; Rouleau, J.L.; Chartrand, C.; Wieland, D.M.; Lepanto, L.; Legault, F.; Suissa, S.; Rosenthall, L.; Burgess, J.H.

    1987-12-01

    In heart failure secondary to chronic mechanical overload, cardiac sympathetic neurons demonstrate depressed catecholamine synthetic and transport function. To assess the potential of sympathetic neuronal imaging for detection of depressed transport function, serial scintigrams were acquired after the intravenous administration of metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) to 13 normal dogs, 3 autotransplanted (denervated) dogs, 5 dogs with left ventricular failure, and 5 dogs with compensated left ventricular hypertrophy due to a surgical arteriovenous shunt. Nine dogs were killed at 14 hours postinjection for determination of metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) and endogenous norepinephrine content in left atrium, left ventricle, liver, and spleen. By 4 hours postinjection, autotransplanted dogs had a 39% reduction in mean left ventricular tracer accumulation, reflecting an absent intraneuronal tracer pool. Failure dogs demonstrated an accelerated early mean left ventricular tracer efflux rate (26.0%/hour versus 13.7%/hour in normals), reflecting a disproportionately increased extraneuronal tracer pool. They also showed reduced late left ventricular and left atrial concentrations of tracer, consistent with a reduced intraneuronal tracer pool. By contrast, compensated hypertrophy dogs demonstrated a normal early mean left ventricular tracer efflux rate (16.4%/hour) and essentially normal late left ventricular and left atrial concentrations of tracer. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I) scintigraphic findings reflect the integrity of the cardiac sympathetic neuronal transport system in canine mechanical-overload heart failure. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 123/I) scintigraphy should be explored as a means of early detection of mechanical-overload heart failure in patients.

  19. Constructing an effective prevention mechanism for MSW lifecycle using failure mode and effects analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chu; Wu, Wen-Fang

    2015-12-01

    Municipal solid waste in Taiwan is a valuable source of renewable energy. Phases of municipal solid waste lifecycle (classification, disposal, storage, collection and transportation) before incineration or landfilled face various potential failures. Applying a proper technique to eliminate or decrease potential failures is desirable and needed. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis to municipal solid waste lifecycle was found in literature. This study utilized the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis as a convenient technique for determining, classifying and analyzing common failures in the municipal solid waste lifecycle. As a result, an appropriate risk scoring of severity, occurrence, and detection of failure modes and computing the Risk Priority Number for identifying the high potential failure modes were made. Nineteen failure modes were identified, and nine of them were ranked as the priority items for improvement. Recommended actions for all failure modes were suggested. Occurrences of failures were remarkably reduced after implementing the procedure for six months. The results of this study have minimized potential failures and brought continuous improvement, thus achieving a better protection of the environment. PMID:26372404

  20. Investigation of failure mechanisms in high-power microwave transmission windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosman, Herman L.

    Thermal runaway and window failure restrict the power output of high power (˜1 MW), long pulse length (˜10 sec) gyrotrons used for plasma heating in magnetic confinement fusion experiments. Chemical vapor deposition diamond is used as window material due to its low loss tangent and high thermal conductivity, but still suffers from occasional, unpredictable failure. With the use of a simple model, it is shown that a uniform thin film of contaminant on a microwave window may absorb up to 50 percent of the incident power, even if the film thickness is only a small fraction of its resistive skin depth. The fraction of power absorbed by thin films on diamond gyrotron windows is estimated by comparison with published data obtained via two different experimental routes. Typically about a fraction of one percent of the incident power is absorbed by the thin films. Discontinuous surface films, where the surface contaminants have a patchy or island structure, are modeled with an equivalent transmission line circuit. Patchy surface contaminants on diamond gyrotron windows do not contribute significantly to the overall power absorbed on the window surface. An unexpected result is that most of the power is absorbed on the 'clean' window surface. The uniform thin film model is therefore adequate to describe surface power losses for diamond windows. The discontinuous film model, applied to alumina windows with TIN coatings, shows power absorption values of approximately 0.1--0.3%. Graphitic contaminants embedded in the CVD diamond absorb RE power from both the RE electric and magnetic field components. The absorbed power is insufficient to cause significant heating or cause graphitization in the diamond. The power absorbed in a diamond gyrotron window causes thermal gradient stresses in the window, with the maximum tensile stress occurring close to the window edge. For power absorption values up to 2000 W, the tensile stresses alone are insufficient to cause mechanical failure. For power absorption greater than about 2000 W the window edge temperature rise is sufficient to cause boiling of the cooling water circulating around the window periphery, which could lead to thermal runaway.

  1. Mechanical Failure Begins Preferentially Near Resorption Cavities in Human Vertebral Cancellous Bone Under Compression

    PubMed Central

    Slyfield, C.R.; Tkachenko, E.V.; Fischer, S.E.; Ehlert, K.M.; Yi, I. H.; Jekir, M. G.; O’Brien, R. G.; Keaveny, T.M.; Hernandez, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The amount of bone turnover in the body has been implicated as a factor that can influence fracture risk and bone strength. Here we test the idea that remodeling cavities promote local tissue failure by determining if microscopic tissue damage (microdamage) caused by controlled loading in vitro is more likely to form near resorption cavities. Specimens of human vertebral cancellous bone (L4, 7 male and 2 female, age 70 ± 10, mean ± SD) were loaded in compression to the yield point, stained for microscopic tissue damage and submitted to three-dimensional fluorescent imaging using serial milling (image voxel size 0.7 × 0.7 × 5.0 µm). We found the resulting damage volume per bone volume (DV/BV) was correlated with percent eroded surface (p < 0.01, r2 = 0.65), demonstrating that whole specimen measures of resorption cavities and microdamage are related. Locations of microdamage were more than two times as likely to have a neighboring resorption cavity than randomly selected sites without microdamage (relative risk 2.39, 95% confidence interval of relative risk: 2.09 – 2.73), indicating a spatial association between resorption cavities and microdamage at the local level. Individual microdamage sites were 48,700 (40,100; 62,700) µm3 in size (median, 25th and 75th percentiles). That microdamage was associated with resorption cavities when measured at the whole specimen level as well as at the local level provides strong evidence that resorption cavities play a role in mechanical failure processes of cancellous bone and therefore have the potential to influence resistance to clinical fracture. PMID:22426306

  2. The Flimser Bergsturz - A new perspective on failure mechanisms and kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volken, Stefan; Wolter, Andrea; Loew, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The Flimser Bergsturz, which happened about 9000 years ago and involved a volume of 8-9 km3, is the largest rockslide event in the European Alpine belt and one of the largest in the world. The landslide deposit covers an area of around 52 km2 in the Vorderrhein valley. According to its characteristics, the Flimser Bergsturz can be termed a rockslide which transformed into a very rapid rock avalanche (Sturzstrom). Although a sliding plane is clearly visible close to the head scarp, there is no published work addressing the release mechanisms and the kinematics of the rockslide in detail. In the current work, extensive field and photogrammetric discontinuity surveys in the head scarp area and the first-time creation of 2D and 3D models of the release area give new insights on release mechanisms and kinematic processes. Detailed discontinuity surveys and mapping at the scarp provide information on persistent structures and consequently potential release mechanisms. In addition, existing descriptions of the landslide deposits, including locations and dimensions of intact rock slabs, suggest possible kinematic processes such as translational sliding. Distinct features such as the undulating sliding plane, which shows a mean dip of about 25° to the south, or the large step-forming features oblique to sliding direction, indicate the rupture surface geometry. The importance of persistent fracture sets can be seen in the morphology of the Flimserstein, which is controlled by these sets. A conceptual model of the evolution of the landscape in the failure area is developed using geomorphological maps and reconstructions of pre-event topography. With the aid of modeling programs, such as Phase2 and RS3 (RocScience 2014), 2D as well as 3D slope stability models are generated, and constrained by field observations and geomorphological mapping.

  3. High levels of B-type natriuretic peptide predict weaning failure from mechanical ventilation in adult patients after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Thiago Martins; Hajjar, Ludhmila Abrahao; de Almeida, Juliano Pinheiro; Fukushima, Julia Tizue; Barbas, Carmem Silvia Valente; Rodrigues, Adriano Rogerio Baldacin; Nozawa, Emilia; Feltrim, Maria Ignes Zanetti; Almeida, Elisangela; Coimbra, Vera; Osawa, Eduardo; de Moraes Ianotti, Rafael; Leme, Alcino Costa; Jatene, Fabio Biscegli; Auler-Jr., Jose Otavio Costa; Galas, Filomena Regina Barbosa Gomes

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The failure to wean from mechanical ventilation is related to worse outcomes after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the serum level of B-type natriuretic peptide is a predictor of weaning failure from mechanical ventilation after cardiac surgery. METHODS: We conducted a prospective, observational cohort study of 101 patients who underwent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. B-type natriuretic peptide was measured postoperatively after intensive care unit admission and at the end of a 60-min spontaneous breathing test. The demographic data, hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, fluid balance, need for vasopressor or inotropic support, and length of the intensive care unit and hospital stays were recorded. Weaning failure was considered as either the inability to sustain spontaneous breathing after 60 min or the need for reintubation within 48 h. RESULTS: Of the 101 patients studied, 12 patients failed the weaning trial. There were no differences between the groups in the baseline or intraoperative characteristics, including left ventricular function, EuroSCORE and lengths of the cardiac procedure and cardiopulmonary bypass. The B-type natriuretic peptide levels were significantly higher at intensive care unit admission and at the end of the breathing test in the patients with weaning failure compared with the patients who were successfully weaned. In a multivariate model, a high B-type natriuretic peptide level at the end of a spontaneous breathing trial was the only independent predictor of weaning failure from mechanical ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: A high B-type natriuretic peptide level is a predictive factor for the failure to wean from mechanical ventilation after cardiac surgery. These findings suggest that optimizing ventricular function should be a goal during the perioperative period. PMID:23420154

  4. Investigating compression failure mechanisms in composite laminates with a transparent fiberglass-epoxy birefringent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuart, M. J.; Williams, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    The response and failure of a + or - 45s class laminate was studied by transparent fiberglass epoxy composite birefringent material. The birefringency property allows the laminate stress distribution to be observed during the test and also after the test if permanent residual stresses occur. The location of initial laminate failure and of the subsequent failure propagation are observed through its transparency characteristics. Experimental results are presented.

  5. Advanced composites: Design and application. Proceedings of the meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R.; Willard, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and application of advanced composites is discussed with emphasis on aerospace, aircraft, automotive, marine, and industrial applications. Failure modes in advanced composites are also discussed.

  6. Mechanical Strength and Failure Characterization of Sn-Ag-Cu Intermetallic Compound Joints at the Microscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladani, Leila; Razmi, Jafar

    2012-03-01

    Continuous miniaturization of microelectronic devices has led the industry to develop interconnects on the order of a few microns for advanced superhigh-density and three-dimensional integrated circuits (3D ICs). At this scale, interconnects that conventionally consist of solder material will completely transform to intermetallic compounds (IMCs) such as Cu6Sn5. IMCs are brittle, unlike conventional solder materials that are ductile in nature; therefore, IMCs do not experience large amounts of plasticity or creep before failure. IMCs have not been fully characterized, and their mechanical and thermomechanical reliability is questioned. This study presents experimental efforts to characterize such material. Sn-based microbonds are fabricated in a controlled environment to assure complete transformation of the bonds to Cu6Sn5 IMC. Microstructural analysis including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and x-ray diffraction (XRD) is utilized to determine the IMC material composition and degree of copper diffusion into the bond area. Specimens are fabricated with different bond thicknesses and in different configurations for various tests. Normal strength of the bonds is measured utilizing double cantilever beam and peeling tests. Shear tests are conducted to quantify the shear strength of the material. Four-point bending tests are conducted to measure the fracture toughness and critical energy release rate. Bonds are fabricated in different sizes, and the size effect is investigated. The shear strength, normal strength, critical energy release rate, and effect of bond size on bond strength are reported.

  7. Failure Mechanism and Consolidation of the Compensation Bellows of the LHC Cryogenic Distribution Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Cruikshank, P.; Fournel, J. L.; Tavian, L.; Veillet, N.

    In the beginning of the year 2013, after the first three years of operation, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) was progressively emptied from helium and warmed up to ambient temperature in order to perform, during its first long shutdown, all necessary consolidation and maintenance of the different technical systems. During the warm-up, six helium leaks were declared on the cryogenic distribution line (QRL). All the leaks were detected on the main header supplying supercritical helium at 4.5 K during normal LHC operation. Following a complex investigation based on combination of time-of-flight leak detection over 400-m long vacuum sub-sectors and X-rays, the leaks have been localized on the compensation bellows required for longitudinal thermal contraction. During the investigation, some compensation bellows were found damaged but not leaky yet, amounting to 16 the total number of bellows to be repaired.This paper will present the investigation method for the localization of damaged bellows, the failure mechanism and the applied improvements in the bellows design. The QRL repair procedures and the final leak-tightness validation campaign will be also described.

  8. Microdamage and mechanical behaviour: predicting failure and remodelling in compact bone.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D; Lee, T C

    2003-08-01

    This paper reports on the development of a theoretical model to simulate the growth and repair of microdamage in bone. Unlike previous theories, which use simplified descriptions of damage, this approach models each individual microcrack explicitly, and also models the basic multicellular units (BMUs) that repair cracks. A computer simulation has been developed that is capable of making a variety of predictions. Firstly, we can predict the mechanical behaviour of dead bone in laboratory experiments, including estimates of the number of cycles to failure and the number and length of microcracks during fatigue tests. Secondly, we can predict the results of bone histomorphometry, including such parameters as BMU activation rates and the changing ratio of primary to secondary bone during ageing. Thirdly, we can predict the occurrence of stress fractures in living bone: these occur when the severity of loading is so great that cracks grow faster than they can be repaired. Finally, we can predict the phenomenon of adaptation, in which bone is deposited to increase cortical thickness and thus prevent stress fractures. In all cases results compare favourably with experimental and clinical data. PMID:12924820

  9. Embryo malposition as a potential mechanism for mercury-induced hatching failure in bird eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, G.; Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the prevalence of embryo malpositions and deformities in relation to total mercury (THg) and selenium (Se) concentrations in American avocet (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri) eggs in San Francisco Bay (CA, USA) during 2005 to 2007. Overall, 11% of embryos were malpositioned in eggs ???18 d of age (n=282) and 2% of embryos were deformed in eggs ???13 d of age (n=470). Considering only those eggs that failed to hatch (n=62), malpositions occurred in 24% of eggs ???18 d of age and deformities occurred in 7% of eggs ???13 d of age. The probability of an embryo being malpositioned increased with egg THg concentrations in Forster's terns, but not in avocets or stilts. The probability of embryo deformity was not related to egg THg concentrations in any species. Using a reduced dataset with both Se and THg concentrations measured in eggs (n=87), we found no interaction between Se and THg on the probability of an embryo being malpositioned or deformed. Results of the present study indicate that embryo malpositions were prevalent in waterbird eggs that failed to hatch and the likelihood of an embryo being malpositioned increased with egg THg concentrations in Forster's terns. We hypothesize that malpositioning of avian embryos may be one reason for mercury-related hatching failure that occurs late in incubation, but further research is needed to elucidate this potential mechanism. ?? 2010 SETAC.

  10. A neural mechanism underlying failure of optimal choice with multiple alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Bolton KH; Kolling, Nils; Hunt, Laurence T; Walton, Mark E; Rushworth, Matthew FS

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread interest in neural mechanisms of decision-making most investigations focus on decisions between just two options. Here we adapt a biophysically plausible model of decision-making to predict how a key decision variable–the value difference signal–encoding how much better one choice is than another, changes with the value of a third, but unavailable, alternative. The model predicts surprising failures of optimal decision-making – greater difficulty choosing between two options in the presence of a third very poor, as opposed to very good, alternative. The prediction was borne out, first, by investigation of human decision-making and, second, functional magnetic resonance imaging-(fMRI)-based measurements of value difference signals in ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC); the vmPFC signal decreased in the presence of low value third alternatives and vmPFC effect sizes predicted individual variation in sub-optimal decision-making in the presence of multiple alternatives. The effect contrasts with that of divisive normalization in parietal cortex. PMID:24509428

  11. Optical performance of the TBC-2 solar collector before and after the 1993 mirror lustering

    SciTech Connect

    Houser, R.; Strachan, J.

    1995-02-01

    In 1993, the mirror facets of one of Sandia`s point-focusing solar collectors, the Test Bed Concentrator {number_sign}2 (TBC-2), were reconditioned. The concentrator`s optical performance was evaluated before and after this operation. This report summarizes and compares the results of these tests. The tests demonstrated that the concentrator`s total power and peak flux were increased while the overall flux distribution in the focal plane remained qualitatively the same.

  12. Probing the Failure Mechanism of SnO2 Nanowires for Sodium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Kushima, Akihiro; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D.; Li, Ju; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-09-30

    Non-lithium metals such as sodium have attracted wide attention as a potential charge carrying ion for rechargeable batteries, performing the same role as lithium in lithium- ion batteries. As sodium and lithium have the same +1 charge, it is assumed that what has been learnt about the operation of lithium ion batteries can be transferred directly to sodium batteries. Using in-situ TEM, in combination with DFT calculations, we probed the structural and chemical evolution of SnO2 nanowire anodes in Na-ion batteries and compared them quantitatively with results from Li-ion batteries [Science 330 (2010) 1515]. Upon Na insertion into SnO2, a displacement reaction occurs, leading to the formation of amorphous NaxSn nanoparticles covered by crystalline Na2O shell. With further Na insertion, the NaxSn core crystallized into Na15Sn4 (x=3.75). Upon extraction of Na (desodiation), the NaxSn core transforms to Sn nanoparticles. Associated with a volume shrinkage, nanopores appear and metallic Sn particles are confined in hollow shells of Na2O, mimicking a peapod structure. These pores greatly increase electrical impedance, therefore naturally accounting for the poor cyclability of SnO2. DFT calculations indicate that Na+ diffuses 30 times slower than Li+ in SnO2, in agreement with in-situ TEM measurement. Insertion of Na can chemo-mechanically soften the reaction product to greater extent than in lithiation. Therefore, in contrast to the lithiation of SnO2, no dislocation plasticity was seen ahead of the sodiation front. This direct comparison of the results from Na and Li highlights the critical role of ionic size and electronic structure of different ionic species on the charge/discharge rate and failure mechanisms in these batteries.

  13. Mechanism of augmented exercise hyperpnea in chronic heart failure and dead space loading

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Chi-Sang; Tin, Chung

    2013-01-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) suffer increased alveolar VD/VT (dead-space-to-tidal-volume ratio), yet they demonstrate augmented pulmonary ventilation such that arterial PCO2 (PaCO2) remains remarkably normal from rest to moderate exercise. This paradoxical effect suggests that the control law governing exercise hyperpnea is not merely determined by metabolic CO2 production (V?CO2) per se but is responsive to an apparent (real-feel) metabolic CO2 load (V?CO2o) that also incorporates the adverse effect of physiological VD/VT on pulmonary CO2 elimination. By contrast, healthy individuals subjected to dead space loading also experience augmented ventilation at rest and during exercise as with increased alveolar VD/VT in CHF, but the resultant response is hypercapnic instead of eucapnic, as with CO2 breathing. The ventilatory effects of dead space loading are therefore similar to those of increased alveolar VD/VT and CO2 breathing combined. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that the increased series VD/VT in dead space loading adds to V?CO2o as with increased alveolar VD/VT in CHF, but this is through rebreathing of CO2 in dead space gas thus creating a virtual (illusory) airway CO2 load within each inspiration, as opposed to a true airway CO2 load during CO2 breathing that clogs the mechanism for CO2 elimination through pulmonary ventilation. Thus, the chemosensing mechanism at the respiratory controller may be responsive to putative drive signals mediated by within-breath PaCO2 oscillations independent of breath-to-breath fluctuations of the mean PaCO2 level. Skeletal muscle afferents feedback, while important for early-phase exercise cardioventilatory dynamics, appears inconsequential for late-phase exercise hyperpnea. PMID:23274121

  14. A New Member of the TBC1D15 Family from Chiloscyllium plagiosum: Rab GTPase-Activating Protein Based on Rab7 as a Substrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanyuan; Wang, Weidong; Cheng, Dandan; Wang, Tao; Lu, Conger; Chen, Jian; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Wenping; Lv, Zhengbing; Wu, Wutong; Shu, Jianhong

    2015-05-01

    APSL (active peptide from shark liver) is a hepatic stimulator cytokine from the liver of Chiloscyllium. It can effectively protect islet cells and improve complications in mice with alloxan-induced diabetes. Here, we demonstrate that the APSL sequence is present in the N-terminus of novel TBC (Tre-2, Bub2 and Cdc16) domain family, member 15 (TBC1D15) from Chiloscyllium plagiosum. This shark TBC1D15 gene, which contains an ORF of 2088 bp, was identified from a cDNA library of regenerating shark liver. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the gene is highly homologous to TBC1D15 genes from other species. Moreover, the N-terminus of shark TBC1D15 contains a motif of unknown function (DUF3548), which encompasses the APSL fragment. Rab-GAP activity analysis showed that shark TBC1D15 is a new member of the TBC1D15 family. These results demonstrated that shark TBC1D15 possesses Rab-GAP activity using Rab7 as a substrate, which is a common property of the TBC1D15 family. The involvement of APSL at the N-terminus of TBC1D15 also demonstrates that this protein might be involved in insulin signaling and may be associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The current findings pave the way for further functional and clinical studies of these proteins from marine sources. PMID:25984991

  15. Mechanics-based scaling laws for the durability of thermal barrier coatings

    E-print Network

    Hutchinson, John W.

    stresses that develop normal to the substrate, around imperfections, as the thermally grown oxide (TGO scenarios with minimal thermal cycling. These mechanisms are based on stresses that develop because of TGO between the TBC and the BC, and (iv) the superalloy substrate. The TBC is the insulator, the BC provides

  16. Effect of Hf Additions to Pt Aluminide Bond Coats on EB-PVD TBC Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James; Nagaraj, Ben; Williams, Jeffrey

    2000-01-01

    Small Hf additions were incorporated into a Pt aluminide coating during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on single crystal RENE N5 substrates. Standard yttria-stabilized zirconia top coats were subsequently deposited onto the coated substrates by electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD). The coated substrates underwent accelerated thermal cycle testing in a furnace at a temperature in excess of 1121 C (2050 F) (45 minute hot exposure, 15 minute cool to approximately 121 C (250 F)) until the thermal barrier coating (TBC) failed by spallation. Incorporating Hf in the bond coat increased the TBC life by slightly more than three times that of a baseline coating without added Hf. Scanning electron microscopy of the spalled surfaces indicated that the presence of the Hf increased the adherence of the thermally grown alumina to the Pt aluminide bond coat. The presence of oxide pegs growing into the coating from the thermally grown alumina may also partially account for the improved TBC life by creating a near-surface layer with a graded coefficient of thermal expansion.

  17. Recessive TBC1D24 Mutations Are Frequent in Moroccan Non-Syndromic Hearing Loss Pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Bakhchane, Amina; Charif, Majida; Salime, Sara; Boulouiz, Redouane; Nahili, Halima; Roky, Rachida

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene are responsible for four neurological presentations: infantile epileptic encephalopathy, infantile myoclonic epilepsy, DOORS (deafness, onychodystrophy, osteodystrophy, mental retardation and seizures) and NSHL (non-syndromic hearing loss). For the latter, two recessive (DFNB86) and one dominant (DFNA65) mutations have so far been identified in consanguineous Pakistani and European/Chinese families, respectively. Here we report the results of a genetic study performed on a large Moroccan cohort of deaf patients that identified three families with compound heterozygote mutations in TBC1D24. Four novel mutations were identified, among which, one c.641G>A (p.Arg214His) was present in the three families, and has a frequency of 2% in control Moroccan population with normal hearing, suggesting that it acts as an hypomorphic variant leading to restricted deafness when combined with another recessive severe mutation. Altogether, our results show that mutations in TBC1D24 gene are a frequent cause (>2%) of NSHL in Morocco, and that due to its possible compound heterozygote recessive transmission, this gene should be further considered and screened in other deaf cohorts. PMID:26371875

  18. Mechanical Failure Mode of Metal Nanowires: Global Deformation versus Local Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Duc Tam; Im, Youngtae; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Earmme, Youn Young; Kim, Sung Youb

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that the failure mode of metal nanowires under tensile loading is the result of the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. Such failure modes can be slip, partial slip or twinning and therefore they are regarded as local deformation. Here we provide numerical and theoretical evidences to show that global deformation is another predominant failure mode of nanowires under tensile loading. At the global deformation mode, nanowires fail with a large contraction along a lateral direction and a large expansion along the other lateral direction. In addition, there is a competition between global and local deformations. Nanowires loaded at low temperature exhibit global failure mode first and then local deformation follows later. We show that the global deformation originates from the intrinsic instability of the nanowires and that temperature is a main parameter that decides the global or local deformation as the failure mode of nanowires. PMID:26087445

  19. A Relationship Between Fragmentation Energy and Fragmentation Speed: Evidence for two Mechanisms of Magma Failure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheu, B.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2005-12-01

    The investigation of volcanic eruptions and magmatic processes is becoming increasingly systematic, quantitative and rigorous. The scientific study of volcanic phenomena cannot rely solely on field data, as direct observations of eruption processes is limited to those parts of an eruption that are accessible. Fragmentation is the process of disintegrating magma into pyroclasts. Various models have been proposed for fragmentation. In this study we solely focus on the fragmentation of vesicular magma due to rapid decompression. In most cases silicic, highly viscous magma will disrupt in a brittle manner, as the process occurs close to the glass transition. During fragmentation the potential energy stored as overpressure in bubbles and melt is used to fracture the magma, creating new surface. The surplus is transformed into kinetic energy of ejected particles. To enhance our quantitative underpinning of mechanisms of magma failure, we performed rapid decompression experiments with a shock tube-like apparatus. Samples from different volcanoes were investigated for this study. The open porosity ranges from 2.5 vol.% to 67 vol.%, resulting in a range of 2.5 - 30.0 MPa for the fragmentation threshold. These threshold values are in good agreement with the threshold curve of Spieler et al. (2004). Experiments were carried out in the pressure range between 2 MPa and 40 MPa resulting in values of fragmentation speed of up to 150 m/s. The energy, which drives the fragmentation process, is largely provided by the expansion of the pressurized gas located in the pore space of the samples. In general, we observed a logarithmic increase of the fragmentation speed with the energy density (fragmentation energy standardized to a unit volume) as soon as a certain ``energy threshold'' is overcome. However, some highly porous samples with high permeability values deviate from the trend towards higher energy values. The densest samples of this study deviate clearly to lower energy values. These observations lead us to the suggestion, that magma fragmentation is driven by two distinct physical mechanisms: (1) At moderate and high porosities gas expansion is the determining process, leading to a vesicle bursting, which is widely accepted as the common process. (2) Whereas at low porosity samples the fracture process due to the unloading wave appear to become increasingly important. We also infer a transition zone, in which both mechanisms occur jointly.

  20. Effect of Superalloy Substrate and Bond Coating on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2010-01-01

    Several different single-crystal superalloys were coated with different bond coatings to study the effect of composition on the cyclic oxidation lifetime of an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coating deposited by electron beam physical vapor deposition from a commercial source. Three different superalloys were coated with a 7 {micro}m Pt layer that was diffused into the surface prior to YSZ deposition. One of the superalloys, N5, was coated with a low activity, Pt-modified aluminide coating and Pt-diffusion coatings with 3 and 7 {micro}m of Pt. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure in 1 h cycles at 1150 C to assess average coating lifetime. The 7 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating on N5 had an average YSZ coating lifetime >50% higher than a Pt-modified aluminide coating on N5. Without a YSZ coating, the Pt-modified aluminide coating on N5 showed the typical surface deformation during cycling, however, the deformation was greatly reduced when constrained by the YSZ coating. The 3 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating had a similar average lifetime as the Pt-modified aluminide coating but a much wider scatter. The Pt diffusion bond coating on superalloy X4 containing Ti exhibited the shortest YSZ coating lifetime, this alloy-coating combination also showed the worst alumina scale adhesion without a YSZ coating. The third generation superalloy N6 exhibited the longest coating lifetime with a 7 {micro}m Pt diffusion coating.

  1. Modelling river bank erosion processes and mass failure mechanisms using 2-D depth averaged numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Die Moran, Andres; El kadi Abderrezzak, Kamal; Tassi, Pablo; Herouvet, Jean-Michel

    2014-05-01

    Bank erosion is a key process that may cause a large number of economic and environmental problems (e.g. land loss, damage to structures and aquatic habitat). Stream bank erosion (toe erosion and mass failure) represents an important form of channel morphology changes and a significant source of sediment. With the advances made in computational techniques, two-dimensional (2-D) numerical models have become valuable tools for investigating flow and sediment transport in open channels at large temporal and spatial scales. However, the implementation of mass failure process in 2D numerical models is still a challenging task. In this paper, a simple, innovative algorithm is implemented in the Telemac-Mascaret modeling platform to handle bank failure: failure occurs whether the actual slope of one given bed element is higher than the internal friction angle. The unstable bed elements are rotated around an appropriate axis, ensuring mass conservation. Mass failure of a bank due to slope instability is applied at the end of each sediment transport evolution iteration, once the bed evolution due to bed load (and/or suspended load) has been computed, but before the global sediment mass balance is verified. This bank failure algorithm is successfully tested using two laboratory experimental cases. Then, bank failure in a 1:40 scale physical model of the Rhine River composed of non-uniform material is simulated. The main features of the bank erosion and failure are correctly reproduced in the numerical simulations, namely the mass wasting at the bank toe, followed by failure at the bank head, and subsequent transport of the mobilised material in an aggradation front. Volumes of eroded material obtained are of the same order of magnitude as the volumes measured during the laboratory tests.

  2. Probing the Failure Mechanism of SnO{sub 2} Nanowires for Sodium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Kushima, Akihiro; Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Browning, Nigel D; Li, Ju; Wang, Chongmin

    2013-09-30

    Nonlithium metals such as sodium have attracted wide attention as a potential charge carrying ion for rechargeable batteries. Using in situ transmission electron microscopy in combination with density functional theory calculations, we probed the structural and chemical evolution of SnO{sub 2} nanowire anodes in Na-ion batteries and compared them quantitatively with results from Li-ion batteries (Huang, J. Y.; et al. Science 2010, 330, 1515-1520). Upon Na insertion into SnO{sub 2}, a displacement reaction occurs, leading to the formation of amorphous Na{sub x}Sn nanoparticles dispersed in Na{sub 2}O matrix. With further Na insertion, the Na{sub x}Sn crystallized into Na{sub 15}Sn{sub 4} (x = 3.75). Upon extraction of Na (desodiation), the Na{sub x}Sn transforms to Sn nanoparticles. Associated with the dealloying, pores are found to form, leading to a structure of Sn particles confined in a hollow matrix of Na{sub 2}O. These pores greatly increase electrical impedance, therefore accounting for the poor cyclability of SnO{sub 2}. DFT calculations indicate that Na{sup +} diffuses 30 times slower than Li{sup +} in SnO{sub 2}, in agreement with in situ TEM measurement. Insertion of Na can chemomechanically soften the reaction product to a greater extent than in lithiation. Therefore, in contrast to the lithiation of SnO{sub 2} significantly less dislocation plasticity was seen ahead of the sodiation front. This direct comparison of the results from Na and Li highlights the critical role of ionic size and electronic structure of different ionic species on the charge/discharge rate and failure mechanisms in these batteries.

  3. The impact of stylolites on brittle failure of carbonates: mechanical data and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, Patrick; Heap, Michael; Xu, Tao; Rolland, Alexandra; Ferrand, Thomas; Nicolé, Marion; Reuschlé, Thierry; Conil, Nathalie

    2015-04-01

    Stylolites are complex column-and-socket interdigitation features that form as a result of intergranular pressure-solution. They are usually orientated perpendicular to the maximum principal stress (weight of the overburden or maximum tectonic stress). They typically form clay-enriched seams; and can sometimes reach a few hundred metres in length. While the impact of stylolites on fluid flow was recently quantified for several carbonate formations (Heap et al., 2012), there is however a paucity of data on their impact on the mechanical strength of carbonates. Observations in quarries suggest that the presence of stylolites is associated with significant mechanical weakening and anisotropy. The aim of this study was to quantify these effects based on laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. We used cores from limestone formations surrounding the ANDRA Underground Research Laboratory at Bure in the south of the Meuse district, France. Several different Oxfordian limestones were selected for this study and more than 50 samples were deformed under uniaxial conditions. The selected rocks are microporous and their average porosities range between 2 and 18%. The porosity of the samples with stylolites was found to be systematically larger than the stylolite-free samples. The stylolite-free rock is found to be mechanically isotropic, with comparable Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) values in all tested orientations. We deformed samples with one stylolite in their central part oriented either horizontally (perpendicular to loading), vertically (parallel to loading) or oblique (30 degrees to loading). The samples with a stylolite were always significantly weaker than the stylolite-free samples but no systematic difference was observed in the different orientations. Visual inspection as well as microstructural analysis revealed some complex interactions between the stylolites and stress-induced microcracking. In particular, when the stylolite is oriented orthogonal to the loading, microcracks clearly appeared to nucleate from the stylolite. Whatever the stylolite orientation, the macroscopic fracture appeared to follow only small parts of the tortuous stylolite path. Numerical simulations were performed using stochastic modelling and the Failure and Process Analysis Code (RPFA). Two dimensional numerical samples (40 mm x 20 mm) consisted of 51200 (320 x 120) square elements were deformed uniaxially. To reflect material heterogeneity on the microscale, each square was assigned a value of strength (tensile and compressive) and Young's modulus using a Weibull probability density function. The model parameters were first set to reproduce the mechanical behavior of the stylolite-free material. Guided by our microstructural analysis we then introduced a weaker layer in several orientations in the numerical samples. The simulations showed good qualitative agreement with the experiments performed on samples with stylolites. Our study showed that stylolites have more impact of the mechanical properties than on fluid flow in the limestone from Bure.

  4. Leptin Reduces the Expression and Increases the Phosphorylation of the Negative Regulators of GLUT4 Traffic TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 in Muscle of ob/ob Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sáinz, Neira; Rodríguez, Amaia; Catalán, Victoria; Becerril, Sara; Ramírez, Beatriz; Lancha, Andoni; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-01-01

    Leptin improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle. Our goal was to determine whether proteins controlling GLUT4 traffic are altered by leptin deficiency and in vivo leptin administration in skeletal muscle of wild type and ob/ob mice. Leptin-deficient ob/ob mice were divided in three groups: control, leptin-treated (1 mg/kg/d) and leptin pair-fed ob/ob mice. Microarray analysis revealed that 1,546 and 1,127 genes were regulated by leptin deficiency and leptin treatment, respectively. Among these, we identified 24 genes involved in intracellular vesicle-mediated transport in ob/ob mice. TBC1 domain family, member 1 (Tbc1d1), a negative regulator of GLUT4 translocation, was up-regulated (P?=?0.001) in ob/ob mice as compared to wild types. Importantly, leptin treatment reduced the transcript levels of Tbc1d1 (P<0.001) and Tbc1d4 (P?=?0.004) in the leptin-treated ob/ob as compared to pair-fed ob/ob animals. In addition, phosphorylation levels of TBC1D1 and TBC1D4 were enhanced in leptin-treated ob/ob as compared to control ob/ob (P?=?0.015 and P?=?0.023, respectively) and pair-fed ob/ob (P?=?0.036 and P?=?0.034, respectively) mice. Despite similar GLUT4 protein expression in wild type and ob/ob groups a different immunolocalization of this protein was evidenced in muscle sections. Leptin treatment increased GLUT4 immunoreactivity in gastrocnemius and extensor digitorum longus sections of leptin-treated ob/ob mice. Moreover, GLUT4 protein detected in immunoprecipitates from TBC1D4 was reduced by leptin replacement compared to control ob/ob (P?=?0.013) and pair-fed ob/ob (P?=?0.037) mice. Our findings suggest that leptin enhances the intracellular GLUT4 transport in skeletal muscle of ob/ob animals by reducing the expression and activity of the negative regulators of GLUT4 traffic TBC1D1 and TBC1D4. PMID:22253718

  5. IMPERMEABLE THIN AL2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2003-12-16

    To improve the hot corrosion resistance of YSZ thermal barrier coatings, a 25 {micro}m and a 2 {micro}m thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay were deposited by HVOF thermal spray and by sol-gel coating method, respectively, onto to the surface of YSZ coating. Indenter test was employed to investigate the spalling of YSZ with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay after hot corrosion. The results showed that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay acted as a barrier against the infiltration of the molten salt into the YSZ coating during exposure, thus significantly reduced the amount of M-phase of ZrO{sub 2} in YSZ coating. However, a thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay was harmful for TBC by increasing compressive stress which causes crack and spalling of YSZ coating. As a result, a dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay is critical for simultaneously preventing YSZ from hot corrosion and spalling. In the next reporting period, we will measure or calculate the residue stress within Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay and YSZ coating to study the mechanism of effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay on spalling of YSZ coating.

  6. IMPERMEABLE THIN AL2O3 OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2002-08-31

    In order to improve the hot corrosion resistance of conventional YSZ TBC system, the overlay of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating was deposited on the TBC by EB-PVD techniques. Hot corrosion tests were carried out on the TBC with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in molten salts mixtures (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at 950 C for different time up to 100h. The microstructures of TBC and overlay before and after exposure were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It has been found that TBC will react with V{sub 2}O{sub 5} to form YVO{sub 4}. The amount of M-phase, which was formed due to the leaching of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} from YSZ, was increased with corrosion time. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay coating deposited by EB-PVD was dense, continues and adherent to the TBC. As a result, overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can prevent the YSZ from the attack by molten salts containing vanadium and decrease the penetration of salts into the YSZ along porous and cracks in the YSZ TBC. The amount of M-phase formed in YSZ covered with an overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is substantially lower than that formed in conventional YSZ TBC, even after 100h exposure to the molten salts. In the next reporting period, the hot corrosion test of TBC with EB-PVD deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating will be again performed. However before hot corrosion tests, the post-annealing will be carried out in vacuum (residual pressure 10 -3 Pa) at 1273K for 1h in order to transform the as-sputtered Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay to crystalline {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. In addition, the effect of the thickness of overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on corrosion resistance will also be investigated.

  7. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  8. Mechanisms of degradation and failure in a plasma deposited thermal barrier coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demasi-Marcin, Jeanine T.; Sheffler, Keith D.; Bose, Sudhangshu

    1989-01-01

    Failure of a two layer plasma deposited thermal barrier coating is caused by cyclic thermal exposure and occurs by spallation of the outer ceramic layer. Spallation life is quantitatively predictable, based on the severity of cyclic thermal exposure. This paper describes and attempts to explain unusual constitutive behavior observed in the insulative ceramic coating layer, and presents details of the ceramic cracking damage accumulation process which is responsible for spallation failure. Comments also are offered to rationalize the previously documented influence of interfacial oxidation on ceramic damage accumulation and spallation life.

  9. Small-scale mechanical characterization of viscoelastic adhesive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shean, T. A. V.

    Aero engine hot end components are often covered with ceramic Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs). Laser drilling in the TBC coated components can be a source of service life TBC degradation and spallation. The present study aims to understand the mechanisms of TBC delamination and develop techniques to drill holes without damaging the TBC, Nimonic 263 workpieces coated with TBC are used in the experiments. Microwave non-destructive testing (NDT) is employed to monitor the integrity of the coating /substrate interfaces of the post-laser drilled materials. A numerical modelling technique is used to investigate the role of melt ejection on TBC delamination. The model accounts for the vapour and the assist gas flow effects in the process. Broadly, melt ejection induced mechanical stresses for the TBC coating / bond coating and thermal effects for the bond coating / substrate interfaces are found the key delamination mechanisms. Experiments are carried out to validate the findings from the model. Various techniques that enable laser drilling without damaging the TBC are demonstrated. Twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling is one successful technique that has been analysed using the melt ejection simulation. Optimisation of the twin jet assisted acute angle laser drilling process parameters is carried out using Design of Experiments (DoE) and statistical modelling approaches. Finally, an industrial case study to develop a high speed, high quality laser drilling system for combustor cans is described. Holes are drilled by percussion and trepan drilling in TBC coated and uncoated Haynes 230 workpieces. The production rate of percussion drilling is significantly higher than the trepan drilling, however metallurgical hole quality and reproducibility is poor. A number of process parameters are investigated to improve these characteristics. Gas type and gas pressure effects on various characteristics of the inclined laser drilled holes are investigated through theoretical and experimental work.

  10. Rab-GAP TBC1D4 (AS160) is dispensable for the renal control of sodium and water homeostasis but regulates GLUT4 in mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Di Chiara, Marianna; Glaudemans, Bob; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Odermatt, Alex; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Devuyst, Olivier; Faresse, Nourdine; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    The Rab GTPase-activating protein TBC1D4 (AS160) controls trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4 in adipocytes and skeletal muscle cells. TBC1D4 is also highly abundant in the renal distal tubule, although its role in this tubule is so far unknown. In vitro studies suggest that it is involved in the regulation of renal transporters and channels such as the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), aquaporin-2 (AQP2), and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. To assess the physiological role of TBC1D4 in the kidney, wild-type (TBC1D4(+/+)) and TBC1D4-deficient (TBC1D4(-/-)) mice were studied. Unexpectedly, neither under standard nor under challenging conditions (low Na(+)/high K(+), water restriction) did TBC1D4(-/-) mice show any difference in urinary Na(+) and K(+) excretion, urine osmolarity, plasma ion and aldosterone levels, and blood pressure compared with TBC1D4(+/+) mice. Also, immunoblotting did not reveal any change in the abundance of major renal sodium- and water-transporting proteins [Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) NKCC2, NaCl cotransporter (NCC), ENaC, AQP2, and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase]. However, the abundance of GLUT4, which colocalizes with TBC1D4 along the distal nephron of TBC1D4(+/+) mice, was lower in whole kidney lysates of TBC1D4(-/-) mice than in TBC1D4(+/+) mice. Likewise, primary thick ascending limb (TAL) cells isolated from TBC1D4(-/-) mice showed an increased basal glucose uptake and an abrogated insulin response compared with TAL cells from TBC1D4(+/+) mice. Thus, TBC1D4 is dispensable for the regulation of renal Na(+) and water transport, but may play a role for GLUT4-mediated basolateral glucose uptake in distal tubules. The latter may contribute to the known anaerobic glycolytic capacity of distal tubules during renal ischemia. PMID:26336159

  11. Failure Mechanisms and Color Stability in Light-Emitting Diodes during Operation in High- Temperature Environments in Presence of Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Lall, Pradeep; Zhang, Hao; Davis, J Lynn

    2015-05-26

    The energy efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED) technology compared to incandescent light bulbs has triggered an increased focus on solid state luminaries for a variety of lighting applications. Solid-state lighting (SSL) utilizes LEDs, for illumination through the process of electroluminescence instead of heating a wire filament as seen with traditional lighting. The fundamental differences in the construction of LED and the incandescent lamp results in different failure modes including lumen degradation, chromaticity shift and drift in the correlated color temperature. The use of LED-based products for safety-critical and harsh environment applications necessitates the characterization of the failure mechanisms and modes. In this paper, failure mechanisms and color stability has been studied for commercially available vertical structured thin film LED (VLED) under harsh environment conditions with and without the presence of contaminants. The VLED used for the study was mounted on a ceramic starboard in order to connect it to the current source. Contamination sources studied include operation in the vicinity of vulcanized rubber and adhesive epoxies in the presence of temperature and humidity. Performance of the VLEDs has been quantified using the measured luminous flux and color shift of the VLEDs subjected to both thermal and humidity stresses under a forward current bias of 350 mA. Results indicate that contamination can result in pre-mature luminous flux degradation and color shift in LEDs.

  12. Effects of crustal-scale mechanical layering on magma chamber failure and magma propagation within the Venusian lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Corvec, Nicolas; McGovern, Patrick J.; Grosfils, Eric B.; Galgana, Gerald

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the connection between shallow subsurface magmatism and related surface expressions provides first-order insight into the volcanic and tectonic processes that shape a planet's evolution. When assessing the role of flexure, previous investigations assumed homogeneous host rock, but planetary lithospheres typically include crust and mantle material, and the mechanical response of a layered lithosphere subjected to flexure may influence both shallow magma reservoir failure and intrusion propagation. To assess the formation of giant radial dike systems, such as those observed on Venus, we create axisymmetric elastic finite element models of a spherical reservoir centered at the contact between stiff, dense mantle overlain by softer, lighter crust. We analyze magma chamber stability, overpressure at rupture, and resulting intrusion types for three distinct environments: lithostatic, upward flexure, and downward flexure. In the lithostatic case, reservoir failure at the crust-mantle contact favors lateral sill injection. In the flexure cases, we observe that failure location depends upon the crust/lithosphere thickness ratio and, at times, will favor radial dike intrusion. Specifically, upward flexure can promote the formation of giant radiating dike swarms, a scenario consistent with a plume-derived origin. Our results present a mechanical explanation for giant radial dike swarm formation, showing that both the stability of magma chambers on Venus and the type of intrusions that form are influenced by lithospheric layering. Furthermore, where dike swarms occur, our approach provides a powerful new way to constrain local crust/mantle layering characteristics within the lithosphere at the time the swarm was forming.

  13. Failure mechanisms of a notched CFRP laminate under multi-axial loading

    E-print Network

    Tan, J. L. Y.; Deshpande, V. S.; Fleck, N. A.

    2015-06-14

    ;34:967. [29] Francis PH, Walrath DE, Weed DN. First ply failure of G/E laminates under biaxial loadings. Fibre Sci Technol 1979;12:97â??110. [30] Gilchrist MD, Svensson N. A fractographic analysis of delamination within multidirectional carbon...

  14. Slope Failure Mechanisms Due to Seepage: Three-Dimensional Soil Block Experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seepage erosion has been suggested to potentially play an important role in streambank failure and gully formation. However, although seepage erosion has three-dimensional characteristics, two-dimensional lysimeters were used in previous research to analyze for the hydraulic and geotechnical control...

  15. Seepage and piping: Solitary and integrated mechanisms of streambank erosion and failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work has shown that a majority of the sediment entering streams and rivers now comes from streambanks. We lack the understanding of the processes controlling streambank failure to be able to predict how erosion control methods will work for all conditions. Research underway at Oklahoma State...

  16. Mechanical torque measurement in the proximal femur correlates to failure load and bone mineral density ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Grote, Stefan; Noeldeke, Tatjana; Blauth, Michael; Mutschler, Wolf; Bürklein, Dominik

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of local bone quality is essential for surgeons to determine operation techniques. A device for intraoperative measurement of local bone quality has been developed by the AO-Research Foundation (Densi - Probe®). We used this device to experimentally measure peak breakaway torque of trabecular bone in the proximal femur and correlated this with local bone mineral density (BMD) and failure load. Bone mineral density of 160 cadaver femurs was measured by ex situ dualenergy X-ray absorptiometry. The failure load of all femurs was analyzed by side-impact analysis. Femur fractures were fixed and mechanical peak torque was measured with the DensiProbe® device. Correlation was calculated whereas correlation coefficient and significance was calculated by Fisher’s Ztransformation. Moreover, linear regression analysis was carried out. The unpaired Student’s t-test was used to assess the significance of differences. The Ward triangle region had the lowest BMD with 0.511 g/cm2 (±0.17 g/cm2), followed by the upper neck region with 0.546 g/cm2 (±0.16 g/cm2), trochanteric region with 0.685 g/cm2 (±0.19 g/cm2) and the femoral neck with 0.813 g/cm2 (±0.2 g/cm2). Peak torque of DensiProbe® in the femoral head was 3.48 Nm (±2.34 Nm). Load to failure was 4050.2 N (±1586.7 N). The highest correlation of peak torque measured by Densi Probe® and load to failure was found in the femoral neck (r=0.64, P<0.001). The overall correlation of mechanical peak torque with T-score was r=0.60 (P<0.001). A correlation was found between mechanical peak torque, load to failure of bone and BMD in vitro. Trabecular strength of bone and bone mineral density are different aspects of bone strength, but a correlation was found between them. Mechanical peak torque as measured may contribute additional information about bone strength, especially in the perioperative testing. PMID:23888206

  17. Failure Morphologies of Cyclically Oxidized ZrO2-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesbitt, James A.; Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Barrett, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Advanced and baseline thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) were thermal cycle tested in air at 1163 C until delamination or spallation of the ceramic top coat. The top coat of the advanced TBC s consisted of ZrO2 with various amounts of Y2O3, Yb2O3, Gd2O3, or Nd2O3 dopants. The composition of the top coat of the baseline TBC was ZrO2-8wt.%Y2O3. All top coats were deposited by air plasma spraying. A NiCrAlY or NiCoCrAlY bond coat was deposited by low pressure plasma spraying onto a single-crystal, Ni-base superalloy. The TBC lifetime for the baseline coatings was approximately 190 cycles (45 minutes at 1163 C per cycle) while the lifetime for the advanced coatings was as high as 425 cycles. The fracture surfaces and sample cross sections were examined after TBC failure by SEM and optical microscopy, and the top coats were further examined by X-ray diffraction. These post-test studies revealed that the fracture path largely followed splat boundaries with some trans-splat fracture. However, there were no obvious distinguishing features which explained the difference in TBC lifetimes between some of the advanced and baseline coatings.

  18. Embedded damage sensor using triboluminescence as a transduction mechanism for detecting failure of a material under load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesho, Jeffery Carl

    Damage sensors are devices that monitor the state of health of structures or materials and that provide a signal indication when external forces or other conditions have caused the structure to fail. Continuous monitoring of structures is vital for safety reasons as well as for reduction of maintenance costs. The present study investigated the use of triboluminescent materials as a transduction mechanism for the detection of failure, combined with development of an electronic system to telemeter the optical pulses to a remote receiver for analysis and classification. The goal of the latter work was to create a low cost system that was small enough to be implanted into a smart material with a useful life of one year. The investigation had four main parts. First a search for an intense triboluminescent radiative material was undertaken. When an appropriate material was identified, a new improved method was developed that yielded a more efficient approach to processing. Research into the mechanism for the chosen material was conducted to determine if a new material could be engineered to yield larger signals. Second, a very low power opto-electronics system was developed that included an electronic circuit designed to monitor the sensor, and when a triboluminescent optical pulse is detected, it activates a transmitter that telemeters the optical decay signal to an external receiver. The receiver captures the optical decay as sampled digital data and correlates the signal with the known optical decay of the triboluminescent radiation. Third, a 'smart material' was fabricated with the triboluminescent sensor embedded in a block of epoxy. This material was tested to failure and the failure event was captured and the data was classified. Lastly, a correlation procedure for classifying the optical decays was written to actively look for failure events and filter out noise. Positive correlation results indicate that fracture has actually occurred.

  19. Mechanical instability is usually a problem that engineers try to prevent. Such instabilities can often lead to structural failures and collapses. For example, in engineering, buckling

    E-print Network

    often lead to structural failures and collapses. For example, in engineering, buckling is instability lithography, stretchable ZnO energy harvester, to Si-anode-based lithium ion battery. Mechanical Engineering

  20. Surgical treatments for patients with terminal heart failure: mechanical support compared with transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Michel; Perrault, Louis P

    2014-12-01

    Heart transplantation remains the gold standard treatment for patients with terminal end-stage heart failure. Although results reported have been excellent, older recipients and donors associated with significant comorbidities are now the rule rather than the exception. Moreover, heart failure has become a significant public health problem with a growing population of patients in countries unable to answer the demand for transplantation. An emerging answer to this dilemma comes from results reported with the use of continuous flow pumps where patient survival approaches 80% one and 2 years after implantation in selected patients. Is it time to triage patients to continuous flow pumps? Should we recommend continuous flow pump implantations in patients with various comorbidities, and offer transplantation to a selected group of patients who will reach the long-term benefit of the procedure? PMID:25284807

  1. Stochastic and systematic patterning failure mechanisms for contact-holes in EUV lithography: Part 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaglio Pret, Alessandro; De Bisschop, Peter; Smith, Mark D.; Biafore, John J.

    2014-03-01

    Patterning uncertainty in EUV lithography arises from each lithographic component: the source, the photomask, the optical system, and the photoresist. All contribute to line roughness and contact disuniformity. In extreme cases, feature variability can result in patterning failures such as line microbridging or random missing contact holes. Historically, redundant contact holes (or vias) were placed to overcome the effects of a missing contact. Due to the aggressive CD shrink of feature size, the use of redundant contacts has been progressively decreased. For some types of devices, almost every contact of the billions found on the chip must be electrically active in order for the device to function. In such scenario, lithographic printing failures may cause catastrophic loss of yield, considering that closed contacts can hardly be corrected by smoothing techniques or etching. In this paper, the minimum contact CD which prints without failure - the contact hole printability limit - is studied for 54nm and 44nm pitch dense arrays. We find that the same resist may show dramatically different printability limits depending upon sizing dose and illumination conditions. This analysis will be implemented to estimate, through simulation-assisted experiments, the required exposure dose and aerial image to safely print sub-30nm contact holes.

  2. Role of folded anisotropic fabric in the failure mode of gneiss: new insights from mechanical, microseismic and microstructural laboratory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, Federico; Vinciguerra, Sergio; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Zanchetta, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    Fabric anisotropy is a key control of the mechanical behaviour of rocks in a variety of geological settings and on different timescales. However, the effects of inherited, tectonically folded anisotropic fabrics on the brittle strength and failure mode of foliated metamorphic rocks is yet to be fully understood. Data from laboratory uniaxial compression tests on folded gneiss (Agliardi et al., 2014, Tectonophysics) recently showed that the brittle failure mode of this rock type depends on the arrangement of two distinct anisotropies (i.e. foliation and fold axial plane anisotropy), and that rock strength correlates with failure mode. Here we investigate the effects of confining pressure on this behaviour by performing triaxial compression experiments with acoustic emission (AE) monitoring, and analyse resulting fracture mechanisms and their microfabric controls using high resolution microanalysis techniques. We tested the Monte Canale Gneiss (Austroalpine Bernina nappe, Central Italian Alps), characterized by low phyllosilicate content, compositional layering folded at the cm-scale, and absence of a well-developed axial plane foliation. We used a servo-controlled hydraulic loading system to test 19 air-dry cylindrical specimens (diameter: 54 mm) that were characterized both in terms of fold geometry and orientation of foliation and fold axial planes to the axial load direction. We instrumented the specimens with direct contact axial and circumferential strain gauges. We performed tests at confining pressures of 40 MPa and constant axial strain rates of 5*10-6 s-1, measuring acoustic emissions and P- and S-wave velocities by three wideband (350-1000 kHz) piezoelectric transceivers with 40 dB preamps, mounted in the compression platens. We carried out post-failure microscale observation of fracture mechanisms, microcrack patterns and related fabric controls on resin-impregnated samples, using X-ray MicroCT (resolution: 9 ?m), optical microscopy and SEM. Samples failed in three distinct brittle modes with different combinations of neat shear planes parallel to foliation, fractures parallel to fold axial planes, or less localized mm-scale brittle shear zones. The different failure modes, consistent with those previously described in uniaxial compression experiments, are associated with distinct stress-strain and acoustic emission signatures (i.e. overall activity, rate distribution, frequency and amplitude patterns). Failure modes involving the quartz-dominated axial plane anisotropy correspond to higher peak strength and axial strain, less brittle macroscopic behaviour with well-developed fracture process zones, and higher and more progressive acoustic emission activity than failure controlled by mica-dominated foliation anisotropy. Experimental and microstructural observations support a decisive control of folded microfabric on the overall behaviour of the same rock type, through the activation of Q-dominated vs. M-dominated crack nucleation / propagation mechanisms.

  3. Enigmatic Moisture Effects on Al2O3 Scale and TBC Adhesion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Alumina scale adhesion to high temperature alloys is known to be affected primarily by sulfur segregation and reactive element additions. However, adherent scales can become partially compromised by excessive strain energy and cyclic cracking. With time, exposure of such scales to moisture can lead to spontaneous interfacial decohesion, occurring while the samples are maintained at ambient conditions. Examples of this Moisture-Induced Delayed Spallation (MIDS) are presented for NiCrAl and single crystal superalloys, becoming more severe with sulfur level and cyclic exposure conditions. Similarly, delayed failure or Desk Top Spallation (DTS) results are reviewed for thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), culminating in the water drop failure test. Both phenomena are discussed in terms of moisture effects on bulk alumina and bulk aluminides. A mechanism is proposed based on hydrogen embrittlement and is supported by a cathodic hydrogen charging experiment. Hydroxylation of aluminum from the alloy interface appears to be the relevant basic reaction.

  4. Coaching behaviors associated with changes in fear of failure: changes in self-talk and need satisfaction as potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Conroy, David E; Coatsworth, J Douglas

    2007-04-01

    Cognitive-interpersonal and motivational mechanisms may regulate relations between youth perceptions of interpersonal aspects of the social ecology and their fear-of-failure (FF) levels. Youth (N=165) registered for a summer swim league rated their fear of failure at the beginning, middle, and end of the season. Extensive model comparisons indicated that youths' end-of-season ratings of coach behaviors could be reduced to three factors (affiliation, control, blame). Perceived control and blame from coaches predicted residualized change in corresponding aspects of youths' self-talk, but only changes in self-blame positively predicted changes in FF levels during the season. Perceived affiliation from coaches predicted autonomy need satisfaction which, in turn, negatively predicted the rate of change in FF levels during the season. These findings indicate that (a) youth perceptions of coaches were directly and indirectly related to acute socialization of FF and (b) both cognitive-interpersonal and motivational mechanisms contributed to this socialization process. Further research is needed to test for developmental differences in these mechanisms to determine whether findings generalize to more heterogeneous and at-risk populations and to investigate other potential social-ecological influences on socialization. PMID:17359243

  5. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms and Residual Stresses in Graphite/Polyimide Composites Subjected to Shear Dominated Biaxial Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Predecki, P. K.; Armentrout, D.; Benedikt, B.; Rupnowski, P.; Gentz, M.; Kumosa, L.; Sutter, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This research contributes to the understanding of macro- and micro-failure mechanisms in woven fabric polyimide matrix composites based on medium and high modulus graphite fibers tested under biaxial, shear dominated stress conditions over a temperature range of -50 C to 315 C. The goal of this research is also to provide a testing methodology for determining residual stress distributions in unidirectional, cross/ply and fabric graphite/polyimide composites using the concept of embedded metallic inclusions and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements.

  6. Mechanics of brittle deformation and slope failure at the North Menan Butte tuff cone, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Menan Volcanic Complex consists of phreatomagmatic tuff cones that were emplaced as part of the regional volcanic activity in the Snake River Plain during the late Pleistocene. These tuff cones, the ';Menan Buttes', resulted from the eruption of basaltic magma through water-saturated alluvium and older basalts along the Snake River. The tuffs are composed primarily of basaltic glass with occasional plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts. The tuff is hydrothermally altered to a massive palagonitic tuff at depth but is otherwise poorly welded. Mass movements along the flanks of the cones were contemporaneous with tuff deposition. These slope failures are manifest as cm- to meter-scale pure folds, faults and fault-related folds, as well as larger slumps that are tens to a few hundred meters wide. Previous investigations classified the structural discontinuities at North Menan Butte based on orientation and sense of displacement, and all were recognized as opening-mode or shear fractures (Russell and Brisbin, 1990). This earlier work also used a generalized model of static (i.e., aseismic) gravity-driven shear failure within cohesionless soils to infer a possible origin for these fractures through slope failure. Recent work at North Menan Butte has provided novel insight into the styles of brittle deformation present, the effect of this deformation on the circulation of subsurface fluids within the tuff cone, as well as the mechanisms of the observed slope failures. Field observations reveal that the brittle deformation, previously classified as fractures, is manifest as deformation bands within the non-altered, poorly welded portions of the tuff. Both dilational and compactional bands, with shear, are observed. Slumps are bounded by normal faults, which are found to have developed within clusters of deformation bands. Deformation bands along the down-slope ends of these failure surfaces are predominantly compactional in nature. These bands have a ~3800 millidarcy permeability, a decrease from the ~9400 millidarcy permeability typical of the non-deformed, poorly-welded tuff. As such, these bands would have acted to slow to the circulation of local fluids through the tuff cone, possibly reducing the slopes' stability further. Future work will employ slope stability models to investigate the tendency for slumping of these tuffs shortly after their emplacement, accounting for water-saturated conditions and the effects of eruption-related seismicity. These results will improve current understanding of the mechanics of fault growth within basaltic tuff and enable more rigorous assessments of the hazards posed by slope instability on active phreatomagmatic tuff cones.

  7. Applicability of failure criteria and empirical relations of mechanical rock properties from outcrop analogue samples for wellbore stability analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, D.; Philipp, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of failure criteria, Young's modulus and uniaxial and tensile strengths, are important to avoid borehole instabilities and adapt the drilling plan on rock mechanical conditions. By this means, a considerable reduction of the total drilling costs can be achieved. This is desirable to enlarge the profit margin of geothermal projects which is rather small compared with hydrocarbon projects. Because core material is rare we aim at predicting in situ rock properties from outcrop analogue samples which are easy and cheap to provide. The comparability of properties determined from analogue samples with samples from depths is analysed by performing conventional triaxial tests, uniaxial compressive strength tests and Brazilian tests of both quarry and equivalent core samples. Equivalent means that the quarry sample is of the same stratigraphic age and of comparable sedimentary facies and composition as the associated core sample. We determined the parameters uniaxial compressive strength (UCS), Young's modulus, and tensile strength for 35 rock samples from quarries and 14 equivalent core samples from the North German Basin. A subgroup of these samples, consisting of one volcanic rock sample, three sandstone and three carbonate samples, was used for triaxial tests. In all cases, comparability of core samples with quarry samples is evaluated using thin section analyses. For UCS versus Young's modulus and tensile strengths, linear- and non-linear regression analyses were performed. We repeat regression separately for clastic rock samples or carbonate rock samples only as well as for quarry samples or core samples only. Empirical relations have high statistical significance and properties of core samples lie within 90% prediction bands of developed regression functions of quarry samples. With triaxial tests we determined linearized Mohr-Coulomb failure criteria, expressed in both principal stresses and shear and normal stresses, for quarry samples. Comparison with samples from larger depths shows that it is possible to apply the obtained principal stress failure criteria on clastic and volcanic rocks, but less so for carbonates. Carbonate core samples have higher strengths and develop larger angles between fault normal and main principal stress than quarry samples. This considerably reduces the residuals between quarry failure criteria and core test results. Therefore, it is advised to use failure criteria, expressed in shear and normal stresses, for prediction of core sample failure conditions. We conclude that it is possible to apply failure criteria on samples from depth if the comparability, especially textural comparability and similar porosities, of chosen outcrop analogues samples is ensured. Applicability of empirical relations of UCS with Young's modulus and tensile strength to rocks at depths is expected. Presented results may help predict mechanical properties for in situ rocks, and thus develop suitable geomechanical models for the adaptation of the drilling strategy on rock mechanical conditions. The authors appreciate the support of 'Niedersächsisches Ministerium für Wissenschaft und Kultur' and 'Baker Hughes' within the gebo research project (http: www.gebo-nds.de).

  8. Acoustic emission and acousto-ultrasonic signature analysis of failure mechanisms in carbon fiber reinforced polymer materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Shawn Allen

    Fiber reinforced polymer composite materials, particularly carbon (CFRPs), are being used for primary structural applications, particularly in the aerospace and naval industries. Advantages of CFRP materials, compared to traditional materials such as steel and aluminum, include: light weight, high strength to weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and long life expectancy. A concern with CFRPs is that despite quality control during fabrication, the material can contain many hidden internal flaws. These flaws in combination with unseen damage due to fatigue and low velocity impact have led to catastrophic failure of structures and components. Therefore a large amount of research has been conducted regarding nondestructive testing (NDT) and structural health monitoring (SHM) of CFRP materials. The principal objective of this research program was to develop methods to characterize failure mechanisms in CFRP materials used by the U.S. Army using acoustic emission (AE) and/or acousto-ultrasonic (AU) data. Failure mechanisms addressed include fiber breakage, matrix cracking, and delamination due to shear between layers. CFRP specimens were fabricated and tested in uniaxial tension to obtain AE and AU data. The specimens were designed with carbon fibers in different orientations to produce the different failure mechanisms. Some specimens were impacted with a blunt indenter prior to testing to simulate low-velocity impact. A signature analysis program was developed to characterize the AE data based on data examination using visual pattern recognition techniques. It was determined that it was important to characterize the AE event , using the location of the event as a parameter, rather than just the AE hit (signal recorded by an AE sensor). A back propagation neural network was also trained based on the results of the signature analysis program. Damage observed on the specimens visually with the aid of a scanning electron microscope agreed with the damage type assigned by the signature analysis program. The load level at which significant damage occurred in the specimens was evaluated using ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel criteria. AU testing proved inconclusive for characterization of the damage due to common problems associated with AU testing such as: reproducibility difficulties due to degradation of the attachment of the sensors, damage not detected unless in the line of sight between sensors, and large intrinsic variation of the data.

  9. In Situ Time-dependent Dielectric Breakdown in the Transmission Electron Microscope: A Possibility to Understand the Failure Mechanism in Microelectronic Devices.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhongquan; Gall, Martin; Yeap, Kong Boon; Sander, Christoph; Clausner, André; Mühle, Uwe; Gluch, Jürgen; Standke, Yvonne; Aubel, Oliver; Beyer, Armand; Hauschildt, Meike; Zschech, Ehrenfried

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) in on-chip interconnect stacks is one of the most critical failure mechanisms for microelectronic devices. The aggressive scaling of feature sizes, both on devices and interconnects, leads to serious challenges to ensure the required product reliability. Standard reliability tests and post-mortem failure analysis provide only limited information about the physics of failure mechanisms and degradation kinetics. Therefore it is necessary to develop new experimental approaches and procedures to study the TDDB failure mechanisms and degradation kinetics in particular. In this paper, an in situ experimental methodology in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) is demonstrated to investigate the TDDB degradation and failure mechanisms in Cu/ULK interconnect stacks. High quality imaging and chemical analysis are used to study the kinetic process. The in situ electrical test is integrated into the TEM to provide an elevated electrical field to the dielectrics. Electron tomography is utilized to characterize the directed Cu diffusion in the insulating dielectrics. This experimental procedure opens a possibility to study the failure mechanism in interconnect stacks of microelectronic products, and it could also be extended to other structures in active devices. PMID:26167933

  10. Distribution of coastal cliffs in Kerala, India: their mechanisms of failure and related human engineering response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avinash; Seralathan, P.; Jayappa, K. S.

    2009-08-01

    The 560-km-long Kerala coast is characterised by long barriers with narrow beaches and steep cliffs. Distribution of cliffs from nine sections measuring a cumulative length of 63.5 km is evaluated in ArcGIS Software using topomaps and field survey data. The cliff sections in the southern coast comprise both permeable and impermeable rocks, whereas those along northern coast are comprised of either Precambrian crystalline and/or Tertiary formations. Notches, caves and even small arches are developed in Cannanore, Dharmadam and Kadalundi cliffs, where only primary laterites are exposed to wave attack. Stacks composed of laterite and Precambrian crystallines found in nearshore of cliffed coast indicate recession of shoreline. Mass wasting, mudslide and mudflow type of cliff failures are common in permeable to semi-permeable rocks, whereas rotational sliding, rockfall and toppling failure are found in hard rock cliffs. Retreat of cliff sections are induced by natural or anthropogenic activities or both. Rate of recession vary from a few centimetres to one metre/year depending upon the nature of lithology, structures and recession agents acting upon the cliffs. Various methods of cliff protection for e.g. hard structures—revetments, groins, seawalls, breakwater and jetties—and soft measures—artificial reefs/marsh creation, floating breakwaters, beach nourishment, beach scraping and vegetation planting—are suggested.

  11. Structural and Population-Based Evaluations of TBC1D1 p.Arg125Trp

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Thomas, Elaine C.; Sessions, Richard B.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.; Day, Ian N. M.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is now a leading cause of preventable death in the industrialised world. Understanding its genetic influences can enhance insight into molecular pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. A non-synonymous polymorphism (rs35859249, p.Arg125Trp) in the N-terminal TBC1D1 phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain has shown a replicated association with familial obesity in women. We investigated these findings in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a large European birth cohort of mothers and offspring, and by generating a predicted model of the structure of this domain. Structural prediction involved the use of three separate algorithms; Robetta, HHpred/MODELLER and I-TASSER. We used the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to investigate familial association in the ALSPAC study cohort (N?=?2,292 mother-offspring pairs). Linear regression models were used to examine the association of genotype with mean measurements of adiposity (Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference and Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessed fat mass), and logistic regression was used to examine the association with odds of obesity. Modelling showed that the R125W mutation occurs in a location of the TBC1D1 PTB domain that is predicted to have a function in a putative protein:protein interaction. We did not detect an association between R125W and BMI (mean per allele difference 0.27 kg/m2 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.00, 0.53) P?=?0.05) or obesity (odds ratio 1.01 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.77, 1.31, P?=?0.96) in offspring after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Furthermore, there was no evidence to suggest that there was familial association between R125W and obesity (?2?=?0.06, P?=?0.80). Our analysis suggests that R125W in TBC1D1 plays a role in the binding of an effector protein, but we find no evidence that the R125W variant is related to mean BMI or odds of obesity in a general population sample. PMID:23667688

  12. Structural and population-based evaluations of TBC1D1 p.Arg125Trp.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Tom G; Thomas, Elaine C; Sessions, Richard B; Lawlor, Debbie A; Tavaré, Jeremy M; Day, Ian N M

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is now a leading cause of preventable death in the industrialised world. Understanding its genetic influences can enhance insight into molecular pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets. A non-synonymous polymorphism (rs35859249, p.Arg125Trp) in the N-terminal TBC1D1 phosphotyrosine-binding (PTB) domain has shown a replicated association with familial obesity in women. We investigated these findings in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), a large European birth cohort of mothers and offspring, and by generating a predicted model of the structure of this domain. Structural prediction involved the use of three separate algorithms; Robetta, HHpred/MODELLER and I-TASSER. We used the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to investigate familial association in the ALSPAC study cohort (N?=?2,292 mother-offspring pairs). Linear regression models were used to examine the association of genotype with mean measurements of adiposity (Body Mass Index (BMI), waist circumference and Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) assessed fat mass), and logistic regression was used to examine the association with odds of obesity. Modelling showed that the R125W mutation occurs in a location of the TBC1D1 PTB domain that is predicted to have a function in a putative protein:protein interaction. We did not detect an association between R125W and BMI (mean per allele difference 0.27 kg/m(2) (95% Confidence Interval: 0.00, 0.53) P?=?0.05) or obesity (odds ratio 1.01 (95% Confidence Interval: 0.77, 1.31, P?=?0.96) in offspring after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Furthermore, there was no evidence to suggest that there was familial association between R125W and obesity (?(2)?=?0.06, P?=?0.80). Our analysis suggests that R125W in TBC1D1 plays a role in the binding of an effector protein, but we find no evidence that the R125W variant is related to mean BMI or odds of obesity in a general population sample. PMID:23667688

  13. Mechanical failure of a Thompson's hemiarthoplasty stem 28 years post-implantation: an investigation with electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Maris, Ioannis; Darmanis, Spyros; Kytopoulos, Victor; Economakis, Angela; Kazakos, Konstantinos

    2007-06-01

    Tauhe authors would like to report a mechanical failure of a Thompson's prosthesis, 28 years post-implantation. A detailed examination of the specimen revealed no defects in the prosthesis and a dominating 'brittle component' fracture of the stem. In this context the detailed fractographic study by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed no detrimental manufactural defects that may have produced microcracks and consequently risked initiating the fracture propagation. In contrast, the fracture was mainly a fatigue one with a mixed mode of microscopic trans- and intergranular crack propagation. To the best of our knowledge, such a mechanism of implant failure in a cementless stem has never before reached 28 years neither in a Thompson's nor any other type of prosthesis, and in the already reported case, it exceeded 30 years [N. Wolson and J. P. Waadell, Can. J. Surg. 38(6) (1995) 542], however the stem's ultrastructure has never been investigated under electron microscopy, which arguably can provide a useful assessment of a fatigue fracture. Tauhe authors introduce the question of revising our standards when evaluating the newly designed and expensive implants and propose re-focusing on surgical technique, rather than purely on implant properties. PMID:17268876

  14. Basolateral Endocytic Recycling Requires RAB-10 and AMPH-1 Mediated Recruitment of RAB-5 GAP TBC-2 to Endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ou; Grant, Barth D.

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAB-5/Rab5 is a master regulator of the early endosome, required for a myriad of coordinated activities, including the degradation and recycling of internalized cargo. Here we focused on the recycling function of the early endosome and the regulation of RAB-5 by GAP protein TBC-2 in the basolateral C. elegans intestine. We demonstrate that downstream basolateral recycling regulators, GTPase RAB-10/Rab10 and BAR domain protein AMPH-1/Amphiphysin, bind to TBC-2 and help to recruit it to endosomes. In the absence of RAB-10 or AMPH-1 binding to TBC-2, RAB-5 membrane association is abnormally high and recycling cargo is trapped in early endosomes. Furthermore, the loss of TBC-2 or AMPH-1 leads to abnormally high spatial overlap of RAB-5 and RAB-10. Taken together our results indicate that RAB-10 and AMPH-1 mediated down-regulation of RAB-5 is an important step in recycling, required for cargo exit from early endosomes and regulation of early endosome–recycling endosome interactions. PMID:26393361

  15. Mechanisms of Ventricular Fibrillation in Canine Models of Congestive Heart Failure and Ischemia Assessed by In Vivo Noncontact Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Thomas H.; Wilson, Emily E.; Foreman, Scott; Olgin, Jeffrey E.

    2007-01-01

    Background Much of the research performed studying the mechanism of ventricular fibrillation (VF) has been in normal ventricles rather than under a pathological condition predisposing to VF. We hypothesized that different ventricular substrates would alter the mechanism and characteristics of VF. Methods and Results Three groups of dogs were studied: (1) control (n=8), (2) pacing-induced congestive heart failure (n=7), and (3) acute ischemia produced by 30 minutes of mid left anterior descending artery ligation (n=5). A noncontact mapping catheter (Ensite 3000, ESI) was placed via transseptal into the left ventricle (LV), along with an electrophysiology catheter. A multielectrode basket catheter (EP Technologies) was placed in the right ventricle, along with an electrophysiology catheter. Several episodes of VF were recorded in each animal. In addition to constructing isopotential and isochronal maps of the VF episodes, signals underwent frequency domain analysis as a fast Fourier transform was performed over a 2-second window every 1 second. From the fast Fourier transform, the dominant frequency was determined, and the organization was calculated. In control dogs, meandering, reentrant spiral wave activity was the main feature of the VF. The congestive heart failure group showed evidence of a stable rotor (n=3), evidence of a focal source (n=3), or no evidence of a driver in the LV (n=1). The ischemic group showed evidence of an initial focal mechanism that transitioned into reentry. In the control and ischemic groups, the LV always had higher dominant frequencies than the right ventricle. Conclusions Different ventricular substrates produced by the different animal models altered the characteristics of VF. Thus, different mechanisms of VF may be present in the LV, depending on the animal model. PMID:16145002

  16. Global large deep-focus earthquakes: Source process and cascading failure of shear instability as a unified physical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wen, Lianxing

    2015-08-01

    We apply a multiple source inversion method to systematically study the source processes of 25 large deep-focus (depth >400 km) earthquakes with Mw > 7.0 from 1994 to 2012, based on waveform modeling of P, pP, SH and sSH wave data. The earthquakes are classified into three categories based on spatial distributions and focal mechanisms of the inferred sub-events: 1) category one, with non-planar distribution and variable focal mechanisms of sub-events, represented by the 1994 Mw 8.2 Bolivia earthquake and the 2013 Mw 8.3 Okhotsk earthquake; 2) category two, with planar distribution but focal mechanisms inconsistent with the plane, including eighteen earthquakes; and 3) category three, with planar distribution and focal mechanisms consistent with the plane, including six earthquakes. We discuss possible physical mechanisms for earthquakes in each category in the context of plane rupture, transformational faulting and shear thermal instability. We suggest that the inferred source processes of large deep-focus earthquakes can be best interpreted by cascading failure of shear thermal instabilities in pre-existing weak zones, with the perturbation of stress generated by a shear instability triggering another and focal mechanisms of the sub-events controlled by orientations of the pre-existing weak zones. The proposed mechanism can also explain the observed great variability of focal mechanisms, the presence of large values of CLVD (Compensated Linear Vector Dipole) and the super-shear rupture of deep-focus earthquakes in the previous studies. In addition, our studies suggest existence of relationships of seismic moment ? (source duration)3 and moment ? (source dimension)3 in large deep-focus earthquakes.

  17. Investigation of accelerated stress factors and failure/degradation mechanisms in terrestrial solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathrop, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Research on the reliability of terrestrial solar cells was performed to identify failure/degradation modes affecting solar cells and to relate these to basic physical, chemical, and metallurgical phenomena. Particular concerns addressed were the reliability attributes of individual single crystalline, polycrystalline, and amorphous thin film silicon cells. Results of subjecting different types of crystalline cells to the Clemson accelerated test schedule are given. Preliminary step stress results on one type of thin film amorphous silicon (a:Si) cell indicated that extraneous degradation modes were introduced above 140 C. Also described is development of measurement procedures which are applicable to the reliability testing of a:Si solar cells as well as an approach to achieving the necessary repeatability of fabricating a simulated a:Si reference cell from crystalline silicon photodiodes.

  18. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2004-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land -based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems; a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization.

  19. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  20. On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitoring for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2005-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Power Generation, Inc proposed a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization'', to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Power Generation, Inc. has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  1. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-07-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  2. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2003-10-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can, therefore, accelerate the degradation of substrate component materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical components and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  3. ON-LINE THERMAL BARRIER COATING MONITORING FOR REAL-TIME FAILURE PROTECTION AND LIFE MAXIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis H. LeMieux

    2002-04-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation proposes a four year program titled, ''On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization,'' to develop, build and install the first generation of an on-line TBC monitoring system for use on land-based advanced gas turbines (AGT). Federal deregulation in electric power generation has accelerated power plant owner's demand for improved reliability availability maintainability (RAM) of the land-based advanced gas turbines. As a result, firing temperatures have been increased substantially in the advanced turbine engines, and the TBCs have been developed for maximum protection and life of all critical engine components operating at these higher temperatures. Losing TBC protection can therefore accelerate the degradation of substrate components materials and eventually lead to a premature failure of critical component and costly unscheduled power outages. This program seeks to substantially improve the operating life of high cost gas turbine components using TBC; thereby, lowering the cost of maintenance leading to lower cost of electricity. Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has teamed with Indigo Systems, a supplier of state-of-the-art infrared camera systems, and Wayne State University, a leading research organization in the field of infrared non-destructive examination (NDE), to complete the program.

  4. A Randomized Trial of Initial Trophic versus Full-Energy Enteral Nutrition in Mechanically Ventilated Patients with Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Todd W.; Mogan, Susan; Hays, Margaret A.; Bernard, Gordon R.; Jensen, Gordon L.; Wheeler, Arthur P.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Enteral nutrition is provided to mechanically ventilated patients who cannot eat normally, yet the amount of support needed is unknown. We conducted this randomized, open-label study to test the hypothesis that initial low-volume (i.e. trophic) enteral nutrition would decrease episodes of gastrointestinal intolerance/complications and improve outcomes as compared to initial full-energy enteral nutrition in patients with acute respiratory failure. Design Randomized, open-label study Patients 200 Patients with acute respiratory failure expected to require mechanical ventilation for at least 72 hours Interventions Patients were randomized to receive either initial trophic (10 ml/hr) or full-energy enteral nutrition for the initial 6 days of ventilation. Measurements and Main Results The primary outcome measure was ventilator-free days to day 28. Baseline characteristics were similar between the 98 patients randomized to trophic and the 102 patients randomized to full-energy nutrition. At enrollment, patients had a mean APACHE II score of 26.9, PaO2/FiO2 of 182 and 38% were in shock. Both groups received similar duration of enteral nutrition (5.5 vs. 5.1 days; P=0.51). The trophic group received an average of 15 ± 11% of goal calories daily through day 6 compared to 74.8 ± 38.5% (P<0.001) for the full-energy group. Both groups had a median of 23.0 ventilator-free (P=0.90) and 21.0 ICU-free days (P=0.64). Mortality to hospital discharge was 22.4% for trophic vs. 19.6% for full-energy (P=0.62). In the first 6 days, the trophic group had trends for less diarrhea (19 vs. 24% of feeding days; P=0.08) and significantly fewer episodes of elevated gastric residual volumes (2 vs. 8% of feeding days; P<0.001). Conclusions Initial trophic enteral nutrition resulted in similar clinical outcomes in mechanically ventilated patients with acute respiratory failure as early full-energy enteral nutrition but with fewer episodes of gastrointestinal intolerance. PMID:21242788

  5. Electronics reliability fracture mechanics. Volume 1: Causes of failures of shop replaceable units and hybrid microcircuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallis, J.; Buechler, D.; Erickson, J.; Westerhuyzen, D. V.; Strokes, R.

    1992-05-01

    This is the first of two volumes. The other volume (WL-TR-91-3119) is 'Fracture Mechanics'. The objective of the Electronics Reliability Fracture Mechanics (ERFM) program was to develop and demonstrate a life prediction technique for electronic assemblies, when subjected to environmental stress of vibration and thermal cycling, based upon the mechanical properties of the materials and packaging configurations which make up an electronic system. A detailed investigation was performed of the following two shop replaceable units (SRUs): Timing and Control Module (P/N 3562102) and Linear Regulator Module (P/N 3569800). The SRUs are in the Programmable Signal Processor (3137042) Line Replaceable Unit (LRU) of the Hughes AN/APG-63 Radar for the F-15 Aircraft.

  6. Diaphragm pacing failure secondary to deteriorated chest wall mechanics: When a good diaphragm does not suffice to take a good breath in

    PubMed Central

    Layachi, Lila; Georges, Marjolaine; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jésus; Brun, Anne-Laure; Similowski, Thomas; Morélot-Panzini, Capucine

    2015-01-01

    Diaphragm pacing allows certain quadriplegic patients to be weaned from mechanical ventilation. Pacing failure can result from device dysfunction, neurotransmission failure, or degraded lung mechanics (such as atelectasis). We report two cases where progressive pacing failure was attributed to deteriorated chest wall mechanics. The first patient suffered from cervical spinal cord injury at age 45, was implanted with a phrenic stimulator (intrathoracic), successfully weaned from ventilation, and permanently paced for 7 years. Pacing effectiveness then slowly declined, finally attributed to rib cage stiffening due to ankylosing spondylitis. The second patient became quadriplegic after meningitis at age 15, was implanted with a phrenic stimulator (intradiaphragmatic) and weaned. After a year hypoventilation developed without obvious cause. In relationship with complex endocrine disorders, the patient had gained 31 kg. Pacing failure was attributed to excessive mechanical inspiratory load. Rib cage mechanics abnormalities should be listed among causes of diaphragm pacing failure and it should be kept in mind that a “good diaphragm” is not sufficient to produce a “good inspiration”. PMID:26236593

  7. Weld Growth Mechanisms and Failure Behavior of Three-Sheet Resistance Spot Welds Made of 5052 Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Luo, Zhen; Chao, Y. J.; Ao, Sansan; Cui, Xuetuan

    2015-06-01

    This paper investigates the weld nugget formation in three-sheet aluminum alloy resistance spot welding. The nugget formation process in three equal thickness sheets and three unequal thickness sheets of 5052 aluminum alloy were studied. The results showed that the nugget was initially formed at the workpiece/workpiece interfaces (i.e., both upper interface and lower interface). The two small nuggets then grew along the radial direction and axial direction (welding direction) as the welding time increased. Eventually, the two nuggets fused into one large nugget. During the welding process, the Peltier effect between the Cu-Al caused the shift of the nugget in the welding direction. In addition, the mechanical strength and fracture mode of the weld nuggets at the upper and lower interfaces were also studied using tensile shear specimen configuration. Three failure modes were identified, namely interfacial, mixed, and pullout. The critical welding time and critical nugget diameter corresponding to the transitions of these modes were investigated. Finally, an empirical failure load formula for three-sheet weld similar to two-sheet spot weld was developed.

  8. Study of failure mechanisms for InGaN light-emitting diode chips with patterned sapphire substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Chia-Hung; Huang, Man-Fang; Yang, Hsu-Han; Chen, Fang-Ming; Chen, Tzung-Te

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated the failure mechanisms of blue InGaN LEDs grown on patterned sapphire substrates and demonstrated the influence of patterned sapphire substrates on the reliability of GaN LED by comparing with conventional LEDs grown on planar sapphire substrates. From experimental results, we found that InGaN LEDs grown on patterned substrates had a higher turn-on voltage but a smaller series resistance compared with conventional LEDs owing to rough inner patterns and small threading dislocation density. Both samples were then acceleratedly aged under a high DC current for two hours. Failure modes were studied with various measurements taken before and after aging. From the power evolution performance, we found that output power of LEDs with patterned substrates increased slightly due to fewer defects while output power of conventional LEDs decayed. This can be inferred from small reverse leakage currents and tunneling currents observed from Log I-V characteristics and EMMI measurement of P-LEDs. A slight redshift in emission wavelength was also found during aging because of possible leakage shunt paths caused by defect generation. Moreover, operation voltage increased slightly after aging which was caused by contact degradation induced by thermal annealing.

  9. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Details» www.kidneyfund.org > Kidney Disease > Kidney Failure Kidney Failure Kidney failure is when your kidneys stop ... are the tests for kidney failure? How is kidney failure (ESRD) different from chronic kidney disease (CKD)? ...

  10. JAP-00590-2004 Mechanics, nonlinearity, and failure strength of lung tissue in a mouse

    E-print Network

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    of emphysema: possible role of collagen remodeling Satoru Ito, Edward P. Ingenito*, Kelly K. Brewer, Lauren D's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA 02115 Running title: Respiratory mechanics of emphysema Address and re-organization of the connective tissue fiber network during the development of pulmonary emphysema

  11. When Public Acts Like Private: The Failure of Estonia's School Choice Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poder, Kaire; Lauri, Triin

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to show the segregating effect of the market-like matching of students and schools at the basic school level. The natural experiment case is Tallinn, the capital of Estonia. The current school choice mechanism applied in this case is based on entrance tests. There are increasingly over-subscribed intra-catchment area public…

  12. Impermeable thin AI2O3 overlay for TBC protection from sulfate and vanadate attack in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2005-10-30

    In order to improve the hot corrosion resistance of conventional YSZ TBC system, a dense and continues overlay of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating of about 0.1-25 {micro}m thick was deposited on the surface of TBC by EB-PVD, high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray and composite-sol-gel (CSG) techniques. Hot corrosion tests were carried out on the TBC with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating in molten salts mixtures (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + 5%V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at 950 C for 10h. The microstructures of TBC and overlay before and after exposure were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In order to investigate the effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay on degradation and spalling of the TBC, indentation test has been employed to study spallation behaviors of YSZ coating with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay. It has been found that TBC will react with V{sub 2}O5 to form YVO{sub 4} in hot corrosion tests. A substantial amount of M-phase of ZrO{sub 2} was formed due to the leaching of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} from YSZ. During hot corrosion test, there were no significant interactions between overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating and molten salts. After exposure, the alumina coating, especially produced by HVOF, was still very dense and cover the surface of YSZ, although they had been translated to {alpha} - Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} from original {gamma} - Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. As a result, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay coating decreased the penetration of salts into the YSZ and prevented the YSZ from the attack by molten salts containing vanadium. Accordingly, only a few M-phase was formed in YSZ TBC, compared with TBC without overlay coating. The penetration of salts into alumina coating was thought to be through microcracks formed in overlay Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating and at the interface between alumina and zirconia due to the presence of tensile stress in the alumina coating. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay acted as a barrier against the infiltration of the molten salt into the YSZ coating during exposure, thus significantly reduced the amount of M-phase of ZrO{sub 2} in YSZ coating. However, a thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay was harmful for TBC by increasing compressive stress which causes crack and spalling of YSZ coating. As a result, a dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay is critical for simultaneously preventing YSZ from hot corrosion and spalling.

  13. Fatigue failure kinetics and structural changes in lead-free interconnects due to mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Brent Alan

    Environmental and human health concerns drove European parliament to mandate the Reduction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) for electronics. This was enacted in July 2006 and has practically eliminated lead in solder interconnects. There is concern in the electronics packaging community because modern lead-free solder is rich in tin. Presently, near-eutectic tin-silver-copper solders are favored by industry. These solders are stiffer than the lead-tin near-eutectic alloys, have a higher melting temperature, fewer slip systems, and form intermetallic compounds (IMC) with Cu, Ni and Ag, each of which tend to have a negative effect on lifetime. In order to design more reliable interconnects, the experimental observation of cracking mechanisms is necessary for the correct application of existing theories. The goal of this research is to observe the failure modes resulting from mode II strain and to determine the damage mechanisms which describe fatigue failures in 95.5 Sn- 4.0 Ag - 0.5 Cu wt% (SAC405) lead-free solder interconnects. In this work the initiation sites and crack paths were characterized for SAC405 ball-grid array (BGA) interconnects with electroless-nickel immersion-gold (ENIG) pad-finish. The interconnects were arranged in a perimeter array and tested in fully assembled packages. Evaluation methods included monotonic and displacement controlled mechanical shear fatigue tests, and temperature cycling. The specimens were characterized using metallogaphy, including optical and electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and precise real-time electrical resistance structural health monitoring (SHM). In mechanical shear fatigue tests, strain was applied by the substrates, simulating dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the board and chip-carrier. This type of strain caused cracks to initiate in the soft Sn-rich solder and grow near the interface between the solder and intermetallic compounds (IMC). The growth near the interface was found to be caused by dislocation pile-ups at the IMC when the plastic zone ahead of the crack tip reached this interface. In temperature cycling testing, strains arose within the interconnect due to CTE mismatch between the solder and IMC. The substrates had matched CTE for all specimens in this research. Because of this, all the temperature cycling cracks were observed at interfaces, generally between the solder and IMC. Additionally, real-time electrical resistance may be a useful non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tool for the empirical observation of fatigue cracking in ball-grid arrays (BGA) during both mechanical and temperature cycling tests.

  14. Coexistent chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-heart failure: mechanisms, diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Sunil K; Gupta, Mansi

    2010-01-01

    Mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is more often due to cardiac rather than respiratory causes. The coexistence of heart failure (HF) and COPD is frequent but remains under-diagnosed. Both conditions share several similarities including the age of the population affected, a common risk factor in smoking and symptoms of exertional dyspnoea. There is also a strong possibility of COPD promoting atherosclerotic vascular disease through systemic inflammation. Both the conditions are punctuated by episodes of acute exacerbations of symptoms from time to time where differentiation between these two can be especially challenging. Although coexistence of the two is common, more often, only one of the two is diagnosed resulting in under-treatment and unsatisfactory response. Awareness of co-occurrence is essential among both pulmonologists and cardiologists and a high index of suspicion should be maintained. The coexistence of the COPD and HF also poses several challenges in management. Active search for the second disease using clinical examination supplemented with specialised investigations including plasma natriuretic peptides, lung function testing and echocardiography should be carried out followed by appropriate management. Issues such as adverse effects of drugs on cardiac or pulmonary function need to be sorted out by studies in coexistent COPD-HF patients. Caution is advised with use of beta2-agonists in COPD when HF is also present, more so in acute exacerbations. On current evidence, the beneficial effects of selective beta1-blockers should not be denied in stable patients who have coexistent COPD-HF. The prognosis of coexistent COPD and HF is poorer than that in either disease alone. A favourable response in the patient with coexistent COPD and HF depends on proper evaluation of the severity of each of the two and appropriate management with judicious use of medication. PMID:21302600

  15. Topical Report ''Corrosion Evaluation of LLW2 Skid-B Weld Failure Mechanisms (44139-92)

    SciTech Connect

    JI Young Chang

    2001-05-31

    An independent investigation of pipe welding leaks from the Low-Level Waste 2 (LLW2) Skid-B System for the possibilities of improper welding (IW), microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC), sensitization, chloride pitting corrosion (CPC), and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) was conducted. The results show the prevailing mechanisms that caused the leaks are identified as IW, CPC, and the improper selection of weld filler material for the base metals in an environment of the North Plateau underground water. These is no evidence of MIC, sensitization, or IGSCC. The chloride pitting corrosion mechanism that took place at all the welds are also described. All the pipelines were replaced with polyvinyl chloride (PVC) for cost saving and the LLW2 Skid B System has been successfully operating since 1999. This report summarizes the findings and recommendations associated with preventive measures for future operations. The LLW2 Facility is a replacement for an existing waste treatment system. The Facility processes two different waste streams through two different ''skids.'' After seven months of operation, one of the two skids began to leak. Extensive evaluation of the corrosion mechanisms and the contributing factors are documented in this report. This report principally evaluates the physical and chemical configurations that led to the corrosion and leaks. Chloride pitting corrosion, exacerbated by weld defects, is the corrosion mechanism. The report also discusses fabrication and Quality Assurance (QA)/Quality Control (QC) actions that would have prevented their occurrence. It is believed that in the absence of either the defects or the chloride concentrations, corrosion would not have occurred. In developing the specification for processing skids to be used in the Facility, high chloride was not identified as a parameter of concern. As such, piping fabrication and inspection standards for the system did not identify more rigorous welding standards that could have prevented the corrosion and subsequent leaks.

  16. On the triggering of shear faults during brittle compressive failure: A new mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Schulson, E.M.; Iliescu, D.; Renshaw, C.E.

    1999-08-01

    Direct observations are presented of the micromechanical events that contribute to the localization of deformation within brittle compressive shear faults. The observations were made on ice and show that faults are composed of both wing cracks and splay cracks. The latter features initiate from one side of inclined parent cracks and create sets of slender microcolumns fixed on one end and free on the other. It is proposed that the fault-triggering mechanism is the breaking of near-surface microcolumns owing to frictional sliding across their free ends. A lower-bound estimate of the compressive strength of ice is found to be in order of magnitude agreement with experiment.

  17. Monitoring of temperature fatigue failure mechanism for polyvinyl alcohol fiber concrete using acoustic emission sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongsheng; Cao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to monitor the mechanism of evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber concrete damage under temperature fatigue loading is investigated. Using the temperature fatigue test, real-time AE monitoring data of PVA fiber concrete is achieved. Based on the AE signal characteristics of the whole test process and comparison of AE signals of PVA fiber concretes with different fiber contents, the damage evolution process of PVA fiber concrete is analyzed. Finally, a qualitative evaluation of the damage degree is obtained using the kurtosis index and b-value of AE characteristic parameters. The results obtained using both methods are discussed. PMID:23012555

  18. Monitoring of Temperature Fatigue Failure Mechanism for Polyvinyl Alcohol Fiber Concrete Using Acoustic Emission Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dongsheng; Cao, Hai

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of acoustic emission (AE) techniques to monitor the mechanism of evolution of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber concrete damage under temperature fatigue loading is investigated. Using the temperature fatigue test, real-time AE monitoring data of PVA fiber concrete is achieved. Based on the AE signal characteristics of the whole test process and comparison of AE signals of PVA fiber concretes with different fiber contents, the damage evolution process of PVA fiber concrete is analyzed. Finally, a qualitative evaluation of the damage degree is obtained using the kurtosis index and b-value of AE characteristic parameters. The results obtained using both methods are discussed. PMID:23012555

  19. Evaluation of the onset of failure under mechanical and thermal stresses on luting agent for metal–ceramic and metal crowns by finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Agnihotri, Hema; Bhatnagar, Naresh; Rao, G. Venugopal; Jain, Veena; Parkash, Hari; Kar, Aswini Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Long-term clinical failures of cemented prosthesis depend, to a large extent, on the integrity of the luting agent. The causative factors that lead to microfracture and, hence, failure of the luting agents are the stresses acting inside the oral cavity. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop an understanding of the relationship between stresses in the tooth and the failure potential of the luting agent. Two-dimensional finite element stress analysis was performed on the mandibular second premolar. The behavior of zinc-phosphate and glass-ionomer were studied under different crowns (metal–ceramic and metal crown) and loading conditions (mechanical force of 450 N acting vertically over the occlusal surface, thermal loads of 60° and 0°C). It was observed from the study that failure threshold of the luting agent was influenced both by the elastic modulus of the luting agent and by the type of the crown. PMID:22114426

  20. Failure of feedback as a putative common mechanism of spreading depolarizations in migraine and stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlem, Markus A.; Schneider, Felix M.; Schöll, Eckehard

    2008-06-01

    The stability of cortical function depends critically on proper regulation. Under conditions of migraine and stroke a breakdown of transmembrane chemical gradients can spread through cortical tissue. A concomitant component of this emergent spatio-temporal pattern is a depolarization of cells detected as slow voltage variations. The propagation velocity of ˜3mm/min indicates a contribution of diffusion. We propose a mechanism for spreading depolarizations (SD) that rests upon a nonlocal or noninstantaneous feedback in a reaction-diffusion system. Depending upon the characteristic space and time scales of the feedback, the propagation of cortical SD can be suppressed by shifting the bifurcation line, which separates the parameter regime of pulse propagation from the regime where a local disturbance dies out. The optimization of this feedback is elaborated for different control schemes and ranges of control parameters.

  1. Failure Mechanisms and Damage Model of Ductile Cast Iron Under Low-Cycle Fatigue Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Sloss, Clayton

    2014-10-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on ductile cast iron (DCI) at strain rates of 0.02, 0.002, and 0.0002/s in the temperature range from room temperature to 1073 K (800 °C). A constitutive-damage model was developed within the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) framework on the premise of strain decomposition into rate-independent plasticity and time-dependent creep. Four major damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement (IE), (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation were considered in a nonlinear creep-fatigue interaction model which represents the overall damage accumulation process consisting of oxidation-assisted fatigue crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage ( e.g., IE and creep), leading to final fracture. The model was found to agree with the experimental observations of the complex DCI-LCF phenomena, for which the linear damage summation rule would fail.

  2. Probing the failure mechanism of nanoscale LiFePO4 for Li-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Meng; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ji-guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2015-05-01

    LiFePO4 is a high power rate cathode material for lithium ion battery and shows remarkable capacity retention, featuring a 91% capacity retention after 3300 cycles. In this work, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to study the gradual capacity fading mechanism of LiFePO4 materials. We found that upon prolonged electrochemical cycling of the battery, the LiFePO4 cathode shows surface amorphization and loss of oxygen species, which directly contribute to the gradual capacity fading of the battery. The finding can guide the design and improvement of LiFePO4 cathode for high-energy and high-power rechargeable battery for electric transportation.

  3. Deformation and failure mechanisms of niobium and tantalum during tensile testing in uranium at 1473 K

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.S.; Gallegos, G.F.; Stratman, M.P.; Sedillo, E.

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that, when a higher-melting-point solid metal is exposed to the combination of a specific lower-melting-point liquid metal and stress, severe embrittlement can occur. This is known as liquid metal embrittlement (LME). Refractory metals with high melting points and good workability, such as the Group VB metals (V, Nb, and Ta) have been used to construct molds for casting other metals that have low melting points. One of these low-melting-point metals is U, which is used in nuclear power reactors as fuel. However, it was previously reported that severe degradation occurred when Ta was exposed to liquid U. The kinetics of the penetration of U into Ta under stress-free conditions were studied. It was found that, between 1433 K and 1623 K, despite the low solubility of U in Ta, the Ta matrix recrystallized into elongated grains, and U penetrated between the grains. The penetrated U existed in front of the transformed grains as a separate layer and along grain boundaries. For conditions in which stresses exist, it is expected that the penetration of liquid uranium could be further accelerated and thus embrittle the Ta matrix. There is no detailed study about the LME mechanisms of Group VB metals in liquid U. The authors have initiated a research activity to study the mechanisms of embrittlement of Nb and Ta by liquid uranium. Their initial results, as reported in this paper, indicate a significant difference between Nb and Ta when exposed to liquid U and subjected to tensile stress.

  4. Noninvasive ventilation as a weaning strategy for mechanical ventilation in adults with respiratory failure: a Cochrane systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Karen E.A.; Meade, Maureen O.; Premji, Azra; Adhikari, Neill K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noninvasive ventilation has been studied as a means of reducing complications among patients being weaned from invasive mechanical ventilation. We sought to summarize evidence comparing noninvasive and invasive weaning and their effects on mortality. Methods: We identified relevant randomized and quasirandomized trials through searches of databases, conference proceedings and grey literature. We included trials comparing extubation and immediate application of noninvasive ventilation with continued invasive weaning in adults on mechanical ventilation. Two reviewers each independently screened citations, assessed trial quality and abstracted data. Our primary outcome was mortality. Results: We identified 16 trials involving 994 participants, most of whom had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Compared with invasive weaning, noninvasive weaning significantly reduced mortality (risk ratio [RR] 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36 to 0.80), weaning failures (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.42 to 0.96), ventilator-associated pneumonia (RR 0.25, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.43), length of stay in the intensive care unit (mean difference [MD] ?5.59 d, 95% CI ?7.90 to ?3.28) and in hospital (MD ?6.04 d, 95% CI ?9.22 to ?2.87), and total duration of mechanical ventilation (MD ?5.64 d, 95% CI ?9.50 to ?1.77). Noninvasive weaning had no significant effect on the duration of ventilation related to weaning, but significantly reduced rates of tracheostomy (RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.47) and reintubation (RR 0.65, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.97). Mortality benefits were significantly greater in trials enrolling patients with COPD than in trials enrolling mixed patient populations (RR 0.36 [95% CI 0.24 to 0.56] v. RR 0.81 [95% CI 0.47 to 1.40]). Interpretation: Noninvasive weaning reduces rates of death and pneumonia without increasing the risk of weaning failure or reintubation. In subgroup analyses, mortality benefits were significantly greater in patients with COPD. PMID:24324020

  5. Impact induced failure of cartilage-on-bone following creep loading: a microstructural and fracture mechanics study.

    PubMed

    Thambyah, Ashvin; Zhang, Geran; Kim, Woong; Broom, Neil D

    2012-10-01

    Cartilage-on-bone samples obtained from healthy bovine patellae, with or without prior static compression (i.e. creep) at 2MPa for 3h, were delivered a single impact via an instrumented pendulum indenter at a velocity of 1.13m/s and an energy of 2.2J. Mechanical data was obtained and microstructural assessment of the region of failure was carried out using differential interference contrast (DIC) optical imaging. In addition, a fibrillar-level structural analysis using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was conducted on a control batch of non-impacted samples that were subjected to either creep or non-creep loading protocols. Arising from the impact event the deepest levels of crack penetration into the articular cartilage occurred in those samples subjected to prior creep loading. Further the crack depth was inversely proportional to the rebound velocity of the indenter. By contrast, those impacted samples not subjected to prior creep loading had only short obliquely patterned microcracks confined to the upper one-third of the full cartilage depth. Ultrastructurally the creep-loaded cartilage matrix exhibited a substantial radial collapse or compaction of the fibrillar network in its primary radial zone. The increase in crack length in the prior creep-loaded cartilage is consistent with a reduction in its dissipative properties as indicated by a reduction in rebound velocity. An interpretation is offered in terms of classical fracture mechanics theory. PMID:22784816

  6. Evaluation of seawater exposure on mechanical properties and failure behavior of E-Glass/BMI composite for marine use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yian; Wang, Zhiying; Seah, Leong Keey; Chai, Gin Boay

    2015-03-01

    Since composite material is playing an increasingly important role in the marine and offshore drilling industry, it is essential to have a good understanding on degradation of the material in the seawater environment. This study investigates the influence of seawater exposure on the mechanical and failure behavior of E-Glass/BMI composite. The water diffusion behavior in the composite has been studied through immersing the specimens in seawater under different conditions. The diffusion rate accelerates with increase of temperature, and the material shows irreversible damage due to seawater absorption at the temperature of 80°C. It is also found that external stress would significantly increase the water absorption. The water uptake in the specimen at 50°C showed a two stage behavior dominated by Fickian law and polymeric relaxation respectively, and saturation was not achieved in 8 months. After diffusion, the Tg of the material is considerably lowered due to plasticization effect. However the effect was found to be reversible after drying the specimen. Based on the testing results of tensile, flexure and fatigue properties of the composites, it is concluded that seawater exposure especially at elevated temperature leads to significant degradation on mechanical properties of the composite. However, the flexural strength of BMI composite with seawater absorption becomes less susceptible to temperature change. It is also found that the seawater absorption doesn't show significant effect on the stiffness of the material.

  7. Impact of defects on the electrical transport, optical properties and failure mechanisms of GaN nanowires.

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Aubry, Sylvie; Shaner, Eric Arthur; Siegal, Michael P.; Li, Qiming; Jones, Reese E.; Westover, Tyler; Wang, George T.; Zhou, Xiao Wang; Talin, Albert Alec; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Harris, C. Thomas; Huang, Jian Yu

    2010-09-01

    We present the results of a three year LDRD project that focused on understanding the impact of defects on the electrical, optical and thermal properties of GaN-based nanowires (NWs). We describe the development and application of a host of experimental techniques to quantify and understand the physics of defects and thermal transport in GaN NWs. We also present the development of analytical models and computational studies of thermal conductivity in GaN NWs. Finally, we present an atomistic model for GaN NW electrical breakdown supported with experimental evidence. GaN-based nanowires are attractive for applications requiring compact, high-current density devices such as ultraviolet laser arrays. Understanding GaN nanowire failure at high-current density is crucial to developing nanowire (NW) devices. Nanowire device failure is likely more complex than thin film due to the prominence of surface effects and enhanced interaction among point defects. Understanding the impact of surfaces and point defects on nanowire thermal and electrical transport is the first step toward rational control and mitigation of device failure mechanisms. However, investigating defects in GaN NWs is extremely challenging because conventional defect spectroscopy techniques are unsuitable for wide-bandgap nanostructures. To understand NW breakdown, the influence of pre-existing and emergent defects during high current stress on NW properties will be investigated. Acute sensitivity of NW thermal conductivity to point-defect density is expected due to the lack of threading dislocation (TD) gettering sites, and enhanced phonon-surface scattering further inhibits thermal transport. Excess defect creation during Joule heating could further degrade thermal conductivity, producing a viscous cycle culminating in catastrophic breakdown. To investigate these issues, a unique combination of electron microscopy, scanning luminescence and photoconductivity implemented at the nanoscale will be used in concert with sophisticated molecular-dynamics calculations of surface and defect-mediated NW thermal transport. This proposal seeks to elucidate long standing material science questions for GaN while addressing issues critical to realizing reliable GaN NW devices.

  8. Inventory of landslides in southern Illinois near the New Madrid Seismic Zone and the possible failure mechanism at three sites

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Wen June . Engineering Geology Section)

    1992-01-01

    A total of 221 landslides was inventoried along a 200-kilometer reach of the Ohio and the Mississippi Rivers from Olmsted to Chester, IL using Side-Looking Airborne Radar imagery, vertical, stereoscopic, black and white aerial photography at various scales, and low altitude, oblique color and color infrared photography. Features observed on aerial photographs were used to classify landslides into three types (rock/debris fall, block slide, and rotational/translational slide) at three levels of confidence: certain, probable, or possible. Some landslides combined two or more types at a single site. Only a few of the landslides showed evidence of repeated activity; most are ancient landforms. Most of the landslides were developed in the loess, alluvium, colluvium, and weak clay layers of the Chesterian Series or in the Porter's Creek Clay and McNairy Formation. Failure of three representative landslides was modeled under static (aseismic) and dynamic (seismic) situations using three different sliding mechanisms. Both the pseudo-static method and a simplified method of the Newmark displacement analysis were used to determine the stability of the slope under earthquake conditions. The three representative landslides selected for detailed slope stability analysis were the Ford Hill, Jones Ridge, and Olmsted landslides. The Ford Hill and Jones Ridge landslides have similar slope geometries. Their modes of failure were recognized as a translational block slide on a weak clay layer. The Olmsted landslide is a complex of several rotational slides of different ages and a mega block slide on weak clay layers. The stability analyses of these three landslides suggest that they would not have occurred under aseismic conditions. However, under earthquake loadings similar to those generated by the 1811-12 earthquakes, most of the slopes could have experienced large displacements leading to landslide initiation.

  9. Mechanical failures after fixation with proximal femoral nail and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Koyuncu, ?emmi; Altay, Ta?k?n; Kayal?, Cemil; Ozan, F?rat; Yamak, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aims at assessing the clinical results, radiographic findings, and associated complications after osteosynthesis of trochanteric hip fractures with proximal femoral nail (PFN). Methods A total of 152 patients with hip fractures who underwent osteosynthesis with PFN were included. The hip fracture types in the patients included in the study were classified according to the American Orthopedic/Orthopedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA). AO/OTA A1, A2, and A3 type fractures were found in 24 (15.8%), 107 (70.4%), and 21 (13.8%) patients, respectively. The Baumgaertner scale was used to assess the degree of postoperative reduction. The Salvati–Wilson hip function (SWS) scoring system was used to evaluate functional results. After a follow-up period, clinical and radiographic results were evaluated and complications were assessed. The relationship between the complications and SWS score, age, sex, fracture type, reduction quality, and time from the fracture to surgery was evaluated. Results Eighty-five (55.9%) female patients and 67 (44.1%) male patients were enrolled in the study. Seventy-nine (51.9%) patients had left hip fractures, and 73 (48.1%) had right hip fractures. The mean age was 76 (range 21–93) years, and the mean follow-up duration was 23.6 (range 7–49) months. Postoperatively, one patient (0.6%) had a poor reduction, 16 patients (10.5%) had an acceptable reduction, and 135 patients (88.9%) had a good reduction according to the above criteria. The SWS scores were excellent, good, moderate, and poor in 91 (59.8%), 45 (29.6%), 15 (9.8%), and one (0.6%) patients, respectively. Late postoperative complications were seen in 27 patients (17.7%). A total of 14 patients (9.2%) underwent a revision procedure for mechanical complications. Conclusion The study results suggest that the quality of fracture reduction is an important factor that affects the revision rate and SWS score in patients with mechanical complications after osteosynthesis with PFN for trochanteric fractures. PMID:26719682

  10. A new failure mechanism in thin film by collaborative fracture and delamination: Interacting duos of cracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marthelot, Joël; Bico, José; Melo, Francisco; Roman, Benoît

    2015-11-01

    When a thin film moderately adherent to a substrate is subjected to residual stress, the cooperation between fracture and delamination leads to unusual fracture patterns, such as spirals, alleys of crescents and various types of strips, all characterized by a robust characteristic length scale. We focus on the propagation of a duo of cracks: two fractures in the film connected by a delamination front and progressively detaching a strip. We show experimentally that the system selects an equilibrium width on the order of 25 times the thickness of the coating and independent of both fracture and adhesion energies. We investigate numerically the selection of the width and the condition for propagation by considering Griffith's criterion and the principle of local symmetry. In addition, we propose a simplified model based on the criterion of maximum of energy release rate, which provides insights of the physical mechanisms leading to these regular patterns, and predicts the effect of material properties on the selected width of the detaching strip.

  11. Damage and failure mechanisms of continuous glass fiber reinforced polyphenylene sulfide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, F.; Hiltner, A.; Baer, E.

    1992-01-01

    The damage that accompanies flexural deformation of a unidirectional glass fiber composite of polyphenylene sulfide was examined by AE and SEM. These complementary techniques were used to identify damage mechanisms at the microscale and correlate them with the macroscopic stress state in four-point bending. The flexural stress-strain curve was nominally linear to about 1.0 percent strain, but the onset of damage detectable by AE occurred at 0.3 percent strain. Two peaks in the AE amplitude distribution were observed at 35 dB and 60 dB. Low-amplitude events were detected along the entire length of the specimen, and correlation with direct observations of damage made by deforming the composite on the SEM stage suggested that these events arose from matrix cracking and fiber debonding concentrated at flaws on the composite. High amplitude events occurred primarily in the region of highest flexural stress between the inner loading points. They were attributed to fracture of glass fibers on the tension side and surface damage on the compressive side.

  12. A new failure mechanism in thin film by collaborative fracture and delamination: interacting duos of cracks

    E-print Network

    Joel Marthelot; Jose Bico; Francisco Melo; Benoit Roman

    2015-09-20

    When a thin film moderately adherent to a substrate is subjected to residual stress, the cooperation between fracture and delamination leads to unusual fracture patterns, such as spirals, alleys of crescents and various types of strips, all characterized by a robust characteristic length scale. We focus on the propagation of a duo of cracks: two fractures in the film connected by a delamination front and progressively detaching a strip. We show experimentally that the system selects an equilibrium width on the order of 25 times the thickness of the coating and independent of both fracture and adhesion energies. We investigate numerically the selection of the width and the condition for propagation by considering Griffith's criterion and the principle of local symmetry. In addition, we propose a simplified model based on the criterion of maximum of energy release rate, which provides insights of the physical mechanisms leading to these regular patterns, and predicts the effect of material properties on the selected width of the detaching strip.

  13. Identification and Association of SNPs in TBC1D1 Gene with Growth Traits in Two Rabbit Breeds

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhi-Juan; Fu, Lu; Zhang, Gong-Wei; Yang, Yu; Chen, Shi-Yi; Wang, Jie; Lai, Song-Jia

    2013-01-01

    The TBC1D1 plays a key role in body energy homeostasis by regulating the insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. The present study aimed to identify the association between genetic polymorphisms of TBC1D1 and body weight (BW) in rabbits. Among the total of 12 SNPs detected in all 20 exons, only one SNP was non-synonymous (c.214G>A. p.G72R) located in exon 1. c.214G>A was subsequently genotyped among 491 individuals from two rabbit breeds by the high-resolution melting method. Allele A was the predominant allele with frequencies of 0.7780 and 0.6678 in European white rabbit (EWR, n = 205) and New Zealand White rabbit (NZW, n = 286), respectively. The moderate polymorphism information content (0.250.05). Our results implied that the c.214G>A of TBC1D1 gene might be one of the candidate loci affecting the trait of 35 d BW in the rabbit. PMID:25049738

  14. TBCs for Gas Turbines under Thermomechanical Loadings: Failure Behaviour and Life Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, T.; Trunova, O.; Herzog, R.; Singheiser, L.

    2012-10-01

    The present contribution gives an overview about recent research on a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system consisted of (i) an intermetallic MCrAlY-alloy Bondcoat (BC) applied by vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) and (ii) an Yttria Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) top coat air plasma sprayed (APS) at Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institute of Energy and Climate Research (IEK-1). The influence of high temperature dwell time, maximum and minimum temperature on crack growth kinetics during thermal cycling of such plasma sprayed TBCs is investigated using infrared pulse thermography (IT), acoustic emission (AE) analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Thermocyclic life in terms of accumulated time at maximum temperature decreases with increasing high temperature dwell time and increases with increasing minimum temperature. AE analysis proves that crack growth mainly occurs during cooling at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of the BC. Superimposed mechanical load cycles accelerate delamination crack growth and, in case of sufficiently high mechanical loadings, result in premature fatigue failure of the substrate. A life prediction model based on TGO growth kinetics and a fracture mechanics approach has been developed which accounts for the influence of maximum and minimum temperature as well as of high temperature dwell time with good accuracy in an extremely wide parameter range.

  15. Mechanical failure characterization of optical components caused by laser induced damage initiated at contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Faux, D. R., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this research is to quantify by numerical techniques the effects of surface and subsurface absorbing defects on damage initiation and growth in high power laser optical components. The defects include laser absorbing spots (e.g., surface particulate contamination) and surface damage regions (e.g., micro-cracks and voids) which are present due to environmental exposure and fabrication processes. This report focuses on three sources of contamination that can cause damage to optical components: (1) Front surface particle contamination, (2) Back surface particle contamination, and (3) Subsurface particle contamination. The DYNA2D (non-linear structural mechanics) code was used to model the growth of damage in the glass substrate. The damage in the nominally transparent glass substrate as a result of front surface particle contamination was found to be dependent on the magnitude of the resultant pressure pulse applied to the particle and the initial area of contact between the particle and glass substrate. The pressures generated from a back surface particle being blown off the surface provided sufficient loading to severely damage (crack) the glass substrate. A subsurface Ceria dioxide particle showed a strong surface interaction that influenced the formation and direction of the damage (cracking) that ultimately resulted in the blow-out of the damaged material leaving a relatively clean crater in the glass. Crater shape and size was determined. Since fused silica is the most transparent, and therefore laser damage resistant, of the optical materials, it is used for the most at-risk optical elements. The present studies are for a fused silica substrate. Some oxides such as Ceria are transparent in the infrared and visible, but absorbing in the UV part of the spectrum. Because ICF lasers like NIF use frequency tripling, effects of such oxides must be included.

  16. Mechanical properties and shear failure surfaces of two alumina powders in triaxial compression

    SciTech Connect

    ZEUCH,DAVID H.; GRAZIER,J. MARK; ARGUELLO JR.,JOSE G.; EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    2000-04-24

    In the manufacture of ceramic components, near-net-shape parts are commonly formed by uniaxially pressing granulated powders in rigid dies. Density gradients that are introduced into a powder compact during press-forming often increase the cost of manufacturing, and can degrade the performance and reliability of the finished part. Finite element method (FEM) modeling can be used to predict powder compaction response, and can provide insight into the causes of density gradients in green powder compacts; however, accurate numerical simulations require accurate material properties and realistic constitutive laws. To support an effort to implement an advanced cap plasticity model within the finite element framework to realistically simulate powder compaction, the authors have undertaken a project to directly measure as many of the requisite powder properties for modeling as possible. A soil mechanics approach has been refined and used to measure the pressure dependent properties of ceramic powders up to 68.9 MPa (10,000 psi). Due to the large strains associated with compacting low bulk density ceramic powders, a two-stage process was developed to accurately determine the pressure-density relationship of a ceramic powder in hydrostatic compression, and the properties of that same powder compact under deviatoric loading at the same specific pressures. Using this approach, the seven parameters that are required for application of a modified Drucker-Prager cap plasticity model were determined directly. The details of the experimental techniques used to obtain the modeling parameters and the results for two different granulated alumina powders are presented.

  17. Mechanisms of High-Temperature Fatigue Failure in Alloy 800H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    BhanuSankaraRao, K.; Schuster, H.; Halford, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    The damage mechanisms influencing the axial strain-controlled Low-Cycle Fatigue (LCF) behavior of alloy 800H at 850 C have been evaluated under conditions of equal tension/compression ramp rates (Fast-Fast (F-F): 4 X 10(sup -3)/s and Slow-Slow (S-S): 4 X 10(sup -5)/s) and asymmetrical ramp rates (Fast-Slow (F-S): 4 x 10(sup -3)/s / 4 X 10(sup -5/s and Slow-Fast (S-F): 4 X 10(sup -5) / 4 X 10(sup -3)/s) in tension and compression. The fatigue life, cyclic stress response, and fracture modes were significantly influenced by the waveform shape. The fatigue lives displayed by different loading conditions were in the following order: F-F greater than S-S greater than F-S greater than S-F. The fracture mode was dictated by the ramp rate adopted in the tensile direction. The fast ramp rate in the tensile direction led to the occurrence of transgranular crack initiation and propagation, whereas the slow ramp rate caused intergranular initiation and propagation. The time-dependent processes and their synergistic interactions, which were at the basis of observed changes in cyclic stress response and fatigue life, were identified. Oxidation, creep damage, dynamic strain aging, massive carbide precipitation, time-dependent creep deformation, and deformation ratcheting were among the several factors influencing cyclic life. Irrespective of the loading condition, the largest effect on life was exerted by oxidation processes. Deformation ratcheting had its greatest influence on life under asymmetrical loading conditions. Creep damage accumulated the greatest amount during the slow tensile ramp under S-F conditions.

  18. [Pharmacological and mechanical support of the myocardium in perioperative period in cardio-surgical patients with chronic heart failure].

    PubMed

    Babaev, M A; Eremenko, A A; Ziuliaeva, T P; Fedulova, S V; Molochnikov, I O; Fominykh, M V; Poliakova, P V; Dzemeshkevich, S L

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with a retrospective study devoted to the combined methods of myocardial support in cardiosurgical patients with chronic heart failure (III-IY FC according to NYHA) and low myocardial reserves capacity (LVEF 28.3 +/- 9.4%). This methods include pharmacologic (Levosimendan) and mechanical support (IABP). During the work we have analyzed data of 116 patients and measured pressure in the pulmonary artery (mmHg), end-systolic volume (ESV ml), end-diastolic volume (ED, ml), stroke volume output (SVO, ml), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, %). We evaluated the level of valvular insufficiency and pulmonary hypertension (PH) and BNP concentration (pg/ml). The following indications for the usage of pharmacological and/or mechanical myocardial support were identified: I) Preventive usage of pharmacological and/or mechanical myocardial support is recommended for patients with CHF III-IY FC (NYHA) and low left ventricular EF(< or = 35%), significant valvular insufficiency, PH, PICS (postinfarction cardiosclerosis); 2) The certain method of the support can be chosen with the help of Levosimendan infusion testing; 3) In case one of the above mentioned indications (point 1) or in case of mild reaction to levosimendan infusion in patients with the lesions of more than 2 coronary arteries (including the trunk of the left coronary artery) the usage of combined support is recommended; 4) In case of < or = 6 scores according to EUROSCORE scale, lesions of 2 or more coronary arteries, tricuspid insufficiency (TriI), PH, and high pressure in pulmonary artery (higher than the 2nd degree), high end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume of LV the isolated usage of levosimendan is recommended; 5) In case of significant ischemic heart disease, PICS, lesions of more than 2 coronary arteries, (including the trunk of the left coronary artery) but without significant decrease of pressure in the pulmonary artery, end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and TriI the isolated usage of IABP is recommended. PMID:25306682

  19. Failure Mechanism analysis of rainfall-induced landslide at Pingguang Stream in Taiwan: Mapping, Investigation, and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Kai; Lee, Ching-Fang; Lo, Chia-Ming; Chiu, Chun-Jung

    2015-04-01

    On September 15, 2012, torrential storm carried by the peripheral circulation of Typhoon Sanba and the northeast monsoon induced a translational landslide near Pingguang Road in Xindian District of New Taipei City, Taiwan. The total volume of the landslide was approximately 162,000 m^3. The sliding mass destroyed two houses across the stream and formed a landslide dam at the toe of the slope, constricting the stream. In this study, remote sensing images and LiDAR scanning were interpreted, and conducted onsite surveys to obtain material parameters, and performed simulations using the discrete element method to reconstruction the post event, in order to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the landslide process. Survey results revealed complex geological conditions with wide spreading tension cracks at source area. This facilitated the infiltration of surface runoff into weak surfaces and raised groundwater levels. Once the shear strength falls below a critical value, failure surface will occur along the stratum boundary. The results of numerical simulation reveal that at 80 sec after the Pingguang Stream landslide began, a maximum deposition depth of 20 m had been reached. The sliding mass cut off the stream and pushed the stream flow roughly 35 m to the southeast. Because the slope materials surrounding the study area and the landslide-inducing mechanisms are similar, the top of the slopes to the northwest of the study area require monitoring immediately. In addition to filling in the tension cracks, drainage facilities should be constructed to prevent further landslides. Keywords: translational landslide, onsite survey, discrete element method, mechanism, landslide process

  20. Blocking NMDA receptors delays death in rats with acute liver failure by dual protective mechanisms in kidney and brain.

    PubMed

    Cauli, Omar; González-Usano, Alba; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Gimenez-Garzó, Carla; López-Larrubia, Pilar; Ruiz-Sauri, Amparo; Hernández-Rabaza, Vicente; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Malek, Michal; Lazarewicz, Jerzy W; Carratalá, Arturo; Urios, Amparo; Miguel, Alfonso; Torregrosa, Isidro; Carda, Carmen; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of patients with acute liver failure (ALF) is unsatisfactory and mortality remains unacceptably high. Blocking NMDA receptors delays or prevents death of rats with ALF. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Clarifying these mechanisms will help to design more efficient treatments to increase patient's survival. The aim of this work was to shed light on the mechanisms by which blocking NMDA receptors delays rat's death in ALF. ALF was induced by galactosamine injection. NMDA receptors were blocked by continuous MK-801 administration. Edema and cerebral blood flow were assessed by magnetic resonance. The time course of ammonia levels in brain, muscle, blood, and urine; of glutamine, lactate, and water content in brain; of glomerular filtration rate and kidney damage; and of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and intracranial pressure was assessed. ALF reduces kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as reflected by reduced inulin clearance. GFR reduction is due to both reduced renal perfusion and kidney tubular damage as reflected by increased Kim-1 in urine and histological analysis. Blocking NMDA receptors delays kidney damage, allowing transient increased GFR and ammonia elimination which delays hyperammonemia and associated changes in brain. Blocking NMDA receptors does not prevent cerebral edema or blood-brain barrier permeability but reduces or prevents changes in cerebral blood flow and brain lactate. The data show that dual protective effects of MK-801 in kidney and brain delay cerebral alterations, HE, intracranial pressure increase and death. NMDA receptors antagonists may increase survival of patients with ALF by providing additional time for liver transplantation or regeneration. PMID:24338618

  1. Electromigration in metal interconnects is the most pernicious failure mechanism in semiconductor integrated circuits (ICs). Early electromigration investigations were primarily focused on aluminum interconnects for

    E-print Network

    Electromigration in metal interconnects is the most pernicious failure mechanism in semiconductor interconnects for silicon-based ICs. An alternative metallization compatible with gallium arsenide (Ga at higher current densities and elevated temperatures. Gold-based metallization was implemented on Ga

  2. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. An overview of the following TBC spalling mechanisms is presented: metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress singularities at edges and corners, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, temperature gradients, component design features and object impact damage. TBC spalling life analytical models are proposed based on observations of TBC spalling and plausible failure theories. TBC spalling was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceed the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  3. Anisotropic damage mechanics as a novel approach to improve pre- and post-failure borehole stability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaede, O.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2013-06-01

    Anisotropic damage distribution and evolution have a profound effect on borehole stress concentrations. Damage evolution is an irreversible process that is not adequately described within classical equilibrium thermodynamics. Therefore, we propose a constitutive model, based on non-equilibrium thermodynamics, that accounts for anisotropic damage distribution, anisotropic damage threshold and anisotropic damage evolution. We implemented this constitutive model numerically, using the finite element method, to calculate stress-strain curves and borehole stresses. The resulting stress-strain curves are distinctively different from linear elastic-brittle and linear elastic-ideal plastic constitutive models and realistically model experimental responses of brittle rocks. We show that the onset of damage evolution leads to an inhomogeneous redistribution of material properties and stresses along the borehole wall. The classical linear elastic-brittle approach to borehole stability analysis systematically overestimates the stress concentrations on the borehole wall, because dissipative strain-softening is underestimated. The proposed damage mechanics approach explicitly models dissipative behaviour and leads to non-conservative mud window estimations. Furthermore, anisotropic rocks with preferential planes of failure, like shales, can be addressed with our model.

  4. Modeling shear failure and permeability enhancement due to coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical processes in Enhanced Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, Sharad

    2011-01-01

    The connectivity and accessible surface area of flowing fractures, whether natural or man-made, is possibly the single most important factor, after temperature, which determines the feasibility of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). Rock deformation and in-situ stress changes induced by injected fluids can lead to shear failure on preexisting fractures which can generate microseismic events, and also enhance the permeability and accessible surface area of the geothermal formation. Hence, the ability to accurately model the coupled thermal-hydrologic-mechanical (THM) processes in fractured geological formations is critical in effective EGS reservoir development and management strategies. The locations of the microseismic events can serve as indicators of the zones of enhanced permeability, thus providing vital information for verification of the coupled THM models. We will describe a general purpose computational code, FEHM, developed for this purpose, that models coupled THM processes during multiphase fluid flow and transport in fractured porous media. The code incorporates several models of fracture aperture and stress behavior combined with permeability relationships. We provide field scale examples of applications to geothermal systems to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  5. Measurement of trabecular bone microstructure does not improve prediction of mechanical failure loads at the distal radius compared with bone mass alone.

    PubMed

    Lochmüller, E-M; Kristin, J; Matsuura, M; Kuhn, V; Hudelmaier, M; Link, T M; Eckstein, F

    2008-10-01

    Bone mass predicts a high proportion of variability in bone failure strength but is known to overlap among subjects with and without fractures. Here, we tested the hypothesis that trabecular bone microstructure, determined with micro-computed tomography (microCT), can improve the prediction of experimental failure loads in the distal forearm compared with bone mass alone. The right forearm and left distal radius of 130 human specimens were examined. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured with peripheral dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The specimens were mechanically tested to failure in a fall configuration, with the hand, elbow, ligaments, and tendons intact. Cylindrical bone samples from the metaphysis of the contralateral distal radius were obtained adjacent to the subchondral bone plate and scanned with microCT. When analyzing the total sample, BMD of the distal radius displayed a correlation of r = 0.82 with mechanical failure loads. After excluding 21 specimens with no obvious radiological sign of fracture after the test, the correlation increased to r = 0.85. When only including 79 specimens with loco typico fractures, the correlation was r = 0.82. The microstructural parameters showed correlation coefficients with the failure loads of < or =0.55 and did not add significant information to DXA in predicting failure loads in multiple regression models. These findings suggest that, under experimental conditions of mechanically testing entire bones, measurement of bone microstructure does not improve the prediction of distal radius bone strength. Determination of bone microstructure may thus be less promising in improving the prediction of fractures than commonly assumed. PMID:18839046

  6. On mechanics and material length scales of failure in heterogeneous interfaces using a finite strain high performance solver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosby, Matthew; Matouš, Karel

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations capable of resolving the large range of spatial scales, from the failure-zone thickness up to the size of the representative unit cell, in damage mechanics problems of particle reinforced adhesives are presented. We show that resolving this wide range of scales in complex three-dimensional heterogeneous morphologies is essential in order to apprehend fracture characteristics, such as strength, fracture toughness and shape of the softening profile. Moreover, we show that computations that resolve essential physical length scales capture the particle size-effect in fracture toughness, for example. In the vein of image-based computational materials science, we construct statistically optimal unit cells containing hundreds to thousands of particles. We show that these statistically representative unit cells are capable of capturing the first- and second-order probability functions of a given data-source with better accuracy than traditional inclusion packing techniques. In order to accomplish these large computations, we use a parallel multiscale cohesive formulation and extend it to finite strains including damage mechanics. The high-performance parallel computational framework is executed on up to 1024 processing cores. A mesh convergence and a representative unit cell study are performed. Quantifying the complex damage patterns in simulations consisting of tens of millions of computational cells and millions of highly nonlinear equations requires data-mining the parallel simulations, and we propose two damage metrics to quantify the damage patterns. A detailed study of volume fraction and filler size on the macroscopic traction-separation response of heterogeneous adhesives is presented.

  7. Metallization failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R.

    1971-01-01

    Metallization-related failure mechanisms were shown to be a major cause of integrated circuit failures under accelerated stress conditions, as well as in actual use under field operation. The integrated circuit industry is aware of the problem and is attempting to solve it in one of two ways: (1) better understanding of the aluminum system, which is the most widely used metallization material for silicon integrated circuits both as a single level and multilevel metallization, or (2) evaluating alternative metal systems. Aluminum metallization offers many advantages, but also has limitations particularly at elevated temperatures and high current densities. As an alternative, multilayer systems of the general form, silicon device-metal-inorganic insulator-metal, are being considered to produce large scale integrated arrays. The merits and restrictions of metallization systems in current usage and systems under development are defined.

  8. Computational modeling of dynamic-failure mechanisms in armor/anti-armor materials. Final report, 1 Oct 88-30 Sep 91

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew, S.P.; Caligiuri, R.D.; Parnell, T.K.; Eiselstein, L.E.

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop improved dynamic failure models for brittle materials (primarily ceramics). The approach to developing these failure models was to establish a database (ACERAM) in which fundamental material properties and processing information could be directly correlated with ballistic performance data. Under this contract, a comprehensive literature search was conducted, many contacts were established in the armor/anti-armor research and development community, and database development was undertaken. A more limited project was also undertaken to assess and compare the effects of material properties and penetration mechanisms on the ballistic performance of depleted uranium and tungsten alloy penetrators.

  9. Study of the causes and identification of the dominant mechanisms of failure of bellows expansion joints used in district heating system pipelines at MOEK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Nikolaev, A. E.; Semenov, V. N.; Shipkov, A. A.; Shepelev, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    The results of laboratory studies of material properties and of numerical and analytical investigations to assess the stress-strain state of the metal of the bellows expansion joints used in the district heating system pipelines at MOEK subjected to corrosion failure are presented. The main causes and the dominant mechanisms of failure of the expansion joints have been identified. The influence of the initial crevice defects and the operating conditions on the features and intensity of destruction processes in expansion joints used in the district heating system pipelines at MOEK has been established.

  10. Differences in Mechanisms of Failure, Intraoperative Findings, and Surgical Characteristics Between Single- and Multiple-Revision ACL Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, James L.; Allen, Christina R.; Stephens, Thomas E.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Wright, Rick W.; Feeley, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Background The factors that lead to patients failing multiple anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructions are not well understood. Hypothesis Multiple-revision ACL reconstruction will have different characteristics than first-time revision in terms of previous and current graft selection, mode of failure, chondral/meniscal injuries, and surgical charactieristics. Study Design Case-control study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A prospective multicenter ACL revision database was utilized for the time period from March 2006 to June 2011. Patients were divided into those who underwent a single-revision ACL reconstruction and those who underwent multiple-revision ACL reconstructions. The primary outcome variable was Marx activity level. Primary data analyses between the groups included a comparison of graft type, perceived mechanism of failure, associated injury (meniscus, ligament, and cartilage), reconstruction type, and tunnel position. Data were compared by analysis of variance with a post hoc Tukey test. Results A total of 1200 patients (58% men; median age, 26 years) were enrolled, with 1049 (87%) patients having a primary revision and 151 (13%) patients having a second or subsequent revision. Marx activity levels were significantly higher (9.77) in the primary-revision group than in those patients with multiple revisions (6.74). The most common cause of reruptures was a traumatic, noncontact ACL graft injury in 55% of primary-revision patients; 25% of patients had a nontraumatic, gradual-onset recurrent injury, and 11% had a traumatic, contact injury. In the multiple-revision group, a nontraumatic, gradual-onset injury was the most common cause of recurrence (47%), followed by traumatic noncontact (35%) and nontraumatic sudden onset (11%) (P < .01 between groups). Chondral injuries in the medial compartment were significantly more common in the multiple-revision group than in the single-revision group, as were chondral injuries in the patellofemoral compartment. Conclusion Patients with multiple-revision ACL reconstructions had lower activity levels, were more likely to have chondral injuries in the medial and patellofemoral compartments, and had a high rate of a nontraumatic, recurrent injury of their graft. PMID:23698386

  11. Detection, Diagnosis and Prognosis: Contribution to the energy challenge: Proceedings of the Meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shives, T. R. (editor); Willard, W. A. (editor)

    1981-01-01

    The contribution of failure detection, diagnosis and prognosis to the energy challenge is discussed. Areas of special emphasis included energy management, techniques for failure detection in energy related systems, improved prognostic techniques for energy related systems and opportunities for detection, diagnosis and prognosis in the energy field.

  12. Loss-of-Function Mutations in TBC1D20 Cause Cataracts and Male Infertility in blind sterile Mice and Warburg Micro Syndrome in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Liegel, Ryan P.; Handley, Mark T.; Ronchetti, Adam; Brown, Stephen; Langemeyer, Lars; Linford, Andrea; Chang, Bo; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J.; Carpanini, Sarah; Posmyk, Renata; Harthill, Verity; Sheridan, Eamonn; Abdel-Salam, Ghada M.H.; Terhal, Paulien A.; Faravelli, Francesca; Accorsi, Patrizia; Giordano, Lucio; Pinelli, Lorenzo; Hartmann, Britta; Ebert, Allison D.; Barr, Francis A.; Aligianis, Irene A.; Sidjanin, Duska J.

    2013-01-01

    blind sterile (bs) is a spontaneous autosomal-recessive mouse mutation discovered more than 30 years ago. Phenotypically, bs mice exhibit nuclear cataracts and male infertility; genetic analyses assigned the bs locus to mouse chromosome 2. In this study, we first positionally cloned the bs locus and identified a putative causative mutation in the Tbc1d20 gene. Functional analysis established the mouse TBC1D20 protein as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for RAB1 and RAB2, and bs as a TBC1D20 loss-of-function mutation. Evaluation of bs mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) identified enlarged Golgi morphology and aberrant lipid droplet (LD) formation. Based on the function of TBC1D20 as a RABGAP and the bs cataract and testicular phenotypes, we hypothesized that mutations in TBC1D20 may contribute to Warburg micro syndrome (WARBM); WARBM constitutes a spectrum of disorders characterized by eye, brain, and endocrine abnormalities caused by mutations in RAB3GAP1, RAB3GAP2, and RAB18. Sequence analysis of a cohort of 77 families affected by WARBM identified five distinct TBC1D20 loss-of-function mutations, thereby establishing these mutations as causative of WARBM. Evaluation of human fibroblasts deficient in TBC1D20 function identified aberrant LDs similar to those identified in the bs mEFs. Additionally, our results show that human fibroblasts deficient in RAB18 and RAB3GAP1 function also exhibit aberrant LD formation. These findings collectively indicate that a defect in LD formation/metabolism may be a common cellular abnormality associated with WARBM, although it remains unclear whether abnormalities in LD metabolism are contributing to WARBM disease pathology. PMID:24239381

  13. Study on the Failure Mechanism of Basalts with Columnar Joints in the Unloading Process on the Basis of an Experimental Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Changyu; Yang, Chengxiang; Fang, Dan; Xu, Shuai

    2015-05-01

    Basalt with columnar joints is a kind of jointed rock body cut by both original joints and aphanitic microcracks. After unloading during excavation, such rock bodies manifest obvious mechanical phenomena such as discontinuities, anisotropy, and liability to fracture. In this work, the failure modes of basalts with columnar joints are studied based on monitoring of test tunnels on the one hand, and also through the mechanical properties of the original joints and those of microfissures of aphanitic microcracks in the unloading process analyzed by a discrete element method using a strain-softening constitutive model. Through comprehensive analysis of the numerical simulation results and the monitored behaviors of the basalts with columnar joints, their failure mechanisms are revealed, which may provide a basis for choosing suitable support plans for this kind of rock mass.

  14. Heart Failure: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Auld, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure is a complex and multisystem clinical syndrome that results from impaired ventricular contractility and/or relaxation. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease are common antecedents to heart failure. The main pathogenic mechanisms involved in heart failure include sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, as well as inflammation. A detailed history and physical examination and additional diagnostic tests may be needed to diagnose heart failure. Most treatment strategies target neurohormonal systems. Nonpharmacologic interventions and effective engagement in self-care are also important in overall heart failure management. Therapeutic strategies are geared toward prolonging life and optimizing quality of life. PMID:26567488

  15. IMPERMEABLE THIN Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} OVERLAY FOR TBC PROTECTION FROM SULFATE AND VANADATE ATTACK IN GAS TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Scott X. Mao

    2003-12-16

    To improve the hot corrosion resistance of YSZ thermal barrier coatings, a 25 {micro}m and a 2 {micro}m thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay were deposited by HVOF thermal spray and by sol-gel coating method, respectively, onto to the surface of YSZ coating. Indenter test was employed to investigate the spalling of YSZ with and without Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay after hot corrosion. The results showed that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay acted as a barrier against the infiltration of the molten salt into the YSZ coating during exposure, thus significantly reduced the amount of M-phase of ZrO{sub 2} in YSZ coating. However, a thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay was harmful for TBC by increasing compressive stress which causes crack and spalling of YSZ coating. As a result, a dense and thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay is critical for simultaneously preventing YSZ from hot corrosion and spalling. In the next reporting period, we will measure or calculate the residue stress within Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay and YSZ coating to study the mechanism of effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlay on spalling of YSZ coating.

  16. Strain accumulation controls failure of a plate boundary zone: Linking deformation of the Central Andes and lithosphere mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, O.; Boutelier, D.; Dresen, G.; Schemmann, K.

    2012-12-01

    We make use of observations on orogenic strain accumulation and deformation partitioning in the Central Andes to explore the backarc strength evolution at the lithospheric scale. In plan view, the Altiplano-Puna plateaux experienced rapid initial increase of surface area undergoing active deformation during the Cenozoic. Beyond the maximum lateral extent reached around 10-15 Ma (40-50% of entire proto-Andes undergoing deformation) at 10-20% total strain, rapid localization initiated at the eastern flank of the Altiplano (Inter- and Subandean thrust belt) but not at the Puna latitude. Localization was associated with a significant increase in bulk shortening rate. Average fault slip rates equally increased by an order of magnitude following a protracted period of stable average rates. Estimates of strength evolution based on force balance calculations and critical wedge analysis suggest significant backarc weakening driving this change after the Middle Miocene. Strain accumulation led to localization and weakening with development of a detachment propagating through crust and upper mantle. We find that lithosphere-scale failure resulting from strain weakening beyond a critical strain threshold (c. 20%) and fault coalescence with formation of a weak detachment in shales (effective coefficient of friction < 0.1) plays a key role in the evolution of the Andes. Strain-related lithosphere weakening appears to dominate over the impact of external forcing mechanisms, such as variations of plate convergence, mantle-assisted processes, or erosion. Comparison of these orogen-scale observations with experimental rock rheology indicates substantial similarity of deformation behavior with similar weakening thresholds across a wide range of scales.

  17. Homozygous TBC1D24 mutation in two siblings with familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy (FIME) and moderate intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Poulat, Anne-Lise; Ville, Dorothée; de Bellescize, Julitta; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Cacciagli, Pierre; Milh, Mathieu; Villard, Laurent; Lesca, Gaetan

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in the TBC1D24 gene were first reported in an Italian family with a unique epileptic phenotype consisting of drug-responsive, early-onset idiopathic myoclonic seizures. Patients presented with isolated bilateral or focal myoclonia, which could evolve to long-lasting attacks without loss of consciousness, with a peculiar reflex component, and were associated with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. This entity was named "familial infantile myoclonic epilepsy" (FIME). More recently, TBC1D24 mutations have been shown to cause a variable range of disorders, including epilepsy of various seizure types and severity, non-syndromic deafness, and DOORS syndrome. We report on the electro-clinical features of two brothers, born to first-cousin parents, affected with infantile-onset myoclonic epilepsy. The peculiar epileptic presentation prompted us to perform direct sequencing of the TBC1D24 gene. The patients had very early onset of focal myoclonic fits with variable topography, lasting a few minutes to several hours, without loss of consciousness, which frequently evolved to generalized myoclonus or myoclonic status. Reflex myoclonia were noticed in one patient. Neurological outcome was marked by moderate intellectual disability. Despite the high frequency of seizures, repeated EEG recordings showed normal background rhythm and rare interictal spikes and waves. We found a homozygous missense mutation, c.457G>A/p.Glu153Lys, in the two affected brothers. This observation combined with recent data from the literature, suggest that mutations in TBCD24 cause a pathological continuum, with FIME at the "benign" end and severe drug-refractory epileptic encephalopathy on the severe end. Early-onset myoclonic epilepsy with focal and generalized myoclonic seizures is a common characteristic of this continuum. PMID:25769375

  18. Heart Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump ... the lungs, where it picks up oxygen. The Heart's Pumping Action In normal hearts, blood vessels called ...

  19. Heart Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    MENU Return to Web version Heart Failure Overview What is heart failure? Despite the way it sounds, the term "heart failure" simply means ... you were born with) Diabetes Thyroid problems Diagnosis & Tests How will my doctor know if I have ...

  20. Electro-thermally induced structural failure actuator (ETISFA) for implantable controlled drug delivery devices based on micro-electro-mechanical-systems.

    PubMed

    Elman, N M; Masi, B C; Cima, M J; Langer, R

    2010-10-21

    A new electro-thermally induced structural failure actuator (ETISFA) is introduced as an activation mechanism for on demand controlled drug delivery from a Micro-Electro-Mechanical-System (MEMS). The device architecture is based on a reservoir that is sealed by a silicon nitride membrane. The release mechanism consists of an electrical fuse constructed on the membrane. Activation causes thermal shock of the suspended membrane allowing the drugs inside of the reservoir to diffuse out into the region of interest. The effects of fuse width and thickness were explored by observing the extent to which the membrane was ruptured and the required energy input. Device design and optimization simulations of the opening mechanism are presented, as well as experimental data showing optimal energy consumption per fuse geometry. In vitro release experiments demonstrated repeatable release curves of mannitol-C(14) that precisely follow ideal first order release kinetics. Thermally induced structural failure was demonstrated as a feasible activation mechanism that holds great promise for controlled release in biomedical microdevices. PMID:20820485

  1. The role of soil processes in determining mechanisms of slope failure and hillslope development in a humid-tropical forest eastern Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.; Larsen, M.C.; Hupp, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    Translational failures, with associated downslope earthflow components and shallow slides, appear to be the primary mechanism of hillslope denudation in the humid tropical forests of the mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. In-situ weathering of quartz diorite and marine-deposited volcaniclastics produces residual soil (saprolite; up to 21 m deep) / weathered rock profiles. Discontinuous zones of contrasting density and permeability particularly in quartz-diorite slopes at 0.5 m, and between 3 and 7 m, create both pathways and impedances for water that can result in excess pore pressures and, ultimately, aid in determining the location of failure planes and magnitudes of slope failures. In combination with relict fractures which create planes of weakness within the saprolite, and the potential significance of tensile stresses in the upper zone of saprolite (hypothesized to be caused by subsurface soil creep), shear failure can then occur during or after periods of heavy rainfall. Results of in-situ shear-strength testing show negative y-intercepts on the derived Mohr-Coulomb failure envelopes (approximately 50% of all tests) that are interpreted as apparent tensile stresses. Observation of tension cracks 1-2 m deep support the test data. Subsurface soil creep can cause extension of the soil and the development of tensile stresses along upper-slope segments. Shear-strength data support this hypothesis for both geologic types. Apparent values of maximum and mean tensile stress are greatest along upper slopes (16.5 and 6.29 kPa). Previously documented maximum rates of downslope movement coincided with local minima of shear strength, and the shear-strength minimum for all tests was located near 0.5 m below land surface, the shallow zone of contrasting permeabilities. These results indicate that subsurface soil creep, a slow semi-continuous process, may exert a profound influence on rapid, shallow slope failures in saprolitic soils. Data indicate that cove slopes in quartz diorite tend to be the most unstable when saturation levels reach 75%. Deep failures (7 m deep) appear the most critical but not the most frequent because pore pressure build-up will occur more rapidly in the upper perched zone of translocated clays before reaching the lower zone between 3 and 7 m. Frequent shallow failures could reduce the probability of deeper failures by removing overburden and reducing shear stress at depth. Deep failures are more likely to result from storm events of great duration and intensity. Sixty-six 'naturally occurring' and more than 100 'road-related' landslides were mapped. Forest elevations exceed 1000 m, but the majority of these failures were found between 600 and 800 m in elevation. This appears to be the area where there is sufficient concentration of subsurface water to result in excess pore pressures. The high percentage of slope failures in the 600-800-m range, relative to the percentage at higher elevations, suggests that differences in soil-water processes are responsible for the form of these mountain slopes. Steep linear segments are maintained at higher elevations. Slope angles are reduced in the 600-800-m range by frequent shallow slides, creating a largely concave surface. In combination, slope segments above 800 m, and those between 600 and 800 m, produce the characteristic form of the mountains of eastern Puerto Rico. ?? 1990.

  2. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  3. Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 56 (2008) 15111533 Multiscale cohesive failure modeling of heterogeneous adhesives

    E-print Network

    Matous, Karel

    2008-01-01

    modeling of heterogeneous adhesives Karel Matous a,b,Ã, Mohan G. Kulkarnib , Philippe H. Geubelleb to relate the homogenized cohesive law used to model the failure of the adhesive layer at the macro; Hill's lemma; Computational homogenization; Cohesive model; Heterogeneous adhesives 1. Introduction

  4. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... What Is Respiratory Failure? Respiratory (RES-pih-rah-tor-e) failure is a condition in which not ... the help of a ventilator (VEN-til-a-tor). A ventilator is a machine that supports breathing. ...

  5. Dynamic failure in brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-04-01

    Failure of brittle solids within the extremes of the shock loading environment is not well understood. Recent shock-wave data on compression shear failure and tensile spall failure for selected high-strength ceramics are presented and used to examine the mechanisms of dynamic failure. Energy-based theories are used to bound the measured strength properties. A new concept of failure waves in brittle solids is explored in light of the kinetic processes of high-rate fracture. Classical failure criteria are compared with the present base of dynamic strength data on ceramics.

  6. The use of failure mode and effects analysis to construct an effective disposal and prevention mechanism for infectious hospital waste

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Chao Chung; Liao, Ching-Jong

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > This study is based on a real case in a regional teaching hospital in Taiwan. > We use Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) as the evaluation method. > We successfully identify the risk factors of infectious waste disposal. > We propose plans for the detection of exceptional cases of infectious waste. - Abstract: In recent times, the quality of medical care has been continuously improving in medical institutions wherein patient-centred care has been emphasized. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has also been promoted as a method of basic risk management and as part of total quality management (TQM) for improving the quality of medical care and preventing mistakes. Therefore, a study was conducted using FMEA to evaluate the potential risk causes in the process of infectious medical waste disposal, devise standard procedures concerning the waste, and propose feasible plans for facilitating the detection of exceptional cases of infectious waste. The analysis revealed the following results regarding medical institutions: (a) FMEA can be used to identify the risk factors of infectious waste disposal. (b) During the infectious waste disposal process, six items were scored over 100 in the assessment of uncontrolled risks: erroneous discarding of infectious waste by patients and their families, erroneous discarding by nursing staff, erroneous discarding by medical staff, cleaning drivers pierced by sharp articles, cleaning staff pierced by sharp articles, and unmarked output units. Therefore, the study concluded that it was necessary to (1) provide education and training about waste classification to the medical staff, patients and their families, nursing staff, and cleaning staff; (2) clarify the signs of caution; and (3) evaluate the failure mode and strengthen the effects.

  7. The use of failure mode and effects analysis to construct an effective disposal and prevention mechanism for infectious hospital waste.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chao Chung; Liao, Ching-Jong

    2011-12-01

    In recent times, the quality of medical care has been continuously improving in medical institutions wherein patient-centred care has been emphasized. Failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has also been promoted as a method of basic risk management and as part of total quality management (TQM) for improving the quality of medical care and preventing mistakes. Therefore, a study was conducted using FMEA to evaluate the potential risk causes in the process of infectious medical waste disposal, devise standard procedures concerning the waste, and propose feasible plans for facilitating the detection of exceptional cases of infectious waste. The analysis revealed the following results regarding medical institutions: (a) FMEA can be used to identify the risk factors of infectious waste disposal. (b) During the infectious waste disposal process, six items were scored over 100 in the assessment of uncontrolled risks: erroneous discarding of infectious waste by patients and their families, erroneous discarding by nursing staff, erroneous discarding by medical staff, cleaning drivers pierced by sharp articles, cleaning staff pierced by sharp articles, and unmarked output units. Therefore, the study concluded that it was necessary to (1) provide education and training about waste classification to the medical staff, patients and their families, nursing staff, and cleaning staff; (2) clarify the signs of caution; and (3) evaluate the failure mode and strengthen the effects. PMID:21807493

  8. Mn in misch-metal based superlattice metal hydride alloy - Part 2 Ni/MH battery performance and failure mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, K.; Koch, J.; Yasuoka, S.; Shen, H.; Bendersky, L. A.

    2015-03-01

    The performance and failure mode of Ni/MH batteries made from a series of Mn-modified A2B7 superlattice and a commercially available AB5 metal hydride alloys were studied and reported. Cells with the Mn-free A2B7 alloy generally show improved low-temperature, higher peak power, and similar charge-retention behavior over those with a conventional AB5 alloy. As Mn-additive amount increased, cell voltage and high-rate capacity improved, low temperature, charge retention, and cycle life first improved, but then deteriorated, and peak power and high temperature voltage stand deteriorated. Analysis of battery performance test results show the use of a superlattice alloy containing 2.3% Mn as the best overall alloy composition. Failure analysis of the highly cycled AB5 alloy containing cells indicate a balanced degradation in negative, positive, separator, and a moderate loss of electrolyte. Same analysis on cells containing the various superlattice alloys suffered from a high degree of pulverization and oxidation of its negative electrode (with the 9.3% Mn content experiencing the worst amount of pulverization/oxidation) and a high degree of electrolyte loss.

  9. Microstructure and failure mechanism in As-deposited, vacuum plasma-sprayed Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimijazi, H. R.; Coyle, T. W.; Mostaghimi, J.; Leblanc, L.

    2005-06-01

    The microstructure, phase composition, and chemical composition of vacuum plasma-sprayed Ti-6Al-4V alloys were examined in detail using a variety of techniques, including x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The observed chemistry and structure were related to the conditions under which the deposit was formed and the phase equilibria in the Ti alloy system. The porosity of the deposit was in the range of 3 to 5%. A slight decrease in the Al content and a slight increase in the amount of oxygen and hydrogen was found relative to the starting powder. Within individual splats, a columnar solidification structure can be seen. However, the as-deposited material is ?90% ?? martensite that is present in the form of fine lathes on the order of 500 nm in width surrounded by residual ?-phase. This herringbone structure obscures to some extent the preexisting columnar structure of the as-solidified ?-phase. The material fails at low elongations (˜1%) when tested in tension, with a macroscopic stress-strain curve, which appears to be quite brittle. Examination of the fracture surface, however, reveals a ductile failure mode within individual splats, which is consistent with the structure described above. Sections perpendicular to the fracture surface show that failure occurs at the weak splat boundaries through the development and growth of voids between splats.

  10. An automated dynamic fracture procedure and a continuum damage mechanics based model for finite element simulations of delamination failure in laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminjikarai Vedagiri, Srinivasa Babu

    An active field of research that has developed due to the increasing use of computational techniques like finite element simulations for analysis of highly complex structural mechanics problems and the increasing use of composite laminates in varied industries such as aerospace, automotive, bio-medical, etc. is the development of numerical models to capture the behavior of composite materials. One of the big challenges not yet overcome convincingly in this field is the modeling of delamination failure which is one of the primary modes of damage in composite laminates. Hence, the primary aim of this work is to develop two numerical models for finite element simulations of delamination failure in composite laminates and implement them in the explicit finite element software DYNA3D/LS-DYNA. Dynamic fracture mechanics is an example of a complex structural analysis problem for which finite element simulations seem to be the only possible way to extract detailed information on sophisticated physical quantities of the crack-tip at any instant of time along a highly transient history of fracture. However, general purpose, commercial finite element software which have capabilities to do fracture analyses are still limited in their use to stationary cracks and crack propagation along trajectories known a priori. Therefore, an automated dynamic fracture procedure capable of simulating dynamic propagation of through-thickness cracks in arbitrary directions in linear, isotropic materials without user-intervention is first developed and implemented in DYNA3D for its default 8-node solid (brick) element. Dynamic energy release rate and stress intensity factors are computed in the model using integral expressions particularly well-suited for the finite element method. Energy approach is used to check for crack propagation and the maximum circumferential stress criterion is used to determine the direction of crack growth. Since the re-meshing strategy used to model crack growth explicitly in the model induces spurious high-frequency oscillations in the finite element results after crack initiation, a "gradual nodal release" procedure is implemented as part of the model to overcome this problem. Also, an in-built contact algorithm of DYNA3D is modified to adapt it to the remeshing strategy to maintain proper contact conditions at newly added elements. Finally, the model is suitably modified for simulating delamination failure in laminated composites and used to predict delamination resistance characteristics which are important considerations for effective use of composite structures. Continuum damage mechanics is a popular approach for modeling the in-plane failure modes in composites. However, its applicability to modeling delamination has not been sufficiently analyzed yet. Hence, as the second part of this dissertation work, a new material model is developed for unidirectional polymer matrix composites in which this approach is used to predict delamination failure and used to perform a qualitative study of the damage mechanics approach to modeling delamination. The new material model is developed using micro-mechanics and accounts for the strain-rate dependent behavior of polymer matrix composites. It is implemented for three different element formulations with different transverse shear strain assumptions and the effect of these assumptions on the delamination prediction using this approach is analyzed.

  11. Acute Lung Failure

    PubMed Central

    Mac Sweeney, Rob; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Lung failure is the most common organ failure seen in the intensive care unit. The pathogenesis of acute respiratory failure (ARF) can be classified as (1) neuromuscular in origin, (2) secondary to acute and chronic obstructive airway diseases, (3) alveolar processes such as cardiogenic and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema and pneumonia, and (4) vascular diseases such as acute or chronic pulmonary embolism. This article reviews the more common causes of ARF from each group, including the pathological mechanisms and the principles of critical care management, focusing on the supportive, specific, and adjunctive therapies for each condition. PMID:21989697

  12. Mechanical, Hormonal and Psychological Effects of a Non-Failure Short-Term Strength Training Program in Young Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Sarabia, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime; Juan-Recio, Casto; Hernández-Davó, Hector; Urbán, Tomás; Moya, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a 6-week non-failure strength training program in youth tennis players. Twenty tennis players (age: 15.0 ± 1 years, body height: 170.9 ± 5.1 cm, body mass: 63.3 ± 9.1 kg) were divided into experimental and control groups. Pre and post-tests included half squats, bench press, squat jumps, countermovement-jumps and side-ball throws. Salivary cortisol samples were collected, and the Profile of Mood States questionnaire was used weekly during an anatomical adaptation period, a main training period and after a tapering week. The results showed that, after the main training period, the experimental group significantly improved (p<0.05) in mean and peak power output and in the total number of repetitions during the half-squat endurance test; mean force, power and velocity in the half-squat power output test; Profile of Mood States (in total mood disturbance between the last week of the mean training period and the tapering week); and in squat-jump and countermovement-jump height. Moreover, significant differences were found between the groups at the post-tests in the total number of repetitions, mean and peak power during the half-squat endurance test, mean velocity in the half-squat power output test, salivary cortisol concentration (baselines, first and third week of the mean training period) and in the Profile of Mood States (in fatigue subscale: first and third week of the mean training period). In conclusion, a non-failure strength training protocol improved lower-limb performance levels and produced a moderate psychophysiological impact in youth elite tennis players, suggesting that it is a suitable program to improve strength. Such training protocols do not increase the total training load of tennis players and may be recommended to improve strength. PMID:25964812

  13. Investigation of deformation and failure mechanisms in woven and nonwoven fabrics under quasi-static loading conditions

    E-print Network

    Jearanaisilawong, Petch, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical responses of high performance ballistic woven and nonwoven fabrics under in- plane quasi-static loading conditions have been investigated. The investigations focused on the responses of fabrics at the ...

  14. Saturn component failure rate and failure rate modifiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Failure mode frequency ratios, environmental adjustment factors, and failure rates for mechanical and electromechanical component families are presented. The failure rates and failure rate modifiers resulted from a series of studies whose purpose was to provide design, tests, reliability, and systems engineers with accurate, up-to-date failure rate information. The results of the studies were achieved through an extensive engineering analysis of the Saturn Program test data and Unsatisfactory Condition Reports (UCR's) and the application of mathematical techniques developed for the studies.

  15. Large-Scale Molecular Simulations on the Mechanical Response and Failure Behavior of a defective Graphene: Cases of 5-8-5 Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuaiwei; Yang, Baocheng; Yuan, Jinyun; Si, Yubing; Chen, Houyang

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the effect of defects on mechanical responses and failure behaviors of a graphene membrane is important for its applications. As examples, in this paper, a family of graphene with various 5-8-5 defects are designed and their mechanical responses are investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations. The dependence of fracture strength and strain as well as Young’s moduli on the nearest neighbor distance and defect types is examined. By introducing the 5-8-5 defects into graphene, the fracture strength and strain become smaller. However, the Young’s moduli of DL (Linear arrangement of repeat unit 5-8-5 defect along zigzag-direction of graphene), DS (a Slope angle between repeat unit 5-8-5 defect and zigzag direction of graphene) and DZ (Zigzag-like 5-8-5 defects) defects in the zigzag direction become larger than those in the pristine graphene in the same direction. A maximum increase of 11.8% of Young’s modulus is obtained. Furthermore, the brittle cracking mechanism is proposed for the graphene with 5-8-5 defects. The present work may provide insights in controlling the mechanical properties by preparing defects in the graphene, and give a full picture for the applications of graphene with defects in flexible electronics and nanodevices.

  16. Brain mechanisms of sympathetic activation in heart failure: Roles of the renin?angiotensin system, nitric oxide and pro?inflammatory cytokines (Review).

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Li, Hongli

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an insufficient perfusion to the peripheral tissues due to decreased cardiac output. The compensatory mechanisms are triggered even prior to the occurrence of clinical symptoms, which include activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and other neurohumoral factors. However, the long?term activation of the SNS contributes to progressive cardiac dysfunction and has toxic effects on the cardiomyocytes. The mechanisms leading to the activation of SNS include changes in peripheral baroreceptor and chemoreceptor reflexes and the abnormal regulation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies have focused on the role of brain mechanisms in the regulation of SNA and the progression of CHF. The renin?angiotensin system, nitric oxide and pro?inflammatory cytokines were shown to be involved in the abnormal regulation of SNA in the CNS. The alteration of these neurohumoral factors during CHF influences the activity of neurons in the autonomic regions and finally increase the sympathetic outflow. The present review summarizes the brain mechanisms contributing to sympathoexcitation in CHF. PMID:26499491

  17. Large-Scale Molecular Simulations on the Mechanical Response and Failure Behavior of a defective Graphene: Cases of 5–8–5 Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuaiwei; Yang, Baocheng; Yuan, Jinyun; Si, Yubing; Chen, Houyang

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effect of defects on mechanical responses and failure behaviors of a graphene membrane is important for its applications. As examples, in this paper, a family of graphene with various 5–8–5 defects are designed and their mechanical responses are investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations. The dependence of fracture strength and strain as well as Young’s moduli on the nearest neighbor distance and defect types is examined. By introducing the 5–8–5 defects into graphene, the fracture strength and strain become smaller. However, the Young’s moduli of DL (Linear arrangement of repeat unit 5–8–5 defect along zigzag-direction of graphene), DS (a Slope angle between repeat unit 5–8–5 defect and zigzag direction of graphene) and DZ (Zigzag-like 5–8–5 defects) defects in the zigzag direction become larger than those in the pristine graphene in the same direction. A maximum increase of 11.8% of Young’s modulus is obtained. Furthermore, the brittle cracking mechanism is proposed for the graphene with 5–8–5 defects. The present work may provide insights in controlling the mechanical properties by preparing defects in the graphene, and give a full picture for the applications of graphene with defects in flexible electronics and nanodevices. PMID:26449655

  18. A model to describe the mechanical behavior and the ductile failure of hydrided Zircaloy-4 fuel claddings between 25 °C and 480 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Saux, M.; Besson, J.; Carassou, S.

    2015-11-01

    A model is proposed to describe the mechanical behavior and the ductile failure at 25, 350 and 480 °C of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes, as-received and hydrided up to 1200 wt. ppm (circumferential hydrides). The model is based on the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model extended to account for plastic anisotropy and viscoplasticity. The model considers damage nucleation by both hydride cracking and debonding of the interface between the Laves phase precipitates and the matrix. The damage nucleation rate due to hydride cracking is directly deduced from quantitative microstructural observations. The other model parameters are identified from several experimental tests. Finite element simulations of axial tension, hoop tension, expansion due to compression and hoop plane strain tension experiments are performed to assess the model prediction capability. The calibrated model satisfactorily reproduces the effects of hydrogen and temperature on both the viscoplastic and the failure properties of the material. The results suggest that damage is anisotropic and influenced by the stress state for the non-hydrided or moderately hydrided material and becomes more isotropic for high hydrogen contents.

  19. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  20. Biomechanical modeling and morphology analysis indicates plaque rupture due to mechanical failure unlikely in atherosclerosis-prone mice

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Ian C.; Weiss, Daiana; Suever, Jonathan D.; Virmani, Renu; Veneziani, Alessandro; Vito, Raymond P.; Oshinski, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous plaque rupture in mouse models of atherosclerosis is controversial, although numerous studies have discussed so-called “vulnerable plaque” phenotypes in mice. We compared the morphology and biomechanics of two acute and one chronic murine model of atherosclerosis to human coronaries of the thin-cap fibroatheroma (TCFA) phenotype. Our acute models were apolipoprotein E-deficient (ApoE?/?) and LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr?/?) mice, both fed a high-fat diet for 8 wk with simultaneous infusion of angiotensin II (ANG II), and our chronic mouse model was the apolipoprotein E-deficient strain fed a regular chow diet for 1 yr. We found that the mouse plaques from all three models exhibited significant morphological differences from human TCFA plaques, including the plaque burden, plaque thickness, eccentricity, and amount of the vessel wall covered by lesion as well as significant differences in the relative composition of plaques. These morphological differences suggested that the distribution of solid mechanical stresses in the walls may differ as well. Using a finite-element analysis computational solid mechanics model, we computed the relative distribution of stresses in the walls of murine and human plaques and found that although human TCFA plaques have the highest stresses in the thin fibrous cap, murine lesions do not have such stress distributions. Instead, local maxima of stresses were on the media and adventitia, away from the plaque. Our results suggest that if plaque rupture is possible in mice, it may be driven by a different mechanism than mechanics. PMID:23203971

  1. Life and failure mechanism prediction of eco-friendly P2O5-SnO2-B2O3 glass frits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyoung-Seuk; Choi, Duck-Kyun

    2013-09-01

    Glass frits are used widely in the VFD, PDP, LCD, and OLED displays, solar cells, and automobiles. It is essential for glass frits to exhibit material properties such as low melting temperatures and coefficient of thermal expansion close to glass to prevent thermal shock and to lower the thermal stress. Glass frit containing 60%-85% of PbO lowers the melting temperature. However, PbO causes environmental pollution. In this study, we developed P2O5-SnO2-B2O3 glass frits and carried out life tests on these systems. In addition, life tests were also carried out on Pb-containing glass frits (VFD) for comparison to predict the life of the P2O5-SnO2-B2O3 systems. Subsequently, the failure mechanisms of VFD and Pb-free P2O5-SnO2-B2O3 glass frits were analyzed.

  2. Failure mechanisms of 3-D woven SiC/SiC composites under tensile and flexural loading at room and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Chulya, A.; Gyekenyesi, J.Z.; Gyekenyesi, J.P.

    1992-08-01

    Nicalon silicon carbide 3D yarn with silicon carbide matrix composites made through a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process were investigated under tensile and flexural loading at 23, 1200 and 1550 C in air. The effectiveness of a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC surface coating was also evaluated in severe oxidizing environment. Acoustic emission sensors and in situ optical microscopy were used at room temperature to monitor the failure mechanisms. It is shown that the level of tensile stress at which nonlinear behavior begins is not drastically reduced at 1200 and 1550 C when composites were protected by a SiC surface coating. Extensive fiber pull-out was observed only in the 1550 C specimen. Similar behaviors were also found in flexural specimens. 14 refs.

  3. Mechanisms of filtration failure during postischemic injury of the human kidney. A study of the reperfused renal allograft.

    PubMed Central

    Alejandro, V; Scandling, J D; Sibley, R K; Dafoe, D; Alfrey, E; Deen, W; Myers, B D

    1995-01-01

    Postischemic filtration failure in experimental animals results primarily from depression of the transcapillary hydraulic pressure difference (delta P), a quantity that cannot be determined in humans. To circumvent this limitation we determined the GFR and each of its remaining determinants in transplanted kidneys. Findings in 12 allografts that exhibited subsequent normofiltration (group 1) were compared with those in 11 allografts that exhibited persistent hypofiltration (group 2). Determinations were made intraoperatively in the exposed graft after 1-3 h of reperfusion. GFR (6 +/- 2 vs 29 +/- 5 ml/min) and renal plasma flow by Doppler flow meter (140 +/- 30 vs 315 +/- 49 ml/min) were significantly lower in group 2 than group 1. Morphometric analysis of glomeruli obtained by biopsy and a structural hydrodynamic model of viscous flow revealed the glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient to be similar, averaging 3.5 +/- 0.6 and 3.1 +/- 0.2 ml/(min.mmHg) in group 2 vs 1, respectively. Corresponding values for plasma oncotic pressure were also similar, averaging 19 +/- 1 vs 21 +/- 1 mmHg. We next used a mathematical model of glomerular ultrafiltration and a sensitivity analysis to calculate the prevailing range for delta P from the foregoing measured quantities. This revealed delta P to vary from only 20-21 mmHg in group 2 vs 34-45 mmHg in group 1 (P < 0.001). Further morphometric analysis revealed the diameters of Bowman's space and tubular lumens, as well as the percentage of tubular cells that were necrotic or devoid of brush border, to be similar in the two groups. We thus conclude (a) that delta P depression is the predominant cause of hypofiltration in this form of postischemic injury; and (b) that afferent vasoconstriction rather than tubular obstruction is the proximate cause of the delta P depression. Images PMID:7860766

  4. Mechanisms of filtration failure during postischemic injury of the human kidney. A study of the reperfused renal allograft.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, V; Scandling, J D; Sibley, R K; Dafoe, D; Alfrey, E; Deen, W; Myers, B D

    1995-02-01

    Postischemic filtration failure in experimental animals results primarily from depression of the transcapillary hydraulic pressure difference (delta P), a quantity that cannot be determined in humans. To circumvent this limitation we determined the GFR and each of its remaining determinants in transplanted kidneys. Findings in 12 allografts that exhibited subsequent normofiltration (group 1) were compared with those in 11 allografts that exhibited persistent hypofiltration (group 2). Determinations were made intraoperatively in the exposed graft after 1-3 h of reperfusion. GFR (6 +/- 2 vs 29 +/- 5 ml/min) and renal plasma flow by Doppler flow meter (140 +/- 30 vs 315 +/- 49 ml/min) were significantly lower in group 2 than group 1. Morphometric analysis of glomeruli obtained by biopsy and a structural hydrodynamic model of viscous flow revealed the glomerular ultrafiltration coefficient to be similar, averaging 3.5 +/- 0.6 and 3.1 +/- 0.2 ml/(min.mmHg) in group 2 vs 1, respectively. Corresponding values for plasma oncotic pressure were also similar, averaging 19 +/- 1 vs 21 +/- 1 mmHg. We next used a mathematical model of glomerular ultrafiltration and a sensitivity analysis to calculate the prevailing range for delta P from the foregoing measured quantities. This revealed delta P to vary from only 20-21 mmHg in group 2 vs 34-45 mmHg in group 1 (P < 0.001). Further morphometric analysis revealed the diameters of Bowman's space and tubular lumens, as well as the percentage of tubular cells that were necrotic or devoid of brush border, to be similar in the two groups. We thus conclude (a) that delta P depression is the predominant cause of hypofiltration in this form of postischemic injury; and (b) that afferent vasoconstriction rather than tubular obstruction is the proximate cause of the delta P depression. PMID:7860766

  5. Postmortem and insitu TEM methods to study the mechanism of failure in controlled-morphology high-impact polystrene resin

    SciTech Connect

    Cieslinski, R.C.; Dineen, M.T.; Hahnfeld, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced Styrenic resins are being developed throughout the industry to bridge the properties gap between traditional HIPS (High Impact Polystyrene) and ABS (Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene copolymers) resins. These new resins have an unprecedented balance of high gloss and high impact energies. Dow Chemical`s contribution to this area is based on a unique combination of rubber morphologies including labyrinth, onion skin, and core-shelf rubber particles. This new resin, referred as a controlled morphology resin (CMR), was investigated to determine the toughening mechanism of this unique rubber morphology. This poster will summarize the initial studies of these resins using the double-notch four-point bend test of Su and Yee, tensile stage electron microscopy, and Poisson Ratio analysis of the fracture mechanism.

  6. Ballistic-Failure Mechanisms in Gas Metal Arc Welds of Mil A46100 Armor-Grade Steel: A Computational Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Galgalikar, R.; Ramaswami, S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2014-09-01

    In our recent work, a multi-physics computational model for the conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) joining process was introduced. The model is of a modular type and comprises five modules, each designed to handle a specific aspect of the GMAW process, i.e.: (i) electro-dynamics of the welding-gun; (ii) radiation-/convection-controlled heat transfer from the electric-arc to the workpiece and mass transfer from the filler-metal consumable electrode to the weld; (iii) prediction of the temporal evolution and the spatial distribution of thermal and mechanical fields within the weld region during the GMAW joining process; (iv) the resulting temporal evolution and spatial distribution of the material microstructure throughout the weld region; and (v) spatial distribution of the as-welded material mechanical properties. In the present work, the GMAW process model has been upgraded with respect to its predictive capabilities regarding the spatial distribution of the mechanical properties controlling the ballistic-limit (i.e., penetration-resistance) of the weld. The model is upgraded through the introduction of the sixth module in the present work in recognition of the fact that in thick steel GMAW weldments, the overall ballistic performance of the armor may become controlled by the (often inferior) ballistic limits of its weld (fusion and heat-affected) zones. To demonstrate the utility of the upgraded GMAW process model, it is next applied to the case of butt-welding of a prototypical high-hardness armor-grade martensitic steel, MIL A46100. The model predictions concerning the spatial distribution of the material microstructure and ballistic-limit-controlling mechanical properties within the MIL A46100 butt-weld are found to be consistent with prior observations and general expectations.

  7. miR-17-5p Regulates Endocytic Trafficking through Targeting TBC1D2/Armus

    PubMed Central

    Serva, Andrius; Knapp, Bettina; Tsai, Yueh-Tso; Claas, Christoph; Lisauskas, Tautvydas; Matula, Petr; Harder, Nathalie; Kaderali, Lars; Rohr, Karl; Erfle, Holger; Eils, Roland; Braga, Vania; Starkuviene, Vytaute

    2012-01-01

    miRNA cluster miR-17-92 is known as oncomir-1 due to its potent oncogenic function. miR-17-92 is a polycistronic cluster that encodes 6 miRNAs, and can both facilitate and inhibit cell proliferation. Known targets of miRNAs encoded by this cluster are largely regulators of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Here, we show that miRNAs encoded by this cluster and sharing the seed sequence of miR-17 exert their influence on one of the most essential cellular processes – endocytic trafficking. By mRNA expression analysis we identified that regulation of endocytic trafficking by miR-17 can potentially be achieved by targeting of a number of trafficking regulators. We have thoroughly validated TBC1D2/Armus, a GAP of Rab7 GTPase, as a novel target of miR-17. Our study reveals regulation of endocytic trafficking as a novel function of miR-17, which might act cooperatively with other functions of miR-17 and related miRNAs in health and disease. PMID:23285084

  8. miR-17-5p regulates endocytic trafficking through targeting TBC1D2/Armus.

    PubMed

    Serva, Andrius; Knapp, Bettina; Tsai, Yueh-Tso; Claas, Christoph; Lisauskas, Tautvydas; Matula, Petr; Harder, Nathalie; Kaderali, Lars; Rohr, Karl; Erfle, Holger; Eils, Roland; Braga, Vania; Starkuviene, Vytaute

    2012-01-01

    miRNA cluster miR-17-92 is known as oncomir-1 due to its potent oncogenic function. miR-17-92 is a polycistronic cluster that encodes 6 miRNAs, and can both facilitate and inhibit cell proliferation. Known targets of miRNAs encoded by this cluster are largely regulators of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Here, we show that miRNAs encoded by this cluster and sharing the seed sequence of miR-17 exert their influence on one of the most essential cellular processes - endocytic trafficking. By mRNA expression analysis we identified that regulation of endocytic trafficking by miR-17 can potentially be achieved by targeting of a number of trafficking regulators. We have thoroughly validated TBC1D2/Armus, a GAP of Rab7 GTPase, as a novel target of miR-17. Our study reveals regulation of endocytic trafficking as a novel function of miR-17, which might act cooperatively with other functions of miR-17 and related miRNAs in health and disease. PMID:23285084

  9. Heart Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  10. Kidney Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Dialysis or Transplant Paying for Kidney Failure Treatment Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ... to share this content freely. October 2, 2013 Contact Us Health Information Center Phone: 1-800-860- ...

  11. Astronaut Mamoru Mohri Leaves Patrick Air Base After the Scrub of STS-99 Due to Mechanical Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-99 mission was to complete high resolution mapping of large sections of the Earth's surface using the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a specially modified radar system. This radar system produced unrivaled 3-D images of the Earth's Surface. The mission was launched at 12:31 on February 11, 2000 onboard the space shuttle Endeavour, and led by Commander Kevin Kregel. The crew was Pilot Dominic L. Pudwill Gorie and Mission Specialists Janet L. Kavandi, Janice E. Voss, Mamoru Mohri from the National Space Development Agency (Japanese Space Agency), and Gerhard P. J. Thiele from DARA (German Space Agency). This videotape shows Mamoru Mohri boarding a plane at Patrick Air Base after the scrub of the mission due to mechanical problems. Prior to his departure, he answers a few questions from members of the Japanese press who had gathered for his departure.

  12. Probing the failure mechanism of nanoscale LiFePO{sub 4} for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chongmin; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Ji-guang

    2015-05-18

    LiFePO{sub 4} is a high power rate cathode material for lithium ion battery and shows remarkable capacity retention, featuring a 91% capacity retention after 3300 cycles. In this work, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to study the gradual capacity fading mechanism of LiFePO{sub 4} materials. We found that upon prolonged electrochemical cycling of the battery, the LiFePO{sub 4} cathode shows surface amorphization and loss of oxygen species, which directly contribute to the gradual capacity fading of the battery. The finding can guide the design and improvement of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode for high-energy and high-power rechargeable battery for electric transportation.

  13. Combining mechanical and chemical effects in the deformation and failure of a cylindrical electrode particle in a Li-ion battery

    E-print Network

    Jeevanjyoti Chakraborty; Colin P. Please; Alain Goriely; S. Jonathan Chapman

    2014-07-31

    A general framework to study the mechanical behaviour of a cylindrical silicon anode particle in a lithium ion battery as it undergoes lithiation is presented. The two-way coupling between stress and concentration of lithium in silicon, including the possibility of plastic deformation, is taken into account and two particular cases are considered. First, the cylindrical particle is assumed to be free of surface traction and second, the axial deformation of the cylinder is prevented. In both cases plastic stretches develop through the entire cylinder and not just near the surface as is commonly found in spherical anode particles. It is shown that the stress evolution depends both on the lithiation rate and the external constraints. Furthermore, as the cylinder expands during lithiation it can develop a compressive axial stress large enough to induce buckling, which in turn may lead to mechanical failure. An explicit criterion for swelling-induced buckling obtained as a modification of the classical Euler buckling criterion shows the competition between the stabilising effect of radius increase and the destabilising effect of axial stress.

  14. Tensile Creep and Fatigue of Sylramic-iBN Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites: Retained Properties, Damage Development, and Failure Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Greg; Gowayed, yasser; Miller, Robert; Ojard, Greg; Ahmad, Jalees; Santhosh, Unni; John, Reji

    2008-01-01

    An understanding of the elevated temperature tensile creep, fatigue, rupture, and retained properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) envisioned for use in gas turbine engine applications are essential for component design and life-prediction. In order to quantify the effect of stress, time, temperature, and oxidation for a state-of-the-art composite system, a wide variety of tensile creep, dwell fatigue, and cyclic fatigue experiments were performed in air at 1204 C for the SiC/SiC CMC system consisting of Sylramic-iBN SiC fibers, BN fiber interphase coating, and slurry-cast melt-infiltrated (MI) SiC-based matrix. Tests were either taken to failure or interrupted. Interrupted tests were then mechanically tested at room temperature to determine the residual properties. The retained properties of most of the composites subjected to tensile creep or fatigue were usually within 20% of the as-produced strength and 10% of the as-produced elastic modulus. It was observed that during creep, residual stresses in the composite are altered to some extent which results in an increased compressive stress in the matrix upon cooling and a subsequent increased stress required to form matrix cracks. Microscopy of polished sections and the fracture surfaces of specimens which failed during stressed-oxidation or after the room-temperature retained property test was performed on some of the specimens in order to quantify the nature and extent of damage accumulation that occurred during the test. It was discovered that the distribution of stress-dependent matrix cracking at 1204 C was similar to the as-produced composites at room temperature; however, matrix crack growth occurred over time and typically did not appear to propagate through thickness except at final failure crack. Failure of the composites was due to either oxidation-induced unbridged crack growth, which dominated the higher stress regime (> 179 MPa) or controlled by degradation of the fibers, probably caused by intrinsic creep-induced flaw growth of the fibers or internal attack of the fibers via Si diffusion through the CVI SiC and/or microcracks at the lower stress regime (< 165 MPa).

  15. Total Liquid Ventilation Provides Superior Respiratory Support to Conventional Mechanical Ventilation in a Large Animal Model of Severe Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pohlmann, Joshua R; Brant, David O; Daul, Morgan A; Reoma, Junewai L; Kim, Anne C; Osterholzer, Kathryn R; Johnson, Kent J; Bartlett, Robert H; Cook, Keith E; Hirschl, Ronald B

    2011-01-01

    Total liquid ventilation (TLV) has the potential to provide respiratory support superior to conventional mechanical ventilation (CMV) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, laboratory studies are limited to trials in small animals for no longer than 4 hours. The objective of this study was to compare TLV and CMV in a large animal model of ARDS for 24 hours. Ten sheep weighing 53 ± 4 (SD) kg were anesthetized and ventilated with 100% oxygen. Oleic acid was injected into the pulmonary circulation until PaO2:FiO2 ? 60 mmHg, followed by transition to a protective CMV protocol (n=5) or TLV (n=5) for 24 hours. Pathophysiology was recorded and the lungs were harvested for histological analysis. Animals treated with CMV became progressively hypoxic and hypercarbic despite maximum ventilatory support. Sheep treated with TLV maintained normal blood gases with statistically greater PO2 (p<10?9) and lower PCO2 (p < 10?3) than the CMV group. Survival at 24 hours in the TLV and CMV groups were 100% and 40% respectively (p< 0.05). Thus, TLV provided gas exchange superior to CMV in this laboratory model of severe ARDS. PMID:21084968

  16. Laminated, composite flywheel failure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmer, R. P.

    1980-06-01

    A hybrid, composite flywheel, composed of a laminated, flat S2 glass central disc, with a filament wound, graphite outer ring has been proposed for vehicle application. The failure mechanism of the laminated central disco of this hybrid design is discussed with reference to spin test data, nondestructive ultrasound test data, and supporting failure analysis.

  17. Kidney (Renal) Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Kidney Failure Kidney failure, also known as renal failure, ... evaluated? How is kidney failure treated? What is kidney (renal) failure? The kidneys are designed to maintain ...

  18. Heart failure - overview

    MedlinePLUS

    CHF; Congestive heart failure; Left-sided heart failure; Right-sided heart failure - Cor pulmonale; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure ... Heart failure is often a long-term (chronic) condition, but it may come on suddenly. It can ...

  19. PNL-SA-22914 Presented at the 48th Meeting of the Mechanical Failures Prevention Group (MFPG 48) 19-21 April 1994 in Wakefield, MA

    E-print Network

    ), it is incapable of predicting failures. The current diagnostic process depends upon humans to integrate, categorize and analyze currents and voltages. Diagnostics are based on individual experience, heuristics

  20. Respiratory Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ribs around the lungs. An injury to the chest can cause this damage. Drug or alcohol overdose Injuries from inhaling smoke or harmful fumes Treatment for respiratory failure depends on whether the condition is acute (short-term) or chronic (ongoing) and how severe ...

  1. Low-dose copper infusion into the coronary circulation induces acute heart failure in diabetic rats: New mechanism of heart disease.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carlos Chun Ho; Soon, Choong Yee; Chuang, Chia-Lin; Phillips, Anthony R J; Zhang, Shaoping; Cooper, Garth J S

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impairs copper (Cu) regulation, causing elevated serum Cu and urinary Cu excretion in patients with established cardiovascular disease; it also causes cardiomyopathy and chronic cardiac impairment linked to defective Cu homeostasis in rats. However, the mechanisms that link impaired Cu regulation to cardiac dysfunction in diabetes are incompletely understood. Chronic treatment with triethylenetetramine (TETA), a Cu²?-selective chelator, improves cardiac function in diabetic patients, and in rats with heart disease; the latter displayed ?3-fold elevations in free Cu²? in the coronary effluent when TETA was infused into their coronary arteries. To further study the nature of defective cardiac Cu regulation in diabetes, we employed an isolated-perfused, working-heart model in which we infused micromolar doses of Cu²? into the coronary arteries and measured acute effects on cardiac function in diabetic and non-diabetic-control rats. Infusion of CuCl? solutions caused acute dose-dependent cardiac dysfunction in normal hearts. Several measures of baseline cardiac function were impaired in diabetic hearts, and these defects were exacerbated by low-micromolar Cu²? infusion. The response to infused Cu²? was augmented in diabetic hearts, which became defective at lower infusion levels and underwent complete pump failure (cardiac output = 0 ml/min) more often (P < 0.0001) at concentrations that only moderately impaired function of control hearts. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the acute effects on cardiac function of pathophysiological elevations in coronary Cu²?. The effects of Cu²? infusion occur within minutes in both control and diabetic hearts, which suggests that they are not due to remodelling. Heightened sensitivity to the acute effects of small elevations in Cu²? could contribute substantively to impaired cardiac function in patients with diabetes and is thus identified as a new mechanism of heart disease. PMID:26208785

  2. Heart Failure Cardiovascular Features of Heart Failure

    E-print Network

    Morrell, Christopher H.

    Heart Failure Cardiovascular Features of Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction Versus of patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) that differ from those in individuals failure. Background Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction often develops in HLVH patients

  3. Dependent failure analysis of NPP data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.E.; Lofgren, E.V. ); Samanta, P.K.; Wong, See-Meng )

    1990-01-01

    A technical approach for analyzing plant-specific data bases for vulnerabilities to dependent failures has been developed and applied. Since the main purpose of this work, to aid in the formulation of defenses to dependent failures, is different than that for other dependent failure analyses, the approach of this analysis is also critically different. For instance, component failures have been defined to include all types of component function loss (e.g., catastrophic, degraded, incipient). Also, the determination of component failure dependencies has been based upon identical failure mechanisms rather than failure modes. Consequently, in the context of this study, both the definition of component failure and a categorization scheme for component failure mechanisms are used to identify clusters of component failures which are termed common failure mechanism (CFM) events. Motor-operated valves (MOVs) in two nuclear power plant data bases have been analyzed with this approach. The analysis results include seven different failure mechanism categories; identified potential CFM events; and assessment of the risk-significance of the potential CFM events using existing probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs); and postulated defenses to the identified potential CFM events. 2 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  4. Development of Reliability Based Life Prediction Methods for Thermal and Environmental Barrier Coatings in Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, Ashwin

    2001-01-01

    Literature survey related to the EBC/TBC (environmental barrier coating/thermal barrier coating) fife models, failure mechanisms in EBC/TBC and the initial work plan for the proposed EBC/TBC life prediction methods development was developed as well as the finite element model for the thermal/stress analysis of the GRC-developed EBC system was prepared. Technical report for these activities is given in the subsequent sections.

  5. Structural-scaling transitions in mesodefect ensembles as mechanisms of relaxation and failure in shocked and dynamically loaded materials (experimental and theoretical study)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimark, O. B.

    2006-08-01

    Nonlinear aspects of relaxation and failure are related to new type of critical phenomena in ensembles of mesoscopic defects - structural-scaling transitions, generation of specific collective modes of mesodefects, which subject the relaxation and kinetics of damage-failure transition. Theoretical results were supported by original experiments and allowed us to propose the explanation: the transition from the steady-state to the branching and stochastic regimes of crack dynamics, fragmentation scenario, the steady-state structure and the four power law universality of the plastic wave front, the “failure wave” phenomenon as delayed failure effect related to the excitation and propagation of mesodefects collective mode with “blow-up” damage localization kinetics.

  6. Induction of autophagy markers is associated with attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic heart failure patients undergoing mechanical unloading

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Duryee, Michael J; Shahshahan, Hamid R; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Anderson, Daniel R; Mishra, Paras K

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is ubiquitous in all forms of heart failure and cardioprotective miR-133a is attenuated in human heart failure. Previous reports from heart failure patients undergoing left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation demonstrated that autophagy is upregulated in the LV of the failing human heart. Studies in the murine model show that diabetes downregulates miR-133a. However, the role of miR-133a in the regulation of autophagy in diabetic hearts is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that diabetes exacerbates cardiac autophagy by inhibiting miR-133a in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. The miRNA assay was performed on the LV of 15 diabetic (D) and 6 non-diabetic (ND) heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. Four ND with highly upregulated and 5 D with highly downregulated miR-133a were analyzed for autophagy markers (Beclin1, LC3B, ATG3) and their upstream regulators (mTOR and AMPK), and hypertrophy marker (beta-myosin heavy chain) by RT-qPCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Our results demonstrate that attenuation of miR-133a in diabetic hearts is associated with the induction of autophagy and hypertrophy, and suppression of mTOR without appreciable difference in AMPK activity. In conclusion, attenuation of miR-133a contributes to the exacerbation of diabetes mediated cardiac autophagy and hypertrophy in heart failure patients undergoing LVAD implantation. PMID:26064437

  7. Gene Therapy for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tilemann, Lisa; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Weber, Thomas; Hajjar, Roger J.

    2012-01-01

    Congestive heart failure accounts for half a million deaths per year in the US. Despite its place among the leading causes of morbidity, pharmcalogical and mechanic remedies have been able to slow the progression of the disease, today’s science has yet to provide a cure and there are few therapeutic modalities available for patients with advanced heart failure. There is a critical need to explore new therapeutic approaches in heart failure and gene therapy has emerged as a viable alternative. Recent advances in understanding of the molecular basis of myocardial dysfunction, together with the evolution of increasingly efficient gene transfer technology, has placed heart failure within reach of gene-based therapy. The recent successful and safe completion of a phase 2 trial targeting the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase pump (SERCA2a) along with the start of more recent phase 1 trials opens a new era for gene therapy for the treatment of heart failure. PMID:22383712

  8. Failure studies of glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lower, Nathan Paul

    This dissertation is divided into six sections. The first section includes a review of the literature on the mechanical properties of glass, including glass strength. Section two describes a study of the effects of composition of calcium aluminoborosilicate glasses on the inert and room temperature two-point bending failure characteristics of glass fibers, including fatigue and aging effects. Sections three and four include studies of the effects of composition and structure of alkali silicate and aluminosilicate glasses on the inert two-point bending fiber failure properties. Section five describes the inert two-point bending failure results of sodium borate glass fibers. Section six includes a study of the effects of melting time and temperature (i.e. thermal history) on the resulting two-point bending failure properties of glass fibers produced from a variety of glass compositions. Throughout the course of this work, new experimental equipment and techniques were developed so that high quality failure measurements could be obtained. When glass melts were prepared to ensure homogeneity, the failure properties were shown to be sensitive to glass composition and structure and the reproducibility of the failure data was less than for a variety of different silicate glass compositions. Fibers have also been aged under controlled humidity and temperature conditions to characterize the effects of aging time on the failure strain. With the ability to produce and test high quality fiber, a new failure property of glass has been observed. Fibers tested under liquid nitrogen produce failure strains that depend on the testing rate of the two-point bending equipment. In the case of silica glass fibers, failure strain increases with increasing testing rate, an effect attributed to 'normal' inert fatigue behavior. However, some glasses, such as the high alkali silicates and soda lime silicates, show the opposite dependence of failure strain on testing rate, where slower testing rates produce greater failure strains (i.e. an "inert delayed failure effect"). With the ability to determine the intrinsic (flaw-free) failure properties of glass and the dependence of these properties on testing rate, a new insight to the understanding of glass failure and strength with relation to composition and structure may be possible.

  9. Influence of "Island-Like" Oxides in the Bond-Coat on the Stress and Failure Patterns of the Thermal-Barrier Coatings Fabricated by Atmospheric Plasma Spraying During Long-Term High Temperature Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zhong, X. H.; Tao, S. Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs) are very important ceramic-coating materials due to their excellent performance at high temperature. The inner zone of the bond-coat is often easily endured oxidized (internal oxidation) in the process of thermal spraying and the long-time exposure to the high temperature, and the "island-like" oxides can be formed. Especially, when the bond-coat was fabricated by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), this trend is more evident. In this paper, the stress distribution around the thermally grown oxide (TGO) has been calculated by the finite element method when the "island-like" oxides have been considered. The simulation results indicate that the maximum tensile stress and compressive stress existed in the TGO, and the existence of the "island-like" oxides will further decrease the maximum tensile stress level in the TGO. While the "island-like" oxides in the bond-coat will decrease the effective thickness of the TGO at the metallic layer/ceramic layer interface due to the oxidation of the metallic elements in the bond-coat. The crack propagation equation has been established and the failure mechanism of the TBC due to the formation and growth of the TGO has also been discussed in detail. The lifetime of the TBCs which have experienced high temperature oxidation has been predicted and the theoretical results agreed well with the experimental data.

  10. Failure modes in surface micromachined microelectromechanical actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; LaVigne, G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Clews, P.; Tanner, D.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    In order for the rapidly emerging field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) to meet its extraordinary expectations regarding commercial impact, issues pertaining to how they fail must be understood. The authors identify failure modes common to a broad range of MEMS actuators, including adhesion (stiction) and friction induced failures caused by improper operational methods, mechanical instabilities, and electrical instabilities. Demonstrated methods to mitigate these failure modes include implementing optimized designs, model based operational methods, and chemical surface treatments.

  11. Peyronie's disease and erectile failure

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, P.; Ebbehoj, J.; Uhrenholdt, A.; Wagner, G.

    1983-12-01

    A total of 20 patients with Peyronie's disease, including 15 with erectile failure and 5 with normal potency, underwent evaluation with dynamic xenon washout and infusion cavernosography. Abnormal drainage from the cavernous body was found in 13 of the 15 patients with erectile failure and in none of the 5 potent patients, indicating that this condition seems to be the underlying pathological mechanism leading to erectile impotence in patients with Peyronie's disease.

  12. Congestive heart failure. New frontiers.

    PubMed Central

    Parmley, W. W.; Chatterjee, K.; Francis, G. S.; Firth, B. G.; Kloner, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Congestive heart failure is a common syndrome with high mortality in its advanced stages. Current therapy includes the use of vasodilator drugs, which have been shown to prolong life. Despite current therapy, mortality remains high in patients with severe heart failure. Potent new inotropic vasodilators have improved ventricular performance but have not prolonged life in patients with end-stage heart failure. Serious arrhythmias are implicated in the sudden deaths of 30% to 40% of patients with severe heart failure, but the benefits of antiarrhythmic therapy have not been established. Upcoming trials will address this question. Ventricular remodeling and progressive dilatation after myocardial infarction commonly lead to congestive heart failure; early unloading of the ventricle with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor may attenuate these events. These findings support the concept that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may be useful in managing heart failure of all degrees of severity, including left ventricular dysfunction and end-stage heart failure. Part of the damage that may occur with acute myocardial infarction, particularly in this era of thrombolysis therapy, is reperfusion injury, which may be mediated by oxygen-derived free radicals. Better knowledge of the mechanisms and treatment of myocardial infarction, the leading cause of congestive heart failure, may help prevent or attenuate the development of this syndrome. PMID:1678903

  13. The influence of normal fault geometry on porous sandstone deformation: Insights from mechanical models into conditions leading to Coulomb failure and shear-enhanced compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, K.; Reinen, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Slip on non-planar faults produces stress perturbations in the surrounding host rock that can yield secondary faults at a scale too small to be resolved on seismic surveys. Porosity changes during failure may affect the ability of the rock to transmit fluids through dilatant cracking or, in porous rocks, shear-enhanced compaction (i.e., cataclastic flow). Modeling the mechanical behavior of the host rock in response to slip on non-planar faults can yield insights into the role of fault geometry on regions of enhanced or inhibited fluid flow. To evaluate the effect of normal fault geometry on deformation in porous sandstones, we model the system as a linear elastic, homogeneous, whole or half space using the boundary-element modeling program Poly3D. We consider conditions leading to secondary deformation using the maximum Coulomb shear stress (MCSS) as an index of brittle deformation and proximity to an elliptical yield envelope (Y), determined experimentally for porous sandstone (Baud et al., JGR, 2006), for cataclastic flow. We model rectangular faults consisting of two segments: an upper leg with a constant dip of 60° and a lower leg with dips ranging 15-85°. We explore far-field stress models of constant and gradient uniaxial strain. We investigate the potential damage in the host rock in two ways: [1] the size of the damage zone, and [2] regions of enhanced deformation indicated by elevated MCSS or Y. Preliminary results indicate that, along a vertical transect passing through the fault kink, [1] the size of the damage zone increases in the footwall with increasing lower leg dip and remains constant in the hanging wall. [2] In the footwall, the amount of deformation does not change as a function of lower leg dip in constant stress models; in gradient stress models, both MCSS and Y increase with dip. In the hanging wall, Y decreases with increasing lower leg dip for both constant and gradient stress models. In contrast, MCSS increases: as lower leg dip increases for constant stress models, and as the difference between lower leg dip and 60° increases for gradient stress models. These preliminary results indicate that the dip of the lower fault segment significantly affects the amount and style of deformation in the host rock.

  14. Model the Deformation and Failure of Solids

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-10-19

    EMU models the deformation and failure of solids based on a reformulated theory of continuum mechanics known as the Peridynamic model. This approach allows dynamic fracture and other failure mechanisms to be simulated with a minimum of mesh effeces and without a need for supplementary kinetic relations for crack growth. Penetration by a rigid projectile is also included in the code.

  15. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  16. Thermal barrier coating life modeling in aircraft gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissley, D. M.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical models useful for predicting ceramic thermal barrier coating (TBC) spalling life in aircraft gas turbine engines are presented. Electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma sprayed TBC systems are discussed. TBC spalling was attributed to a combination of mechanisms such as metal oxidation at the ceramic-metal interface, ceramic-metal interface stress concentrations at free surfaces due to dissimilar materials, ceramic-metal interface stresses caused by local radius of curvature and interface roughness, material properties and mechanical behavior, transient temperature gradients across the ceramic layer and component design features. TBC spalling life analytical models were developed based on observations of TBC failure modes and plausible failure theories. TBC failure was assumed to occur when the imposed stresses exceeded the material strength (at or near the ceramic-metal interface). TBC failure knowledge gaps caused by lack of experimental evidence and analytical understanding are noted. The analytical models are considered initial engineering approaches that capture observed TBC failure trends.

  17. Rethinking Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fouché, Jaunine

    2013-01-01

    Which is better--telling high school students they are wrong, or letting them figure it out for themselves? Research supports the latter. In other words, do nit short-circuit students; struggles to achieve understanding as they grapple with their own beliefs. Removing that struggle may deny students the mechanism they need to replace their…

  18. Sterilization failures and their causes.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, R M

    1985-06-15

    To say that a sterilization failure rate is expected does not answer why. Forty-seven cases of repeat sterilization have undergone such surgical and pathologic scrutiny. Resection methods failed most frequently because of spontaneous reanastomosis or fistula formation. Fimbriectomy was particularly vulnerable to reanastomosis because the fimbria ovarica was not removed. Mechanical devices failed when the device was defective, placed improperly, or placed in an improper location. Tissue damage was evident but incomplete when the bipolar electrocoagulation method failures were reviewed, and the endosalpinx remained viable. Unipolar method injuries, in contrast, were complete; they failed by fistula formation. Thus bipolar method failures may occur because of the limited range of electrical power available when using bipolar generators. Some sterilization failures are preventable, but many are not. When medicolegal questions arise, these findings may help answer the question, Why? PMID:4014332

  19. Acute kidney failure

    MedlinePLUS

    Kidney failure; Renal failure; Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute ... There are many possible causes of kidney damage. They include: ... cholesterol (cholesterol emboli) Decreased blood flow due to very ...

  20. Investigation of heat transfer in zirconium potassium perchlorate at low temperature: A study of the failure mechanism of the NASA standard initiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varghese, Philip L.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the reasons for the failure of pyrotechnic initiators at very low temperatures (10 to 100 K). A two-dimensional model of the NASA standard initiator was constructed to model heat transfer from the electrically heated stainless steel bridgewire to the zirconium potassium perchlorate explosive charge and the alumina charge cup. Temperature dependent properties were used in the model to simulate initiator performance over a wide range of initial temperatures (10 to 500 K). A search of the thermophysical property data base showed that pure alumina has a very high thermal conductivity at low temperatures. It had been assumed to act as a thermal insulator in all previous analyses. Rapid heat transfer from the bridgewire to the alumina at low initial temperatures was shown to cause failure of the initiators if the wire did not also make good contact with the zirconium potassium perchlorate charge. The mode is able to reproduce the results of the tests that had been conducted to investigate the cause for failure. It also provides an explanation for previously puzzling results and suggests simple design changes that will increase reliability at very low initial temperatures.

  1. Reconstructing western Grand Canyon's lava dams and their failure mechanisms: new insights from geochemical correlation and 40Ar/39Ar dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, R.; Karlstrom, K. E.; McIntosh, W. C.; Peters, L.; Dunbar, N. W.

    2010-12-01

    New geochemical analyzes and 40Ar/39Ar dating of lava dam remnants allows for the more accurate reconstruction of the timing, extent, and structure of western Grand Canyon’s lava dams. Whole-rock major, trace, and rare-earth element (REE) analyzes on over 60 basaltic lava dam remnants, cascades, plugs, and basaltic alluvium, show compositional variation from basanites to alkali basalts to tholeiites. Whitmore Canyon flows, for example, are some of the only tholeiitic flows and have a distinguishable trace and REE composition, which allows for correlation of dam remnants. Over 30 new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar dates also aid in remnant correlation and establish a better-constrained sequence of intra-canyon lava dams. Reliable 40Ar/39Ar dates on western Grand Canyon’s intra-canyon basalts range from ca. 100 ka to 840 ka (new date). The best understood lava dam formed from tholeiitic flows that erupted on the north rim, flowed down Whitmore side canyon and blocked a 6-km-long reach of the Grand Canyon. The youngest of these flows is unique because we know its age (200ka), its composition (tholeiitic), and the exact area where it entered Grand Canyon. The highest flow in the resulting dam, Whitmore Cascade, is capped with very coarse basaltic alluvium that previous workers have attributed to an upstream catastrophic dam failure event at about 200 ka. However, strong similarities between the geochemistry and age of the alluvium with the underlying Whitmore Cascade flow suggest that the alluvial deposit is related to failure of the 200 ka Whitmore Cascade dam itself. Similarly the 100 ka Upper Gray Ledge flow is commonly overlain by a balsaltic alluvium that is indistinguishable in terms of age and geochemistry from the underlying Upper Gray Ledge flow. These observations lead to a new model for Grand Canyon lava dams by which lava dams undergo multi-staged failure where the upstream parts of dams fail quickly (sometimes catastrophically) but downstream parts are longer lived because they undergo less interaction with river water and fracturing and generally fill dry portions of the river bed. Identification of far-traveled clasts on top of lava dam remnants in at least two locations supports the idea that the stable Colorado River established itself on top of the distal parts of some lava dams. Thus, whereas previous workers reported that deposits from outburst flood dam failure events exist in western grand canyon, our data identify specific dam failures and an interaction of catastrophic events at the head of lava dams and modified fluvial processes in distal portions of dams.

  2. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program (i.e. Shuttle) and at the beginning of a new and untested program (i.e. Constellation). The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation section in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic failure analysis and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment (GSE) for the Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This presentation will explore a variety of failure case studies at KSC and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  3. Failure Analysis at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salazar, Victoria L.; Wright, M. Clara

    2010-01-01

    History has shown that failures occur in every engineering endeavor, and what we learn from those failures contributes to the knowledge base to safely complete future missions. The necessity of failure analysis is at its apex at the end of one aged program and at the beginning of a new and untested program. The information that we gain through failure analysis corrects the deficiencies in the current vehicle to make the next generation of vehicles more efficient and safe. The Failure Analysis and Materials Evaluation Branch in the Materials Science Division at the Kennedy Space Center performs metallurgical, mechanical, electrical, and non-metallic materials failure analyses and accident investigations on both flight hardware and ground support equipment for the Space Shuttle, International Space Station, Constellation, and Launch Services Programs. This paper will explore a variety of failure case studies at the Kennedy Space Center and the lessons learned that can be applied in future programs.

  4. Analyses of Transistor Punchthrough Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David P.

    1999-01-01

    The failure of two transistors in the Altitude Switch Assembly for the Solid Rocket Booster followed by two additional failures a year later presented a challenge to failure analysts. These devices had successfully worked for many years on numerous missions. There was no history of failures with this type of device. Extensive checks of the test procedures gave no indication for a source of the cause. The devices were manufactured more than twenty years ago and failure information on this lot date code was not readily available. External visual exam, radiography, PEID, and leak testing were performed with nominal results Electrical testing indicated nearly identical base-emitter and base-collector characteristics (both forward and reverse) with a low resistance short emitter to collector. These characteristics are indicative of a classic failure mechanism called punchthrough. In failure analysis punchthrough refers to an condition where a relatively low voltage pulse causes the device to conduct very hard producing localized areas of thermal runaway or "hot spots". At one or more of these hot spots, the excessive currents melt the silicon. Heavily doped emitter material diffuses through the base region to the collector forming a diffusion pipe shorting the emitter to base to collector. Upon cooling, an alloy junction forms between the pipe and the base region. Generally, the hot spot (punch-through site) is under the bond and no surface artifact is visible. The devices were delidded and the internal structures were examined microscopically. The gold emitter lead was melted on one device, but others had anomalies in the metallization around the in-tact emitter bonds. The SEM examination confirmed some anomalies to be cosmetic defects while other anomalies were artifacts of the punchthrough site. Subsequent to these analyses, the contractor determined that some irregular testing procedures occurred at the time of the failures heretofore unreported. These testing irregularities involved the use of a breakout box and were the likely cause of the failures. There was no evidence to suggest a generic failure mechanism was responsible for the failure of these transistors.

  5. Failure mode analysis to predict product reliability.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zemanick, P. P.

    1972-01-01

    The failure mode analysis (FMA) is described as a design tool to predict and improve product reliability. The objectives of the failure mode analysis are presented as they influence component design, configuration selection, the product test program, the quality assurance plan, and engineering analysis priorities. The detailed mechanics of performing a failure mode analysis are discussed, including one suggested format. Some practical difficulties of implementation are indicated, drawn from experience with preparing FMAs on the nuclear rocket engine program.

  6. Congestive cardiac failure following laxative withdrawal.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, J. A.; Brown, A. R.; Walker, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    We report the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with weakness and hypokalaemia due to excessive use of laxatives. When the laxatives were withdrawn, she developed severe congestive cardiac failure requiring treatment with a diuretic and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor. There was no underlying cardiac abnormality, and these drugs were eventually stopped with no recurrence of the cardiac failure. The possible mechanisms of heart failure following laxative withdrawal is discussed. PMID:8796216

  7. Development of a ReaxFF reactive force field for ettringite and study of its mechanical failure modes from reactive dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lianchi; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A; Sun, Huai

    2012-04-19

    Ettringite is a hexacalcium aluminate trisulfate hydrate mineral that forms during Portland cement hydration. Its presence plays an important role in controlling the setting rate of the highly reactive aluminate phases in cement paste and has also been associated with severe cracking in cured hardened cement. To understand how it forms and how its properties influence those of hardened cement and concrete, we have developed a first-principles-based ReaxFF reactive force field for Ca/Al/H/O/S. Here, we report on the development of this ReaxFF force field and on its validation and application using reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations to characterize and understand the elastic, plastic, and failure response of ettringite at the atomic scale. The ReaxFF force field was validated by comparing the lattice parameters, pairwise distribution functions, and elastic constants of an ettringite crystal model obtained from RMD simulations with those from experiments. The predicted results are in close agreement with published experimental data. To characterize the atomistic failure modes of ettringite, we performed stress-strain simulations to find that Ca-O bonds are responsible for failure of the calcium sulfate and tricalcium aluminate (C3A) column in ettringite during uniaxial compression and tension and that hydrogen bond re-formation during compression induces an increase in plastic strain beyond the material's stress-strain proportionality limit. These results provide essential insight into understanding the mechanistic role of this mineral in cement and concrete degradation, and the ReaxFF potential developed in this work serves as a fundamental tool to further study the kinetics of hydration in cement and concrete. PMID:22413941

  8. Bond Coat Engineering Influence on the Evolution of the Microstructure, Bond Strength, and Failure of TBCs Subjected to Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, R. S.; Nagy, D.; Marple, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of thermal spray systems, including HVOF (JP5000 and DJ2600-hybrid), APS (F4-MB and Axial III), and LPPS (Oerlikon Metco system) were employed to spray CoNiCrAlY bond coats (BCs) onto Inconel 625 substrates. The chemical composition of the BC powder was the same in all cases; however, the particle size distribution of the powder employed with each torch was that specifically recommended for the torch. For optimization purposes, these BCs were screened based on initial evaluations of roughness, porosity, residual stress, relative oxidation, and isothermal TGO growth. A single type of standard YSZ top coat was deposited via APS (F4MB) on all the optimized BCs. The TBCs were thermally cycled by employing a furnace cycle test (FCT) (1080 °C-1 h—followed by forced air cooling). Samples were submitted to 10, 100, 400, and 1400 cycles as well as being cycled to failure. The behavior of the microstructures, bond strength values (ASTM 633), and the TGO evolution of these TBCs, were investigated for the as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. During FCT, the TBCs found to be both the best and poorest performing and had their BCs deposited via HVOF. The results showed that engineering low-oxidized BCs does not necessarily lead to an optimal TBC performance. Moreover, the bond strength values decrease significantly only when the TBC is about to fail (top coat spall off) and the as-sprayed bond strength values cannot be used as an indicator of TBC performance.

  9. Analyses of Failure Mechanisms in Woven Graphite/Polyimide Composites with Medium and High Modulus Graphite Fibers Subjected to In-Plane Shear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumosa, M.; Armentrout, D.; Rupnowski, P.; Kumosa, L.; Shin, E.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    The application of the Iosipescu shear test for the room and high temperature failure analyses of the woven graphite/polyimide composites with the medium (T-650) and igh (M40J and M60J) modulus graphite fibers is discussed. The M40J/PMR-II-50 and M60J/PMR-II-50 composites were tested as supplied and after thermal conditioning. The effect of temperature and conditioning on the initiation of intralaminar damage and the shear strength of the composites was established.

  10. On the oxidation of high-temperature alloys, and its role in failure of thermal barrier coatings

    E-print Network

    Loeffel, Kaspar Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems are applied to superalloy turbine blades to provide thermal insulation and oxidation protection. A TBC system consists of (a) an outer oxide layer that imparts thermal insulation, and ...

  11. High-Temperature Mechanical Behavior of End-of-Life Cryomilled NiCrAlY Bond Coat Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funk, M.; Ma, K.; Eberl, C.; Schoenung, J. M.; Göken, M.; Hemker, K. J.

    2011-08-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that the lifetime of atmospheric plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems incorporating cryomilled NiCrAlY bond coats show superior reliability with up to 3 times longer lifetimes compared to conventional ones. These conventional and cryomilled NiCrAlY bond coats at end-of-life (after thermal cycle failure) were studied in detail in the present work with a focus on the mechanical behavior in the temperature range from room temperature to 1273 K (1000 °C). The investigations were carried out using microtensile samples and the DIC technique. It turns out that the low-temperature strength of the cryomilled NiCrAlY bond coat is inferior to that of conventional ones, which might be due to a more pronounced porosity. At higher temperatures (between 1173 K and 1273 K (900 °C and 1000 °C)), the cryomilled bond coat shows almost twice the strength of the conventional bond coat, despite having been exposed to almost 3 times as many thermal cycles. The thermal stability of the nitride dispersoids appears to compensate for the gamma prime dissolution that typically occurs at these elevated temperatures, allowing for strength retention.

  12. Estimation of Failure Frequency for Type I and II High Level Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, K.H.

    2001-05-15

    The failure frequency of Type I and Type II High Level Waste tanks was calculated. The degradation mechanism that could lead to large break failure and the credits taken for steps taken to prevent large break failure were considered.

  13. On mechanisms triggering the levees failure along the Foenna stream on 1st January 2006 and which caused the flooding in the urban area of Sinalunga, Tuscany Region (Italy). A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camici, Stefania; Moramarco, Tommaso; Brocca, Luca; Melone, Florisa; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Perrone, Angela; Loperte, Antonio

    2010-05-01

    On 1st January 2006, during an ordinary flood event, a levee failure along the Foenna stream caused the flooding in the urban area of Sinalunga, a small town located in Tuscany region (Italy). The event was monitored by a public agency with the responsibility for the control and maintenance of the natural channel networks. Long time before of flooding, people living in the surrounding area of the stream blamed the presence of wild animals and of numerous burrows along the levees. Although the numerous actions of maintenance along the levees mainly for removing the burrows, a levee seepage occurred during that flood. The presence of an outflow located on the downstream face, almost 2 m below the levee top, caused the spurt of brown water denoting the presence of sediment erosion. On the upstream face of levee, a little hole of about 30 cm at the same height of the outflow was discovered. Although the agency workers tried to close the hole by using appropriate blankets, in short time the top of the levee subsided and the overtopping flow caused a trapezoidal breach typical for an earth-fill embankment. The formation of breach was so fast that in a little more of one hour the urban area near to the Foenna stream was flooded causing high economic damages. Mechanisms triggered the levees failure are the object of this work. The analysis of the event has been first addressed to assess the state of-fact of levees conditions along the Foenna stream, thus to understand how much the activity of wild animals, in particular that of porcupine, may have affected the hydraulic safety of the embankment. At the purpose, after the event, topographical surveys of cross sections have been done along with tomographic surveys by geoelectric technique for investigating the possible presence, besides of burrows, also of tunnels dug into the levees by animals. Then, the analysis of hydrometeorological conditions of the event has allowed to better understand the evolution of the flood and if its magnitude was able to affect the hydraulic holding of levees. Finally, the seepage vulnerability of these levees has been also assessed to address their hydraulic safety applying two models based on a steady and unsteady infiltration, respectively. Based on the obtained results, the following findings can be drawn. 1) The levees failure near the Sinalunga urban area is certainly due to the presence of the porcupine burrow at middle height of upstream face of levee that has addressed the flow into the embankment and then triggered the seepage phenomenon. 2) The works of the maintenance finalized to the closure of the burrows carried out before of the flood event were necessary but not sufficient to prevent the failure of levees. 3) To prevent the failure due to burrows presence, the levees maintenance should have been addressed through both the closure of burrows and the capture of wild animals; if this action had been done for the Foenna stream then the probability of failure would have been truly low. This last aspect has been also inferred through geoelectrical tomography surveys that showed the possible presence of at least two tunnels along both faces of levees, so emphasizing as the various closure of burrows made in the past by maintenance agency were totally useless. 4) The seepage vulnerability analysis has shown that levees might be to risk of failure for floods whose durations are consistent with the ones might occur in the Foenna basin. However, for this particular event the levees failure can be only ascribed to wild animals activity, seeing that the seepage was caused by a burrow hole.

  14. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  15. Failure models for textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    1995-01-01

    The goals of this investigation were to: (1) identify mechanisms of failure and determine how the architecture of reinforcing fibers in 3D woven composites controlled stiffness, strength, strain to failure, work of fracture, notch sensitivity, and fatigue life; and (2) to model composite stiffness, strength, and fatigue life. A total of 11 different angle and orthogonal interlock woven composites were examined. Composite properties depended on the weave architecture, the tow size, and the spatial distributions and strength of geometrical flaws. Simple models were developed for elastic properties, strength, and fatigue life. A more complicated stochastic model, called the 'Binary Model,' was developed for damage tolerance and ultimate failure. These 3D woven composites possessed an extraordinary combination of strength, damage tolerance, and notch insensitivity.

  16. First passage failure: Analysis alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    PAEZ,THOMAS L.; NGUYEN,H.P.; WIRSCHING,PAUL H.

    2000-04-17

    Most mechanical and structural failures can be formulated as first passage problems. The traditional approach to first passage analysis models barrier crossings as Poisson events. The crossing rate is established and used in the Poisson framework to approximate the no-crossing probability. While this approach is accurate in a number of situations, it is desirable to develop analysis alternatives for those situations where traditional analysis is less accurate and situations where it is difficult to estimate parameters of the traditional approach. This paper develops an efficient simulation approach to first passage failure analysis. It is based on simulation of segments of complex random processes with the Karhunen-Loeve expansion, use of these simulations to estimate the parameters of a Markov chain, and use of the Markov chain to estimate the probability of first passage failure. Some numerical examples are presented.

  17. Pressure-overload-induced right heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rain, S; Handoko, M L; Vonk Noordegraaf, A; Bogaard, H J; van der Velden, J; de Man, F S

    2014-06-01

    Although pulmonary arterial hypertension originates in the lung and is caused by progressive remodeling of the small pulmonary arterioles, patients die from the consequences of pressure-overload-induced right heart failure. Prognosis is poor, and currently there are no selective treatments targeting the failing right ventricle. Therefore, it is of utmost importance to obtain more insights into the mechanisms of right ventricular adaptation and the transition toward right heart failure. In this review, we propose that the same adaptive mechanisms, which initially preserve right ventricular systolic function and maintain cardiac output, eventually initiate the transition toward right heart failure. PMID:24488007

  18. Ca2+ Cycling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Min; Anderson, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    Ca2+ plays a crucial role in connecting membrane excitability with contraction in myocardium. The hallmark features of heart failure are mechanical dysfunction and arrhythmias; defective intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis is a central cause of contractile dysfunction and arrhythmias in failing myocardium. Defective Ca2+ homeostasis in heart failure can result from pathological alteration in the expression and activity of an increasingly understood collection of Ca2+ homeostatic binding proteins, ion channels and enzymes. This review focuses on the molecular mechanisms of defective Ca2+ cycling in heart failure and consider how fundamental understanding of these pathways may translate into novel and innovative therapies. PMID:23989713

  19. P2X4 receptor–eNOS signaling pathway in cardiac myocytes as a novel protective mechanism in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ronghua; Beqiri, Dardan; Shen, Jian-Bing; Redden, John M.; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Liang, Bruce T.

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated using immunoprecipitation and immunostaining a novel physical association of the P2X4 receptor (P2X4R), a ligand-gated ion channel, with the cardioprotective, calcium-dependent enzyme endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Treatment of murine ventricular myocytes with the P2XR agonist 2-methylthioATP (2-meSATP) to induce a current (mainly Na+) increased the formation of nitric oxide (NO), as measured using a fluorescent probe. Possible candidates for downstream effectors mediating eNOS activity include cyclic GMP and PKG or cellular protein nitrosylation. A cardiac-specific P2X4R overexpressing mouse line was protected from heart failure (HF) with improved cardiac function and survival in post-infarct, pressure overload, and calsequestrin (CSQ) overexpression models of HF. Although the role of the P2X4R in other tissues such as the endothelium and monocytes awaits characterization in tissue-specific KO, cardiac-specific activation of eNOS may be more cardioprotective than an increased activity of global systemic eNOS. The intra-myocyte formation of NO may be more advantageous over NO derived externally from a donor. A small molecule drug stimulating this sarcolemmal pathway or gene therapy-mediated overexpression of the P2X4R in cardiac myocytes may represent a new therapy for both ischemic and pressure overloaded HF. PMID:25750695

  20. Asynchronous Failure Detectors

    E-print Network

    Cornejo, Alejandro

    2013-10-10

    Failure detectors -- oracles that provide information about process crashes -- are an important abstraction for crash tolerance in distributed systems. The generality of failure-detector theory, while providing great ...

  1. Assessment of hoist failure rate for Payload Transporter III

    SciTech Connect

    Demmie, P.N.

    1994-02-01

    Assessment of the hoist failure rate for the Payload Transporter Type III (PT-III) hoist was completed as one of the ground transportation tasks for the Minuteman II (MMIII) Weapon System Safety Assessment. The failures of concern are failures that lead to dropping a reentry system (RS) during hoist operations in a silo or the assembly, storage, and inspection building for a MMIII wing. After providing a brief description of the PT-III hoist system, the author summarizes his search for historical data from industry and the military services for failures of electric hoist systems. Since such information was not found, the strategy for assessing a failure rate was to consider failure mechanisms which lead to load-drop accidents, estimate their rates, and sum the rates for the PT-III hoist failure rate. The author discusses failure mechanisms and describes his assessment of a chain failure rate that is based on data from destructive testing of a chain of the type used for the PT-III hoist and projected usage rates for hoist operations involving the RS. The main result provides upper bounds for chain failure rates that are based on these data. No test data were found to estimate failure rates due to mechanisms other than chain failure. The author did not attempt to quantify the effects of human factors on the PT-III hoist failure rate.

  2. Preventing Spacecraft Failures Due to Tribological Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Many mechanical failures that occur on spacecraft are caused by tribological problems. This publication presents a study that was conducted by the author on various preventatives, analyses, controls and tests (PACTs) that could be used to prevent spacecraft mechanical system failure. A matrix is presented in the paper that plots tribology failure modes versus various PACTs that should be performed before a spacecraft is launched in order to insure success. A strawman matrix was constructed by the author and then was sent out to industry and government spacecraft designers, scientists and builders of spacecraft for their input. The final matrix is the result of their input. In addition to the matrix, this publication describes the various PACTs that can be performed and some fundamental knowledge on the correct usage of lubricants for spacecraft applications. Even though the work was done specifically to prevent spacecraft failures the basic methodology can be applied to other mechanical system areas.

  3. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E?, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in alleviation of ischemia) or activation of compensatory pathways already devised by evolution. In summary, meaningful quantitative characterization of diastolic function in any clinical setting, including heart failure, requires metrics based on physiologic mechanisms that quantify the suction pump attribute of the heart. This requires advancing beyond phenomenological global indexes such as E/A, E/E?, Vp, etc. and employing causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function easily obtained via the parametrized diastolic function (PDF) formalism. PMID:25922587

  4. Age-related failure of endocytosis may be the pathogenetic mechanism responsible for cold follicle formation in the aging mouse thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, H.; Peter, H.J.; Studer, H.

    1987-05-01

    With advancing age, 60-80% of the follicles of the mouse thyroid gland turn cold, i.e. they lose their normal capacity to iodinate thyroglobulin (Tgb). Cold follicles are morphologically characterized by their large size, by deeply periodic acid-Schiff-stained colloid and by flat epithelial cells. We investigated the hypothesis that a progressive, age-related failure of endocytosis, leading to a gradually increasing mismatch between production of new Tgb and resorption of stored Tgb, could lead to overfilling of colloid stores with consecutive impediment of diffusion. To this purpose, labeling of the thyroids was started when mice were 3 months old, and 125I was continuously administered thereafter for 2-6 months. After this time, all follicles were homogeneously labeled in autoradiographs. Tracer application was then discontinued. Autoradiographs obtained at intervals during the washout of the tracer yielded a mirror image of that observed after acute labeling. The large follicles which were cold after acute labeling in old animals now still retained labeled iodoproteins even after 7 weeks of washout, i.e. at a time when morphologically normal follicles had long lost their labeled Tgb stores. Thus, the cold follicles of the old thyroid must have been functioning normally during equilibration of young thyroids, but have then gradually lost their capacity to iodinate and to remove stored Tgb from the colloid. The observation supports the thesis that aging primarily affects the cytoskeleton and, thus, the cell's endocytotic machinery. This effect of aging on the thyroid can be prevented by life-long stimulation of the gland by TSH.

  5. In-vitro renal epithelial cell infection reveals a viral kidney tropism as a potential mechanism for acute renal failure during Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) Coronavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes symptoms similar to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV), yet involving an additional component of acute renal failure (ARF) according to several published case reports. Impairment of the kidney is not typically seen in Coronavirus infections. The role of kidney infection in MERS is not understood. Findings A systematic review of communicated and peer-reviewed case reports revealed differences in descriptions of kidney involvement in MERS versus SARS patients. In particular, ARF in MERS patients occurred considerably earlier after a median time to onset of 11 days (SD ±2,0 days) as opposed to 20 days for SARS, according to the literature. In-situ histological staining of the respective cellular receptors for MERS- and SARS-Coronavirus showed highly similar staining patterns with a focus of a receptor-specific signal in kidney epithelial cells. Comparative infection experiments with SARS- and MERS-CoV in primary human kidney cells versus primary human bronchial epithelial cells showed cytopathogenic infection only in kidney cells, and only if infected with MERS-CoV. Kidney epithelial cells produced almost 1000-fold more infectious MERS-CoV progeny than bronchial epithelial cells, while only a small difference was seen between cell types when infected with SARS-CoV. Conclusion Epidemiological studies should analyze kidney impairment and its characteristics in MERS-CoV. Virus replication in the kidney with potential shedding in urine might constitute a way of transmission, and could explain untraceable transmission chains leading to new cases. Individual patients might benefit from early induction of renoprotective treatment. PMID:24364985

  6. Antithrombotics in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Mili?i?, Davor; Samardži?, Jure; Petri?evi?, Mate

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure is a common clinical condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rate despite significant improvements in pharmacotherapy and implementation of medical procedures. Patients with heart failure are at an increased risk of developing arterial and venous thrombosis, which contribute to the high rate of adverse events and fatal outcomes. Many heart failure patients routinely receive antithrombotic therapy due to the presence of a specific indication for its use, like ischemic heart disease or atrial fibrillation. However, there is no solid evidence to support the routine use of antithrombotic agents in all heart failure patients. This article reviews the evidence for using antithrombotic therapy in heart failure patients. PMID:25559833

  7. Class of dependent failures

    SciTech Connect

    Papazoglou, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect on the reliability of redundant systems of a class of dependent failures that are due to causes internal to the system (sympathetic failures). A general Markovian model that can incorporate both common cause (externally generated) and sympathetic failures is developed. The model includes the ..beta..-factor model and the Marshall-Olkin model as special cases. Three specialized versions of the general model are presented. It is shown that sympathetic failures can restrict the achievable reliability of a system beyond the limit set by common cause failures.

  8. The effect of time step, thermostat, and strain rate on ReaxFF simulations of mechanical failure in diamond, graphene, and carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Benjamin D; Wise, Kristopher E; Odegard, Gregory M

    2015-08-01

    As the sophistication of reactive force fields for molecular modeling continues to increase, their use and applicability has also expanded, sometimes beyond the scope of their original development. Reax Force Field (ReaxFF), for example, was originally developed to model chemical reactions, but is a promising candidate for modeling fracture because of its ability to treat covalent bond cleavage. Performing reliable simulations of a complex process like fracture, however, requires an understanding of the effects that various modeling parameters have on the behavior of the system. This work assesses the effects of time step size, thermostat algorithm and coupling coefficient, and strain rate on the fracture behavior of three carbon-based materials: graphene, diamond, and a carbon nanotube. It is determined that the simulated stress-strain behavior is relatively independent of the thermostat algorithm, so long as coupling coefficients are kept above a certain threshold. Likewise, the stress-strain response of the materials was also independent of the strain rate, if it is kept below a maximum strain rate. Finally, the mechanical properties of the materials predicted by the Chenoweth C/H/O parameterization for ReaxFF are compared with literature values. Some deficiencies in the Chenoweth C/H/O parameterization for predicting mechanical properties of carbon materials are observed. PMID:26096628

  9. Tensile failure criteria for fiber composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, B. W.; Zweben, C. H.

    1972-01-01

    The analysis provides insight into the failure mechanics of these materials and defines criteria which serve as tools for preliminary design material selection and for material reliability assessment. The model incorporates both dispersed and propagation type failures and includes the influence of material heterogeneity. The important effects of localized matrix damage and post-failure matrix shear stress transfer are included in the treatment. The model is used to evaluate the influence of key parameters on the failure of several commonly used fiber-matrix systems. Analyses of three possible failure modes were developed. These modes are the fiber break propagation mode, the cumulative group fracture mode, and the weakest link mode. Application of the new model to composite material systems has indicated several results which require attention in the development of reliable structural composites. Prominent among these are the size effect and the influence of fiber strength variability.

  10. Dynamics of one- and two-dimensional fronts in a bistable equation with time-delayed global feedback: Propagation failure and control mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Boubendir, Yassine; Mendez, Vicenc; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2010-09-15

    We study the evolution of fronts in a bistable equation with time-delayed global feedback in the fast reaction and slow diffusion regime. This equation generalizes the Hodgkin-Grafstein and Allen-Cahn equations. We derive a nonlinear equation governing the motion of fronts, which includes a term with delay. In the one-dimensional case this equation is linear. We study the motion of one- and two-dimensional fronts, finding a much richer dynamics than for the previously studied cases (without time-delayed global feedback). We explain the mechanism by which localized fronts created by inhibitory global coupling loose stability in a Hopf bifurcation as the delay time increases. We show that for certain delay times, the prevailing phase is different from that corresponding to the system in the absence of global coupling. Numerical simulations of the partial differential equation are in agreement with the analytical predictions.

  11. A bulge-induced dehydration failure mode of nanocomposite hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingda; Yu, Zejun; Sun, Youyi; Pei, Yongmao; Fang, Daining

    2013-10-01

    Since hydrogels are very soft and usually weak in swollen state, they pose unique challenges to traditional mechanical experiments. The mechanical property of nanocomposite poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogel was characterized by the bulge test in this investigation. A dehydration failure phenomenon of the hydrogel was found and the failure mechanism was presented. A criterion is proposed that when strain reaches the threshold, water molecules migrate out of the polymer networks and the dehydration failure occurs. The critical strain keeps constant for orifices with different diameters. This failure mode can be applied in the controllable release of drugs.

  12. Micromechanics-Based Progressive Failure Analysis of Composite Laminates Using Different Constituent Failure Theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moncada, Albert M.; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting failure in a composite can be done with ply level mechanisms and/or micro level mechanisms. This paper uses the Generalized Method of Cells and High-Fidelity Generalized Method of Cells micromechanics theories, coupled with classical lamination theory, as implemented within NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells. The code is able to implement different failure theories on the level of both the fiber and the matrix constituents within a laminate. A comparison is made among maximum stress, maximum strain, Tsai-Hill, and Tsai-Wu failure theories. To verify the failure theories the Worldwide Failure Exercise (WWFE) experiments have been used. The WWFE is a comprehensive study that covers a wide range of polymer matrix composite laminates. The numerical results indicate good correlation with the experimental results for most of the composite layups, but also point to the need for more accurate resin damage progression models.

  13. Damage-Failure Transition: Dynamic Crack Branching, Fragmentation, Failure Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naimark, O.; Plekhov, O.; Proud, W.; Uvarov, S.

    2007-12-01

    The application of statistical theory allows the development of new description of critical phenomena—structural-scaling transitions. These can be classified as a specific form of self-organized criticality in mesodefect ensembles (microcracks, microshears). The phenomenology developed explains different stages of the damage kinetics and self-similarity of damage localization, related to the generation of collective modes of defect response in a number of different damage-failure transitions. Dynamic, shock wave experiments and structural studies support the role of these modes in material response in a wide range of load intensity and highlight the linkage of different mechanisms of dynamic crack propagation, fragmentation statistics and the resonance nature of failure wave generation and propagation.

  14. Right heart failure: toward a common language

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  15. Right heart failure: toward a common language.

    PubMed

    Mehra, Mandeep R; Park, Myung H; Landzberg, Michael J; Lala, Anuradha; Waxman, Aaron B

    2013-12-01

    In this guideline, the International Right Heart Foundation Working Group moves a step forward to develop a common language to describe the development and defects that exemplify the common syndrome of right heart failure. We first propose fundamental definitions of the distinctive components of the right heart circulation and provide consensus on a universal definition of right heart failure. These definitions will form the foundation for describing a uniform nomenclature for right heart circulatory failure with a view to foster collaborative research initiatives and conjoint education in an effort to provide insight into mechanisms of disease unique to the right heart. PMID:25006413

  16. Pleasant Prairie unit 1 feedwater line failure

    SciTech Connect

    Patulski, S.A.

    1995-12-31

    The material degradation mechanism known as Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) or Erosion Corrosion (EC) is the result of improved feed water and boiler water chemistry in nuclear and fossil power plants in the United States and western Europe. Failures in large bore feed water piping in fossil fired power plants as a result of FAC have not been documented in technical literature. The following paper discusses the occurrence of a feed water line failure in a coal fired power plant in the United States which resulted from of FAC. It also discusses the root causes for this failure.

  17. Duralumin - Defects and Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, WM

    1927-01-01

    It is proposed in this paper to identify some of the defects and failures in duralumin most frequently encountered by the aircraft industry with a view to indicate their importance. The defects and failures in duralumin may be classified into the following groups: 1) defects produced during manufacture; 2) defects produced during fabrication; 3) corrosion and erosion; and 4) fatigue failures. Only the first two will be covered in this report.

  18. Unusual mode of failure of intertrochanteric femur fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Roy, Kunal; Nemade, Pradip; Aggarwal, Rishi; Patil, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic hip screw fixation is a commonly used modality of treatment for intertrochanteric femur (ITF) fractures. Various modes of failure in an operated case of ITF fracture have been described. The most frequent mode of failure is screw cut-out through the head. Occurrence of mechanical failure is rare and usually involves the shaft of the plate. We describe an unusual case with failure at the barrel of the plate and hip screw. A middle-aged man with a previously operated ITF fracture presented with pain in the same hip. Radiographs revealed non-union of the fracture with an implant failure. Revision surgery was performed during which a unique mode of implant failure was found to have occurred. The barrel of the plate had broken resulting in a bent Richard's screw. This case underlines the importance of high stress failure in non-union as opposed to high cycle, low stress failure, which is more frequently seen. PMID:26564119

  19. School Failure in Luxembourg.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerger, Lucien

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the current problem of school failure in Luxembourg. Examines school failure in general and describes the main characteristics of Luxembourg's school system, highlighting possible remedial solutions to the situation that are being recommended by the government, and examining pertinent developments in the field of teacher training. (SM)

  20. Ampoule Failure System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watring, Dale A. (Inventor); Johnson, Martin L. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An ampoule failure system for use in material processing furnaces comprising a containment cartridge and an ampoule failure sensor. The containment cartridge contains an ampoule of toxic material therein and is positioned within a furnace for processing. An ampoule failure probe is positioned in the containment cartridge adjacent the ampoule for detecting a potential harmful release of toxic material therefrom during processing. The failure probe is spaced a predetermined distance from the ampoule and is chemically chosen so as to undergo a timely chemical reaction with the toxic material upon the harmful release thereof. The ampoule failure system further comprises a data acquisition system which is positioned externally of the furnace and is electrically connected to the ampoule failure probe so as to form a communicating electrical circuit. The data acquisition system includes an automatic shutdown device for shutting down the furnace upon the harmful release of toxic material. It also includes a resistance measuring device for measuring the resistance of the failure probe during processing. The chemical reaction causes a step increase in resistance of the failure probe whereupon the automatic shutdown device will responsively shut down the furnace.

  1. Study of intermittent field hardware failure data in digital electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, E. J.; Halverson, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    The collection and analysis of data concerning intermittent dailures in digital devices was performed using data from a computer design for shipboard usage. The failure data consisted of actual field failures classified by failure mechanisms and their likelihood of having been intermittent, potentially intermittent, or hard. Each class was studies with respect to computer operation in the ranges of 0 to 2,000 hours, 0 to 5, hours, and 0 to 10,000 hours. The study was done at the computer level as well as the microcircuit level. Results indicate that as age increases, the quasi-intermittent failure rate increases and the mean time to failure descreases.

  2. Deficiencies in the uterine environment and failure to support embryo development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pregnancy failure in livestock can result from failure to fertilize the oocyte or embryonic loss during gestation. Although fertilization failure occurs, embryonic mortality has a greater contribution to pregnancy failure. The focus of this review is on cattle and factors affecting, and mechanisms r...

  3. Lox/Gox related failures during Space Shuttle Main Engine development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    Specific rocket engine hardware and test facility system failures are described which were caused by high pressure liquid and/or gaseous oxygen reactions. The failures were encountered during the development and testing of the space shuttle main engine. Failure mechanisms are discussed as well as corrective actions taken to prevent or reduce the potential of future failures.

  4. The Rab GTPase-Activating Protein TBC1D4/AS160 Contains an Atypical Phosphotyrosine-Binding Domain That Interacts with Plasma Membrane Phospholipids To Facilitate GLUT4 Trafficking in Adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi-Xiong; Ng, Yvonne; Burchfield, James G.; Ramm, Georg; Lambright, David G.; Stöckli, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    The Rab GTPase-activating protein TBC1D4/AS160 regulates GLUT4 trafficking in adipocytes. Nonphosphorylated AS160 binds to GLUT4 vesicles and inhibits GLUT4 translocation, and AS160 phosphorylation overcomes this inhibitory effect. In the present study we detected several new functional features of AS160. The second phosphotyrosine-binding domain in AS160 encodes a phospholipid-binding domain that facilitates plasma membrane (PM) targeting of AS160, and this function is conserved in other related RabGAP/Tre-2/Bub2/Cdc16 (TBC) proteins and an AS160 ortholog in Drosophila. This region also contains a nonoverlapping intracellular GLUT4-containing storage vesicle (GSV) cargo-binding site. The interaction of AS160 with GSVs and not with the PM confers the inhibitory effect of AS160 on insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Constitutive targeting of AS160 to the PM increased the surface GLUT4 levels, and this was attributed to both enhanced AS160 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding and inhibition of AS160 GAP activity. We propose a model wherein AS160 acts as a regulatory switch in the docking and/or fusion of GSVs with the PM. PMID:23045393

  5. Future challenges for MEMS failure analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Walraven, Jeremy Allen

    2003-07-01

    MEMS processes and components are rapidly changing in device design, processing, and, most importantly, application. This paper will discuss the future challenges faced by the MEMS failure analysis as the field of MEMS (fabrication, component design, and applications) grows. Specific areas of concern for the failure analyst will also be discussed. MEMS components are extremely diverse in their application and function. Failure analysts will have to be equally diverse and/or multidisciplinary in their analysis of these devices. Many tools and techniques developed from the IC industry have been used for MEMS FA, but more MEMS-specific FA toolsets have to be developed for diagnosis of these failure mechanisms. Many of the devices discussed in this paper have global issues associated with failure analysis. Many non destructive techniques must be developed to assess the failure mechanisms. Tools and techniques that can perform these functions on a larger scale will also be required. To achieve this, industry will have to work with academia and government institutions to create the knowledge base required for tool and technique development for global and local defect localization.

  6. Analysis of a Memory Device Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolas, David P.; Devaney, John; Gores, Mark; Dicken, Howard

    1998-01-01

    The recent failure of a vintage memory device presented a unique challenge to failure analysts. Normally device layouts, fabrication parameters and other technical information were available to assist the analyst in the analysis. However, this device was out of production for many years and the manufacturer was no longer in business, so the information was not available. To further complicate this analysis, the package leads were all but removed making additional electrical testing difficult. Under these conditions, new and innovative methods were used to analyze the failure. The external visual exam, radiography, PIND, and leak testing were performed with nominal results. Since electrical testing was precluded by the short lead lengths, the device was delidded to expose the internal structures for microscopic examination. No failure mechanism was identified. The available electrical data suggested an ESD or low level EOS type mechanism which left no visible surface damage. Due to parallel electrical paths, electrical probing on the chip failed to locate the failure site. Two non-destructive Scanning Electron Microscopy techniques, CIVA (Charge Induced Voltage Alteration) and EBIC (Electron Beam Induced Current), and a liquid crystal decoration technique which detects localized heating were employed to aid in the analysis. CIVA and EBIC isolated two faults in the input circuitry, and the liquid crystal technique further localized two hot spots in regions on two input gates. Removal of the glassivation and metallization revealed multiple failure sites located in the gate oxide of two input transistors suggesting machine (testing) induced damage.

  7. Heterogeneity: The key to failure forecasting

    PubMed Central

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Elastic waves are generated when brittle materials are subjected to increasing strain. Their number and energy increase non-linearly, ending in a system-sized catastrophic failure event. Accelerating rates of geophysical signals (e.g., seismicity and deformation) preceding large-scale dynamic failure can serve as proxies for damage accumulation in the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Here we test the hypothesis that the style and mechanisms of deformation, and the accuracy of the FFM, are both tightly controlled by the degree of microstructural heterogeneity of the material under stress. We generate a suite of synthetic samples with variable heterogeneity, controlled by the gas volume fraction. We experimentally demonstrate that the accuracy of failure prediction increases drastically with the degree of material heterogeneity. These results have significant implications in a broad range of material-based disciplines for which failure forecasting is of central importance. In particular, the FFM has been used with only variable success to forecast failure scenarios both in the field (volcanic eruptions and landslides) and in the laboratory (rock and magma failure). Our results show that this variability may be explained, and the reliability and accuracy of forecast quantified significantly improved, by accounting for material heterogeneity as a first-order control on forecasting power. PMID:26307196

  8. Heterogeneity: The key to failure forecasting.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B; Lavallée, Yan; Bell, Andrew F; Main, Ian G; Dingwell, Donald B

    2015-01-01

    Elastic waves are generated when brittle materials are subjected to increasing strain. Their number and energy increase non-linearly, ending in a system-sized catastrophic failure event. Accelerating rates of geophysical signals (e.g., seismicity and deformation) preceding large-scale dynamic failure can serve as proxies for damage accumulation in the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Here we test the hypothesis that the style and mechanisms of deformation, and the accuracy of the FFM, are both tightly controlled by the degree of microstructural heterogeneity of the material under stress. We generate a suite of synthetic samples with variable heterogeneity, controlled by the gas volume fraction. We experimentally demonstrate that the accuracy of failure prediction increases drastically with the degree of material heterogeneity. These results have significant implications in a broad range of material-based disciplines for which failure forecasting is of central importance. In particular, the FFM has been used with only variable success to forecast failure scenarios both in the field (volcanic eruptions and landslides) and in the laboratory (rock and magma failure). Our results show that this variability may be explained, and the reliability and accuracy of forecast quantified significantly improved, by accounting for material heterogeneity as a first-order control on forecasting power. PMID:26307196

  9. Heterogeneity: The key to failure forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Lavallée, Yan; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2015-08-01

    Elastic waves are generated when brittle materials are subjected to increasing strain. Their number and energy increase non-linearly, ending in a system-sized catastrophic failure event. Accelerating rates of geophysical signals (e.g., seismicity and deformation) preceding large-scale dynamic failure can serve as proxies for damage accumulation in the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Here we test the hypothesis that the style and mechanisms of deformation, and the accuracy of the FFM, are both tightly controlled by the degree of microstructural heterogeneity of the material under stress. We generate a suite of synthetic samples with variable heterogeneity, controlled by the gas volume fraction. We experimentally demonstrate that the accuracy of failure prediction increases drastically with the degree of material heterogeneity. These results have significant implications in a broad range of material-based disciplines for which failure forecasting is of central importance. In particular, the FFM has been used with only variable success to forecast failure scenarios both in the field (volcanic eruptions and landslides) and in the laboratory (rock and magma failure). Our results show that this variability may be explained, and the reliability and accuracy of forecast quantified significantly improved, by accounting for material heterogeneity as a first-order control on forecasting power.

  10. Common Variants for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shutong; Tao, Lichan; Wang, Xiuzhi; Kong, Xiangqing; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a common disease with high morbidity and mortality; however, none of the drugs available are now entirely optimal for the treatment of HF. In addition to various clinical diseases and environment influences, genetic factors also contribute to the development and progression of HF. Identifying the common variants for HF by genome-wide association studies will facilitate the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying HF. This review summarizes the recently identified common variants for HF risk and outcome and discusses their implications for the clinic therapy. PMID:26085806

  11. Modelling early failures in Space Station Freedom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navard, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    A major problem encountered in planning for Space Station Freedom is the amount of maintenance that will be required. To predict the failure rates of components and systems aboard Space Station Freedom, the logical approach is to use data obtained from previously flown spacecraft. In order to determine the mechanisms that are driving the failures, models can be proposed, and then checked to see if they adequately fit the observed failure data obtained from a large variety of satellites. For this particular study, failure data and truncation times were available for satellites launched between 1976 and 1984; no data past 1984 was available. The study was limited to electrical subsystems and assemblies, which were studied to determine if they followed a model resulting from a mixture of exponential distributions.

  12. Liver Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Bacak, Stephen J; Thornburg, Loralei L

    2016-01-01

    Acute liver failure is a rare but life-threatening medical emergency in pregnancy whose true incidence remains unknown. Many cases of acute liver failure are caused by pregnancy-related conditions such as acute fatty liver of pregnancy and HELLP syndrome. However, acute deterioration in liver function can also be caused by drug overdose, viral infections, and an exacerbation of underlying chronic liver disease. This article provides an overview of the normal liver changes that occur during pregnancy, and summarizes the most common conditions and general management strategies of liver failure during pregnancy. PMID:26600444

  13. Incipient failure detection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griswold, J. W.

    1971-01-01

    In connection with the preparation for long-range space missions it is highly important to be able to identify potentially failure prone equipment in advance of the launch commitment. Physical phenomena investigated for this purpose include X-ray and gamma radiation, electrical noise, IR and UV radiation, and vibration energy. The technique selected must be capable of detecting the onset and evaluating the progression of conditions that represent basic causes which could lead to failure. As a result of the investigation, techniques based on acoustic energy release were selected as the most promising for incipient failure detection.

  14. Mechanism of failure of two pyrotechnic components

    SciTech Connect

    Munger, A.C.; Woods, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of two unrelated pyrotechnic test device misfires revealed an ignition phenomenon that helps to explain the well-known necessity of maintaining good integrity between bridgewire and powder in hot-wire devices that use insensitive pyrotechnic powders. The factor common to both devices was the TiH/sub 1.65/:KC10/sub 4/ in a 33:67 weight percent ratio. This material is being used because of its high static insensitivity, a characteristic that makes good bridgewire contact mandatory for reliable ignition. Extensive work with a scanning electron microscope revealed that not only does the bridgewire require entrapment, but the initiation reaction gases must be contained within the immediate vicinity of the bridgewire or the initiation will not be sustained. Evidence is presented to document the phenomenon that caused the misfire of both components that were investigated. 9 refs., 17 figs.

  15. Mechanism of defibration in torsional failure

    SciTech Connect

    Koran, Z.

    1983-01-01

    Cylindrical wood bars were twisted through a 360-degree rotation in a standard torsiometer in glycerine at 20, 60, and 100/sup 0/C temperatures. The torsional load-deformation curves were plotted for each specimen, and energy consumptions were calculated at each temperature. 11 references, 6 figures.

  16. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies.

  17. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Sep 29,2015 The ejection fraction ( ... below you agree to the Terms and Conditions Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  18. What Causes Respiratory Failure?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... easily move oxygen into your blood and remove carbon dioxide from your blood (gas exchange). This can cause a low oxygen level or high carbon dioxide level, or both, in your blood. Respiratory failure ...

  19. Analysis of a failure

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, R.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper is an in-depth look at the events that led up to a ``total black shutdown`` of a 600 MWe fossil generating unit. This shutdown resulted in severe turbine bearing and journal damage. The most significant fact about this incident was that it was the direct result of four concurrent failures. Had any one failure been prevented, the incident would not occurred. These failures also placed the adjacent unit in peril of a similar fate for several hours. This paper identifies the failures that permitted this incident to occur. The paper also explains the corrective actions that were taken to prevent a reoccurrence of this incident. These actions are of special interest to utilities that are upgrading older units with distributed process control including burner management systems.

  20. Genesis Failure Investigation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, John

    2004-01-01

    The-Genesis mission to collect solar-wind samples and return them to Earth for detailed analysis proceeded successfully for 3.5 years. During reentry on September 8, 2004, a failure in the entry, descent and landing sequence resulted in a crash landing of the Genesis sample return capsule. This document describes the findings of the avionics sub-team that supported the accident investigation of the JPL Failure Review Board.

  1. Perspectives of “Functional Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The present dialogue piece briefly examines six perspectives of functional failure (individual-level, societal-level, life spheres impacted, number of severe consequences, attribution of consequences to drug misuse, and socio-environmental generalizability) as they might apply to seven degrees of drug misuse (constant, dependence, heavy, binging, controlled use, “dry,” sober). Variation in judgments of failure is posited across the perspectives and across degrees of drug misuse. PMID:23186439

  2. Respiratory failure in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Sevransky, Jonathan E; Haponik, Edward F

    2003-02-01

    Elderly individuals comprise an increasing proportion of the population and represent a progressively expanding number of patients admitted to the ICU. Because of underlying pulmonary disease, loss of muscle mass, and other comorbid conditions, older persons are at increased risk of developing respiratory failure. Recognition of this vulnerability and the adoption of proactive measures to prevent decompensation requiring intrusive support are major priorities together with clear delineation of patients' wishes regarding the extent of support desired should clinical deterioration occur. Further, the development of coordinated approaches to identify patients at risk for respiratory failure and strategies to prevent the need for intubation, such as the use of NIV in appropriate patients, are crucial. As soon as endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are implemented strategies that facilitate the liberation of elderly patients from the ventilator are especially important. The emphasis on a team approach, which characterizes geriatric medicine, is essential in coordinating the skills of multiple health care professionals in this setting. Respiratory failure can neither be effectively diagnosed nor managed in isolation. Integration with all other aspects of care is essential. Patient vulnerability to nosocomial complications and the "cascade effect" of these problems such as the effects of medications and invasive supportive procedures all impact on respiratory care of elderly patients. For example, prolonged mechanical ventilation may be required long after resolution of the underlying cause of respiratory failure because of unrecognized and untreated delirium or residual effects of small doses of sedative and/or analgesic agents or other medications in elderly patients with altered drug metabolism. The deleterious impact of the foreign and sometimes threatening ICU environment and/or sleep deprivation on the patient's course are too often overlooked because the physician focuses management on physiologic measurements, mechanical ventilator settings, and other technologic nuances of care [40]. Review of the literature suggests that the development of respiratory failure in patients with certain disease processes such as COPD, IPF, and ARDS in elderly patients may lead to worsened outcome but it appears that the disease process itself, rather than the age of the patient, is the major determinant of outcome. Additional studies suggest that other comorbid factors may be more important than age. Only when comorbid processes are taken into account should decisions be made about the efficacy of instituting mechanical ventilation. In addition, because outcome prediction appears to be more accurate for groups of patients rather than for individual patients a well-structured therapeutic trial of instituting mechanical ventilation, even if comorbidities are present, may be indicated in certain patients if appropriately informed patients wish to pursue this course. This approach requires careful and realistic definition of potential outcomes, focus on optimizing treatment of the reversible components of the illness, and continuous communication with the patient and family. Although many clinicians share a nihilistic view regarding the potential usefulness of mechanical ventilation in elderly patients few data warrant this negative prognostication and more outcome studies are needed to delineate the optimum application of this element of supportive care. As with other interventions individualization of the decision must take into account the patient's premorbid status, concomitant conditions, the nature of the precipitating illness and its prospects for improvement, and most important, patient preferences. In this determination pursuing the course most consistent with the patient's wishes is essential and it must be appreciated that caregivers' impressions regarding the vigor of support desired by the patient are often erroneous. The SUPPORT investigators observed that clinicians often underestimated the degree of i

  3. Failure analysis of stainless steel femur fixation plate.

    PubMed

    Hussain, P B; Mohammad, M

    2004-05-01

    Failure analysis was performed to investigate the failure of the femur fixation plate which was previously fixed on the femur of a girl. Radiography, metallography, fractography and mechanical testing were conducted in this study. The results show that the failure was due to the formation of notches on the femur plate. These notches act as stress raisers from where the cracks start to propagate. Finally fracture occurred on the femur plate and subsequently, the plate failed. PMID:15468877

  4. Novel biomarkers in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Shah, Kevin S; Maisel, Alan S

    2014-07-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) is a common subtype of heart failure with morbidity and mortality similar to that of heart failure with systolic dysfunction. This article discusses the numerous biomarkers that promise to play a substantial role in terms of our ability to understand the mechanisms of HFPEF and discern possible phenotypes that respond to targeted therapies: natriuretic peptides, high-sensitivity troponins, galectin-3, soluble ST2, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, and cystatin C. PMID:24975910

  5. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    The present work deals with modes and mechanisms of failure in compression of angle-ply laminates. Experimental results were obtained from 42 angle-ply IM7/8551-7a specimens with a lay-up of ((plus or minus theta)/(plus or minus theta)) sub 6s where theta, the off-axis angle, ranged from 0 degrees to 90 degrees. The results showed four failure modes, these modes being a function of off-axis angle. Failure modes include fiber compression, inplane transverse tension, inplane shear, and inplane transverse compression. Excessive interlaminar shear strain was also considered as an important mode of failure. At low off-axis angles, experimentally observed values were considerably lower than published strengths. It was determined that laminate imperfections in the form of layer waviness could be a major factor in reducing compression strength. Previously developed linear buckling and geometrically nonlinear theories were used, with modifications and enhancements, to examine the influence of layer waviness on compression response. The wavy layer is described by a wave amplitude and a wave length. Linear elastic stress-strain response is assumed. The geometrically nonlinear theory, in conjunction with the maximum stress failure criterion, was used to predict compression failure and failure modes for the angle-ply laminates. A range of wave length and amplitudes were used. It was found that for 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 15 degrees failure was most likely due to fiber compression. For 15 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 35 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse tension. For 35 degrees less than theta less than or equal to 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane shear. For theta less than 70 degrees, failure was most likely due to inplane transverse compression. The fiber compression and transverse tension failure modes depended more heavily on wave length than on wave amplitude. Thus using a single parameter, such as a ratio of wave amplitude to wave length, to describe waviness in a laminate would be inaccurate. Throughout, results for AS4/3502, studied previously, are included for comparison. At low off-axis angles, the AS4/3502 material system was found to be less sensitive to layer waviness than IM7/8551-7a. Analytical predictions were also obtained for laminates with waviness in only some of the layers. For this type of waviness, laminate compression strength could also be considered a function of which layers in the laminate were wavy, and where those wavy layers were. Overall, the geometrically nonlinear model correlates well with experimental results.

  6. Common Cause Failure Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hark, Frank; Britton, Paul; Ring, Rob; Novack, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Common Cause Failures (CCFs) are a known and documented phenomenon that defeats system redundancy. CCFS are a set of dependent type of failures that can be caused by: system environments; manufacturing; transportation; storage; maintenance; and assembly, as examples. Since there are many factors that contribute to CCFs, the effects can be reduced, but they are difficult to eliminate entirely. Furthermore, failure databases sometimes fail to differentiate between independent and CCF (dependent) failure and data is limited, especially for launch vehicles. The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MFSC) is using generic data from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's database of common cause failures at nuclear power plants to estimate CCF due to the lack of a more appropriate data source. There remains uncertainty in the actual magnitude of the common cause risk estimates for different systems at this stage of the design. Given the limited data about launch vehicle CCF and that launch vehicles are a highly redundant system by design, it is important to make design decisions to account for a range of values for independent and CCFs. When investigating the design of the one-out-of-two component redundant system for launch vehicles, a response surface was constructed to represent the impact of the independent failure rate versus a common cause beta factor effect on a system's failure probability. This presentation will define a CCF and review estimation calculations. It gives a summary of reduction methodologies and a review of examples of historical CCFs. Finally, it presents the response surface and discusses the results of the different CCFs on the reliability of a one-out-of-two system.

  7. On the Failure of Shocked Titanium Diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Gray, G. T., III; Millett, J. C. F.

    1999-06-01

    The failure of brittle materials to uniaxial compressive shock loading has been the subject of much recent discussion. The physical interpretation of the yield point, the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL), is not explained. Titanium diboride is known to exhibit an anomalous Hugoniot containing cusps at 4.5-7.0 and 13-17 GPa. These features are additionally found on the free-surface wave-profiles. Various variables have been measured to find an explanation for these features. In other ceramics, failure has been seen to occur behind a travelling boundary that follows a shock front called a failure wave across which the strength of the material dramatically reduces. In order to elucidate whether the cusps are related to failure, gauges were embedded in order to measure the lateral stress behind the shock front. As in other materials it was seen to rise across a failure front. However, failure only occurred over certain stress ranges. A mechanical interpretation is suggested relating to the cusps observed.

  8. Failure analysis of surface-micromachined microengines

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, K.A.; Tangyunyong, P.; Pimentel, A.A.

    1998-11-01

    Microelectronic failure analysis (FA) has been an integral part of the development of state-of-the-art integrated circuits. FA of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) is moving from its infancy stage to assume an important role in the successful design, fabrication, performance and reliability analysis for this new technology. In previous work, the authors focused on the application of several techniques developed for integrated circuit analysis to an earlier version of a surface micromachined microengine fabricated at Sandia. Recently, they have identified important new failure modes in binary counters that incorporate a newer design of the microengine, using a subset of integrated circuit failure analysis techniques including optical microscopy, focused ion beam (FIB) techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The primary failure mode they have identified is directly related to visible wear on bearing surfaces. In this paper, they describe in detail the characteristics of the failure modes in binary counters. They also compare the failure characteristics with those of an earlier version of the microengine.

  9. Pyrotechnic system failures: Causes and prevention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.

    1988-01-01

    Although pyrotechnics have successfully accomplished many critical mechanical spacecraft functions, such as ignition, severance, jettisoning and valving (excluding propulsion), failures continue to occur. Provided is a listing of 84 failures of pyrotechnic hardware with completed design over a 23-year period, compiled informally by experts from every NASA Center, as well as the Air Force Space Division and the Naval Surface Warfare Center. Analyses are presented as to when and where these failures occurred, their technical source or cause, followed by the reasons why and how these kinds of failures persist. The major contributor is a fundamental lack of understanding of the functional mechanisms of pyrotechnic devices and systems, followed by not recognizing pyrotechnics as an engineering technology, insufficient manpower with hands-on experience, too few test facilities, and inadequate guidelines and specifications for design, development, qualification and acceptance. Recommendations are made on both a managerial and technical basis to prevent failures, increase reliability, improve existing and future designs, and develop the technology to meet future requirements.

  10. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  11. Acute renal failure in association with cosmetic suction lipectomy.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    A case of severe non-oliguric acute renal failure following cosmetic suction lipectomy in a 33 year old woman is described. The renal failure, although requiring emergency treatment, resolved spontaneously with only negligible residual impairment of renal function. An aetiology involving rhabdomyolysis and myoglobinuria is proposed and other mechanisms are discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:4095055

  12. Failure waves in shock-compressed glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanel, Gennady I.

    2005-07-01

    The failure wave is a network of cracks that are nucleated on the surface and propagate into the elastically stressed body. It is a mode of catastrophic fracture in an elastically stressed media whose relevance is not limited to impact events. In the presentation, main properties of the failure waves are summarized and discussed. It has been shown that the failure wave is really a wave process which is characterized by small increase of the longitudinal stress and corresponding increments of the particle velocity and the density. The propagation velocity of the failure wave is less than the sound speed; it is not directly related to the compressibility but is determined by the crack growth speed. Transformation of elastic compression wave followed by the failure wave in a thick glass plate into typical two-wave configuration in a pile of thin glass plates confirms crucial role of the surfaces. The latter, as well as specific kinematics of the process distinguishes the failure wave from a time-dependent inelastic compressive behavior of brittle materials. The failure wave is steady if the stress state ahead of it is supported unchanging. Mechanism of this self-supporting propagation of compressive fracture is not quite clear as yet. On the other hand, collected data about its kinematics allow formulating phenomenological models of the phenomenon. In some sense the process is similar to the diffusion of cracks from a source on the glass surface. However, the diffusion-like models contradict to observed steady propagation of the failure wave. Analogy with a subsonic combustion wave looks more fruitful. Computer simulations based on the phenomenological combustion-like model reproduces well all kinematical aspects of the phenomenon.

  13. Modeling and Tolerating Heterogeneous Failures

    E-print Network

    Kondo, Derrick

    - size-fits all #12;Goal · Design application-centric failure model ­Considering component failure-tolerance algorithms #12;Approach · Analyze 5 years of event logs of production HPC system · Develop failure modelModeling and Tolerating Heterogeneous Failures in Large Parallel Systems Eric Heien1

  14. BIOASSAY VESSEL FAILURE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2008-09-22

    Two high-pressure bioassay vessels failed at the Savannah River Site during a microwave heating process for biosample testing. Improper installation of the thermal shield in the first failure caused the vessel to burst during microwave heating. The second vessel failure is attributed to overpressurization during a test run. Vessel failure appeared to initiate in the mold parting line, the thinnest cross-section of the octagonal vessel. No material flaws were found in the vessel that would impair its structural performance. Content weight should be minimized to reduce operating temperature and pressure. Outer vessel life is dependent on actual temperature exposure. Since thermal aging of the vessels can be detrimental to their performance, it was recommended that the vessels be used for a limited number of cycles to be determined by additional testing.

  15. Dissecting heart failure.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sameer; Gupta, Sameer; Guglin, Maya

    2014-06-01

    Dissection of ascending aorta is a medical emergency typically presenting with acute chest or back pain and hemodynamic instability. We are reporting a very unusual case of dissection of a large ascending aortic aneurysm presenting as a new onset heart failure. A 46-year-old man presented with gradually increasing dyspnea and orthopnea. His physical examination and laboratory findings were consistent with heart failure. The only unusual feature was a diastolic murmur, which prompted echocardiographic evaluation. Besides left ventricular dilatation, hypertrophy, and severe global hypokinesis, which were expected, we also found severely dilated aortic root with aortic regurgitation and a 8.6×9.7 cm ascending aortic aneurysm with dissection. The patient had a brother who died several years earlier from aortic dissection. Surgical treatment was successful. Type A aortic dissection may rarely present as heart failure. Aortic dissection at young age should prompt screening of first-degree relatives because genetic nature of the disease is very likely. PMID:24418447

  16. [Acute liver failure].

    PubMed

    Alberto, Sara Folgado; Pires, S Sousa; Figueiredo, A; Deus, J Ramos de

    2009-01-01

    Acute liver failure refers to the rapid development of severe acute liver injury with impaired synthetic function in a patient who previously had a normal liver or a well compensated liver disease. Its aetiology is diversified and it provides one of the best indicators of prognosis thus being crucial its quick identification. Because it can progress to multiple organ failure syndrome these patients should be managed in an Intensive Care Unit. The first therapeutic approach consists of intensive care support until treatment for specific aetiologies can be started. Besides encephalopathy, many other complications can develop causing the high rates of morbidity and mortality of acute liver failure and so they need tight surveillance and treatment. Liver support systems are therapeutic options still in study and without proven success in a long term period which makes hepatic transplantation the final therapeutic. Given the wide limitations of hepatic transplantation the final decision is based on a correct diagnosis and prognostic scoring systems. PMID:20350465

  17. Weld failure detection

    DOEpatents

    Pennell, William E. (Unity Township, Westmoreland County, PA); Sutton, Jr., Harry G. (Mt. Lebanon, PA)

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for detecting failure in a welded connection, particrly applicable to not readily accessible welds such as those joining components within the reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor system. A preselected tag gas is sealed within a chamber which extends through selected portions of the base metal and weld deposit. In the event of a failure, such as development of a crack extending from the chamber to an outer surface, the tag gas is released. The environment about the welded area is directed to an analyzer which, in the event of presence of the tag gas, evidences the failure. A trigger gas can be included with the tag gas to actuate the analyzer.

  18. Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Winters, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    Patients with acute decompensated heart failure are usually critically ill and require immediate treatment. However, most are not volume overloaded. Emergency department (ED) management is based on rapid initiation of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation and aggressive titration of nitrates. Afterload reduction with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor can be considered. A diuretic should not be administered before optimal preload and afterload reduction has been achieved. Short-term inotropic therapy can be considered in select patients with cardiogenic shock and acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who fail to respond to standard therapy. PMID:26226866

  19. Common Cause Failure Modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.; Anderson, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    High technology industries with high failure costs commonly use redundancy as a means to reduce risk. Redundant systems, whether similar or dissimilar, are susceptible to Common Cause Failures (CCF). CCF is not always considered in the design effort and, therefore, can be a major threat to success. There are several aspects to CCF which must be understood to perform an analysis which will find hidden issues that may negate redundancy. This paper will provide definition, types, a list of possible causes and some examples of CCF. Requirements and designs from NASA projects will be used in the paper as examples.

  20. SNS STRIPPER FOIL FAILURE MODES AND THEIR CURES

    SciTech Connect

    Galambos, John D; Luck, Chris; Plum, Michael A; Shaw, Robert W; Ladd, Peter; Raparia, Deepak; Macek, Robert James; Kim, Sang-Ho; Peters, Charles C; Polsky, Yarom

    2010-01-01

    The diamond stripper foils in use at the Spallation Neutron Source worked successfully with no failures until May 3, 2009, when we started experiencing a rash of foil system failures after increasing the beam power to ~840 kW. The main contributors to the failures are thought to be 1) convoy electrons, stripped from the incoming H beam, that strike the foil bracket and may also reflect back from the electron catcher, and 2) vacuum breakdown from the charge developed on the foil by secondary electron emission. In this paper we will detail these and other failure mechanisms, and describe the improvements we have made to mitigate them.

  1. Catalysinganenergyrevolution Nuclear Failures

    E-print Network

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    , this merged with Framatome, the nuclear reactor builder, to create the Areva group. Currently, 96 EDF operates all 59 nuclear reactors in service in France. EDF was partly privatised in 2005Catalysinganenergyrevolution France's Nuclear Failures The great illusion of nuclear energy

  2. Learning from Failures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saffran, Murray

    1991-01-01

    Describes mistakes made in trying to change the Nutrition and Digestion section of a medical biochemistry course. Author tried to make the section student taught and reports nine mistakes including the following: ignoring active opposition of colleagues, failure to assess the receptivity of the class to a new form of teaching, and overestimating…

  3. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePLUS

    Jessup M, Abraham WT, Casey DE, Feldman AM, Francis GS, Ganiats TG, et al. 2009 focused update: ACCF/AHA Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Heart Failure in Adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American ...

  4. Heart failure - home monitoring

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Jessup M, Abraham WT, Casey DE, Feldman AM, Francis GS, Ganiats TG, et al. 2009 focused update: ACCF/AHA Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Heart Failure in Adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American ...

  5. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Jessup M, Abraham WT, Casey DE, Feldman AM, Francis GS, Ganiats TG, et al. 2009 focused update: ACCF/AHA Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Heart Failure in Adults: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American ...

  6. Comparison of exercise capacity in COPD and other etiologies of chronic respiratory failure requiring non-invasive mechanical ventilation at home: retrospective analysis of 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Salturk, Cuneyt; Karakurt, Zuhal; Takir, Huriye Berk; Balci, Merih; Kargin, Feyza; Mocin, Ozlem Yaz?c?oglu; Gungor, Gokay; Ozmen, Ipek; Oztas, Selahattin; Yalcinsoy, Murat; Evin, Ruya; Ozturk, Murat; Adiguzel, Nalan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study was to compare the change in 6-minute walking distance (6MWD) in 1 year as an indicator of exercise capacity among patients undergoing home non-invasive mechanical ventilation (NIMV) due to chronic hypercapnic respiratory failure (CHRF) caused by different etiologies. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary pulmonary disease hospital in patients who had completed 1-year follow-up under home NIMV because of CHRF with different etiologies (ie, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD], obesity hypoventilation syndrome [OHS], kyphoscoliosis [KS], and diffuse parenchymal lung disease [DPLD]), between January 2011 and January 2012. The results of arterial blood gas (ABG) analyses and spirometry, and 6MWD measurements with 12-month interval were recorded from the patient files, in addition to demographics, comorbidities, and body mass indices. The groups were compared in terms of 6MWD via analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis (independent variables: analysis age, sex, baseline 6MWD, baseline forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and baseline partial carbon dioxide pressure, in reference to COPD group). Results A total of 105 patients with a mean age (± standard deviation) of 61±12 years of whom 37 had COPD, 34 had OHS, 20 had KS, and 14 had DPLD were included in statistical analysis. There were no significant differences between groups in the baseline and delta values of ABG and spirometry findings. Both univariate ANOVA and MLR showed that the OHS group had the lowest baseline 6MWD and the highest decrease in 1 year (linear regression coefficient ?24.48; 95% CI ?48.74 to ?0.21, P=0.048); while the KS group had the best baseline values and the biggest improvement under home NIMV (linear regression coefficient 26.94; 95% CI ?3.79 to 57.66, P=0.085). Conclusion The 6MWD measurements revealed improvement in exercise capacity test in CHRF patients receiving home NIMV treatment on long-term depends on etiological diagnoses. PMID:26648713

  7. FORMATION AND FAILURE OF NATURAL DAMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Costa, John E.; Schuster, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Of the numerous kinds of dams that form by natural processes, dams formed from landslides, glacial ice, and late-neoglacial moraines present the greatest threat to people and property. Landslide dams form a wide range of physiographic settings. The most common types of mass movements that form landslide dams are rock and debris avalanches; rock and soil slumps and slides; and mud, debris, and earth flows. The most common initiation mechanisms for dam-forming landslides are excessive rainfall and snowmelt and earthquakes. Natural dams may cause upstream flooding as the lake rises and downstream flooding as a result of failure of the dam. Although data are few, for the same potential energy at the dam site, downstream flood peaks from the failure of glacier-ice dams are smaller than those from landslide, moraine, and constructed earth-fill and rock-fill dam failures.

  8. Heterogeneity: The key to forecasting material failure?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, J.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Lavallée, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2014-12-01

    Empirical mechanistic models have been applied to the description of the stress and strain rate upon failure for heterogeneous materials. The behaviour of porous rocks and their analogous two-phase viscoelastic suspensions are particularly well-described by such models. Nevertheless, failure cannot yet be predicted forcing a reliance on other empirical prediction tools such as the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). Measurable, accelerating rates of physical signals (e.g., seismicity and deformation) preceding failure are often used as proxies for damage accumulation in the FFM. Previous studies have already statistically assessed the applicability and performance of the FFM, but none (to the best of our knowledge) has done so in terms of intrinsic material properties. Here we use a rheological standard glass, which has been powdered and then sintered for different times (up to 32 hours) at high temperature (675°C) in order to achieve a sample suite with porosities in the range of 0.10-0.45 gas volume fraction. This sample suite was then subjected to mechanical tests in a uniaxial press at a constant strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and a temperature in the region of the glass transition. A dual acoustic emission (AE) rig has been employed to test the success of the FFM in these materials of systematically varying porosity. The pore-emanating crack model describes well the peak stress at failure in the elastic regime for these materials. We show that the FFM predicts failure within 0-15% error at porosities >0.2. However, when porosities are <0.2, the forecast error associated with predicting the failure time increases to >100%. We interpret these results as a function of the low efficiency with which strain energy can be released in the scenario where there are few or no heterogeneities from which cracks can propagate. These observations shed light on questions surrounding the variable efficacy of the FFM applied to active volcanoes. In particular, they provide a systematic demonstration of the fact that a good understanding of the material properties is required. Thus, we wish to emphasize the need for a better coupling of empirical failure forecasting models with mechanical parameters, such as failure criteria for heterogeneous materials, and point to the implications of this for a broad range of material-based disciplines.

  9. Designing for Failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beerthuizen, P.

    The title of this paper is of course meant as a teaser, and both the title and the paper were partly inspired by the 1991 Turing Award Lecture by Fernando J. Corbató. It refers to two aspects of today s (embedded) aerospace system design: systems have become so complex that (partial) failure becomes almost inevitable; and conversely one must find ways to cope with these failures such that function and performance are not significantly compromised, especially when dependability is an issue. Software tends to dramatically increase complexity: anything seems possible to implement, especially when processor performance and memory capacity hardly pose real constraints to the creative minds of a system s specifier. A vast amount of approaches and methods have been defined and taken into widespread use in the last decades to make better and more reliable software designs (whatever that may be), like modular and modifiable architectures, extensive testing in various ways, analyse systems for nominal and failure behaviour, software process improvement, extensive standardisation, and so on. However, when studying the literature and watching every day s newspaper columns, it appears that failures of complex systems are manifold, are seemingly unavoidable, and are sometimes extremely expensive. The question now is: Is there any way at all to avoid such occurrences? It will be obvious, that this paper does not present the silver bullet; nor do all those approaches and methods. Applying them (if done correctly) usually does no harm, and may even result in very good working systems. However, it is not a guarantee for being failure free, and cost and needed time tend to increase exponentially for most of them. A number of aspects, especially related to dependable systems, will be discussed.

  10. Searching for Non-Sense: Identification of Pacemaker Non-Sense and Non-Capture Failures using Machine Learning Techniques

    E-print Network

    Povinelli, Richard J.

    failures of the battery and electrodes, or physiological failures to respond to the stimulus may cause harmSearching for Non-Sense: Identification of Pacemaker Non-Sense and Non-Capture Failures using Abnormal or unexpected function of pacemakers due to mechanical failure of the implantation, electrical

  11. Electrical overstress failure in silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, R.L.; Barnum, J.R.; van Lint, V.A.J.; Vulliet, W.V.; Wrobel, T.F.

    1982-11-01

    A solar-cell electrical-overstress-failure model and the results of experimental measurements of threshold pulsed failure currents on four types of silicon solar cells are presented. The transient EMP field surrounding a lightning stroke has been identified as a potential threat to a photovoltaic array, yet failure analysis of solar cells in a pulsed environment had not previously been reported. Failure in the low-resistivity concentrator cells at pulse widths between 1 ..mu..s and 1 ms occurred initially in the junction. Finger damage in the form of silver melting occurs at currents only slightly greater than that required for junction damage. The result of reverse-bias transient-overstress tests on high-resistivity (10 ..cap omega..cm) cells demonstrated that the predominant failure mode was due to edge currents. These flat-plate cells failed at currents of only 4 to 20 A, which is one or two orders of magnitude below the model predictions. It thus appears that high-resistivity flat-plate cells are quite vulnerable to electrical overstress which could be produced by a variety of mechanisms.

  12. On the failure of shocked titanium diboride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourne, N. K.; Gray, G. T.; Millett, J. C. F.

    2000-04-01

    The failure of brittle materials in uniaxial compressive shock loading has been the subject of much recent discussion. For instance, the physical interpretation of the yield point, the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL), is not explained in brittle materials. Titanium diboride is known to exhibit an anomalous Hugoniot containing cusps at 4.5-7 and 13-17 GPa. These features are additionally found on the free-surface wave-profiles. Various variables have been measured to find an explanation for these features. In other ceramics, failure has been seen to occur behind a travelling boundary that follows a shock front called a failure wave across which the strength of the material dramatically reduces. In order to elucidate whether the cusps are related to failure, gauges were embedded in order to measure the lateral stress behind the shock front. As in other materials this stress was seen to rise across a failure front. However, this phenomenon only occurred over certain stress ranges. A mechanical interpretation is suggested relating to the cusps observed.

  13. Electrical overstress failure in silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, R. L.; Barnum, J. R.; Vanlint, V. A. J.; Vulliet, W. V.; Wrobel, T. F.

    1982-11-01

    A solar-cell electrical-overstress-failure model and the results of experimental measurements of threshold pulsed failure currents on four types of silicon solar cells are presented. The transient electromagnet pulse field surrounding a lightning stroke was identified as a potential threat to a photovoltaic array, yet failure analysis of solar cells in a pulsed environment had not previously been reported. Failure in the low-resistivity concentrator cells at pulse widths between 1 SIGMA and 1 ms occurred initially in the junction. Finger damage in the form of silver melting occurs at currents only slightly greater than that required for junction damage. The result of reverse-bias transient-overstress tests on high-resistivity (10 LAMBDA cm) cells demonstrated that the predominant failure mode was due to edge currents. These flat-plate cells failed at currents of only 4 to 20 A, which is one or two orders of magnitude below the model predictions. It thus appears that high-resistivity flat-plate cells are quite vulnerable to electrical overstress which could be produced by a variety of mechanisms.

  14. 3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials, Spring 2003

    E-print Network

    Gibson, Lorna J.

    Phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level. Relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics include: elasticity, viscoelasticity, ...

  15. 3.22 Mechanical Properties of Materials, Spring 2004

    E-print Network

    Gibson, Lorna J.

    Phenomenology of mechanical behavior of materials at the macroscopic level. Relationship of mechanical behavior to material structure and mechanisms of deformation and failure. Topics include: elasticity, viscoelasticity, ...

  16. Global Failure Modes in Composite Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knauss, W. G.; Gonzalez, Luis

    2001-01-01

    Composite materials provide well-known advantages for space and aeronautical applications in terms of strength and rigidity to weight ratios and other mechanical properties. As a consequence, their use has experienced a constant increase in the past decades and it is anticipated that this trend will be maintained in the near future. At the same time, being these materials relatively new compared to metals, and having failure characteristics completely different from them, their damage growth and their failure mechanisms are not as well understood in a predictive sense. For example, while in metals fracture produces "clean" cracks with their well defined analytically stress fields at the crack tip, composite fracture is a more complex phenomenon. Instead of a crack, we confront a "damage zone" that may include fiber breakage, fiber microbuckling, fiber pullout, matrix cracking, delamination, debonding or any combination of all these different mechanisms. These phenomena are prevalent in any failure process through an aircraft structure, whether one addresses a global failure such as the ripping of a fuselage or wing section, or whether one is concerned with the failure initiation near a thickness change at stringers or other reinforcement. Thus the topic that has been under consideration has wide application in any real structure and is considered an essential contribution to the predictive failure analysis capability for aircraft containing composite components. The heterogeneity and the anisotropy of composites are not only advantageous but essential characteristics, yet these same features provide complex stress fields, especially in the presence of geometrical discontinuities such as notches, holes or cutouts or structural elements such as stiffeners, stringers, etc. To properly address the interaction between a damage/crack front and a hole with a stringer it is imperative that the stress and deformation fields of the former be (sufficiently well) characterized. The question of "scaling" is an essential concern in any structural materials investigation. For example, experiments in the past have shown that the "strength" of a composite depends on hole size. As a consequence the validity of traditional fracture mechanics concepts applied to composite materials failure must be questioned. The size of the fibers, the dimensions of the laminae, etc. together with the fact that, because of the layered anisotropy, the stress field is no longer two-dimensional, prevent the otherwise obviously confident use of "similarity concepts". Therefore, the question needs to be raised of whether in composites "size matters or not", i.e., whether the results obtained in a laboratory using small coupons are truly representative of the situation involving a full scale component.

  17. Mechanics of Materials and Structures

    E-print Network

    Fleck, Norman A.

    a local shear failure criterion are used to model the rupture of the material. Appropriately calibrated FE of these metallic structures under dynamic loading is a major design constraint: typically, failure occursJournal of Mechanics of Materials and Structures DYNAMIC FAILURE OF CLAMPED CIRCULAR PLATES

  18. Geothermal well pump failure

    SciTech Connect

    Culver, G.

    1995-06-01

    Over the years since 1978, the Geo-Heat Center has been asked for advice on new pump installations and replacement installations. For at least half that time, the advice was based on experience with pumps on the Oregon Institute of Technology since it was the only modern large geothermal direct-use installation, and of course, the Center is located on the campus. Some information on this system was readily available. The other large system, the Warm Springs Water District in Boise, Idaho, was nearly 100 years old; but, we had limited contact with them. Most, if not all, geothermal well pump problems seemed readily solved. Typical problems were worn impellers due to lack of adequate bowl lateral, broken column lineshafts due to bearing failures and hard starts, coupling failures due to hard starts, and excessive longitudinal loads, etc.

  19. Structural crashworthiness and failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Norman; Wierzbicki, Tomasz

    1993-04-01

    Lectures presented at the Third International Symposium on Structural Crashworthiness held at the University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK on 14-16 April 1993 are included. Topics covered are: failure in ductile material using finite element methods; modelling the process of failure in structures; criteria for the inelastic rupture of ductile metal beams subjected to large dynamic loads; strain localization and fracture in metal sheets and thin walled structures; impact on metal tubes; indentation and perforation; composite strength and energy adsorption as an aspect of structural crash resistance; crash response of composite structures; dynamic compression of cellular structures and materials; elastic effects in the dynamic plastic response of structure; impact performance of aluminium structures; motorway impact attenuation devices: past, present and future; and grounding damage of ships.

  20. Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Tools & Resources Stroke More Your Heart Failure Healthcare Team Updated:Sep 29,2015 Patients with heart failure ... good relationships with all the members of this team. Learn to talk to them openly and honestly ...

  1. In-vessel ITER tubing failure rates for selected materials and coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, T.D.; Cadwallader, L.C.

    1994-03-01

    Several materials have been suggested for fabrication of ITER in-vessel coolant tubing: beryllium, copper, Inconel, niobium, stainless steel, titanium, and vanadium. This report generates failure rates for the materials to identify the best performer from an operational safety and availability perspective. Coolant types considered in this report are helium gas, liquid lithium, liquid sodium, and water. Failure rates for the materials are generated by including the influence of ITER`s operating environment and anticipated tubing failure mechanisms with industrial operating experience failure rates. The analyses define tubing failure mechanisms for ITER as: intergranular attack, flow erosion, helium induced swelling, hydrogen damage, neutron irradiation embrittlement, cyclic fatigue, and thermal cycling. K-factors, multipliers, are developed to model each failure mechanism and are applied to industrial operating experience failure rates to generate tubing failure rates for ITER. The generated failure rates identify the best performer by its expected reliability. With an average leakage failure rate of 3.1e-10(m-hr){sup {minus}1}and an average rupture failure rate of 3.1e-11(m-hr){sup {minus}1}, titanium proved to be the best performer of the tubing materials. The failure rates generated in this report are intended to serve as comparison references for design safety and optimization studies. Actual material testing and analyses are required to validate the failure rates.

  2. Some clinical features of liver cell failure: an appraisal of their causes.

    PubMed Central

    Read, A E

    1978-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the cause of the major clinical features of liver cell failure are reviewed. These include jaundice, fluid retention, hepatic encephalopathy, bleeding tendency, etc. PMID:355067

  3. Investigation of Tantalum Wet Slug Capacitor Failures in the Apollo Telescope Mount Charger Battery Regulator Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. F.; Wiedeman, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation describes the capacitor failures and to identify the cause of the failure mechanism. Early failures were thought to have happened because of age and/or abuse since the failed capacitors were dated 1967. It is shown that all 1967 capacitors were replaced with 1972 capacitors.

  4. Warning Signs of Heart Failure

    MedlinePLUS

    Warning Signs of Heart Failure Updated:Sep 30,2015 By themselves, any one sign of heart failure may not be cause for alarm. But ... below you agree to the Terms and Conditions Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Use these questions ...

  5. Failure modes for pipelines in landslide areas

    SciTech Connect

    Bruschi, R.; Spinazze, M.; Tomassini, D.; Cuscuna, S.; Venzi, S.

    1995-12-31

    In recent years a number of incidences of pipelines affected by slow soil movements have been reported in the relevant literature. Further related issues such as soil-pipe interaction have been studied both theoretically and through experimental surveys, along with the environmental conditions which are responsible for hazard to the pipeline integrity. A suitable design criteria under these circumstances has been discussed by several authors, in particular in relation to a limit state approach and hence a strain based criteria. The scope of this paper is to describe the failure mechanisms which may affect the pipeline in the presence of slow soil movements impacting on the pipeline, both in the longitudinal and transverse direction. Particular attention is paid to environmental, geometric and structural parameters which steer the process towards one or other failure mechanism. Criteria for deciding upon remedial measures required to guarantee the structural integrity of the pipeline, both in the short and in the long term, are discussed.

  6. Comprehension and retrieval of failure cases in airborne observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, Sergio J.; Mock, Kenrick J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes research dealing with the computational problem of analyzing and repairing failures of electronic and mechanical systems of telescopes in NASA's airborne observatories, such as KAO (Kuiper Airborne Observatory) and SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy). The research has resulted in the development of an experimental system that acquires knowledge of failure analysis from input text, and answers questions regarding failure detection and correction. The system's design builds upon previous work on text comprehension and question answering, including: knowledge representation for conceptual analysis of failure descriptions, strategies for mapping natural language into conceptual representations, case-based reasoning strategies for memory organization and indexing, and strategies for memory search and retrieval. These techniques have been combined into a model that accounts for: (a) how to build a knowledge base of system failures and repair procedures from descriptions that appear in telescope-operators' logbooks and FMEA (failure modes and effects analysis) manuals; and (b) how to use that knowledge base to search and retrieve answers to questions about causes and effects of failures, as well as diagnosis and repair procedures. This model has been implemented in FANSYS (Failure ANalysis SYStem), a prototype text comprehension and question answering program for failure analysis.

  7. Moisture-Induced Delamination Video of an Oxidized Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    PVD TBC coatings were thermally cycled to near-failure at 1150 C. Normal failure occurred after 200 to 300 1-hr cycles with only moderate weight gains (0.5 mg/sq cm). Delamination and buckling was often delayed until well after cooldown (desktop spallation), but could be instantly induced by the application of water drops, as shown in a video clip which can be viewed by clicking on figure 2 of this report. Moisture therefore plays a primary role in delayed desktop TBC failure. Hydrogen embrittlement is proposed as the underlying mechanism.

  8. Moisture-Induced Delamination Video of an Oxidized Thermal Barrier Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Zhu, Dongming; Cuy, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    PVD TBC coatings were thermally cycled to near-failure at 1150 C. Normal failure occurred after 200-300 1-hr cycles with only moderate weight gains (0.5 mg/cm2). Delamination and buckling was often delayed until well after cooldown (desktop spallation), but could be instantly induced by the application of water drops, as shown in an accompanying video-recording. Moisture therefore plays a primary role in delayed desktop TBC failure. Hydrogen embrittlement is proposed as the underlying mechanism.

  9. Deposit-related boiler failures -- Case histories

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Problems created by internal deposition in water and steam carrying components of boilers are discussed. Methods of controlling deposition and their related problems are also described. Several case histories are presented which illustrate common, as well as unusual problems created by internal deposits. Failure mechanisms include caustic corrosion, hydrogen damage, stress corrosion cracking, overheating, contamination, and liquid metal embrittlement. Components include tubing from economizers, water walls, generating banks, superheaters, and reheaters.

  10. Simulating failures on large-scale systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, N.; Lusk, E.; Buettner, D.; Cherry, A.; Voran, T.; Univ. of Colorado

    2008-09-01

    Developing fault management mechanisms is a difficult task because of the unpredictable nature of failures. In this paper, we present a fault simulation framework for Blue Gene/P systems implemented as a part of the Cobalt resource manager. The primary goal of this framework is to support system software development. We also present a hardware diagnostic system that we have implemented using this framework.

  11. FRACTURE FAILURE CRITERIA OF SOFC PEN STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-30

    Thermal stresses and warpage of the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature and mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. The porous nature of anode and cathode in the PEN structures determines presence of the initial flaws and crack on the interfaces of anode/electrolyte/cathode and in the interior of the materials. The sintering/assembling induced stresses may cause the fracture failure of PEN structure. Therefore, fracture failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures is developed in order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC. In this paper, the fracture criteria based on the relationship between the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warped cells caused by the temperature changes as well as mechanical flattening process is established so that possible failure of SOFC PEN structures may be predicted deterministically by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warped cells.

  12. Intelligent failure-tolerant control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.

    1991-01-01

    An overview of failure-tolerant control is presented, beginning with robust control, progressing through parallel and analytical redundancy, and ending with rule-based systems and artificial neural networks. By design or implementation, failure-tolerant control systems are 'intelligent' systems. All failure-tolerant systems require some degrees of robustness to protect against catastrophic failure; failure tolerance often can be improved by adaptivity in decision-making and control, as well as by redundancy in measurement and actuation. Reliability, maintainability, and survivability can be enhanced by failure tolerance, although each objective poses different goals for control system design. Artificial intelligence concepts are helpful for integrating and codifying failure-tolerant control systems, not as alternatives but as adjuncts to conventional design methods.

  13. Lunar Base Life Support Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry W.

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of the lunar outpost habitat life support was undertaken to investigate the impact of life support failures and to investigate responses. Some preparatory static analysis for the Lunar Outpost life support model, an earlier version of the model, and an investigation into the impact of Extravehicular Activity (EVA) were reported previously. (Jones, 2008-01-2184, 2008-01-2017) The earlier model was modified to include possible resupply delays, power failures, recycling system failures, and atmosphere and other material storage failures. Most failures impact the lunar outpost water balance and can be mitigated by reducing water usage. Food solids, nitrogen can be obtained only by resupply from Earth. The most time urgent failure is a lass of carbon dioxide removal capability. Life support failures might be survivable if effective operational solutions are provided in the system design.

  14. Haemostatic mechanism in uraemia

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, R. A.; O'Shea, M. J.

    1968-01-01

    The haemostatic mechanism was investigated in 20 patients with renal failure, of whom nine had evidence of a bleeding tendency. A defect of platelet function was the most common finding. The effect of dialysis on the bleeding state is briefly discussed, and a scheme for the routine investigation of haemostasis in renal failure is put forward. PMID:5699082

  15. Why young elite athletes fear failure: consequences of failure.

    PubMed

    Sagar, Sam S; Lavallee, David; Spray, Christopher M

    2007-09-01

    Fear of failure can have negative effects on children in achievement settings, affecting many aspects of their lives. Perceiving the consequences of failure to be aversive provides the basis for fear of failure, and the anticipation of a threatening outcome elicits fear. Problems attributed to fear of failure in achievement settings are prevalent. Sport is a popular and significant achievement domain for children and adolescents and there is a lack of research on fear of failure in sport among this age group. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate fear of failure in the sport domain among young elite athletes, and to explore their perceptions of the consequences of failure. Interviews were conducted individually with nine athletes aged 14 - 17 years (5 males, 4 females). Analysis identified and organized perceived consequences of failure into themes and categories. Results revealed that the most commonly perceived aversive consequences of failure were diminished perception of self, no sense of achievement, and the emotional cost of failure. These findings are consistent with those reported in adult population, suggesting the potential for generalizing existing results to young elite athletes. PMID:17654229

  16. Acute Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    McDowell Torres, Dawn; Stevens, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Although comprising a minority of the transplant population, acute liver failure (ALF) patients represent some of the most challenging cases in terms of the level and complexity of care required. An ALF patient requires much more than a single skilled intensivist, gastroenterologist, or surgeon. Successful care of the ALF patient begins with early diagnosis and triage to the appropriate level of care where a multitude of specialties are required to work together to maximize the chance of recovery and/or extend the window of opportunity for transplant. PMID:20827368

  17. Renal Failure in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Balofsky, Ari; Fedarau, Maksim

    2016-01-01

    Renal failure during pregnancy affects both mother and fetus, and may be related to preexisting disease or develop secondary to diseases of pregnancy. Causes include hypovolemia, sepsis, shock, preeclampsia, thrombotic microangiopathies, and renal obstruction. Treatment focuses on supportive measures, while pharmacologic treatment is viewed as second-line therapy, and is more useful in mitigating harmful effects than treating the underlying cause. When supportive measures and pharmacotherapy prove inadequate, dialysis may be required, with the goal being to prolong pregnancy until delivery is feasible. Outcomes and recommendations depend primarily on the underlying cause. PMID:26600445

  18. Sleep and Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Kimberly A; Trupp, Robin J

    2015-12-01

    Sleep deprivation occurs for many reasons but, when chronic in nature, has many consequences for optimal health and performance. Despite its high prevalence, sleep-disordered breathing is underrecognized and undertreated. This is especially true in the setting of heart failure, where sleep-disordered breathing affects more than 50% of patients. Although the optimal strategy to best identify patients is currently unknown, concerted and consistent efforts to support early recognition, diagnosis, and subsequent treatment should be encouraged. Optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy and concurrent treatment of sleep-disordered breathing are necessary to improve outcomes in this complex high-risk population. PMID:26567495

  19. Sleep and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, Kathy P; Dunbar, Sandra B

    2002-10-01

    Sleep problems and symptoms of sleep disturbance are very prevalent in patients with heart failure (HF). Numerous contributing factors include sleep-related breathing disorders, increasing age, medications, anxiety and depression, and comorbidities. Thus, the cardiovascular nurse has an important role in the recognition and management of sleep-related problems in persons with HF. This article provides an overview of sleep disturbances in patients with HF, suggests evidence-based strategies for managing the sleep problems, and identifies pertinent areas for future nursing inquiry. PMID:12358091

  20. Routes to failure in rotating MEMS devices experiencing sliding friction

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; LaVigne, G.; Rodgers, M.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Waters, J.P.; McWhorter, P.J.

    1997-08-01

    Gear systems rotating on hubs have been operated to failure using Sandia`s microengine as the actuation device. Conventional failure modes such as fatigue induced fracture did not occur, indicating that the devices are mechanically extremely robust. The generic route to failure observed for all rotating devices involves sticking of structures that are in sliding contact. This sticking evidently results from microscopic changes in the sliding surfaces during operation. The rate at which these changes occur is accelerated by excessive applied forces, which originate from non-optimized designs or inappropriate drive voltages. Precursors to failure are observed, enabling further understanding of the microscopic changes that occur in the sliding surfaces that ultimately lead to failure.